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Sample records for host cell selection

  1. Select host cell proteins coelute with monoclonal antibodies in protein A chromatography.

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    Nogal, Bartek; Chhiba, Krishan; Emery, Jefferson C

    2012-01-01

    The most significant factor contributing to the presence of host cell protein (HCP) impurities in Protein A chromatography eluates is their association with the product monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been reported previously, and it has been suggested that more efficacious column washes may be developed by targeting the disruption of the mAbs-HCP interaction. However, characterization of this interaction is not straight forward as it is likely to involve multiple proteins and/or types of interaction. This work is an attempt to begin to understand the contribution of HCP subpopulations and/or mAb interaction propensity to the variability in HCP levels in the Protein A eluate. We performed a flowthrough (FT) recycling study with product respiking using two antibody molecules of apparently different HCP interaction propensities. In each case, the ELISA assay showed depletion of select subpopulations of HCP in Protein A eluates in subsequent column runs, while the feedstock HCP in the FTs remained unchanged from its native harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF) levels. In a separate study, the final FT from each molecule's recycling study was cross-spiked with various mAbs. In this case, Protein A eluate levels remained low for all but two molecules which were known as having high apparent HCP interaction propensity. The results of these studies suggest that mAbs may preferentially bind to select subsets of HCPs, and the degree of interaction and/or identity of the associated HCPs may vary depending on the mAb. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  2. Isolating E.Coli Bacteriophage from Raw Sewage and Determining its Selectivity to the Host Cell

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    SM Imeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and destroy prokaryote cells, specifically the bacteria. They act too selective, so as each bacteriophage affects only on specific type of bacteria. Due to their specific features, bacteriophages can be used as an appropriate substitute for antibiotics in infectious diseases treatment. Therefore, this study aimed to isolate E. coli-specific bacteriophage from raw sewage. Methods: Eight samples of raw sewage, each containing approximately 50 ml of raw sewage with 10 minute gap, were prepared from Zargandeh wastewater treatment plant, Tehran, Iran. The sewages were mixed with Brain-heart infusion medium (BHI as a liquid culture medium in order to let the microorganisms grow. Incubation, purification and determination of bacteria were followed repeatedly to isolate the bacteriophage. Then it was tested on E.coli (ATCC 25922, Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 19433, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 2392, and Yersinia enterocolitica (ATCC 9610 in order to determine the bacteriophage selectivity. Results: The E.coli bacteriophages were successfully isolated from all the eight samples, that were completely able to lyse and destroy E.coli bacterial cells, though no effect was observed on other types of bacteria. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that bacteriophages act selectively. Considering the raise of antibiotic resistance in the world, bacteriophages can serve as a good substitute for antibiotics in treating infectious diseases.

  3. Association and host selectivity in multi-host pathogens.

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    José M Malpica

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of multi-host pathogens over their host range conditions their population dynamics and structure. Also, host co-infection by different pathogens may have important consequences for the evolution of hosts and pathogens, and host-pathogen co-evolution. Hence it is of interest to know if the distribution of pathogens over their host range is random, or if there are associations between hosts and pathogens, or between pathogens sharing a host. To analyse these issues we propose indices for the observed patterns of host infection by pathogens, and for the observed patterns of co-infection, and tests to analyse if these patterns conform to randomness or reflect associations. Applying these tests to the prevalence of five plant viruses on 21 wild plant species evidenced host-virus associations: most hosts and viruses were selective for viruses and hosts, respectively. Interestingly, the more host-selective viruses were the more prevalent ones, suggesting that host specialisation is a successful strategy for multi-host pathogens. Analyses also showed that viruses tended to associate positively in co-infected hosts. The developed indices and tests provide the tools to analyse how strong and common are these associations among different groups of pathogens, which will help to understand and model the population biology of multi-host pathogens.

  4. Defect in negative selection in lpr donor-derived T cells differentiating in non-lpr host thymus

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    Matsumoto, K.; Yoshikai, Y.; Asano, T.; Himeno, K.; Iwasaki, A.; Nomoto, K. (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells of lpr/lpr mice into irradiated normal mice fails to develop massive lymphadenopathy or autoimmunity but causes severe graft-vs.-host-like syndrome. To elucidate an abnormality of lpr/lpr bone marrow-derived T cells, we transplanted bone marrow cells of Mlsb lpr/lpr mice into H-2-compatible Mlsa non-lpr mice. Although lpr/lpr T cell precursors repopulated the host thymus as well as +/+ cells, a proportion of CD4+CD8+ cells decreased, and that of both CD4- and CD8- single-positive cells increased compared with those of +/+ recipients. Notably, in MRL/lpr----AKR and C3H/lpr----AKR chimeras, CD4 single-positive thymocytes contained an increased number of V beta 6+ cells in spite of potentially deleting alleles of Mlsa, whereas V beta 6+ mature T cells were deleted in the MRL/+ ----AKR and C3H/+ ----AKR chimeras. There was no difference between MRL/+ ----AKR and MRL/lpr----AKR chimeras in their proportion of V beta 3+ cells because both host and donor strain lack the deleting alleles. Interleukin 2 receptor expression of mature T cells, in the thymus and lymph node, was obviously higher in the MRL/lpr----AKR chimeras, in particular in the forbidden V beta 6+ subset. Moreover, lpr donor-derived peripheral T cells showed vigorous anti-CD3 response. These results indicate that lpr-derived T cells escape not only tolerance-related clonal deletion but also some induction of unresponsiveness in the non-lpr thymus.

  5. Transient dominant host-range selection using Chinese hamster ovary cells to generate marker-free recombinant viral vectors from vaccinia virus.

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    Liu, Liang; Cooper, Tamara; Eldi, Preethi; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Howley, Paul M; Hayball, John D

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACVs) are promising antigen-delivery systems for vaccine development that are also useful as research tools. Two common methods for selection during construction of rVACV clones are (i) co-insertion of drug resistance or reporter protein genes, which requires the use of additional selection drugs or detection methods, and (ii) dominant host-range selection. The latter uses VACV variants rendered replication-incompetent in host cell lines by the deletion of host-range genes. Replicative ability is restored by co-insertion of the host-range genes, providing for dominant selection of the recombinant viruses. Here, we describe a new method for the construction of rVACVs using the cowpox CP77 protein and unmodified VACV as the starting material. Our selection system will expand the range of tools available for positive selection of rVACV during vector construction, and it is substantially more high-fidelity than approaches based on selection for drug resistance.

  6. Rapid engraftment without significant graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic transplantation of CD34+ selected cells from peripheral blood.

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    Urbano-Ispizua, A; Rozman, C; Martínez, C; Marín, P; Briones, J; Rovira, M; Féliz, P; Viguria, M C; Merino, A; Sierra, J; Mazzara, R; Carreras, E; Montserrat, E

    1997-06-01

    We have prospectively evaluated the feasibility and results of the biotin-avidin immunoadsorption method (Ceprate SC system) for a phase I/II study of T-cell depletion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) for allogeneic transplantation. Twenty consecutive patients, median age, 40 years (21 to 54) and diagnoses of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (n = 5), acute myeloblastic leukemia (n = 7), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 2), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 1), refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (n = 3), histiocytosis X (n = 1), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 1), were conditioned with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and total body irradiation (13 Gy; 4 fractions). HLA identical sibling donors received G-CSF at 10 microg/kg/d subcutaneously (SC); on days 5 and 6 (19 cases) and days 5 to 8 (1 case) donors underwent 10 L leukapheresis. PBPC were purified by positive selection of CD34+ cells using immunoadsorption biotin-avidin method (Ceprate SC) and were infused in the patients as the sole source of progenitor cells. No growth factors were administered posttransplant. The median recovery of CD34+ cells after the procedure was of 65%. The median number of CD34+ cells infused in the patients was 2.9 (range, 1.5 to 8.6) x 10(6)/kg. The median number of CD3+ cells administered was 0.42 x 10(6)/kg (range, 0.1 to 2). All patients engrafted. Neutrophil counts >500 and >1,000/microL were achieved at a median of 14 days (range, 10 to 18) and 15 days (range, 11 to 27), respectively. Likewise, platelet counts >20,000 and >50,000/microL were observed at a median of 10 days (range, 6 to 23) and 17 days (range, 12 to 130), respectively. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine plus methylprednisolone. No patient developed either grade II to IV acute or extensive chronic GVHD. After a median follow-up of 7.5 months (range, 2 to 22) three patients

  7. Generalized selection to overcome innate immunity selects for host breadth in an RNA virus.

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    Wasik, Brian R; Muñoz-Rojas, Andrés R; Okamoto, Kenichi W; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn; Turner, Paul E

    2016-02-01

    Virus-host coevolution has selected for generalized host defense against viruses, exemplified by interferon production/signaling and other innate immune function in eukaryotes such as humans. Although cell-surface binding primarily limits virus infection success, generalized adaptation to counteract innate immunity across disparate hosts may contribute to RNA virus emergence potential. We examined this idea using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) populations previously evolved on strictly immune-deficient (HeLa) cells, strictly immune competent (MDCK) cells, or on alternating deficient/competent cells. By measuring viral fitness in unselected human cancer cells of differing innate immunity, we confirmed that HeLa-adapted populations were specialized for innate immune-deficient hosts, whereas MDCK-adapted populations were relatively more generalized for fitness on hosts of differing innate immune capacity and of different species origin. We also confirmed that HeLa-evolved populations maintained fitness in immune-deficient nonhuman primate cells. These results suggest that innate immunity is more prominent than host species in determining viral fitness at the host-cell level. Finally, our prediction was inexact that selection on alternating deficient/competent hosts should produce innate viral generalists. Rather, fitness differences among alternating host-evolved VSV populations indicated variable capacities to evade innate immunity. Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of innate immune selection can affect whether RNA viruses evolve greater host-breadth. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Diversifying selection and host adaptation in two endosymbiont genomes

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    Slatko Barton

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis infects a broad range of arthropod and filarial nematode hosts. These diverse associations form an attractive model for understanding host:symbiont coevolution. Wolbachia's ubiquity and ability to dramatically alter host reproductive biology also form the foundation of research strategies aimed at controlling insect pests and vector-borne disease. The Wolbachia strains that infect nematodes are phylogenetically distinct, strictly vertically transmitted, and required by their hosts for growth and reproduction. Insects in contrast form more fluid associations with Wolbachia. In these taxa, host populations are most often polymorphic for infection, horizontal transmission occurs between distantly related hosts, and direct fitness effects on hosts are mild. Despite extensive interest in the Wolbachia system for many years, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms that mediate its varied interactions with different hosts. We have compared the genomes of the Wolbachia that infect Drosophila melanogaster, wMel and the nematode Brugia malayi, wBm to that of an outgroup Anaplasma marginale to identify genes that have experienced diversifying selection in the Wolbachia lineages. The goal of the study was to identify likely molecular mechanisms of the symbiosis and to understand the nature of the diverse association across different hosts. Results The prevalence of selection was far greater in wMel than wBm. Genes contributing to DNA metabolism, cofactor biosynthesis, and secretion were positively selected in both lineages. In wMel there was a greater emphasis on DNA repair, cell division, protein stability, and cell envelope synthesis. Conclusion Secretion pathways and outer surface protein encoding genes are highly affected by selection in keeping with host:parasite theory. If evidence of selection on various cofactor molecules reflects possible provisioning, then both insect as

  9. Cytometric analysis, genetic manipulation and antibiotic selection of the snail embryonic cell line Bge from Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Rinaldi, Gabriel; Yan, Hongbin; Nacif-Pimenta, Rafael; Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Bridger, Joanna; Mann, Victoria H; Smout, Michael J; Brindley, Paul J; Knight, Matty

    2015-07-01

    The invertebrate cell line, Bge, from embryos of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, remains to date the only established cell line from any species of the Phylum Mollusca. Since its establishment in 1976 by Eder Hansen, few studies have focused on profiling its cytometrics, growth characteristics or sensitivity to xenobiotics. Bge cells are reputed to be challenging to propagate and maintain. Therefore, even though this cell line is a noteworthy resource, it has not been studied widely. With growing interest in functional genomics, including genetic transformation, to elucidate molecular aspects of the snail intermediate hosts responsible for transmission of schistosomiasis, and aiming to enhance the convenience of maintenance of this molluscan cell line, we deployed the xCELLigene real time approach to study Bge cells. Doubling times for three isolates of Bge, termed CB, SL and UK, were longer than for mammalian cell lines - longer than 40 h in complete Bge medium supplemented with 7% fetal bovine serum at 25°C, ranging from ∼42 h to ∼157 h when 40,000 cells were seeded. To assess the potential of the cells for genetic transformation, antibiotic selection was explored. Bge cells were sensitive to the aminonucleoside antibiotic puromycin (from Streptomyces alboniger) from 5 μg/ml to 200 ng/ml, displaying a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ∼1.91 μg/ml. Sensitivity to puromycin, and a relatively quick kill time (<48 h in 5 μg/ml) facilitated use of this antibiotic, together with the cognate resistance gene (puromycin N-acetyl-transferase) for selection of Bge cells transformed with the PAC gene (puroR). Bge cells transfected with a plasmid encoding puroR were partially rescued when cultured in the presence of 5 μg/ml of puromycin. These findings pave the way for the development of functional genomic tools applied to the host-parasite interaction during schistosomiasis and neglected tropical trematodiases at large. Copyright © 2015 Australian

  10. Host selection by a kleptobiotic spider

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    Hénaut, Yann; Delme, Juliette; Legal, Luc; Williams, Trevor

    2005-02-01

    Why do kleptobiotic spiders of the genus Argyrodes seem to be associated with spiders of the genus Nephila worldwide? Observations following introduction of experimental insect prey of different sizes and weights on to host webs revealed that: (1) small prey are more effectively retained on the web of Nephila clavipes than on the web of another common host, Leucauge venusta. (2) N. clavipes did not consume small prey that accumulated on the web whereas larger, heavier prey were enveloped and stored. (3) We observed clear partitioning of prey items between N. clavipes and Argyrodes spp.; diet selection by Argyrodes did not overlap with that of N. clavipes but closely overlapped with that of L. venusta. (4) L. venusta responds very quickly to prey impact whereas N. clavipes is slower, offering a temporal window of opportunity for Argyrodes foraging. (5) The ability of L. venusta to detect and respond to small items also means that it acts aggressively to Argyrodes spp., whereas N. clavipes does not. Consequently, food-acquisition behaviours of Argyrodes were clearly less risky with N. clavipes compared with L. venusta. We conclude that when a kleptobiotic organism has a choice of various host species, it will opt for the least risky host that presents the highest rate of availability of food items. The fact that Nephila species present such characteristics explains the worldwide association with Argyrodes kleptobiotic spiders.

  11. Manipulating the bioenergetics of alloreactive T cells causes their selective apoptosis and arrests graft versus host disease

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    Gatza, Erin; Wahl, Daniel R.; Opipari, Anthony W.; Sundberg, Thomas B.; Reddy, Pavan; Liu, Chen; Glick, Gary D.; Ferrara, James L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cells generate ATP by glycolysis and by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) (1, 2). Despite the importance of having sufficient ATP available for the energy-dependent processes involved in immune activation, little is known about the metabolic adaptations that occur in vivo to meet the increased demand for ATP in activated and proliferating lymphocytes. We found that bone marrow (BM) cells proliferating after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) increased aerobic glycolysis but not OXPHOS, while ...

  12. Salmonella - at home in the host cell.

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    Preeti eMalik Kale

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica has developed an array of sophisticated tools to manipulate the host cell and establish an intracellular niche, for successful propagation as a facultative intracellular pathogen. While Salmonella exerts diverse effects on its host cell, only the cell biology of the classic trigger-mediated invasion process and the subsequent development of the Salmonella-containing vacuole have been investigated extensively. These processes are dependent on cohorts of effector proteins translocated into host cells by two type III secretion systems (T3SS, although T3SS-independent mechanisms of entry may be important for invasion of certain host cell-types. Recent studies into the intracellular lifestyle of Salmonella have provided new insights into the mechanisms used by this pathogen to modulate its intracellular environment. Here we discuss current knowledge of Salmonella-host interactions including invasion and establishment of an intracellular niche within the host.

  13. Mosquito host selection varies seasonally with host availability and mosquito density.

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    Tara C Thiemann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Host selection by vector mosquitoes is a critical component of virus proliferation, particularly for viruses such as West Nile (WNV that are transmitted enzootically to a variety of avian hosts, and tangentially to dead-end hosts such as humans. Culex tarsalis is a principal vector of WNV in rural areas of western North America. Based on previous work, Cx. tarsalis utilizes a variety of avian and mammalian hosts and tends to feed more frequently on mammals in the late summer than during the rest of the year. To further explore this and other temporal changes in host selection, bloodfed females were collected at a rural farmstead and heron nesting site in Northern California from May 2008 through May 2009, and bloodmeal hosts identified using either a microsphere-based array or by sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene. Host composition during summer was dominated by four species of nesting Ardeidae. In addition, the site was populated with various passerine species as well as domestic farm animals and humans. When present, Cx. tarsalis fed predominantly (>80% upon the ardeids, with Black-crowned Night-Herons, a highly competent WNV host, the most prevalent summer host. As the ardeids fledged and left the area and mosquito abundance increased in late summer, Cx. tarsalis feeding shifted to include more mammals, primarily cattle, and a high diversity of avian species. In the winter, Yellow-billed Magpies and House Sparrows were the predominant hosts, and Yellow-billed Magpies and American Robins were fed upon more frequently than expected given their relative abundance. These data demonstrated that host selection was likely based both on host availability and differences in utilization, that the shift of bloodfeeding to include more mammalian hosts was likely the result of both host availability and increased mosquito abundance, and that WNV-competent hosts were fed upon by Cx. tarsalis throughout the year.

  14. Host response to biomaterials the impact of host response on biomaterial selection

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    Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Host Response to Biomaterials: The Impact of Host Response on Biomaterial Selection explains the various categories of biomaterials and their significance for clinical applications, focusing on the host response to each biomaterial. It is one of the first books to connect immunology and biomaterials with regard to host response. The text also explores the role of the immune system in host response, and covers the regulatory environment for biomaterials, along with the benefits of synthetic versus natural biomaterials, and the transition from simple to complex biomaterial solutions. Fiel

  15. Directional Selection from Host Plants Is a Major Force Driving Host Specificity in Magnaporthe Species.

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    Zhong, Zhenhui; Norvienyeku, Justice; Chen, Meilian; Bao, Jiandong; Lin, Lianyu; Chen, Liqiong; Lin, Yahong; Wu, Xiaoxian; Cai, Zena; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Xiaoye; Hong, Yonghe; Huang, Jun; Xu, Linghong; Zhang, Honghong; Chen, Long; Tang, Wei; Zheng, Huakun; Chen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yanli; Lian, Bi; Zhang, Liangsheng; Tang, Haibao; Lu, Guodong; Ebbole, Daniel J; Wang, Baohua; Wang, Zonghua

    2016-05-06

    One major threat to global food security that requires immediate attention, is the increasing incidence of host shift and host expansion in growing number of pathogenic fungi and emergence of new pathogens. The threat is more alarming because, yield quality and quantity improvement efforts are encouraging the cultivation of uniform plants with low genetic diversity that are increasingly susceptible to emerging pathogens. However, the influence of host genome differentiation on pathogen genome differentiation and its contribution to emergence and adaptability is still obscure. Here, we compared genome sequence of 6 isolates of Magnaporthe species obtained from three different host plants. We demonstrated the evolutionary relationship between Magnaporthe species and the influence of host differentiation on pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that evolution of pathogen directly corresponds with host divergence, suggesting that host-pathogen interaction has led to co-evolution. Furthermore, we identified an asymmetric selection pressure on Magnaporthe species. Oryza sativa-infecting isolates showed higher directional selection from host and subsequently tends to lower the genetic diversity in its genome. We concluded that, frequent gene loss or gain, new transposon acquisition and sequence divergence are host adaptability mechanisms for Magnaporthe species, and this coevolution processes is greatly driven by directional selection from host plants.

  16. The evolution of mutualism in gut microbiota via host epithelial selection.

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    Jonas Schluter

    Full Text Available The human gut harbours a large and genetically diverse population of symbiotic microbes that both feed and protect the host. Evolutionary theory, however, predicts that such genetic diversity can destabilise mutualistic partnerships. How then can the mutualism of the human microbiota be explained? Here we develop an individual-based model of host-associated microbial communities. We first demonstrate the fundamental problem faced by a host: The presence of a genetically diverse microbiota leads to the dominance of the fastest growing microbes instead of the microbes that are most beneficial to the host. We next investigate the potential for host secretions to influence the microbiota. This reveals that the epithelium-microbiota interface acts as a selectivity amplifier: Modest amounts of moderately selective epithelial secretions cause a complete shift in the strains growing at the epithelial surface. This occurs because of the physical structure of the epithelium-microbiota interface: Epithelial secretions have effects that permeate upwards through the whole microbial community, while lumen compounds preferentially affect cells that are soon to slough off. Finally, our model predicts that while antimicrobial secretion can promote host epithelial selection, epithelial nutrient secretion will often be key to host selection. Our findings are consistent with a growing number of empirical papers that indicate an influence of host factors upon microbiota, including growth-promoting glycoconjugates. We argue that host selection is likely to be a key mechanism in the stabilisation of the mutualism between a host and its microbiota.

  17. Bartonella entry mechanisms into mammalian host cells.

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    Eicher, Simone C; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The Gram-negative genus Bartonella comprises arthropod-borne pathogens that typically infect mammals in a host-specific manner. Bartonella bacilliformis and Bartonella quintana are human-specific pathogens, while several zoonotic bartonellae specific for diverse animal hosts infect humans as an incidental host. Clinical manifestations of Bartonella infections range from mild symptoms to life-threatening disease. Following transmission by blood-sucking arthropods or traumatic contact with infected animals, bartonellae display sequential tropisms towards endothelial and possibly other nucleated cells and erythrocytes, the latter in a host-specific manner. Attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to nucleated cells is mediated by surface-exposed bacterial adhesins, in particular trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs). The subsequent engulfment of the pathogen into a vacuolar structure follows a unique series of events whereby the pathogen avoids the endolysosomal compartments. For Bartonella henselae and assumingly most other species, the infection process is aided at different steps by Bartonella effector proteins (Beps). They are injected into host cells through the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB/D4 and subvert host cellular functions to favour pathogen uptake. Bacterial binding to erythrocytes is mediated by Trw, another T4SS, in a strictly host-specific manner, followed by pathogen-forced uptake involving the IalB invasin and subsequent replication and persistence within a membrane-bound intra-erythrocytic compartment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Host-selective toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis induce common responses associated with host susceptibility.

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    Iovanna Pandelova

    Full Text Available Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr, a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA and Ptr ToxB (ToxB, are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death.

  19. Single experience learning of host fruit selection by lepidopteran larvae.

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    Pszczolkowski, Maciej A; Brown, John J

    2005-09-15

    Neonate larvae of a lepidopteran, the codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.) search for their host fruit after hatch. The process of host searching is known to be activated by kairomones contained in host fruit volatiles, but the mechanism of actual selection and infestation of the fruit is unclear. Here we show that lepidopteran neonates can utilize single experience learning in selection and infestation of host apple. We found that the process of host fruit selection may be modified by single experience learning, namely preference induction or averse conditioning. Both types of learning were acquired within 3 h of training. Experience was retained for over 3 days in the case of averse conditioning. Preference induction, a form of learning specific to insects, is expected to produce rigid host preference lasting for days if not weeks, but in codling moth neonates this type of memory was retained only for 3 h. We speculate that conjunction of preference induction with short retention time and averse conditioning with long retention time provide an optimal adaptive strategy of host fruit selection for codling moth neonates.

  20. Parvoviral host range and cell entry mechanisms.

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    Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Parvoviruses elaborate rugged nonenveloped icosahedral capsids of approximately 260 A in diameter that comprise just 60 copies of a common core structural polypeptide. While serving as exceptionally durable shells, capable of protecting the single-stranded DNA genome from environmental extremes, the capsid also undergoes sequential conformational changes that allow it to translocate the genome from its initial host cell nucleus all the way into the nucleus of its subsequent host. Lacking a duplex transcription template, the virus must then wait for its host to enter S-phase before it can initiate transcription and usurp the cell's synthetic pathways. Here we review cell entry mechanisms used by parvoviruses. We explore two apparently distinct modes of host cell specificity, first that used by Minute virus of mice, where subtle glycan-specific interactions between host receptors and residues surrounding twofold symmetry axes on the virion surface mediate differentiated cell type target specificity, while the second involves novel protein interactions with the canine transferrin receptor that allow a mutant of the feline leukopenia serotype, Canine parvovirus, to bind to and infect dog cells. We then discuss conformational shifts in the virion that accompany cell entry, causing exposure of a capsid-tethered phospholipase A2 enzymatic core that acts as an endosomolytic agent to mediate virion translocation across the lipid bilayer into the cell cytoplasm. Finally, we discuss virion delivery into the nucleus, and consider the nature of transcriptionally silent DNA species that, escaping detection by the cell, might allow unhampered progress into S-phase and hence unleash the parvoviral Trojan horse.

  1. Gut Microbiota Co-microevolution with Selection for Host Humoral Immunity

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    Lingyu Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To explore coevolution between the gut microbiota and the humoral immune system of the host, we used chickens as the model organism. The host populations were two lines (HAS and LAS developed from a common founder that had undergone 40 generations of divergent selection for antibody titers to sheep red blood cells (SRBC and two relaxed sublines (HAR and LAR. Analysis revealed that microevolution of host humoral immunity contributed to the composition of gut microbiota at the taxa level. Relaxing selection enriched some microorganisms whose functions were opposite to host immunity. Particularly, Ruminococcaceae and Oscillospira enriched in high antibody relaxed (HAR and contributed to reduction in antibody response, while Lactobacillus increased in low antibody relaxed (LAR and elevated the antibody response. Microbial functional analysis showed that alterations were involved in pathways relating to the immune system and infectious diseases. Our findings demonstrated co-microevolution relationships of host-microbiota and that gut microorganisms influenced host immunity.

  2. Reduced graft-versus-host disease-inducing capacity of T cells after activation, culturing, and magnetic cell sorting selection in an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation model in rats

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    Weijtens, M; van Spronsen, A; Hagenbeek, A; Braakman, E; Martens, A

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), a major complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, has been ascribed to mature T cells in the graft. Because T cells play an important role in engraftment of the bone marrow and decrease the probability of relapse of leukemia, a treatment strategy was

  3. Host cell selection of Murray Valley encephalitis virus variants altered at an RGD sequence in the envelope protein and in mouse virulence.

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    Lobigs, M; Usha, R; Nestorowicz, A; Marshall, I D; Weir, R C; Dalgarno, L

    1990-06-01

    We have passaged the prototype strain of Murray Valley encephalitis virus in SW13 (human) cells, sequenced the E and M genes, and examined the virulence of the passaged virus for 21-day-old mice following intracranial and intraperitoneal inoculation. Six independent passage series were carried out: four in the presence of mouse hyperimmune ascitic fluid and two without antibody. Changes were observed in the E protein deduced amino acid sequence for each of the six 10th passage stocks sequenced. Eleven changes were observed in total for the six stocks sequenced; these were at residues 117, 118, 390, 423, and 460. Nine of the changes were nonconservative. Five of the six passaged variants were altered at Asp 390 which is part of an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence. This change resulted from adaptation to SW13 cells rather than from antibody selection. The RGD sequence (and residue 423) falls within a region which is highly conserved between flaviviruses and is strongly hydrophilic. All five variants which were altered at Asp 390 were attenuated in 21-day-old mice following i.p. inoculation. We propose that the domain of E encompassing the RGD sequence is an important determinant of flavivirus pathogenicity.

  4. The Survival Strategies of Malaria Parasite in the Red Blood Cell and Host Cell Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunanidhi Dhangadamajhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite growth within the erythrocyte causes dramatic alterations of host cell which on one hand facilitates nutrients acquisition from extracellular environment and on other hand contributes to the symptoms of severe malaria. The current paper focuses on interactions between the Plasmodium parasite and its metabolically highly reduced host cell, the natural selection of numerous polymorphisms in the genes encoding hemoglobin and other erythrocyte proteins.

  5. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns were identified by cell counting with trypan blue under confocal microscopy, and cell cycle changes were investigated by flow cytometry. L6 cells infected with T. gondii showed decreased proliferation compared to uninfected L6 cells and revealed a tendency to stay at S or G2/M cell phase. The treatment of exosomes isolated from T. gondii-infected cells showed attenuation of cell proliferation and slight enhancement of S phase in L6 cells. The cell cycle alteration was not as obvious as reduction of the cell proliferation by the exosome treatment. These changes were transient and disappeared at 48 hr after the exosome treatment. Microarray analysis and web-based tools indicated that various exosomal miRNAs were crucial for the regulation of target genes related to cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the exosomes originating from T. gondii could change the host cell proliferation and alter the host cell cycle.

  6. Concepts of papillomavirus entry into host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Patricia M; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-02-01

    Papillomaviruses enter basal cells of stratified epithelia. Assembly of new virions occurs in infected cells during terminal differentiation. This unique biology is reflected in the mechanism of entry. Extracellularly, the interaction of nonenveloped capsids with several host cell proteins, after binding, results in discrete conformational changes. Asynchronous internalization occurs over several hours by an endocytic mechanism related to, but distinct from macropinocytosis. Intracellular trafficking leads virions through the endosomal system, and from late endosomes to the trans-Golgi-network, before nuclear delivery. Here, we discuss the existing data with the aim to synthesize an integrated model of the stepwise process of entry, thereby highlighting key open questions. Additionally, we relate data from experiments with cultured cells to in vivo results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Host Cell Factors as Antiviral Targets in Arenavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa B. Damonte

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection.

  8. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  9. Cryptosporidium parvum Infection Requires Host Cell Actin Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, David A.; Coleman, Daniel J.; Lane, Michael A.; May, Robin C.; Machesky, Laura M.; Clark, Douglas P.

    2001-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum accumulates host cell actin at the interface between the parasite and the host cell cytoplasm. Here we show that the actin polymerizing proteins Arp2/3, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), and neural Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) are present at this interface and that host cell actin polymerization is necessary for parasite infection.

  10. Cryptosporidium parvum infection requires host cell actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D A; Coleman, D J; Lane, M A; May, R C; Machesky, L M; Clark, D P

    2001-09-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum accumulates host cell actin at the interface between the parasite and the host cell cytoplasm. Here we show that the actin polymerizing proteins Arp2/3, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), and neural Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) are present at this interface and that host cell actin polymerization is necessary for parasite infection.

  11. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  12. Studying host cell protein interactions with monoclonal antibodies using high throughput protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodiya, Vikram N; Lequieu, Joshua; Rodriguez, Maricel; McDonald, Paul; Lazzareschi, Kathlyn P

    2012-10-01

    Protein A chromatography is typically used as the initial capture step in the purification of monoclonal antibodies produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Although exploiting an affinity interaction for purification, the level of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent varies significantly with different feedstocks. Using a batch binding chromatography method, we performed a controlled study to assess host cell protein clearance across both MabSelect Sure and Prosep vA resins. We individually spiked 21 purified antibodies into null cell culture fluid generated with a non-producing cell line, creating mock cell culture fluids for each antibody with an identical composition of host cell proteins and antibody concentration. We demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions are primarily responsible for the variable levels of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent for both resins when antibody is present. Using the additives guanidine HCl and sodium chloride, we demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions may be disrupted, reducing the level of host cell proteins present after purification on both resins. The reduction in the level of host cell proteins differed between antibodies suggesting that the interaction likely varies between individual antibodies but encompasses both an electrostatic and hydrophobic component. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  14. Two Plasmodium falciparum genes express merozoite proteins that are related to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium yoelii adhesive proteins involved in host cell selection and invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Julian C.; Galinski, Mary R.; Ingravallo, Paul; Barnwell, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Two related Plasmodium falciparum genes and their encoded proteins have been identified by comparative analyses with Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding protein 2 (PvRBP-2). The P. falciparum genes have a structure which suggests that they may be the result of an evolutionary duplication event, as they share more than 8 kb of closely related nucleotide sequence but then have quite divergent unique 3′ ends. Between these shared and unique regions is a complex set of repeats, the nature and number of which differs between the two genes, as well as between different P. falciparum strains. Both genes encode large hydrophilic proteins, which are concentrated at the invasive apical end of the merozoite and are predicted to be more than 350 kDa, with an N-terminal signal sequence and a single transmembrane domain near their C termini. Importantly, they also share gene structure and amino acid homology with the Plasmodium yoelii 235-kDa rhoptry protein family, which is also related to PvRBP-2. Together these Plasmodium proteins define an extended family of proteins that appear to function in erythrocyte selection and invasion. As such, they may prove to be essential components of malaria vaccine preparations. PMID:10920203

  15. Emerging prion disease drives host selection in a wildlife population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stacie J.; Samuel, Michael D.; Johnson, Chad J.; Adams, Marie; McKenzie, Debbie I.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases are increasingly recognized as an important force driving population dynamics, conservation biology, and natural selection in wildlife populations. Infectious agents have been implicated in the decline of small or endangered populations and may act to constrain population size, distribution, growth rates, or migration patterns. Further, diseases may provide selective pressures that shape the genetic diversity of populations or species. Thus, understanding disease dynamics and selective pressures from pathogens is crucial to understanding population processes, managing wildlife diseases, and conserving biological diversity. There is ample evidence that variation in the prion protein gene (PRNP) impacts host susceptibility to prion diseases. Still, little is known about how genetic differences might influence natural selection within wildlife populations. Here we link genetic variation with differential susceptibility of white-tailed deer to chronic wasting disease (CWD), with implications for fitness and disease-driven genetic selection. We developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay to efficiently genotype deer at the locus of interest (in the 96th codon of the PRNP gene). Then, using a Bayesian modeling approach, we found that the more susceptible genotype had over four times greater risk of CWD infection; and, once infected, deer with the resistant genotype survived 49% longer (8.25 more months). We used these epidemiological parameters in a multi-stage population matrix model to evaluate relative fitness based on genotype-specific population growth rates. The differences in disease infection and mortality rates allowed genetically resistant deer to achieve higher population growth and obtain a long-term fitness advantage, which translated into a selection coefficient of over 1% favoring the CWD-resistant genotype. This selective pressure suggests that the resistant allele could become dominant in the population within an

  16. Emerging prion disease drives host selection in a wildlife population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stacie J; Samuel, Michael D; Johnson, Chad J; Adams, Marie; McKenzie, Debbie I

    2012-04-01

    Infectious diseases are increasingly recognized as an important force driving population dynamics, conservation biology, and natural selection in wildlife populations. Infectious agents have been implicated in the decline of small or endangered populations and may act to constrain population size, distribution, growth rates, or migration patterns. Further, diseases may provide selective pressures that shape the genetic diversity of populations or species. Thus, understanding disease dynamics and selective pressures from pathogens is crucial to understanding population processes, managing wildlife diseases, and conserving biological diversity. There is ample evidence that variation in the prion protein gene (PRNP) impacts host susceptibility to prion diseases. Still, little is known about how genetic differences might influence natural selection within wildlife populations. Here we link genetic variation with differential susceptibility of white-tailed deer to chronic wasting disease (CWD), with implications for fitness and disease-driven genetic selection. We developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay to efficiently genotype deer at the locus of interest (in the 96th codon of the PRNP gene). Then, using a Bayesian modeling approach, we found that the more susceptible genotype had over four times greater risk of CWD infection; and, once infected, deer with the resistant genotype survived 49% longer (8.25 more months). We used these epidemiological parameters in a multi-stage population matrix model to evaluate relative fitness based on genotype-specific population growth rates. The differences in disease infection and mortality rates allowed genetically resistant deer to achieve higher population growth and obtain a long-term fitness advantage, which translated into a selection coefficient of over 1% favoring the CWD-resistant genotype. This selective pressure suggests that the resistant allele could become dominant in the population within an

  17. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R. Litwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN, human leukocyte antigen A and B (HLA-A and HLA-B-A/B, and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 (TP53 and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 (RB1 tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  18. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Clarke, Megan A; Dean, Michael; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2017-08-03

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha ( PIK3CA ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog ( PTEN ), human leukocyte antigen A and B ( HLA-A and HLA-B ) -A/B , and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 ( TP53 ) and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 ( RB1 ) tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  19. Characterization of Host Cell Proteins (HCPs) in CHO Cell Bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogwood, Catherine E M; Chiverton, Lesley M; Mark Smales, C

    2017-01-01

    Host cell protein content during bioprocessing of biotherapeutic proteins generated from cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is typically measured using immunological and gel-based methods. Estimation of HCP concentration is usually undertaken using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays (ELISA), while estimation of HCP clearance/presence can be achieved by comparing 2D-PAGE images of samples and by undertaking western blotting of 2D-PAGE analyzed samples. Here, we describe the analyses of HCP content using these methodologies.

  20. Host cells and methods for production of isobutanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, Larry Cameron; He, Hongxian; Huang, Lixuan Lisa; Okeefe, Daniel P.; Kruckeberg, Arthur Leo; Li, Yougen; Maggio-Hall, Lori Ann; McElvain, Jessica; Nelson, Mark J.; Patnaik, Ranjan; Rothman, Steven Cary

    2016-08-23

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of isobutanol. Yeast host cells provided comprise an isobutanol biosynthetic pathway and at least one of reduced or eliminated aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, reduced or eliminated acetolactate reductase activity; or a heterologous polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide having ketol-acid reductoisomerase activity.

  1. Host cells and methods for production of isobutanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, Larry Cameron; He, Hongxian; Huang, Lixuan Lisa; Okeefe, Daniel P.; Kruckeberg, Arthur Leo; Li, Yougen; Maggio-Hall, Lori; McElvain, Jessica; Nelson, Mark J.; Patnaik, Ranjan; Rothman, Steven Cary

    2017-10-17

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of isobutanol. Yeast host cells provided comprise an isobutanol biosynthetic pathway and at least one of reduced or eliminated aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, reduced or eliminated acetolactate reductase activity; or a heterologous polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide having ketol-acid reductoisomerase activity.

  2. How pathogens use linear motifs to perturb host cell networks

    KAUST Repository

    Via, Allegra

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mimicry is one of the powerful stratagems that pathogens employ to colonise their hosts and take advantage of host cell functions to guarantee their replication and dissemination. In particular, several viruses have evolved the ability to interact with host cell components through protein short linear motifs (SLiMs) that mimic host SLiMs, thus facilitating their internalisation and the manipulation of a wide range of cellular networks. Here we present convincing evidence from the literature that motif mimicry also represents an effective, widespread hijacking strategy in prokaryotic and eukaryotic parasites. Further insights into host motif mimicry would be of great help in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind host cell invasion and the development of anti-infective therapeutic strategies.

  3. Patterns of oligonucleotide sequences in viral and host cell RNA identify mediators of the host innate immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Greenbaum

    Full Text Available The innate immune response provides a first line of defense against pathogens by targeting generic differential features that are present in foreign organisms but not in the host. These innate responses generate selection forces acting both in pathogens and hosts that further determine their co-evolution. Here we analyze the nucleic acid sequence fingerprints of these selection forces acting in parallel on both host innate immune genes and ssRNA viral genomes. We do this by identifying dinucleotide biases in the coding regions of innate immune response genes in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and then use this signal to identify other significant host innate immune genes. The persistence of these biases in the orthologous groups of genes in humans and chickens is also examined. We then compare the significant motifs in highly expressed genes of the innate immune system to those in ssRNA viruses and study the evolution of these motifs in the H1N1 influenza genome. We argue that the significant under-represented motif pattern of CpG in an AU context--which is found in both the ssRNA viruses and innate genes, and has decreased throughout the history of H1N1 influenza replication in humans--is immunostimulatory and has been selected against during the co-evolution of viruses and host innate immune genes. This shows how differences in host immune biology can drive the evolution of viruses that jump into species with different immune priorities than the original host.

  4. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Taft

    Full Text Available There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs. We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium. ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82% lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55% when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240 of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137 of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the

  5. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Robert A; Low, Benjamin E; Byers, Shannon L; Murray, Stephen A; Kutny, Peter; Wiles, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH) that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium). ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82%) lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55%) when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240) of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137) of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the production

  6. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  7. Salmonella – At Home in the Host Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti eMalik Kale; Jolly, Carrie E.; Stephanie eLathrop; Seth eWinfree; Courtney eLuterbach; Olivia eSteele-Mortimer

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica has developed an array of sophisticated tools to manipulate the host cell and establish an intracellular niche, for successful propagation as a facultative intracellular pathogen. While Salmonella exerts diverse effects on its host cell, only the cell biology of the classic “trigger”-mediated invasion process and the subsequent development of the Salmonella-containing vacuole have been investigated extensively. These processes are dependent on c...

  8. Host manipulation by cancer cells: Expectations, facts, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, Tazzio; Arnal, Audrey; Jacqueline, Camille; Poulin, Robert; Lefèvre, Thierry; Mery, Frédéric; Renaud, François; Roche, Benjamin; Massol, François; Salzet, Michel; Ewald, Paul; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Ujvari, Beata; Thomas, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Similar to parasites, cancer cells depend on their hosts for sustenance, proliferation and reproduction, exploiting the hosts for energy and resources, and thereby impairing their health and fitness. Because of this lifestyle similarity, it is predicted that cancer cells could, like numerous parasitic organisms, evolve the capacity to manipulate the phenotype of their hosts to increase their own fitness. We claim that the extent of this phenomenon and its therapeutic implications are, however, underappreciated. Here, we review and discuss what can be regarded as cases of host manipulation in the context of cancer development and progression. We elaborate on how acknowledging the applicability of these principles can offer novel therapeutic and preventive strategies. The manipulation of host phenotype by cancer cells is one more reason to adopt a Darwinian approach in cancer research. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Metabolic adaptation of Chlamydia trachomatis to mammalian host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlitz, Adrian; Eylert, Eva; Huber, Claudia; Lindner, Buko; Vollmuth, Nadine; Karunakaran, Karthika; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rudel, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic adaptation is a key feature for the virulence of pathogenic intracellular bacteria. Nevertheless, little is known about the pathways in adapting the bacterial metabolism to multiple carbon sources available from the host cell. To analyze the metabolic adaptation of the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, we labeled infected HeLa or Caco-2 cells with 13 C-marked glucose, glutamine, malate or a mix of amino acids as tracers. Comparative GC-MS-based isotopologue analysis of protein-derived amino acids from the host cell and the bacterial fraction showed that C. trachomatis efficiently imported amino acids from the host cell for protein biosynthesis. FT-ICR-MS analyses also demonstrated that label from exogenous 13 C-glucose was efficiently shuffled into chlamydial lipopolysaccharide probably via glucose 6-phosphate of the host cell. Minor fractions of bacterial Ala, Asp, and Glu were made de novo probably using dicarboxylates from the citrate cycle of the host cell. Indeed, exogenous 13 C-malate was efficiently taken up by C. trachomatis and metabolized into fumarate and succinate when the bacteria were kept in axenic medium containing the malate tracer. Together, the data indicate co-substrate usage of intracellular C. trachomatis in a stream-lined bipartite metabolism with host cell-supplied amino acids for protein biosynthesis, host cell-provided glucose 6-phosphate for cell wall biosynthesis, and, to some extent, one or more host cell-derived dicarboxylates, e.g. malate, feeding the partial TCA cycle of the bacterium. The latter flux could also support the biosynthesis of meso-2,6-diaminopimelate required for the formation of chlamydial peptidoglycan. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Fungal invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Filler

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Many fungi that cause invasive disease invade host epithelial cells during mucosal and respiratory infection, and subsequently invade endothelial cells during hematogenous infection. Most fungi invade these normally non-phagocytic host cells by inducing their own uptake. Candida albicans hyphae interact with endothelial cells in vitro by binding to N-cadherin on the endothelial cell surface. This binding induces rearrangement of endothelial cell microfilaments, which results in the endocytosis of the organism. The capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans is composed of glucuronoxylomannan, which binds specifically to brain endothelial cells, and appears to mediate both adherence and induction of endocytosis. The mechanisms by which other fungal pathogens induce their own uptake are largely unknown. Some angioinvasive fungi, such as Aspergillus species and the Zygomycetes, invade endothelial cells from the abluminal surface during the initiation of invasive disease, and subsequently invade the luminal surface of endothelial cells during hematogenous dissemination. Invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells has different consequences, depending on the type of invading fungus. Aspergillus fumigatus blocks apoptosis of pulmonary epithelial cells, whereas Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces apoptosis of epithelial cells. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which diverse fungal pathogens invade normally non-phagocytic host cells and discusses gaps in our knowledge that provide opportunities for future research.

  11. Malaria Sporozoites Traverse Host Cells within Transient Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco-Castillo, Veronica; Topçu, Selma; Marinach, Carine; Manzoni, Giulia; Bigorgne, Amélie E; Briquet, Sylvie; Baudin, Xavier; Lebrun, Maryse; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Silvie, Olivier

    2015-11-11

    Plasmodium sporozoites are deposited in the host skin by Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites migrate from the dermis to the liver, where they invade hepatocytes through a moving junction (MJ) to form a replicative parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Malaria sporozoites need to traverse cells during progression through host tissues, a process requiring parasite perforin-like protein 1 (PLP1). We find that sporozoites traverse cells inside transient vacuoles that precede PV formation. Sporozoites initially invade cells inside transient vacuoles by an active MJ-independent process that does not require vacuole membrane remodeling or release of parasite secretory organelles typically involved in invasion. Sporozoites use pH sensing and PLP1 to exit these vacuoles and avoid degradation by host lysosomes. Next, parasites enter the MJ-dependent PV, which has a different membrane composition, precluding lysosome fusion. The malaria parasite has thus evolved different strategies to evade host cell defense and establish an intracellular niche for replication.

  12. Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taek Soon; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides for a method of producing an isoprenyl alkanoate in a genetically modified host cell. In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses an enzyme capable of catalyzing the esterification of an isoprenol and a straight-chain fatty acid, such as an alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) or lipase, under a suitable condition so that the isoprenyl alkanoate is produced.

  13. Host-Parasite Interactions and Purifying Selection in a Microsporidian Parasite of Honey Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Huang

    Full Text Available To clarify the mechanisms of Nosema ceranae parasitism, we deep-sequenced both honey bee host and parasite mRNAs throughout a complete 6-day infection cycle. By time-series analysis, 1122 parasite genes were significantly differently expressed during the reproduction cycle, clustering into 4 expression patterns. We found reactive mitochondrial oxygen species modulator 1 of the host to be significantly down regulated during the entire infection period. Our data support the hypothesis that apoptosis of honey bee cells was suppressed during infection. We further analyzed genome-wide genetic diversity of this parasite by comparing samples collected from the same site in 2007 and 2013. The number of SNP positions per gene and the proportion of non-synonymous substitutions per gene were significantly reduced over this time period, suggesting purifying selection on the parasite genome and supporting the hypothesis that a subset of N. ceranae strains might be dominating infection.

  14. Selection of Apis mellifera workers by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor using host cuticular hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Piccolo, F; Nazzi, F; Della Vedova, G; Milani, N

    2010-05-01

    The parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is the most important threat for apiculture in most bee-keeping areas of the world. The mite is carried to the bee brood cell, where it reproduces, by a nurse bee; therefore the selection of the bee stage by the parasite could influence its reproductive success. This study investigates the role of the cuticular hydrocarbons of the European honeybee (Apis mellifera) in host-selection by the mite. Preliminary laboratory bioassays confirmed the preference of the varroa mite for nurse bees over pollen foragers. GC-MS analysis of nurse and pollen bees revealed differences in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the two stages; in particular, it appeared that pollen bees have more (Z)-8-heptadecene than nurse bees. Laboratory experiments showed that treatment of nurse bees with 100 ng of the pure compound makes them repellent to the varroa mite. These results suggest that the mite can exploit the differences in the cuticular composition of its host for a refined selection that allows it to reach a brood cell and start reproduction. The biological activity of the alkene encourages further investigations for the development of novel control techniques based on this compound.

  15. Hijacking host cell highways: manipulation of the host actin cytoskeleton by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens replicate within eukaryotic cells and display unique adaptations that support key infection events including invasion, replication, immune evasion, and dissemination. From invasion to dissemination, all stages of the intracellular bacterial life cycle share the same three-dimensional cytosolic space containing the host cytoskeleton. For successful infection and replication, many pathogens hijack the cytoskeleton using effector proteins introduced into the host cytosol by specialized secretion systems. A subset of effectors contains eukaryotic-like motifs that mimic host proteins to exploit signaling and modify specific cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. Cytoskeletal rearrangement promotes numerous events that are beneficial to the pathogen, including internalization of bacteria, subversion of cell intrinsic immunity, structural support for bacteria-containing vacuoles, altered vesicular trafficking, actin-dependent bacterial movement, and pathogen dissemination. This review highlights a diverse group of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that manipulate the host cytoskeleton to thrive within eukaryotic cells and discusses underlying molecular mechanisms that promote these dynamic host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Avian host-selection by Culex pipiens in experimental trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Simpson

    Full Text Available Evidence from field studies suggests that Culex pipiens, the primary mosquito vector of West Nile virus (WNV in the northeastern and north central United States, feeds preferentially on American robins (Turdus migratorius. To determine the contribution of innate preferences to observed preference patterns in the field, we conducted host preference trials with a known number of adult female C. pipiens in outdoor cages comparing the relative attractiveness of American robins with two common sympatric bird species, European starling, Sternus vulgaris and house sparrow, Passer domesticus. Host seeking C. pipiens were three times more likely to enter robin-baited traps when with the alternate host was a European starling (n = 4 trials; OR = 3.06; CI [1.42-6.46] and almost twice more likely when the alternative was a house sparrow (n = 8 trials; OR = 1.80; CI = [1.22-2.90]. There was no difference in the probability of trap entry when two robins were offered (n = 8 trials. Logistic regression analysis determined that the age, sex and weight of the birds, the date of the trial, starting-time, temperature, humidity, wind-speed and age of the mosquitoes had no effect on the probability of a choosing a robin over an alternate bird. Findings indicate that preferential feeding by C. pipiens mosquitoes on certain avian hosts is likely to be inherent, and we discuss the implications innate host preferences may have on enzootic WNV transmission.

  17. Bystander Host Cell Killing Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Shrestha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE binds to claudin receptors, e.g., claudin-4, and then forms a pore that triggers cell death. Pure cultures of host cells that do not express claudin receptors, e.g., fibroblasts, are unaffected by pathophysiologically relevant CPE concentrations in vitro. However, both CPE-insensitive and CPE-sensitive host cells are present in vivo. Therefore, this study tested whether CPE treatment might affect fibroblasts when cocultured with CPE-sensitive claudin-4 fibroblast transfectants or Caco-2 cells. Under these conditions, immunofluorescence microscopy detected increased death of fibroblasts. This cytotoxic effect involved release of a toxic factor from the dying CPE-sensitive cells, since it could be reproduced using culture supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells, particularly Caco-2 cells, were found to contain high levels of membrane vesicles, often containing a CPE species. However, most cytotoxic activity remained in those supernatants even after membrane vesicle depletion, and CPE was not detected in fibroblasts treated with supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells. Instead, characterization studies suggest that a major cytotoxic factor present in supernatants from CPE-treated sensitive cells may be a 10- to 30-kDa host serine protease or require the action of that host serine protease. Induction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis was found to be important for triggering release of the cytotoxic factor(s from CPE-treated sensitive host cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxic factor(s in these supernatants was shown to induce a caspase-3-mediated killing of fibroblasts. This bystander killing effect due to release of cytotoxic factors from CPE-treated sensitive cells could contribute to CPE-mediated disease.

  18. [How does the apicomplexan parasite Theileria control host cell identity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolier, Justine; Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents, like bacteria or virus, are responsible for a large number of pathologies in mammals. Microbes have developed mechanisms for interacting with host cell pathways and hijacking cellular machinery to change the phenotypic state. In this review, we focus on an interesting apicomplexan parasite called Theileria. Infection by the tick-transmitted T. annulata parasite causes Tropical Theileriosis in North Africa and Asia, and the related T. parva parasite causes East Coast Fever in Sub-Saharan Africa. This parasite is the only eukaryote known to induce the transformation of its mammalian host cells. Indeed, T. annulata and T. parva infect bovine leukocytes leading to transforming phenotypes, which partially mirror human lymphoma pathologies. Theileria infection causes hyperproliferation, invasiveness and escape from apoptosis, presumably through the manipulation of host cellular pathways. Several host-signaling mechanisms have been implicated. Here we describe the mechanisms involved in parasite-induced transformation phenotypes. © Société de Biologie, 2015.

  19. Transcriptome and microRNome of Theileria annulata Host Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rchiad, Zineb

    2016-06-01

    Tropical Theileriosis is a parasitic disease of calves with a profound economic impact caused by Theileria annulata, an apicomplexan parasite of the genus Theileria. Transmitted by Hyalomma ticks, T. annulata infects and transforms bovine lymphocytes and macrophages into a cancer-like phenotype characterized by all six hallmarks of cancer. In the current study we investigate the transcriptional landscape of T. annulata-infected lymphocytes to define genes and miRNAs regulated by host cell transformation using next generation sequencing. We also define genes and miRNAs differentially expressed as a result of the attenuation of a T.annulata-infected macrophage cell line used as a vaccine. By comparing the transcriptional landscape of one attenuated and two transformed cell lines we identify four genes that we propose as key factors in transformation and virulence of the T. annulata host cells. We also identify miR- 126-5p as a key regulator of infected cells proliferation, adhesion, survival and invasiveness. In addition to the host cell trascriptome we studied T. annulata transcriptome and identified the role of ROS and TGF-β2 in controlling parasite gene expression. Moreover, we have used the deep parasite ssRNA-seq data to refine the available T. annulata annotation. Taken together, this study provides the full list of host cell’s genes and miRNAs transcriptionally perturbed after infection with T. annulata and after attenuation and describes genes and miRNAs never identified before as players in this type of host cell transformation. Moreover, this study provides the first database for the transcriptome of T. annulata and its host cells using next generation sequencing.

  20. Insights into Host Cell Modulation and Induction of New Cells by the Corn Smut Ustilago maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amey Redkar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many filamentous fungal pathogens induce drastic modulation of host cells causing abnormal infectious structures such as galls, or tumors that arise as a result of re-programming in the original developmental cell fate of a colonized host cell. Developmental consequences occur predominantly with biotrophic phytopathogens. This suggests that these host structures result as an outcome of efficient defense suppression and intimate fungal–host interaction to suit the pathogen’s needs for completion of its infection cycle. This mini-review mainly summarizes host cell re-programming that occurs in the Ustilago maydis – maize interaction, in which the pathogen deploys cell-type specific effector proteins with varying activities. The fungus senses the physiological status and identity of colonized host cells and re-directs the endogenous developmental program of its host. The disturbance of host cell physiology and cell fate leads to novel cell shapes, increased cell size, and/or the number of host cells. We particularly highlight the strategies of U. maydis to induce physiologically varied host organs to form the characteristic tumors in both vegetative and floral parts of maize.

  1. Insights into Host Cell Modulation and Induction of New Cells by the Corn Smut Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redkar, Amey; Matei, Alexandra; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    Many filamentous fungal pathogens induce drastic modulation of host cells causing abnormal infectious structures such as galls, or tumors that arise as a result of re-programming in the original developmental cell fate of a colonized host cell. Developmental consequences occur predominantly with biotrophic phytopathogens. This suggests that these host structures result as an outcome of efficient defense suppression and intimate fungal–host interaction to suit the pathogen’s needs for completion of its infection cycle. This mini-review mainly summarizes host cell re-programming that occurs in the Ustilago maydis – maize interaction, in which the pathogen deploys cell-type specific effector proteins with varying activities. The fungus senses the physiological status and identity of colonized host cells and re-directs the endogenous developmental program of its host. The disturbance of host cell physiology and cell fate leads to novel cell shapes, increased cell size, and/or the number of host cells. We particularly highlight the strategies of U. maydis to induce physiologically varied host organs to form the characteristic tumors in both vegetative and floral parts of maize. PMID:28611813

  2. Invasion of Host Cells and Tissues by Uropathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Adam J.; Richards, Amanda C.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the mammalian urinary tract uropathogenic bacteria face many challenges, including the shearing flow of urine, numerous antibacterial molecules, the bactericidal effects of phagocytes, and a scarcity of nutrients. These problems may be circumvented in part by the ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and several other uropathogens to invade the epithelial cells that line the urinary tract. By entering host cells, uropathogens can gain access to additional nutrients and protection from both host defenses and antibiotic treatments. Translocation through host cells can facilitate bacterial dissemination within the urinary tract, while the establishment of stable intracellular bacterial populations may create reservoirs for relapsing and chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Here we review the mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by uropathogenic bacteria, with consideration of the defenses that are brought to bear against facultative intracellular pathogens within the urinary tract. The relevance of host cell invasion to the pathogenesis of UTIs in human patients is also assessed, along with some of the emerging treatment options that build upon our growing understanding of the infectious life cycle of UPEC and other uropathogenic bacteria. PMID:28087946

  3. Volatile chemical cues guide host location and host selection by parasitic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin B. Runyon; Mark C. Mescher; Consuelo M. De Moraes

    2006-01-01

    The importance of plant volatiles in mediating interactions between plant species is much debated. Here, we demonstrate that the parasitic plant Cuscuta pentagona (dodder) uses volatile cues for host location. Cuscuta pentagona seedlings exhibit directed growth toward nearby tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum...

  4. Host plant selection and oviposition behaviour of whitefly Bemisia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The feeding and egg laying was significantly higher on S. malagna L. leaves as compare to other two host plants in the open arena. S malagna L. was also preferred when pest was tested in confined cages for free choice probing on capsicum and S. malagna L. There was no significant but a slight difference in survivorship ...

  5. Host cell proteases: critical determinants of coronavirus tropism and pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a large group of enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a wide range of avian and mammalian species, including humans. The emergence of deadly human coronaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have bolstered research in these viral and often zoonotic pathogens. While coronavirus cell and tissue tropism, host range, and pathogenesis are initially controlled by interactions between the spike envelope glycoprotein and host cell receptor, it is becoming increasingly apparent that proteolytic activation of spike by host cell proteases also plays a critical role. Coronavirus spike proteins are the main determinant of entry as they possess both receptor binding and fusion functions. Whereas binding to the host cell receptor is an essential first step in establishing infection, the proteolytic activation step is often critical for the fusion function of spike, as it allows for controlled release of the fusion peptide into target cellular membranes. Coronaviruses have evolved multiple strategies for proteolytic activation of spike, and a large number of host proteases have been shown to proteolytically process the spike protein. These include, but are not limited to, endosomal cathepsins, cell surface transmembrane protease/serine (TMPRSS) proteases, furin, and trypsin. This review focuses on the diversity of strategies coronaviruses have evolved to proteolytically activate their fusion protein during spike protein biosynthesis and the critical entry step of their life cycle, and highlights important findings on how proteolytic activation of coronavirus spike influences tissue and cell tropism, host range and pathogenicity. PMID:25445340

  6. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelina Albornoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion.

  7. The Cell Biology of the Trichosporon-Host Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Oliveira, Cláudio; Rodrigues, Fernando; Gonçalves, Samuel M; Goldman, Gustavo H; Carvalho, Agostinho; Cunha, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Trichosporon are increasingly recognized as causative agents of superficial and invasive fungal disease in humans. Although most species are considered commensals of the human skin and gastrointestinal tract, these basidiomycetes are an increasing cause of fungal disease among immunocompromised hosts, such as hematological patients and solid organ transplant recipients. The initiation of commensal or pathogenic programs by Trichosporon spp. involves the adaptation to the host microenvironment and its immune system. However, the exact virulence factors activated upon the transition to a pathogenic lifestyle, including the intricate biology of the cell wall, and how these interact with and subvert the host immune responses remain largely unknown. Here, we revisit our current understanding of the virulence attributes of Trichosporon spp., particularly T. asahii, and their interaction with the host immune system, and accommodate this knowledge within novel perspectives on fungal diagnostics and therapeutics.

  8. Lipid exchange between Borrelia burgdorferi and host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson T Crowley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, has cholesterol and cholesterol-glycolipids that are essential for bacterial fitness, are antigenic, and could be important in mediating interactions with cells of the eukaryotic host. We show that the spirochetes can acquire cholesterol from plasma membranes of epithelial cells. In addition, through fluorescent and confocal microscopy combined with biochemical approaches, we demonstrated that B. burgdorferi labeled with the fluorescent cholesterol analog BODIPY-cholesterol or (3H-labeled cholesterol transfer both cholesterol and cholesterol-glycolipids to HeLa cells. The transfer occurs through two different mechanisms, by direct contact between the bacteria and eukaryotic cell and/or through release of outer membrane vesicles. Thus, two-way lipid exchange between spirochetes and host cells can occur. This lipid exchange could be an important process that contributes to the pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  9. Generational distribution of a Candida glabrata population: Resilient old cells prevail, while younger cells dominate in the vulnerable host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Bouklas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Similar to other yeasts, the human pathogen Candida glabrata ages when it undergoes asymmetric, finite cell divisions, which determines its replicative lifespan. We sought to investigate if and how aging changes resilience of C. glabrata populations in the host environment. Our data demonstrate that old C. glabrata are more resistant to hydrogen peroxide and neutrophil killing, whereas young cells adhere better to epithelial cell layers. Consequently, virulence of old compared to younger C. glabrata cells is enhanced in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Electron microscopy images of old C. glabrata cells indicate a marked increase in cell wall thickness. Comparison of transcriptomes of old and young C. glabrata cells reveals differential regulation of ergosterol and Hog pathway associated genes as well as adhesion proteins, and suggests that aging is accompanied by remodeling of the fungal cell wall. Biochemical analysis supports this conclusion as older cells exhibit a qualitatively different lipid composition, leading to the observed increased emergence of fluconazole resistance when grown in the presence of fluconazole selection pressure. Older C. glabrata cells accumulate during murine and human infection, which is statistically unlikely without very strong selection. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that neutrophils constitute the predominant selection pressure in vivo. When we altered experimentally the selection pressure by antibody-mediated removal of neutrophils, we observed a significantly younger pathogen population in mice. Mathematical modeling confirmed that differential selection of older cells is sufficient to cause the observed demographic shift in the fungal population. Hence our data support the concept that pathogenesis is affected by the generational age distribution of the infecting C. glabrata population in a host. We conclude that replicative aging constitutes an emerging trait, which is selected by the host and

  10. Galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine lectin: the coordinator of host cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This killing involves the amoebic surface protein referred to as the Gal/GalNAc lectin. The Gal/GalNAc lectin binds galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine allowing the adherence of amoebas to host cells. Involvement of the lectin in the pathogenesis of E. histolytica infection will be reviewed in this paper. The lectin has been ...

  11. Evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans host defense under selection by the bacterial parasite Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penley, McKenna J; Ha, Giang T; Morran, Levi T

    2017-01-01

    Parasites can impose strong selection on hosts. In response, some host populations have adapted via the evolution of defenses that prevent or impede infection by parasites. However, host populations have also evolved life history shifts that maximize host fitness despite infection. Outcrossing and self-fertilization can have contrasting effects on evolutionary trajectories of host populations. While selfing and outcrossing are known to affect the rate at which host populations adapt in response to parasites, these mating systems may also influence the specific traits that underlie adaptation to parasites. Here, we determined the role of evolved host defense versus altered life history,in mixed mating (selfing and outcrossing) and obligately outcrossing C. elegans host populations after experimental evolution with the bacterial parasite, S. marcescens. Similar to previous studies, we found that both mixed mating and obligately outcrossing host populations adapted to S. marcescens exposure, and that the obligately outcrossing populations exhibited the greatest rates of adaptation. Regardless of the host population mating system, exposure to parasites did not significantly alter reproductive timing or total fecundity over the course of experimental evolution. However, both mixed mating and obligately outcrossing host populations exhibited significantly reduced mortality rates in the presence of the parasite after experimental evolution. Therefore, adaptation in both the mixed mating and obligately outcrossing populations was driven, at least in part, by the evolution of increased host defense and not changes in host life history. Thus, the host mating system altered the rate of adaptation, but not the nature of adaptive change in the host populations.

  12. The Contribution of the Airway Epithelial Cell to Host Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Frauke Stanke

    2015-01-01

    In the context of cystic fibrosis, the epithelial cell has been characterized in terms of its ion transport capabilities. The ability of an epithelial cell to initiate CFTR-mediated chloride and bicarbonate transport has been recognized early as a means to regulate the thickness of the epithelial lining fluid and recently as a means to regulate the pH, thereby determining critically whether or not host defense proteins such as mucins are able to fold appropriately. This review describes how t...

  13. Cytoskeletal requirements in Chlamydia trachomatis infection of host cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm, N.; Wyrick, P B

    1995-01-01

    Infection of genital epithelial cells by the closely related sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis serovars E and L2 results in different clinical disease manifestations. Following entry into target host cells, individual vesicles containing chlamydiae fuse with one another to form one large inclusion. At the cellular level, the only obvious difference between these serovars is the time until inclusion maturation, which is 48 h for the invasive serovar L2 and 72 h for serovar E...

  14. Mountain Pine Beetle Host Selection Between Lodgepole and Ponderosa Pines in the Southern Rocky Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel R; Briggs, Jennifer S; Jacobi, William R; Negrón, José F

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence of range expansion and host transition by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins; MPB) has suggested that MPB may not primarily breed in their natal host, but will switch hosts to an alternate tree species. As MPB populations expanded in lodgepole pine forests in the southern Rocky Mountains, we investigated the potential for movement into adjacent ponderosa pine forests. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to evaluate four aspects of MPB population dynamics and host selection behavior in the two hosts: emergence timing, sex ratios, host choice, and reproductive success. We found that peak MPB emergence from both hosts occurred simultaneously between late July and early August, and the sex ratio of emerging beetles did not differ between hosts. In two direct tests of MPB host selection, we identified a strong preference by MPB for ponderosa versus lodgepole pine. At field sites, we captured naturally emerging beetles from both natal hosts in choice arenas containing logs of both species. In the laboratory, we offered sections of bark and phloem from both species to individual insects in bioassays. In both tests, insects infested ponderosa over lodgepole pine at a ratio of almost 2:1, regardless of natal host species. Reproductive success (offspring/female) was similar in colonized logs of both hosts. Overall, our findings suggest that MPB may exhibit equally high rates of infestation and fecundity in an alternate host under favorable conditions. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Importance of Physiologically Relevant Cell Lines for Studying Virus–Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hare

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Viruses interact intimately with the host cell at nearly every stage of replication, and the cell model that is chosen to study virus infection is critically important. Although primary cells reflect the phenotype of healthy cells in vivo better than cell lines, their limited lifespan makes experimental manipulation challenging. However, many tumor-derived and artificially immortalized cell lines have defects in induction of interferon-stimulated genes and other antiviral defenses. These defects can affect virus replication, especially when cells are infected at lower, more physiologically relevant, multiplicities of infection. Understanding the selective pressures and mechanisms underlying the loss of innate signaling pathways is helpful to choose immortalized cell lines without impaired antiviral defense. We describe the trials and tribulations we encountered while searching for an immortalized cell line with intact innate signaling, and how directed immortalization of primary cells avoids many of the pitfalls of spontaneous immortalization.

  16. Necroptosis: The Trojan horse in cell autonomous antiviral host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocarski, Edward S; Guo, Hongyan; Kaiser, William J

    2015-05-01

    Herpesviruses suppress cell death to assure sustained infection in their natural hosts. Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) encodes suppressors of apoptosis as well as M45-encoded viral inhibitor of RIP activation (vIRA) to block RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM)-signaling and recruitment of RIP3 (also called RIPK3), to prevent necroptosis. MCMV and human cytomegalovirus encode a viral inhibitor of caspase (Casp)8 activation to block apoptosis, an activity that unleashes necroptosis. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)1 and HSV2 incorporate both RHIM and Casp8 suppression strategies within UL39-encoded ICP6 and ICP10, respectively, which are herpesvirus-conserved homologs of MCMV M45. Both HSV proteins sensitize human cells to necroptosis by blocking Casp8 activity while preventing RHIM-dependent RIP3 activation and death. In mouse cells, HSV1 ICP6 interacts with RIP3 and, surprisingly, drives necroptosis. Thus, herpesviruses have illuminated the contribution of necoptosis to host defense in the natural host as well as its potential to restrict cross-species infections in nonnatural hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Host T cells affect donor T cell engraftment and graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Nancy M; Hakim, Frances; Steinberg, Seth M; Krumlauf, Michael; Cvitkovic, Romana; Babb, Rebecca; Odom, Jeanne; Fowler, Daniel H; Gress, Ronald E; Bishop, Michael R

    2007-09-01

    Mixed chimerism in the T cell compartment (MCT) after reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) may influence immune repopulation with alloreactive donor T cells. We examined effects of host T cell numbers on donor T cell engraftment and recovery and on acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) in a relatively homogeneous patient population with respect to residual host T cells through quantified immune depletion prior to RIST and to donor T cells by setting the allograft T cell dose of 1x10(5) CD3+ cells/kg. In this setting, 2 patterns of early donor T cell engraftment could be distinguished by day +42: (1) early and complete donor chimerism in the T cell compartment (FDCT) and (2) persistent MCT. FDCT was associated with lower residual host CD8+ T cell counts prior to transplant and aGVHD. With persistent MCT, subsequent development of aGVHD could be predicted by the direction of change in T cell donor chimerism after donor lymphocyte infusion, and no aGVHD occurred until FDCT was established. MCT did not affect recovery of donor T cell counts. These observations suggest that the relative number and alloreactivity of donor and host T cells are more important than the absolute allograft T cell dose in determining donor engraftment and aGVHD after RIST.

  18. Comparative genome scan detects host-related divergent selection in the grasshopper Hesperotettix viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, Jennifer L; Grace, Tony; Joern, Anthony; St Amand, Paul; Wisely, Samantha M

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we used a comparative genome scan to examine patterns of population differentiation with respect to host plant use in Hesperotettix viridis, a Nearctic oligophagous grasshopper locally specialized on various Asteraceae including Solidago, Gutierrezia, and Ericameria. We identified amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci with significantly elevated F(ST) (outlier loci) in multiple different-host and same-host comparisons of populations while controlling for geographic distance. By comparing the number and identities of outlier loci in different-host vs. same-host comparisons, we found evidence of host plant-related divergent selection for some population comparisons (Solidago- vs. Gutierrezia-feeders), while other comparisons (Ericameria- vs. Gutierrezia-feeders) failed to demonstrate a strong role for host association in population differentiation. In comparisons of Solidago- vs. Gutierrezia-feeding populations, a relatively high number of outlier loci observed repeatedly in different-host comparisons (35% of all outliers and 2.7% of all 625 AFLP loci) indicated a significant role for host-related selection in contributing to overall genomic differentiation in this grasshopper. Mitochondrial DNA sequence data revealed a star-shaped phylogeny with no host- or geography-related structure, low nucleotide diversity, and high haplotype diversity, suggesting a recent population expansion. mtDNA data do not suggest a long period of isolation in separate glacial refugia but are instead more compatible with a single glacial refugium and more recent divergence in host use. Our study adds to research documenting heterogeneity in differentiation across the genome as a consequence of divergent natural selection, a phenomenon that may occur as part of the process of ecological speciation. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Relationships between host and symbiont cell cycles in sea anemones and their symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, James L; Pineda, Rea R; Ramos-Ascherl, Zullaylee; Bingham, Brian L

    2013-10-01

    The processes by which cnidarians and their algal endosymbionts achieve balanced growth and biomass could include coordination of host and symbiont cell cycles. We evaluated this theory with natural populations of sea anemones hosting symbiotic dinoflagellates, focusing on the temperate sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima symbiotic with Symbiodinium muscatinei in Washington State, USA, and the tropical anemone Stichodactyla helianthus associating with unknown Symbiodinium spp. in Belize. By extruding symbiont-containing gastrodermal cells from the relatively large tentacles of these species and using nuclear staining and flow cytometry, we selectively analyzed cell cycle distributions of the symbionts and the host gastrodermal cells that house them. We found no indications of diel synchrony in host and symbiont G2/M phases, and we observed evidence of diel periodicity only in Symbiodinium spp. associated with S. helianthus but not in the anemone itself. Seasonally, S. muscatinei showed considerable G2/M phase variability among samples collected quarterly over an annual period, while the G2/M phase of its host varied much less. Within samples taken at different times of the year, correlations between host and symbiont G2/M phases ranged from very weakly to very strongly positive, with significant correlations in only half of the samples (two of four A. elegantissima samples and one of two S. helianthus samples). Overall, the G2/M phase relationships across species and sampling periods were positive. Thus, while we found no evidence of close cell cycle coupling, our results suggest a loose, positive relationship between cell cycle processes of the symbiotic partners.

  20. Selection for increased spore efficacy by host genetic background in a wheat powdery mildew population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaréal, L M; Lannou, C

    2000-12-01

    ABSTRACT A field experiment was designed to test the hypothesis of for increased reproductive ability on different host genetic backgrounds within a wheat powdery mildew population. Studies have suggested that, in host mixtures, such selection could increase the reproduction rate of simple patho-types that always develop on the same host genetic background, whereas complex pathotypes should not be affected because they infect different host genotypes. In our experiment, the Erysiphe graminis population reproduced for successive generations on cvs. Orkis and Etecho, either grown as pure stands or in a mixture. In an additional treatment, the host cultivar changed after each generation. Isolates were sampled in April and, after seven pathogen generations, in July. At the second sampling date and for pure stands only, mean spore efficacy was greater on the host from which isolates were sampled than on the other one. This was attributed to selection within the pathogen population for better spore efficacy on the host genetic background. This selection was independent of the virulence genes carried by the isolates. The possibility of a phenotypic plasticity effect was tested and rejected.

  1. Centrality of host cell death in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Martin B; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for proper growth, development, and cellular homeostasis in all eukaryotes. The regulation of PCD is of central importance in plant-microbe interactions; notably, PCD and features associated with PCD are observed in many host resistance responses. Conversely, pathogen induction of inappropriate cell death in the host results in a susceptible phenotype and disease. Thus, the party in control of PCD has a distinct advantage in these battles. PCD processes appear to be of ancient origin, as indicated by the fact that many features of cell death strategy are conserved between animals and plants; however, some of the details of death execution differ. Mammalian core PCD genes, such as caspases, are not present in plant genomes. Similarly, pro- and antiapoptotic mammalian regulatory elements are absent in plants, but, remarkably, when expressed in plants, successfully impact plant PCD. Thus, subtle structural similarities independent of sequence homology appear to sustain operational equivalence. The vacuole is emerging as a key organelle in the modulation of plant PCD. Under different signals for cell death, the vacuole either fuses with the plasmalemma membrane or disintegrates. Moreover, the vacuole appears to play a key role in autophagy; evidence suggests a prosurvival function for autophagy, but other studies propose a prodeath phenotype. Here, we describe and discuss what we know and what we do not know about various PCD pathways and how the host integrates signals to activate salicylic acid and reactive oxygen pathways that orchestrate cell death. We suggest that it is not cell death as such but rather the processes leading to cell death that contribute to the outcome of a given plant-pathogen interaction.

  2. Signalome-wide assessment of host cell response to hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Wu, Jianmin; Simpson, Kaylene J; Daly, Roger J; Netter, Hans J; Baumert, Thomas F; Doerig, Christian

    2017-05-08

    Host cell signalling during infection with intracellular pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we report on the use of antibody microarray technology to detect variations in the expression levels and phosphorylation status of host cell signalling proteins during hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Following transfection with HCV RNA, the JNK and NF-κB pathways are suppressed, while the JAK/STAT5 pathway is activated; furthermore, components of the apoptosis and cell cycle control machineries are affected in the expression and/or phosphorylation status. RNAi-based hit validation identifies components of the JAK/STAT, NF-κB, MAPK and calcium-induced pathways as modulators of HCV replication. Selective chemical inhibition of one of the identified targets, the JNK activator kinase MAP4K2, does impair HCV replication. Thus this study provides a comprehensive picture of host cell pathway mobilization by HCV and uncovers potential therapeutic targets. The strategy of identifying targets for anti-infective intervention within the host cell signalome can be applied to any intracellular pathogen.

  3. Signalome-wide assessment of host cell response to hepatitis C virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Wu, Jianmin; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Daly, Roger J.; Netter, Hans J.; Baumert, Thomas F.; Doerig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Host cell signalling during infection with intracellular pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we report on the use of antibody microarray technology to detect variations in the expression levels and phosphorylation status of host cell signalling proteins during hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Following transfection with HCV RNA, the JNK and NF-κB pathways are suppressed, while the JAK/STAT5 pathway is activated; furthermore, components of the apoptosis and cell cycle control machineries are affected in the expression and/or phosphorylation status. RNAi-based hit validation identifies components of the JAK/STAT, NF-κB, MAPK and calcium-induced pathways as modulators of HCV replication. Selective chemical inhibition of one of the identified targets, the JNK activator kinase MAP4K2, does impair HCV replication. Thus this study provides a comprehensive picture of host cell pathway mobilization by HCV and uncovers potential therapeutic targets. The strategy of identifying targets for anti-infective intervention within the host cell signalome can be applied to any intracellular pathogen. PMID:28480889

  4. [Molecular mechanism of ORFV intervention strategies based on the UPS of host cell: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong-Zhong; Tong, Chun-Yu; Song, Bai-Fen; An, Hong-Boi; Yu, Li-Yun; Yu, Li; Cui, Yu-Dong

    2013-11-01

    In order to compete the antiviral effects of the host cell in the process of infection, ORFV(known as Orf virus) relies on a series of functional genes developed through long-term population evolution, such as interferon resistance genes, Bcl-2 protein genes and cell cycle inhibitor gene and so on, with these weapons this virus is able to effectively counteract immune clearance and immune regulation from a host cell. Concurrently, ORFV also focuses on exploiting signal transduction pathways of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS), circumvents the intracellular signal transduction and CD8+ T activation, for shielding virus particles towards maturation and releasing outside. This review introduced inner link between the UPS of host cell and intervention mechanism by virus, and analyzed the key roles of certains components in UPS, these all together showed the evolution tendency of ORFV that was involved in the designing of inhibition to immune response and for intracellular immune escape upon the selection pressure in host cell infected.

  5. Counteracting selective regimes and host preference evolution in ecotypes of two species of walking-sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, C P; Nosil, P

    2005-11-01

    The evolution of ecological specialization has been a central topic in ecology because specialized adaptations to divergent environments can result in reproductive isolation and facilitate speciation. However, the order in which different aspects of habitat adaptation and habitat preference evolve is unclear. Timema walking-stick insects feed and mate on the host plants on which they rest. Previous studies of T. cristinae ecotypes have documented divergent, host-specific selection from visual predators and the evolution of divergent host and mate preferences between populations using different host-plant species (Ceanothus or Adenostoma). Here we present new data that show that T. podura, a nonsister species of T. cristinae, has also formed ecotypes on these host genera and that in both species these ecotypes exhibit adaptive divergence in color-pattern and host preference. Color-pattern morphs exhibit survival trade-offs on different hosts due to differential predation. In contrast, fecundity trade-offs on different hosts do not occur in either species. Thus, host preference in both species has evolved before divergent physiological adaptation but in concert with morphological adaptations. Our results shed light onto which traits are involved in the initial stages of ecological specialization and ecologically based reproductive isolation.

  6. Necroptosis: The Trojan Horse in Cell Autonomous Antiviral Host Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Mocarski, Edward S.; Guo, Hongyan; Kaiser, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses suppress cell death to assure sustained infection in their natural hosts. Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) encodes suppressors of apoptosis as well as M45-encoded viral inhibitor of RIP activation (vIRA) to block RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM)-signaling and recruitment of RIP3 (also called RIPK3), to prevent necroptosis. MCMV and human cytomegalovirus encode a viral inhibitor of caspase (Casp)8 activation to blocks apoptosis, an activity that unleashes necroptosis. Herpes s...

  7. Neonates know better than their mothers when selecting a host plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soler, R.; Pineda, A.; Li, Y.; Ponzio, C.A.M.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Weldegergis, B.T.; Dicke, M.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary ecological theory predicts that among insect herbivores ‘mothers know best’ when selecting a plant to deposit their eggs. Host-plant selection is usually studied for the adult stage exclusively, although mothers have not always been reported to know best. Here, we investigate the

  8. Virulence factors and strategies of Leptopilina spp.: selective responses in Drosophila hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark J; Kalamarz, Marta E; Paddibhatla, Indira; Small, Chiyedza; Rajwani, Roma; Govind, Shubha

    2009-01-01

    To ensure survival, parasitic wasps of Drosophila have evolved strategies to optimize host development to their advantage. They also produce virulence factors that allow them to overcome or evade host defense. Wasp infection provokes cellular and humoral defense reactions, resulting in alteration in gene expression of the host. The activation of these reactions is controlled by conserved mechanisms shared by other invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Application of genomics and bioinformatics approaches is beginning to reveal comparative host gene expression changes after infection by different parasitic wasps. We analyze this comparison in the context of host physiology and immune cells, as well as the biology of the venom factors that wasps introduce into their hosts during oviposition. We compare virulence strategies of Leptopilina boulardi and L. heterotoma, in relation to genome-wide changes in gene expression in the fly hosts after infection. This analysis highlights fundamental differences in the changes that the host undergoes in its immune and general physiology in response to the two parasitic wasps. Such a comparative approach has the potential of revealing mechanisms governing the evolution of pathogenicity and how it impacts host range.

  9. Bacteria modulate the CD8+ T cell epitope repertoire of host cytosol-exposed proteins to manipulate the host immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Maman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The main adaptive immune response to bacteria is mediated by B cells and CD4+ T-cells. However, some bacterial proteins reach the cytosol of host cells and are exposed to the host CD8+ T-cells response. Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria can translocate proteins to the cytosol through type III and IV secretion and ESX-1 systems, respectively. The translocated proteins are often essential for the bacterium survival. Once injected, these proteins can be degraded and presented on MHC-I molecules to CD8+ T-cells. The CD8+ T-cells, in turn, can induce cell death and destroy the bacteria's habitat. In viruses, escape mutations arise to avoid this detection. The accumulation of escape mutations in bacteria has never been systematically studied. We show for the first time that such mutations are systematically present in most bacteria tested. We combine multiple bioinformatic algorithms to compute CD8+ T-cell epitope libraries of bacteria with secretion systems that translocate proteins to the host cytosol. In all bacteria tested, proteins not translocated to the cytosol show no escape mutations in their CD8+ T-cell epitopes. However, proteins translocated to the cytosol show clear escape mutations and have low epitope densities for most tested HLA alleles. The low epitope densities suggest that bacteria, like viruses, are evolutionarily selected to ensure their survival in the presence of CD8+ T-cells. In contrast with most other translocated proteins examined, Pseudomonas aeruginosa's ExoU, which ultimately induces host cell death, was found to have high epitope density. This finding suggests a novel mechanism for the manipulation of CD8+ T-cells by pathogens. The ExoU effector may have evolved to maintain high epitope density enabling it to efficiently induce CD8+ T-cell mediated cell death. These results were tested using multiple epitope prediction algorithms, and were found to be consistent for most proteins tested.

  10. Differential proteome analysis of chikungunya virus infection on host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Li-Ping Thio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused multiple unprecedented and re-emerging outbreaks in both tropical and temperate countries. Despite ongoing research efforts, the underlying factors involved in facilitating CHIKV replication during early infection remains ill-characterized. The present study serves to identify host proteins modulated in response to early CHIKV infection using a proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The whole cell proteome profiles of CHIKV-infected and mock control WRL-68 cells were compared and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE. Fifty-three spots were found to be differentially modulated and 50 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Eight were significantly up-regulated and 42 were down-regulated. The mRNA expressions of 15 genes were also found to correlate with the corresponding protein expression. STRING network analysis identified several biological processes to be affected, including mRNA processing, translation, energy production and cellular metabolism, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP and cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a first attempt to investigate alteration of the host cellular proteome during early CHIKV infection. Our proteomics data showed that during early infection, CHIKV affected the expression of proteins that are involved in mRNA processing, host metabolic machinery, UPP, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 regulation (in favour of virus survival, replication and transmission. While results from this study complement the proteomics results obtained from previous late host response studies, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles during early CHIKV infection in humans.

  11. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  12. The Contribution of the Airway Epithelial Cell to Host Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    In the context of cystic fibrosis, the epithelial cell has been characterized in terms of its ion transport capabilities. The ability of an epithelial cell to initiate CFTR-mediated chloride and bicarbonate transport has been recognized early as a means to regulate the thickness of the epithelial lining fluid and recently as a means to regulate the pH, thereby determining critically whether or not host defense proteins such as mucins are able to fold appropriately. This review describes how the epithelial cell senses the presence of pathogens and inflammatory conditions, which, in turn, facilitates the activation of CFTR and thus directly promotes pathogens clearance and innate immune defense on the surface of the epithelial cell. This paper summarizes functional data that describes the effect of cytokines, chemokines, infectious agents, and inflammatory conditions on the ion transport properties of the epithelial cell and relates these key properties to the molecular pathology of cystic fibrosis. Recent findings on the role of cystic fibrosis modifier genes that underscore the role of the epithelial ion transport in host defense and inflammation are discussed.

  13. The Contribution of the Airway Epithelial Cell to Host Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Stanke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of cystic fibrosis, the epithelial cell has been characterized in terms of its ion transport capabilities. The ability of an epithelial cell to initiate CFTR-mediated chloride and bicarbonate transport has been recognized early as a means to regulate the thickness of the epithelial lining fluid and recently as a means to regulate the pH, thereby determining critically whether or not host defense proteins such as mucins are able to fold appropriately. This review describes how the epithelial cell senses the presence of pathogens and inflammatory conditions, which, in turn, facilitates the activation of CFTR and thus directly promotes pathogens clearance and innate immune defense on the surface of the epithelial cell. This paper summarizes functional data that describes the effect of cytokines, chemokines, infectious agents, and inflammatory conditions on the ion transport properties of the epithelial cell and relates these key properties to the molecular pathology of cystic fibrosis. Recent findings on the role of cystic fibrosis modifier genes that underscore the role of the epithelial ion transport in host defense and inflammation are discussed.

  14. Optimizing eukaryotic cell hosts for protein production through systems biotechnology and genome-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jahir M; Lewis, Nathan E

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic cell lines, including Chinese hamster ovary cells, yeast, and insect cells, are invaluable hosts for the production of many recombinant proteins. With the advent of genomic resources, one can now leverage genome-scale computational modeling of cellular pathways to rationally engineer eukaryotic host cells. Genome-scale models of metabolism include all known biochemical reactions occurring in a specific cell. By describing these mathematically and using tools such as flux balance analysis, the models can simulate cell physiology and provide targets for cell engineering that could lead to enhanced cell viability, titer, and productivity. Here we review examples in which metabolic models in eukaryotic cell cultures have been used to rationally select targets for genetic modification, improve cellular metabolic capabilities, design media supplementation, and interpret high-throughput omics data. As more comprehensive models of metabolism and other cellular processes are developed for eukaryotic cell culture, these will enable further exciting developments in cell line engineering, thus accelerating recombinant protein production and biotechnology in the years to come. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Ticks Collected from Selected Mammalian Hosts Surveyed in the Republic of Korea During 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    selected acaricides of ticks collected from domestic livestock ( cows ) from 35 cities and counties and 6 provinces from 1982 to 1984. Species col- lected...medium, provided the original work is properly cited. In the Republic of Korea (ROK), mammals and their associ- ated ticks are hosts to a number of... tick - borne encephalitis virus [6-8]. Humans are incidental hosts as a result of outdoor activities, i.e., agriculture, construction, main- tenance

  16. Measurement and control of host cell proteins (HCPs) in CHO cell bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogwood, Catherine E M; Bracewell, Daniel G; Smales, C Mark

    2014-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used for the production of biotherapeutic recombinant proteins for a range of molecules including monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins. Regulatory requirements for the final product include the removal of host cell proteins (HCPs) to acceptable amounts (<100ppm). Recent research has begun to unravel the extent to which upstream process conditions and subsequent product recovery and purification processes impact upon the HCP profile. A number of upstream parameters, including the selection of the cell line, the culturing process (e.g. feeding regime, culture temperature), cell viability at time of harvest/culture duration and cell shear sensitivity can all influence the resulting HCP profile. Further, the molecule itself plays an important role in determining those HCPs that are retained throughout a bioprocess and HCPs can co-elute with the target product during purification. Measurement and monitoring of HCPs is usually undertaken using ELISA technology, however alternative approaches are also now emerging that complement ELISA and allow the detection, identification and monitoring of specific HCPs. Here we discuss our understanding of how the process itself influences those HCPs present throughout the production process and the challenges in their monitoring, measurement and removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ureaplasma parvum infection alters filamin a dynamics in host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Mary B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ureaplasmas are among the most common bacteria isolated from the human urogenital tract. Ureaplasmas can produce asymptomatic infections or disease characterized by an exaggerated inflammatory response. Most investigations have focused on elucidating the pathogenic potential of Ureaplasma species, but little attention has been paid to understanding the mechanisms by which these organisms are capable of establishing asymptomatic infection. Methods We employed differential proteome profiling of bladder tissues from rats experimentally infected with U. parvum in order to identify host cell processes perturbed by colonization with the microbe. Tissues were grouped into four categories: sham inoculated controls, animals that spontaneously cleared infection, asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI, and complicated UTI. One protein that was perturbed by infection (filamin A was used to further elucidate the mechanism of U. parvum-induced disruption in human benign prostate cells (BPH-1. BPH-1 cells were evaluated by confocal microscopy, immunoblotting and ELISA. Results Bladder tissue from animals actively colonized with U. parvum displayed significant alterations in actin binding proteins (profilin 1, vinculin, α actinin, and filamin A that regulate both actin polymerization and cell cytoskeletal function pertaining to focal adhesion formation and signal transduction (Fisher's exact test, P U. parvum perturbed the regulation of filamin A. Specifically, infected BPH-1 cells exhibited a significant increase in filamin A phosphorylated at serine2152 (P ≤ 0.01, which correlated with impaired proteolysis of the protein and its normal intracellular distribution. Conclusion Filamin A dynamics were perturbed in both models of infection. Phosphorylation of filamin A occurs in response to various cell signaling cascades that regulate cell motility, differentiation, apoptosis and inflammation. Thus, this phenomenon may be a useful

  18. Aphid Parasitoid Mothers Don't Always Know Best through the Whole Host Selection Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Quentin; Ameline, Arnaud; Doury, Géraldine; Le Roux, Vincent; Couty, Aude

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid host selection behaviour has been extensively studied in experimentally simplified tritrophic systems formed by one single food chain (one plant, one herbivore and one parasitoid species). The "Mother knows best" hypothesis predicts that the preference for a plant-host complex should be positively correlated with plant quality for offspring performance. We studied the host selection behaviour of the generalist endoparasitoid Aphidius matricariae towards the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in the intercrop system including Vicia faba as a focal plant and its companion plant Camelina sativa. Dual-choice laboratory bioassays revealed that parasitoid females preferred to orientate towards (1) the plant-aphid complex over the non-infested plant whatever the complex (2) the C. sativa-A. fabae complex over the V. faba-A. fabae complex. In dual choice attack rate bioassays, parasitoid females showed more interest towards the aphids on C. sativa but paradoxically chose to oviposit more in aphids on V. faba. Ultimately, parasitoids that had developed on the V. faba-A. fabae complex exhibited better fitness parameters. By demonstrating that parasitoid females were able to discriminate the aphid host that offered the highest fitness to their offspring but selected beforehand the least suitable plant-aphid complex, we provide key insight into the disruption in their host selection behaviour potentially triggered by diverse habitats. This suggests that the "Mother knows best" hypothesis could be thwarted by increasing the complexity of the studied systems. PMID:26270046

  19. Aphid Parasitoid Mothers Don't Always Know Best through the Whole Host Selection Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Chesnais

    Full Text Available Parasitoid host selection behaviour has been extensively studied in experimentally simplified tritrophic systems formed by one single food chain (one plant, one herbivore and one parasitoid species. The "Mother knows best" hypothesis predicts that the preference for a plant-host complex should be positively correlated with plant quality for offspring performance. We studied the host selection behaviour of the generalist endoparasitoid Aphidius matricariae towards the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in the intercrop system including Vicia faba as a focal plant and its companion plant Camelina sativa. Dual-choice laboratory bioassays revealed that parasitoid females preferred to orientate towards (1 the plant-aphid complex over the non-infested plant whatever the complex (2 the C. sativa-A. fabae complex over the V. faba-A. fabae complex. In dual choice attack rate bioassays, parasitoid females showed more interest towards the aphids on C. sativa but paradoxically chose to oviposit more in aphids on V. faba. Ultimately, parasitoids that had developed on the V. faba-A. fabae complex exhibited better fitness parameters. By demonstrating that parasitoid females were able to discriminate the aphid host that offered the highest fitness to their offspring but selected beforehand the least suitable plant-aphid complex, we provide key insight into the disruption in their host selection behaviour potentially triggered by diverse habitats. This suggests that the "Mother knows best" hypothesis could be thwarted by increasing the complexity of the studied systems.

  20. Aphid Parasitoid Mothers Don't Always Know Best through the Whole Host Selection Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Quentin; Ameline, Arnaud; Doury, Géraldine; Le Roux, Vincent; Couty, Aude

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid host selection behaviour has been extensively studied in experimentally simplified tritrophic systems formed by one single food chain (one plant, one herbivore and one parasitoid species). The "Mother knows best" hypothesis predicts that the preference for a plant-host complex should be positively correlated with plant quality for offspring performance. We studied the host selection behaviour of the generalist endoparasitoid Aphidius matricariae towards the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in the intercrop system including Vicia faba as a focal plant and its companion plant Camelina sativa. Dual-choice laboratory bioassays revealed that parasitoid females preferred to orientate towards (1) the plant-aphid complex over the non-infested plant whatever the complex (2) the C. sativa-A. fabae complex over the V. faba-A. fabae complex. In dual choice attack rate bioassays, parasitoid females showed more interest towards the aphids on C. sativa but paradoxically chose to oviposit more in aphids on V. faba. Ultimately, parasitoids that had developed on the V. faba-A. fabae complex exhibited better fitness parameters. By demonstrating that parasitoid females were able to discriminate the aphid host that offered the highest fitness to their offspring but selected beforehand the least suitable plant-aphid complex, we provide key insight into the disruption in their host selection behaviour potentially triggered by diverse habitats. This suggests that the "Mother knows best" hypothesis could be thwarted by increasing the complexity of the studied systems.

  1. Divergent co-transcriptomes of different host cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii reveal cell type-specific host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierzy, Izabela J; Händel, Ulrike; Kaever, Alexander; Jarek, Michael; Scharfe, Maren; Schlüter, Dirk; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2017-08-03

    The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii infects various cell types in avian and mammalian hosts including humans. Infection of immunocompetent hosts is mostly asymptomatic or benign, but leads to development of largely dormant bradyzoites that persist predominantly within neurons and muscle cells. Here we have analyzed the impact of the host cell type on the co-transcriptomes of host and parasite using high-throughput RNA sequencing. Murine cortical neurons and astrocytes, skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) and fibroblasts differed by more than 16,200 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) before and after infection with T. gondii. However, only a few hundred of them were regulated by infection and these largely diverged in neurons, SkMCs, astrocytes and fibroblasts indicating host cell type-specific transcriptional responses after infection. The heterogeneous transcriptomes of host cells before and during infection coincided with ~5,400 DEGs in T. gondii residing in different cell types. Finally, we identified gene clusters in both T. gondii and its host, which correlated with the predominant parasite persistence in neurons or SkMCs as compared to astrocytes or fibroblasts. Thus, heterogeneous expression profiles of different host cell types and the parasites' ability to adapting to them may govern the parasite-host cell interaction during toxoplasmosis.

  2. Differences between selection on sex versus recombination in red queen models with diploid hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Aneil F

    2009-08-01

    The Red Queen hypothesis argues that parasites generate selection for genetic mixing (sex and recombination) in their hosts. A number of recent papers have examined this hypothesis using models with haploid hosts. In these haploid models, sex and recombination are selectively equivalent. However, sex and recombination are not equivalent in diploids because selection on sex depends on the consequences of segregation as well as recombination. Here I compare how parasites select on modifiers of sexual reproduction and modifiers of recombination rate. Across a wide set of parameters, parasites tend to select against both sex and recombination, though recombination is favored more often than is sex. There is little correspondence between the conditions favoring sex and those favoring recombination, indicating that the direction of selection on sex is often determined by the effects of segregation, not recombination. Moreover, when sex was favored it is usually due to a long-term advantage whereas short-term effects are often responsible for selection favoring recombination. These results strongly indicate that Red Queen models focusing exclusively on the effects of recombination cannot be used to infer the type of selection on sex that is generated by parasites on diploid hosts.

  3. γδ T cells in homeostasis and host defence of epithelial barrier tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten M.; Witherden, Deborah A.; Havran, Wendy L.

    2017-01-01

    homeostasis and repair. In this Review, we focus on the intraepithelial γδ T cell compartment of the two largest epithelial tissues in the body — namely, the epidermis and the intestine — and provide a comprehensive overview of the crucial contributions of intraepithelial γδ T cells to tissue integrity...... and repair, host homeostasis and protection in the context of the symbiotic relationship with the microbiome and during pathogen clearance. Finally, we describe epithelium-specific butyrophilin-like molecules and briefly review their emerging role in selectively shaping and regulating epidermal...

  4. [Geographical distribution and host selection of Leptotrombidium rubellum in some parts of Yunnan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ming-lu; Guo, Xian-guo; Guo, Bin

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the geographical distribution and host selection of Leptotrombidium rubellum among different small mammal hosts in some areas of Yunnan province, China. Field survey was carried out in 23 counties of Yunnan province between 2001 and 2011. Small mammal hosts were captured with mouse cages and traps with baits. Chigger mites on the surface of two auricles were scraped off by a bistoury, and then preserved in 70% ethanol. Every specimen of the chigger mites on the slides was finally identified into species under a microscope. Some conventional statistical methods were adopted to calculate all the collected chigger mite species and the constituent ratios of L. rubellum in different areas and on different hosts, with prevalence (P), mean intensity (MI) and mean abundance (MA) on different hosts calculated. Linear regression was used to analyze the relationship among P, MI and MA. Patch index (m*/m) was used to measure the spatial patterns of L. rubellum among different individuals of related small mammal hosts. A total of 108 480 chigger mites were collected from the body surface of all the captured small mammal hosts. All the collected chigger mites were identified as 3 subfamilies, 24 genera and 234 species. Of the 234 species of chigger mites, 654 individuals of L. rubellum were collected, only in 4 counties. The collected individuals of L. rubellum accounted for 0.603% of the total mites (108 480 individuals). 96.637% of L. rubellum came from flatland areas and habitats while only 3.363% of the L. rubellum were from the mountainous regions. The orderings of the hosts appeared as Rodentia and Insectivora harbored 96.296% and 2.469% respectively, of the collected while Lagomorpha and other orders there was no L. rubellum found. Of 67 species (in 34 genera and 12 families of 5 orders), Rattus tanezumi (in genus Rattus and family Muridae of Rodentia) harbored 96.788% of the collected L. rubellum with relatively low prevalence (P = 3.776%) or mean

  5. Host selection and feeding preference of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on ash (Fraxinus spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Therese M. Poland

    2009-01-01

    We studied the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A. planipennis is an exotic forest insect pest native to Asia that was discovered in North America in 2002 and is causing widespread mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp...

  6. Chemical ecology of bark beetles in regard to search and selection of host trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), especially pests in the genera Dendroctonus, Ips, Scolytus, Trypodendron, Tomicus, and Pityogenes of the Northern hemisphere are reviewed regarding aspects of their chemical ecology during host finding and selection. Most of the species covered here feed on con...

  7. Chemical ecology of host-plant selection by herbivorous arthropods : a multitrophic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, M.

    2000-01-01

    Most herbivorous arthropods are specialists that feed on one or a few related plant species. To understand why this is so, both mechanistic and functional studies have been carried out, predominantly restricted to bitrophic aspects. Host-selection behaviour of herbivorous arthropods has been

  8. [Cell-host-parasite interactions: biodiversity, pathogenesis, environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, I; Aubert, D; Pinon, J-M

    2006-03-01

    The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular parasite, can infect humans and a wide range of vertebrates leading to toxoplasmosis. This generally benign affection can causes severe life-threatening disease, particularly in immunocompromised patients and in children with congenital toxoplasmosis. Our research team works on cell-host-parasite interactions by studying biodiversity, pathogenic mechanisms and environment. We search to identify prognostic factors of disease and markers of resistance. This project is an integral part of our Research Institute (IFR53) which receives support from the Toxoplasma Biological Resource Center for constituting a bank of well characterized toxoplasma isolates for genotyping, clinical and epidemiological data. The involvement of metalloproteinases implicated during monocytic cell invasion and identification of ABC transporter proteins in T. gondii, factors implicated in resistance, need to be explored.

  9. Genome-Scale Analysis of Mycoplasma agalactiae Loci Involved in Interaction with Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapski, Agnès; Hygonenq, Marie-Claude; Sagné, Eveline; Guiral, Sébastien; Citti, Christine; Baranowski, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is an important pathogen of small ruminants, in which it causes contagious agalactia. It belongs to a large group of “minimal bacteria” with a small genome and reduced metabolic capacities that are dependent on their host for nutrients. Mycoplasma survival thus relies on intimate contact with host cells, but little is known about the factors involved in these interactions or in the more general infectious process. To address this issue, an assay based on goat epithelial and fibroblastic cells was used to screen a M. agalactiae knockout mutant library. Mutants with reduced growth capacities in cell culture were selected and 62 genomic loci were identified as contributing to this phenotype. As expected for minimal bacteria, “transport and metabolism” was the functional category most commonly implicated in this phenotype, but 50% of the selected mutants were disrupted in coding sequences (CDSs) with unknown functions, with surface lipoproteins being most commonly represented in this category. Since mycoplasmas lack a cell wall, lipoproteins are likely to be important in interactions with the host. A few intergenic regions were also identified that may act as regulatory sequences under co-culture conditions. Interestingly, some mutants mapped to gene clusters that are highly conserved across mycoplasma species but located in different positions. One of these clusters was found in a transcriptionally active region of the M. agalactiae chromosome, downstream of a cryptic promoter. A possible scenario for the evolution of these loci is discussed. Finally, several CDSs identified here are conserved in other important pathogenic mycoplasmas, and some were involved in horizontal gene transfer with phylogenetically distant species. These results provide a basis for further deciphering functions mediating mycoplasma-host interactions. PMID:21966487

  10. Dynamic flux of microvesicles modulate parasite-host cell interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M I; Deolindo, P; de Messias-Reason, I J; Arigi, Emma A; Choi, H; Almeida, I C; Evans-Osses, I

    2017-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from pathogens may alter host cell functions. We previously demonstrated the involvement of host cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) during early interaction between Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigote (META) stage and THP-1 cells. Here, we aim to understand the contribution of different parasite stages and their extracellular vesicles in the interaction with host cells. First, we observed that infective host cell-derived trypomastigote (tissue culture-derived trypomastigote [TCT]), META, and noninfective epimastigote (EPI) stages were able to induce different levels of MV release from THP-1 cells; however, only META and TCT could increase host cell invasion. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy revealed that THP-1-derived MVs can fuse with parasite-derived MVs. Furthermore, MVs derived from the TCT-THP-1 interaction showed a higher fusogenic capacity than those from META- or EPI-THP-1 interaction. However, a higher presence of proteins from META (25%) than TCT (12%) or EPI (5%) was observed in MVs from parasite-THP-1 interaction, as determined by proteomics. Finally, sera from patients with chronic Chagas disease at the indeterminate or cardiac phase differentially recognized antigens in THP-1-derived MVs resulting only from interaction with infective stages. The understanding of intracellular trafficking and the effect of MVs modulating the immune system may provide important clues about Chagas disease pathophysiology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. γδ T cells in homeostasis and host defence of epithelial barrier tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Witherden, Deborah A; Havran, Wendy L

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial surfaces line the body and provide a crucial interface between the body and the external environment. Tissue-resident epithelial γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in the epithelial tissues and are ideally positioned to carry out barrier surveillance and aid in tissue homeostasis and repair. In this Review, we focus on the intraepithelial γδ T cell compartment of the two largest epithelial tissues in the body - namely, the epidermis and the intestine - and provide a comprehensive overview of the crucial contributions of intraepithelial γδ T cells to tissue integrity and repair, host homeostasis and protection in the context of the symbiotic relationship with the microbiome and during pathogen clearance. Finally, we describe epithelium-specific butyrophilin-like molecules and briefly review their emerging role in selectively shaping and regulating epidermal and intestinal γδ T cell repertoires.

  12. Predation determines different selective pressure on pea aphid host races in a complex agricultural mosaic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Balog

    Full Text Available Field assessments were conducted to examine the interplay between host plant and predation in complex agricultural mosaic on pea aphid clover and alfalfa races. In one experiment, we examined the relative fitness on clover race (CR and alfalfa race (AR pea aphids on broad bean, red clover and alfalfa alone. But because clover is typically grown in a more complex agricultural mosaic with alfalfa and broad bean, a second experiment was conducted to assess the fitness consequences under predation in a more complex agricultural field setting that also included potential apparent competition with AR pea aphids. In a third experiment we tested for the effect of differential host race density on the fitness of the other host race mediated by a predator effect. CR pea aphids always had fitness losses when on broad bean (had lower fitness on broad bean relative to red clover and fitness benefits when on red clover (higher fitness on red clover relative to broad bean, whether or not in apparent competition with alfalfa race aphids on bean and alfalfa. AR suffered fitness loss on both alfalfa and bean in apparent competition with CR on clover. Therefore we can conclude that the predation rate between host races was highly asymmetrical. The complexity of the agricultural mosaic thus can influence prey selection by predators on different host plants. These may have evolutionary consequences through context dependent fitness benefits on particular host plants.

  13. Reef fishes can recognize bleached habitat during settlement: sea anemone bleaching alters anemonefish host selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anna; Dixson, Danielle L

    2016-05-25

    Understanding how bleaching impacts the settlement of symbiotic habitat specialists and whether there is flexibility in settlement choices with regard to habitat quality is essential given our changing climate. We used five anemonefishes (Amphiprion clarkii, Amphiprion latezonatus, Amphiprion ocellaris, Amphiprion percula and Premnas biaculeatus) and three host sea anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis crispa and Heteractis magnifica) in paired-choice flume experiments to determine whether habitat naive juveniles have the olfactory capabilities to distinguish between unbleached and bleached hosts, and how this may affect settlement decisions. All anemonefishes were able to distinguish between bleached and unbleached hosts, and responded only to chemical cues from species-specific host anemones irrespective of health status, indicating a lack of flexibility in host use. While bleached hosts were selected as habitat, this occurred only when unbleached options were unavailable, with the exception of A. latezonatus, which showed strong preferences for H. crispa regardless of health. This study highlights the potential deleterious indirect impacts of declining habitat quality during larval settlement in habitat specialists, which could be important in the field, given that bleaching events are becoming increasingly common. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Fierce Competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for Host Cell Structures in Dually Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Julia D.; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A.; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M.

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogen's benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients. PMID:23243063

  15. HCMV Induces Macropinocytosis for Host Cell Entry in Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzenecker, Stefanie; Helenius, Ari; Krzyzaniak, Magdalena Anna

    2016-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important and widespread pathogen in the human population. While infection by this β-herpesvirus in endothelial, epithelial and dendritic cells depends on endocytosis, its entry into fibroblasts is thought to occur by direct fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane. To characterize individual steps during entry in primary human fibroblasts, we employed quantitative assays as well as electron, fluorescence and live cell microscopy in combination with a variety of inhibitory compounds. Our results showed that while infectious entry was pH- and clathrin-independent, it required multiple, endocytosis-related factors and processes. The virions were found to undergo rapid internalization into large vacuoles containing internalized fluid and endosome markers. The characteristics of the internalization process fulfilled major criteria for macropinocytosis. Moreover, we found that soon after addition to fibroblasts the virus rapidly triggered the formation of circular dorsal ruffles in the host cell followed by the generation of large macropinocytic vacuoles. This distinctive form of macropinocytosis has been observed especially in primary cells but has not previously been reported in response to virus stimulation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Host selection by the pine processionary moth enhances larval performance: An experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Soler, Juan J.; Soler, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    The development of a phytophagous insect depends on the nutritional characteristics of plants on which it feeds. Offspring from different females, however, may vary in their ability to develop in different host species and therefore females should place their eggs on host plants that result in the highest performance for the insect offspring. Causes underlying the predicted relationships between host selection and offspring performance may be: (1) a genetic association between larval ability to exploit particular hosts and the female insect's host preference; and (2) phenotypic plasticity of larvae that may be due to (a) maternal effects (e.g. differential investment in eggs) or (b) diet. In this work, we analyse the performance (i.e. hatching success and larval size and mortality) of the pine processionary (Thaumetopoea pityocampa) caterpillar developing in Aleppo (Pinus halepensis) or maritime (Pinus pinaster) pines. Larvae of this moth species do not move from the individual pine selected by the mother for oviposition. By means of cross-fostering experiments of eggs batches and silk nests of larvae between these two pine species, we explored whether phenotypic plasticity of offspring traits or genetic correlations between mother and offspring traits account for variation in developmental characteristics of caterpillars. Our results showed that females preferentially selected Aleppo pine for oviposition. Moreover, the offspring had the highest probability of survival and reached a larger body size in this pine species independently of whether or not batches were experimentally cross-fostered. Notably, the interaction between identity of donor and receiver pine species of larvae nests explained a significant proportion of variance of larval size and mortality, suggesting a role of diet-induced phenotypic plasticity of the hatchlings. These results suggest that both female selection of the more appropriate pine species and phenotypic plasticity of larva explain the

  17. The EG95 antigen of Echinococcus spp. contains positively selected amino acids, which may influence host specificity and vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Luisa Haag

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonotic parasitic disease of humans and various herbivorous domestic animals (intermediate hosts transmitted by the contact with wild and domestic carnivores (definitive hosts, mainly foxes and dogs. Recently, a vaccine was developed showing high levels of protection against one parasite haplotype (G1 of Echinococcus granulosus, and its potential efficacy against distinct parasite variants or species is still unclear. Interestingly, the EG95 vaccine antigen is a secreted glycosylphosphatydilinositol (GPI-anchored protein containing a fibronectin type III domain, which is ubiquitous in modular proteins involved in cell adhesion. EG95 is highly expressed in oncospheres, the parasite life cycle stage which actively invades the intermediate hosts. After amplifying and sequencing the complete CDS of 57 Echinococcus isolates belonging to 7 distinct species, we uncovered a large amount of genetic variability, which may influence protein folding. Two positively selected sites are outside the vaccine epitopes, but are predicted to alter protein conformation. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses indicate that EG95 isoform evolution is convergent with regard to the number of beta-sheets and alpha-helices. We conclude that having a variety of EG95 isoforms is adaptive for Echinococcus parasites, in terms of their ability to invade different hosts, and we propose that a mixture of isoforms could possibly maximize vaccine efficacy.

  18. Engrafted Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Promote Functional Recovery through Synapse Reorganization with Spared Host Neurons after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Yokota

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI. However, the efficacy of NSPC transplantation on severe SCI is poorly understood. We herein show that NSPC transplantation promotes functional recovery after mild and moderate SCI, but not after severe SCI. In severe SCI mice, there were few remaining host neurons within the range of NSPC engraftment; thus, we examined whether the co-distribution of transplant and host is a contributory factor for functional improvement. A cellular selective analysis using laser microdissection revealed that drug-induced host neuronal ablation considerably decreased the synaptogenic potential of the engrafted NSPCs. Furthermore, following host neuronal ablation, neuronal retrograde tracing showed less propriospinal relay connections bridging the lesion after NSPC transplantation. Our findings suggest that the interactive synaptic reorganization between engrafted NSPCs and spared host neurons is crucial for functional recovery, providing significant insight for establishing therapeutic strategies for severe SCI.

  19. Host-selected mutations converging on a global regulator drive an adaptive leap towards symbiosis in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabrina Pankey, M; Foxall, Randi L; Ster, Ian M; Perry, Lauren A; Schuster, Brian M; Donner, Rachel A; Coyle, Matthew; Cooper, Vaughn S; Whistler, Cheryl A

    2017-01-01

    Host immune and physical barriers protect against pathogens but also impede the establishment of essential symbiotic partnerships. To reveal mechanisms by which beneficial organisms adapt to circumvent host defenses, we experimentally evolved ecologically distinct bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri by colonization and growth within the light organs of the squid Euprymna scolopes. Serial squid passaging of bacteria produced eight distinct mutations in the binK sensor kinase gene, which conferred an exceptional selective advantage that could be demonstrated through both empirical and theoretical analysis. Squid-adaptive binK alleles promoted colonization and immune evasion that were mediated by cell-associated matrices including symbiotic polysaccharide (Syp) and cellulose. binK variation also altered quorum sensing, raising the threshold for luminescence induction. Preexisting coordinated regulation of symbiosis traits by BinK presented an efficient solution where altered BinK function was the key to unlock multiple colonization barriers. These results identify a genetic basis for microbial adaptability and underscore the importance of hosts as selective agents that shape emergent symbiont populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24414.001 PMID:28447935

  20. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Schulze, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Hjorth, J.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chary, R.; Cucchiara, A.; Ellis, R.; Fong, W.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Greiner, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kim, S.; Laskar, T.; Levan, A. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (“SHOALS”), a multi-observatory high-redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly deep, multicolor optical/near-IR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without preexisting redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust obscured, and at most 2% originate from z\\gt 5.5. Using this sample, we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z∼ 2.5 and fall by at least an order of magnitude toward low (z = 0) redshift, while declining more gradually toward high (z∼ 7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.

  1. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, D. A.; Kruhler, T.; Schulze, S.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Hjorth, J.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chary, R.; Cucchiara, A.; Ellis, R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a multi-observatory high redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly deep, multicolor optical/near-IR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without preexisting redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust obscured, and at most 2% originate from z > 5.5. Using this sample, we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z approx. 2.5 and fall by at least an order of magnitude toward low (z = 0) redshift, while declining more gradually toward high (z approx. 7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.

  2. The transforming parasite Theileria co-opts host cell mitotic and central spindles to persist in continuously dividing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad von Schubert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Theileria inhabits the host cell cytoplasm and possesses the unique capacity to transform the cells it infects, inducing continuous proliferation and protection against apoptosis. The transforming schizont is a multinucleated syncytium that resides free in the host cell cytoplasm and is strictly intracellular. To maintain transformation, it is crucial that this syncytium is divided over the two daughter cells at each host cell cytokinesis. This process was dissected using different cell cycle synchronization methods in combination with the targeted application of specific inhibitors. We found that Theileria schizonts associate with newly formed host cell microtubules that emanate from the spindle poles, positioning the parasite at the equatorial region of the mitotic cell where host cell chromosomes assemble during metaphase. During anaphase, the schizont interacts closely with host cell central spindle. As part of this process, the schizont recruits a host cell mitotic kinase, Polo-like kinase 1, and we established that parasite association with host cell central spindles requires Polo-like kinase 1 catalytic activity. Blocking the interaction between the schizont and astral as well as central spindle microtubules prevented parasite segregation between the daughter cells during cytokinesis. Our findings provide a striking example of how an intracellular eukaryotic pathogen that evolved ways to induce the uncontrolled proliferation of the cells it infects usurps the host cell mitotic machinery, including Polo-like kinase 1, one of the pivotal mitotic kinases, to ensure its own persistence and survival.

  3. Bacterial colonization of host cells in the absence of cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey D Gilk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. DHCR24(-/- MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24(-/- MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24(-/- MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in -cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated α(Vβ(3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24(-/- MEFs lacked the CD63-positive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions.

  4. Bacterial Colonization of Host Cells in the Absence of Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilk, Stacey D.; Cockrell, Diane C.; Luterbach, Courtney; Hansen, Bryan; Knodler, Leigh A.; Ibarra, J. Antonio; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Reports implicating important roles for cholesterol and cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in host-pathogen interactions have largely employed sterol sequestering agents and biosynthesis inhibitors. Because the pleiotropic effects of these compounds can complicate experimental interpretation, we developed a new model system to investigate cholesterol requirements in pathogen infection utilizing DHCR24−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). DHCR24−/− MEFs lack the Δ24 sterol reductase required for the final enzymatic step in cholesterol biosynthesis, and consequently accumulate desmosterol into cellular membranes. Defective lipid raft function by DHCR24−/− MEFs adapted to growth in cholesterol-free medium was confirmed by showing deficient uptake of cholera-toxin B and impaired signaling by epidermal growth factor. Infection in the absence of cholesterol was then investigated for three intracellular bacterial pathogens: Coxiella burnetii, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Invasion by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis was unaltered in DHCR24−/− MEFs. In contrast, C. burnetii entry was significantly decreased in −cholesterol MEFs, and also in +cholesterol MEFs when lipid raft-associated αVβ3 integrin was blocked, suggesting a role for lipid rafts in C. burnetii uptake. Once internalized, all three pathogens established their respective vacuolar niches and replicated normally. However, the C. burnetii-occupied vacuole within DHCR24−/− MEFs lacked the CD63-postive material and multilamellar membranes typical of vacuoles formed in wild type cells, indicating cholesterol functions in trafficking of multivesicular bodies to the pathogen vacuole. These data demonstrate that cholesterol is not essential for invasion and intracellular replication by S. Typhimurium and C. trachomatis, but plays a role in C. burnetii-host cell interactions. PMID:23358892

  5. Interaction of KSHV with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus entry is a complex process characterized by a sequence of events. Since the discovery of KSHV in 1994, tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of KSHV entry into its in vitro target cells. KSHV entry is a complex multistep process involving viral envelope glycoproteins and several cell surface molecules that is utilized by KSHV for its attachment and entry. KSHV has a broad cell tropism and the attachment and receptor engagement on target cells have an important role in determining the cell type-specific mode of entry. KSHV utilizes heparan sulfate, integrins and EphrinA2 molecules as receptors which results in the activation of host cell pre-existing signal pathways that facilitate the subsequent cascade of events resulting in the rapid entry of virus particles, trafficking towards the nucleus followed by viral and host gene expression. KSHV enters human fibroblast cells by dynamin dependant clathrin mediated endocytosis and by dynamin independent macropinocytosis in dermal endothelial cells. Once internalized into endosomes, fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membranes in an acidification dependent manner results in the release of capsids which subsequently reaches the nuclear pore vicinity leading to the delivery of viral DNA into the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the principal mechanisms that enable KSHV to interact with the host cell surface receptors as well as the mechanisms that are required to modulate cell signaling machinery for a successful entry.

  6. Lassa Virus Cell Entry Reveals New Aspects of Virus-Host Cell Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, Giulia; Galan-Navarro, Clara; Kunz, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    Viral entry represents the first step of every viral infection and is a determinant for the host range and disease potential of a virus. Here, we review the latest developments on cell entry of the highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus, providing novel insights into the complex virus-host cell interaction of this important human pathogen. We will cover new discoveries on the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition, endocytosis, and the use of late endosomal entry factors. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Eimeria bovis infection modulates endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism for successful replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid, Penny H.; Hirzmann, Joerg; Kerner, Katharina; Gimpl, Gerald; Lochnit, Guenter; Hermosilla, Carlos R.; Taubert, Anja

    2015-01-01

    During first merogony Eimeria bovis forms large macromeronts in endothelial host cells containing >120 000 merozoites I. During multiplication, large amounts of cholesterol are indispensable for the enormous offspring membrane production. Cholesterol auxotrophy was proven for other apicomplexan parasites. Consequently they scavenge cholesterol from their host cell apparently in a parasite-specific manner. We here analyzed the influence of E. bovis infection on endothelial host cell cholestero...

  8. Viral Ubiquitin Ligase Stimulates Selective Host MicroRNA Expression by Targeting ZEB Transcriptional Repressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Youn; Leader, Andrew; Stoller, Michelle L.; Coen, Donald M.; Wilson, Angus C.

    2017-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) brings numerous changes in cellular gene expression. Levels of most host mRNAs are reduced, limiting synthesis of host proteins, especially those involved in antiviral defenses. The impact of HSV-1 on host microRNAs (miRNAs), an extensive network of short non-coding RNAs that regulate mRNA stability/translation, remains largely unexplored. Here we show that transcription of the miR-183 cluster (miR-183, miR-96, and miR-182) is selectively induced by HSV-1 during productive infection of primary fibroblasts and neurons. ICP0, a viral E3 ubiquitin ligase expressed as an immediate-early protein, is both necessary and sufficient for this induction. Nuclear exclusion of ICP0 or removal of the RING (really interesting new gene) finger domain that is required for E3 ligase activity prevents induction. ICP0 promotes the degradation of numerous host proteins and for the most part, the downstream consequences are unknown. Induction of the miR-183 cluster can be mimicked by depletion of host transcriptional repressors zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1)/δ-crystallin enhancer binding factor 1 (δEF1) and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2)/Smad-interacting protein 1 (SIP1), which we establish as new substrates for ICP0-mediated degradation. Thus, HSV-1 selectively stimulates expression of the miR-183 cluster by ICP0-mediated degradation of ZEB transcriptional repressors. PMID:28783105

  9. Identifying selection in the within-host evolution of influenza using viral sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J R Illingworth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The within-host evolution of influenza is a vital component of its epidemiology. A question of particular interest is the role that selection plays in shaping the viral population over the course of a single infection. We here describe a method to measure selection acting upon the influenza virus within an individual host, based upon time-resolved genome sequence data from an infection. Analysing sequence data from a transmission study conducted in pigs, describing part of the haemagglutinin gene (HA1 of an influenza virus, we find signatures of non-neutrality in six of a total of sixteen infections. We find evidence for both positive and negative selection acting upon specific alleles, while in three cases, the data suggest the presence of time-dependent selection. In one infection we observe what is potentially a specific immune response against the virus; a non-synonymous mutation in an epitope region of the virus is found to be under initially positive, then strongly negative selection. Crucially, given the lack of homologous recombination in influenza, our method accounts for linkage disequilibrium between nucleotides at different positions in the haemagglutinin gene, allowing for the analysis of populations in which multiple mutations are present at any given time. Our approach offers a new insight into the dynamics of influenza infection, providing a detailed characterisation of the forces that underlie viral evolution.

  10. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2015-08-18

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  11. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schoonneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2017-08-22

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  12. Legionella pneumophila type IV effectors hijack the transcription and translation machinery of the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, Monica; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate the host response to persist and replicate inside a eukaryotic cell and cause disease. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is present in freshwater environments and represents one of these pathogens. During coevolution with protozoan cells, L. pneumophila has acquired highly sophisticated and diverse strategies to hijack host cell processes. It secretes hundreds of effectors into the host cell, and these manipulate host signaling pathways and key cellular processes. Recently it has been shown that L. pneumophila is also able to alter the transcription and translation machinery of the host and to exploit epigenetic mechanisms in the cells it resides in to counteract host responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial heterogeneity, frequency-dependent selection and polymorphism in host-parasite interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellier Aurélien

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic and pathology analysis has revealed enormous diversity in genes involved in disease, including those encoding host resistance and parasite effectors (also known in plant pathology as avirulence genes. It has been proposed that such variation may persist when an organism exists in a spatially structured metapopulation, following the geographic mosaic of coevolution. Here, we study gene-for-gene relationships governing the outcome of plant-parasite interactions in a spatially structured system and, in particular, investigate the population genetic processes which maintain balanced polymorphism in both species. Results Following previous theory on the effect of heterogeneous environments on maintenance of polymorphism, we analysed a model with two demes in which the demes have different environments and are coupled by gene flow. Environmental variation is manifested by different coefficients of natural selection, the costs to the host of resistance and to the parasite of virulence, the cost to the host of being diseased and the cost to an avirulent parasite of unsuccessfully attacking a resistant host. We show that migration generates negative direct frequency-dependent selection, a condition for maintenance of stable polymorphism in each deme. Balanced polymorphism occurs preferentially if there is heterogeneity for costs of resistance and virulence alleles among populations and to a lesser extent if there is variation in the cost to the host of being diseased. We show that the four fitness costs control the natural frequency of oscillation of host resistance and parasite avirulence alleles. If demes have different costs, their frequencies of oscillation differ and when coupled by gene flow, there is amplitude death of the oscillations in each deme. Numerical simulations show that for a multiple deme island model, costs of resistance and virulence need not to be present in each deme for stable polymorphism to occur

  14. Host cell protein adsorption characteristics during protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Richard D R; Velez-Suberbie, M Lourdes; Tait, Andrew S; Smales, C Mark; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2012-07-01

    Protein A chromatography is a critical and 'gold-standard' step in the purification of monoclonal antibody (mAb) products. Its ability to remove >98% of impurities in a single step alleviates the burden on subsequent process steps and facilitates the implementation of platform processes, with a minimal number of chromatographic steps. Here, we have evaluated four commercially available protein A chromatography matrices in terms of their ability to remove host cell proteins (HCPs), a complex group of process related impurities that must be removed to minimal levels. SELDI-TOF MS was used as a screening tool to generate an impurity profile fingerprint for each resin and indicated a number of residual impurities present following protein A chromatography, agreeing with HCP ELISA. Although many of these were observed for all matrices there was a significantly elevated level of impurity binding associated with the resin based on controlled pore glass under standard conditions. Use of null cell line supernatant with and without spiked purified mAb demonstrated the interaction of HCPs to be not only with the resin back-bone but also with the bound mAb. A null cell line column overload and sample enrichment method before 2D-PAGE was then used to determine individual components associated with resin back-bone adsorption. The methods shown allow for a critical analysis of HCP removal during protein A chromatography. Taken together they provide the necessary process understanding to allow process engineers to identify rational approaches for the removal of prominent HCPs. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  15. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  16. Approaches to LLW disposal site selection and current progress of host states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.; Kerr, T.A.

    1990-11-01

    In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and under the guidance of 10 CFR 61, States have begun entering into compacts to establish and operate regional disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The progress a state makes in implementing a process to identify a specific location for a disposal site is one indication of the level of a state's commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Federal law and interstate compact agreements. During the past few years, several States have been engaged in site selection processes. The purpose of this report is to summarize the site selection approaches of some of the Host States (California, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Illinois), and their progress to date. An additional purpose of the report is to discern whether the Host States's site selection processes were heavily influenced by any common factors. One factor each state held in common was that political and public processes exerted a powerful influence on the site selection process at virtually every stage. 1 ref.

  17. Host-secreted antimicrobial peptide enforces symbiotic selectivity in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Shengming; Liu, Jinge; Terecskei, Kata; Ábrahám, Edit; Gombár, Anikó; Domonkos, Ágota; Szűcs, Attila; Körmöczi, Péter; Wang, Ting; Fodor, Lili; Mao, Linyong; Fei, Zhangjun; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter; Kereszt, Attila; Zhu, Hongyan

    2017-06-27

    Legumes engage in root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria known as rhizobia. In nodule cells, bacteria are enclosed in membrane-bound vesicles called symbiosomes and differentiate into bacteroids that are capable of converting atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Bacteroid differentiation and prolonged intracellular survival are essential for development of functional nodules. However, in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis, incompatibility between symbiotic partners frequently occurs, leading to the formation of infected nodules defective in nitrogen fixation (Fix-). Here, we report the identification and cloning of the M. truncatula NFS2 gene that regulates this type of specificity pertaining to S. meliloti strain Rm41. We demonstrate that NFS2 encodes a nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptide that acts to promote bacterial lysis after differentiation. The negative role of NFS2 in symbiosis is contingent on host genetic background and can be counteracted by other genes encoded by the host. This work extends the paradigm of NCR function to include the negative regulation of symbiotic persistence in host-strain interactions. Our data suggest that NCR peptides are host determinants of symbiotic specificity in M. truncatula and possibly in closely related legumes that form indeterminate nodules in which bacterial symbionts undergo terminal differentiation.

  18. Cancer cell: using inflammation to invade the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aller María-Angeles

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is increasingly recognized as an important component of tumorigenesis, although the mechanisms involved are not fully characterized. The invasive capacity of cancers is reflected in the classic metastatic cascade: tumor (T, node (N and metastasis (M. However, this staging system for cancer would also have a tumoral biological significance. Presentation of the hypothesis To integrate the mechanisms that control the inflammatory response in the actual staging system of cancer. It is considered that in both processes of inflammation and cancer, three successive phenotypes are presented that represent the expression of trophic functional systems of increasing metabolic complexity for using oxygen. Testing the hypothesis While a malignant tumor develops it express phenotypes that also share the inflammatory response such as: an ischemic phenotype (anoxic-hypoxic, a leukocytic phenotype with anaerobic glycolysis and migration, and an angiogenic phenotype with hyperactivity of glycolytic enzymes, tumor proliferation and metastasis, and cachexia of the host. The increasing metabolic complexity of the tumor cell to use oxygen allows for it to be released, migrate and proliferate, thus creating structures of growing complexity. Implication of the hypothesis One aim of cancer gene therapy could be the induction of oxidative phosphorylation, the last metabolic step required by inflammation in order to differentiate the tissue that it produces.

  19. Identification and monitoring of host cell proteins by mass spectrometry combined with high performance immunochemistry testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Bomans

    Full Text Available Biotherapeutics are often produced in non-human host cells like Escherichia coli, yeast, and various mammalian cell lines. A major focus of any therapeutic protein purification process is to reduce host cell proteins to an acceptable low level. In this study, various E. coli host cell proteins were identified at different purifications steps by HPLC fractionation, SDS-PAGE analysis, and tryptic peptide mapping combined with online liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS. However, no host cell proteins could be verified by direct LC-MS analysis of final drug substance material. In contrast, the application of affinity enrichment chromatography prior to comprehensive LC-MS was adequate to identify several low abundant host cell proteins at the final drug substance level. Bacterial alkaline phosphatase (BAP was identified as being the most abundant host cell protein at several purification steps. Thus, we firstly established two different assays for enzymatic and immunological BAP monitoring using the cobas® technology. By using this strategy we were able to demonstrate an almost complete removal of BAP enzymatic activity by the established therapeutic protein purification process. In summary, the impact of fermentation, purification, and formulation conditions on host cell protein removal and biological activity can be conducted by monitoring process-specific host cell proteins in a GMP-compatible and high-throughput (> 1000 samples/day manner.

  20. Microbial production host selection for converting second-generation feedstocks into bioproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Groenestijn Johan W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates are used as the feedstock for industrial fermentations. These biomass hydrolysates are complex mixtures of different fermentable sugars, but also inhibitors and salts that affect the performance of the microbial production host. The performance of six industrially relevant microorganisms, i.e. two bacteria (Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum, two yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis and two fungi (Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei were compared for their (i ability to utilize monosaccharides present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, (ii resistance against inhibitors present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, (iii their ability to utilize and grow on different feedstock hydrolysates (corn stover, wheat straw, sugar cane bagasse and willow wood. The feedstock hydrolysates were generated in two manners: (i thermal pretreatment under mild acid conditions followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and (ii a non-enzymatic method in which the lignocellulosic biomass is pretreated and hydrolyzed by concentrated sulfuric acid. Moreover, the ability of the selected hosts to utilize waste glycerol from the biodiesel industry was evaluated. Results Large differences in the performance of the six tested microbial production hosts were observed. Carbon source versatility and inhibitor resistance were the major discriminators between the performances of these microorganisms. Surprisingly all 6 organisms performed relatively well on pretreated crude feedstocks. P. stipitis and A. niger were found to give the overall best performance C. glutamicum and S. cerevisiae were shown to be the least adapted to renewable feedstocks. Conclusion Based on the results obtained we conclude that a substrate oriented instead of the more commonly used product oriented approach towards the selection of a microbial production host will avoid the requirement for extensive metabolic

  1. Host Immune Selection of Rumen Bacteria through Salivary Secretory IgA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle M. Fouhse

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The rumen microbiome is integral to efficient production in cattle and shows strong host specificity, yet little is known about what host factors shape rumen microbial composition. Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA is produced in large amounts in the saliva, can coat both commensal and pathogenic microbes within the gut, and presents a plausible mechanism of host specificity. However, the role salivary SIgA plays in commensal bacteria selection in ruminants remains elusive. The main objectives of this study were to develop an immuno-affinity benchtop method to isolate SIgA-tagged microbiota and to determine if salivary SIgA preferentially binds selected bacteria. We hypothesized that SIgA-tagged bacteria would differ from total bacteria, thus supporting a potential host-derived mechanism in commensal bacterial selection. Whole rumen (n = 9 and oral secretion samples (n = 10 were incubated with magnetic beads conjugated with anti-secretory IgA antibodies to enrich SIgA-tagged microbiota. Microbial DNA from the oral secretion, whole rumen, SIgA-tagged oral secretion, and SIgA-tagged rumen was isolated for amplicon sequencing of V1–V3 region of 16S rDNA genes. Whole rumen and oral secretion had distinctive (P < 0.05 bacterial compositions indicated by the non-parametric multidimensional scaling plot using Euclidean distance metrics. The SIgA-tagged microbiota from rumen and oral secretion had similar abundance of Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Fibrobacter, candidate phyla TM7, and Tenericutes and are clustered tightly. Composition of SIgA-tagged oral secretion microbiota was more similar to whole rumen microbiota than whole oral secretion due to enrichment of rumen bacteria (Lachnospiraceae and depletion of oral taxa (Streptococcus, Rothia, Neisseriaceae, and Lactobacillales. In conclusion, SIgA-tagged oral secretion microbiota had an increased resemblance to whole rumen microbiota, suggesting salivary SIgA-coating may be one host

  2. B-cell involvement in chronic graft-versus-host disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapur, Rick; Ebeling, Saskia; Hagenbeek, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease is a serious complication in long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with several organ systems affected. Chronic graft-versus-host disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell

  3. Host Factors Invovled in the Entry of Coronaviruses into Mammalian Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkard, C.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Centralized Dynamic Cell Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2016-01-01

    Centralized architectures with fronthauls can be used to deal with some of the problems inherently associated with dense small cell deployments. This study examines a joint cell assignment and scheduling solution for the downlink to increase the users’ data rates, based on cell switching and a su...... with two different traffic models, and it is not necessary to be able to connect to a large number of cells in order to reap most of the benefits of the centralized dynamic cell selection....

  5. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  6. From microbiology to cell biology: when an intracellular bacterium becomes part of its host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, John P

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are now called organelles, but they used to be bacteria. As they transitioned from endosymbionts to organelles, they became more and more integrated into the biochemistry and cell biology of their hosts. Work over the last 15 years has shown that other symbioses show striking similarities to mitochondria and chloroplasts. In particular, many sap-feeding insects house intracellular bacteria that have genomes that overlap mitochondria and chloroplasts in terms of size and coding capacity. The massive levels of gene loss in some of these bacteria suggest that they, too, are becoming highly integrated with their host cells. Understanding these bacteria will require inspiration from eukaryotic cell biology, because a traditional microbiological framework is insufficient for understanding how they work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Time resolved bovine host reponse to virulence factors mapped in milk by selected reaction monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Stine Lønnerup; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Codrea, Marius Cosmin

    to gram-positive and gram-negative cell wall components. The results demonstrated that the extent of protein regulation is much larger after challenge with LPS than with PGN underpinning the growing evidence that gram-negative bacteria cause a far more acute host response than gram-positive bacteria...... in milk samples from cows challenged with peptidoglycan (PGN) from the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli for 54 hours. This method allowed for the first time a thorough proteome analysis of the time-resolved response...

  8. Host-Based Th2 Cell Therapy for Prolongation of Cardiac Allograft Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jason E.; Costanzo, Carliann M.; Sennesh, Joel D.; Solomon, Michael A.; Fowler, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Donor T cell transfusion, which is a long-standing approach to prevent allograft rejection, operates indirectly by alteration of host T cell immunity. We therefore hypothesized that adoptive transfer of immune regulatory host Th2 cells would represent a novel intervention to enhance cardiac allograft survival. Using a well-described rat cardiac transplant model, we first developed a method for ex vivo manufacture of rat host-type Th2 cells in rapamycin, with subsequent injection of such Th2.R cells prior to class I and class II disparate cardiac allografting. Second, we determined whether Th2.R cell transfer polarized host immunity towards a Th2 phenotype. And third, we evaluated whether Th2.R cell therapy prolonged allograft viability when used alone or in combination with a short-course of cyclosporine (CSA) therapy. We found that host-type Th2.R cell therapy prior to cardiac allografting: (1) reduced the frequency of activated T cells in secondary lymphoid organs; (2) shifted post-transplant cytokines towards a Th2 phenotype; and (3) prolonged allograft viability when used in combination with short-course CSA therapy. These results provide further support for the rationale to use “direct” host T cell therapy for prolongation of allograft viability as an alternative to “indirect” therapy mediated by donor T cell infusion. PMID:21559526

  9. Host-based Th2 cell therapy for prolongation of cardiac allograft viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Amarnath

    Full Text Available Donor T cell transfusion, which is a long-standing approach to prevent allograft rejection, operates indirectly by alteration of host T cell immunity. We therefore hypothesized that adoptive transfer of immune regulatory host Th2 cells would represent a novel intervention to enhance cardiac allograft survival. Using a well-described rat cardiac transplant model, we first developed a method for ex vivo manufacture of rat host-type Th2 cells in rapamycin, with subsequent injection of such Th2.R cells prior to class I and class II disparate cardiac allografting. Second, we determined whether Th2.R cell transfer polarized host immunity towards a Th2 phenotype. And third, we evaluated whether Th2.R cell therapy prolonged allograft viability when used alone or in combination with a short-course of cyclosporine (CSA therapy. We found that host-type Th2.R cell therapy prior to cardiac allografting: (1 reduced the frequency of activated T cells in secondary lymphoid organs; (2 shifted post-transplant cytokines towards a Th2 phenotype; and (3 prolonged allograft viability when used in combination with short-course CSA therapy. These results provide further support for the rationale to use "direct" host T cell therapy for prolongation of allograft viability as an alternative to "indirect" therapy mediated by donor T cell infusion.

  10. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Roehe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e

  11. Donor Satellite Cell Engraftment is Significantly Augmented When the Host Niche is Preserved and Endogenous Satellite Cells are Incapacitated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Luisa; Neal, Alice; Zammit, Peter S; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is already in clinical practice for certain genetic diseases and is a promising therapy for dystrophic muscle. We used the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy to investigate the effect of the host satellite cell niche on the contribution of donor muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to muscle regeneration. We found that incapacitation of the host satellite cells and preservation of the muscle niche promote donor satellite cell contribution to muscle regeneration and functional reconstitution of the satellite cell compartment. But, if the host niche is not promptly refilled, or is filled by competent host satellite cells, it becomes nonfunctional and donor engraftment is negligible. Application of this regimen to aged host muscles also promotes efficient regeneration from aged donor satellite cells. In contrast, if the niche is destroyed, yet host satellite cells remain proliferation-competent, donor-derived engraftment is trivial. Thus preservation of the satellite cell niche, concomitant with functional impairment of the majority of satellite cells within dystrophic human muscles, may improve the efficiency of stem cell therapy. Stem Cells2012;30:1971–1984 PMID:22730231

  12. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Botrytis cinerea genes targeting plant cell walls during infections of different hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Morales-Cruz, Abraham; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Labavitch, John M.; Powell, Ann L. T.; Cantu, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are barriers that impair colonization of host tissues, but also are important reservoirs of energy-rich sugars. Growing hyphae of necrotrophic fungal pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Botrytis, henceforth), secrete enzymes that disassemble cell wall polysaccharides. In this work we describe the annotation of 275 putative secreted Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) identified in the Botrytis B05.10 genome. Using RNAseq we determined which Botrytis CAZymes were expressed during infections of lettuce leaves, ripe tomato fruit, and grape berries. On the three hosts, Botrytis expressed a common group of 229 potentially secreted CAZymes, including 28 pectin backbone-modifying enzymes, 21 hemicellulose-modifying proteins, 18 enzymes that might target pectin and hemicellulose side-branches, and 16 enzymes predicted to degrade cellulose. The diversity of the Botrytis CAZymes may be partly responsible for its wide host range. Thirty-six candidate CAZymes with secretion signals were found exclusively when Botrytis interacted with ripe tomato fruit and grape berries. Pectin polysaccharides are notably abundant in grape and tomato cell walls, but lettuce leaf walls have less pectin and are richer in hemicelluloses and cellulose. The results of this study not only suggest that Botrytis targets similar wall polysaccharide networks on fruit and leaves, but also that it may selectively attack host wall polysaccharide substrates depending on the host tissue. PMID:25232357

  13. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M. C.; Brum, Felipe L.; da Silva, Camila C.; Zuma, Aline A.; Elias, Maria C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  14. IMMUNE INHIBITION OF VIRUS RELEASE FROM HUMAN AND NONHUMAN CELLS BY ANTIBODY TO VIRAL AND HOST-CELL DETERMINANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHARIFF, DM; DESPERBASQUES, M; BILLSTROM, M; GEERLIGS, HJ; WELLING, GW; WELLINGWESTER, S; BUCHAN, A; SKINNER, GRB

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA virues, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and

  15. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  16. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi secreted proteins and host cell signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Watanabe Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6-7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion.

  17. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A; Fraser, Mark E; Scott, Jordan L; Soni, Smita P; Jones, Keaton R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-09-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. Copyright © 2015, American

  18. Cellular Aspects of Shigella Pathogenesis: Focus on the Manipulation of Host Cell Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killackey, Samuel A; Sorbara, Matthew T; Girardin, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for shigellosis. Over the years, the study of Shigella has provided a greater understanding of how the host responds to bacterial infection, and how bacteria have evolved to effectively counter the host defenses. In this review, we provide an update on some of the most recent advances in our understanding of pivotal processes associated with Shigella infection, including the invasion into host cells, the metabolic changes that occur within the bacterium and the infected cell, cell-to-cell spread mechanisms, autophagy and membrane trafficking, inflammatory signaling and cell death. This recent progress sheds a new light into the mechanisms underlying Shigella pathogenesis, and also more generally provides deeper understanding of the complex interplay between host cells and bacterial pathogens in general.

  19. Positive Selection of Iris, a Retroviral Envelope-Derived Host Gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B. Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana, a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene

  20. Positive selection of Iris, a retroviral envelope-derived host gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmit S Malik

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B. Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana, a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene

  1. Bacterial host and reporter gene optimization for genetically encoded whole cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Escoffier, Camille; Descamps, Elodie C T; Prudent, Elsa; Cayron, Julien; Dumas, Louis; Ricquebourg, Manon; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; de Groot, Arjan; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on reporter genes allow detection of toxic metals in water with high selectivity and sensitivity under laboratory conditions; nevertheless, their transfer to a commercial inline water analyzer requires specific adaptation and optimization to field conditions as well as economical considerations. We focused here on both the influence of the bacterial host and the choice of the reporter gene by following the responses of global toxicity biosensors based on constitutive bacterial promoters as well as arsenite biosensors based on the arsenite-inducible P ars promoter. We observed important variations of the bioluminescence emission levels in five different Escherichia coli strains harboring two different lux-based biosensors, suggesting that the best host strain has to be empirically selected for each new biosensor under construction. We also investigated the bioluminescence reporter gene system transferred into Deinococcus deserti, an environmental, desiccation- and radiation-tolerant bacterium that would reduce the manufacturing costs of bacterial biosensors for commercial water analyzers and open the field of biodetection in radioactive environments. We thus successfully obtained a cell survival biosensor and a metal biosensor able to detect a concentration as low as 100 nM of arsenite in D. deserti. We demonstrated that the arsenite biosensor resisted desiccation and remained functional after 7 days stored in air-dried D. deserti cells. We also report here the use of a new near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent reporter candidate, a bacteriophytochrome from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, which showed a NIR fluorescent signal that remained optimal despite increasing sample turbidity, while in similar conditions, a drastic loss of the lux-based biosensors signal was observed.

  2. Exploiting Cell Death Pathways for Inducible Cell Elimination to Modulate Graft-versus-Host-Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Falcon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potent form of immunotherapy, potentially life-saving for many malignant hematologic diseases. However, donor lymphocytes infused with the graft while exerting a graft versus malignancy effect can also cause potentially fatal graft versus host disease (GVHD. Our group has previously validated the inducible caspase-9 suicide gene in the haploidentical stem cell transplant setting, which proved successful in reversing signs and symptoms of GVHD within hours, using a non-therapeutic dimerizing agent. Cellular death pathways such as apoptosis and necroptosis are important processes in maintaining healthy cellular homeostasis within the human body. Here, we review two of the most widely investigated cell death pathways active in T-cells (apoptosis and necroptosis, as well as the emerging strategies that can be exploited for the safety of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, such strategies could be exploited for the safety of other cellular therapeutics as well.

  3. Exploiting Cell Death Pathways for Inducible Cell Elimination to Modulate Graft-versus-Host-Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Corey; Al-Obaidi, Mustafa; Di Stasi, Antonio

    2017-06-14

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potent form of immunotherapy, potentially life-saving for many malignant hematologic diseases. However, donor lymphocytes infused with the graft while exerting a graft versus malignancy effect can also cause potentially fatal graft versus host disease (GVHD). Our group has previously validated the inducible caspase-9 suicide gene in the haploidentical stem cell transplant setting, which proved successful in reversing signs and symptoms of GVHD within hours, using a non-therapeutic dimerizing agent. Cellular death pathways such as apoptosis and necroptosis are important processes in maintaining healthy cellular homeostasis within the human body. Here, we review two of the most widely investigated cell death pathways active in T-cells (apoptosis and necroptosis), as well as the emerging strategies that can be exploited for the safety of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, such strategies could be exploited for the safety of other cellular therapeutics as well.

  4. A Sequential Model of Host Cell Killing and Phagocytosis by Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sateriale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is responsible for invasive intestinal and extraintestinal amebiasis. The virulence of Entamoeba histolytica is strongly correlated with the parasite's capacity to effectively kill and phagocytose host cells. The process by which host cells are killed and phagocytosed follows a sequential model of adherence, cell killing, initiation of phagocytosis, and engulfment. This paper presents recent advances in the cytolytic and phagocytic processes of Entamoeba histolytica in context of the sequential model.

  5. Signalome-wide assessment of host cell response to hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Wu, Jianmin; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Daly, Roger J.; Netter, Hans J.; Baumert, Thomas F.; Doerig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Host cell signalling during infection with intracellular pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we report on the use of antibody microarray technology to detect variations in the expression levels and phosphorylation status of host cell signalling proteins during hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Following transfection with HCV RNA, the JNK and NF-?B pathways are suppressed, while the JAK/STAT5 pathway is activated; furthermore, components of the apoptosis and cell cycle control machine...

  6. A Sequential Model of Host Cell Killing and Phagocytosis by Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateriale, Adam; Huston, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is responsible for invasive intestinal and extraintestinal amebiasis. The virulence of Entamoeba histolytica is strongly correlated with the parasite's capacity to effectively kill and phagocytose host cells. The process by which host cells are killed and phagocytosed follows a sequential model of adherence, cell killing, initiation of phagocytosis, and engulfment. This paper presents recent advances in the cytolytic and phagocytic processes of Entamoeba histolytica in context of the sequential model. PMID:21331284

  7. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N

    2016-04-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Host Cell Nuclear Localization of Shigella flexneri Effector OspF Is Facilitated by SUMOylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Eun Jin; Yu, Hyun Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Kim, Dong Wook

    2017-03-28

    When Shigella infect host cells, various effecter molecules are delivered into the cytoplasm of the host cell through the type III secretion system (TTSS) to facilitate their invasion process and control the host immune responses. Among these effectors, the S. flexneri effector OspF dephosphorylates mitogen-activated protein kinases and translocates itself to the nucleus, thus preventing histone H3 modification to regulate expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Despite the critical role of OspF, the mechanism by which it localizes in the nucleus has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we identified a potential small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) modification site within OspF and we demonstrated that Shigella TTSS effector OspF is conjugated with SUMO in the host cell and this modification mediates the nuclear translocation of OspF. Our results show a bacterial virulence factor can exploit host post-translational machinery to execute its intracellular trafficking.

  9. Chew on this: Amoebic trogocytosis and host cell killing by Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica was named “histolytica” (histo-: tissue; lytic-: dissolving) for its ability to destroy host tissues. Direct killing of host cells by the amoebae is likely to be the driving factor that underlies tissue destruction, but the mechanism was unclear. We recently showed that after attaching to host cells, amoebae bite off and ingest distinct host cell fragments, and that this contributes to cell killing. Here we review this process, termed “amoebic trogocytosis” (trogo-: nibble), and how this process interplays with phagocytosis, or whole cell ingestion, in this organism. “Nibbling” processes have been described in other microbes and in multicellular organisms. The discovery of amoebic trogocytosis in E. histolytica may also shed light on an evolutionarily conserved process for intercellular exchange. PMID:26070402

  10. Bordetella effector BopN is translocated into host cells via its N-terminal residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Akio; Nishimura, Ryutaro; Kuwae, Asaomi

    2017-06-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica infects a wide variety of mammals, the type III secretion system (T3SS) being involved in long-term colonization by Bordetella of the trachea and lung. T3SS translocates virulence factors (commonly referred to as effectors) into host cells, leading to alterations in the host's physiological function. The Bordetella effectors BopN and BteA are known to have roles in up-regulation of IL-10 and cytotoxicity, respectively. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which BopN is translocated into host cells has not been examined in sufficient detail. Therefore, to determine the precise mechanisms of translocation of BopN into host cells, truncated derivatives of BopN were built and the derivatives' ability to translocate into host cells evaluated by adenylate cyclase-mediated translocation assay. It was found that N-terminal amino acid (aa) residues 1-200 of BopN are sufficient for its translocation into host cells. Interestingly, BopN translocation was completely blocked by deletion of the N-terminal aa residues 6-50, indicating that the N-terminal region is critical for BopN translocation. Furthermore, BopN appears to play an auxiliary role in BteA-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, BopN can apparently translocate into host cells and may facilitate activity of BteA. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Cell Selection Using Recursive Bipartite Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert

    Wireless communication network consist nowadays of multiple standards, as well as cells of different sizes and coverage. Providing the best connection in such environment is a challenging task. We propose a new approach of solving the cell selection problem in heterogeneous networks. The method...

  12. Hybrid hepatitis B virus-host transcripts in a human hepatoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, J; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    The human PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cell line (the Alexander cell) contains at least seven copies of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integrated in its genome; but it selectively expresses the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) gene and perhaps low levels of the core gene. We have prepared a cDNA library from PLC/PRF/5 cell poly(A)+ RNA and isolated clones containing HBV sequences. Hybridization experiments show that the great majority of HBV-specific RNAs in this cell line contain HBsAg coding sequences and are presumably derived from the HBsAg gene. Primer extension experiments show that these HBsAg mRNAs are, however, derived from multiple initiation sites in the HBsAg gene and involve two promoters: one at the 5' end of the gene that can produce a protein of 45 kDa, and one located in the pre-S region that can produce two proteins of 31 kDa and the mature HBsAg, 25 kDa, respectively. The HBV RNAs are hybrid RNA species that contain HBV sequences at their 5' ends and host DNA sequences at the 3' ends. The great majority of these hybrid RNAs are transcribed from two closely related yet distinct HBV integrants. The viral-host sequences of these two related hybrid RNAs suggest that the related HBV sequences were generated from a parental fragment via duplication, translocation, and mutagenesis. These processes may play a role in HBV-related oncogenesis. Images PMID:2982146

  13. Phospholipid composition of purified Chlamydia trachomatis mimics that of the eucaryotic host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, G M; McClarty, G

    1998-08-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular eubacterial parasite capable of infecting a wide range of eucaryotic host cells. Purified chlamydiae contain several lipids typically found in eucaryotes, and it has been established that eucaryotic lipids are transported from the host cell to the parasite. In this report, we examine the phospholipid composition of C. trachomatis purified from host cells grown under a variety of conditions in which the cellular phospholipid composition was altered. A mutant CHO cell line, with a thermolabile CDP-choline synthetase, was used to show that decreased host cell phosphatidylcholine levels had no significant effect on C. trachomatis growth. However, less phosphatidylcholine was transported to the parasite and purified elementary bodies contained decreased levels of phosphatidylcholine. Brefeldin A, fumonisin B1, and exogenous sphingomyelinase were used to alter levels of host cell sphingomyelin. None of the agents had a significant effect on C. trachomatis replication. Treatment with fumonisin B1 and exogenous sphingomyelinase resulted in decreased levels of host cell sphingomyelin. This had no effect on glycerophospholipid trafficking to chlamydiae; however, sphingomyelin trafficking was reduced and elementary bodies purified from treated cells had reduced sphingomyelin content. Exposure to brefeldin A, which had no adverse effect on chlamydia growth, resulted in an increase in cellular levels of sphingomyelin and a concomitant increase in the amount of sphingomyelin in purified chlamydiae. Under the experimental conditions used, brefeldin A treatment had only a small effect on sphingomyelin trafficking to the host cell surface or to C. trachomatis. Thus, the final phospholipid composition of purified C. trachomatis mimics that of the host cell in which it is grown.

  14. MECHANISMS OF MICROBE-HOST-INTERACTION IN CROHN'S DISEASE: DYSBIOSIS VS. PATHOBIONT SELECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica F. Buttó

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease (CD is a systemic chronic inflammatory condition mainly characterized by discontinuous transmural pathology of the gastrointestinal tract and frequent extra-intestinal manifestations with intermittent episodes of remission and relapse. Genome-wide association studies identified a number of risk loci that, catalyzed by environmental triggers, result in the loss of tolerance towards commensal bacteria based on dysregulated innate effector functions and anti-microbial defense, leading to exacerbated adaptive immune responses responsible for chronic immune-mediated tissue damage. In this review, we discuss the interrelated role of changes in the intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity and immune cell functions on the pathogenesis of CD, describing the current approaches available to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Substantial effort has been dedicated to define disease-associated changes in the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis and to link pathobionts to the aetiology of IBD. A cogent definition of dysbiosis is lacking, as well as an agreement of whether pathobionts or complex shifts in the microbiota trigger inflammation in the host. Among the rarely available animal models, SAMP/Yit and TNFdeltaARE mice are the best known displaying a transmural CD-like phenotype. New hypothesis-driven mouse models e.g. epithelial-specific Caspase8-/-, ATG16L1-/- and XBP-1-/- mice validate pathway-focused function of specific CD-associated risk genes highlighting the role of Paneth cells in antimicrobial defense. To study the causal role of bacteria in initiating inflammation in the host, the use of germfree mouse models is indispensable. Unraveling the interactions of genes, immune cells and microbes constitute a criterion for the development of safe, reliable and effective treatment options for CD.

  15. Impact of host cell line adaptation on quasispecies composition and glycosylation of influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Verena Roedig

    Full Text Available The genome of influenza A viruses is constantly changing (genetic drift resulting in small, gradual changes in viral proteins. Alterations within antibody recognition sites of the viral membrane glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA result in an antigenetic drift, which requires the seasonal update of human influenza virus vaccines. Generally, virus adaptation is necessary to obtain sufficiently high virus yields in cell culture-derived vaccine manufacturing. In this study detailed HA N-glycosylation pattern analysis was combined with in-depth pyrosequencing analysis of the virus genomic RNA. Forward and backward adaptation from Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells to African green monkey kidney (Vero cells was investigated for two closely related influenza A virus PR/8/34 (H1N1 strains: from the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC or the Robert Koch Institute (RKI. Furthermore, stability of HA N-glycosylation patterns over ten consecutive passages and different harvest time points is demonstrated. Adaptation to Vero cells finally allowed efficient influenza A virus replication in Vero cells. In contrast, during back-adaptation the virus replicated well from the very beginning. HA N-glycosylation patterns were cell line dependent and stabilized fast within one (NIBSC-derived virus or two (RKI-derived virus successive passages during adaptation processes. However, during adaptation new virus variants were detected. These variants carried "rescue" mutations on the genomic level within the HA stem region, which result in amino acid substitutions. These substitutions finally allowed sufficient virus replication in the new host system. According to adaptation pressure the composition of the virus populations varied. In Vero cells a selection for "rescue" variants was characteristic. After back-adaptation to MDCK cells some variants persisted at indifferent frequencies, others slowly diminished and even

  16. Host population structure and treatment frequency maintain balancing selection on drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Edward B.; Colijn, Caroline; Hanage, William; Fraser, Christophe; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-01-01

    It is a truism that antimicrobial drugs select for resistance, but explaining pathogen- and population-specific variation in patterns of resistance remains an open problem. Like other common commensals, Streptococcus pneumoniae has demonstrated persistent coexistence of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains. Theoretically, this outcome is unlikely. We modelled the dynamics of competing strains of S. pneumoniae to investigate the impact of transmission dynamics and treatment-induced selective pressures on the probability of stable coexistence. We find that the outcome of competition is extremely sensitive to structure in the host population, although coexistence can arise from age-assortative transmission models with age-varying rates of antibiotic use. Moreover, we find that the selective pressure from antibiotics arises not so much from the rate of antibiotic use per se but from the frequency of treatment: frequent antibiotic therapy disproportionately impacts the fitness of sensitive strains. This same phenomenon explains why serotypes with longer durations of carriage tend to be more resistant. These dynamics may apply to other potentially pathogenic, microbial commensals and highlight how population structure, which is often omitted from models, can have a large impact. PMID:28835542

  17. The Natural Selection of Herpesviruses and Virus-Specific NK Cell Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C. Sun

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available During the co-evolution of cytomegalovirus (CMV and natural killer (NK cells, each has evolved specific tactics in an attempt to prevail. CMV has evolved multiple immune evasion mechanisms to avoid detection by NK cells and other immune cells, leading to chronic infection. Meanwhile, the host has evolved virus-specific receptors to counter these evasion strategies. The natural selection of viral genes and host receptors allows us to observe a unique molecular example of "survival of the fittest", as virus and immune cells try to out-maneuver one another or for the virus to achieve détente for optimal dissemination in the population.

  18. Diversity in host clone performance within a Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Peter M; Berthelot, Maud E; Young, Robert J; Graham, James W A; Racher, Andrew J; Aldana, Dulce

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve the capabilities of individual Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell lines to synthesize recombinant therapeutic proteins (rPs). However, given the increasing variety in rP molecular types and formats it may be advantageous to employ a toolbox of CHO host cell lines in biomanufacturing. Such a toolbox would contain a panel of hosts with specific capabilities to synthesize certain molecular types at high volumetric concentrations and with the correct product quality (PQ). In this work, we examine a panel of clonally derived host cell lines isolated from CHOK1SV for the ability to manufacture two model proteins, an IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) and an Fc-fusion protein (etanercept). We show that these host cell lines vary in their relative ability to synthesize these proteins in transient and stable pool production format. Furthermore, we examined the PQ attributes of the stable pool-produced Mab and etanercept (by N-glycan ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), respectively), and uncovered substantial variation between the host cell lines in Mab N-glycan micro-heterogeneity and etanercept N and O-linked macro-heterogeneity. To further investigate the capabilities of these hosts to act as cell factories, we examined the glycosylation pathway gene expression profiles as well as the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in the untransfected hosts. We uncovered a moderate correlation between ER mass and the volumetric product concentration in transient and stable pool Mab production. This work demonstrates the utility of leveraging diversity within the CHOK1SV pool to identify new host cell lines with different performance characteristics. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Tick-borne pathogens induce differential expression of genes promoting cell survival and host resistance in Ixodes ricinus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Karen L; Cook, Charlotte; Ellis, Richard J; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Johnson, Nicholas; Alberdi, Pilar; de la Fuente, José; Fooks, Anthony R

    2017-02-15

    There has been an emergence and expansion of tick-borne diseases in Europe, Asia and North America in recent years, including Lyme disease, tick-borne encephalitis and human anaplasmosis. The primary vectors implicated are hard ticks of the genus Ixodes. Although much is known about the host response to these bacterial and viral pathogens, there is limited knowledge of the cellular responses to infection within the tick vector. The bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum is able to bypass apoptotic processes in ticks, enabling infection to proceed. However, the tick cellular responses to infection with the flaviviruses tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and louping ill virus (LIV), which cause tick-borne encephalitis and louping ill respectively, are less clear. Infection and transcriptional analysis of the Ixodes ricinus tick cell line IRE/CTVM20 with the viruses LIV and TBEV, and the bacterium A. phagocytophilum, identified activation of common and distinct cellular pathways. In particular, commonly-upregulated genes included those that modulate apoptotic pathways, putative anti-pathogen genes, and genes that influence the tick innate immune response, including selective activation of toll genes. These data provide an insight into potential key genes involved in the tick cellular response to viral or bacterial infection, which may promote cell survival and host resistance.

  20. Host selection in the forest interior: cowbirds target ground-nesting species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, D.C.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated patterns of cowbird host selection in a large (1300 ha), unfragmented forest in eastern New York in 1992-3 to determine whether cowbird parasitism rates can be attributed to species-specific traits or to other features associated with nest sites. Nest height was significantly associated with parasitism (P = 0.003) in this community of 23 species (n = 430 nests, 23% parasitized). Further analysis revealed that the difference in mean nest heights between parasitized and unparasitized nests was due to species identity, and within each species there was no difference in mean nest heights between parasitized and unparasitized nests. These results imply that during 1992-3 cowbirds in this forest specialized on species that have low nests and did not necessarily select low nests regardless of species. This was further supported by a negative association across all 23 species between mean nest height and parasitism rate (P = 0.03). Thus, although most of the forest-nesting species in this community experienced cowbird parasitism, there was a tendency for higher parasitism rates on low-nesting species such as the Ovenbird, Black-and-white Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Veery, and Hermit Thrush. The Wood Thrush, a mid-range nester which is heavily parasitized in southern Illinois, experienced only 10% parasitism in our site and ranked 9th in parasitism rate, although it was the most abundant species in this forest in terms of the number of nests found. A long-term study is necessary to determine whether this cowbird population consistently parasitizes the ground-nesting species of this forest community more often than those nesting at higher levels or whether they periodically shift among hosts at different heights and in different habitats across the local landscape.

  1. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  2. Brucella abortus choloylglycine hydrolase affects cell envelope composition and host cell internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C; Mujer, Cesar V; DelVecchio, Vito G; Comerci, Diego J

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization.

  3. Perturbation of host cell cytoskeleton by cranberry proanthocyanidins and their effect on enteric infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Harmidy

    Full Text Available Cranberry-derived compounds, including a fraction known as proanthocyanidins (PACs exhibit anti-microbial, anti-infective, and anti-adhesive properties against a number of disease-causing organisms. In this study, the effect of cranberry proanthocyanidins (CPACs on the infection of epithelial cells by two enteric bacterial pathogens, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC and Salmonella Typhimurium was investigated. Immunofluorescence data showed that actin pedestal formation, required for infection by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, was disrupted in the presence of CPACs. In addition, invasion of HeLa cells by Salmonella Typhimurium was significantly reduced, as verified by gentamicin protection assay and immunofluorescence. CPACs had no effect on bacterial growth, nor any detectable effect on the production of bacterial effector proteins of the type III secretion system. Furthermore, CPACs did not affect the viability of host cells. Interestingly, we found that CPACs had a potent and dose-dependent effect on the host cell cytoskeleton that was evident even in uninfected cells. CPACs inhibited the phagocytosis of inert particles by a macrophage cell line, providing further evidence that actin-mediated host cell functions are disrupted in the presence of cranberry CPACs. Thus, although CPAC treatment inhibited Salmonella invasion and EPEC pedestal formation, our results suggest that this is likely primarily because of the perturbation of the host cell cytoskeleton by CPACs rather than an effect on bacterial virulence itself. These findings have significant implications for the interpretation of experiments on the effects of CPACs on bacteria-host cell interactions.

  4. Selective adsorption of bacterial cells onto zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Munehiro; Nakabayashi, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Yuki; Shiomi, Tohru; Yamada, Yusuke; Ino, Keita; Yamanokuchi, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Masayoshi; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2008-06-15

    Zeolites adsorb microbial cells on their surfaces and selective adsorption for specific microorganisms was seen with certain zeolites. Tests for the adsorption ability of zeolites were conducted using various established microbial cell lines. Specific cell lines were shown to selectively absorb to certain zeolites, species to species. In order to understand the selectivity of adsorption, we tested adsorption under various pH conditions and determined the zeta-potentials of zeolites and cells. The adsorption of some cell lines depended on the pH, and some microorganisms were preferentially adsorbed at acidic pH. The values of zeta-potentials were used for calculating the electric double layer interaction energy between zeolites and microbial cells. There was a correlation between the experimental adsorption results and the interaction energy. Moreover, we evaluated the surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells by using the microbial adherence to hydrocarbon (MATH) assay. In addition, we also applied this method for zeolites to quantify relative surface hydrophobicity. As a result, we found a correlation between the adsorption results and the hydrophobicity of bacterial cells and zeolites. These results suggested that adsorption could be explained mainly by electric double layer interactions and hydrophobic interactions. Finally, by using the zeolites Na-BEA and H-Y, we succeeded in clearly separating three representative microbes from a mixture of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Zeolites could adsorb each of the bacterial cell species with high selectivity even from a mixed suspension. Zeolites can therefore be used as effective carrier materials to provide an easy, rapid and accurate method for cell separation.

  5. Attachment and Invasion of Neisseria meningitidis to Host Cells Is Related to Surface Hydrophobicity, Bacterial Cell Size and Capsule

    OpenAIRE

    Bartley, Stephanie N.; Yih-Ling Tzeng; Kathryn Heel; Lee, Chiang W.; Shakeel Mowlaboccus; Torsten Seemann; Wei Lu; Ya-Hsun Lin; Ryan, Catherine S.; Christopher Peacock; Stephens, David S.; Davies, John K.; Kahler, Charlene M.

    2013-01-01

    We compared exemplar strains from two hypervirulent clonal complexes, strain NMB-CDC from ST-8/11 cc and strain MC58 from ST-32/269 cc, in host cell attachment and invasion. Strain NMB-CDC attached to and invaded host cells at a significantly greater frequency than strain MC58. Type IV pili retained the primary role for initial attachment to host cells for both isolates regardless of pilin class and glycosylation pattern. In strain MC58, the serogroup B capsule was the major inhibitory determ...

  6. Heterologously expressed Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding proteins are sufficient for invasion of host cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Francois, P; Que, Y A; Hussain, M; Heilmann, C; Moreillon, P; Lew, D; Krause, K H; Peters, Georg; Herrmann, M

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus invasion of mammalian cells, including epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblastic cells, critically depends on fibronectin bridging between S. aureus fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) and the host fibronectin receptor integrin alpha(5)beta(1) (B. Sinha et al., Cell.

  7. Host cell-derived lactate functions as an effector molecule in Neisseria meningitidis microcolony dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurlásdóttir, Sara; Engman, Jakob; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Saroj, Sunil D; Zguna, Nadezda; Lloris-Garcerá, Pilar; Ilag, Leopold L; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2017-04-01

    The development of meningococcal disease, caused by the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, is preceded by the colonization of the epithelial layer in the nasopharynx. After initial adhesion to host cells meningococci form aggregates, through pilus-pilus interactions, termed microcolonies from which the bacteria later detach. Dispersal from microcolonies enables access to new colonization sites and facilitates the crossing of the cell barrier; however, this process is poorly understood. In this study, we used live-cell imaging to investigate the process of N. meningitidis microcolony dispersal. We show that direct contact with host cells is not required for microcolony dispersal, instead accumulation of a host-derived effector molecule induces microcolony dispersal. By using a host-cell free approach, we demonstrated that lactate, secreted from host cells, initiate rapid dispersal of microcolonies. Interestingly, metabolic utilization of lactate by the bacteria was not required for induction of dispersal, suggesting that lactate plays a role as a signaling molecule. Furthermore, Neisseria gonorrhoeae microcolony dispersal could also be induced by lactate. These findings reveal a role of host-secreted lactate in microcolony dispersal and virulence of pathogenic Neisseria.

  8. Manipulation of the host cell membrane by human γ-herpesviruses EBV and KSHV for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhu, Qing; Ding, Ling; Liang, Qing; Cai, Qiliang

    2016-10-01

    The cell membrane regulates many physiological processes including cellular communication, homing and metabolism. It is therefore not surprising that the composition of the host cell membrane is manipulated by intracellular pathogens. Among these, the human oncogenic herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) exploit the host cell membrane to avoid immune surveillance and promote viral replication. Accumulating evidence has shown that both EBV and KSHV directly encode several similar membrane-associated proteins, including receptors and receptor-specific ligands (cytokines and chemokines), to increase virus fitness in spite of host antiviral immune responses. These proteins are expressed individually at different phases of the EBV/KSHV life cycle and employ various mechanisms to manipulate the host cell membrane. In recent decades, much effort has been made to address how these membrane-based signals contribute to viral tumorigenesis. In this review, we summarize and highlight the recent understanding of how EBV and KSHV similarly manipulate host cell membrane signals, particularly how remodeling of the cell membrane allows EBV and KSHV to avoid host antiviral immune responses and favors their latent and lytic infection.

  9. Combined single-cell quantitation of host and SIV genes and proteins ex vivo reveals host-pathogen interactions in individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Diane L; McGinnis, Kathleen; Finak, Greg; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Gottardo, Raphael; Roederer, Mario

    2017-06-01

    CD4 T cells harboring HIV-1/SIV represent a formidable hurdle to eradicating infection, and yet their detailed phenotype remains unknown. Here we integrate two single-cell technologies, flow cytometry and highly multiplexed quantitative RT-PCR, to characterize SIV-infected CD4 T cells directly ex vivo. Within individual cells, we correlate the cellular phenotype, in terms of host protein and RNA expression, with stages of the viral life cycle defined by combinatorial expression of viral RNAs. Spliced RNA+ infected cells display multiple memory and activation phenotypes, indicating virus production by diverse CD4 T cell subsets. In most (but not all) cells, progressive infection accompanies post-transcriptional downregulation of CD4 protein, while surface MHC class I is largely retained. Interferon-stimulated genes were also commonly upregulated. Thus, we demonstrate that combined quantitation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation at the single-cell level informs in vivo mechanisms of viral replication and immune evasion.

  10. Cholesterol and host cell surface proteins contribute to cell-cell fusion induced by the Burkholderia type VI secretion system 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Liam; Haug, Maria; Klein, Kristina; Willmann, Matthias; Bohn, Erwin; Chiantia, Salvatore; Schwarz, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Following escape into the cytoplasm of host cells, Burkholderia pseudomallei and the related species Burkholderia thailandensis employ the type VI secretion system 5 (T6SS-5) to induce plasma membrane fusion with an adjacent host cell. This process leads to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and facilitates bacterial access to an uninfected host cell in a direct manner. Despite its importance in virulence, the mechanism of the T6SS-5 and the role of host cell factors in cell-cell fusion remain elusive. To date, the T6SS-5 is the only system of bacterial origin known to induce host-cell fusion. To gain insight into the nature of T6SS-5-stimulated membrane fusion, we investigated the contribution of cholesterol and proteins exposed on the host cell surface, which were shown to be critically involved in virus-mediated giant cell formation. In particular, we analyzed the effect of host cell surface protein and cholesterol depletion on the formation of multinucleated giant cells induced by B. thailandensis. Acute protease treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages during infection with B. thailandensis followed by agarose overlay assays revealed a strong reduction in the number of cell-cell fusions compared with EDTA treated cells. Similarly, proteolytic treatment of specifically infected donor cells or uninfected recipient cells significantly decreased multinucleated giant cell formation. Furthermore, modulating host cell cholesterol content by acute cholesterol depletion from cellular membranes by methyl- β-cyclodextrin treatment or exogenous addition of cholesterol impaired the ability of B. thailandensis to induce cell-cell fusions. The requirement of physiological cholesterol levels suggests that the membrane organization or mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer influence the fusion process. Altogether, our data suggest that membrane fusion induced by B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis involves a complex interplay between the T6SS-5 and the host cell.

  11. Cholesterol and host cell surface proteins contribute to cell-cell fusion induced by the Burkholderia type VI secretion system 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Whiteley

    Full Text Available Following escape into the cytoplasm of host cells, Burkholderia pseudomallei and the related species Burkholderia thailandensis employ the type VI secretion system 5 (T6SS-5 to induce plasma membrane fusion with an adjacent host cell. This process leads to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and facilitates bacterial access to an uninfected host cell in a direct manner. Despite its importance in virulence, the mechanism of the T6SS-5 and the role of host cell factors in cell-cell fusion remain elusive. To date, the T6SS-5 is the only system of bacterial origin known to induce host-cell fusion. To gain insight into the nature of T6SS-5-stimulated membrane fusion, we investigated the contribution of cholesterol and proteins exposed on the host cell surface, which were shown to be critically involved in virus-mediated giant cell formation. In particular, we analyzed the effect of host cell surface protein and cholesterol depletion on the formation of multinucleated giant cells induced by B. thailandensis. Acute protease treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages during infection with B. thailandensis followed by agarose overlay assays revealed a strong reduction in the number of cell-cell fusions compared with EDTA treated cells. Similarly, proteolytic treatment of specifically infected donor cells or uninfected recipient cells significantly decreased multinucleated giant cell formation. Furthermore, modulating host cell cholesterol content by acute cholesterol depletion from cellular membranes by methyl- β-cyclodextrin treatment or exogenous addition of cholesterol impaired the ability of B. thailandensis to induce cell-cell fusions. The requirement of physiological cholesterol levels suggests that the membrane organization or mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer influence the fusion process. Altogether, our data suggest that membrane fusion induced by B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis involves a complex interplay between the T6SS-5 and

  12. Selection in the host structures the microbiota associated with developing cod larvae (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Ingrid; Coward, Eivind; Andersen, Tom; Vadstein, Olav

    2015-10-01

    Marine fish larvae are immature upon hatching, and share their environment with high numbers of bacteria. The microbial communities associated with developing fish larvae might be structured by other factors than those important in developing terrestrial animals. Here, we analysed the beta (β)-diversity of the microbiota associated with developing cod larvae and compared it with the bacterial communities in water and live feed by applying pyrosequencing of bar coded v4 16S rDNA amplicons. A total of 15 phyla were observed in the cod larval microbiota. Proteobacteria was the most abundant, followed by Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. The composition and diversity of the cod larval microbiota changed considerably with age. The temporal and spatial patterns of β-diversity could not be explained by stochastic processes, and did not coincide with changes in the rearing conditions. Furthermore, the larval microbiota was highly distinct from the water and the live feed microbiota, particularly at early developmental stages. However, the similarity between larval and water microbiota increased with age. This study suggests that strong selection in the host structures the cod larval microbiota. The changes in community structure observed with increasing age can be explained by altered selection pressure due to development of the intestinal system. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Novel host plant leads to the loss of sexual dimorphism in a sexually selected male weapon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Pablo E; Miller, Christine W

    2017-08-16

    In this time of massive global change, species are now frequently interacting with novel players. Greater insight into the impact of these novel interactions on traits linked to fitness is essential, because effects on these traits can hinder population existence or promote rapid adaptation. Sexually selected weapons and ornaments frequently influence fitness and often have heightened condition-dependence in response to nutrition. Condition-dependence in response to different ecological conditions, a form of developmental plasticity, may be responsible for much of the intraspecific variation in sexually selected ornaments and weapons in wild populations. Here we examined the consequences of developing on a novel plant for the expression of size and shape in the leaf-footed cactus bug Narnia femorata (Hemiptera: Coreidae). The males of this species possess enlarged, sexually dimorphic femurs on their hind legs. These legs are used as weapons in male-male contests. Females are typically larger in overall body size. Our study revealed that developing upon a novel host can lead to pronounced phenotypically plastic change in sexually dimorphic traits. Male hind femurs were greatly impacted by the novel diet to the extent that the sexual dimorphism in hind femurs was lost. Further, dimorphism in body size increased, as males became tiny adults while females better maintained their body size. These patterns underscore the complex effects that novel species interactions may have on sexual phenotypes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S; De La Torre, Carola M; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G; Grundler, Florian M W

    2015-10-13

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction.

  15. The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostowy, Serge; Shenoy, Avinash R.

    2016-01-01

    Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton — actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and movement — have important functions in innate immunity and cellular self-defence. Investigations using cellular and animal models have shown that these cytoskeletal proteins are crucial for sensing bacteria and for mobilizing effector mechanisms to eliminate them. In this Review, we highlight the emerging roles of the cytoskeleton as a structural determinant of cell-autonomous host defence. PMID:26292640

  16. Cell-host, LINE and environment: Three players in search of a balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Re, Brunella; Giorgi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements -1 (LINEs, L1s) are retroelements occupying almost 17% of the human genome. L1 retrotransposition can cause deleterious effects on the host-cell and it is generally inhibited by suppressive mechanisms, but it can occur in some specific cells during early development as well as in some tumor cells and in the presence of several environmental factors. In a recent publication we reported that extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field can affect L1 retrotransposition in neuroblastoma cells. In this commentary we discuss the interaction between environment and L1 activity in the light of the new emerging paradigm of host-LINE relationship.

  17. Cif type III effector protein: a smart hijacker of the host cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2009-09-01

    During coevolution with their hosts, bacteria have developed functions that allow them to interfere with the mechanisms controlling the proliferation of eukaryotic cells. Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is one of these cyclomodulins, the family of bacterial effectors that interfere with the host cell cycle. Acquired early during evolution by bacteria isolated from vertebrates and invertebrates, Cif is an effector protein of type III secretion machineries. Cif blocks the host cell cycle in G1 and G2 by inducing the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). The x-ray crystal structure of Cif reveals it to be a divergent member of a superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases. This review summarizes and discusses what we know about Cif, from the bacterial gene to the host target.

  18. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Edward I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated and 901 (CAM treated THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold, eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy stimulates endogenous host progenitor cells to improve colonic epithelial regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sémont

    Full Text Available Patients who undergo pelvic radiotherapy may develop severe and chronic complications resulting from gastrointestinal alterations. The lack of curative treatment highlights the importance of novel and effective therapeutic strategies. We thus tested the therapeutic benefit of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC treatment and proposed molecular mechanisms of action. MSC efficacy was tested in an experimental model of radiation-induced severe colonic ulceration histologically similar to that observed in patients. In this model, MSC from bone marrow were administered intravenously, immediately or three weeks (established lesions after irradiation. MSC therapy reduces radiation-induced colonic ulceration and increases animal survival. MSC treatment induces therapeutic efficacy whatever the time of cell infusion. Infused-MSC engraft in the colon but also increase endogenous MSC mobilization in blood that have lasting benefits over time. In vitro analysis demonstrates that the MSC effect is mediated by paracrine mechanisms through the non-canonical WNT (Wingless integration site pathway. In irradiated rat colons, MSC treatment increases the expression of the non-canonical WNT4 ligand by epithelial cells. The epithelial regenerative process is improved after MSC injection by stimulation of colonic epithelial cells positive for SOX9 (SRY-box containing gene 9 progenitor/stem cell markers. This study demonstrates that MSC treatment induces stimulation of endogenous host progenitor cells to improve the regenerative process and constitutes an initial approach to arguing in favor of the use of MSC to limit/reduce colorectal damage induced by radiation.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry Into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Santos Barrias

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T.cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T.cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasithophorous vacuole (VP. Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the parasitophorous vacuole release from the host cell plasma membrane. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T.cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete VP formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss other mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis Exosomes Deliver Cargo to Host Cells and Mediate Host∶Parasite Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Olivia; Lustig, Gila; Stevens, Grant C.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogential tract where it remains extracellular and adheres to epithelial cells. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Here, we use a combination of methodologies including cell fractionation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, RNA, proteomic and cytokine analyses and cell adherence assays to examine pathogenic properties of T. vaginalis. We have found that T.vaginalis produces and secretes microvesicles with physical and biochemical properties similar to mammalian exosomes. The parasite-derived exosomes are characterized by the presence of RNA and core, conserved exosomal proteins as well as parasite-specific proteins. We demonstrate that T. vaginalis exosomes fuse with and deliver their contents to host cells and modulate host cell immune responses. Moreover, exosomes from highly adherent parasite strains increase the adherence of poorly adherent parasites to vaginal and prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, exosomes from poorly adherent strains had no measurable effect on parasite adherence. Exosomes from parasite strains that preferentially bind prostate cells increased binding of parasites to these cells relative to vaginal cells. In addition to establishing that parasite exosomes act to modulate host∶parasite interactions, these studies are the first to reveal a potential role for exosomes in promoting parasite∶parasite communication and host cell colonization. PMID:23853596

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis exosomes deliver cargo to host cells and mediate host∶parasite interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Twu

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogential tract where it remains extracellular and adheres to epithelial cells. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Here, we use a combination of methodologies including cell fractionation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, RNA, proteomic and cytokine analyses and cell adherence assays to examine pathogenic properties of T. vaginalis. We have found that T.vaginalis produces and secretes microvesicles with physical and biochemical properties similar to mammalian exosomes. The parasite-derived exosomes are characterized by the presence of RNA and core, conserved exosomal proteins as well as parasite-specific proteins. We demonstrate that T. vaginalis exosomes fuse with and deliver their contents to host cells and modulate host cell immune responses. Moreover, exosomes from highly adherent parasite strains increase the adherence of poorly adherent parasites to vaginal and prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, exosomes from poorly adherent strains had no measurable effect on parasite adherence. Exosomes from parasite strains that preferentially bind prostate cells increased binding of parasites to these cells relative to vaginal cells. In addition to establishing that parasite exosomes act to modulate host∶parasite interactions, these studies are the first to reveal a potential role for exosomes in promoting parasite∶parasite communication and host cell colonization.

  3. Apicomplexans pulling the strings: manipulation of the host cell cytoskeleton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Rita; Soares, Helena; Hemphill, Andrew; Leitão, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Invasive stages of apicomplexan parasites require a host cell to survive, proliferate and advance to the next life cycle stage. Once invasion is achieved, apicomplexans interact closely with the host cell cytoskeleton, but in many cases the different species have evolved distinct mechanisms and pathways to modulate the structural organization of cytoskeletal filaments. The host cell cytoskeleton is a complex network, largely, but not exclusively, composed of microtubules, actin microfilaments and intermediate filaments, all of which are modulated by associated proteins, and it is involved in diverse functions including maintenance of cell morphology and mechanical support, migration, signal transduction, nutrient uptake, membrane and organelle trafficking and cell division. The ability of apicomplexans to modulate the cytoskeleton to their own advantage is clearly beneficial. We here review different aspects of the interactions of apicomplexans with the three main cytoskeletal filament types, provide information on the currently known parasite effector proteins and respective host cell targets involved, and how these interactions modulate the host cell physiology. Some of these findings could provide novel targets that could be exploited for the development of preventive and/or therapeutic strategies.

  4. Autophagy controls an intrinsic host defense to bacteria by promoting epithelial cell survival: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Young Chang

    Full Text Available Cell death is a critical host response to regulate the fate of bacterial infections, innate immune responses, and ultimately, disease outcome. Shigella spp. invade and colonize gut epithelium in human and nonhuman primates but adult mice are naturally resistant to intra-gastric Shigella infection. In this study, however, we found Shigella could invade the terminal ileum of the mouse small intestine by 1 hour after infection and be rapidly cleared within 24 h. These early phase events occurred shortly after oral infection resulting in epithelial shedding, degranulation of Paneth cells, and cell death in the intestine. During this process, autophagy proceeded without any signs of inflammation. In contrast, blocking autophagy in epithelial cells enhanced host cell death, leading to tissue destruction and to inflammation, suggesting that autophagic flow relieves cellular stress associated with host cell death and inflammation. Herein we propose a new concept of "epithelial barrier turnover" as a general intrinsic host defense mechanism that increases survival of host cells and inhibits inflammation against enteric bacterial infections, which is regulated by autophagy.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi uses macropinocytosis as an additional entry pathway into mammalian host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrias, E S; Reignault, L C; De Souza, W; Carvalho, T M U

    2012-11-01

    Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. It is no different with Trypanosoma cruzi. Evidences indicate that T. cruzi entry may occur by endocytosis/phagocytosis or by an active manner. Although macropinocytosis is largely considered an endocytic process where cells internalize only large amounts of solutes, several pathogens use this pathway to enter into host cells. To investigate whether T. cruzi entry into peritoneal macrophages and LLC-MK2 epithelial cells can be also mediated through a macropinocytosis-like process, we used several experimental strategies presently available to characterize macropinocytosis such as the use of different inhibitors. These macropinocytosis' inhibitors blocked internalization of T. cruzi by host cells. To further support this, immunofluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used. Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that after treatment, parasites remained attached to the external side of host cell plasma membrane. Proteins such as Rabankyrin 5, tyrosine kinases, Pak1 and actin microfilaments, which participate in macropinosome formation, were localized at T. cruzi entry sites. We also observed co-localization between the parasite and an endocytic fluid phase marker. All together, these results indicate that T. cruzi is able to use multiple mechanisms of penetration into host cell, including macropinocytosis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Toxoplasma gondii Development of Its Replicative Niche: in Its Host Cell and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens can replicate efficiently only after they manipulate and modify their host cells to create an environment conducive to replication. While diverse cellular pathways are targeted by different pathogens, metabolism, membrane and cytoskeletal architecture formation, and cell death are the three primary cellular processes that are modified by infections. Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan that infects ∼30% of the world's population and causes severe and life-threatening disease in developing fetuses, in immune-comprised patients, and in certain otherwise healthy individuals who are primarily found in South America. The high prevalence of Toxoplasma in humans is in large part a result of its ability to modulate these three host cell processes. Here, we highlight recent work defining the mechanisms by which Toxoplasma interacts with these processes. In addition, we hypothesize why some processes are modified not only in the infected host cell but also in neighboring uninfected cells. PMID:24951442

  7. Persistence of donor-derived protein in host myeloid cells after induced rejection of engrafted allogeneic bone marrow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toshiki I.; Fujisaki, Joji; Carlson, Alicia L.; Lin, Charles P.; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Objective In recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to treat hematologic malignancies, we have unexpectedly observed anti-tumor effects in association with donor cell rejection in both mice and humans. Host-type CD8 T cells were shown to be required for these anti-tumor effects in the murine model. Since sustained host CD8 T cell activation was observed in the murine bone marrow following the disappearance of donor chimerism in the peripheral blood, we hypothesized that donor antigen presentation in the bone marrow might be prolonged. Materials and Methods To assess this hypothesis, we established mixed chimerism with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive allogeneic bone marrow cells, induced rejection of the donor cells by giving recipient leukocyte infusions (RLI), and utilized in vivo microscopy to follow GFP-positive cells. Results After peripheral donor leukocytes disappeared, GFP persisted within host myeloid cells surrounding the blood vessels in the bone marrow, suggesting that the host myeloid cells captured donor-derived GFP protein. Conclusions Since the host-versus-graft reaction promotes the induction of anti-tumor responses in this model, this retention of donor-derived protein may play a role in the efficacy of RLI as an anti-tumor therapy. PMID:20167247

  8. Integrin-mediated host cell invasion by type 1-piliated uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danelle S Eto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, the primary causative agent of urinary tract infections, typically express filamentous adhesive organelles called type 1 pili that mediate both bacterial attachment to and invasion of bladder urothelial cells. Several host proteins have previously been identified as receptors for type 1 pili, but none have been conclusively shown to promote UPEC entry into host bladder cells. Using overlay assays with FimH, the purified type 1 pilus adhesin, and mass spectroscopy, we have identified beta1 and alpha3 integrins as key host receptors for UPEC. FimH recognizes N-linked oligosaccharides on these receptors, which are expressed throughout the urothelium. In a bladder cell culture system, beta1 and alpha3 integrin receptors co-localize with invading type 1-piliated bacteria and F-actin. FimH-mediated bacterial invasion of host bladder cells is inhibited by beta1 and alpha3 integrin-specific antibodies and by disruption of the beta1 integrin gene in the GD25 fibroblast cell line. Phosphorylation site mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of beta1 integrin that alter integrin signaling also variably affect UPEC entry into host cells, by either attenuating or boosting invasion frequencies. Furthermore, focal adhesion and Src family kinases, which propagate integrin-linked signaling and downstream cytoskeletal rearrangements, are shown to be required for FimH-dependent bacterial invasion of target host cells. Cumulatively, these results indicate that beta1 and alpha3 integrins are functionally important receptors for type 1 pili-expressing bacteria within the urinary tract and possibly at other sites within the host.

  9. Traversing the Cell: Agrobacterium T-DNA’s Journey to the Host Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Agrobacterium is unique in its ability to conduct interkingdom genetic exchange. Virulent Agrobacterium strains transfer single-strand forms of T-DNA (T-strands) and several Virulence effector proteins through a bacterial type IV secretion system into plant host cells. T-strands must traverse the plant wall and plasma membrane, traffic through the cytoplasm, enter the nucleus, and ultimately target host chromatin for stable integration. Because any DNA sequence placed between T-DNA “borders” can be transferred to plants and integrated into the plant genome, the transfer and intracellular trafficking processes must be mediated by bacterial and host proteins that form complexes with T-strands. This review summarizes current knowledge of proteins that interact with T-strands in the plant cell, and discusses several models of T-complex (T-strand and associated proteins) trafficking. A detailed understanding of how these macromolecular complexes enter the host cell and traverse the plant cytoplasm will require development of novel technologies to follow molecules from their bacterial site of synthesis into the plant cell, and how these transferred molecules interact with host proteins and sub-cellular structures within the host cytoplasm and nucleus. PMID:22645590

  10. An aspartyl protease defines a novel pathway for export of Toxoplasma proteins into the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Michael J; Sleebs, Brad E; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Garnham, Alexandra; Franco, Magdalena; Marino, Nicole D; Panas, Michael W; Ferguson, David Jp; Enciso, Marta; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Stewart, Rebecca J; Dewson, Grant; Smyth, Gordon K; Smith, Brian J; Masters, Seth L; Boothroyd, John C; Boddey, Justin A; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-11-18

    Infection by Toxoplasma gondii leads to massive changes to the host cell. Here, we identify a novel host cell effector export pathway that requires the Golgi-resident aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5). We demonstrate that ASP5 cleaves a highly constrained amino acid motif that has similarity to the PEXEL-motif of Plasmodium parasites. We show that ASP5 matures substrates at both the N- and C-terminal ends of proteins and also controls trafficking of effectors without this motif. Furthermore, ASP5 controls establishment of the nanotubular network and is required for the efficient recruitment of host mitochondria to the vacuole. Assessment of host gene expression reveals that the ASP5-dependent pathway influences thousands of the transcriptional changes that Toxoplasma imparts on its host cell. All these changes result in attenuation of virulence of Δasp5 tachyzoites in vivo. This work characterizes the first identified machinery required for export of Toxoplasma effectors into the infected host cell.

  11. RNA-Seq unveils new attributes of the heterogeneous Salmonella-host cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Pucciarelli, M Graciela

    2017-04-03

    High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has uncovered hundreds of small RNAs and complex modes of RNA regulation in every bacterium analyzed to date. This complexity agrees with the adaptability of most bacteria to varied environments including, in the case of pathogens, the new niches encountered in the host. Recent RNA-Seq studies have analyzed simultaneously gene expression in the intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica and infected host cells at population and single-cell level. Distinct polarization states or interferon responses in the infected macrophage were linked to variable growth rates or activities of defined virulence regulators in intra-phagosomal bacteria. Intracellular Salmonella, however, exhibit disparate intracellular lifestyles depending the host cell, ranging from a hyper-replicative cytosolic state in epithelial cells to a non-replicative intra-phagosomal condition in varied host cell types. The basis of such diverse pathogen-host communications could be examined by RNA-Seq studies in single intracellular Salmonella cells, certainly a challenge for future investigations.

  12. Eimeria bovis infection modulates endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism for successful replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Penny H; Hirzmann, Joerg; Kerner, Katharina; Gimpl, Gerald; Lochnit, Guenter; Hermosilla, Carlos R; Taubert, Anja

    2015-09-23

    During first merogony Eimeria bovis forms large macromeronts in endothelial host cells containing >120 000 merozoites I. During multiplication, large amounts of cholesterol are indispensable for the enormous offspring membrane production. Cholesterol auxotrophy was proven for other apicomplexan parasites. Consequently they scavenge cholesterol from their host cell apparently in a parasite-specific manner. We here analyzed the influence of E. bovis infection on endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism and found considerable differences to other coccidian parasites. Overall, free cholesterol significantly accumulated in E. bovis infected host cells. Furthermore, a striking increase of lipid droplet formation was observed within immature macromeronts. Artificial host cell lipid droplet enrichment significantly improved E. bovis merozoite I production confirming the key role of lipid droplet contents for optimal parasite proliferation. The transcription of several genes being involved in both, cholesterol de novo biosynthesis and low density lipoprotein-(LDL) mediated uptake, was significantly up-regulated at a time in infected cells suggesting a simultaneous exploitation of these two cholesterol acquisition pathways. E. bovis scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol apparently through significantly increased levels of surface LDL receptor abundance and LDL binding to infected cells. Consequently, LDL supplementation significantly improved parasite replication. The up-regulation of the oxidized LDL receptor 1 furthermore identified this scavenger receptor as a key molecule in parasite-triggered LDL uptake. Moreover, cellular cholesterol processing was altered in infected cells as indicated by up-regulation of cholesterol-25-hydroxylase and sterol O-acyltransferase. Overall, these results show that E. bovis considerably exploits the host cell cholesterol metabolism to guarantee its massive intracellular growth and replication.

  13. The neural bases of host plant selection in a Neuroecology framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina E Reisenman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how animals make use of environmental information to guide behavior is a fundamental problem in the field of neuroscience. Similarly, the field of ecology seeks to understand the role of behavior in shaping interactions between organisms at various levels of organization, including population-, community- and even ecosystem-level scales. Together, the newly emerged field of Neuroecology seeks to unravel this fundamental question by studying both the function of neurons at many levels of the sensory pathway and the interactions between organisms and their natural environment. The interactions between herbivorous insects and their host plants are ideal examples of Neuroecology given the strong ecological and evolutionary forces and the underlying physiological and behavioral mechanisms that shaped these interactions. In this review we focus on an exemplary herbivorous insect within the Lepidoptera, the giant sphinx moth Manduca sexta, as much is known about the natural behaviors related to hostplant selection and the involved neurons at several level of the sensory pathway. We also discuss how herbivore-induced plant odorants and secondary metabolites in floral nectar in turn can affect moth behavior, and the underlying neural mechanisms.

  14. The host galaxies of ultra hard X-ray selected AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Michael J.

    One of the great mysteries surrounding active galactic nuclei (AGN) is their triggering mechanism. Since the discovery that almost all massive galaxies host nuclear supermassive black holes, it has become clear that a trigger mechanism is required to 'turn on' and continue to fuel the central black hole. While it is established that accretion processes are responsible for the energy emitted, the source of the accreting material is still controversial. Furthermore, the energy input from phases of black hole growth is thought to be a key regulator in the formation of galaxies and the establishment of various scaling relations. Theorists often invoke galaxy mergers as the violent mechanism to drive gas into the central regions and ignite luminous quasars, but among more common moderate luminosity AGN, there has been great controversy whether secular processes or mergers dominate AGN fueling. A survey in the ultra hard X-ray band (14--195 keV) is an important new way to answer the fundamental question of AGN fueling. This method is independent of selection effects such as dust extinction and obscuration that plague surveys at other wavelengths because of the ability of the primary continuum to easily pass through large columns of obscuring gas and dust (2 keV) imaging.

  15. The Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III Secretion Systems manipulate host cell MAPK for critical steps in pathogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia

    2010-12-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a food-borne pathogen causing inflammation of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Pathogenic strains of this bacterium possess two Type III Secretion Systems (TTSS) that deliver effector proteins into host cells. In order to better understand human host cell responses to V. parahaemolyticus, the modulation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) activation in epithelial cells by an O3:K6 clinical isolate, RIMD2210633, was investigated. The importance of MAPK activation for the ability of the bacterium to be cytotoxic and to induce secretion of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) was determined.

  16. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs: Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Oswald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  17. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs): Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions. PMID:22069713

  18. Assessing Host-Virus Codivergence for Close Relatives of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infecting African Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinda, Nadège F; Ehlers, Bernhard; Wertheim, Joel O; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Bergl, Richard A; Boesch, Christophe; Akonkwa, Dieudonné Boji Mungu; Eckardt, Winnie; Fruth, Barbara; Gillespie, Thomas R; Gray, Maryke; Hohmann, Gottfried; Karhemere, Stomy; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Nishuli, Radar; Pauly, Maude; Petrzelkova, Klara J; Robbins, Martha M; Todd, Angelique; Schubert, Grit; Stoinski, Tara S; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Peeters, Martine; Leendertz, Fabian H; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    It has long been hypothesized that polyomaviruses (PyV; family Polyomaviridae) codiverged with their animal hosts. In contrast, recent analyses suggested that codivergence may only marginally influence the evolution of PyV. We reassess this question by focusing on a single lineage of PyV infecting hominine hosts, the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) lineage. By characterizing the genetic diversity of these viruses in seven African great ape taxa, we show that they exhibit very strong host specificity. Reconciliation analyses identify more codivergence than noncodivergence events. In addition, we find that a number of host and PyV divergence events are synchronous. Collectively, our results support codivergence as the dominant process at play during the evolution of the MCPyV lineage. More generally, our results add to the growing body of evidence suggesting an ancient and stable association of PyV and their animal hosts. The processes involved in viral evolution and the interaction of viruses with their hosts are of great scientific interest and public health relevance. It has long been thought that the genetic diversity of double-stranded DNA viruses was generated over long periods of time, similar to typical host evolutionary timescales. This was also hypothesized for polyomaviruses (family Polyomaviridae), a group comprising several human pathogens, but this remains a point of controversy. Here, we investigate this question by focusing on a single lineage of polyomaviruses that infect both humans and their closest relatives, the African great apes. We show that these viruses exhibit considerable host specificity and that their evolution largely mirrors that of their hosts, suggesting that codivergence with their hosts played a major role in their diversification. Our results provide statistical evidence in favor of an association of polyomaviruses and their hosts over millions of years. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii RON4 binds to heparan sulfate on the host cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemae, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Sugi, Tatsuki; Han, Yongmei; Gong, Haiyan; Ishiwa, Akiko; Recuenco, Frances C; Murakoshi, Fumi; Takano, Ryo; Murata, Yuho; Nagamune, Kisaburo; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi; Kato, Kentaro

    2018-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry neck protein 4 (TgRON4) is a component of the moving junction, a key structure for host cell invasion. We previously showed that host cellular β-tubulin is a binding partner of TgRON4 in the invasion process. Here, to identify other binding partners of TgRON4 in the host cell, we examined the binding of TgRON4 to components of the host cell surface. TgRON4 binds to various mammalian cells, but this binding disappeared in glycosaminoglycan- and heparan sulfate-deficient CHO cells and after heparitinase treatment of mammalian cells. The C-terminal half of TgRON4 showed relatively strong binding to cells and heparin agarose. A glycoarray assay indicated that TgRON4 binds to heparin and modified heparin derivatives. Immunoprecipitation of T. gondii-infected CHO cell lysates showed that TgRON4 interacts with glypican 1 during Toxoplasma invasion. This interaction suggests a role for heparan sulfate in parasite invasion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancement and abrogation : modifications of host immune status influence IL-2 and LAK cell immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P. Steller (Erick)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis will discuss the role immune cells and the host immune system can play in enhancement and abrogation of this novel immunotherapy with interleukin 2 and lymphokine-activated killer cells. Chapter 3 and 4 will discuss the scoring methods in this intraperitoneal cancer and

  1. Habitat selection of a parasitoid mediated by volatiles informing on host and intraguild predator densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotes, Belén; Rännbäck, Linda Marie; Björkman, Maria

    2015-01-01

    To locate and evaluate host patches before oviposition, parasitoids of herbivorous insects utilize plant volatiles and host-derived cues, but also evaluate predator-derived infochemicals to reduce predation risks. When foraging in host habitats infested with entomopathogenic fungi that can infect...... both a parasitoid and its host, parasitoids may reduce the risk of intraguild predation (IGP) by avoiding such patches. In this study, we examined whether the presence of the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium brunneum and Beauveria bassiana in soil habitats of a root herbivore, Delia radicum, affects...

  2. Host Actin Polymerization Tunes the Cell Division Cycle of an Intracellular Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sloan Siegrist

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Growth and division are two of the most fundamental capabilities of a bacterial cell. While they are well described for model organisms growing in broth culture, very little is known about the cell division cycle of bacteria replicating in more complex environments. Using a D-alanine reporter strategy, we found that intracellular Listeria monocytogenes (Lm spend a smaller proportion of their cell cycle dividing compared to Lm growing in broth culture. This alteration to the cell division cycle is independent of bacterial doubling time. Instead, polymerization of host-derived actin at the bacterial cell surface extends the non-dividing elongation period and compresses the division period. By decreasing the relative proportion of dividing Lm, actin polymerization biases the population toward cells with the highest propensity to form actin tails. Thus, there is a positive-feedback loop between the Lm cell division cycle and a physical interaction with the host cytoskeleton.

  3. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell engineering to increase sialylation of recombinant therapeutic proteins by modulating sialyltransferase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nan; Mascarenhas, Joaquina; Sealover, Natalie R; George, Henry J; Brooks, Jeanne; Kayser, Kevin J; Gau, Brian; Yasa, Isil; Azadi, Parastoo; Archer-Hartmann, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans of human proteins possess both α2,6- and α2,3-linked terminal sialic acid (SA). Recombinant glycoproteins produced in Chinese hamster overy (CHO) only have α2,3-linkage due to the absence of α2,6-sialyltransferase (St6gal1) expression. The Chinese hamster ST6GAL1 was successfully overexpressed using a plasmid expression vector in three recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG)-producing CHO cell lines. The stably transfected cell lines were enriched for ST6GAL1 overexpression using FITC-Sambucus nigra (SNA) lectin that preferentially binds α2,6-linked SA. The presence of α2,6-linked SA was confirmed using a novel LTQ Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (LTQ MS) method including MSn fragmentation in the enriched ST6GAL1 Clone 27. Furthermore, the total SA (mol/mol) in IgG produced by the enriched ST6GAL1 Clone 27 increased by 2-fold compared to the control. For host cell engineering, the CHOZN(®) GS host cell line was transfected and enriched for ST6GAL1 overexpression. Single-cell clones were derived from the enriched population and selected based on FITC-SNA staining and St6gal1 expression. Two clones ("ST6GAL1 OE Clone 31 and 32") were confirmed for the presence of α2,6-linked SA in total host cell protein extracts. ST6GAL1 OE Clone 32 was subsequently used to express SAFC human IgG1. The recombinant IgG expressed in this host cell line was confirmed to have α2,6-linked SA and increased total SA content. In conclusion, overexpression of St6gal1 is sufficient to produce recombinant proteins with increased sialylation and more human-like glycoprofiles without combinatorial engineering of other sialylation pathway genes. This work represents our ongoing effort of glycoengineering in CHO host cell lines for the development of "bio-better" protein therapeutics and cell culture vaccine production. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  4. Glycan analysis in cell culture-based influenza vaccine production: influence of host cell line and virus strain on the glycosylation pattern of viral hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Jana; Rapp, Erdmann; Hennig, René; Genzel, Yvonne; Jordan, Ingo; Sandig, Volker; Reichl, Udo

    2009-07-09

    Mammalian cell culture processes are commonly used for production of recombinant glycoproteins, antibodies and viral vaccines. Since several years there is an increasing interest in cell culture-based influenza vaccine production to overcome limitations of egg-based production systems, to improve vaccine supply and to increase flexibility in vaccine manufacturing. With the switch of the production system several key questions concerning the possible impact of host cell lines on antigen quality, passage-dependent selection of certain viral phenotypes or changes in hemagglutinin (HA) conformation have to be addressed to guarantee safety and efficiency of vaccines. In contrast to the production of recombinant glycoproteins, comparatively little is known regarding glycosylation of HA, derived from mammalian cell cultures. Within this study, a capillary DNA-sequencer (based on CGE-LIF technology), was utilized for N-glycan analysis of three different influenza virus strains, which were replicated in six different cell lines. Detailed results concerning the influence of the host cell line on complexity and composition of the HA N-glycosylation pattern, are presented. Strong host cell but also virus type and subtype dependence of HA N-glycosylation was found. Clear differences were already observed, by N-glycan fingerprint comparison. Further structural investigations of the N-glycan pools revealed that host cell dependence of HA N-glycosylation was mainly related to minor variations of the (monomeric) constitution of single N-glycans. To some extent, shifts in the N-glycan pool composition regarding the proportion of different N-glycan types were observed. In contrast to this, a principal switch of the N-glycan type attached to HA was observed when comparing different virus types (A and B) and subtypes (H1N1 and H3N2).

  5. Repression of Salmonella host cell invasion by aromatic small molecules from the human fecal metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Rafael J M; Alves, Eduardo S; Wang, Melody; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Granato, Alessandra; Han, Jun; Gill, Hira; Jacobson, Kevan; Lobo, Leandro A; Domingues, Regina M C P; Borchers, Christoph H; Davies, Julian E; Finlay, B Brett; Antunes, L Caetano M

    2017-07-28

    The human microbiome is a collection of microorganisms that inhabit every surface of the body that is exposed to the environment, generally coexisting peacefully with their host. These microbes have important functions such as the production of vitamins, maturation of the immune system and protection against pathogens. We have previously shown that a small-molecule extract from the human fecal microbiome has a strong repressive effect on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium host cell invasion by modulating the expression of genes involved in this process. Here, we describe the characterization of this biological activity. Using a series of purification methods, we obtained fractions with biological activity and characterized them by mass spectrometry. These experiments revealed an abundance of aromatic compounds in the bioactive fraction. Selected compounds were obtained from commercial sources and tested with respect to their ability to repress the expression of hilA, the gene encoding the master regulator of invasion genes in Salmonella We found that the aromatic compound 3,4-dimethylbenzoic acid acts as a strong inhibitor of hilA expression as well as invasion of cultured host cells by Salmonella Future studies should reveal the molecular details of this phenomenon, such as the signaling cascades involved in sensing this bioactive molecule.Importance Microbes constantly sense and adapt to their environment. Often, this is achieved through the production and sensing of small extracellular molecules. The human body is colonized by complex communities of microbes, and, given their biological and chemical diversity, these ecosystems represent a platform where the production and sensing of molecules occurs. In previous work, we showed that small molecules produced by microbes from the human gut can significantly impair the virulence of the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica Here, we describe a specific compound from the human gut that produces this same effect

  6. Third-party regulatory T cells prevent murine acute graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Song, Yunejin; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2017-10-19

    Adoptive therapy with regulatory T (Treg) cells to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) would benefit from a strategy to improve homing to the sites of inflammation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although donor-derived Treg cells have mainly been used in these models, third-party-derived Treg cells are a promising alternative for cell-based immunotherapy, as they can be screened for pathogens and cell activity, and banked for GVHD prevention. In this study, we explored major histocompatibility complex (MHC) disparities between Treg cells and conventional T cells in HSCT to evaluate the impact of these different cell populations on the prevention of acute GVHD, as well as survival after allogeneic transplantation. To induce acute GVHD, lethally irradiated BALB/c (H-2d) mice were transplanted with 5 × 105 T cell-depleted bone marrow cells and 5 × 105 CD4+CD25- splenic T cells from C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. Recipients were injected with 5 × 105 cultured donor-, host-, or third-party-derived CD4+CD25+CD62L+ Treg cells (bone marrow transplantation + day 1). Systemic infusion of three groups of Treg cell improved clinicopathological manifestations and survival in an acute GVHD model. Although donor-derived Treg cells were immunologically the most effective, the third-party-derived Treg cell therapy group displayed equal regulation of expansion of CD4+CD25+- Foxp3+ Treg cells and suppressive CD4+IL-17+ T-helper (Th17) cells in ex vivo assays compared with the donor- and host-derived groups. Our findings demonstrate that the use of third-party Treg cells is a viable alternative to donor-derived Treg cellular therapy in clinical settings, in which human leukocyte antigen-matched donors are not always readily available.

  7. Virus versus host cell translation love and hate stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Anastassia V; Haenni, Anne-Lise; Ramírez, Bertha Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis by viruses occurs at all levels of translation. Even prior to protein synthesis itself, the accessibility of the various open reading frames contained in the viral genome is precisely controlled. Eukaryotic viruses resort to a vast array of strategies to divert the translation machinery in their favor, in particular, at initiation of translation. These strategies are not only designed to circumvent strategies common to cell protein synthesis in eukaryotes, but as revealed more recently, they also aim at modifying or damaging cell factors, the virus having the capacity to multiply in the absence of these factors. In addition to unraveling mechanisms that may constitute new targets in view of controlling virus diseases, viruses constitute incomparably useful tools to gain in-depth knowledge on a multitude of cell pathways.

  8. Label-free live cell imaging by Confocal Raman Microscopy identifies CHO host and producer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Harreither, Eva; Schosserer, Markus; Puxbaum, Verena; Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Borth, Nicole; Gierlinger, Notburga; Grillari, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    As a possible viable and non-invasive method to identify high producing cells, Confocal Raman Microscopy was shown to be able to differentiate CHO host cell lines and derivative production clones. Cluster analysis of spectra and their derivatives was able to differentiate between different producer cell lines and a host, and also distinguished between an intracellular region of high lipid and protein content that in structure resembles the Endoplasmic Reticulum. This ability to identify the ER may be a major contributor to the identification of high producers. PCA enabled the discrimination even of host cell lines and their subclones with inherently higher production capacity. The method is thus a promising option that may contribute to early, non-invasive identification of high potential candidates during cell line development and possibly could also be used for proof of identity of established production clones. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A ToxA-like protein from Cochliobolus heterostrophus induces light-dependent leaf necrosis with host selectivity on maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxA, the first discovered fungal proteinaceous host-selective toxin (HST), was originally identified from Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr), and its homologues have not been identified from any other ascomycetes except Parastagonospora nodorum. Here we report the identification of a ToxA-like pro...

  10. Receptor binding and cell entry of Old World arenaviruses reveal novel aspects of virus-host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Stefan

    2009-05-10

    Ten years ago, the first cellular receptor for the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the highly pathogenic Lassa virus (LASV) was identified as alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG), a versatile receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Biochemical analysis of the interaction of alpha-DG with arenaviruses and ECM proteins revealed a strikingly similar mechanism of receptor recognition that critically depends on specific sugar modification on alpha-DG involving a novel class of putative glycosyltransferase, the LARGE proteins. Interestingly, recent genome-wide detection and characterization of positive selection in human populations revealed evidence for positive selection of a locus within the LARGE gene in populations from Western Africa, where LASV is endemic. While most enveloped viruses that enter the host cell in a pH-dependent manner use clathrin-mediated endocytosis, recent studies revealed that the Old World arenaviruses LCMV and LASV enter the host cell predominantly via a novel and unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the virus is rapidly delivered to endosomes via an unusual route of vesicular trafficking that is largely independent of the small GTPases Rab5 and Rab7. Since infection of cells with LCMV and LASV depends on DG, this unusual endocytotic pathway could be related to normal cellular trafficking of the DG complex. Alternatively, engagement of arenavirus particles may target DG for an endocytotic pathway not normally used in uninfected cells thereby inducing an entry route specifically tailored to the pathogen's needs.

  11. Selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Roberts, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this article an in vitro system for the selection of restriction endonucleases using artificial cells. The artificial cells are generated in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion by in vitro compartmentalization. Each aqueous compartment contains a reconstituted transcription/translation mix along with the dispersed DNA templates. In the compartments containing endonuclease genes, an endonuclease expressed in vitro cleaves its own DNA template adjacent to the gene, leaving a sticky end. The pooled DNA templates are then ligated to an adaptor with a compatible end. The endonuclease genes are then enriched by adaptor-specific PCR on the ligation mix. We demonstrate that the system can achieve at least 100-fold enrichment in a single round of selection. It is sensitive enough to enrich an active endonuclease gene from a 1:10(5) model library in 2-3 rounds of selection. Finally, we describe experiments where we selected endonuclease genes directly from a bacterial genomic DNA source in three rounds of selections: the known PstI gene from Providencia stuartii and the new TspMI gene from Thermus sp. manalii. This method provides a unique tool for cloning restriction endonuclease genes and has many other potential applications.

  12. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  13. Identification of a peptide-pheromone that enhances Listeria monocytogenes escape from host cell vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Alonzo, Francis; Freitag, Nancy E

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades mammalian cells and escapes from membrane-bound vacuoles to replicate within the host cell cytosol. Gene products required for intracellular bacterial growth and bacterial spread to adjacent cells are regulated by a transcriptional activator known as PrfA. PrfA becomes activated following L. monocytogenes entry into host cells, however the signal that stimulates PrfA activation has not yet been defined. Here we provide evidence for L. monocytogenes secretion of a small peptide pheromone, pPplA, which enhances the escape of L. monocytogenes from host cell vacuoles and may facilitate PrfA activation. The pPplA pheromone is generated via the proteolytic processing of the PplA lipoprotein secretion signal peptide. While the PplA lipoprotein is dispensable for pathogenesis, bacteria lacking the pPplA pheromone are significantly attenuated for virulence in mice and have a reduced efficiency of bacterial escape from the vacuoles of nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Mutational activation of PrfA restores virulence and eliminates the need for pPplA-dependent signaling. Experimental evidence suggests that the pPplA peptide may help signal to L. monocytogenes its presence within the confines of the host cell vacuole, stimulating the expression of gene products that contribute to vacuole escape and facilitating PrfA activation to promote bacterial growth within the cytosol.

  14. Identification of a Peptide-Pheromone that Enhances Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Host Cell Vacuoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Alonzo, Francis; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades mammalian cells and escapes from membrane-bound vacuoles to replicate within the host cell cytosol. Gene products required for intracellular bacterial growth and bacterial spread to adjacent cells are regulated by a transcriptional activator known as PrfA. PrfA becomes activated following L. monocytogenes entry into host cells, however the signal that stimulates PrfA activation has not yet been defined. Here we provide evidence for L. monocytogenes secretion of a small peptide pheromone, pPplA, which enhances the escape of L. monocytogenes from host cell vacuoles and may facilitate PrfA activation. The pPplA pheromone is generated via the proteolytic processing of the PplA lipoprotein secretion signal peptide. While the PplA lipoprotein is dispensable for pathogenesis, bacteria lacking the pPplA pheromone are significantly attenuated for virulence in mice and have a reduced efficiency of bacterial escape from the vacuoles of nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Mutational activation of PrfA restores virulence and eliminates the need for pPplA-dependent signaling. Experimental evidence suggests that the pPplA peptide may help signal to L. monocytogenes its presence within the confines of the host cell vacuole, stimulating the expression of gene products that contribute to vacuole escape and facilitating PrfA activation to promote bacterial growth within the cytosol. PMID:25822753

  15. Synthetic immunostimulatory glycans interference with host cell apoptosis upon of Toxoplasma gondii infection, in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Eassa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is a protozoan infection of humans and animals caused by Toxoplasma gondii, and it’s continuous public health and food safety issue. The tachyzoites (Tg of T. gondii are the most important stage, as they come in direct contact with immune cells such as a macrophage. Tg can modulate and prevent apoptosis of immune cells while promoting survival of the pathogen. Infections caused by Tg can be eradicated if immune cells could stimulate apoptosis and kill pathogens upon exposure. Apoptosis is characterized by the release of mediators, namely Caspases (Cas. New means are required for inducing apoptosis and enhance immunity in the infected host cell to control toxoplasmosis. The present study investigated whether Synthetic Immuno-stimulatory Glycans (SIGs influence Cas and Nitric oxide (NO release and led to Tg damage. Galβ1-3Gal-PAA-fluor (SIG1, Fucα1-4GlcNAcβ-PAA-fluor (SIG2 and GlcNAcβ1-3GalNAcα-PAA-fluor (SIG3 constituted samples studied principally. Murine macrophage had been exposed to the Tg then the SIGs effects on Cas and NO production were determined after 20 hours of pathogen phagocytosis. Here we report that the SIGs had potent in vitro activity against T. gondii; SIG2 was more effective than SIG1 and SIG3, representative by SIG2 treated infected macrophages can induced infected macrophages to release Cas1, 3, and 9. Maximum production of NO by infected macrophages was noticed following the expoxure to all SIGs. Therefore the present study provided the method for the selection of SIGs ligands bearing immunostimulatory factor and apoptotic stimuli properties.

  16. Selection and Amplification of Hosts From Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries of Macrocyclic Disulfides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Sijbren; Furlan, Ricardo L.E.; Sanders, Jeremy K.M.

    2002-01-01

    We have discovered two receptors for two different guests from a single dynamic combinatorial library. Each of the two guests amplifies the formation of a tightly binding host at the expense of unfit library members. Small differences in host-guest binding translate into useful differences in

  17. PKH26 can transfer to host cells in vitro and vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Run; Sun, Haitao; Chen, Lei; Liu, Fang; Yao, Chen; Du, Mouxuan; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2013-01-15

    The fluorescent dye, PKH26, which mainly binds to the cell membrane, has been used as the cell tracer to locate the transplanted cells in host for a long time. However, there was no detailed report that whether the PKH26 dye was specific to the transplanted cells. Therefore, the aim of this article is to explore the effect of cells debris as the cracking cells from the PKH26-labeled adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the cells in vitro and the host in vivo. After we tested the proliferation and toxicity of PKH26 to the ADSCs by the Cell Count-8 kit and alamar blue assay, we constructed 2 models, coculturing lots of PKH26-labeled cell debris with the unlabeled ADSCs in vitro and injecting via the tail vein in rat, to evaluate the specificity of the PKH26 dye. The result indicated that the PKH26 didn't inhibit the proliferation and had no toxicity to the ADSCs compared with the unlabeled ADSCs, but the cell debris cracking from PKH26-labeled transplanted cells can cause the unlabeled cells to emit red fluorescence in vitro and also lead the tissues displaying red fluorescence in vivo. We can conclude that the PKH26 dye, used as a cell tracer for a long time, was not an ideal cell tracer.

  18. Role of volatile and non-volatile plant secondary metabolites in host tree selection by Christmas beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Mamoru; Foley, William J; Floyd, Robert B

    2011-03-01

    Individual Eucalyptus trees in south-eastern Australia vary considerably in susceptibility to herbivores. On the one hand, studies with insect herbivores have suggested that variation in the concentrations of foliar monoterpenes is related to variation in susceptibility. On the other, studies with marsupial folivores have suggested that variation in the concentrations of sideroxylonals (a group of formylated phloroglucinol compounds) is responsible for variation in susceptibility. We examined relative importance of sideroxylonals and 1,8-cineole (a dominant monoterpene) in host tree selection by Christmas beetles (Anoplognathus species: Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) by using no-choice experiments, choice/no-choice experiments, and manipulative experiments in which concentrations of sideroxylonals or 1,8-cineole were altered. We used two species of host Eucalyptus, one species of non-host Eucalyptus, and three species of non-host non-Eucalyptus trees. Leaf consumption by Christmas beetles was negatively correlated with the concentrations of sideroxylonals and 1,8-cineole. Artificial increases in the concentration of sideroxylonals or 1,8-cineole reduced leaf consumption by Christmas beetles. An artificial reduction in foliar monoterpenes had no effect on leaf consumption by the beetles when leaves contained high or very low concentrations of sideroxylonals. However, when the concentration of sideroxylonals was moderate, a reduction in the foliar monoterpenes increased leaf consumption by the beetles. Therefore, monoterpenes such as 1,8-cineole may be used as a negative cue by Christmas beetles. The pattern of food consumption on non-host Eucalyptus species and non-host non-Eucalyptus species suggest that both positive and negative cues may be used by Christmas beetles to select host trees.

  19. African swine fever virus uses macropinocytosis to enter host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Elena G; Quintas, Ana; Pérez-Núñez, Daniel; Nogal, Marisa; Barroso, Susana; Carrascosa, Ángel L; Revilla, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is caused by a large and highly pathogenic DNA virus, African swine fever virus (ASFV), which provokes severe economic losses and expansion threats. Presently, no specific protection or vaccine against ASF is available, despite the high hazard that the continued occurrence of the disease in sub-Saharan Africa, the recent outbreak in the Caucasus in 2007, and the potential dissemination to neighboring countries, represents. Although virus entry is a remarkable target for the development of protection tools, knowledge of the ASFV entry mechanism is still very limited. Whereas early studies have proposed that the virus enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, the specific mechanism used by ASFV remains uncertain. Here we used the ASFV virulent isolate Ba71, adapted to grow in Vero cells (Ba71V), and the virulent strain E70 to demonstrate that entry and internalization of ASFV includes most of the features of macropinocytosis. By a combination of optical and electron microscopy, we show that the virus causes cytoplasm membrane perturbation, blebbing and ruffles. We have also found that internalization of the virions depends on actin reorganization, activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, and signaling events typical of the macropinocytic mechanism of endocytosis. The entry of virus into cells appears to directly stimulate dextran uptake, actin polarization and EGFR, PI3K-Akt, Pak1 and Rac1 activation. Inhibition of these key regulators of macropinocytosis, as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, results in a considerable decrease in ASFV entry and infection. In conclusion, this study identifies for the first time the whole pathway for ASFV entry, including the key cellular factors required for the uptake of the virus and the cell signaling involved.

  20. African swine fever virus uses macropinocytosis to enter host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena G Sánchez

    Full Text Available African swine fever (ASF is caused by a large and highly pathogenic DNA virus, African swine fever virus (ASFV, which provokes severe economic losses and expansion threats. Presently, no specific protection or vaccine against ASF is available, despite the high hazard that the continued occurrence of the disease in sub-Saharan Africa, the recent outbreak in the Caucasus in 2007, and the potential dissemination to neighboring countries, represents. Although virus entry is a remarkable target for the development of protection tools, knowledge of the ASFV entry mechanism is still very limited. Whereas early studies have proposed that the virus enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, the specific mechanism used by ASFV remains uncertain. Here we used the ASFV virulent isolate Ba71, adapted to grow in Vero cells (Ba71V, and the virulent strain E70 to demonstrate that entry and internalization of ASFV includes most of the features of macropinocytosis. By a combination of optical and electron microscopy, we show that the virus causes cytoplasm membrane perturbation, blebbing and ruffles. We have also found that internalization of the virions depends on actin reorganization, activity of Na(+/H(+ exchangers, and signaling events typical of the macropinocytic mechanism of endocytosis. The entry of virus into cells appears to directly stimulate dextran uptake, actin polarization and EGFR, PI3K-Akt, Pak1 and Rac1 activation. Inhibition of these key regulators of macropinocytosis, as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, results in a considerable decrease in ASFV entry and infection. In conclusion, this study identifies for the first time the whole pathway for ASFV entry, including the key cellular factors required for the uptake of the virus and the cell signaling involved.

  1. Host-parasite interactions that guide red blood cell invasion by malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Aditya S; Egan, Elizabeth S; Duraisingh, Manoj T

    2015-05-01

    Malaria is caused by the infection and proliferation of parasites from the genus Plasmodium in red blood cells (RBCs). A free Plasmodium parasite, or merozoite, released from an infected RBC must invade another RBC host cell to sustain a blood-stage infection. Here, we review recent advances on RBC invasion by Plasmodium merozoites, focusing on specific molecular interactions between host and parasite. Recent work highlights the central role of host-parasite interactions at virtually every stage of RBC invasion by merozoites. Biophysical experiments have for the first time measured the strength of merozoite-RBC attachment during invasion. For P. falciparum, there have been many key insights regarding the invasion ligand PfRh5 in particular, including its influence on host species tropism, a co-crystal structure with its RBC receptor basigin, and its suitability as a vaccine target. For P. vivax, researchers identified the origin and emergence of the parasite from Africa, demonstrating a natural link to the Duffy-negative RBC variant in African populations. For the simian parasite P. knowlesi, zoonotic invasion into human cells is linked to RBC age, which has implications for parasitemia during an infection and thus malaria. New studies of the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing RBC invasion by Plasmodium parasites have shed light on various aspects of parasite biology and host cell tropism, and indicate opportunities for malaria control.

  2. Serine phosphorylation of cortactin is required for maximal host cell invasion by Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Derrick R; Konkel, Michael E

    2013-11-04

    Campylobacter jejuni causes acute disease characterized by severe diarrhea containing blood and leukocytes, fever, and abdominal cramping. Disease caused by C. jejuni is dependent on numerous bacterial and host factors. C. jejuni invasion of the intestinal epithelial cells is seen in both clinical samples and animal models indicating that host cell invasion is, in part, necessary for disease. C. jejuni utilizes a flagellar Type III Secretion System (T3SS) to deliver the Campylobacter invasion antigens (Cia) to host cells. The Cia proteins modulate host cell signaling leading to actin cytoskeleton rearrangement necessary for C. jejuni host cell invasion, and are required for the development of disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that the C. jejuni CiaD effector protein mediates Erk 1/2 dependent cytoskeleton rearrangement. We showed that CiaD was required for the maximal phosphorylation of Erk 1/2 by performing an immunoblot with a p-Erk 1/2 specific antibody and that Erk 1/2 participates in C. jejuni invasion of host cells by performing the gentamicin protection assay in the presence and absence of the PD98059 (a potent inhibitor of Erk 1/2 activation). CiaD was also found to be required for the maximal phosphorylation of cortactin S405 and S418, as judged by immunoblot analysis. The response of human INT 407 epithelial cells to infection with C. jejuni was evaluated by confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine the extent of membrane ruffling. This analysis revealed that CiaD, Erk 1/2, and cortactin participate in C. jejuni-induced membrane ruffling. Finally, cortactin and N-WASP were found to be involved in C. jejuni invasion of host cells using siRNA to N-WASP, and siRNA to cortactin, coupled with the gentamicin protection assay. We conclude that CiaD is involved in the activation of Erk 1/2 and that activated Erk 1/2 facilitates C. jejuni invasion by phosphorylation of cortactin on serine 405 and 418. This is the first time

  3. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  4. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  5. Langerhans cells are not required for graft-versus-host disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongmei; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Matte-Martone, Catherine; Tan, Hung Sheng; Venkatesan, Srividhya; Johnson, Kody; Demetris, Anthony J.; McNiff, Jennifer; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Shlomchik, Warren D.

    2011-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is initiated and maintained by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that prime alloreactive donor T cells. APCs are therefore attractive targets for GVHD prevention and treatment. APCs are diverse in phenotype and function, making understanding how APC subsets contribute to GVHD necessary for the development of APC-targeted therapies. Langerhans cells (LCs) have been shown to be sufficient to initiate skin GVHD in a major histocompatibility complex–mismatched model...

  6. Role of B cells in host defense against primary Coxiella burnetii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenlaub, Laura; Elliott, Alexandra; Freches, Danielle; Mitchell, William J; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-12-01

    Despite Coxiella burnetii being an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, our recent study demonstrated that B cells play a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity to C. burnetii infection by producing protective antibodies. However, the role of B cells in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether B cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. The results showed that peritoneal B cells were able to phagocytose virulent C. burnetii bacteria and form Coxiella-containing vacuoles (CCVs) and that C. burnetii can infect and replicate in peritoneal B1a subset B cells in vitro, demonstrating a potential role for peritoneal B cells in host defense against C. burnetii infection in vivo. In addition, the results showing that B1a cells secreted a high level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in response to C. burnetii infection in vitro suggest that B1a cells may play an important role in inhibiting the C. burnetii infection-induced inflammatory response. The observation that adoptive transfer of peritoneal B cells did not significantly affect the severity of C. burnetii infection-induced diseases in both severe combined immunity-deficient (SCID) and μMT mice indicates that peritoneal B cells alone may not be able to control C. burnetii infection. In contrast, our finding that C. burnetii infection induced more-severe splenomegaly and a higher bacterial burden in the spleens of B1a cell-deficient Bruton's tyrosine kinase x-linked immunity-deficient (BTK(xid)) mice than in their wild-type counterparts further suggests that B1a cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Invasion of Eukaryotic Cells by Legionella Pneumophila: A Common Strategy for all Hosts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Hoffman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental micro-organism capable of producing an acute lobar pneumonia, commonly referred to as Legionnaires’ disease, in susceptible humans. Legionellae are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, where they survive in biofilms or intracellularly in various protozoans. Susceptible humans become infected by breathing aerosols laden with the bacteria. The target cell for human infection is the alveolar macrophage, in which the bacteria abrogate phagolysosomal fusion. The remarkable ability of L pneumophila to infect a wide range of eukaryotic cells suggests a common strategy that exploits very fundamental cellular processes. The bacteria enter host cells via coiling phagocytosis and quickly subvert organelle trafficking events, leading to formation of a replicative phagosome in which the bacteria multiply. Vegetative growth continues for 8 to 10 h, after which the bacteria develop into a short, highly motile form called the ‘mature form’. The mature form exhibits a thickening of the cell wall, stains red with the Gimenez stain, and is between 10 and 100 times more infectious than agar-grown bacteria. Following host cell lysis, the released bacteria infect other host cells, in which the mature form differentiates into a Gimenez-negative vegetative form, and the cycle begins anew. Virulence of L pneumophila is considered to be multifactorial, and there is growing evidence for both stage specific and sequential gene expression. Thus, L pneumophila may be a good model system for dissecting events associated with the host-parasite interactions.

  8. Systems approach to characterizing cell signaling in host-pathogen response to staphylococcus toxin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosiano, J. J. (John J.); Gupta, G. (Goutam); Gray, P. C. (Perry C.); Hush, D. R. (Donald R.); Fugate, M. L. (Michael L.); Cleland, T. J. (Timothy J.); Roberts, R. M. (Randy M.); Hlavacek, W. S. (William S.); Smith, J. L. (Jessica L.)

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is capable of highly sensitive and specific responses when challenged by pathogens. It is believed that the human immune repertoire - the total number of distinct antigens that can be recognized - is between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 11}. The most specific responses are cell mediated and involve complex and subtle communications among the immune cells via small proteins known as cytokines. The details of host-pathogen response are exceedingly complex, involving both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms. These include the presentation of antigen by B cells to helper T cells and subsequent stimulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression within both B and T-cell populations. These in turn lead to the secretion of cytokines and receptor expression. Intercellular cytokine signaling can trigger a host of immune responses including the proliferation and specialization of naive immune cells and the marshaling of effector cells to combat infection. In the ever-evolving game of threat and countermeasure played out by pathogens and their intended hosts, there are direct assaults aimed at subverting the immune system's ability to recognize antigens and respond effectively to challenge by pathogens. Staphylococcus is one of these. Staph bacteria secrete a variety of toxins known generically as superantigens. Superantigen molecules bind simultaneously to the MHC receptors of antigen presenting cells and the TCR receptors of helper T cells, locking them in place and leading to overstimulation. This strategy can effectively burn out the immune system in a matter of days.

  9. B cells as a critical node in the microbiota-host immune system network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Emma; Balmer, Maria L; Macpherson, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Mutualism with our intestinal microbiota is a prerequisite for healthy existence. This requires physical separation of the majority of the microbiota from the host (by secreted antimicrobials, mucus, and the intestinal epithelium) and active immune control of the low numbers of microbes that overcome these physical and chemical barriers, even in healthy individuals. In this review, we address how B-cell responses to members of the intestinal microbiota form a robust network with mucus, epithelial integrity, follicular helper T cells, innate immunity, and gut-associated lymphoid tissues to maintain host-microbiota mutualism. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Active penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into host cells: historical considerations and current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecia Maria Ulisses Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of scientific groups working on several countries have made efforts to better understand the process of invasion of several types of host cells by Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. In this mini-review we analyze the two mechanisms of invasion considered to be relevant: active penetration and endocytosis. The term active penetration is considered in view of its original description by Dvorak and co-workers. Taking into consideration all results obtained we conclude that endocytosis, with its many variations, is the only mechanism used by T. cruzi to invade host cells.

  11. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. A Reinterpretation of Cell Transplantation: GFP Transfer From Donor to Host Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortin-Martinez, Arturo; Tsai, En Leh Samuel; Nickerson, Philip E; Bergeret, Miriam; Lu, Yao; Smiley, Sheila; Comanita, Lacrimioara; Wallace, Valerie A

    2017-04-01

    The utilization of fluorescent reporter transgenes to discriminate donor versus host cells has been a mainstay of photoreceptor transplantation research, the assumption being that the presence of reporter+ cells in outer nuclear layer (ONL) of transplant recipients represents the integration of donor photoreceptors. We previously reported that GFP+ cells in the ONL of cone-GFP transplanted retinas exhibited rod-like characteristics, raising the possibility that GFP signal in recipient tissue may not be a consequence of donor cell integration. To investigate the basis for this mismatch, we performed a series of transplantations using multiple transgenic donor and recipient models, and assessed cell identity using nuclear architecture, immunocytochemistry, and DNA prelabeling. Our results indicate that GFP+ cells in the ONL fail to exhibit hallmark elements of donor cells, including nuclear hetero/euchromatin architecture. Furthermore, GFP signal does not appear to be a consequence of classic donor/host cell fusion or transfating post-transplant, but is most likely due to material exchange between donor and host photoreceptors. This transfer can be mediated by rods and cones, is bidirectional between donor and host cells, requires viable photoreceptors, occurs preferentially at sites of outer limiting membrane disruption and can be detected in second-order retinal neurons and Müller glia. Collectively, these data warrant re-evaluation of the use of lineage tracing fluorescent reporters in transplantation studies involving the retina and other CNS tissues. Furthermore, the reinterpretation of previous functional rescue data, based on material exchange, rather than cell integration, may offer a novel approach to vision rescue. Stem Cells 2017;35:932-939. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Pixuna virus modifies host cell cytoskeleton to secure infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Pedro Ignacio; Albrieu-Llinás, Guillermo; Mlewski, Estela Cecilia; Monetti, Marina; Fozzatti, Laura; Cuffini, Cecilia; Fernández Romero, José; Kunda, Patricia; Paglini, María Gabriela

    2017-07-18

    Pixuna virus (PIXV) is an enzootic member of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus complex and belongs to the New World cluster of alphaviruses. Herein we explore the role of the cellular cytoskeleton during PIXV replication. We first identified that PIXV undergoes an eclipse phase consisting of 4 h followed by 20 h of an exponential phase in Vero cells. The infected cells showed morphological changes due to structural modifications in actin microfilaments (MFs) and microtubules (MTs). Cytoskeleton-binding agents, that alter the architecture and dynamics of MFs and MTs, were used to study the role of cytoskeleton on PIXV replication. The virus production was significantly affected (p < 0.05) after treatment with paclitaxel or nocodazole due to changes in the MTs network. Interestingly, disassembly of MFs with cytochalasin D, at early stage of PIXV replication cycle, significantly increased the virus yields in the extracellular medium (p < 0.005). Furthermore, the stabilization of actin network with jasplakinolide had no effect on virus yields. Our results demonstrate that PIXV relies not only on intact MTs for the efficient production of virus, but also on a dynamic actin network during the early steps of viral replication.

  14. Mast cell-mediated reactions of host defense and tissue injury: the regulatory role of eosinophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzl, E J

    1977-09-01

    Immunological stimulation of mast cells, by way of either IgE- or IgG-directed reactions, initiates the rapid release of an array of chemical mediators. The predominant local tissue effects of these mediators collectively constitute a defensive response of the host. The early humoral phase of defense is exemplified by the alterations in microvascular permeability induced by histamine which provide a local concentration of immunoglobulins and complement components. The later cellular phase of defense is composed of the PMN leukocytes that accumulate in response to mast cell-derived chemotactic principles and which phagocytose and degrade opsonized foreign material, thus eliminating the inciting stimulus. Of the several endogenous regulatory mechanisms which act to contain the immediate hypersensitivity reaction, the eosinophil has a special role since it is specifically attracted to sites of mast cell activation and has selective concentrations of several enzymes which degrade the mast cell-derived chemical mediators. Failure of the local regulatory processes can permit the mast cell responses of host defense to become pathological reactions leading to tissue injury by virtue of persistence of high levels of humoral mediators and/or increasing infiltration with PMN leukocytes.

  15. T Follicular Helper Cells Promote a Beneficial Gut Ecosystem for Host Metabolic Homeostasis by Sensing Microbiota-Derived Extracellular ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Perruzza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-gated ionotropic P2X7 receptor regulates T follicular helper (Tfh cell abundance in the Peyer’s patches (PPs of the small intestine; deletion of P2rx7, encoding for P2X7, in Tfh cells results in enhanced IgA secretion and binding to commensal bacteria. Here, we show that Tfh cell activity is important for generating a diverse bacterial community in the gut and that sensing of microbiota-derived extracellular ATP via P2X7 promotes the generation of a proficient gut ecosystem for metabolic homeostasis. The results of this study indicate that Tfh cells play a role in host-microbiota mutualism beyond protecting the intestinal mucosa by induction of affinity-matured IgA and suggest that extracellular ATP constitutes an inter-kingdom signaling molecule important for selecting a beneficial microbial community for the host via P2X7-mediated regulation of B cell help.

  16. Host-cell-dependent role of actin cytoskeleton during the replication of a human strain of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeletti, M C; De Conto, F; Ferraglia, F; Pinardi, F; Gatti, R; Orlandini, G; Covan, S; Motta, F; Rodighiero, I; Dettori, G; Chezzi, C

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the possible involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in the modulation of host permissiveness to A/NWS/33 human influenza virus infection in two mammalian (MDCK and LLC-MK2) cell lines in vitro. During the early stages of infection, no appreciable association between incoming NWS/33 virions and cortical actin was detectable in the permissive MDCK model by confocal microscopy, while extensive colocalization and a slower infection progression were observed in LLC-MK2 cells. In the latter model, we also demonstrated the inability of the virus to carry out multiple replication cycles, irrespective of the presence of cleaved HA subunits in the released virions. Treatment with the actin-depolymerizing agent cytochalasin D significantly increased the infection efficiency in LLC-MK2 cells, while a detrimental effect was observed in the MDCK cell line. Our data suggest a selective role of the actin network in inducing a restriction to influenza virus replication, mostly depending on its molecular organization, the host cell type and virus replication phase.

  17. Dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin selectively ablates T-CAEBV cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Zhao; Yao, Chun-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Tian, Zhi-Qing; Jin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Tong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) represents a new subtype of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by high morbidity and mortality rates and often leads to malignant transformation of infected cells. Efficient therapeutic strategies are presently unavailable; therefore, the development of therapies to prevent CAEBV-mediated transformation and disease progression is crucial. Here, we used microarray analysis and luciferase reporter assays to reveal the potential role of activated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) in T cell type of-CAEBV infection. Using a series of cellular and molecular experiments, we demonstrated that dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), a novel NF-kB inhibitor, can selectively induce apoptosis in SNT-16 cells infected with CAEBV. Mechanistic studies suggested that DHMEQ induces SNT-16 cell apoptosis through NF-kB inhibition coupled with oxidative stress generation. Thus, activated NF-kB could be a new target for CAEBV therapeutics. Owing to its selective targeting ability, DHMEQ may be a candidate for a novel therapeutic regimen to control the progression of CAEBV infections.

  18. Is Black Hole Growth a Universal Process? Exploring Selection Effects in Measurements of AGN Accretion Rates and Host Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mackenzie

    2018-01-01

    At the center of essentially every massive galaxy is a monstrous black hole producing luminous radiation driven by the accretion of gas. By observing these active galactic nuclei (AGN) we may trace the growth of black holes across cosmic time. However, our knowledge of the full underlying AGN population is hindered by complex observational biases. My research aims to untangle these biases by using a novel approach to simulate the impact of selection effects on multiwavelength observations.The most statistically powerful studies of AGN to date come from optical spectroscopic surveys, with some reporting a complex relationship between AGN accretion rates and host galaxy characteristics. However, the optical waveband can be strongly influenced by selection effects and dilution from host galaxy star formation. I have shown that accounting for selection effects, the Eddington ratio distribution for optically-selected AGN is consistent with a broad power-law, as seen in the X-rays (Jones et al. 2016). This suggests that a universal Eddington ratio distribution may be enough to describe the full multiwavelength AGN population.Building on these results, I have expanded a semi-numerical galaxy formation simulation to include this straightforward prescription for AGN accretion and explicitly model selection effects. I have found that a simple model for AGN accretion can broadly reproduce the host galaxies and halos of X-ray AGN, and that different AGN selection techniques yield samples with very different host galaxy properties (Jones et al. 2017). Finally, I will discuss the capabilities of this simulation to build synthetic multiwavelength SEDs in order to explore what AGN populations would be detected with the next generation of observatories. This research is supported by a NASA Jenkins Graduate Fellowship under grant no. NNX15AU32H.

  19. Temporal expression of bacterial proteins instructs host CD4 T cell expansion and Th17 development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Joo Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens can substantially alter gene expression within an infected host depending on metabolic or virulence requirements in different tissues, however, the effect of these alterations on host immunity are unclear. Here we visualized multiple CD4 T cell responses to temporally expressed proteins in Salmonella-infected mice. Flagellin-specific CD4 T cells expanded and contracted early, differentiated into Th1 and Th17 lineages, and were enriched in mucosal tissues after oral infection. In contrast, CD4 T cells responding to Salmonella Type-III Secretion System (TTSS effectors steadily accumulated until bacterial clearance was achieved, primarily differentiated into Th1 cells, and were predominantly detected in systemic tissues. Thus, pathogen regulation of antigen expression plays a major role in orchestrating the expansion, differentiation, and location of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in vivo.

  20. Secretion of Cpn0796 from Chlamydia pneumoniae into the host cell cytoplasm by an autotransporter mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandahl, Brian B S; Stensballe, Allan; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    By comparison of proteome profiles of purified Chlamydia pneumoniae and whole lysates of C. pneumoniae infected HEp-2 cells, an N-terminal fragment of the previously uncharacterized chlamydial protein Cpn0796 was identified as a secreted protein. A 38 kDa cleavage product of Cpn0796 was present...... of C. pneumoniae infected HEp-2 and BHK cells. Furthermore, Cpn0796 was detected in the cytoplasm of infected cells in the lungs of C. pneumoniae infected C57Bl mice. When cleavage was inhibited, Cpn0796 was retained in the chlamydiae. We propose that Cpn0796 is an autotransporter the N......-terminal of which is translocated to the host cell cytoplasm. This is the first example of secretion of a Chlamydia autotransporter passenger domain into the host cell cytoplasm. Cpn0796 is specific for C. pneumoniae, where five homologous proteins are encoded by clustered genes. None of these five proteins were...

  1. Microbial production host selection for converting second-generation feedstocks into bioproducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rumbold, K.; Buijsen, H.J.J. van; Overkamp, K.M.; Groenestijn, J.W. van; Punt, P.J.; Werf, M.J.V.D.

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates are used as the feedstock for industrial fermentations. These biomass hydrolysates are complex mixtures of different fermentable sugars, but also inhibitors and salts that affect the performance of the microbial production host. The performance of

  2. Obtaining control of cell surface functionalizations via Pre-targeting and Supramolecular host guest interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Mark T. M.; Spa, Silvia J.; Welling, Mick M.; Ten Hove, Jan Bart; van Willigen, Danny M.; Buckle, Tessa; Velders, Aldrik H.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2017-01-01

    The use of mammalian cells for therapeutic applications is finding its way into modern medicine. However, modification or “training” of cells to make them suitable for a specific application remains complex. By envisioning a chemical toolbox that enables specific, but straight-forward and generic cellular functionalization, we investigated how membrane-receptor (pre)targeting could be combined with supramolecular host-guest interactions based on β-cyclodextrin (CD) and adamantane (Ad). The feasibility of this approach was studied in cells with membranous overexpression of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). By combining specific targeting of CXCR4, using an adamantane (Ad)-functionalized Ac-TZ14011 peptide (guest; KD = 56 nM), with multivalent host molecules that entailed fluorescent β-CD-Poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic-anhydride)-polymers with different fluorescent colors and number of functionalities, host-guest cell-surface modifications could be studied in detail. A second set of Ad-functionalized entities enabled introduction of additional surface functionalities. In addition, the attraction between CD and Ad could be used to drive cell-cell interactions. Combined we have shown that supramolecular interactions, that are based on specific targeting of an overexpressed membrane-receptor, allow specific and stable, yet reversible, surface functionalization of viable cells and how this approach can be used to influence the interaction between cells and their surroundings.

  3. A versatile selection system for folding competent proteins using genetic complementation in a eukaryotic host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, C.; Kjaerulff, S.; Muller, S.

    2010-01-01

    -control systems to retain misfolded proteins in the ER and redirect them for cytosolic degradation, thereby only allowing folded proteins to reach the cell surface. Accordingly, the folding potential of the tested protein determines the ability of autotrophic colony growth. This system was successfully......Recombinant expression of native or modified eukaryotic proteins is pivotal for structural and functional studies and for industrial and pharmaceutical production of proteins. However, it is often impeded by the lack of proper folding. Here, we present a stringent and broadly applicable eukaryotic...... in vivo selection system for folded proteins. It is based on genetic complementation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe growth marker gene invertase fused C-terminally to a protein library. The fusion proteins are directed to the secretion system, utilizing the ability of the eukaryotic protein quality...

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus: interaction with fibroblasts and muscle cells - new insights into parasite-mediated host cell cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Ricardo Chaves; Benchimol, Marlene

    2012-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic, flagellated protists that inhabit the urogenital tract of humans and bovines, respectively. T. vaginalis causes the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide and has been associated with an increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in humans. Infections by T. foetus cause significant losses to the beef industry worldwide due to infertility and spontaneous abortion in cows. Several studies have shown a close association between trichomonads and the epithelium of the urogenital tract. However, little is known concerning the interaction of trichomonads with cells from deeper tissues, such as fibroblasts and muscle cells. Published parasite-host cell interaction studies have reported contradictory results regarding the ability of T. foetus and T. vaginalis to interact with and damage cells of different tissues. In this study, parasite-host cell interactions were examined by culturing primary human fibroblasts obtained from abdominal biopsies performed during plastic surgeries with trichomonads. In addition, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, primary chick embryo myogenic cells and L6 muscle cells were also used as models of target cells. The parasite-host cell cultures were processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy and were tested for cell viability and cell death. JC-1 staining, which measures mitochondrial membrane potential, was used to determine whether the parasites induced target cell damage. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling staining was used as an indicator of chromatin damage. The colorimetric crystal violet assay was performed to ana-lyse the cytotoxicity induced by the parasite. The results showed that T. foetus and T. vaginalis adhered to and were cytotoxic to both fibroblasts and muscle cells, indicating that trichomonas infection of the connective and muscle tissues is likely to occur; such infections could cause

  5. Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus: interaction with fibroblasts and muscle cells - new insights into parasite-mediated host cell cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chaves Vilela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic, flagellated protists that inhabit the urogenital tract of humans and bovines, respectively. T. vaginalis causes the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide and has been associated with an increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in humans. Infections by T. foetus cause significant losses to the beef industry worldwide due to infertility and spontaneous abortion in cows. Several studies have shown a close association between trichomonads and the epithelium of the urogenital tract. However, little is known concerning the interaction of trichomonads with cells from deeper tissues, such as fibroblasts and muscle cells. Published parasite-host cell interaction studies have reported contradictory results regarding the ability of T. foetus and T. vaginalis to interact with and damage cells of different tissues. In this study, parasite-host cell interactions were examined by culturing primary human fibroblasts obtained from abdominal biopsies performed during plastic surgeries with trichomonads. In addition, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, primary chick embryo myogenic cells and L6 muscle cells were also used as models of target cells. The parasite-host cell cultures were processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy and were tested for cell viability and cell death. JC-1 staining, which measures mitochondrial membrane potential, was used to determine whether the parasites induced target cell damage. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling staining was used as an indicator of chromatin damage. The colorimetric crystal violet assay was performed to ana-lyse the cytotoxicity induced by the parasite. The results showed that T. foetus and T. vaginalis adhered to and were cytotoxic to both fibroblasts and muscle cells, indicating that trichomonas infection of the connective and muscle tissues is likely to occur; such

  6. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection. PMID:22044420

  7. Virus-host relationships of marine single-celled eukaryotes resolved from metatranscriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; Wurch, Louie L; Alexander, Harriet; Dyhrman, Sonya T; Gobler, Christopher J; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2017-06-28

    Establishing virus-host relationships has historically relied on culture-dependent approaches. Here we report on the use of marine metatranscriptomics to probe virus-host relationships. Statistical co-occurrence analyses of dsDNA, ssRNA and dsRNA viral markers of polyadenylation-selected RNA sequences from microbial communities dominated by Aureococcus anophagefferens (Quantuck Bay, NY), and diatoms (Narragansett Bay, RI) show active infections by diverse giant viruses (NCLDVs) associated with algal and nonalgal hosts. Ongoing infections of A. anophagefferens by a known Mimiviridae (AaV) occur during bloom peak and decline. Bloom decline is also accompanied by increased activity of viruses other than AaV, including (+) ssRNA viruses. In Narragansett Bay, increased temporal resolution reveals active NCLDVs with both 'boom-and-bust' and 'steady-state infection'-like ecologies that include known as well as novel virus-host interactions. Our approach offers a method for screening active viral infections and develops links between viruses and their potential hosts in situ. Our observations further demonstrate that previously unknown virus-host relationships in marine systems are abundant.

  8. Virus-host relationships of marine single-celled eukaryotes resolved from metatranscriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; Wurch, Louie L.; Alexander, Harriet; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Gobler, Christopher J.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2017-01-01

    Establishing virus–host relationships has historically relied on culture-dependent approaches. Here we report on the use of marine metatranscriptomics to probe virus–host relationships. Statistical co-occurrence analyses of dsDNA, ssRNA and dsRNA viral markers of polyadenylation-selected RNA sequences from microbial communities dominated by Aureococcus anophagefferens (Quantuck Bay, NY), and diatoms (Narragansett Bay, RI) show active infections by diverse giant viruses (NCLDVs) associated with algal and nonalgal hosts. Ongoing infections of A. anophagefferens by a known Mimiviridae (AaV) occur during bloom peak and decline. Bloom decline is also accompanied by increased activity of viruses other than AaV, including (+) ssRNA viruses. In Narragansett Bay, increased temporal resolution reveals active NCLDVs with both ‘boom-and-bust’ and ‘steady-state infection’-like ecologies that include known as well as novel virus–host interactions. Our approach offers a method for screening active viral infections and develops links between viruses and their potential hosts in situ. Our observations further demonstrate that previously unknown virus–host relationships in marine systems are abundant. PMID:28656958

  9. Predicting the subcellular localization of viral proteins within a mammalian host cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas DY

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioinformatic prediction of protein subcellular localization has been extensively studied for prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, this is not the case for viruses whose proteins are often involved in extensive interactions at various subcellular localizations with host proteins. Results Here, we investigate the extent of utilization of human cellular localization mechanisms by viral proteins and we demonstrate that appropriate eukaryotic subcellular localization predictors can be used to predict viral protein localization within the host cell. Conclusion Such predictions provide a method to rapidly annotate viral proteomes with subcellular localization information. They are likely to have widespread applications both in the study of the functions of viral proteins in the host cell and in the design of antiviral drugs.

  10. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A (MsrA) Deficient Mycoplasma genitalium Shows Decreased Interactions with Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kishore; De la Garza, Georgina; Maffi, Shivani; Saikolappan, Sankaralingam; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important sexually transmitted pathogen that affects both men and women. In genital-mucosal tissues, it initiates colonization of epithelial cells by attaching itself to host cells via several identified bacterial ligands and host cell surface receptors. We have previously shown that a mutant form of M. genitalium lacking methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme which converts oxidized methionine (Met(O)) into methionine (Met), shows decreased viability in infected animals. To gain more insights into the mechanisms by which MsrA controls M. genitalium virulence, we compared the wild-type M. genitalium strain (G37) with an msrA mutant (MS5) strain for their ability to interact with target cervical epithelial cell lines (HeLa and C33A) and THP-1 monocytic cells. Infection of epithelial cell lines with both strains revealed that MS5 was less cytotoxic to HeLa and C33A cell lines than the G37 strain. Also, the MS5 strain was more susceptible to phagocytosis by THP-1 cells than wild type strain (G37). Further, MS5 was less able to induce aggregation and differentiation in THP-1 cells than the wild type strain, as determined by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeling of the cells, followed by counting of cells attached to the culture dish using image analysis. Finally, MS5 was observed to induce less proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α by THP-1 cells than wild type G37 strain. These results indicate that MsrA affects the virulence properties of M. genitalium by modulating its interaction with host cells. PMID:22558404

  11. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA deficient Mycoplasma genitalium shows decreased interactions with host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Das

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma genitalium is an important sexually transmitted pathogen that affects both men and women. In genital-mucosal tissues, it initiates colonization of epithelial cells by attaching itself to host cells via several identified bacterial ligands and host cell surface receptors. We have previously shown that a mutant form of M. genitalium lacking methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA, an antioxidant enzyme which converts oxidized methionine (Met(O into methionine (Met, shows decreased viability in infected animals. To gain more insights into the mechanisms by which MsrA controls M. genitalium virulence, we compared the wild-type M. genitalium strain (G37 with an msrA mutant (MS5 strain for their ability to interact with target cervical epithelial cell lines (HeLa and C33A and THP-1 monocytic cells. Infection of epithelial cell lines with both strains revealed that MS5 was less cytotoxic to HeLa and C33A cell lines than the G37 strain. Also, the MS5 strain was more susceptible to phagocytosis by THP-1 cells than wild type strain (G37. Further, MS5 was less able to induce aggregation and differentiation in THP-1 cells than the wild type strain, as determined by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE labeling of the cells, followed by counting of cells attached to the culture dish using image analysis. Finally, MS5 was observed to induce less proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α by THP-1 cells than wild type G37 strain. These results indicate that MsrA affects the virulence properties of M. genitalium by modulating its interaction with host cells.

  12. The moving junction protein RON8 facilitates firm attachment and host cell invasion in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtis W Straub

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan moving junction (MJ is a highly conserved structure formed during host cell entry that anchors the invading parasite to the host cell and serves as a molecular sieve of host membrane proteins that protects the parasitophorous vacuole from host lysosomal destruction. While recent work in Toxoplasma and Plasmodium has reinforced the composition of the MJ as an important association of rhoptry neck proteins (RONs with micronemal AMA1, little is known of the precise role of RONs in the junction or how they are targeted to the neck subcompartment. We report the first functional analysis of a MJ/RON protein by disrupting RON8 in T. gondii. Parasites lacking RON8 are severely impaired in both attachment and invasion, indicating that RON8 enables the parasite to establish a firm clasp on the host cell and commit to invasion. The remaining junction components frequently drag in trails behind invading knockout parasites and illustrate a malformed complex without RON8. Complementation of Δron8 parasites restores invasion and reveals a processing event at the RON8 C-terminus. Replacement of an N-terminal region of RON8 with a mCherry reporter separates regions within RON8 that are necessary for rhoptry targeting and complex formation from those required for function during invasion. Finally, the invasion defects in Δron8 parasites seen in vitro translate to radically impaired virulence in infected mice, promoting a model in which RON8 has a crucial and unprecedented task in committing Toxoplasma to host cell entry.

  13. Fibronectin-degrading activity of Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteinase plays a role in host cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu, Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S-activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation. PMID:21435673

  15. Sialylation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) Anchors of Mammalian Prions Is Regulated in a Host-, Tissue-, and Cell-specific Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Klimova, Nina; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2016-01-01

    Prions or PrPSc are proteinaceous infectious agents that consist of misfolded, self-replicating states of the prion protein or PrPC. PrPC is posttranslationally modified with N-linked glycans and a sialylated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Conformational conversion of PrPC gives rise to glycosylated and GPI-anchored PrPSc. The question of the sialylation status of GPIs within PrPSc has been controversial. Previous studies that examined scrapie brains reported that both sialo- and asialo-GPIs were present in PrPSc, with the majority being asialo-GPIs. In contrast, recent work that employed cultured cells claimed that only PrPC with sialylo-GPIs could be recruited into PrPSc, whereas PrPC with asialo-GPIs inhibited conversion. To resolve this controversy, we analyzed the sialylation status of GPIs within PrPSc generated in the brain, spleen, or cultured N2a or C2C12 myotube cells. We found that recruiting PrPC with both sialo- and asialo-GPIs is a common feature of PrPSc. The mixtures of sialo- and asialo-GPIs were observed in PrPSc universally regardless of prion strain as well as host, tissue, or type of cells that produced PrPSc. Remarkably, the proportion of sialo- versus asialo-GPIs was found to be controlled by host, tissue, and cell type but not prion strain. In summary, this study found no strain-specific preferences for selecting PrPC with sialo- versus asialo-GPIs. Instead, this work suggests that the sialylation status of GPIs within PrPSc is regulated in a cell-, tissue-, or host-specific manner and is likely to be determined by the specifics of GPI biosynthesis. PMID:27317661

  16. A novel mechanism of bacterial toxin transfer within host blood cell-derived microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-lie Ståhl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system.

  17. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite-host interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (Plactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. The present study details the interaction between lactoferrin and parasite host cells, ie, RBCs and macrophages, using various cellular processes and expression studies. The study reveals the possible mechanism of

  18. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Methods Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. Results The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (Plactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. Conclusion The present study details the interaction between lactoferrin and parasite host cells, ie, RBCs and macrophages, using various cellular processes and expression studies. The study

  19. Intracellular accommodation of rhizobia in legume host cell: the fine-tuning of the endomembrane system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavrin, A.Y.

    2015-01-01

    The symbiosis of legumes with rhizobia leads to the formation of root nodules. Rhizobia which are hosted inside specialized infected cells are surrounded by hostderived membranes, forming symbiosomes. Although it is known that symbiosome formation involves proliferation of membranes and changing of

  20. Bright fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for live cell imaging of host-pathogen interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, M.; Aprianto, R.; Fernandes, V.E.; Andrew, P.W.; Strijp, van J.A.G.; Nijland, R.; Veening, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people, but at the same time one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells is poorly understood. One of the

  1. Bright Fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for Live-Cell Imaging of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjos, Morten; Aprianto, Rieza; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074307053; Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people but, at the same time, one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells are poorly understood. One of the

  2. Where in the Cell Are You? Probing HIV-1 Host Interactions through Advanced Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan S. Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continuously evolve to hijack the host cell machinery in order to successfully replicate and orchestrate key interactions that support their persistence. The type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 is a prime example of viral persistence within the host, having plagued the human population for decades. In recent years, advances in cellular imaging and molecular biology have aided the elucidation of key steps mediating the HIV-1 lifecycle and viral pathogenesis. Super-resolution imaging techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED and photoactivation and localization microscopy (PALM have been instrumental in studying viral assembly and release through both cell–cell transmission and cell–free viral transmission. Moreover, powerful methods such as Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC have shed light on the protein-protein interactions HIV-1 engages within the host to hijack the cellular machinery. Specific advancements in live cell imaging in combination with the use of multicolor viral particles have become indispensable to unravelling the dynamic nature of these virus-host interactions. In the current review, we outline novel imaging methods that have been used to study the HIV-1 lifecycle and highlight advancements in the cell culture models developed to enhance our understanding of the HIV-1 lifecycle.

  3. Treg cell-IgA axis in maintenance of host immune homeostasis with microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Ting; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    The intestine is the home to a vast diversity of microbiota and a complex of mucosal immune system. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control host immune responses to microbiota and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. This mini review will provide evidence indicating a Treg cell-IgA axis and such axis playing a major role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis.

  4. The Paracoccidioides cell wall: past and present layers towards understanding interaction with the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana ePuccia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall of pathogenic fungi plays import roles in interaction with the host, so that its composition and structure may determine the course of infection. Here we present an overview of the current and past knowledge on the cell wall constituents of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii. These are temperature-dependent dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic granulomatous and debilitating disease. Focus is given on cell wall carbohydrate and protein contents, their immune-stimulatory features, adhesion properties, drug target characteristics, and morphological phase specificity. We offer a journey towards the future understanding of the dynamic life that takes place in the cell wall and of the changes that it may suffer when living in the human host.

  5. Benchmarking selected computational gene network growing tools in context of virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Biruhalem; Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A; Eisenhaber, Frank; Sugrue, Richard J; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2017-07-19

    Several available online tools provide network growing functions where an algorithm utilizing different data sources suggests additional genes/proteins that should connect an input gene set into functionally meaningful networks. Using the well-studied system of influenza host interactions, we compare the network growing function of two free tools GeneMANIA and STRING and the commercial IPA for their performance of recovering known influenza A virus host factors previously identified from siRNA screens. The result showed that given small (~30 genes) or medium (~150 genes) input sets all three network growing tools detect significantly more known host factors than random human genes with STRING overall performing strongest. Extending the networks with all the three tools significantly improved the detection of GO biological processes of known host factors compared to not growing networks. Interestingly, the rate of identification of true host factors using computational network growing is equal or better to doing another experimental siRNA screening study which could also be true and applied to other biological pathways/processes.

  6. Conventional NK cells can produce IL-22 and promote host defense in Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Zhang, Hongwei H; Singh, Satya P; Wynn, Thomas A; Wilson, Mark S; Farber, Joshua M

    2014-02-15

    It was reported that host defense against pulmonary Klebsiella pneumoniae infection requires IL-22, which was proposed to be of T cell origin. Supporting a role for IL-22, we found that Il22(-/-) mice had decreased survival compared with wild-type mice after intratracheal infection with K. pneumoniae. Surprisingly, however, Rag2(-/-) mice did not differ from wild-type mice in survival or levels of IL-22 in the lungs postinfection with K. pneumoniae. In contrast, K. pneumoniae-infected Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice failed to produce IL-22. These data suggested a possible role for NK cells or other innate lymphoid cells in host defense and production of IL-22. Unlike NK cell-like innate lymphoid cells that produce IL-22 and display a surface phenotype of NK1.1(-)NKp46(+)CCR6(+), lung NK cells showed the conventional phenotype, NK1.1(+)NKp46(+)CCR6(-). Mice depleted of NK cells using anti-asialo GM1 showed decreased survival and higher lung bacterial counts, as well as increased dissemination of K. pneumoniae to blood and liver, compared with control-treated mice. NK cell depletion also led to decreased production of IL-22 in the lung. Within 1 d postinfection, although there was no increase in the number of lung NK cells, a subset of lung NK cells became competent to produce IL-22, and such cells were found in both wild-type and Rag2(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that, during pulmonary infection of mice with K. pneumoniae, conventional NK cells are required for optimal host defense, which includes the production of IL-22.

  7. Attachment and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis to host cells is related to surface hydrophobicity, bacterial cell size and capsule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Bartley

    Full Text Available We compared exemplar strains from two hypervirulent clonal complexes, strain NMB-CDC from ST-8/11 cc and strain MC58 from ST-32/269 cc, in host cell attachment and invasion. Strain NMB-CDC attached to and invaded host cells at a significantly greater frequency than strain MC58. Type IV pili retained the primary role for initial attachment to host cells for both isolates regardless of pilin class and glycosylation pattern. In strain MC58, the serogroup B capsule was the major inhibitory determinant affecting both bacterial attachment to and invasion of host cells. Removal of terminal sialylation of lipooligosaccharide (LOS in the presence of capsule did not influence rates of attachment or invasion for strain MC58. However, removal of either serogroup B capsule or LOS sialylation in strain NMB-CDC increased bacterial attachment to host cells to the same extent. Although the level of inhibition of attachment by capsule was different between these strains, the regulation of the capsule synthesis locus by the two-component response regulator MisR, and the level of surface capsule determined by flow cytometry were not significantly different. However, the diplococci of strain NMB-CDC were shown to have a 1.89-fold greater surface area than strain MC58 by flow cytometry. It was proposed that the increase in surface area without changing the amount of anchored glycolipid capsule in the outer membrane would result in a sparser capsule and increase surface hydrophobicity. Strain NMB-CDC was shown to be more hydrophobic than strain MC58 using hydrophobicity interaction chromatography and microbial adhesion-to-solvents assays. In conclusion, improved levels of adherence of strain NMB-CDC to cell lines was associated with increased bacterial cell surface and surface hydrophobicity. This study shows that there is diversity in bacterial cell surface area and surface hydrophobicity within N. meningitidis which influence steps in meningococcal pathogenesis.

  8. Attachment and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis to host cells is related to surface hydrophobicity, bacterial cell size and capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Stephanie N; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Heel, Kathryn; Lee, Chiang W; Mowlaboccus, Shakeel; Seemann, Torsten; Lu, Wei; Lin, Ya-Hsun; Ryan, Catherine S; Peacock, Christopher; Stephens, David S; Davies, John K; Kahler, Charlene M

    2013-01-01

    We compared exemplar strains from two hypervirulent clonal complexes, strain NMB-CDC from ST-8/11 cc and strain MC58 from ST-32/269 cc, in host cell attachment and invasion. Strain NMB-CDC attached to and invaded host cells at a significantly greater frequency than strain MC58. Type IV pili retained the primary role for initial attachment to host cells for both isolates regardless of pilin class and glycosylation pattern. In strain MC58, the serogroup B capsule was the major inhibitory determinant affecting both bacterial attachment to and invasion of host cells. Removal of terminal sialylation of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in the presence of capsule did not influence rates of attachment or invasion for strain MC58. However, removal of either serogroup B capsule or LOS sialylation in strain NMB-CDC increased bacterial attachment to host cells to the same extent. Although the level of inhibition of attachment by capsule was different between these strains, the regulation of the capsule synthesis locus by the two-component response regulator MisR, and the level of surface capsule determined by flow cytometry were not significantly different. However, the diplococci of strain NMB-CDC were shown to have a 1.89-fold greater surface area than strain MC58 by flow cytometry. It was proposed that the increase in surface area without changing the amount of anchored glycolipid capsule in the outer membrane would result in a sparser capsule and increase surface hydrophobicity. Strain NMB-CDC was shown to be more hydrophobic than strain MC58 using hydrophobicity interaction chromatography and microbial adhesion-to-solvents assays. In conclusion, improved levels of adherence of strain NMB-CDC to cell lines was associated with increased bacterial cell surface and surface hydrophobicity. This study shows that there is diversity in bacterial cell surface area and surface hydrophobicity within N. meningitidis which influence steps in meningococcal pathogenesis.

  9. A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ngo, Hoan; Bhalla, Manmeet; Chen, Da-Yuan; Ireton, Keith

    2017-11-01

    The bacterial surface protein InlB mediates internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes into human cells through interaction with the host receptor tyrosine kinase, Met. InlB-mediated entry requires localised polymerisation of the host actin cytoskeleton. Apart from actin polymerisation, roles for other host processes in Listeria entry are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that exocytosis in the human cell promotes InlB-dependent internalisation. Using a probe consisting of VAMP3 with an exofacial green fluorescent protein tag, focal exocytosis was detected during InlB-mediated entry. Exocytosis was dependent on Met tyrosine kinase activity and the GTPase RalA. Depletion of SNARE proteins by small interfering RNA demonstrated an important role for exocytosis in Listeria internalisation. Depletion of SNARE proteins failed to affect actin filaments during internalisation, suggesting that actin polymerisation and exocytosis are separable host responses. SNARE proteins were required for delivery of the human GTPase Dynamin 2, which promotes InlB-mediated entry. Our results identify exocytosis as a novel host process exploited by Listeria for infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Zika virus infection reprograms global transcription of host cells to allow sustained infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Dang, Jason; Qin, Yue; Lichinchi, Gianluigi; Bansal, Vikas; Rana, Tariq M

    2017-04-26

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging virus causally linked to neurological disorders, including congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. There are currently no targeted therapies for ZIKV infection. To identify novel antiviral targets and to elucidate the mechanisms by which ZIKV exploits the host cell machinery to support sustained replication, we analyzed the transcriptomic landscape of human microglia, fibroblast, embryonic kidney and monocyte-derived macrophage cell lines before and after ZIKV infection. The four cell types differed in their susceptibility to ZIKV infection, consistent with differences in their expression of viral response genes before infection. Clustering and network analyses of genes differentially expressed after ZIKV infection revealed changes related to the adaptive immune system, angiogenesis and host metabolic processes that are conducive to sustained viral production. Genes related to the adaptive immune response were downregulated in microglia cells, suggesting that ZIKV effectively evades the immune response after reaching the central nervous system. Like other viruses, ZIKV diverts host cell resources and reprograms the metabolic machinery to support RNA metabolism, ATP production and glycolysis. Consistent with these transcriptomic analyses, nucleoside metabolic inhibitors abrogated ZIKV replication in microglia cells.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of Porphyromonas gingivalis-host cell interaction on periodontal diseases

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    Masaaki Nakayama

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis is a major oral pathogen and associated with periodontal diseases including periodontitis and alveolar bone loss. In this review, we indicate that two virulence factors, which are hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR and cysteine proteases “gingipains”, expressed by P. gingivalis have novel functions on the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis produces three types of gingipains and concomitantly several adhesin domains. Among the adhesin domains, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR, also called HGP15, has the function of induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8 expression in human gingival epithelial cells, indicating the possibility that HbR is associated with P. gingivalis-induced periodontal inflammation. On bacteria-host cells contact, P. gingivalis induces cellular signaling alteration in host cells. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K and Akt are well known to play a pivotal role in various cellular physiological functions including cell survival and glucose metabolism in mammalian cells. Recently, we demonstrated that gingipains attenuate the activity of PI3K and Akt, which might have a causal influence on periodontal diseases by chronic infection to the host cells from the speculation of molecular analysis. In this review, we discuss new molecular and biological characterization of the virulence factors from P. gingivalis.

  12. CCR5 is essential for NK cell trafficking and host survival following Toxoplasma gondii infection.

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    Imtiaz A Khan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The host response to intracellular pathogens requires the coordinated action of both the innate and acquired immune systems. Chemokines play a critical role in the trafficking of immune cells and transitioning an innate immune response into an acquired response. We analyzed the host response of mice deficient in the chemokine receptor CCR5 following infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. We found that CCR5 controls recruitment of natural killer (NK cells into infected tissues. Without this influx of NK cells, tissues from CCR5-deficient (CCR5-/- mice were less able to generate an inflammatory response, had decreased chemokine and interferon gamma production, and had higher parasite burden. As a result, CCR5-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with T. gondii but were less susceptible to the immune-mediated tissue injury seen in certain inbred strains. Adoptive transfer of CCR5+/+ NK cells into CCR5-/- mice restored their ability to survive lethal T. gondii infection and demonstrated that CCR5 is required for NK cell homing into infected liver and spleen. This study establishes CCR5 as a critical receptor guiding NK cell trafficking in host defense.

  13. Host cell egress and invasion induce marked relocations of glycolytic enzymes in Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites.

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    Sebastien Pomel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are dependent on an F-actin and myosin-based motility system for their invasion into and escape from animal host cells, as well as for their general motility. In Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species, the actin filaments and myosin motor required for this process are located in a narrow space between the parasite plasma membrane and the underlying inner membrane complex, a set of flattened cisternae that covers most the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Here we show that the energy required for Toxoplasma motility is derived mostly, if not entirely, from glycolysis and lactic acid production. We also demonstrate that the glycolytic enzymes of Toxoplasma tachyzoites undergo a striking relocation from the parasites' cytoplasm to their pellicles upon Toxoplasma egress from host cells. Specifically, it appears that the glycolytic enzymes are translocated to the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane complex as well as to the space between the plasma membrane and inner membrane complex. The glycolytic enzymes remain pellicle-associated during extended incubations of parasites in the extracellular milieu and do not revert to a cytoplasmic location until well after parasites have completed invasion of new host cells. Translocation of glycolytic enzymes to and from the Toxoplasma pellicle appears to occur in response to changes in extracellular [K(+] experienced during egress and invasion, a signal that requires changes of [Ca(2+](c in the parasite during egress. Enzyme translocation is, however, not dependent on either F-actin or intact microtubules. Our observations indicate that Toxoplasma gondii is capable of relocating its main source of energy between its cytoplasm and pellicle in response to exit from or entry into host cells. We propose that this ability allows Toxoplasma to optimize ATP delivery to those cellular processes that are most critical for survival outside host cells and those required for growth and

  14. Selectivity by host plants affects the distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: evidence from ITS rDNA sequence metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haishui; Zang, Yanyan; Yuan, Yongge; Tang, Jianjun; Chen, Xin

    2012-04-12

    order and functional group) and high selectivity from host plants for AMF. The effects of ecosystemic, biogeographical, continental and climatic factors on AMF distribution might be mediated by host plants.

  15. The cyclomodulin Cif of Photorhabdus luminescens inhibits insect cell proliferation and triggers host cell death by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Carolina Varela; Jubelin, Grégory; Courties, Gabriel; Gomard, Aurélie; Ginibre, Nadège; Pages, Sylvie; Taïeb, Frédéric; Girard, Pierre-Alain; Oswald, Eric; Givaudan, Alain; Zumbihl, Robert; Escoubas, Jean-Michel

    2010-12-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cif) constitute a broad family of cyclomodulins present in bacterial pathogens of invertebrates and mammals. Cif proteins are thought to be type III effectors capable of arresting the cell cycle at G(2)/M phase transition in human cell lines. We report here the first direct functional analysis of Cif(Pl), from the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens, in its insect host. The cif(Pl) gene was expressed in P. luminescens cultures in vitro. The resulting protein was released into the culture medium, unlike the well characterized type III effector LopT. During locust infection, cif(Pl) was expressed in both the hemolymph and the hematopoietic organ, but was not essential for P. luminescens virulence. Cif(Pl) inhibited proliferation of the insect cell line Sf9, by blocking the cell cycle at the G(2)/M phase transition. It also triggered host cell death by apoptosis. The integrity of the Cif(Pl) catalytic triad is essential for the cell cycle arrest and pro-apoptotic activities of this protein. These results highlight, for the first time, the dual role of Cif in the control of host cell proliferation and apoptotic death in a non-mammalian cell line. Copyright © 2010 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of anticancer action and cell selectivity of short α-helical peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuixia; Hu, Jing; Zeng, Ping; Pan, Fang; Yaseen, Mohammed; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2014-02-01

    Development of functional biomaterials and drugs with good biocompatibility towards host cells but with high potency against cancer cells is a challenging endeavor. By drawing upon the advantageous features of natural antimicrobial peptides and α-helical proteins, we have designed a new class of short α-helical peptides G(IIKK)(n)I-NH2 (n = 1-4) with different potency and high selectivity against cancer cells. We show that the peptides with n = 3 and 4 kill cancer cells effectively whilst remaining benign to the host cells at their working concentrations, through mechanistic processes similar to their bactericidal effects. The high cell selectivity could stem from their preferential binding to the outer cell membranes containing negative charges and high fluidity. In addition to rapid membrane-permeabilizing capacities, the peptides can also induce the programmed cell death of cancer cells via both mitochondrial pathway and death receptor pathway, without inducing non-specific immunogenic responses. Importantly, these peptides can also inhibit tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model without eliciting side effects. Whilst this study reveals the clinical potential of these peptides as potent drugs and for other medical and healthcare applications, it also points to the significance of fundamental material research in the future development of highly selective peptide functional materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Coevolutionary Arms Race between Hosts and Viruses Drives Polymorphism and Polygenicity of NK Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-08-01

    Natural killer cell receptors (NKRs) monitor the expression of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) and stress molecules to detect unhealthy tissue, such as infected or tumor cells. The NKR gene family shows a remarkable genetic diversity, containing several genes encoding receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and varying in gene content and allelic polymorphism. The expansion of the NKR genes is species-specific, with different species evolving alternative expanded NKR genes, which encode structurally different proteins, yet perform comparable functions. So far, the biological function of this expansion within the NKR cluster has remained poorly understood. To study the evolution of NKRs, we have developed an agent-based model implementing a coevolutionary scenario between hosts and herpes-like viruses that are able to evade the immune response by downregulating the expression of MHC-I on the cell surface. We show that hosts evolve specific inhibitory NKRs, specialized to particular MHC-I alleles in the population. Viruses in our simulations readily evolve proteins mimicking the MHC molecules of their host, even in the absence of MHC-I downregulation. As a result, the NKR locus becomes polygenic and polymorphic, encoding both specific inhibiting and activating receptors to optimally protect the hosts from coevolving viruses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. MicroRNA profile analysis of host cells before and after wild human rotavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Wu, Jinyuan; Geng, Panpan; Kui, Xiang; Xie, Yuping; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yaling; Yin, Na; Zhang, Guangming; Yi, Shan; Li, Hongjun; Sun, Maosheng

    2016-09-01

    Rotavirus infection is an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in children, but the interaction between rotavirus and host cells is not completely understood. We isolated a wildtype (wt) rotavirus strain, ZTR-68(P [8] G1), which is derived from an infant with diarrhea in southwest China in 2010. In this study, we investigated host cellular miRNA expression profiles changes in response to ZTR-68 in early stage of infection to investigate the role of miRNAs upon rotavirus infection. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified by deep sequencing and qRT-PCR and the function of their targets predicted by Gene Ontology (GO) function and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation. A total of 36 candidate miRNAs were identified. Comparative analysis indicated that 29 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated and 7 were up-regulated after infection. The data were provided contrasting the types of microRNAs in two different permissive cell lines (HT29 and MA104). The target assays results showed that mml-miR-7 and mml-miR-125a are involved in anti-rotavirus and virus-host interaction in host cells. These results offer clues for identifying potential candidates in vector-based antiviral strategies. J. Med. Virol. 88:1497-1510, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mosquito C6/36 Cells Reveals Host Proteins Involved in Zika Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Qi-Lin; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Shao-bo; Wang, Wei; Deng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhang, Lei-Ke

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae. During replication processes, flavivirus manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while the host cells activate antiviral responses. Identification of host proteins involved in the flavivirus replication process may lead to the discovery of antiviral targets. The mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are epidemiologically important vectors for ZIKV, and effectiv...

  20. [HIV-1 infection affects the expression of host cell factor TSG101 and Alix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui-liang; Meng, Zhe-feng; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Lu, Jian-xin

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the effects of HIV-1 infection on the expression of host factors TSG101 (Tumor Susceptibility Gene 101) and Alix (ALG-2-interacting protein X). HIV-1 infectious clone pNL4-3 was used to infect TZM-bl, PM1, Jurkat cell lines and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Twenty-four hours post-infection, the infected or uninfected cells were harvested respectively for extraction of total RNAs and total cellular proteins, which were subsequently used in RT-PCR and Western-blotting respectively to quantify TSG101 and Alix, respectively. Our data showed that HIV-1 infection resulted in various influences on the expression of TSG101 and Alix in the cell lines and the primary PBMC. A down-regulation was mainly observed in the cell lines, whereas an up-regulation of TSG101 was identified in primary PBMC. Three patterns were observed for down-regulation, including dual down-regulation of TSG101 and Alix for Jurkat cells, single down-regulation of Alix for TZM-bl cells and marginal or no influence on PM1 cells. The dual down-regulation of Alix and TSG101 in Jurkat cells coincided with less expression of HIV-1 p24 protein. This is the first-line evidence that HIV-1 infection affects the expression of host factors TSG101 and Alix, the down-regulation of these molecules may influence the HIV-1 replication. The underlying mechanism remains to be addressed.

  1. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas) during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies) in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals.

  2. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection

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    Elena Ufimtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals.

  3. Drought and host selection influence microbial community dynamics in the grass root microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through 16S rRNA gene profiling across two distinct watering regimes and two developmental time points, we demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between host phylogenetic distance and the microbiome dissimilarity within root tissues, and that drought weakens this correlation by inducing con...

  4. A method for selectively enriching microbial DNA from contaminating vertebrate host DNA.

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    George R Feehery

    Full Text Available DNA samples derived from vertebrate skin, bodily cavities and body fluids contain both host and microbial DNA; the latter often present as a minor component. Consequently, DNA sequencing of a microbiome sample frequently yields reads originating from the microbe(s of interest, but with a vast excess of host genome-derived reads. In this study, we used a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD to separate methylated host DNA from microbial DNA based on differences in CpG methylation density. MBD fused to the Fc region of a human antibody (MBD-Fc binds strongly to protein A paramagnetic beads, forming an effective one-step enrichment complex that was used to remove human or fish host DNA from bacterial and protistan DNA for subsequent sequencing and analysis. We report enrichment of DNA samples from human saliva, human blood, a mock malaria-infected blood sample and a black molly fish. When reads were mapped to reference genomes, sequence reads aligning to host genomes decreased 50-fold, while bacterial and Plasmodium DNA sequences reads increased 8-11.5-fold. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index was calculated for 149 bacterial species in saliva before and after enrichment. Unenriched saliva had an index of 4.72, while the enriched sample had an index of 4.80. The similarity of these indices demonstrates that bacterial species diversity and relative phylotype abundance remain conserved in enriched samples. Enrichment using the MBD-Fc method holds promise for targeted microbiome sequence analysis across a broad range of sample types.

  5. The Endosymbiotic Bacterium Wolbachia Selectively Kills Male Hosts by Targeting the Masculinizing Gene.

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    Takahiro Fukui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens are known to manipulate the reproduction and development of their hosts for their own benefit. Wolbachia is an endosymbiotic bacterium that infects a wide range of insect species. Wolbachia is known as an example of a parasite that manipulates the sex of its host's progeny. Infection of Ostrinia moths by Wolbachia causes the production of all-female progeny, however, the mechanism of how Wolbachia accomplishes this male-specific killing is unknown. Here we show for the first time that Wolbachia targets the host masculinizing gene of Ostrinia to accomplish male-killing. We found that Wolbachia-infected O. furnacalis embryos do not express the male-specific splice variant of doublesex, a gene which acts at the downstream end of the sex differentiation cascade, throughout embryonic development. Transcriptome analysis revealed that Wolbachia infection markedly reduces the mRNA level of Masc, a gene that encodes a protein required for both masculinization and dosage compensation in the silkworm Bombyx mori. Detailed bioinformatic analysis also elucidated that dosage compensation of Z-linked genes fails in Wolbachia-infected O. furnacalis embryos, a phenomenon that is extremely similar to that observed in Masc mRNA-depleted male embryos of B. mori. Finally, injection of in vitro transcribed Masc cRNA into Wolbachia-infected embryos rescued male progeny. Our results show that Wolbachia-induced male-killing is caused by a failure of dosage compensation via repression of the host masculinizing gene. Our study also shows a novel strategy by which a pathogen hijacks the host sex determination cascade.

  6. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier

    2015-04-28

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host's death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. Bt is an entomopathogen found ubiquitously in the environment and is a widely used biopesticide. Studies performed at the population level suggest that the infection process of Bt includes three successive steps (virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation) controlled by different regulators. This study aimed to determine how these phenotypes are activated at the

  7. Easy labeling of proliferative phase and sporogonic phase of microsporidia Nosema bombycis in host cells.

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    Jie Chen

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are eukaryotic, unicellular parasites that have been studied for more than 150 years. These organisms are extraordinary in their ability to invade a wide range of hosts including vertebrates and invertebrates, such as human and commercially important animals. A lack of appropriate labeling methods has limited the research of the cell cycle and protein locations in intracellular stages. In this report, an easy fluorescent labeling method has been developed to mark the proliferative and sporogonic phases of microsporidia Nosema bombycis in host cells. Based on the presence of chitin, Calcofluor White M2R was used to label the sporogonic phase, while β-tubulin antibody coupled with fluorescence secondary antibody were used to label the proliferative phase by immunofluorescence. This method is simple, efficient and can be used on both infected cells and tissue slices, providing a great potential application in microsporidia research.

  8. Ultrastructural characteristics of nurse cell-larva complex of four species of Trichinella in several hosts

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    Sacchi L.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The nurse cell-larva complex of nematodes of the genus Trichinella plays an Important role in the survival of the larva in decaying muscles, frequently favouring the transmission of the parasite in extreme environmental conditions. The ultrastructure of the nurse cell-larva complex in muscles from different hosts infected with T. nativa (a walrus and a polar bear, T. spiralis (horses and humans, T. pseudospiralis (a laboratory mouse and T. papuae (a laboratory mouse were examined. Analysis with transmission electron microscope showed that the typical nurse cell structure was present in all examined samples, irrespective of the species of larva, of the presence of a collagen capsule, of the age of infection and of the host species, suggesting that there exists a molecular mechanism that in the first stage of larva invasion is similar for encapsulated and non-encapsulated species.

  9. Lymphotoxin organizes contributions to host defense and metabolic illness from innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-04-01

    The lymphotoxin (LT)-pathway is a unique constituent branch of the Tumor Necrosis Superfamily (TNFSF). Use of LT is a critical mechanism by which fetal innate lymphoid cells regulate lymphoid organogenesis. Within recent years, adult innate lymphoid cells have been discovered to utilize this same pathway to regulate IL-22 and IL-23 production for host defense. Notably, genetic studies have linked polymorphisms in the genes encoding LTα to several phenotypes contributing to metabolic syndrome. The role of the LT-pathway may lay the foundation for a bridge between host immune response, microbiota, and metabolic syndrome. The contribution of the LT-pathway to innate lymphoid cell function and metabolic syndrome will be visited in this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi: effect of phenothiazines on the parasite and its interaction with host cells

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    Solange L. de Castro

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenothiazines were observed to have a direct effect on Trypanosoma cruzi and on its in vitro interaction with host cells. They caused lysis of trypomastigotes (50 uM/24 h and,to a lesser extent, epimastigote proliferation. Treatment of infected peritoneal macrophages with 12.5 uM chlorpromazine or triflupromazine inhibited the infection; this effect was found to be partially reversible if the drugs were removed after 24 h of treatment. At 60 uM, the drugs caused damage to amastigotes interiorized in heart muscle cells. However, the narrow margin of toxity between anti-trypanossomal activity and damage to host cells mitigates against in vivo investigation at the present time. Possible hypothesis for the mechanism of action of phenothiazines are discussed.

  11. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Besnoitia besnoiti and Toxoplasma gondii: two apicomplexan strategies to manipulate the host cell centrosome and Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Rita; Nolasco, Sofia; Gonçalves, João; Cortes, Helder C; Leitão, Alexandre; Soares, Helena

    2014-09-01

    Besnoitia besnoiti and Toxoplasma gondii are two closely related parasites that interact with the host cell microtubule cytoskeleton during host cell invasion. Here we studied the relationship between the ability of these parasites to invade and to recruit the host cell centrosome and the Golgi apparatus. We observed that T. gondii recruits the host cell centrosome towards the parasitophorous vacuole (PV), whereas B. besnoiti does not. Notably, both parasites recruit the host Golgi apparatus to the PV but its organization is affected in different ways. We also investigated the impact of depleting and over-expressing the host centrosomal protein TBCCD1, involved in centrosome positioning and Golgi apparatus integrity, on the ability of these parasites to invade and replicate. Toxoplasma gondii replication rate decreases in cells over-expressing TBCCD1 but not in TBCCD1-depleted cells; while for B. besnoiti no differences were found. However, B. besnoiti promotes a reorganization of the Golgi ribbon previously fragmented by TBCCD1 depletion. These results suggest that successful establishment of PVs in the host cell requires modulation of the Golgi apparatus which probably involves modifications in microtubule cytoskeleton organization and dynamics. These differences in how T. gondii and B. besnoiti interact with their host cells may indicate different evolutionary paths.

  13. SPOC1-mediated antiviral host cell response is antagonized early in human adenovirus type 5 infection.

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    Sabrina Schreiner

    Full Text Available Little is known about immediate phases after viral infection and how an incoming viral genome complex counteracts host cell defenses, before the start of viral gene expression. Adenovirus (Ad serves as an ideal model, since entry and onset of gene expression are rapid and highly efficient, and mechanisms used 24-48 hours post infection to counteract host antiviral and DNA repair factors (e.g. p53, Mre11, Daxx are well studied. Here, we identify an even earlier host cell target for Ad, the chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader, SPOC1, recently found recruited to double strand breaks, and playing a role in DNA damage response. SPOC1 co-localized with viral replication centers in the host cell nucleus, interacted with Ad DNA, and repressed viral gene expression at the transcriptional level. We discovered that this SPOC1-mediated restriction imposed upon Ad growth is relieved by its functional association with the Ad major core protein pVII that enters with the viral genome, followed by E1B-55K/E4orf6-dependent proteasomal degradation of SPOC1. Mimicking removal of SPOC1 in the cell, knock down of this cellular restriction factor using RNAi techniques resulted in significantly increased Ad replication, including enhanced viral gene expression. However, depletion of SPOC1 also reduced the efficiency of E1B-55K transcriptional repression of cellular promoters, with possible implications for viral transformation. Intriguingly, not exclusive to Ad infection, other human pathogenic viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, HIV-1, and HCV also depleted SPOC1 in infected cells. Our findings provide a general model for how pathogenic human viruses antagonize intrinsic SPOC1-mediated antiviral responses in their host cells. A better understanding of viral entry and early restrictive functions in host cells should provide new perspectives for developing antiviral agents and therapies. Conversely, for Ad vectors used in gene therapy, counteracting mechanisms

  14. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF ULTRAVIOLET-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Shapley, Alice E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Steidel, Charles C. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Reddy, Naveen A. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Erb, Dawn K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We use stellar population synthesis modeling to analyze the host-galaxy properties of a sample of 33 UV-selected, narrow-lined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 2-3. In order to quantify the contribution of AGN emission to host galaxy broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we use the subsample of 11 AGNs with photometric coverage spanning from rest-frame UV through near-IR wavelengths. Modeling the SEDs of these objects with a linear combination of stellar population and AGN templates, we infer the effect of the AGN on derived stellar population parameters. We also estimate the typical bias in derived stellar populations for AGNs lacking rest-frame near-IR wavelength coverage, and develop a method for inferring the true host-galaxy properties. We compare AGN host-galaxy properties to those of a sample of UV-selected, star-forming non-AGNs in the same redshift range, including a subsample carefully matched in stellar mass. Although the AGNs have higher masses and star-formation rates than the full non-active sample, their stellar population properties are consistent with those of the mass-selected sample, suggesting that the presence of an AGN is not connected with the cessation of star formation activity in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2-3. We suggest that a correlation between M {sub BH} and galaxy stellar mass is already in place at this epoch. Assuming a roughly constant Eddington ratio for AGNs at all stellar masses, we are unable to detect the AGNs in low-mass galaxies because they are simply too faint.

  15. Proteases of Sporothrix schenckii: Cytopathological effects on a host-cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanero López, Myrna; Flores Villavicencio, Lérida L; Soto Arredondo, Karla; Barbosa Sabanero, Gloria; Villagómez-Castro, Julio César; Cruz Jiménez, Gustavo; Sandoval Bernal, Gerardo; Torres Guerrero, Haydee

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex. The adhesion of the fungus to the host tissue has been considered the key step in the colonization and invasion, but little is known about the early events in the host-parasite interaction. To evaluate the proteolytic activity of S. schenckii on epithelial cells. The proteolytic system (at pH 5 and 7) was evaluated using azocoll and zymograms. The host-parasite interaction and epithelial cell response were also analyzed by examining the microfilament cytoskeleton using phalloidin-FITC and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, the metabolic activity was determined using an XTT assay. The zymograms showed that S. schenckii yeast cells possess high intracellular and extracellular proteolytic activities (Mr≥200, 116, 97, and 70kDa) that are pH dependent and are inhibited by PMSF and E64, which act on serine and cysteine-type proteases. During the epithelial cell-protease interaction, the cells showed alterations in the microfilament distribution, as well as in the plasma membrane structure. Moreover, the metabolic activity of the epithelial cells decreased 60% without a protease inhibitor. Our data demonstrate the complexity of the cellular responses during the infection process. This process is somehow counteracted by the action of proteases inhibitors. Furthermore, the results provide critical information for understanding the nature of host-fungus interactions and for searching a new effective antifungal therapy, which includes protease inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. β2-agonists promote host defense against bacterial infection in primary human bronchial epithelial cells

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    Weinberger Andrew R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway epithelial cells are critical in host defense against bacteria including Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. β2-agonists are mainstay of COPD and asthma therapy, but whether β2-agonists directly affect airway epithelial host defense functions is unclear. Methods Epithelial cells from bronchial brushings of normal (n = 8, asthma (n = 8 and COPD (n = 8 subjects were grown in air-liquid interface cultures, and treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE and/or Th2 cytokine IL-13, followed by Mp infection and treatment with β2-agonists albuterol and formoterol for up to seven days. Mp and host defense proteins short palate, lung, and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1 and β-defensin-2 were quantified. Expression of β2-adrenergic receptors was also measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results (R- or racemic albuterol and (R,R- or racemic formoterol significantly decreased Mp levels in normal and asthma epithelial cells. Normal cells treated with Mp and (R- or racemic albuterol showed an increase in SPLUNC1, but not in β-defensin-2. COPD cells did not respond to drug treatment with a significant decrease in Mp or an increase in SPLUNC1. IL-13 attenuated drug effects on Mp, and markedly decreased SPLUNC1 and β2-adrenergic receptors. Conclusions These results for the first time show that β2-agonists enhance host defense functions of primary bronchial epithelial cells from normal and asthma subjects, which is attenuated by IL-13.

  17. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Mueller, Claudius [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Roberts, Brian [Leidos Health Life Sciences, 5202 Presidents Court, Suite 110, Frederick, MD (United States); Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Petricoin, Emanuel [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Narayanan, Aarthi, E-mail: anaraya1@gmu.edu [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  18. Trees Wanted—Dead or Alive! Host Selection and Population Dynamics in Tree-Killing Bark Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausrud, Kyrre L.; Grégoire, Jean-Claude; Skarpaas, Olav; Erbilgin, Nadir; Gilbert, Marius; Økland, Bjørn; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) feed and breed in dead or severely weakened host trees. When their population densities are high, some species aggregate on healthy host trees so that their defences may be exhausted and the inner bark successfully colonized, killing the tree in the process. Here we investigate under what conditions participating with unrelated conspecifics in risky mass attacks on living trees is an adaptive strategy, and what this can tell us about bark beetle outbreak dynamics. We find that the outcome of individual host selection may deviate from the ideal free distribution in a way that facilitates the emergence of tree-killing (aggressive) behavior, and that any heritability on traits governing aggressiveness seems likely to exist in a state of flux or cycles consistent with variability observed in natural populations. This may have implications for how economically and ecologically important species respond to environmental changes in climate and landscape (forest) structure. The population dynamics emerging from individual behavior are complex, capable of switching between “endemic” and “epidemic” regimes spontaneously or following changes in host availability or resistance. Model predictions are compared to empirical observations, and we identify some factors determining the occurrence and self-limitation of epidemics. PMID:21647433

  19. Trees wanted--dead or alive! Host selection and population dynamics in tree-killing bark beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausrud, Kyrre L; Grégoire, Jean-Claude; Skarpaas, Olav; Erbilgin, Nadir; Gilbert, Marius; Økland, Bjørn; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2011-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) feed and breed in dead or severely weakened host trees. When their population densities are high, some species aggregate on healthy host trees so that their defences may be exhausted and the inner bark successfully colonized, killing the tree in the process. Here we investigate under what conditions participating with unrelated conspecifics in risky mass attacks on living trees is an adaptive strategy, and what this can tell us about bark beetle outbreak dynamics. We find that the outcome of individual host selection may deviate from the ideal free distribution in a way that facilitates the emergence of tree-killing (aggressive) behavior, and that any heritability on traits governing aggressiveness seems likely to exist in a state of flux or cycles consistent with variability observed in natural populations. This may have implications for how economically and ecologically important species respond to environmental changes in climate and landscape (forest) structure. The population dynamics emerging from individual behavior are complex, capable of switching between "endemic" and "epidemic" regimes spontaneously or following changes in host availability or resistance. Model predictions are compared to empirical observations, and we identify some factors determining the occurrence and self-limitation of epidemics.

  20. Trees wanted--dead or alive! Host selection and population dynamics in tree-killing bark beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrre L Kausrud

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae feed and breed in dead or severely weakened host trees. When their population densities are high, some species aggregate on healthy host trees so that their defences may be exhausted and the inner bark successfully colonized, killing the tree in the process. Here we investigate under what conditions participating with unrelated conspecifics in risky mass attacks on living trees is an adaptive strategy, and what this can tell us about bark beetle outbreak dynamics. We find that the outcome of individual host selection may deviate from the ideal free distribution in a way that facilitates the emergence of tree-killing (aggressive behavior, and that any heritability on traits governing aggressiveness seems likely to exist in a state of flux or cycles consistent with variability observed in natural populations. This may have implications for how economically and ecologically important species respond to environmental changes in climate and landscape (forest structure. The population dynamics emerging from individual behavior are complex, capable of switching between "endemic" and "epidemic" regimes spontaneously or following changes in host availability or resistance. Model predictions are compared to empirical observations, and we identify some factors determining the occurrence and self-limitation of epidemics.

  1. Differential inhibition of host cell cholesterol de novo biosynthesis and processing abrogates Eimeria bovis intracellular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Penny H; Hirzmann, Jörg; Hermosilla, Carlos; Taubert, Anja

    2014-11-01

    Eimeria bovis macromeront formation in bovine endothelial host cells is an energy- and nutrient-demanding process. Obligate intracellular replicating coccidians are generally considered as auxotrophic for cholesterol synthesis and scavenge cholesterol from the host cell by either enhancing the uptake of extracellular cholesterol sources or by upregulating the host cellular de novo biosynthesis. We here focused on the latter mechanism and analyzed the effects of several inhibitors targeting the host cellular mevalonate biosynthesis pathway and cholesterol processing. The following inhibitors were used: lovastatin, squalestatin, CI976 and C75 targeting HMG-CoA reductase, squalene synthase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase, and fatty acid synthase, respectively. In summary, all inhibitors significantly interfered with E. bovis meront formation and merozoite production in a dose-dependent manner. Dose effect responses identified lovastatin as the most effective compound, followed by CI976, C75, and squalestatin, respectively. Overall, merozoite production was inhibited by 99.6, 99.7, 84.6, and 70.2% via lovastatin (1 μM), CI976, C75, and squalestatin (all 5 μM) treatments, respectively. Concerning macromeront formation, both the rate and size of developing meronts were affected by inhibitor treatments. The effects were characterized by developmental arrest and meront degradation. In the case of CI976 treatment, we additionally observed detrimental effects on host cellular lipid droplet formation leading to meront developmental arrest irrespective of the time point of treatment onset. These analyses clearly indicate that successful E. bovis intracellular development strictly depends on the host cellular de novo biosynthesis of cholesterol and on the adequate subsequent processing thereof.

  2. Prediction of NK Cell Licensing Level in Selection of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donor, Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogatko-Koroś, Marta; Mika-Witkowska, Renata; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Wysoczańska, Barbara; Jaskuła, Emilia; Kościńska, Katarzyna; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Dziopa, Joanna; Szlendak, Urszula; Gwozdowicz, Sławomir; Graczyk-Pol, Elżbieta; Lange, Andrzej; Nowak, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell licensing status depends on clonal expression of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (iKIR) and short term HLA environment. Licensed NK cells are more efficient in tumor killing than unlicensed NK cells. Cognate KIR-HLA pairs in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) donor and recipient are decisive for the possible change in the NK cell licensing status after HSCT. We assessed clinical outcomes in 297 patients with lymphoproliferative or myeloproliferative malignancies, or myelodysplastic syndrome in a model with upward licensing, downward resetting, and unchanged licensing genetics status after T cell replate HSCT from unrelated donors. We found extremely low (0%) relapse/progression incidence (RI), and better (59%) event-free survival (EFS) in recipients with upward licensing status and highly increased RI (37.5%), and reduced EFS (8%) among patients with the downward resetting status of repopulated donor NK cells after HSCT, as compared with unchanged NK cell licensing (RI 23%, EFS 47%). These trends were confirmed in adjusted multivariable models (for RI p = 6.66E-09, OR = 1.47, 95% CI 1.29-1.66 and for EFS p = 3.79E-13, OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.50-1.84). Differences in the incidence of acute graft versus host disease (GvHD 62, 69, and 47%) and chronic GvHD (24, 44, and 15%, respectively) in three groups were insignificant. It would be rationale the preferential selection of the donors with upward licensing over downward resetting inhibitory KIR:HLA constellation and inclusion of the KIR genotyping in the donor selection algorithm for malignant patients. Further studies using enlarged cohorts of patients with more homogenous diagnosis are essential to reliably verify these preliminary data.

  3. Als3 Is a Candida albicans Invasin That Binds to Cadherins and Induces Endocytosis by Host Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Quynh T.; Myers, Carter L.; Yue Fu; Sheppard, Donald C.; Yeaman, Michael R.; Welch, William H.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Edwards, John E.; Filler, Scott G.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of hematogenously disseminated and oropharyngeal candidiasis. Both of these diseases are characterized by fungal invasion of host cells. Previously, we have found that C. albicans hyphae invade endothelial cells and oral epithelial cells in vitro by inducing their own endocytosis. Therefore, we set out to identify the fungal surface protein and host cell receptors that mediate this process. We found that the C. albicans Als3 is required for the organi...

  4. Cell scale host-pathogen modeling: another branch in the evolution of constraint-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Neema; Raghunathan, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-based models have become popular methods for systems biology as they enable the integration of complex, disparate datasets in a biologically cohesive framework that also supports the description of biological processes in terms of basic physicochemical constraints and relationships. The scope, scale, and application of genome scale models have grown from single cell bacteria to multi-cellular interaction modeling; host-pathogen modeling represents one of these examples at the current horizon of constraint-based methods. There are now a small number of examples of host-pathogen constraint-based models in the literature, however there has not yet been a definitive description of the methodology required for the functional integration of genome scale models in order to generate simulation capable host-pathogen models. Herein we outline a systematic procedure to produce functional host-pathogen models, highlighting steps which require debugging and iterative revisions in order to successfully build a functional model. The construction of such models will enable the exploration of host-pathogen interactions by leveraging the growing wealth of omic data in order to better understand mechanism of infection and identify novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. CELL SCALE HOST-PATHOGEN MODELING: ANOTHER BRANCH IN THE EVOLUTION OF CONSTRAINT-BASED METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema eJamshidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Constraint-based models have become popular methods for systems biology as they enable the integration of complex, disparate datasets in a biologically cohesive framework that also supports the description of biological processes in terms of basic physicochemical constraints and relationships. The scope, scale, and application of genome scale models have grown from single cell bacteria to multi-cellular interaction modeling; host-pathogen modeling represents one of these examples at the current horizon of constraint-based methods. There are now a small number of examples of host-pathogen constraint-based models in the literature, however there has not yet been a definitive description of the methodology required for the functional integration of genome scale models in order to generate simulation capable host-pathogen models. Herein we outline a systematic procedure to produce functional host-pathogen models, highlighting steps which require debugging and iterative revisions in order to successfully build a functional model. The construction of such models will enable the exploration of host-pathogen interactions by leveraging the growing wealth of omic data in order to better understand mechanism of infection and identify novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Sodium selectivity of Reissner's membrane epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyunghee X

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by Reissner's membrane is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of cochlear endolymph. It was previously shown that the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride and benzamil. The most commonly-observed target of these drugs is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, which is composed of the three subunits α-,β- and γ-ENaC. However, other less-selective cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive to benzamil and amiloride. The aim of this study was to determine whether Reissner's membrane epithelial cells could support parasensory K+ absorption via amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive electrogenic pathways. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6196, RT-PCR, and whole-cell patch clamp. Transcript expression analysis of Reissner's membrane detected no amiloride-sensitive acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b nor amiloride-sensitive cyclic-nucleotide gated channels (CNGA1, CNGA2, CNGA4, CNGB3. By contrast, α-,β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present in Reissner's membrane. The selectivity of the benzamil-sensitive cation currents was observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings under Cl--free conditions where cations were the only permeant species. The currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, and the permeability of Li+ was greater than that of Na+ in Reissner's membrane. Complete replacement of bath Na+ with the inpermeable cation NMDG+ led to the same inward current as with benzamil in a Na+ bath. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride/benzamil-sensitive absorptive flux of Reissner's membrane mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel that has several key characteristics in common with αβγ-ENaC. The amiloride-sensitive pathway therefore absorbs only Na+ in this epithelium and does not provide a parasensory K+ efflux route from scala

  7. African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells provide an alternative host cell system for influenza A and B viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Govorkova, E A; Murti, G; Meignier, B; de Taisne, C; Webster, R G

    1996-01-01

    The preparation of live, attenuated human influenza virus vaccines and of large quantities of inactivated vaccines after the emergence or reemergence of a pandemic influenza virus will require an alternative host cell system, because embryonated chicken eggs will likely be insufficient and suboptimal. Preliminary studies indicated that an African green monkey kidney cell line (Vero) is a suitable system for the primary isolation and cultivation of influenza A viruses (E. A. Govorkova, N. V. K...

  8. Global impact of Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA on host cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenal-Muñoz, Elena, E-mail: e_cardenal@us.es; Gutiérrez, Gabriel, E-mail: ggpozo@us.es; Ramos-Morales, Francisco, E-mail: framos@us.es

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • We analyzed HeLa cells transcriptome in response to Salmonella SteA. • Significant differential expression was detected for 58 human genes. • They are involved in ECM organization and regulation of some signaling pathways. • Cell death, cell adhesion and cell migration were decreased in SteA-expressing cells. • These results contribute to understand the role of SteA during infections. - Abstract: Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes gastroenteritis, bacteremia and typhoid fever in several animal species including humans. Its virulence is greatly dependent on two type III secretion systems, encoded in pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. These systems translocate proteins called effectors into eukaryotic host cell. Effectors interfere with host signal transduction pathways to allow the internalization of pathogens and their survival and proliferation inside vacuoles. SteA is one of the few Salmonella effectors that are substrates of both type III secretion systems. Here, we used gene arrays and bioinformatics analysis to study the genetic response of human epithelial cells to SteA. We found that constitutive synthesis of SteA in HeLa cells leads to induction of genes related to extracellular matrix organization and regulation of cell proliferation and serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways. SteA also causes repression of genes related to immune processes and regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis and pathway-restricted SMAD protein phosphorylation. In addition, a cell biology approach revealed that epithelial cells expressing steA show altered cell morphology, and decreased cytotoxicity, cell–cell adhesion and migration.

  9. Selective Oxidation of Glycerol with 3% H2O2 Catalyzed by LDH-Hosted Cr(III Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongde Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of layered double hydroxides (LDHs –hosted sulphonato-salen Cr(III complexes were prepared and characterized by various physico-chemical measurements, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscope (TEM, scanning electron microscope (SEM and elemental analysis. Additionally, their catalytic performances were investigated in the selective oxidation of glycerol (GLY using 3% H2O2 as an oxidant. It was found that all the LDH-hosted Cr(III complexes exhibited significantly enhanced catalytic performance compared to the homogeneous Cr(III complex. Additionally, it was worth mentioning that the metal composition of LDH plates played an important role in the catalytic performances of LDH-hosted Cr(III complex catalysts. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the highest GLY conversion reached 85.5% with 59.3% of the selectivity to 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (DHA. In addition, the catalytic activity remained after being recycled five times.

  10. Recombinant Wild-Type and Edmonston Strain Measles Viruses Bearing Heterologous H Proteins: Role of H Protein in Cell Fusion and Host Cell Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makoto; Miyajima, Naoko; Kobune, Fumio; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi; Tashiro, Masato

    2002-01-01

    Wild-type measles virus (MV) isolated from B95a cells has a restricted host cell specificity and hardly replicates in Vero cells, whereas the laboratory strain Edmonston (Ed) replicates in a variety of cell types including Vero cells. To investigate the role of H protein in the differential MV host cell specificity and cell fusion activity, H proteins of wild-type MV (IC-B) and Ed were coexpressed with the F protein in Vero cells. Cell-cell fusion occurred in Vero cells when Ed H protein, but...

  11. Role of αβ T Cell Depletion in Prevention of Graft versus Host Disease

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    Haitham Abdelhakim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Graft versus host disease (GVHD represents a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo HCT. Graft cellular manipulation has been used to mitigate the risk of GVHD. The αβ T cells are considered the primary culprit for causing GVHD therefore depletion of this T cell subset emerged as a promising cellular manipulation strategy to overcome the human leukocyte antigen (HLA barrier of haploidentical (haplo HCT. This approach is also being investigated in HLA-matched HCT. In several studies, αβ T cell depletion HCT has been performed without pharmacologic GVHD prophylaxis, thus unleashing favorable effect of donor’s natural killer cells (NK and γδ T cells. This article will discuss the evolution of this method in clinical practice and the clinical outcome as described in different clinical trials.

  12. Legionella Effector AnkX Disrupts Host Cell Endocytic Recycling in a Phosphocholination-Dependent Manner

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    Samual C. Allgood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The facultative intracellular bacterium Legionella pneumophila proliferates within amoebae and human alveolar macrophages, and it is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a life-threatening pneumonia. Within host cells, L. pneumophila establishes a replicative haven by delivering numerous effector proteins into the host cytosol, many of which target membrane trafficking by manipulating the function of Rab GTPases. The Legionella effector AnkX is a phosphocholine transferase that covalently modifies host Rab1 and Rab35. However, a detailed understanding of the biological consequence of Rab GTPase phosphocholination remains elusive. Here, we broaden the understanding of AnkX function by presenting three lines of evidence that it interferes with host endocytic recycling. First, using immunogold transmission electron microscopy, we determined that GFP-tagged AnkX ectopically produced in mammalian cells localizes at the plasma membrane and tubular membrane compartments, sites consistent with targeting the endocytic recycling pathway. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of AnkX was responsible for association with the plasma membrane, and we determined that this region was also able to bind the phosphoinositide lipids PI(3P and PI(4P in vitro. Second, we observed that mCherry-AnkX co-localized with Rab35, a regulator of recycling endocytosis and with major histocompatibility class I protein (MHC-I, a key immunoregulatory protein whose recycling from and back to the plasma membrane is Rab35-dependent. Third, we report that during infection of macrophages, AnkX is responsible for the disruption of endocytic recycling of transferrin, and AnkX's phosphocholination activity is critical for this function. These results support the hypothesis that AnkX targets endocytic recycling during host cell infection. Finally, we have demonstrated that the phosphocholination activity of AnkX is also critical for inhibiting fusion of the Legionella

  13. Immunoregulatory Effects Triggered by Lactic Acid Bacteria Exopolysaccharides: New Insights into Molecular Interactions with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiño, Jonathan; Villena, Julio; Kanmani, Paulraj; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2016-08-15

    Researchers have demonstrated that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with immunomodulatory capabilities (immunobiotics) exert their beneficial effects through several molecules, including cell wall, peptidoglycan, and exopolysaccharides (EPS), that are able to interact with specific host cell receptors. EPS from LAB show a wide heterogeneity in its composition, meaning that biological properties depend on the strain and. therefore, only a part of the mechanism of action has been elucidated for these molecules. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the health-promoting actions of EPS from LAB with special focus on their immunoregulatory actions. In addition, we describe our studies using porcine intestinal epithelial cells (PIE cells) as a model to evaluate the molecular interactions of EPS from two immunobiotic LAB strains and the host cells. Our studies showed that EPS from immunobiotic LAB have anti-inflammatory capacities in PIE cells since they are able to reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines in cells challenged with the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4-agonist lipopolysaccharide. The effects of EPS were dependent on TLR2, TLR4, and negative regulators of TLR signaling. We also reported that the radioprotective 105 (RP105)/MD1 complex, a member of the TLR family, is partially involved in the immunoregulatory effects of the EPS from LAB. Our work described, for the first time, that LAB and their EPS reduce inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells in a RP105/MD1-dependent manner. A continuing challenge for the future is to reveal more effector-receptor relationships in immunobiotic-host interactions that contribute to the beneficial effects of these bacteria on mucosal immune homeostasis. A detailed molecular understanding should lead to a more rational use of immunobiotics in general, and their EPS in particular, as efficient prevention and therapies for specific immune-related disorders in humans and animals.

  14. Immunoregulatory Effects Triggered by Lactic Acid Bacteria Exopolysaccharides: New Insights into Molecular Interactions with Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Laiño

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have demonstrated that lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunomodulatory capabilities (immunobiotics exert their beneficial effects through several molecules, including cell wall, peptidoglycan, and exopolysaccharides (EPS, that are able to interact with specific host cell receptors. EPS from LAB show a wide heterogeneity in its composition, meaning that biological properties depend on the strain and. therefore, only a part of the mechanism of action has been elucidated for these molecules. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the health-promoting actions of EPS from LAB with special focus on their immunoregulatory actions. In addition, we describe our studies using porcine intestinal epithelial cells (PIE cells as a model to evaluate the molecular interactions of EPS from two immunobiotic LAB strains and the host cells. Our studies showed that EPS from immunobiotic LAB have anti-inflammatory capacities in PIE cells since they are able to reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines in cells challenged with the Toll-like receptor (TLR-4-agonist lipopolysaccharide. The effects of EPS were dependent on TLR2, TLR4, and negative regulators of TLR signaling. We also reported that the radioprotective 105 (RP105/MD1 complex, a member of the TLR family, is partially involved in the immunoregulatory effects of the EPS from LAB. Our work described, for the first time, that LAB and their EPS reduce inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells in a RP105/MD1-dependent manner. A continuing challenge for the future is to reveal more effector-receptor relationships in immunobiotic-host interactions that contribute to the beneficial effects of these bacteria on mucosal immune homeostasis. A detailed molecular understanding should lead to a more rational use of immunobiotics in general, and their EPS in particular, as efficient prevention and therapies for specific immune-related disorders in humans and animals.

  15. Internalization of components of the host cell plasma membrane during infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Carvalho TMU

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi attach to the macrophage surface and are internalized with the formation of a membrane bounded vacuole, known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. In order to determine if components of the host cell membrane are internalized during formation of the PV we labeled the macrophage surface with fluorescent probes for proteins, lipids and sialic acid residues and then allowed the labeled cells to interact with the parasites. The interaction process was interrupted after 1 hr at 37ºC and the distribution of the probes analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. During attachment of the parasites to the macrophage surface an intense labeling of the attachment regions was observed. Subsequently labeling of the membrane lining the parasitophorous vacuole containing epimastigote and trypomastigote forms was seen. Labeling was not uniform, with regions of intense and light or no labeling. The results obtained show that host cell membrane lipids, proteins and sialoglycoconjugates contribute to the formation of the membrane lining the PV containing epimastigote and trypomastigote T. cruzi forms. Lysosomes of the host cell may participate in the process of PV membrane formation.

  16. Subverting Host Cell P21-Activated Kinase: A Case of Convergent Evolution across Pathogens

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    Simona John Von Freyend

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens have evolved a wide range of strategies to not only escape from the immune systems of their hosts, but also to directly exploit a variety of host factors to facilitate the infection process. One such strategy is to subvert host cell signalling pathways to the advantage of the pathogen. Recent research has highlighted that the human serine/threonine kinase PAK, or p21-activated kinase, is a central component of host-pathogen interactions in many infection systems involving viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic pathogens. PAK paralogues are found in most mammalian tissues, where they play vital roles in a wide range of functions. The role of PAKs in cell proliferation and survival, and their involvement in a number of cancers, is of great interest in the context of drug discovery. In this review we discuss the latest insights into the surprisingly central role human PAK1 plays for the infection by such different infectious disease agents as viruses, bacteria, and parasitic protists. It is our intention to open serious discussion on the applicability of PAK inhibitors for the treatment, not only of neoplastic diseases, which is currently the primary objective of drug discovery research targeting these enzymes, but also of a wide range of infectious diseases.

  17. Subverting Host Cell P21-Activated Kinase: A Case of Convergent Evolution across Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Von Freyend, Simona; Kwok-Schuelein, Terry; Netter, Hans J; Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Doerig, Christian

    2017-04-21

    Intracellular pathogens have evolved a wide range of strategies to not only escape from the immune systems of their hosts, but also to directly exploit a variety of host factors to facilitate the infection process. One such strategy is to subvert host cell signalling pathways to the advantage of the pathogen. Recent research has highlighted that the human serine/threonine kinase PAK, or p21-activated kinase, is a central component of host-pathogen interactions in many infection systems involving viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic pathogens. PAK paralogues are found in most mammalian tissues, where they play vital roles in a wide range of functions. The role of PAKs in cell proliferation and survival, and their involvement in a number of cancers, is of great interest in the context of drug discovery. In this review we discuss the latest insights into the surprisingly central role human PAK1 plays for the infection by such different infectious disease agents as viruses, bacteria, and parasitic protists. It is our intention to open serious discussion on the applicability of PAK inhibitors for the treatment, not only of neoplastic diseases, which is currently the primary objective of drug discovery research targeting these enzymes, but also of a wide range of infectious diseases.

  18. Subverting Host Cell P21-Activated Kinase: A Case of Convergent Evolution across Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    John von Freyend, Simona; Kwok-Schuelein, Terry; Netter, Hans J.; Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Doerig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have evolved a wide range of strategies to not only escape from the immune systems of their hosts, but also to directly exploit a variety of host factors to facilitate the infection process. One such strategy is to subvert host cell signalling pathways to the advantage of the pathogen. Recent research has highlighted that the human serine/threonine kinase PAK, or p21-activated kinase, is a central component of host-pathogen interactions in many infection systems involving viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic pathogens. PAK paralogues are found in most mammalian tissues, where they play vital roles in a wide range of functions. The role of PAKs in cell proliferation and survival, and their involvement in a number of cancers, is of great interest in the context of drug discovery. In this review we discuss the latest insights into the surprisingly central role human PAK1 plays for the infection by such different infectious disease agents as viruses, bacteria, and parasitic protists. It is our intention to open serious discussion on the applicability of PAK inhibitors for the treatment, not only of neoplastic diseases, which is currently the primary objective of drug discovery research targeting these enzymes, but also of a wide range of infectious diseases. PMID:28430160

  19. The role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during Giardia - host cell interactions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Britta; Hanevik, Kurt; Andersson, Mattias K; Bruserud, Oystein; Svärd, Staffan G

    2013-11-14

    Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid important in growing individuals and under non-homeostatic conditions/disease. Many pathogens interfere with arginine-utilization in host cells, especially nitric oxide (NO) production, by changing the expression of host enzymes involved in arginine metabolism. Here we used human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and three different isolates of the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis to investigate the role of arginine and arginine-metabolizing enzymes during intestinal protozoan infections. RNA expression analyses of major arginine-metabolizing enzymes revealed the arginine-utilizing pathways in human IECs (differentiated Caco-2 cells) grown in vitro. Most genes were constant or down-regulated (e.g. arginase 1 and 2) upon interaction with Giardia, whereas inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were up-regulated within 6 h of infection. Giardia was shown to suppress cytokine-induced iNOS expression, thus the parasite has both iNOS inducing and suppressive activities. Giardial arginine consumption suppresses NO production and the NO-degrading parasite protein flavohemoglobin is up-regulated in response to host NO. In addition, the secreted, arginine-consuming giardial enzyme arginine deiminase (GiADI) actively reduces T-cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, the effects on NO production and T cell proliferation could be reversed by addition of external arginine or citrulline. Giardia affects the host's arginine metabolism on many different levels. Many of the effects can be reversed by addition of arginine or citrulline, which could be a beneficial supplement in oral rehydration therapy.

  20. Characterisation of cell death inducing Phytophthora capsici CRN effectors suggests diverse activities in the host nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco eStam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant-Microbe interactions are complex associations that feature recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns by the plant immune system and dampening of subsequent responses by pathogen encoded secreted effectors. With large effector repertoires now identified in a range of sequenced microbial genomes, much attention centres on understanding their roles in immunity or disease. These studies not only allow identification of pathogen virulence factors and strategies, they also provide an important molecular toolset suited for studying immunity in plants. The Phytophthora intracellular effector repertoire encodes a large class of proteins that translocate into host cells and exclusively target the host nucleus. Recent functional studies have implicated the CRN protein family as an important class of diverse effectors that target distinct subnuclear compartments and modify host cell signalling. Here, we characterised three necrosis inducing CRNs and show that there are differences in the levels of cell death. We show that only expression of CRN20_624 has an additive effect on PAMP induced cell death but not AVR3a induced ETI. Given their distinctive phenotypes, we assessed localisation of each CRN with a set of nuclear markers and found clear differences in CRN subnuclear distribution patterns. These assays also revealed that expression of CRN83_152 leads to a distinct change in nuclear chromatin organisation, suggesting a distinct series of events that leads to cell death upon over-expression. Taken together, our results suggest diverse functions carried by CRN C-termini, which can be exploited to identify novel processes that take place in the host nucleus and are required for immunity or susceptibility.

  1. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  2. Phengaris (Maculinea) teleius butterflies select host plants close to Myrmica ants for oviposition, but P. nausithous do not

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wynhoff, Irma; Langevelde, van Frank

    2017-01-01

    Many lycaenid butterfly species have interactions with ants, with 12% obligatorily depending on two sequential sources of larval food, namely host plants and host ants. When host plants are abundant but the density of host ant nests is relatively low, most host plants have no host ant nest in their

  3. CD69 Deficiency Enhances the Host Response to Vaccinia Virus Infection through Altered NK Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notario, Laura; Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; de Molina, Antonio; Lauzurica, Pilar

    2016-07-15

    During the host response to viral infection, the transmembrane CD69 protein is highly upregulated in all immune cells. We have studied the role of CD69 in the murine immune response to vaccinia virus (VACV) infection, and we report that the absence of CD69 enhances protection against VACV at both short and long times postinfection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. Natural killer (NK) cells were implicated in the increased infection control, since the differences were greatly diminished when NK cells were depleted. This role of NK cells was not based on an altered NK cell reactivity, since CD69 did not affect the NK cell activation threshold in response to major histocompatibility complex class I NK cell targets or protein kinase C activation. Instead, NK cell numbers were increased in the spleen and peritoneum of CD69-deficient infected mice. That was not just secondary to better infection control in CD69-deficient mice, since NK cell numbers in the spleens and the blood of uninfected CD69(-/-) mice were already augmented. CD69-deficient NK cells from infected mice did not have an altered proliferation capacity. However, a lower spontaneous cell death rate was observed for CD69(-/-) lymphocytes. Thus, our results suggest that CD69 limits the innate immune response to VACV infection at least in part through cell homeostatic survival. We show that increased natural killer (NK) cell numbers augment the host response and survival after infection with vaccinia virus. This phenotype is found in the absence of CD69 in immunocompetent and immunodeficient hosts. As part of the innate immune system, NK lymphocytes are activated and participate in the defense against infection. Several studies have focused on the contribution of NK cells to protection against infection with vaccinia virus. In this study, it was demonstrated that the augmented early NK cell response in the absence of CD69 is responsible for the increased protection seen during infection with

  4. The Salmonella effector SteA binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate for subcellular targeting within host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Lia; Ismail, Ahmad; Charro, Nuno; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Holden, David W; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Mota, Luís Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The function of these effectors depends on their localization within infected cells, but the mechanisms determining subcellular targeting of each effector are mostly elusive. Here, we show that the Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA binds specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Ectopically expressed SteA localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells. However, SteA was displaced from the PM of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mutants unable to synthesize the local pool of PI(4)P and from the PM of HeLa cells after localized depletion of PI(4)P. Moreover, in infected cells, bacterially translocated or ectopically expressed SteA localized at the membrane of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) and to Salmonella-induced tubules; using the PI(4)P-binding domain of the Legionella type IV secretion effector SidC as probe, we found PI(4)P at the SCV membrane and associated tubules throughout Salmonella infection of HeLa cells. Both binding of SteA to PI(4)P and the subcellular localization of ectopically expressed or bacterially translocated SteA were dependent on a lysine residue near the N-terminus of the protein. Overall, this indicates that binding of SteA to PI(4)P is necessary for its localization within host cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that these

  6. Hsp90 inhibition destabilizes Ezh2 protein in alloreactive T cells and reduces graft-versus-host disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingrong; He, Shan; Tian, Yuanyuan; Gu, Yuting; Chen, Pan; Li, Changhong; Huang, Jiefang; Liu, Yongnian; Yu, Hongshuang; Jin, Min; Hu, Shaoyan; Tong, Qing; Ma, Anqi; Jin, Jian; Hexner, Elizabeth; Fung, Henry; Reshef, Ran; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yanyun

    2017-05-18

    Modulating T-cell alloreactivity has been a main strategy to reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Genetic deletion of T-cell Ezh2, which catalyzes trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), inhibits GVHD. Therefore, reducing Ezh2-mediated H3K27me3 is thought to be essential for inhibiting GVHD. We tested this hypothesis in mouse GVHD models. Unexpectedly, administration of the Ezh2 inhibitor GSK126, which specifically decreases H3K27me3 without affecting Ezh2 protein, failed to prevent the disease. In contrast, destabilizing T-cell Ezh2 protein by inhibiting Hsp90 using its specific inhibitor AUY922 reduced GVHD in mice undergoing allogeneic HSCT. In vivo administration of AUY922 selectively induced apoptosis of activated T cells and decreased the production of effector cells producing interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α, similar to genetic deletion of Ezh2. Introduction of Ezh2 into alloreactive T cells restored their expansion and production of effector cytokines upon AUY922 treatment, suggesting that impaired T-cell alloreactivity by inhibiting Hsp90 is achieved mainly through depleting Ezh2. Mechanistic analysis revealed that the enzymatic SET domain of Ezh2 directly interacted with Hsp90 to prevent Ezh2 from rapid degradation in activated T cells. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 preserved antileukemia activity of donor T cells, leading to improved overall survival of recipient mice after allogeneic HSCT. Our findings identify the Ezh2-Hsp90 interaction as a previously unrecognized mechanism essential for T-cell responses and an effective target for controlling GVHD. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite strains cloned from Gossypium barbadense further supports selection due to host resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Muhammad Tehseen; Akhtar, Sohail; Mansoor, Shahid

    2012-10-01

    The cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite encodes an essential pathogenicity determinant involved in induction of disease symptoms. We have shown recently that a recombinant betasatellite with a satellite conserved region derived from the tomato leaf curl betasatellite, is prevalent in the Punjab province and is associated with the breakdown of resistance in cotton to cotton leaf curl disease. We intended to see if the betasatellite that was associated with the first epidemic is still being maintained in some other hosts. We cloned betasatellite from G. barbadense, a cotton species highly susceptible to the disease. We found that both the original and recombinant betasatellite are associated with this cotton species. These findings strengthen our hypothesis that the recombinant betasatellite now prevalent on commercial cotton has been selected due to its ability to cross the host resistance barrier.

  8. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Namrata Anand,1 Rupinder K Kanwar,2 Mohan Lal Dubey,1 R K Vahishta,3 Rakesh Sehgal,1,* Anita K Verma,4 Jagat R Kanwar2,*1Department of Medical Parasitology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India; 2Nanomedicine Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, School of Medicine, Molecular and Medical Research Strategic Research Centre, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 4Nanobiotech Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Kirorimal College, University of Delhi, Delhi, India*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells.Methods: Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections.Results: The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene

  9. Host selection and parasite infection in Aedes taeniorhynchus, endemic disease vector in the Galápagos Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Fournié, Guillaume; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Parker, Patricia G; Cunningham, Andrew A; Goodman, Simon J

    2012-12-01

    Host selection in blood-sucking arthropods has important evolutionary and ecological implications for the transmission dynamics, distribution and host-specificity of the parasites they transmit. The black salt-marsh mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus Wiedemann) is distributed throughout tropical to temperate coastal zones in the Americas, and continental populations are primarily mammalphilic. It is the only indigenous mosquito in the Galápagos Islands, having colonised the archipelago around 200,000 years ago, potentially adapting its host selection, and in the process, altering the dynamics of vector mediated pathogen interactions in the archipelago. Here, we use blood-meal analysis and PCR-based parasite screening approach to determine the blood-feeding patterns of A. taeniorhynchus in the Galápagos Islands and identify potential parasite transmission with which this mosquito could be involved. Our results show that A. taeniorhynchus feeds equally on mammals and reptiles, and only one avian sample was observed in 190 successful PCR amplifications from blood meals. However, we detected endemic filarial worms and Haemoproteus parasites known to infect various Galápagos bird species in mosquito thoraces, suggesting that feeding on birds must occur at low frequency, and that A. taeniorhynchus may play a role in maintaining some avian vector-borne pathogens, although more work is needed to explore this possibility. We also isolated three different DNA sequences corresponding to hemogregarine parasites of the genus Hepatozoon from mosquito and iguana blood samples, suggesting that more than one species of Hepatozoon parasites are present in Galápagos. Phylogenetic analysis of Hepatozoon 18sRNA sequences indicates that A. taeniorhynchus may have facilitated a recent breakdown in host-species association of formerly isolated Hepatozoon spp. infecting the reptile populations in the Galápagos Islands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Shiga Toxins: Intracellular Trafficking to the ER Leading to Activation of Host Cell Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Seung Lee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to improve hygenic conditions and regulate food and drinking water safety, the enteric pathogens, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC and Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 remain major public health concerns due to widespread outbreaks and the severity of extra-intestinal diseases they cause, including acute renal failure and central nervous system complications. Shiga toxins are the key virulence factors expressed by these pathogens mediating extra-intestinal disease. Delivery of the toxins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER results in host cell protein synthesis inhibition, activation of the ribotoxic stress response, the ER stress response, and in some cases, the induction of apoptosis. Intrinsic and/or extrinsic apoptosis inducing pathways are involved in executing cell death following intoxication. In this review we provide an overview of the current understanding Shiga toxin intracellular trafficking, host cellular responses to the toxin and ER stress-induced apoptosis with an emphasis on recent findings.

  11. Host epithelial cell invasion by Campylobacter jejuni: trigger or zipper mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg eÓ Cróinín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative pathogen, is a highly frequent cause of gastrointestinal foodborne illness in humans worldwide. Clinical outcome of C. jejuni infections ranges from mild to severe diarrheal disease, and some other complications including reactive arthritis and Guillain–Barré syndrome. This review article highlights various C. jejuni pathogenicity factors, host cell determinants and proposed signaling mechanisms involved in human host cell invasion and their potential role in the development of C. jejuni-mediated disease. A model is presented which outlines the various important interactions of C. jejuni with the intestinal epithelium, and we discuss the pro’s and con’s for the zipper over the trigger mechanism of invasion. Future work should clarify the contradictory role of some previously identified factors, and should identify and characterize novel virulence determinants, which are crucial to provide fresh insights into the diversity of strategies employed by this pathogen to cause disease.

  12. Molecular dissection of host cell invasion by the Apicomplexans: the glideosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldati-Favre D.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Gliding motility is an essential and fascinating apicomplexantypical adaptation to an intracellular lifestyle. Apicomplexan parasites rely on gliding motility for their migration across biological barriers and for host cell invasion and egress. This unusual substrate-dependent mode of locomotion involves the concerted action of secretory adhesins, a myosin motor, factors regulating actin dynamics and proteases. During invasion, complexes of soluble and transmembrane micronemes proteins (MICs and rhoptry neck proteins (RONs are discharged to the apical pole of the parasite, some protein acts as adhesins and bind to host cell receptors whereas others are involved in the moving junction formation. These complexes redistribute towards the posterior pole of the parasite via a physical connection to the parasite actomyosin system and are eventually released from the parasite surface by the action of parasite proteases.

  13. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  14. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino S. Aricò

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK, new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2. This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115.

  15. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  16. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweiss, Karen; Oh, Annie; Rondelli, Damiano; Patel, Pritesh

    2016-01-01

    Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentiate this from other diagnoses and promptly discontinue therapy.

  17. Analysis of host-cell proteins in biotherapeutic proteins by LC/MS approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doneanu, Catalin E; Chen, Weibin

    2014-01-01

    A generic method for the identification and quantification of host-cell proteins (HCPs) in protein biopharmaceuticals is described. Therapeutic proteins and HCPs were converted to complex peptide mixtures following tryptic digestion. Comprehensive peptide separations were performed using online two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography-(LC) involving high-pH reversed phase (RP)/low-pH RP separations. We applied this method to the analysis of HCP impurities in monoclonal antibody (mAb) preparations.

  18. Plasmodium Helical Interspersed Subtelomeric (PHIST) Proteins, at the Center of Host Cell Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warncke, Jan D.; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY During the asexual cycle, Plasmodium falciparum extensively remodels the human erythrocyte to make it a suitable host cell. A large number of exported proteins facilitate this remodeling process, which causes erythrocytes to become more rigid, cytoadherent, and permeable for nutrients and metabolic products. Among the exported proteins, a family of 89 proteins, called the Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric (PHIST) protein family, has been identified. While also found in other Plasmodium species, the PHIST family is greatly expanded in P. falciparum. Although a decade has passed since their first description, to date, most PHIST proteins remain uncharacterized and are of unknown function and localization within the host cell, and there are few data on their interactions with other host or parasite proteins. However, over the past few years, PHIST proteins have been mentioned in the literature at an increasing rate owing to their presence at various localizations within the infected erythrocyte. Expression of PHIST proteins has been implicated in molecular and cellular processes such as the surface display of PfEMP1, gametocytogenesis, changes in cell rigidity, and also cerebral and pregnancy-associated malaria. Thus, we conclude that PHIST proteins are central to host cell remodeling, but despite their obvious importance in pathology, PHIST proteins seem to be understudied. Here we review current knowledge, shed light on the definition of PHIST proteins, and discuss these proteins with respect to their localization and probable function. We take into consideration interaction studies, microarray analyses, or data from blood samples from naturally infected patients to combine all available information on this protein family. PMID:27582258

  19. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-dependent induction of host cell death by membrane-derived vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Thay

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide spectrum of infections in humans, ranging from superficial cutaneous infections, infections in the circum-oral region, to life-threatening bacteremia. It was recently demonstrated that Gram-positive organisms such as S. aureus liberate membrane-derived vesicles (MVs, which analogously to outer membrane vesicles (OMVs of Gram-negative bacteria can play a role in delivering virulence factors to host cells. In the present study we have shown that cholesterol-dependent fusion of S. aureus MVs with the plasma membrane represents a route for delivery of a key virulence factor, α-toxin (α-hemolysin; Hla to human cells. Most S. aureus strains produce this 33-kDa pore-forming protein, which can lyse a wide range of human cells, and induce apoptosis in T-lymphocytes. Our results revealed a tight association of biologically active α-toxin with membrane-derived vesicles isolated from S. aureus strain 8325-4. Concomitantly, α-toxin contributed to HeLa cell cytotoxicity of MVs, and was the main vesicle-associated protein responsible for erythrocyte lysis. In contrast, MVs obtained from an isogenic hla mutant were significantly attenuated with regards to both causing lysis of erythrocytes and death of HeLa cells. This is to our knowledge the first recognition of an S. aureus MV-associated factor contributing to host cell cytotoxicity.

  1. The Role of B Cell Targeting in Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Ruben; Gaballa, Sameh

    2017-10-17

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a leading cause of late morbidity and mortality following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Current therapies, including corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, are only effective in roughly 50% of cases; therefore, new treatment strategies are under investigation. What was previously felt to be a T cell disease has more recently been shown to involve activation of both T and B cells, as well as a number of cytokines. With a better understanding of its pathophysiology have come more expansive preclinical and clinical trials, many focused on B cell signaling. This report briefly reviews our current understanding of cGVHD pathophysiology and reviews clinical and preclinical trials with B cell-targeted agents.

  2. Liver Graft versus Host Disease after Allogeneic Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation: Update on Etiopathogenesis and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihăilă R.-G.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Graft versus host disease (GVHD is the main complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and is more frequent after peripheral stem cell transplants. Graft versus leukemia or lymphoma component of them is beneficial to eradicate residual tumor mass after previous treatment and conditioning regimen. A severe GVHD may endanger the patient's life. The most important liver manifestations of GVHD are increased serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin values. The last allows to estimate the GVHD severity. Sometimes, an increase of aminotransferases can mimic an acute hepatitis. Donor-derived hematopoietic cells appeared to turn in mesenchymal liver cells. Activated CD4(+ T cells, humoral and complement activation, a large number of cytokines and cytokine receptors are involved in GVHD development. Correct and early recognition of GVHD and its differentiation from the other liver diseases are essential for the medical practice.

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei Differentially Regulates Host Innate Immune Response Genes for Intracellular Survival in Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumutha Malar Vellasamy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis poses a serious threat to humankind. B. pseudomallei secretes numerous virulence proteins that alter host cell functions to escape from intracellular immune sensors. However, the events underlying disease pathogenesis are poorly understood.We determined the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 human lung epithelial cells, and also investigated the early transcriptional responses using an Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 microarray platform, after three hours of exposure to live B. pseudomallei (BCMS and its secreted proteins (CCMS.We found that the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly correlated with increase of multiplicity of infection and duration of contact. Activation of host carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis as well as suppression of amino acid metabolism and innate immune responses both by live bacteria and its secreted proteins were evident. These early events might be linked to initial activation of host genes directed towards bacterial dissemination from lungs to target organs (via proposed in vivo mechanisms or to escape potential sensing by macrophages.Understanding the early responses of A549 cells toward B. pseudomallei infection provide preliminary insights into the likely pathogenesis mechanisms underlying melioidosis, and could contribute to development of novel intervention strategies to combat B. pseudomallei infections.

  4. Staphylococcal Adhesion and Host Cell Invasion: Fibronectin-Binding and Other Mechanisms

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    Jérôme Josse

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic bacteria from the genus Staphylococcus can cause life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, endocarditis, bone and joint infections, and sepsis. This pathogenicity is closely related to their capacity to bind directly to the extracellular matrix or to host cells. Adhesion is indeed the first step in the formation of biofilm or the invasion of host cells, which protect the bacteria from the host immune system and facilitate chronic infection. Adhesion relies on the expression of a repertoire of surface proteins called adhesins, notably microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules. In this short review, we discuss the main pathway (FnBP-Fn-α5β1 integrin, as well as alternatives, through which Staphylococcus aureus adheres to and then invades non-professional phagocytic cells. We then examine the corresponding mechanisms for coagulase negative staphylococci. There is currently a little understanding of the molecular mechanisms that lead to internalization. Filling this gap in the literature would therefore be an important step toward limiting the duration of staphylococci infections in clinical practice.

  5. Adhesion and host cell modulation: critical pathogenicity determinants of Bartonella henselae

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    Kempf Volkhard AJ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bartonella henselae, the agent of cat scratch disease and the vasculoproliferative disorders bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatis, contains to date two groups of described pathogenicity factors: adhesins and type IV secretion systems. Bartonella adhesin A (BadA, the Trw system and possibly filamentous hemagglutinin act as promiscous or specific adhesins, whereas the virulence locus (VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system modulates a variety of host cell functions. BadA mediates bacterial adherence to endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins and triggers the induction of angiogenic gene programming. The VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system is responsible for, e.g., inhibition of host cell apoptosis, bacterial persistence in erythrocytes, and endothelial sprouting. The Trw-conjugation system of Bartonella spp. mediates host-specific adherence to erythrocytes. Filamentous hemagglutinins represent additional potential pathogenicity factors which are not yet characterized. The exact molecular functions of these pathogenicity factors and their contribution to an orchestral interplay need to be analyzed to understand B. henselae pathogenicity in detail.

  6. Interactions of Prototype Foamy Virus Capsids with Host Cell Polo-Like Kinases Are Important for Efficient Viral DNA Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurnic, Irena; Hütter, Sylvia; Rzeha, Ute; Stanke, Nicole; Reh, Juliane; Müllers, Erik; Hamann, Martin V; Kern, Tobias; Gerresheim, Gesche K; Lindel, Fabian; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Engelman, Alan N; Cherepanov, Peter; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Unlike for other retroviruses, only a few host cell factors that aid the replication of foamy viruses (FVs) via interaction with viral structural components are known. Using a yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) screen with prototype FV (PFV) Gag protein as bait we identified human polo-like kinase 2 (hPLK2), a member of cell cycle regulatory kinases, as a new interactor of PFV capsids. Further Y2H studies confirmed interaction of PFV Gag with several PLKs of both human and rat origin. A consensus Ser-Thr/Ser-Pro (S-T/S-P) motif in Gag, which is conserved among primate FVs and phosphorylated in PFV virions, was essential for recognition by PLKs. In the case of rat PLK2, functional kinase and polo-box domains were required for interaction with PFV Gag. Fluorescently-tagged PFV Gag, through its chromatin tethering function, selectively relocalized ectopically expressed eGFP-tagged PLK proteins to mitotic chromosomes in a Gag STP motif-dependent manner, confirming a specific and dominant nature of the Gag-PLK interaction in mammalian cells. The functional relevance of the Gag-PLK interaction was examined in the context of replication-competent FVs and single-round PFV vectors. Although STP motif mutated viruses displayed wild type (wt) particle release, RNA packaging and intra-particle reverse transcription, their replication capacity was decreased 3-fold in single-cycle infections, and up to 20-fold in spreading infections over an extended time period. Strikingly similar defects were observed when cells infected with single-round wt Gag PFV vectors were treated with a pan PLK inhibitor. Analysis of entry kinetics of the mutant viruses indicated a post-fusion defect resulting in delayed and reduced integration, which was accompanied with an enhanced preference to integrate into heterochromatin. We conclude that interaction between PFV Gag and cellular PLK proteins is important for early replication steps of PFV within host cells.

  7. The role of host and microbial factors in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal bacteraemia arising from a single bacterial cell bottleneck.

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    Alice Gerlini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of bacteraemia after challenge with one million pneumococci of three isogenic variants was investigated. Sequential analyses of blood samples indicated that most episodes of bacteraemia were monoclonal events providing compelling evidence for a single bacterial cell bottleneck at the origin of invasive disease. With respect to host determinants, results identified novel properties of splenic macrophages and a role for neutrophils in early clearance of pneumococci. Concerning microbial factors, whole genome sequencing provided genetic evidence for the clonal origin of the bacteraemia and identified SNPs in distinct sub-units of F0/F1 ATPase in the majority of the ex vivo isolates. When compared to parental organisms of the inoculum, ex-vivo pneumococci with mutant alleles of the F0/F1 ATPase had acquired the capacity to grow at low pH at the cost of the capacity to grow at high pH. Although founded by a single cell, the genotypes of pneumococci in septicaemic mice indicate strong selective pressure for fitness, emphasising the within-host complexity of the pathogenesis of invasive disease.

  8. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riestra, Angelica M; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis.

  9. Host cell poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi infection cycle.

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    Salomé C Vilchez Larrea

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas' disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG. In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl pyrrolidinediol or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas' disease.

  10. Exploitation of host cell biology and evasion of immunity by Francisella tularensis

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    Yousef eAbu Kwaik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an intracellular bacterium that infects humans and many small mammals. During infection, F. tularensis replicates predominantly in macrophages but also proliferate in other cell types. Entry into host cells is mediate by various receptors. Complement-opsonized F. tularensis enters into macrophages by looping phagoscytosis. Uptake is mediated in part by Syk, which may activate actin rearrangement in the phagocytic cup resulting in the engulfment of F. tularensis in a lipid raft rich phagosome. Inside the host cells, F. tularensis resides transiently in an acidified late endosome-like compartment before disruption of the phagosomal membrane and escape into the cytosol, where bacterial proliferation occurs. Modulation of phagosome biogenesis and escape into the cytosol is mediated by the Francisella pathogenicity island-encoded type VI-like secretion system. Whilst inside the phagosome, F. tularensis inhibits NADPH oxidase activity but temporarily inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines in PI3K/Akt-dependent manner, which is counteracted by the induction of SHIP that negatively regulates PI3K/Akt activation and promotes bacterial escape into the cytosol. Interestingly, F. tularensis subverts CD4 T cells-mediated killing by inhibiting antigen presentation by activated macrophages through ubiquitin dependent degradation of MHC II molecules on activated macrophages. In the cytosol, F. tularensis is recognized by the host cell AIM2-dependent inflammasome, which is down-regulated by F. tularensis that also inhibits Caspase-1 and ASC activity. During late stages of intracellular proliferation, caspase-3 is activated but apoptosis is delayed through activation of NF-kB and Ras, which ensures cell viability.

  11. Host searching in Argulus foliaceus L. (Crustacea: Branchiura): the role of vision and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, V N; Valtonen, E T; Rintamäki-Kinnunen, P

    1998-05-01

    In laboratory experiments the swimming behaviour of the ectoparasite Argulus foliaceus and its infection rates on juvenile perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus) were examined. The highest infection rate and a preference for perch juveniles were obtained in darkness, the lowest infection rate and a lack of preference in the light, when aquaria with glass walls (high reflectivity) were used. In the light, when aquaria were lined with black plastic (low reflectivity) an intermediate level of infection for perch and the highest for roach was recorded. Under such conditions roach were significantly more heavily infected than perch; an attack rate 4 times greater was recorded for brighter (more reflective) roach juveniles than for perch. Within the aquaria with a low reflective interior parasites swam 4.4 times slower and were observed predominantly in the central area, while in the highly reflective aquaria fast swimming A. foliaceus were recorded mainly near the walls. The primary role of visual stimuli for the host search behavior of A. foliaceus in the light is suggested. Parasites can effectively use such stimuli only in the low reflective surroundings. Highly reflective glass aquarium walls produce numerous secondary local light sources, which cause fast, erratic parasite movements and prevent the efficient location of potential hosts.

  12. Sialoglycoconjugates in Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interaction: possible biological model - a review

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    Alane Beatriz Vermelho

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of glycoconjugates, including glycolipids and glycoproteins, participate in the process of host-cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and one of the most important carbohydrates involved on this interaction is sialic acid. It is known that parasite trans-sialidase participates with sialic acid in a coordinated fashion in the initial stages of invasion. Given the importance of these sialogycoconjugates, this review sets out various possible biological models for the interaction between the parasite and mammalian cells that possess a sialylated receptor/ligand system.

  13. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: What Is the Mechanism in Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease?

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    Neil Dunavin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After more than a decade of preclinical and clinical development, therapeutic infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells is now a leading investigational strategy for the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. While their clinical use continues to expand, it is still unknown which of their immunomodulatory properties contributes most to their therapeutic activity. Herein we describe the proposed mechanisms, focusing on the inhibitory activity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs at immunologic checkpoints. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of action will allow us to design more effective treatment strategies.

  14. Preference and performance of the hyperparasitoid Syrphophagus aphidivorus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae): fitness consequences of selecting hosts in live aphids or aphid mummies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Boivin, G.; Vet, L.E.M.; Brodeur, J.

    2004-01-01

    1. Theoretical models predict that ovipositional decisions of parasitoid females should lead to the selection of the most profitable host for parasitoid development. Most parasitoid species have evolved specific adaptations to exploit a single host stage. However, females of the aphid

  15. Natural killer cell dependent within-host competition arises during multiple MCMV infection: consequences for viral transmission and evolution.

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    Andrea R McWhorter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are the result of infection from multiple genetically distinct strains of a pathogen. Such multi-strain infections have the capacity to alter both disease and pathogen dynamics. Infection with multiple strains of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is common and has been linked to enhanced disease. Suggestions that disease enhancement in multi-strain infected patients is due to complementation have been supported by trans-complementation studies in mice during co-infection of wild type and gene knockout strains of murine CMV (MCMV. Complementation between naturally circulating strains of CMV has, however, not been assessed. In addition, many models of multi-strain infection predict that co-infecting strains will compete with each other and that this competition may contribute to selective transmission of more virulent pathogen strains. To assess the outcome of multi-strain infection, C57BL/6 mice were infected with up to four naturally circulating strains of MCMV. In this study, profound within-host competition was observed between co-infecting strains of MCMV. This competition was MCMV strain specific and resulted in the complete exclusion of certain strains of MCMV from the salivary glands of multi-strain infected mice. Competition was dependent on Ly49H(+ natural killer (NK cells as well as the expression of the ligand for Ly49H, the MCMV encoded product, m157. Strains of MCMV which expressed an m157 gene product capable of ligating Ly49H were outcompeted by strains of MCMV expressing variant m157 genes. Importantly, within-host competition prevented the shedding of the less virulent strains of MCMV, those recognized by Ly49H, into the saliva of multi-strain infected mice. These data demonstrate that NK cells have the strain specific recognition capacity required to meditate within-host competition between strains of MCMV. Furthermore, this within-host competition has the capacity to shape the

  16. Nuclear import of Avian Sarcoma Virus integrase is facilitated by host cell factors

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    Goldstein Andrew D

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of retroviral DNA into the host cell genome is an obligatory step in the virus life cycle. In previous reports we identified a sequence (amino acids 201–236 in the linker region between the catalytic core and C-terminal domains of the avian sarcoma virus (ASV integrase protein that functions as a transferable nuclear localization signal (NLS in mammalian cells. The sequence is distinct from all known NLSs but, like many, contains basic residues that are essential for activity. Results Our present studies with digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells show that nuclear import mediated by the NLS of ASV integrase is an active, saturable, and ATP-dependent process. As expected for transport through nuclear pore complexes, import is blocked by treatment of cells with wheat germ agglutinin. We also show that import of ASV integrase requires soluble cellular factors but does not depend on binding the classical adapter Importin-α. Results from competition studies indicate that ASV integrase relies on one or more of the soluble components that mediate transport of the linker histone H1. Conclusion These results are consistent with a role for ASV integrase and cytoplasmic cellular factors in the nuclear import of its viral DNA substrate, and lay the foundation for identification of host cell components that mediate this reaction.

  17. MAVS-mediated host cell defense is inhibited by Borna disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujun; Song, Wuqi; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Qingmeng; He, Junming; Li, Aimei; Qian, Jun; Zhai, Aixia; Hu, Yunlong; Kao, Wenping; Wei, Lanlan; Zhang, Fengmin; Xu, Dakang

    2013-08-01

    Viruses often have strategies for preventing host cell apoptosis, which antagonizes viral replication. Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus that establishes a non-cytolytic persistent infection. Although BDV suppresses type I Interferon (IFN) through (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1) associated BDV P protein, it is still unclear how BDV can survive in the host cell and establish a persistent infection. Recently, it has been recognized that mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway is a crucial component of the innate immune response. In this work we show that BDV X protein colocalizes and interacts with MAVS in the mitochondria to block programmed cell death. BDV X protein-mediated inhibition of apoptosis was independent of type I IFN production and NF-κB activity. The reduction of BDV X expression with RNA interference (RNAi) or the mutation of BDV X enhanced MAVS-induced cell death. Collectively, our data provide novel insights into how BDV X protein inhibits antiviral-associated programmed cell death, through its action of MAVS function. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Glycopeptidolipid of Mycobacterium smegmatis J15cs Affects Morphology and Survival in Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Maeda, Shinji; Naka, Takashi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Yamamoto, Saburo; Ayata, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis has been widely used as a mycobacterial infection model. Unlike the M. smegmatis mc2155 strain, M. smegmatis J15cs strain has the advantage of surviving for one week in murine macrophages. In our previous report, we clarified that the J15cs strain has deleted apolar glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) in the cell wall, which may affect its morphology and survival in host cells. In this study, the gene causing the GPL deletion in the J15cs strain was identified. The mps1-2 gene (MSMEG_0400-0402) correlated with GPL biosynthesis. The J15cs strain had 18 bps deleted in the mps1 gene compared to that of the mc2155 strain. The mps1-complemented J15cs mutant restored the expression of GPLs. Although the J15cs strain produces a rough and dry colony, the colony morphology of this mps1-complement was smooth like the mc2155 strain. The length in the mps1-complemented J15cs mutant was shortened by the expression of GPLs. In addition, the GPL-restored J15cs mutant did not survive as long as the parent J15cs strain in the murine macrophage cell line J774.1 cells. The results are direct evidence that the deletion of GPLs in the J15cs strain affects bacterial size, morphology, and survival in host cells. PMID:25970481

  19. Glycopeptidolipid of Mycobacterium smegmatis J15cs Affects Morphology and Survival in Host Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagatoshi Fujiwara

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium smegmatis has been widely used as a mycobacterial infection model. Unlike the M. smegmatis mc(2155 strain, M. smegmatis J15cs strain has the advantage of surviving for one week in murine macrophages. In our previous report, we clarified that the J15cs strain has deleted apolar glycopeptidolipids (GPLs in the cell wall, which may affect its morphology and survival in host cells. In this study, the gene causing the GPL deletion in the J15cs strain was identified. The mps1-2 gene (MSMEG_0400-0402 correlated with GPL biosynthesis. The J15cs strain had 18 bps deleted in the mps1 gene compared to that of the mc(2155 strain. The mps1-complemented J15cs mutant restored the expression of GPLs. Although the J15cs strain produces a rough and dry colony, the colony morphology of this mps1-complement was smooth like the mc(2155 strain. The length in the mps1-complemented J15cs mutant was shortened by the expression of GPLs. In addition, the GPL-restored J15cs mutant did not survive as long as the parent J15cs strain in the murine macrophage cell line J774.1 cells. The results are direct evidence that the deletion of GPLs in the J15cs strain affects bacterial size, morphology, and survival in host cells.

  20. Analysis of Prototype Foamy Virus particle-host cell interaction with autofluorescent retroviral particles

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    Schwille Petra

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The foamy virus (FV replication cycle displays several unique features, which set them apart from orthoretroviruses. First, like other B/D type orthoretroviruses, FV capsids preassemble at the centrosome, but more similar to hepadnaviruses, FV budding is strictly dependent on cognate viral glycoprotein coexpression. Second, the unusually broad host range of FV is thought to be due to use of a very common entry receptor present on host cell plasma membranes, because all cell lines tested in vitro so far are permissive. Results In order to take advantage of modern fluorescent microscopy techniques to study FV replication, we have created FV Gag proteins bearing a variety of protein tags and evaluated these for their ability to support various steps of FV replication. Addition of even small N-terminal HA-tags to FV Gag severely impaired FV particle release. For example, release was completely abrogated by an N-terminal autofluorescent protein (AFP fusion, despite apparently normal intracellular capsid assembly. In contrast, C-terminal Gag-tags had only minor effects on particle assembly, egress and particle morphogenesis. The infectivity of C-terminal capsid-tagged FV vector particles was reduced up to 100-fold in comparison to wild type; however, infectivity was rescued by coexpression of wild type Gag and assembly of mixed particles. Specific dose-dependent binding of fluorescent FV particles to target cells was demonstrated in an Env-dependent manner, but not binding to target cell-extracted- or synthetic- lipids. Screening of target cells of various origins resulted in the identification of two cell lines, a human erythroid precursor- and a zebrafish- cell line, resistant to FV Env-mediated FV- and HIV-vector transduction. Conclusions We have established functional, autofluorescent foamy viral particles as a valuable new tool to study FV - host cell interactions using modern fluorescent imaging techniques. Furthermore, we

  1. Analysis of prototype foamy virus particle-host cell interaction with autofluorescent retroviral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnnagel, Kristin; Lüftenegger, Daniel; Stange, Annett; Swiersy, Anka; Müllers, Erik; Reh, Juliane; Stanke, Nicole; Grosse, Arend; Chiantia, Salvatore; Keller, Heiko; Schwille, Petra; Hanenberg, Helmut; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lindemann, Dirk

    2010-05-17

    The foamy virus (FV) replication cycle displays several unique features, which set them apart from orthoretroviruses. First, like other B/D type orthoretroviruses, FV capsids preassemble at the centrosome, but more similar to hepadnaviruses, FV budding is strictly dependent on cognate viral glycoprotein coexpression. Second, the unusually broad host range of FV is thought to be due to use of a very common entry receptor present on host cell plasma membranes, because all cell lines tested in vitro so far are permissive. In order to take advantage of modern fluorescent microscopy techniques to study FV replication, we have created FV Gag proteins bearing a variety of protein tags and evaluated these for their ability to support various steps of FV replication. Addition of even small N-terminal HA-tags to FV Gag severely impaired FV particle release. For example, release was completely abrogated by an N-terminal autofluorescent protein (AFP) fusion, despite apparently normal intracellular capsid assembly. In contrast, C-terminal Gag-tags had only minor effects on particle assembly, egress and particle morphogenesis. The infectivity of C-terminal capsid-tagged FV vector particles was reduced up to 100-fold in comparison to wild type; however, infectivity was rescued by coexpression of wild type Gag and assembly of mixed particles. Specific dose-dependent binding of fluorescent FV particles to target cells was demonstrated in an Env-dependent manner, but not binding to target cell-extracted- or synthetic- lipids. Screening of target cells of various origins resulted in the identification of two cell lines, a human erythroid precursor- and a zebrafish- cell line, resistant to FV Env-mediated FV- and HIV-vector transduction. We have established functional, autofluorescent foamy viral particles as a valuable new tool to study FV--host cell interactions using modern fluorescent imaging techniques. Furthermore, we succeeded for the first time in identifying two cell lines

  2. Host-parasite interactions and purifying selection in a microsporidian parasite of honey bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosema ceranae is a microsporidian parasite that infects honey bee mid-gut epithelial cells. Infection can impair honey bee cognitive function, shorten lifespan, suppress the innate immune response and inhibit the apoptosis of infected gut cells. However, the virulence factors of this parasite are s...

  3. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  4. Colitogenic Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Antigens Access Host Immune Cells in a Sulfatase-Dependent Manner via Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Christina A; Kuhn, Kristine A; Donermeyer, David L; Porter, Nathan T; Jin, Chunsheng; Cameron, Elizabeth A; Jung, Haerin; Kaiko, Gerard E; Wegorzewska, Marta; Malvin, Nicole P; Glowacki, Robert W P; Hansson, Gunnar C; Allen, Paul M; Martens, Eric C; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2015-05-13

    Microbes interact with the host immune system via several potential mechanisms. One essential step for each mechanism is the method by which intestinal microbes or their antigens access specific host immune cells. Using genetically susceptible mice (dnKO) that develop spontaneous, fulminant colitis, triggered by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta), we investigated the mechanism of intestinal microbial access under conditions that stimulate colonic inflammation. B. theta antigens localized to host immune cells through outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that harbor bacterial sulfatase activity. We deleted the anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme (anSME) from B. theta, which is required for post-translational activation of all B. theta sulfatase enzymes. This bacterial mutant strain did not stimulate colitis in dnKO mice. Lastly, access of B. theta OMVs to host immune cells was sulfatase dependent. These data demonstrate that bacterial OMVs and associated enzymes promote inflammatory immune stimulation in genetically susceptible hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The interaction between Histoplasma capsulatum cell wall carbohydrates and host components: relevance in the immunomodulatory role of histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorocica, Patricia; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Alvarado-Vásquez, Noé; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Lascurain, Ricardo; Zenteno, Edgar

    2009-05-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is an intracellular fungal pathogen that causes respiratory and systemic disease by proliferating within phagocytic cells. The binding of H. capsulatum to phagocytes may be mediated by the pathogen's cell wall carbohydrates, glucans, which consist of glucose homo and hetero-polymers and whose glycosydic linkage types differ between the yeast and mycelial phases. The alpha-1,3-glucan is considered relevant for H. capsulatum virulence, whereas the beta-1,3-glucan is antigenic and participates in the modulation of the host immune response. H. capsulatum cell wall components with lectin-like activity seem to interact with the host cell surface, while host membrane lectin-like receptors can recognize a particular fungal carbohydrate ligand. This review emphasizes the relevance of the main H. capsulatum and host carbohydrate-driven interactions that allow for binding and internalization of the fungal cell into phagocytes and its subsequent avoidance of intracellular elimination.

  6. The interaction between Histoplasma capsulatum cell wall carbohydrates and host components: relevance in the immunomodulatory role of histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gorocica

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasma capsulatum is an intracellular fungal pathogen that causes respiratory and systemic disease by proliferating within phagocytic cells. The binding of H. capsulatum to phagocytes may be mediated by the pathogen's cell wall carbohydrates, glucans, which consist of glucose homo and hetero-polymers and whose glycosydic linkage types differ between the yeast and mycelial phases. The ±-1,3-glucan is considered relevant for H. capsulatum virulence, whereas the ²-1,3-glucan is antigenic and participates in the modulation of the host immune response. H. capsulatum cell wall components with lectin-like activity seem to interact with the host cell surface, while host membrane lectin-like receptors can recognize a particular fungal carbohydrate ligand. This review emphasizes the relevance of the main H. capsulatum and host carbohydrate-driven interactions that allow for binding and internalization of the fungal cell into phagocytes and its subsequent avoidance of intracellular elimination.

  7. O-antigen delays lipopolysaccharide recognition and impairs antibacterial host defense in murine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia U Duerr

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 signals from the cell surface of myeloid cells, it is restricted to an intracellular compartment and requires ligand internalization in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. Yet, the functional consequence of cell-type specific receptor localization and uptake-dependent lipopolysaccharide (LPS recognition is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a strikingly delayed activation of IECs but not macrophages by wildtype Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sv. (S. Typhimurium as compared to isogenic O-antigen deficient mutants. Delayed epithelial activation is associated with impaired LPS internalization and retarded TLR4-mediated immune recognition. The O-antigen-mediated evasion from early epithelial innate immune activation significantly enhances intraepithelial bacterial survival in vitro and in vivo following oral challenge. These data identify O-antigen expression as an innate immune evasion mechanism during apical intestinal epithelial invasion and illustrate the importance of early innate immune recognition for efficient host defense against invading Salmonella.

  8. How the growth rate of host cells affects cancer risk in a deterministic way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Clément; Viger, Louise; Denis, Fabrice; Letellier, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that cancers are significantly more often encountered in some tissues than in other ones. In this paper, by using a deterministic model describing the interactions between host, effector immune and tumor cells at the tissue level, we show that this can be explained by the dependency of tumor growth on parameter values characterizing the type as well as the state of the tissue considered due to the "way of life" (environmental factors, food consumption, drinking or smoking habits, etc.). Our approach is purely deterministic and, consequently, the strong correlation (r = 0.99) between the number of detectable growing tumors and the growth rate of cells from the nesting tissue can be explained without evoking random mutation arising during DNA replications in nonmalignant cells or "bad luck". Strategies to limit the mortality induced by cancer could therefore be well based on improving the way of life, that is, by better preserving the tissue where mutant cells randomly arise.

  9. Effects of LncRNA-HOST2 on cell proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Run-Tian; Cao, Jing-Lin; Yan, Chang-Qing; Wang, Yang; An, Cong-Jing; Lv, Hai-Tao

    2017-04-30

    The present study explored the effect of long non-coding RNA-human ovarian cancer-specific transcript 2 (LncRNA-HOST2) on cell proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC-7721. HCC tissues and adjacent normal tissues from 162 HCC patients were collected. The HCC cell lines were assigned into the control group (regular culture), negative control (NC) group (transfected with siRNA) and experimental group (transfected with Lnc-HOST2 siRNA). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of LncRNA-HOST2. Cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 and colony-forming assays, cell apoptosis by flow cytometry and cell migration by Scratch test. Transwell assay was used to evaluate cell migration and invasion abilities. LncRNA-HOST2 expression in the HCC tissues increased 2-10 times than that in the adjacent normal tissues. Compared with the HL-7702 cell line, LncRNA-HOST2 expression in HepG2, SMMC-7721 and Huh7 cell lines was all up-regulated, but the SMMC-7721 cell had the highest Lnc-HOST2 expression. The LncRNA-HOST2 expression in the experimental group was down-regulated as compared with the control and NC groups. In comparison with the control and NC groups, cloned cells reduced, cell apoptosis increased, clone-forming ability weakened and inhibitory rate of colony formation increased in the experimental group. The cells migrating and penetrating into the transwell chamber were fewer in the experimental group than those in the control and NC groups. The experimental group exhibited slow wound healing and decreased cell migration area after 48 h. These findings indicate that LncRNA-HOST2 can promote cell proliferation, migration and invasion and inhibit cell apoptosis in human HCC cell line SMMC-7721. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Host cell factors in HIV replication: meta-analysis of genome-wide studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic D Bushman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed host cell genes linked to HIV replication that were identified in nine genome-wide studies, including three independent siRNA screens. Overlaps among the siRNA screens were very modest (<7% for any pairwise combination, and similarly, only modest overlaps were seen in pairwise comparisons with other types of genome-wide studies. Combining all genes from the genome-wide studies together with genes reported in the literature to affect HIV yields 2,410 protein-coding genes, or fully 9.5% of all human genes (though of course some of these are false positive calls. Here we report an "encyclopedia" of all overlaps between studies (available at http://www.hostpathogen.org, which yielded a more extensively corroborated set of host factors assisting HIV replication. We used these genes to calculate refined networks that specify cellular subsystems recruited by HIV to assist in replication, and present additional analysis specifying host cell genes that are attractive as potential therapeutic targets.

  11. The dynamics of the CHO host cell protein profile during clarification and protein A capture in a platform antibody purification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogwood, Catherine E M; Tait, Andrew S; Koloteva-Levine, Nadejda; Bracewell, Daniel G; Smales, C Mark

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein products such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for use in the clinic must be clear of host cell impurities such as host cell protein (HCP), DNA/RNA, and high molecular weight immunogenic aggregates. Despite the need to remove and monitor HCPs, the nature, and fate of these during downstream processing (DSP) remains poorly characterized. We have applied a proteomic approach to investigate the dynamics and fate of HCPs in the supernatant of a mAb producing cell line during early DSP including centrifugation, depth filtration, and protein A capture chromatography. The primary clarification technique selected was shown to influence the HCP profile that entered subsequent downstream steps. MabSelect protein A chromatography removed the majority of contaminating proteins, however using 2D-PAGE we could visualize not only the antibody species in the eluate (heavy and light chain) but also contaminant HCPs. These data showed that the choice of secondary clarification impacts upon the HCP profile post-protein A chromatography as differences arose in both the presence and abundance of specific HCPs when depth filters were compared. A number of intracellularly located HCPs were identified in protein A elution fractions from a Null cell line culture supernatant including the chaperone Bip/GRP78, heat shock proteins, and the enzyme enolase. We demonstrate that the selection of early DSP steps influences the resulting HCP profile and that 2D-PAGE can be used for monitoring and identification of HCPs post-protein A chromatography. This approach could be used to screen cell lines or hosts to select those with reduced HCP profiles, or to identify HCPs that are problematic and difficult to remove so that cell-engineering approaches can be applied to reduced, or eliminate, such HCPs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. M062 is a host range factor essential for myxoma virus pathogenesis and functions as an antagonist of host SAMD9 in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Zhang, Leiliang; McFadden, Grant

    2011-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) M062R is a functional homolog of the C7L family of host range genes from orthopoxviruses. We constructed a targeted M062R-knockout-MYXV (vMyxM062-KO) and characterized its properties in vitro and in vivo. In European rabbits, infection by vMyxM062-KO was completely asymptomatic. The surviving rabbits did not gain full protection against the subsequent lethal-dose challenge with wild-type MYXV. We also looked for cellular tropism defects in a variety of cultured cells. In all of the rabbit cells tested, vMyxM062-KO conducts an abortive infection, although it initiates viral DNA replication. In many, but not all, human cancer cells that are permissive for wild-type MYXV, vMyxM062-KO exhibited a profound replication defect. We categorized human cells tested into two groups: (i) type A, which support productive replication for wild-type MYXV but are unable to produce significant levels of progeny virus by vMyxM062-KO, and (ii) type B, which are permissive to infections by both wild-type MYXV and vMyxM062-KO. Furthermore, using proteomic strategies, we identified sterile α motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9), an interferon-regulated cellular protein implicated in human inflammatory disorders, as a unique host binding partner of M062 in human cells. Significantly, knocking down SAMD9 in type A human cancer cells led to a substantial rescue of vMyxM062-KO infection. In summary, M062 is a novel host range factor that controls productive MYXV replication in rabbit cells and in a wide variety of human cells. M062 also binds and antagonizes cellular SAMD9 in human cells, suggesting that SAMD9 is a novel innate antiviral factor against poxviruses.

  13. Carcinoma cells misuse the host tissue damage response to invade the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han-Ning; van Rossum, Denise; Sieger, Dirk; Siam, Laila; Klemm, Florian; Bleckmann, Annalen; Bayerlová, Michaela; Farhat, Katja; Scheffel, Jörg; Schulz, Matthias; Dehghani, Faramarz; Stadelmann, Christine; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The metastatic colonization of the brain by carcinoma cells is still barely understood, in particular when considering interactions with the host tissue. The colonization comes with a substantial destruction of the surrounding host tissue. This leads to activation of damage responses by resident innate immune cells to protect, repair, and organize the wound healing, but may distract from tumoricidal actions. We recently demonstrated that microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, assist carcinoma cell invasion. Here we report that this is a fatal side effect of a physiological damage response of the brain tissue. In a brain slice coculture model, contact with both benign and malignant epithelial cells induced a response by microglia and astrocytes comparable to that seen at the interface of human cerebral metastases. While the glial damage response intended to protect the brain from intrusion of benign epithelial cells by inducing apoptosis, it proved ineffective against various malignant cell types. They did not undergo apoptosis and actually exploited the local tissue reaction to invade instead. Gene expression and functional analyses revealed that the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and WNT signaling were involved in this process. Furthermore, CXCR4-regulated microglia were recruited to sites of brain injury in a zebrafish model and CXCR4 was expressed in human stroke patients, suggesting a conserved role in damage responses to various types of brain injuries. Together, our findings point to a detrimental misuse of the glial damage response program by carcinoma cells resistant to glia-induced apoptosis. PMID:23832647

  14. Cascading effect in bioprocessing-The impact of mild hypothermia on CHO cell behavior and host cell protein composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goey, Cher H; Tsang, Joshua M H; Bell, David; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2017-12-01

    A major challenge in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is the removal of host cell proteins (HCPs). Previous studies have shown that cell culture conditions significantly impact the HCP content at harvest. However, it is currently unclear how process conditions affect physiological changes in the host cell population, and how these changes, in turn, cascade down to change the HCP profile. We examined how temperature downshift (TDS) to mild hypothermia affects key upstream performance indicators, that is antibody titre, HCP concentration and HCP species, across the cell culture decline phase and at harvest through the lens of changes in cellular behavior. Mild hypothermic conditions introduced on day 5 of fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell bioreactors resulted in a lower cell proliferation rate but larger percentages of healthier cells across the cell culture decline phase compared to bioreactors maintained at standard physiological temperature. Moreover, the onset of apoptosis was less evident in mild hypothermic cultures. Consequently, mild hypothermic cultures took an extra 5 days to reach an integral viable cell concentration (IVCC) and antibody yield similar to that of the control at standard physiological temperature. When cell viability dropped below 80%, mild hypothermic cell cultures had a reduced variety of HCP species by 36%, including approximately 44% and 27% lower proteases and chaperones, respectively, despite having similar HCP concentration. This study suggests that TDS may be a good strategy to provide cleaner downstream feedstocks by reducing the variety of HCPs and to maintain product integrity by reducing the number of proteases and chaperones. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Vertebrate hosts as islands: dynamics of selection, immigration, loss, persistence and potential function of bacteria on salamander skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Howard Loudon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin bacterial communities can protect amphibians from a fungal pathogen; however, little is known about how these communities are maintained. We used a neutral model of community ecology to identify bacteria that are maintained on salamanders by selection or by dispersal from a bacterial reservoir (soil and ecological drift. We found that 75% (9/12 of bacteria that were consistent with positive selection, < 1% of bacteria that were consistent with random dispersal and none of the bacteria that were consistent under negative selection had a 97% or greater match to antifungal isolates. Additionally we performed an experiment where salamanders were either provided or denied a bacterial reservoir and estimated immigration and loss (emigration and local extinction rates of bacteria on salamanders in both treatments. Loss was strongly related to bacterial richness, suggesting competition is important for structuring the community. Bacteria closely related to antifungal isolates were more likely to persist on salamanders with or without a bacterial reservoir, suggesting they had a competitive advantage. Furthermore, over-represented and under-represented OTUs had similar persistence on salamanders when a bacterial reservoir was present. However, under-represented OTUs were less likely to persist in the absence of a bacterial reservoir, suggesting that the over-represented and under-represented bacteria are selected for or against on salamanders through time. Our findings from the neutral model, migration and persistence analyses show that bacteria that exhibit a high similarity to antifungal isolates persist on salamanders, which likely protect hosts against pathogens and improve fitness. This research is one of the first to apply ecological theory to investigate assembly of host associated-bacterial communities, which can provide insights for probiotic bioaugmentation as a conservation strategy against disease.

  16. Running with the Red Queen: host-parasite coevolution selects for biparental sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morran, Levi T; Schmidt, Olivia G; Gelarden, Ian A; Parrish, Raymond C; Lively, Curtis M

    2011-07-08

    Most organisms reproduce through outcrossing, even though it comes with substantial costs. The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that selection from coevolving pathogens facilitates the persistence of outcrossing despite these costs. We used experimental coevolution to test the Red Queen hypothesis and found that coevolution with a bacterial pathogen (Serratia marcescens) resulted in significantly more outcrossing in mixed mating experimental populations of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, we found that coevolution with the pathogen rapidly drove obligately selfing populations to extinction, whereas outcrossing populations persisted through reciprocal coevolution. Thus, consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis, coevolving pathogens can select for biparental sex.

  17. The antimicrobial polymer PHMB enters cells and selectively condenses bacterial chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chindera, Kantaraja; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To combat infection and antimicrobial resistance, it is helpful to elucidate drug mechanism(s) of action. Here we examined how the widely used antimicrobial polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) kills bacteria selectively over host cells. Contrary to the accepted model of microbial membrane disruption...... to bacterial and mammalian cellular DNA and selectively binds and condenses bacterial chromosomes. Because acquired resistance to PHMB has not been reported, selective chromosome condensation provides an unanticipated paradigm for antimicrobial action that may not succumb to resistance....... by PHMB, we observed cell entry into a range of bacterial species, and treated bacteria displayed cell division arrest and chromosome condensation, suggesting DNA binding as an alternative antimicrobial mechanism. A DNA-level mechanism was confirmed by observations that PHMB formed nanoparticles when...

  18. Early host cell targets of Yersinia pestis during primary pneumonic plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Pechous

    Full Text Available Inhalation of Yersinia pestis causes primary pneumonic plague, a highly lethal syndrome with mortality rates approaching 100%. Pneumonic plague progression is biphasic, with an initial pre-inflammatory phase facilitating bacterial growth in the absence of host inflammation, followed by a pro-inflammatory phase marked by extensive neutrophil influx, an inflammatory cytokine storm, and severe tissue destruction. Using a FRET-based probe to quantitate injection of effector proteins by the Y. pestis type III secretion system, we show that these bacteria target alveolar macrophages early during infection of mice, followed by a switch in host cell preference to neutrophils. We also demonstrate that neutrophil influx is unable to limit bacterial growth in the lung and is ultimately responsible for the severe inflammation during the lethal pro-inflammatory phase.

  19. Experimental approaches to investigate effector translocation into host cells in the Ustilago maydis/maize pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Djamei, Armin; Presti, Libera Lo; Schipper, Kerstin; Winterberg, Sarah; Amati, Simone; Becker, Dirk; Büchner, Heike; Kumlehn, Jochen; Reissmann, Stefanie; Kahmann, Regine

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Ustilago maydis is a pathogen that establishes a biotrophic interaction with Zea mays. The interaction with the plant host is largely governed by more than 300 novel, secreted protein effectors, of which only four have been functionally characterized. Prerequisite to examine effector function is to know where effectors reside after secretion. Effectors can remain in the extracellular space, i.e. the plant apoplast (apoplastic effectors), or can cross the plant plasma membrane and exert their function inside the host cell (cytoplasmic effectors). The U. maydis effectors lack conserved motifs in their primary sequences that could allow a classification of the effectome into apoplastic/cytoplasmic effectors. This represents a significant obstacle in functional effector characterization. Here we describe our attempts to establish a system for effector classification into apoplastic and cytoplasmic members, using U. maydis for effector delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Dendritic cell chimerism in oral mucosa of transplanted patients affected by graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Claudio A; Rabanales, Ramón; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Larrondo, Milton; Escobar, Alejandro F; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Alfaro, Jorge I; González, Fermín E

    2016-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is one of the main complications after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clinical features of GVHD include either an acute (aGVHD) or a chronic (cGVHD) condition that affects locations such as the oral mucosa. While the involvement of the host's dendritic cells (DCs) has been demonstrated in aGVHD, the origin (donor/host) and mechanisms underlying oral cGVHD have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we intend to determine the origin of DCs present in mucosal tissue biopsies from the oral cavity of transplanted patients affected by cGVHD. We purified DCs, from oral biopsies of three patients with cGVHD, through immunobeads and subsequently performed DNA extraction. The origin of the obtained DCs was determined by PCR amplification of 13 informative short tandem repeat (STR) alleles. We also characterised the DCs phenotype and the inflammatory infiltrate from biopsies of two patients by immunohistochemistry. Clinical and histological features of the biopsies were concordant with oral cGVHD. We identified CD11c-, CD207- and CD1a-positive cells in the epithelium and beneath the basal layer. Purification of DCs from the mucosa of patients affected by post-transplantation cGVHD was >95%. PCR-STR data analysis of DCs DNA showed that 100% of analysed cells were of donor origin in all of the evaluated patients. Our results demonstrate that resident DCs isolated from the oral tissue of allotransplanted patients affected by cGVHD are originated from the donor. Further research will clarify the role of DCs in the development and/or severity of oral cGVHD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Leptin Protects Host Cells from Entamoeba histolytica Cytotoxicity by a STAT3-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerke, Hans P.; Paul, Shom N.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Petri, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The adipocytokine leptin links nutritional status to immune function. Leptin signaling protects from amebiasis, but the molecular mechanism is not understood. We developed an in vitro model of ameba-host cell interaction to test the hypothesis that leptin prevents ameba-induced apoptosis in host epithelial cells. We demonstrated that activation of mammalian leptin signaling increased cellular resistance to amebic cytotoxicity, including caspase-3 activation. Exogenous expression of the leptin receptor conferred resistance in susceptible cells, and leptin stimulation enhanced protection. A series of leptin receptor signaling mutants showed that resistance to amebic cytotoxicity was dependent on activation of STAT3 but not the Src homology-2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) or STAT5. A common polymorphism in the leptin receptor (Q223R) that increases susceptibility to amebiasis in humans and mice was found to increase susceptibility to amebic cytotoxicity in single cells. The Q223R polymorphism also decreased leptin-dependent STAT3 activation by 21% relative to that of the wild-type (WT) receptor (P = 0.035), consistent with a central role of STAT3 signaling in protection. A subset of genes uniquely regulated by STAT3 in response to leptin was identified. Most notable were the TRIB1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) genes, which have opposing roles in the regulation of apoptosis. Overall apoptotic genes were highly enriched in this gene set (P leptin regulation of host apoptotic genes via STAT3 is responsible for protection. This is the first demonstration of a mammalian signaling pathway that restricts amebic pathogenesis and represents an important advance in our mechanistic understanding of how leptin links nutrition and susceptibility to infection. PMID:22331430

  2. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugal, Cherie; van Beest, Floris; Vander Wal, Eric

    2013-01-01

    , in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely...

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mosquito C6/36 Cells Reveals Host Proteins Involved in Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Qi-Lin; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Shao-Bo; Wang, Wei; Deng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhang, Lei-Ke

    2017-06-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae During replication processes, flavivirus manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while the host cells activate antiviral responses. Identification of host proteins involved in the flavivirus replication process may lead to the discovery of antiviral targets. The mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are epidemiologically important vectors for ZIKV, and effective restrictions of ZIKV replication in mosquitoes will be vital in controlling the spread of virus. In this study, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of ZIKV-infected Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells was performed to investigate host proteins involved in the ZIKV infection process. A total of 3,544 host proteins were quantified, with 200 being differentially regulated, among which CHCHD2 can be upregulated by ZIKV infection in both mosquito C6/36 and human HeLa cells. Our further study indicated that CHCHD2 can promote ZIKV replication and inhibit beta interferon (IFN-β) production in HeLa cells, suggesting that ZIKV infection may upregulate CHCHD2 to inhibit IFN-I production and thus promote virus replication. Bioinformatics analysis of regulated host proteins highlighted several ZIKV infection-regulated biological processes. Further study indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in the ZIKV entry process and that an FDA-approved inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, bortezomib, can inhibit ZIKV infection in vivo Our study illustrated how host cells respond to ZIKV infection and also provided a candidate drug for the control of ZIKV infection in mosquitoes and treatment of ZIKV infection in patients. IMPORTANCE ZIKV infection poses great threats to human health, and there is no FDA-approved drug available for the treatment of ZIKV infection. During replication, ZIKV manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while host cells activate

  4. Genetic impairment of parasite myosin motors uncovers the contribution of host cell membrane dynamics to Toxoplasma invasion forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Marion; Touquet, Bastien; Gonzalez, Virginie; Florent, Isabelle; Meissner, Markus; Tardieux, Isabelle

    2016-11-09

    The several-micrometer-sized Toxoplasma gondii protozoan parasite invades virtually any type of nucleated cell from a warm-blooded animal within seconds. Toxoplasma initiates the formation of a tight ring-like junction bridging its apical pole with the host cell membrane. The parasite then actively moves through the junction into a host cell plasma membrane invagination that delineates a nascent vacuole. Recent high resolution imaging and kinematics analysis showed that the host cell cortical actin dynamics occurs at the site of entry while gene silencing approaches allowed motor-deficient parasites to be generated, and suggested that the host cell could contribute energetically to invasion. In this study we further investigate this possibility by analyzing the behavior of parasites genetically impaired in different motor components, and discuss how the uncovered mechanisms illuminate our current understanding of the invasion process by motor-competent parasites. By simultaneously tracking host cell membrane and cortex dynamics at the site of interaction with myosin A-deficient Toxoplasma, the junction assembly step could be decoupled from the engagement of the Toxoplasma invasive force. Kinematics combined with functional analysis revealed that myosin A-deficient Toxoplasma had a distinct host cell-dependent mode of entry when compared to wild-type or myosin B/C-deficient Toxoplasma. Following the junction assembly step, the host cell formed actin-driven membrane protrusions that surrounded the myosin A-deficient mutant and drove it through the junction into a typical vacuole. However, this parasite-entry mode appeared suboptimal, with about 40 % abortive events for which the host cell membrane expansions failed to cover the parasite body and instead could apply deleterious compressive forces on the apical pole of the zoite. This study not only clarifies the key contribution of T. gondii tachyzoite myosin A to the invasive force, but it also highlights a new mode

  5. Cell Cycle-independent Role of Cyclin D3 in Host Restriction of Influenza Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Mok, Chris Ka-Pun; Chan, Michael Chi Wai; Zhang, Yang; Nal, Béatrice; Kien, François; Bruzzone, Roberto; Sanyal, Sumana

    2017-01-01

    To identify new host factors that modulate the replication of influenza A virus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the cytoplasmic tail of matrix protein 2 from the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain. The screen revealed a high-score interaction with cyclin D3, a key regulator of cell cycle early G1 phase. M2-cyclin D3 interaction was validated through GST pull-down and recapitulated in influenza A/WSN/33-infected cells. Knockdown of Ccnd3 by small interfering RNA significantly enhanced virus progeny titers in cell culture supernatants. Interestingly, the increase in virus production was due to cyclin D3 deficiency per se and not merely a consequence of cell cycle deregulation. A combined knockdown of Ccnd3 and Rb1, which rescued cell cycle progression into S phase, failed to normalize virus production. Infection by influenza A virus triggered redistribution of cyclin D3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, followed by its proteasomal degradation. When overexpressed in HEK 293T cells, cyclin D3 impaired binding of M2 with M1, which is essential for proper assembly of progeny virions, lending further support to its role as a putative restriction factor. Our study describes the identification and characterization of cyclin D3 as a novel interactor of influenza A virus M2 protein. We hypothesize that competitive inhibition of M1-M2 interaction by cyclin D3 impairs infectious virion formation and results in attenuated virus production. In addition, we provide mechanistic insights into the dynamic interplay of influenza virus with the host cell cycle machinery during infection. PMID:28130444

  6. Laser injury promotes migration and integration of retinal progenitor cells into host retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Caihui; Klassen, Henry; Zhang, Xinmei; Young, Michael

    2010-06-04

    The migration and integration of grafted cells into diseased host tissue remains a critical challenge, particularly in the field of retinal progenitor cell (RPC) transplantation. It seems that natural physical barriers at the outer retina can impede the migration of grafted RPCs into the host retina. The purpose of this study was to investigate the integration and differentiation of murine RPCs transplanted into the subretinal space of mice with laser-induced damage to the outer retina. RPCs were harvested from the neural retinas of postnatal day 1 enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice. Retinal photocoagulation was performed using a diode laser. Two microl containing approximately 6x10(5) expanded RPCs in suspension were injected into the subretinal space of the recipient animals following laser treatment. Cell morphometry was performed to assess the integration of donor cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blot were performed on recipient retinas. Three weeks after transplantation, 1,158+/-320 cells per eye had migrated into the recipient outer nuclear layer (ONL). Most of these cells resided in the ONL around the retinal laser lesion. A subpopulation of these cells developed morphological features reminiscent of mature photoreceptors, expressed photoreceptor specific proteins including synaptic protein, and appeared to form synaptic connections with bipolar neurons. Retinal photocoagulation resulted in a significantly increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and cluster differentiation 44 (CD44s), and a decreased expression of neurocan. Transplanted RPCs migrate and integrate into the laser-injured ONL where they differentiate into photoreceptors with morphological features reminiscent of mature photoreceptors, express synaptic protein, and appear to form synaptic connections with retinal bipolar neurons. Following retinal photocoagulation, the enhanced level of integration of grafted RPCs is partially associated with

  7. Evidence for genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii in selected intermediate hosts in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Marija; Ivović, Vladimir; Stajner, Tijana; Djokić, Vitomir; Klun, Ivana; Bobić, Branko; Nikolić, Aleksandra; Djurković-Djaković, Olgica

    2014-05-01

    To contribute to the insight into the worldwide population structure of Toxoplasma gondii, we genetically characterized a total of eight strains isolated from intermediate hosts including humans, sheep and pigeons in Serbia. Although parasite DNA was detected in 28.2% (60/213) of the human samples from 162 patients serologically suspected of active toxoplasmosis, as well as in 5/7 seropositive pigeons and in 2/12 seropositive sheep examined, multilocus PCR-RFLP genotyping, using SAG1, 5'SAG2, 3'SAG2, GRA6, 5'GRA7 and 3'GRA7 as markers, was successful in only four human isolates (of which one was isolated from both the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood samples of a single patient), one sheep and three pigeons. Of the eight isolates, five were type II (62.5%), one was type III, one was atypical, and one had a type I allele at GRA6 as the single locus genotyped. Although type II, as elsewhere in Europe, predominated, these results may suggest a higher genetic diversity of T. gondii in Serbia, reflecting local environmental contamination and also the geographical position of the country in South-East Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Probing host pathogen cross-talk by transcriptional profiling of both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and infected human dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Tailleux

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional profiling using microarrays provides a unique opportunity to decipher host pathogen cross-talk on the global level. Here, for the first time, we have been able to investigate gene expression changes in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major human pathogen, and its human host cells, macrophages and dendritic cells.In addition to common responses, we could identify eukaryotic and microbial transcriptional signatures that are specific to the cell type involved in the infection process. In particular M. tuberculosis shows a marked stress response when inside dendritic cells, which is in accordance with the low permissivity of these specialized phagocytes to the tubercle bacillus and to other pathogens. In contrast, the mycobacterial transcriptome inside macrophages reflects that of replicating bacteria. On the host cell side, differential responses to infection in macrophages and dendritic cells were identified in genes involved in oxidative stress, intracellular vesicle trafficking and phagosome acidification.This study provides the proof of principle that probing the host and the microbe transcriptomes simultaneously is a valuable means to accessing unique information on host pathogen interactions. Our results also underline the extraordinary plasticity of host cell and pathogen responses to infection, and provide a solid framework to further understand the complex mechanisms involved in immunity to M. tuberculosis and in mycobacterial adaptation to different intracellular environments.

  9. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

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    Burleigh Barbara A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at the level of cytokinesis, previously unrecognized for this pathogen-host cell interaction.

  10. Tracing Conidial Fate and Measuring Host Cell Antifungal Activity Using a Reporter of Microbial Viability in the Lung

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    Anupam Jhingran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence can be harnessed to monitor microbial fate and to investigate functional outcomes of individual microbial cell-host cell encounters at portals of entry in native tissue environments. We illustrate this concept by introducing fluorescent Aspergillus reporter (FLARE conidia that simultaneously report phagocytic uptake and fungal viability during cellular interactions with the murine respiratory innate immune system. Our studies using FLARE conidia reveal stepwise and cell-type-specific requirements for CARD9 and Syk, transducers of C-type lectin receptor and integrin signals, in neutrophil recruitment, conidial uptake, and conidial killing in the lung. By achieving single-event resolution in defined leukocyte populations, the FLARE method enables host cell profiling on the basis of pathogen uptake and killing and may be extended to other pathogens in diverse model host organisms to query molecular, cellular, and pharmacologic mechanisms that shape host-microbe interactions.

  11. Strategy to prime the host and cells to augment therapeutic efficacy of progenitor cells for patients with myocardial infarction

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    Jeehoon Kang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy in myocardial infarction (MI is an innovative strategy that is regarded as a rescue therapy to repair the damaged myocardium and to promote neovascularization for the ischemic border zone. Among several stem cell sources for this purpose, autologous progenitors from bone marrow or peripheral blood would be the most feasible and safest cell-source. Despite the theoretical benefit of cell therapy, this method is not widely adopted in the actual clinical practice due to its low therapeutic efficacy. Various methods have been used to augment the efficacy of cell therapy in MI, such as using different source of progenitors, genetic manipulation of cells, or priming of the cells or hosts (patients with agents. Among these methods, the strategy to augment the therapeutic efficacy of the autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells by priming agents may be the most feasible and the safest method that can be applied directly to the clinic. In this review, we will discuss the current status and future directions of priming peripheral blood mononuclear cells or patients, as for cell therapy of MI.

  12. Nylon-3 polymers that enable selective culture of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2013-11-06

    Substrates that selectively encourage the growth of specific cell types are valuable for the engineering of complex tissues. Some cell-selective peptides have been identified from extracellular matrix proteins; these peptides have proven useful for biomaterials-based approaches to tissue repair or regeneration. However, there are very few examples of synthetic materials that display selectivity in supporting cell growth. We describe nylon-3 polymers that support in vitro culture of endothelial cells but do not support the culture of smooth muscle cells or fibroblasts. These materials may be promising for vascular biomaterials applications.

  13. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Lujun; Liu, Siwen; Zhou, Jingjing; Li, Xin; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Xie, Peng

    2014-09-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Serratia marcescens Induces Apoptotic Cell Death in Host Immune Cells via a Lipopolysaccharide- and Flagella-dependent Mechanism*

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    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Imamura, Katsutoshi; Takano, Shinya; Usui, Kimihito; Suzuki, Kazushi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Injection of Serratia marcescens into the blood (hemolymph) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), followed by caspase activation and apoptosis of blood cells (hemocytes). This process impaired the innate immune response in which pathogen cell wall components, such as glucan, stimulate hemocytes, leading to the activation of insect cytokine paralytic peptide. S. marcescens induced apoptotic cell death of silkworm hemocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. We searched for S. marcescens transposon mutants with attenuated ability to induce apoptosis of silkworm hemocytes. Among the genes identified, disruption mutants of wecA (a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis), and flhD and fliR (essential genes in flagella synthesis) showed reduced motility and impaired induction of mouse macrophage cell death. These findings suggest that S. marcescens induces apoptosis of host immune cells via lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent motility, leading to the suppression of host innate immunity. PMID:22859304

  15. Host Cell Proteins in Biologics Manufacturing: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

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    Martin Kornecki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals has been made by increasing the overall titers in the USP (upstream processing titers without raising the cost of the USP. In addition, the development of platform processes led to a higher process robustness. Despite or even due to those achievements, novel challenges are in sight. The higher upstream titers created more complex impurity profiles, both in mass and composition, demanding higher separation capacities and selectivity in downstream processing (DSP. This creates a major shift of costs from USP to DSP. In order to solve this issue, USP and DSP integration approaches can be developed and used for overall process optimization. This study focuses on the characterization and classification of host cell proteins (HCPs in each unit operation of the DSP (i.e., aqueous two-phase extraction, integrated countercurrent chromatography. The results create a data-driven feedback to the USP, which will serve for media and process optimizations in order to reduce, or even eliminate nascent critical HCPs. This will improve separation efficiency and may lead to a quantitative process understanding. Different HCP species were classified by stringent criteria with regard to DSP separation parameters into “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” in terms of pI and MW using 2D-PAGE analysis depending on their positions on the gels. Those spots were identified using LC-MS/MS analysis. HCPs, which are especially difficult to remove and persistent throughout the DSP (i.e., “Bad” or “Ugly”, have to be evaluated by their ability to be separated. In this approach, HCPs, considered “Ugly,” represent proteins with a MW larger than 15 kDa and a pI between 7.30 and 9.30. “Bad” HCPs can likewise be classified using MW (>15 kDa and pI (4.75–7.30 and 9.30–10.00. HCPs with a MW smaller than 15 kDa and a pI lower than 4.75 and higher than 10.00 are classified as “Good” since their

  16. A negative effect of Campylobacter capsule on bacterial interaction with an analogue of a host cell receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinchik, Sona; Seddon, Alan; Karlyshev, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is the leading causative agent of bacterial gastrointestinal infections. The rise of antibiotic resistant forms of this pathogen necessitates the development of novel intervention strategies. One approach is the design of drugs preventing bacterial attachment to host cells. Although some putative C. jejuni adhesins have been identified, the molecular mechanisms of their interaction with host cells and their role in pathogenesis remain to be elucidat...

  17. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G. V. R. Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-01-01

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role. PMID:26559970

  18. Echinococcus multilocularis phosphoglucose isomerase (EmPGI): a glycolytic enzyme involved in metacestode growth and parasite-host cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Britta; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Joachim; Scholl, Sabrina; Müller, Norbert; Gottstein, Bruno; Hemphill, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    In Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes, the surface-associated and highly glycosylated laminated layer, and molecules associated with this structure, is believed to be involved in modulating the host-parasite interface. We report on the molecular and functional characterisation of E. multilocularis phosphoglucose isomerase (EmPGI), which is a component of this laminated layer. The EmPGI amino acid sequence is virtually identical to that of its homologue in Echinococcus granulosus, and shares 64% identity and 86% similarity with human PGI. Mammalian PGI is a multi-functional protein which, besides its glycolytic function, can also act as a cytokine, growth factor and inducer of angiogenesis, and plays a role in tumour growth, development and metastasis formation. Recombinant EmPGI (recEmPGI) is also functionally active as a glycolytic enzyme and was found to be present, besides the laminated layer, in vesicle fluid and in germinal layer cell extracts. EmPGI is released from metacestodes and induces a humoral immune response in experimentally infected mice, and vaccination of mice with recEmPGI renders these mice more resistant towards secondary challenge infection, indicating that EmPGI plays an important role in parasite development and/or in modulating the host-parasite relationship. We show that recEmPGI stimulates the growth of isolated E. multilocularis germinal layer cells in vitro and selectively stimulates the proliferation of bovine adrenal cortex endothelial cells but not of human fibroblasts and rat hepatocytes. Thus, besides its role in glycolysis, EmPGI could also act as a factor that stimulates parasite growth and potentially induces the formation of novel blood vessels around the developing metacestode in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro host range of the Hz-1 nonoccluded virus in insect cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Arthur H; Grasela, James J; Ignoffo, Carlo M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 13 insect cell lines spanning 4 orders (Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Homoptera) were tested for their ability to replicate the nonoccluded virus Hz-1. Only the Lepidopteran cell lines supported replication of the virus with TN-CL1 and BCIRL-HZ-AM1 producing the highest titers of 2.4 x 10(8) tissue culture infective dose (TCID)50/ml and 2.0 x 10(8) TCID50/ml, respectively. A codling moth cell line (CP-169) was the only Lepidopteran cell line that did not replicate the virus and transfection of this cell line with Hz-1 DNA failed to replicate the virus. Also, transfection with DNA from a recombinant baculovirus carrying the red fluorescent protein gene (AcMNPVhsp70 Red) was not expressed in CP-169 cells. The replication cycle of Hz-1 in BCIRL-HZ-AM1 cells showed that this virus replicated rapidly starting at 16 h postinoculation (p.i.) and reaching a peak titer of 1.0 x 10(8) TCID50/ml 56 h postinoculation. Hz-1 when compared with several other baculoviruses has the widest in vitro host spectrum.

  20. Rotavirus replication is correlated with S/G2 interphase arrest of the host cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Glück

    Full Text Available In infected cells rotavirus (RV replicates in viroplasms, cytosolic structures that require a stabilized microtubule (MT network for their assembly, maintenance of the structure and perinuclear localization. Therefore, we hypothesized that RV could interfere with the MT-breakdown that takes place in mitosis during cell division. Using synchronized RV-permissive cells, we show that RV infection arrests the cell cycle in S/G2 phase, thus favoring replication by improving viroplasms formation, viral protein translation, and viral assembly. The arrest in S/G2 phase is independent of the host or viral strain and relies on active RV replication. RV infection causes cyclin B1 down-regulation, consistent with blocking entry into mitosis. With the aid of chemical inhibitors, the cytoskeleton network was linked to specific signaling pathways of the RV-induced cell cycle arrest. We found that upon RV infection Eg5 kinesin was delocalized from the pericentriolar region to the viroplasms. We used a MA104-Fucci system to identify three RV proteins (NSP3, NSP5, and VP2 involved in cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. Our data indicate that there is a strong correlation between the cell cycle arrest and RV replication.

  1. Dysregulation of the host mevalonate pathway during early bacterial infection activates human TCR gamma delta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistowska, Magdalena; Rossy, Emmanuel; Sansano, Sebastiano; Gober, Hans-Jürgen; Landmann, Regine; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-08-01

    Primates, but not rodents, have T cell receptor Vgamma9-Vdelta2 T cells bridging innate and adaptive antimicrobial immunity. This T cell population is activated by prenyl pyrophosphates isolated from microbial or eukaryotic cells. Although the microbial metabolites are more active than the cellular ones, their involvement in TCR gammadelta activation during infection has not been studied. Here, we show that, during the initial phases of infections with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, TCR gammadelta cells are activated by endogenous mevalonate metabolites. Infections with low bacteria inocula up-regulate the production and accumulation of host-derived TCR gammadelta stimulatory antigens within 1 h, which is followed by a peak of TCR gammadelta cell activation at 5 h. Infections induce the accumulation and dephosphorylation of the hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, resulting in increased activity of this enzyme and in increased synthesis of intermediate metabolites. Thus, primates have evolved the ability to readily respond to bacterial infection by sensing the dysregulation of the mevalonate pathway within infected cells, as a mechanism of immediate antimicrobial immunity.

  2. Human gastric mucins differently regulate Helicobacter pylori proliferation, gene expression and interactions with host cells.

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    Emma C Skoog

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the mucus niche of the gastric mucosa and is a risk factor for gastritis, ulcers and cancer. The main components of the mucus layer are heavily glycosylated mucins, to which H. pylori can adhere. Mucin glycosylation differs between individuals and changes during disease. Here we have examined the H. pylori response to purified mucins from a range of tumor and normal human gastric tissue samples. Our results demonstrate that mucins from different individuals differ in how they modulate both proliferation and gene expression of H. pylori. The mucin effect on proliferation varied significantly between samples, and ranged from stimulatory to inhibitory, depending on the type of mucins and the ability of the mucins to bind to H. pylori. Tumor-derived mucins and mucins from the surface mucosa had potential to stimulate proliferation, while gland-derived mucins tended to inhibit proliferation and mucins from healthy uninfected individuals showed little effect. Artificial glycoconjugates containing H. pylori ligands also modulated H. pylori proliferation, albeit to a lesser degree than human mucins. Expression of genes important for the pathogenicity of H. pylori (babA, sabA, cagA, flaA and ureA appeared co-regulated in response to mucins. The addition of mucins to co-cultures of H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells protected the viability of the cells and modulated the cytokine production in a manner that differed between individuals, was partially dependent of adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric cells, but also revealed that other mucin factors in addition to adhesion are important for H. pylori-induced host signaling. The combined data reveal host-specific effects on proliferation, gene expression and virulence of H. pylori due to the gastric mucin environment, demonstrating a dynamic interplay between the bacterium and its host.

  3. Identification of host range mutants of myxoma virus with altered oncolytic potential in human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John W; Alston, Lindsay R; Wang, Fuan; Stanford, Marianne M; Gilbert, Philippe-Alexandre; Gao, Xiujuan; Jimenez, June; Villeneuve, Danielle; Forsyth, Peter; McFadden, Grant

    2007-12-01

    The authors have recently demonstrated that wild-type myxoma virus (MV) tagged with gfp (vMyxgfp) can generate a tumor-specific infection that productively infects and clears human tumor-derived xenografts when injected intratumorally into human gliomas transplanted into immunodeficient mice (Lun et al, 2005). To expand the understanding of MV tropism in cancer cells from a specific tissue lineage, the authors have screened a series of human glioma cells (U87, U118, U251, U343, U373) for myxoma virus replication and oncolysis. To assess the viral tropism determinants for these infections, the authors have screened myxoma virus knockout constructs that have been deleted for specific host range genes (M-T2, M-T4, M-T5, M11L, and M063), as well as a control MV gene knockout construct with no known host range function (vMyx135KO) but is highly attenuated in rabbits. The authors report wide variation in the ability of various vMyx-hrKOs to replicate and spread in the human glioma cells as measured by early and late viral gene expression. This differential ability to support vMyx-hrKO productive viral replication is consistent with levels of endogenous activated Akt in the various gliomas. The authors have identified one vMyx-hrKO virus (vMyx63KO) and one nonhost range knockout construct (vMyx135KO) that appear to replicate in the gliomas even more efficiently than the wild-type virus and that reduce the viability of the infected gliomas. These knockout viruses also inhibit the proliferation of gliomas in a manner similar to the wild-type virus. Together these data, as well as the fact that these knockout viruses are attenuated in their natural hosts, may represent environmentally safer candidate oncolytic viruses for usage in human trials.

  4. Near infrared photoimmunotherapy rapidly elicits specific host immunity against cancer cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2017-02-01

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new molecularly-targeted cancer photo-therapy based on conjugating a near infrared silica-phthalocyanine dye, IR700, to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting cell-surface molecules. When exposed to NIR light, the conjugate induces a highly-selective necrotic/immunogenic cell death (ICD) only in target-positive, mAb-IR700-bound cancer cells. This cell death occurs as early as 1 minute after exposure to NIR light. Meanwhile, immediately adjacent target-negative cells are unharmed. Dynamic 3D-microscopy of live tumor cells undergoing NIR-PIT showed rapid swelling in treated cells immediately after light exposure, followed by irreversible morphologic changes such as bleb formation, and rupture of vesicles within several minutes. Furthermore, biological markers of ICD including relocation of HSP70/90 and calreticulin, and release of ATP and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), were clearly detected immediately after NIR-PIT. When NIR-PIT was performed in a mixture of cancer cells and immature dendritic cells, maturation of immature dendritic cells was strongly induced rapidly after NIR-PIT. Alternatively, NIR-PIT can also target negative regulatory immune cells such as Treg only in the tumor bed. Treg targeting NIR-PIT against CD25 can deplete >80% of Treg in tumor bed within 20 min that induces activation of tumor cell-specific CD8+-T and NK cells within 1.5 hour, and then these activated cells killed cancer cells in local tumor within 1 day and also in distant tumors of the same cell origin within 2 days. In summary, cancer cell-targeting and immuno-suppressor cell-targeting NIR-PITs effectively induce innate and acquired immunity specifically against cancer cells growing in patients, respectively.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Host Cell Entry of Ebola Virus From Sierra Leone, 2014, and Zaire, 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Gnirß, Kerstin; Wrensch, Florian; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) epidemic in Western Africa is the largest EVD outbreak recorded to date and requires the rapid development and deployment of antiviral measures. The viral glycoprotein (GP) facilitates host cell entry and, jointly with cellular interaction partners, constitutes a potential target for antiviral intervention. However, it is unknown whether the GPs of the currently and previously circulating EBOVs use the same mechanisms for cellular entry and are thus susceptible to inhibition by the same antivirals and cellular defenses. Here, we show that the GPs of the EBOVs circulating in 1976 and 2014 transduce the same spectrum of target cells, use the same cellular factors for host cell entry, and are comparably susceptible to blockade by antiviral interferon-induced transmembrane proteins and neutralizing antibody KZ52. Thus, the viruses responsible for the ongoing EVD epidemic should be fully susceptible to established antiviral strategies targeting GP and cellular entry factors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  6. Toxoplasma aldolase is required for metabolism but dispensable for host-cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bang; Sibley, L David

    2014-03-04

    Gliding motility and host-cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites depend on cell-surface adhesins that are translocated via an actin-myosin motor beneath the membrane. The current model posits that fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (ALD) provides a critical link between the cytoplasmic tails of transmembrane adhesins and the actin-myosin motor. Here we tested this model using the Toxoplasma gondii apical membrane protein 1 (TgAMA1), which binds to aldolase in vitro. TgAMA1 cytoplasmic tail mutations that disrupt ALD binding in vitro showed no correlation with host-cell invasion, indicating this interaction is not essential. Furthermore, ALD-depleted parasites were impaired when grown in glucose, yet they showed normal gliding and invasion in glucose-free medium. Depletion of ALD in the presence of glucose led to accumulation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which has been associated with toxicity in other systems. Finally, TgALD knockout parasites and an ALD mutant that specifically disrupts adhesin binding in vitro also supported normal invasion when cultured in glucose-free medium. Taken together, these results suggest that ALD is primarily important for energy metabolism rather than interacting with microneme adhesins, challenging the current model for apicomplexan motility and invasion.

  7. Lactobacilli inhibit Shigella dysenteriae 1 induced pro-inflammatory response and cytotoxicity in host cells via impediment of Shigella-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, G; Murali, M R; Niranjali Devaraj, S

    2010-01-01

    Shigella dysenteriae Type 1 dysentery is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children from less developed and developing countries. The present study explores the hypothesis that lactobacilli protect the host cell during S. dysenteriae Type 1 infection and its mechanism of action. Caco-2 cells incubated for 1h with Lactobacillus rhamnosus or Lactobacillus acidophilus at the multiplicity of infection of 100, either alone or in combination followed by addition of Shigella at the same multiplicity of infection for 5h served as treatment groups. Cells incubated with Shigella without lactobacilli addition served as infected cells. At the end of experimental period, cells were processed suitably to enumerate adherent and internalized Shigella. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to assess mRNA expression of interleukin-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Immunoblot for heat shock protein-70 and cytotoxicity assay were performed. Pretreatment with the combination of lactobacilli significantly (pShigella coupled with reduced expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-8 in host cells. L. rhamnosus and L. acidophilus, synergistically offered better protection during S. dysenteriae Type 1 infection by efficiently inhibiting adherence and internalization of Shigella coupled with inhibition of pro-inflammatory response. Copyright (c) 2009 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microvesicles released during the interaction between Trypanosoma cruzi TcI and TcII strains and host blood cells inhibit complement system and increase the infectivity of metacyclic forms of host cells in a strain-independent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, M P; Ramirez, M I

    2017-09-29

    Extracellular vesicles, whether microvesicles (MVs) or exosomes, shed by pathogens transfer virulence factors and biomolecules to host cells, thereby altering the host's susceptibility to infection. We have previously demonstrated that MV release is increased during the interaction between the infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi and host cells. MVs confer parasite resistance to complement-mediated lysis and enhance parasite invasion. In this study, we show that differences exist in the levels of MVs released during the interaction between metacyclic trypomastigotes of different T. cruzi strains (with varied sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis, namely sensitive G strain TcI and resistant Y strain TcII) and host cells. MVs produced during the interaction between TcII parasites and host cells increased parasite resistance to complement lysis from 50% to 80% and parasite invasion was increased to over 50%. MVs purified during the interaction between TcI parasites and host cells have a stronger effect, doubling complement resistance and parasite invasion. The complement-mediated lysis assays showed that all MVs inhibit mainly the lectin pathway. Interestingly, MVs derived from parasites of one class did not alter complement resistance and the invasion process of parasites from the other class. This is the first description of MVs from T. cruzi with strain-dependent phenotypic effects. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Exploiting induced pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages to unravel host factors influencing Chlamydia trachomatis pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Hale, Christine; Lee, Amy H.; Gill, Erin E.; Bushell, Wendy; Parry-Smith, David; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek; Roumeliotis, Theodoros; Choudhary, Jyoti; Thomson, Nick; Skarnes, William C.; Dougan, Gordon; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis remains a leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections and preventable blindness worldwide. There are, however, limited in vitro models to study the role of host genetics in the response of macrophages to this obligate human pathogen. Here, we describe an approach using macrophages derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSdMs) to study macrophage–Chlamydia interactions in vitro. We show that iPSdMs support the full infectious life cycle of C. trachomatis in a manner that mimics the infection of human blood-derived macrophages. Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling of the macrophage response to chlamydial infection highlighted the role of the type I interferon and interleukin 10-mediated responses. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated biallelic knockout mutations in host genes encoding IRF5 and IL-10RA in iPSCs, and confirmed their roles in limiting chlamydial infection in macrophages. This model can potentially be extended to other pathogens and tissue systems to advance our understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the role of human genetics in influencing the outcome of infections. PMID:28440293

  10. Mycobacterium leprae–host-cell interactions and genetic determinants in leprosy: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; de Souza Salles, Jorgenilce; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae in which susceptibility to the mycobacteria and its clinical manifestations are attributed to the host immune response. Even though leprosy prevalence has decreased dramatically, the high number of new cases indicates active transmission. Owing to its singular features, M. leprae infection is an attractive model for investigating the regulation of human immune responses to pathogen-induced disease. Leprosy is one of the most common causes of nontraumatic peripheral neuropathy worldwide. The proportion of patients with disabilities is affected by the type of leprosy and delay in diagnosis. This article briefly reviews the clinical features as well as the immunopathological mechanisms related to the establishment of the different polar forms of leprosy, the mechanisms related to M. leprae–host cell interactions and prophylaxis and diagnosis of this complex disease. Host genetic factors are summarized and the impact of the development of interventions that prevent, reverse or limit leprosy-related nerve impairments are discussed. PMID:21366421

  11. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis Mimicking Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sweiss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voriconazole is an established first-line agent for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT. It is associated with the uncommon complication of periostitis. We report this complication in a 58-year-old female undergoing HSCT. She was treated with corticosteroids with minimal improvement. The symptoms related to periostitis can mimic chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT and clinicians should differentiate this from other diagnoses and promptly discontinue therapy.

  12. Host nuclear abnormalities and depletion of nuclear antigens induced in Trichinella spiralis-infected muscle cells by the anthelmintic mebendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, C; Bohnet, S; Jasmer, D P

    1998-10-30

    Infection by the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis induces cell cycle repositioning (chronic suspension in apparent G2/M) and genetic reprogramming in differentiated mammalian skeletal muscle cells. These changes occur in association with dramatic enlargement of infected host cell nuclei (as large as 17 microm in diameter) and nucleoli. Nuclear antigens (NA) that colocalize with host chromatin have been detected by antibodies to T. spiralis antigens, but the functions of these NA are unresolved. Mebendazole (MBZ) preferentially binds parasite versus host beta-tubulins, is implicated in inhibiting secretion in nematodes and induces cytoplasmic changes in muscle cells infected with T. spiralis. These infected cell changes might be indirect via MBZ inhibition of parasite secretions. This effect would have implications for host/parasite interactions and was evaluated here. MBZ treatment of chronically infected mice caused: (1) a significant deformation of host nuclei and diminution of nucleoli by 4 and 6 days of treatment (dot), respectively; (2) a reduction of nuclear lamins A/C in infected cell nuclei that was concomitant with nuclear deformation; and (3) significant reductions in total RNA, general protein and acid phosphatase activity levels. These changes were associated with the depletion of NA from host nuclei detected by 4 dot. However, DNA content of infected cell nuclei was not detectably reduced and muscle gene expression was not reactivated. The cellular changes documented are likely to account for previously described cytoplasmic alterations induced by MBZ. Concomitant depletion of NA from infected cell nuclei suggests a role of these products in regulating nuclear functions of host cells.

  13. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Spatially Controls Activation and Misregulation of Host Cell Rac1.

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    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pseudotuberculosis binds host cells and modulates the mammalian Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase at two levels. Activation of Rac1 results from integrin receptor engagement, while misregulation is promoted by translocation of YopE and YopT proteins into target cells. Little is known regarding how these various factors interplay to control Rac1 dynamics. To investigate these competing processes, the localization of Rac1 activation was imaged microscopically using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. In the absence of translocated effectors, bacteria induced activation of the GTPase at the site of bacterial binding. In contrast, the entire cellular pool of Rac1 was inactivated shortly after translocation of YopE RhoGAP. Inactivation required membrane localization of Rac1. The translocated protease YopT had very different effects on Rac1. This protein, which removes the membrane localization site of Rac1, did not inactivate Rac1, but promoted entry of cleaved activated Rac1 molecules into the host cell nucleus, allowing Rac1 to localize with nuclear guanosine nucleotide exchange factors. As was true for YopE, membrane-associated Rac1 was the target for YopT, indicating that the two translocated effectors may compete for the same pool of target protein. Consistent with the observation that YopE inactivation requires membrane localization of Rac1, the presence of YopT in the cell interfered with the action of the YopE RhoGAP. As a result, interaction of target cells with a strain that produces both YopT and YopE resulted in two spatially distinct pools of Rac1: an inactive cytoplasmic pool and an activated nuclear pool. These studies demonstrate that competition between bacterial virulence factors for access to host substrates is controlled by the spatial arrangement of a target protein. In turn, the combined effects of translocated bacterial proteins are to generate pools of a single signaling molecule with distinct localization and

  14. Adenosine Selectively Depletes Alloreactive T Cells to Prevent GVHD While Conserving Immunity to Viruses and Leukemia.

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    Whitehill, Greg D; Amarnath, Shoba; Muranski, Pawel; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, Austin J; Chinnassamy, Dhanalakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Selective depletion (SD) of alloreactive T cells from allogeneic hematopoeitic stem cell transplants to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) without compromising immune reconstitution and antitumor responses remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate a novel SD strategy whereby alloreacting T cells are efficiently deleted ex vivo with adenosine. SD was achieved in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched cocultures by multiple exposures to 2 mmol/l adenosine over 7 days. Adenosine depleted greater than to 90% of alloproliferating T cells in mismatched, haploidentical, and matched sibling pairs while conserving response to third-party antigens. Alloreactive CD4 and CD8 T cells were targeted for depletion while NK and B cells were preserved. Our novel approach also preserved nonalloreactive naive, central, and effector memory T-cell subsets, Tregs, and notably preserved T-cell responses against DNA viruses that contribute to transplant related mortality after allogeneic hematopoeitic stem cell transplants. Additionally, T cells recognizing leukemia-associated antigens were efficiently generated in vitro from the cell product post-SD. This study is the first to demonstrate that adenosine depletion of alloactivated T cells maintains a complete immune cell profile and recall viral responses. Expansion of tumor antigen-specific subsets postdepletion opens the possibility of generating T-cell products capable of graft-versus-tumor responses without causing GVHD.

  15. Eudicot plant-specific sphingolipids determine host selectivity of microbial NLP cytolysins.

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    Lenarčič, Tea; Albert, Isabell; Böhm, Hannah; Hodnik, Vesna; Pirc, Katja; Zavec, Apolonija B; Podobnik, Marjetka; Pahovnik, David; Žagar, Ema; Pruitt, Rory; Greimel, Peter; Yamaji-Hasegawa, Akiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Gömann, Jasmin; Mortimer, Jenny C; Fang, Lin; Mamode-Cassim, Adiilah; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Oecking, Claudia; Feussner, Ivo; Mongrand, Sébastien; Anderluh, Gregor; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2017-12-15

    Necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1-like (NLP) proteins constitute a superfamily of proteins produced by plant pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. Many NLPs are cytotoxins that facilitate microbial infection of eudicot, but not of monocot plants. Here, we report glycosylinositol phosphorylceramide (GIPC) sphingolipids as NLP toxin receptors. Plant mutants with altered GIPC composition were more resistant to NLP toxins. Binding studies and x-ray crystallography showed that NLPs form complexes with terminal monomeric hexose moieties of GIPCs that result in conformational changes within the toxin. Insensitivity to NLP cytolysins of monocot plants may be explained by the length of the GIPC head group and the architecture of the NLP sugar-binding site. We unveil early steps in NLP cytolysin action that determine plant clade-specific toxin selectivity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Modified extracorporeal photopheresis with cells from a healthy donor for acute graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model.

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    Holger Budde

    Full Text Available Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD is a major challenge after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but treatment options for patients are still limited. In many cases first-line treatment with glucocorticoids is not successful. Among second-line therapies the extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP is frequently performed, due to induction of selective tolerance instead of general immunosuppression. However, for some patients with severe acute GvHD the leukapheresis step of the ECP procedure is physically exhausting and limits the number of ECP cycles.We hypothesized that leukocytes from healthy cell donors could be used as a replacement for ECP leukocytes gained from the GvHD patient. For this purpose we used a well established mouse model of acute GvHD. The ECP therapy was based on cells with the genetic background of the initial donor of the stem cell transplantation. As a precondition we developed a protocol representing conventional ECP in mice equivalent to clinical used ECP setup.We could demonstrate that conventional, clinically derived ECP setup is able to alleviate acute GvHD. By using leukocytes obtained from healthy mice with the bone marrow donor's genetic background we could not observe a statistically significant therapeutic effect.Conventional human ECP setup is effective in the mouse model of severe acute GvHD. In addition we could not prove that ECP cells from healthy mice with bone marrow donor's genetic background are as effective as ECP cells derived from GvHD mice. Based on our findings, new questions arise for further studies, in which the cellular characteristics for ECP mediated immune tolerance are a matter of investigation.

  17. More Novel Hantaviruses and Diversifying Reservoir Hosts — Time for Development of Reservoir-Derived Cell Culture Models?

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    Isabella Eckerle

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to novel, improved and high-throughput detection methods, there is a plethora of newly identified viruses within the genus Hantavirus. Furthermore, reservoir host species are increasingly recognized besides representatives of the order Rodentia, now including members of the mammalian orders Soricomorpha/Eulipotyphla and Chiroptera. Despite the great interest created by emerging zoonotic viruses, there is still a gross lack of in vitro models, which reflect the exclusive host adaptation of most zoonotic viruses. The usually narrow host range and genetic diversity of hantaviruses make them an exciting candidate for studying virus-host interactions on a cellular level. To do so, well-characterized reservoir cell lines covering a wide range of bat, insectivore and rodent species are essential. Most currently available cell culture models display a heterologous virus-host relationship and are therefore only of limited value. Here, we review the recently established approaches to generate reservoir-derived cell culture models for the in vitro study of virus-host interactions. These successfully used model systems almost exclusively originate from bats and bat-borne viruses other than hantaviruses. Therefore we propose a parallel approach for research on rodent- and insectivore-borne hantaviruses, taking the generation of novel rodent and insectivore cell lines from wildlife species into account. These cell lines would be also valuable for studies on further rodent-borne viruses, such as orthopox- and arenaviruses.

  18. Gene expression profiling of monkeypox virus-infected cells reveals novel interfaces for host-virus interactions

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    Ichou Mohamed

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monkeypox virus (MPV is a zoonotic Orthopoxvirus and a potential biothreat agent that causes human disease with varying morbidity and mortality. Members of the Orthopoxvirus genus have been shown to suppress antiviral cell defenses, exploit host cell machinery, and delay infection-induced cell death. However, a comprehensive study of all host genes and virus-targeted host networks during infection is lacking. To better understand viral strategies adopted in manipulating routine host biology on global scale, we investigated the effect of MPV infection on Macaca mulatta kidney epithelial cells (MK2 using GeneChip rhesus macaque genome microarrays. Functional analysis of genes differentially expressed at 3 and 7 hours post infection showed distinctive regulation of canonical pathways and networks. While the majority of modulated histone-encoding genes exhibited sharp copy number increases, many of its transcription regulators were substantially suppressed; suggesting involvement of unknown viral factors in host histone expression. In agreement with known viral dependence on actin in motility, egress, and infection of adjacent cells, our results showed extensive regulation of genes usually involved in controlling actin expression dynamics. Similarly, a substantial ratio of genes contributing to cell cycle checkpoints exhibited concerted regulation that favors cell cycle progression in G1, S, G2 phases, but arrest cells in G2 phase and inhibits entry into mitosis. Moreover, the data showed that large number of infection-regulated genes is involved in molecular mechanisms characteristic of cancer canonical pathways. Interestingly, ten ion channels and transporters showed progressive suppression during the course of infection. Although the outcome of this unusual channel expression on cell osmotic homeostasis remains unknown, instability of cell osmotic balance and membrane potential has been implicated in intracellular pathogens egress. Our

  19. Dynamic Changes in Host Gene Expression following In Vitro Viral Mimic Stimulation in Crocodile Cells

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    Subir Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The initial control of viral infection in a host is dominated by a very well orchestrated early innate immune system; however, very little is known about the ability of a host to control viral infection outside of mammals. The reptiles offer an evolutionary bridge between the fish and mammals, with the crocodile having evolved from the archosauria clade that included the dinosaurs, and being the largest living reptile species. Using an RNA-seq approach, we have defined the dynamic changes of a passaged primary crocodile cell line to stimulation with both RNA and DNA viral mimics. Cells displayed a marked upregulation of many genes known to be involved in the mammalian response to viral infection, including viperin, Mx1, IRF7, IRF1, and RIG-I with approximately 10% of the genes being uncharacterized transcripts. Both pathway and genome analysis suggested that the crocodile may utilize the main known mammalian TLR and cytosolic antiviral RNA signaling pathways, with the pathways being responsible for sensing DNA viruses less clear. Viral mimic stimulation upregulated the type I interferon, IFN-Omega, with many known antiviral interferon-stimulated genes also being upregulated. This work demonstrates for the first time that reptiles show functional regulation of many known and unknown antiviral pathways and effector genes. An enhanced knowledge of these ancient antiviral pathways will not only add to our understanding of the host antiviral innate response in non-mammalian species, but is critical to fully comprehend the complexity of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection.

  20. [Studies on periodontal pathogenic proteinases from Porphyromonas gingivalis and host cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K

    1995-05-01

    Progressive periodontal disease is characterized by acute progressive lesions of gingival connective tissues, excessive leukocyte infiltration, and occurrence of a characteristic microflora. A variety of proteolytic enzymes derived from oral bacteria and host cells are found in gingival crevices and thought to play an important role in the onset and development of progressive periodontal disease. The anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated in the etiology of the disease. Recently, we have purified a novel arginine-specific cysteine proteinase, termed "argingipain", from the culture supernatant of the organism. The enzyme was shown to have two important abilities related to the virulence of the organism. One is direct association with periodontal tissue breakdown through its abilities to degrade physiologically important proteins such as human collagens (type I and IV) and to evade inactivation by internal protease inhibitors. The other is associated with disruption of the normal host defense mechanisms through its abilities to degrade immunoglobulins and to inhibit the bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The virulence of argingipain was further substantiated by disruption of argingipain-encoding genes on the chromosome by use of suicide plasmid systems. On the other hand, we have studied roles of host cell-derived proteinases in the periodontal tissue breakdown. Levels of lysosomal proteinases such as cathepsins B, H, L, G and medullasin were determined in gingival crevicular fluid from periodontitis patients and experimental gingivitis subjects by activity measurement and sensitive immunoassay. The results suggested that all of these enzymes would be involved in the development of both gingivitis and periodontitis.

  1. Selective photoinactivation of Candida albicans in the non-vertebrate host infection model Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibebe Junior, José; Sabino, Caetano P; Tan, Xiaojiang; Junqueira, Juliana C; Wang, Yan; Fuchs, Beth B; Jorge, Antonio O C; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2013-10-01

    Candida spp. are recognized as a primary agent of severe fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, and are the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infections. Our study explores treatment with photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an innovative antimicrobial technology that employs a nontoxic dye, termed a photosensitizer (PS), followed by irradiation with harmless visible light. After photoactivation, the PS produces either singlet oxygen or other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that primarily react with the pathogen cell wall, promoting permeabilization of the membrane and cell death. The emergence of antifungal-resistant Candida strains has motivated the study of antimicrobial PDT (aPDT) as an alternative treatment of these infections. We employed the invertebrate wax moth Galleria mellonella as an in vivo model to study the effects of aPDT against C. albicans infection. The effects of aPDT combined with conventional antifungal drugs were also evaluated in G. mellonella. We verified that methylene blue-mediated aPDT prolonged the survival of C. albicans infected G. mellonella larvae. The fungal burden of G. mellonella hemolymph was reduced after aPDT in infected larvae. A fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strain was used to test the combination of aPDT and fluconazole. Administration of fluconazole either before or after exposing the larvae to aPDT significantly prolonged the survival of the larvae compared to either treatment alone. G. mellonella is a useful in vivo model to evaluate aPDT as a treatment regimen for Candida infections. The data suggests that combined aPDT and antifungal therapy could be an alternative approach to antifungal-resistant Candida strains.

  2. Selective photoinactivation of Candida albicans in the non-vertebrate host infection model Galleria mellonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Candida spp. are recognized as a primary agent of severe fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, and are the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infections. Our study explores treatment with photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an innovative antimicrobial technology that employs a nontoxic dye, termed a photosensitizer (PS), followed by irradiation with harmless visible light. After photoactivation, the PS produces either singlet oxygen or other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that primarily react with the pathogen cell wall, promoting permeabilization of the membrane and cell death. The emergence of antifungal-resistant Candida strains has motivated the study of antimicrobial PDT (aPDT) as an alternative treatment of these infections. We employed the invertebrate wax moth Galleria mellonella as an in vivo model to study the effects of aPDT against C. albicans infection. The effects of aPDT combined with conventional antifungal drugs were also evaluated in G. mellonella. Results We verified that methylene blue-mediated aPDT prolonged the survival of C. albicans infected G. mellonella larvae. The fungal burden of G. mellonella hemolymph was reduced after aPDT in infected larvae. A fluconazole-resistant C. albicans strain was used to test the combination of aPDT and fluconazole. Administration of fluconazole either before or after exposing the larvae to aPDT significantly prolonged the survival of the larvae compared to either treatment alone. Conclusions G. mellonella is a useful in vivo model to evaluate aPDT as a treatment regimen for Candida infections. The data suggests that combined aPDT and antifungal therapy could be an alternative approach to antifungal-resistant Candida strains. PMID:24083556

  3. Modulation of cell sialoglycophenotype: a stylish mechanism adopted by Trypanosoma cruzi to ensure its persistence in the infected host

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    Leonardo eFreire-de-Lima

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease exhibits multiple mechanisms to guarantee its establishment and persistence in the infected host. It has been well demonstrated that T. cruzi is not able to synthesize sialic acids (Sia. To acquire the monosaccharide, the parasite makes use of a multifunctional enzyme called trans-sialidase (Tc-TS. Since this enzyme has no analogous in the vertebrate host, it has been used as a target in drug therapy development. Tc-TS preferentially catalyzes the transfer of Sia from the host glycoconjugates to the terminal β-galactopyranosyl residues of mucin-like molecules present on the parasite's cell surface. Alternatively, the enzyme can sialylate/re-sialylate glycoconjugates expressed on the surface of host cells. Since its discovery, several studies have shown that T. cruzi employs the Tc-TS activity to modulate the host cell sialoglycophenotype, thus favoring its perpetuation in the infected vertebrate. In this review, we summarize the dynamic of host/parasite sialylglycophenotype modulation, highlighting its role in the subversion of host immune response in order to promote the establishment of persistent chronic infection.

  4. Purification of infectious human herpesvirus 6A virions and association of host cell proteins

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    Garoff Henrik

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses that are incorporating host cell proteins might trigger autoimmune diseases. It is therefore of interest to identify possible host proteins associated with viruses, especially for enveloped viruses that have been suggested to play a role in autoimmune diseases, like human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A in multiple sclerosis (MS. Results We have established a method for rapid and morphology preserving purification of HHV-6A virions, which in combination with parallel analyses with background control material released from mock-infected cells facilitates qualitative and q