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Sample records for hospital-based tumor registry

  1. [Automatization of a hospital-based tumor registry].

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    Ribes, Josepa; Gálvez, Jordi; Melià, Angels; Clèries, Ramon; Messeguer, Xavier; Bosch, Francesc Xavier

    2005-01-01

    To increase data reliability and reduce the costs associated with the HTR, the Catalan Institute of Oncology programmed the manual procedures of data collection from databases by means of a computer application (ASEDAT). ASEDAT detects the incident tumors of the registry from the databases of the pathology records (PR) and discharge records (DR) and selects the basic information from both databases. Data from the HTR data was collected for the period 1999-2000 by means of 2 procedures: manual and automatized collection and the results obtained were compared. 10,498 cancer patients were detected. Manual resolution detected 8,309 incident tumors and 2,374 prevalent tumors. ASEDAT automatically detected 8,901 patients (84.8%), in whom 8,367 incident tumors were detected (58 more tumors than the manual procedure). Validation of agreement was performed in the incident tumors detected by both methods (7,063 tumors). In 6,185 tumors (87.6%) the information agreed in all the variables. Of the discordant tumors, 692 (9.8%) were obtained by the RHT staff using manual resolution, and the remainder (186; 2.6%) were obtained by the application (automatic resolution). Cancer registry automatization is feasible when PR and DR databases are available, coded and automatized.

  2. Automatización de un registro hospitalario de tumores Automatization of a hospital-based tumor registry

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    Josepa Ribes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El Instituto Catalán de Oncología automatizó los procedimientos manuales de captación de la información de las bases de datos del alta hospitalaria (AH y anatomía patológica (APA mediante una aplicación informática (ASEDAT con el objetivo de aumentar la fiabilidad de los datos y reducir los costes del Registro Hospitalario de Tumores (RHT. Material y Método: ASEDAT detecta los tumores incidentes del centro a partir de las bases de datos de APA y de las AH mediante la selección de la información básica para cada uno de ellos. Se resolvió el RHT para el período 1999-2000 mediante el procedimiento manual y automatizado, y se compararon entre sí los resultados. Resultados: Se detectaron 10.498 pacientes oncológicos. La resolución manual detectó 8.309 tumores incidentes y 2.374 tumores prevalentes. ASEDAT resolvió automáticamente 8.901 pacientes (84,8%, en los cuales se detectaron 8.367 tumores incidentes, 58 tumores más que con el procedimiento manual. La validación de la concordancia se realizó en los tumores incidentes detectados por ambos métodos (7.063 tumores. En 6.185 tumores (87,6%, la información coincidió en todas las variables. De los tumores discordantes, 692 (9,8% fueron generados por el personal del RHT en la resolución manual y el resto (n = 186; 2,6% por la aplicación (resolución automática. Conclusiones: La automatización de un registro de cáncer es posible siempre y cuando el centro disponga de las bases de datos de APA y AH codificadas e informatizadas.Introduction: To increase data reliability and reduce the costs associated with the HTR, the Catalan Institute of Oncology programmed the manual procedures of data collection from databases by means of a computer application (ASEDAT. Material and method: ASEDAT detects the incident tumors of the registry from the databases of the pathology records (PR and discharge records (DR and selects the basic information from both databases. Data

  3. Systematic Review of Hospital Based Cancer Registries (HBCRs): Necessary Tool to Improve Quality of Care in Cancer Patients

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    Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Nahvijou, Azin; Rostam Niakan Kalhori, Sharareh; Davoodi, Somayeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2017-08-27

    Introduction: Incidence and mortality rate of cancer is increasing in all countries including low and middle-income countries. Hospital based cancer registry (HBCR) is an important tool for administration purpose and improvement of the quality of care. It is also important resource for population based cancer registries. In this study we reviewed HBCRs in different countries. Methods: We searched the published literature using the MEDLINE (PubMed), Google scholar, Scopus, ProQuest and Google. We also reviewed websites of the HBCRs in different countries. The search was carried out based on proper keywords in English for all motor engines including “hospital-based”, “clinical” and “data quality” combined with “registry”, “cancer” and “tumor” including all subheadings. We reviewed objectives, developer institutions, minimum datasets, data sources, quality control indicators and processes. Results: In total we found 163 papers in the first step. After screening of the titles, abstracts and the full texts, 14 papers remained for analysis. Analysis of the 14 papers showed that the improvement of the quality of the care were the most important objectives among the registries. HBCRs collect information about patients, tumor diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Generally, indicators such as completeness and validity were used for quality control. Conclusion: Because of the increases in cancer burden in the world, more attention is needed to be paid on cancer surveillance systems, including HBCRs. We evaluated and highlighted the importance and characteristics HBCRs and believe that this paper would help the hospitals and policy makers for planning and establishment of new HBCRs. We suggest the establishment of a worldwide network for coordination and collaboration between HBCRs. Creative Commons Attribution License

  4. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

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    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  5. Demographic and histopathologic profile of pediatric brain tumors: A hospital-based study

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    Harshil C Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few hospital-based or population-based studies are published in the context to the epidemiologic profile of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs in India and Indian subcontinent. Aim: To study the demographic and histopathologic profile of PBTs according to World Health Organization 2007 classification in a single tertiary health care center in India. Materials and Methods: Data regarding age, gender, topography, and histopathology of 76 pediatric patients (0–19 years with brain tumors operated over a period of 24 months (January-2012 to December-2013 was collected retrospectively and analyzed using EpiInfo 7. Chi-square test and test of proportions (Z-test were used wherever necessary. Results: PBTs were more common in males (55.3% as compared to females (44.7% with male to female ratio of 1.23:1. Mean age was 10.69 years. Frequency of tumors was higher in childhood age group (65.8% when compared to adolescent age group (34.2%. The most common anatomical site was cerebellum (39.5%, followed by hemispheres (22.4%. Supratentorial tumors (52.6% were predominant than infratentorial tumors (47.4%. Astrocytomas (40.8% and embryonal tumors (29.0% were the most common histological types almost contributing more than 2/3rd of all tumors. Craniopharyngiomas (11.8% and ependymomas (6.6% were the third and fourth most common tumors, respectively. Conclusion: Astrocytomas and medulloblastomas are the most common tumors among children and adolescents in our region, which needs special attention from the neurosurgical department of our institute. Demographic and histopathologic profile of cohort in the present study do not differ substantially from that found in other hospital-based and population-based studies except for slight higher frequency of craniopharyngiomas.

  6. Breast cancer in a multi-ethnic Asian setting : Results from the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry

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    Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah; Hartman, Mikael; Saxena, Nakul; Lau, Philip; Bulgiba, Awang M.; Lee, Soo Chin; Lim, Siew Eng; Wong, John E. L.; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    Two hospital-based breast cancer databases (University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia [n = 1513] and National University Hospital, Singapore [n = 2545]) were merged into a regional registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2007. A review of the data found 51% of patients

  7. Prevalencia de tumores odontogénicos en el Hospital Base Valdivia: periodo 1989-2008

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    L.C. Thiers; C.C. Sotomayor; F.I. Peters; P.C. Lantaño; L.S. Thiers

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Este artículo corresponde a un estudio observacional de tipo descriptivo de corte transversal, tiene como objetivo determinar la prevalencia de tumores odontogénicos en la población atendida en el Hospital Base Valdivia, en un periodo de 20 años (1989-2008), según la nueva clasificación de lesiones tumorales de la WHO, 2005. Metodología: Se revisaron 2.078 informes de biopsias correspondientes a lesiones de la cavidad oral de los archivos de informes del servicio de Anatomía Patológ...

  8. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

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    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  9. Accuracy of ethnicity data recorded in hospital-based patient clinical records and the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry.

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    Page, Matthew; Wyeth, Emma H; Samaranayaka, Ari; McNoe, Bronwen; Walker, Rachael; Schollum, John; Marshall, Mark; Walker, Robert; Derrett, Sarah

    2017-04-28

    Sustained health inequities are experienced by indigenous and minority populations. Accurate ethnicity data are fundamental to healthcare planning and provision and monitoring of health outcomes to address such inequities. This study investigated the accuracy of ethnicity data in a large clinical registry of end-stage kidney disease patients (the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry; ANZDATA) and hospital-based patient clinical records compared with self-reported ethnicity data collected in the 'Dialysis Outcomes in those aged ≥65 years' (DOS65+) study. Self-reported ethnicity data were collected, as per national guidelines, from DOS65+ participants and compared with ethnicity data recorded for these participants in ANZDATA and hospital-based patient clinical records. Ethnicities were first prioritised and then grouped into one of the following: European, Māori, Pacific, Asian and Other. Cohen's Kappa statistics were calculated to determine overall non-random agreement. Concordances for ethnic group categories were calculated. There was high concordance between self-reported ethnicity and ethnicity recorded in both the ANZDATA (κ=0.95) and hospital-based patient clinical records (κ=0.93). Concordances for ethnic group categories between datasets ranged from 86% to 100%. Our findings show a high level of agreement for ethnicity recorded for end-stage kidney disease patients between the three datasets, suggesting robust data to support health planning and research. Despite this, alignment of ethnicity data collection methods, as per national guidelines, should occur for all databases used for research and clinical practice in New Zealand.

  10. Self Instructional Manual for Tumor Registrars: Book 1, Objectives and Functions of a Tumor Registry.

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    National Cancer Inst. (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The programed text is designed to provide tumor registrars with a means of learning the procedures for abstracting charts of cancer patients and for carrying out the other functions of a tumor registry. It was developed as an adjunct to on-the-job training for use without direct instructor supervision. Directions and suggestions for using the…

  11. Epidemiology of Stroke in Costa Rica: A 7-Year Hospital-Based Acute Stroke Registry of 1319 Consecutive Patients.

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    Torrealba-Acosta, Gabriel; Carazo-Céspedes, Kenneth; Chiou, Sy Han; O'Brien, Anthony Terrence; Fernández-Morales, Huberth

    2017-12-25

    Limited data on stroke exist for Costa Rica. Therefore, we created a stroke registry out of patients with stroke seen in the Acute Stroke Unit of the Hospital Calderon Guardia. We analyzed 1319 patients enrolled over a 7-year period, which incorporated demographic, clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data. The mean age of patients with stroke was 68.0 ± 15.5 years. Seven hundred twenty-five were men and the age range was 13-104 years. The most prevalent risk factors were hypertension (78.8%), dyslipidemia (36.3%), and diabetes (31.9%). Fifteen percent had atrial fibrillation and 24.7% had a previous stroke or transient ischemic attack. Prevalence of hypertension and atrial fibrillation increased with age; however, younger patients were more associated with thrombophilia. We documented 962 (72.9%) ischemic and 270 (20.5%) hemorrhagic strokes. Of the ischemic strokes, 174 (18.1%) were considered secondary to large-artery atherothrombosis, 175 (18.2%) were due to cardiac embolism, 19 (2.0%) were due to lacunar infarcts, and 25 (2.6%) were due to other determined causes. Five hundred sixty-nine (59.1%) remained undetermined. Atherothrombotic strokes were mostly associated with dyslipidemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity, whereas lacunar infarcts were associated with hypertension, smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and previous stroke or transient ischemic attack. Of our patients, 69.9% scored between 0 and 9 in the initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We found differences in sociodemographic features, risk factors, and stroke severity among stroke subtypes. Risk factor prevalence was similar to other registries involving Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Paget sarcoma of the spine: Scottish Bone Tumor Registry experience.

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    Sharma, Himanshu; Mehdi, S A; MacDuff, E; Reece, A T; Jane, M J; Reid, R

    2006-05-20

    Retrospective case study of 13 cases of Paget sarcoma of the spine accrued from a prospectively collected Tumor Registry database. To analyze the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of Paget sarcoma of the spine and to determine the factors influencing the prognosis. Paget disease of bone is a common disorder with the spine being involved in over 50% of patients. However, sarcomatous degeneration in the vertebral column is an extremely rare complication. There is very little in the literature with regard to clinical presentation and prognosis of patients with Paget sarcoma affecting the vertebral column. Between January 1944 and December 2003, 89 patients were registered with a diagnosis of Paget sarcoma in the Scottish Bone Tumor Registry. Thirteen patients with Paget sarcoma of the spine were analyzed with regard to their clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic features along with the prognostic predictors. The mean age was 66.9 years (range: 56-79 years). There were 10 males and three females. There were seven cases involving the sacral spine (63.6%), three cases involving lumbar vertebrae, two affecting the dorsal spine, and one with diffuse dorsolumbar involvement (D11-L3). The mode of presentation was progressively increasing low back pain (in all 13), unilateral sciatica (six; left-sided, five; right-sided, one), bilateral sciatica (two), lower limb weakness (eight), and autonomic dysfunction (four). Ten of 13 cases (76.9%) were osteosarcoma. The rest were chondrosarcoma (n = 1), fibrosarcoma (n = 1), and malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n = 1). Decompression laminectomy was performed in three patients with progressive neurologic deficit. Eight patients had received radiotherapy. The mean survival was 4.22 months. This series confirmed that Paget sarcoma of the spine has a very poor prognosis. We found a constellation of symptomatology in patients with sarcomatous Paget spine resulting from radiculomedullary compression, primarily lumbosacral

  13. Staffing and Training Requirements for Tumor Registry Centers in the State of Louisiana. Technical Report 69-101.

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    Fink, C. Dennis

    An exploratory study was conducted to obtain information regarding staff requirements in small tumor registry centers, involving a brief analysis of existing tumor registry centers and exploration of training and organizational factors that might be associated with establishing new centers. Activities performed by tumor registry personnel were…

  14. Treatment patterns, outcomes and long-term toxicity among patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in real world: results of a hospital based registry

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    E. A. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on treatment results and long-term toxicity of patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Russian Federation are scarce. We present analysis of the S. P. Botkin Hospital based registry. Six hundreds nine patients were identified since 01.01.2006 to 31.12.2015, among them there were 374 (61 % women and 235 (39 % men. The median age was 31 years (range, 15–85. One hundred sixty four patients (29 % had Cotswolds stage IV, 128 (22,5 % – stage III, 256 (45 % – stage II, and 20 (3,5 % – stage I. Among first-line regimens ABVD was received by 26 % of patients, AVD – 1,2 %, COPP/ABVD – 5,6 %, BEACOPP-14 – 22 %, BEACOPP-21 – 19 %, BEACOPP escalated – 2,8 %, EACOPP – 2,6 %, ABVD-BEACOPP – 2,9 %. Sixty seven (11 % patients received other regimens, including MOPP-ABVD, LABO, LOPP, CEA/ABVD, CHOP and irradiation only. Radiotherapy was given to 81 % of patients. Long-term remission after first-line therapy was achieved in 432 patients (75,2 %. Second-line treatment was required in 117 patients (20,4 %. Twenty five patients (4,4 % died before second-line therapy. High dose therapy with autologous stem cells rescue (HDCT-ASCT was conducted in 26 of 117 (22 % patients with relapse after first-line treatment. Five-year overall survival in early stage patients, receiving ABVD was 96 % and 85 % in those, receiving other regimens. In patients with advanced stages no differences in overall survival were found when comparing BEACOPPmodifications with other regimens. Time to next treatment (TTNT was different: 5-year TTNT rate was 71 % in BEACOPP group compared to 56 % in patients, receiving other regimens. BEACOPP-escalated and BEACOPP-14 had an advantage over BEACOPP-21: 5-year TTNT rate was 80, 77 and 63 %, respectively.Long-term toxicity was analyzed by comparing HL patients with age and sex-matched control group, consisting of patients, hospitalized to S. P. Botkin City Hosiptal betwen 01.01.2008 and 01.01.2009 for trauma or infection (n

  15. Characterization of endolymphatic sac tumors and von Hippel-Lindau disease in the International Endolymphatic Sac Tumor Registry

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    Bausch, Birke; Wellner, Ulrich; Peyre, Mathieu; Boedeker, Carsten C.; Hes, Frederik J.; Anglani, Mariagiulia; de Campos, Jose M.; Kanno, Hiroshi; Maher, Eamonn R.; Krauss, Tobias; Sanso, Gabriela; Barontini, Marta; Letizia, Claudio; Hader, Claudia; Schiavi, Francesca; Zanoletti, Elisabetta; Suarez, Carlos; Offergeld, Christian; Malinoc, Angelica; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Glasker, Sven; Bobin, Serge; Sterkers, Olivier; Huy, Patrice Tran Ba; Giraud, Sophie; Links, Thera; Eng, Charis; Opocher, Giuseppe; Richard, Stephane; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.

    Background. Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELSTs) are, with a prevalence of up to 16%, a component of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Data from international registries regarding heritable fraction and characteristics, germline VHL mutation frequency, and prevalence are lacking. Methods. Systematic

  16. Clinical and Neuropsychological Characteristics of a Nationwide Hospital-Based Registry of Frontotemporal Dementia Patients in Korea: A CREDOS-FTD Study

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    Eun-Joo Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: We investigated the demographic, clinical, and neuropsychological characteristics of frontotemporal dementia (FTD from the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea (CREDOS-FTD registry. Methods: A total of 200 consecutive patients with FTD recruited from 16 neurological clinics in Korea were evaluated by cognitive and functional assessments, a screening test for aphasia, behavioral questionnaires, motor assessments, and brain MRI or PET. Results: In our registry, 78 patients were classified as having been diagnosed with behavioral-variant FTD (bvFTD, 70 with semantic dementia (SD, 33 with progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA, and 8 with motor neuron disease plus syndrome (MND-plus. The patients with language variants of dementia were older than those with bvFTD. There were no differences in sex ratio, duration of illness, or level of education among the four subgroups. Overall, the patients with bvFTD showed a significantly better performance in cognitive tests. A higher frequency of motor symptoms and a lower frequency of behavioral symptoms were found in PNFA than in bvFTD and SD. The Global Language Index was significantly lower in SD than in bvFTD and PNFA. The MND-plus group had a poorer performance than all the others in all cognitive domains. Conclusion: The neuropsychological, behavioral, motor, and language characteristics of the four subtypes are comparable with those from other series. However, the proportion of SD (37.0%, which was similar to that of bvFTD (41.3%, was higher in our registry than in other series.

  17. The use of breast conserving surgery: linking insurance claims with tumor registry data

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    Yamashiro Gladys

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to use insurance claims and tumor registry data to examine determinants of breast conserving surgery (BCS in women with early stage breast cancer. Methods Breast cancer cases registered in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR from 1995 to 1998 were linked with insurance claims from a local health plan. We identified 722 breast cancer cases with stage I and II disease. Surgical treatment patterns and comorbidities were identified using diagnostic and procedural codes in the claims data. The HTR database provided information on demographics and disease characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess determinants of BCS vs. mastectomy. Results The linked data set represented 32.8% of all early stage breast cancer cases recorded in the HTR during the study period. Due to the nature of the health plan, 79% of the cases were younger than 65 years. Women with early stage breast cancer living on Oahu were 70% more likely to receive BCS than women living on the outer islands. In the univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis, lower tumor stage, smaller tumor size, and well-differentiated tumor grade were related to receiving BCS. Ethnicity, comorbidity count, menopausal and marital status were not associated with treatment type. Conclusions In addition to developing solutions that facilitate access to radiation facilities for breast cancer patients residing in remote locations, future qualitative research may help to elucidate how women and oncologists choose between BCS and mastectomy.

  18. Characterization of endolymphatic sac tumors and von Hippel-Lindau disease in the International Endolymphatic Sac Tumor Registry.

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    Bausch, Birke; Wellner, Ulrich; Peyre, Mathieu; Boedeker, Carsten C; Hes, Frederik J; Anglani, Mariagiulia; de Campos, Jose M; Kanno, Hiroshi; Maher, Eamonn R; Krauss, Tobias; Sansó, Gabriela; Barontini, Marta; Letizia, Claudio; Hader, Claudia; Schiavi, Francesca; Zanoletti, Elisabetta; Suárez, Carlos; Offergeld, Christian; Malinoc, Angelica; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Glasker, Sven; Bobin, Serge; Sterkers, Olivier; Ba Huy, Patrice Tran; Giraud, Sophie; Links, Thera; Eng, Charis; Opocher, Giuseppe; Richard, Stephane; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2016-04-01

    Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELSTs) are, with a prevalence of up to 16%, a component of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Data from international registries regarding heritable fraction and characteristics, germline VHL mutation frequency, and prevalence are lacking. Systematic registration of ELSTs from international centers of otorhinolaryngology and from multidisciplinary VHL centers' registries was performed. Molecular genetic analyses of the VHL gene were offered to all patients. Our population-based registry comprised 93 patients with ELST and 1789 patients with VHL. The prevalence of VHL germline mutations in apparently sporadic ELSTs was 39%. The prevalence of ELSTs in patients with VHL was 3.6%. ELST was the initial manifestation in 32% of patients with VHL-ELST. Prevalence of ELST in VHL disease is much lower compared to the literature. VHL-associated ELSTs can be the first presentation of the syndrome and mimic sporadic tumors, thus emphasizing the need of molecular testing in all presentations of ELST. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 673-679, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ocular malignant tumors. Review of the Tumor Registry at a tertiary eye hospital in central Saudi Arabia.

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    Khandekar, Rajiv B; Al-Towerki, Abdulelah A; Al-Katan, Hind; Al-Mesfer, Saleh S; Abboud, Emad B; Al-Hussain, Hailah M; Sheikh, Osama H; Chaudhry, Imtiaz A; Ahmed, Wafa A; Zaman, Babar M; Asghar, Nasira; Edward, Deepak P

    2014-04-01

    To present the epidemiologic profile and magnitude of ocular malignant tumors (MT) representative of the Saudi population from the Tumor Registry (TR) at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH). This study evaluated the demographic information, clinical features including tumor laterality, ocular tissue of origin, and diagnosis of patients from the TR registry between 1983 and 2012 at KKESH, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The incidence of MT among Saudi adults (>/= 15 years old), and children (ocular malignancy in children. In adults, the most common MT was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n=363, 45.8%), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (n=186, 23%), uvealmelanoma (n=94, 11.9%), sebaceous gland carcinoma (n=54, 6.8%), lymphomas (orbital, adnexal) (n=46, 5.8%), and others (n=53, 6.8%). The Rb (7.7/M/Y in <5 years old Saudi children) was less frequent than that reported in some Gulf countries, but higher than that reported from the West. The SCC was less frequent in countries with comparable sun exposure than in other continents, but the incidence remained unchanged over 3 decades. There was a significant increase in BCC between 1983-1992 and 2003-2012. The rates of all cancers remained stable over 3 decades except BCC, which showed a significant rise.

  20. [Leather dust and systematic research on occupational tumors: the national and regional registry TUNS].

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    Mensi, Carolina; Sieno, Claudia; Consonni, Dario; Riboldi, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The sinonasal cancer (SNC) are a rare tumors characterized by high occupational etiologic fraction. For this reason their incidence and etiology can be actively monitored by a dedicated cancer registry. The National Registry of these tumours is situated at the Italian Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention (ISPESL) and is based on Regional Operating Centres (ROCs). In Lombardy Region the ROC has been established at the end of 2007 with the purpose to make a systematic surveillance and therefore to support in the most suitable way the scientific research and the prevention actions in the high risk working sectors. The aims of this surveillance are: to estimate the regional incidence of SNC, to define different sources of occupational and environmental exposure both known (wood, leather, nickel, chromium) and unknown. The registry collects all the new incident cases of epithelial SNC occurring in residents in Lombardy Region since 01.01.2008. The regional Registry is managed according to National Guidelines. Until January 2010 we received 596 cases of suspected SNC; only 91 (15%) of these were actually incident cases according to the inclusion criteria of the Registry, and they were preferentially adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma. In 2008 the regional age-standardized incidence rate of SNC for males and females, respectively, is 0.8 and 0.5 per 100,000. Occupational or environmental exposure to wood or leather dust is ascertained in over the 50% of cases. The occupational exposure to leather dust was duo to work in shoe factories. Our preliminary findings confirm that occupational exposure to wood and leather dusts are the more relevant risk factors for SNC. The study of occupational sectors and job activity in cases without such exposure could suggest new etiologic hypothesis.

  1. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

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    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Williams, Melanie [Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niu, Jiangong [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad [Florida Cancer Data System, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J. [New York State Cancer Registry, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  2. Understanding Treatment Disconnect and Mortality Trends in Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Tumor Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Marc C; Egleston, Brian; Hollingsworth, John M; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Miller, David C; Morgan, Todd M; Kim, Simon P; Malhotra, Aseem; Handorf, Elizabeth; Wong, Yu-Ning; Uzzo, Robert G; Kutikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The paradoxical rise in overall and cancer-specific mortality despite increased detection and treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is termed "treatment disconnect." We reassess this phenomenon by evaluating impact of missing data and rising incidence on mortality trends. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, we identified patients with RCC diagnosis from 1973 to 2011. We estimated mortality rates by tumor size after accounting for lags from diagnosis to death using multiple imputations for missing data from 1983. Mortality rates were estimated irrespective of tumor size after adjustment for prior cumulative incidence using ridge regression. A total of 78,891 patients met inclusion criteria. Of 70,212 patients diagnosed since 1983, 10.4% had missing data. Significant attenuation in cancer-specific mortality was noted from 1983 to 2011 when comparing observed with imputed rates: Δobs0.05 versus Δimp0.10 (P=0.001, 7 cm tumors). Holding incidence of RCC constant to 2011 rates, temporal increase in overall mortality for all patients was attenuated (Pmortality trends. These findings were supported by assessment of mortality to incidence ratio trends. Missing data and rising incidence may contribute substantially to the "treatment disconnect" phenomenon when examining mortality rates in RCC using tumor registry data. Caution is advised when basing clinical and policy decisions on these data.

  3. Ovarian Tumors related to Intronic Mutations in DICER1: A Report from the International Ovarian and Testicular Stromal Tumor Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kris Ann; Harris, Anne; Messinger, Yoav; Sencer, Susan; Baldinger, Shari; Dehner, Louis P.; Hill, D. Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Germline DICER1 mutations have been described in individuals with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (SLCT), sarcomas, multinodular goiter, thyroid carcinoma, cystic nephroma and other neoplastic conditions. Early results from the International Ovarian and Testicular Stromal Tumor Registry show germline DICER1 mutations in 48% of girls and women with SLCT. In this report, a young woman presented with ovarian undifferentiated sarcoma. Four years later, she presented with SLCT. She was successfully treated for both malignancies. Sequence results showed a germline intronic mutation in DICER1. This mutation results in an exact duplication of the six bases at the splice site at the intron 23 and exon 24 junction. Predicted improper splicing leads to inclusion of 10 bases of intronic sequence, frameshift and premature truncation of the protein disrupting the RNase IIIb domain. A second individual with SLCT was found to have an identical germline mutation. In each of the ovarian tumors, an additional somatic mutation in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 was found. In rare patients, germline intronic mutations in DICER1 that are predicted to cause incorrect splicing can also contribute to the pathogenesis of SLCT. PMID:26289771

  4. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  5. Melanoma Epidemic: An Analysis of Six Decades of Data From the Connecticut Tumor Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Alan C.; Clapp, Richard W.; Sober, Arthur J.; Gonsalves, Lou; Mueller, Lloyd; Christiansen, Cindy L.; Shaikh, Waqas; Miller, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Melanoma is the most commonly fatal form of skin cancer, with nearly 50,000 annual deaths worldwide. We sought to assess long-term trends in the incidence and mortality of melanoma in a state with complete and consistent registration. Methods We used data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, the original National Cancer Institute SEER site, to determine trends in invasive melanoma (1950-2007), in situ melanoma (1973-2007), tumor thickness (1993-2007), mortality (1950-2007), and mortality to incidence (1950-2007) among the 19,973 and 3,635 Connecticut residents diagnosed with invasive melanoma (1950-2007) and who died as a result of melanoma (1950-2007), respectively. Main outcome measures included trends in incidence and mortality by age, sex, and birth cohort. Results In the initial period (1950-1954), a diagnosis of invasive melanoma was rare, with 1.9 patient cases per 100,000 for men and 2.6 patient cases per 100,000 for women. Between 1950 and 2007, overall incidence rates rose more than 17-fold in men (1.9 to 33.5 per 100,000) and more than nine-fold in women (2.6 to 25.3 per 100,000). During these six decades, mortality rates more than tripled in men (1.6 to 4.9 per 100,000) and doubled in women (1.3 to 2.6 per 100,000). Mortality rates were generally stable or decreasing in men and women through age 54 years. Conclusion Unremitting increases in incidence and mortality of melanoma call for a nationally coordinated effort to encourage and promote innovative prevention and early-detection efforts. PMID:24043747

  6. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in liver cancer patients: A hospital based study of 4610 patients with benign tumors or specific cancers [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Roujun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and impaired fasting glucose (IFG were hypothesised to be different among different tumor patients. This study aimed to study the association between the prevalence of DM, IGT and IFG and liver cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer and benign tumor. Methods:  A hospital based retrospective study was conducted on 4610 patients admitted to the Internal Medical Department of the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, China. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between gender, age group, ethnicity , cancer types or benign tumors and prevalence of DM, IFG, IGT. Results: Among 4610 patients, there were 1000 liver cancer patients, 373 breast cancer patients, 415 nasopharyngeal cancer patients, 230 cervical cancer patients, 405 colorectal cancer patients, and 2187 benign tumor patients. The prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients was 14.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The prevalence of DM and IGT was 13.8% and 20%, respectively, in colorectal cancer patients, significantly higher than that of benign cancers. After adjusting for gender, age group, and ethnicity, the prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancers patients was 1.29 times (CI :1.12-1.66 and 1.49 times (CI :1.20-1.86 higher than that of benign tumors, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients.

  7. Improving patient data quality by integrating oncology practice and state cancer registry tumor staging information: Feasibility and future value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess G

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transition in oncology to electronic charting offers the potential to improve the quality of patient care and value of observational research. Data fields that are more complete, have common standards, and are searchable are critical to help meet these goals. As a key data field, and proof-of-concept we studied the additional gain in recorded stage and agreement in cancer staging by adding ‘missing’ stage information into an oncology practice’s electronic medical records (EMR from a state cancer registry. Methods: In this observational study, patient records were matched and compared between a practice-based (EMR database (Georgia Cancer Specialists [GCS] and a state cancer registry (Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry [GCCR]. Impact on recorded cancer stage following a merge of the EMR and registry data was assessed. Eligible patients had ≥1 visit to any GCS practice site during the study period (1/1/2005-12/31/2008 and a diagnosis of a primary, malignant solid neoplasm (except brain or spine. Results: The final sample included 38,248 patients from GCS files, with 13,486 matched to patients with a solid malignant tumor in the GCCR files. There were 3,424 (25% patients without staging information prior to GCCR integration, which was reduced to 12% after GCCR integration - a relative gain of 52%. Differences between initial GCS stage and initial GCCR stage occurred in 45% of the sample, and varied by cancer type. Conclusions: Adding information from external data sources can help create more complete patient records. The concept is feasible and has the potential to improve data quality. Patient data collected in different systems for different reasons will often be discordant.

  8. Late new morbidity in survivors of adolescent and young-adulthood brain tumors in Finland: a registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Mirja Erika; Malila, Nea; Lähdesmäki, Tuire; Arola, Mikko; Grönroos, Marika; Matomäki, Jaakko; Lähteenmäki, Päivi Maria

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumors (BTs) in adolescence and young adulthood (AYA) differ from those in childhood or late adulthood. However, research concerning late effects in this particular survivor group is limited. This study evaluates late morbidity of survivors diagnosed in AYAs. We identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry all survivors diagnosed with BT at the ages 16-24 years between 1970 and 2004 (N = 315) and used data from the Hospital Discharge Registry to evaluate their late (≥5 y after diagnosis) morbidity requiring treatment in a specialized health care setting. A sibling cohort of BT patients diagnosed before the age of 25 years was used as a comparison cohort (N = 3615). The AYA BT survivors had an increased risk for late-appearing endocrine diseases (HR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1-8.0), psychiatric disorders (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2-3.2), diseases of the nervous system (HR, 9; 95% CI, 6.6-14.0), disorders of vision/hearing loss (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.5-8.5), diseases of the circulatory system (HR, 4.9; 95% CI, 2.9-8.1), and diseases of the kidney (HR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.5-14.1). Survivors with irradiation had an increased risk for diseases of the nervous system compared with non-irradiated survivors (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8-6.2). The cumulative prevalence for most of the diagnoses remained significantly increased for survivors even 20 years after cancer diagnosis. The AYA BT survivors have an increased risk of morbidity for multiple new outcomes for ≥5 years after their primary diagnosis. This emphasizes the need for structured late-effect follow-up for this patient group. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. a Novel Approach to Veterinary Spatial Epidemiology: Dasymetric Refinement of the Swiss Dog Tumor Registry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, G.; Fabrikant, S. I.; Leyk, S.

    2015-08-01

    In spatial epidemiology, disease incidence and demographic data are commonly summarized within larger regions such as administrative units because of privacy concerns. As a consequence, analyses using these aggregated data are subject to the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) as the geographical manifestation of ecological fallacy. In this study, we create small area disease estimates through dasymetric refinement, and investigate the effects on predictive epidemiological models. We perform a binary dasymetric refinement of municipality-aggregated dog tumor incidence counts in Switzerland for the year 2008 using residential land as a limiting ancillary variable. This refinement is expected to improve the quality of spatial data originally aggregated within arbitrary administrative units by deconstructing them into discontinuous subregions that better reflect the underlying population distribution. To shed light on effects of this refinement, we compare a predictive statistical model that uses unrefined administrative units with one that uses dasymetrically refined spatial units. Model diagnostics and spatial distributions of model residuals are assessed to evaluate the model performances in different regions. In particular, we explore changes in the spatial autocorrelation of the model residuals due to spatial refinement of the enumeration units in a selected mountainous region, where the rugged topography induces great shifts of the analytical units i.e., residential land. Such spatial data quality refinement results in a more realistic estimation of the population distribution within administrative units, and thus, in a more accurate modeling of dog tumor incidence patterns. Our results emphasize the benefits of implementing a dasymetric modeling framework in veterinary spatial epidemiology.

  10. Challenges of implementation and implementation research: Learning from an intervention study designed to improve tumor registry reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Scheck McAlearney

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Implementation of interventions designed to improve the quality of medical care often proceeds differently from what is planned. Improving existing conceptual models to better understand the sources of these differences can help future projects avoid these pitfalls and achieve desired effectiveness. To inform an adaptation of an existing theoretical model, we examined unanticipated changes that occurred in an intervention designed to improve reporting of adjuvant therapies for breast cancer patients at a large, urban academic medical center. Methods: Guided by the complex innovation implementation conceptual framework, our study team observed and evaluated the implementation of an intervention designed to improve reporting to a tumor registry. Findings were assessed against the conceptual framework to identify boundary conditions and modifications that could improve implementation effectiveness. Results: The intervention successfully increased identification of the managing medical oncologist and treatment reporting. During implementation, however, unexpected external challenges including hospital acquisitions of community practices and practices’ responses to government incentives to purchase electronic medical record systems led to unanticipated changes and associated threats to implementation. We present a revised conceptual model that incorporates the sources of these unanticipated challenges. Conclusion: This report of our experience highlights the importance of monitoring implementation over time and accounting for changes that affect both implementation and measurement of intervention impact. In this article, we use our study to examine the challenges of implementation research in health care, and our experience can help future implementation efforts.

  11. Histological and Demographic Characteristics of the Distribution of Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors' Sizes: Results from SEER Registries Using Statistical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Keshav P; Vovoras, Dimitrios; Tsokos, Chris P

    2012-09-01

    The examination of brain tumor growth and its variability among cancer patients is an important aspect of epidemiologic and medical data. Several studies for tumors of brain interpreted descriptive data, in this study we perform inference in the extent possible, suggesting possible explanations for the differentiation in the survival rates apparent in the epidemiologic data. Population based information from nine registries in the USA are classified with respect to age, gender, race and tumor histology to study tumor size variation. The Weibull and Dagum distributions are fitted to the highly skewed tumor sizes distributions, the parametric analysis of the tumor sizes showed significant differentiation between sexes, increased skewness for both the male and female populations, as well as decreased kurtosis for the black female population. The effect of population characteristics on the distribution of tumor sizes is estimated by quantile regression model and then compared with the ordinary least squares results. The higher quantiles of the distribution of tumor sizes for whites are significantly higher than those of other races. Our model predicted that the effect of age in the lower quantiles of the tumor sizes distribution is negative given the variables race and sex. We apply probability and regression models to explore the effects of demographic and histology types and observe significant racial and gender differences in the form of the distributions. Efforts are made to link tumor size data with available survival rates in relation to other prognostic variables.

  12. Harvey Cushing as a book collector, bibliophile, and archivist: the precedence for the genesis of the Brain Tumor Registry. Historical vignette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Christopher J; Tubbs, R Shane; Spencer, Dennis D; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2009-11-01

    Influenced by individuals such as his parents, Osler, and Halsted, and by his early medical student experience, Harvey Cushing developed a strong interest in collecting, especially antiquarian medical books. Even today, his collection housed at Yale University is one of the most prestigious in the world. Cushing's interest in archives is further manifested and reinforced by his establishment of the Cushing Brain Tumor Registry. The following is a review of Cushing's background not as an eminent clinician and surgeon but as an individual best described as a bibliophile, archivist, and ardent collector of medical paraphernalia.

  13. Unified Modeling Language (UML) for hospital-based cancer registration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiki, Naomi; Ohno, Yuko; Fujii, Ayumi; Murata, Taizo; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Hospital-based cancer registry involves complex processing steps that span across multiple departments. In addition, management techniques and registration procedures differ depending on each medical facility. Establishing processes for hospital-based cancer registry requires clarifying specific functions and labor needed. In recent years, the business modeling technique, in which management evaluation is done by clearly spelling out processes and functions, has been applied to business process analysis. However, there are few analytical reports describing the applications of these concepts to medical-related work. In this study, we initially sought to model hospital-based cancer registration processes using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), to clarify functions. The object of this study was the cancer registry of Osaka University Hospital. We organized the hospital-based cancer registration processes based on interview and observational surveys, and produced an As-Is model using activity, use-case, and class diagrams. After drafting every UML model, it was fed-back to practitioners to check its validity and improved. We were able to define the workflow for each department using activity diagrams. In addition, by using use-case diagrams we were able to classify each department within the hospital as a system, and thereby specify the core processes and staff that were responsible for each department. The class diagrams were effective in systematically organizing the information to be used for hospital-based cancer registries. Using UML modeling, hospital-based cancer registration processes were broadly classified into three separate processes, namely, registration tasks, quality control, and filing data. An additional 14 functions were also extracted. Many tasks take place within the hospital-based cancer registry office, but the process of providing information spans across multiple departments. Moreover, additional tasks were required in comparison to using a

  14. Quality assessment and correlation of microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical markers among population- and clinic-based colorectal tumors results from the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Mine S; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Bapat, Bharati; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Young, Joanne; Buchanan, Daniel; Walsh, Michael D; Le Marchand, Loic; Burnett, Terrilea; Newcomb, Polly A; Grady, William M; Haile, Robert W; Casey, Graham; Plummer, Sarah J; Krumroy, Lisa A; Baron, John A; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2011-05-01

    The detection of defective mismatch repair (MMR), as assessed by the presence of tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or loss of MMR protein expression by IHC, has been useful for risk assessment, prognosis, and prediction of treatment in patients with colorectal cancer. We analyzed tumors for the presence of defective MMR from 5927 Colorectal Cancer Family Registry patients recruited at six international consortium sites. We evaluated the appropriate percentage instability cutoff used to distinguish the three MSI phenotypes [ie, stable (MSS), low instability (MSI-L), and high instability (MSI-H)]; the sensitivity, specificity, and performance characteristics of individual markers; and the concordance between MSI and IHC phenotypes. Guided by the results of the IHC testing, our findings indicate that the distinction between an MSI-H phenotype from a low-instability or MSS phenotype can best be accomplished by using a cutoff of 30% or greater of the markers showing instability. The sensitivity and specificity of the mononucleotide markers were higher than those of the dinucleotide markers. Specifically, BAT26 and BAT25 had the highest sensitivity (94%) and specificity (98%), and the use of mononucleotide markers alone identified 97% of the MSI-H cases correctly. As expected, the presence of MSI-H correlated with an older age of diagnosis, the presence of tumor in the proximal colon, and female sex. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. First report of the United Network for Organ Sharing Transplant Tumor Registry: donors with a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, H M; McBride, M A; Delmonico, F L

    2000-12-27

    Severe organ shortages have led to donor pool expansion to include older individuals, patients with hypertension, diabetes, and a past history of cancer. Transmission of cancer from cadaveric donors is a risk of transplantation and carries a high mortality rate. During a 33 month period, UNOS recorded 14,705 cadaveric donors of which 257 had a past history of cancer (PHC). A total of 650 organs (397 kidneys, 178 livers, and 75 hearts) were transplanted from these 257 donors. Type of cancer, tumor-free interval at organ procurement, and whether any PHC donor transmitted a tumor to the recipient were analyzed. Three PHC donor tumor types (skin, brain, genitourinary) were associated with 549 of the transplanted organs (85%). Twenty-eight recipients of PHC donor organs developed posttransplantation tumors (18 skin, 2 PTLD, 8 solid cancers). During a mean follow-up of 45 months (range 30-61 months), no recipients of organs from PHC donors developed a donor derived cancer. The majority (71.5%) of all non-skin and non-CNS system cancer donors had a cancer-free interval of greater than five years. Risks of cancer transmission from donors with a history of non-melanoma skin cancer and selected cancers of the CNS appear to be small. Risks of tumor transmission with certain other types of cancer may be acceptable, particularly if the donor has a long cancer-free interval prior to organ procurement while certain other cancers pose a high transmission risk. Selective use of PHC donors may permit expansion of the donor pool.

  16. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  17. The impact of Agent Orange exposure on prognosis and management in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a National Veteran Affairs Tumor Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, Craig; Gilbertson, David; Randall, Nicole M; Tarchand, Gobind; Tomaska, Julie; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa; Morrison, Vicki A

    2017-09-14

    Exposure to Agent Orange (AO) has been associated with the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We performed a retrospective study of 2052 Vietnam veterans identified in the National VA Tumor Registry to assess the impact of AO exposure on CLL prognosis, treatment and survival. Prognostic factors did not differ based on exposure. Veterans exposed to AO were diagnosed younger (63.2 vs. 70.5 years, p < .0001) and had longer overall survival (median not reached vs. 91 months, p < .001). This prolonged survival was in the subgroups of patients aged 60-69 years (p< .0001) and those with 11q deletion (p < .0001). Those exposed to AO were more likely to be treated with fludarabine, chlorambucil and rituximab (38 vs. 21%, p < .001) and bendamustine plus rituximab (25 vs. 18%, p = 0.039) as first line therapy. Exposure to AO was not associated with either poor prognostic factors or shortened overall survival in our large veteran population with CLL.

  18. (A Hospital-based Histopathological Study)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. This is a hospital based retrospective histopathological study of urological tumours in 10 years. Specimens consisted of all surgical excisions, trucut and fine needle biopsies of kidney, prostate, urinary bladder, testis and penis. Urological tumours accounted for 11.45% of all malignant tumours during the period ...

  19. Utilisation of diagnostic computerised tomography imaging and immediate clinical outcomes in older people with stroke before and after introduction of the National Service Framework for older people. A comparative study of hospital-based stroke registry data (1997-2003): Norfolk experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2006-07-01

    how the National Service Framework (NSF) for older people in England might be associated with changes in clinically relevant stroke outcome has not been investigated. We looked for changes in computerised tomography (CT) scan rate, inpatient case-fatality rate (CFR), length of acute hospital stay and discharge destination for older people with stroke, compared with their younger counterparts, for a period before, and after, the introduction of the NSF. two periods, 4 years before and 2 years after the publication of the NSF, were selected to compare the above outcomes between three age categories: or = 85 years of age. Annual summary data for these periods were compared for the magnitude of changes in all age categories for all outcomes measured between pre- and post-NSF periods. n = 5,219. Utilisation of CT imaging had increased in all age groups post-NSF, with the most significant improvement in the oldest group. This change was associated with a greater proportion of people who had CT in this age group being discharged home in the post-NSF period. There was no change in the mortality from stroke in any age group during the study. Although the length of acute hospital stay increased, this was associated with a higher percentage of home discharges particularly in > 65-year olds, suggesting better clinical outcome in those who survived. in this single-centre analysis, the post-NSF period appeared to be associated with improvement in outcome in older people with stroke. Continual monitoring using stroke registry data may help to assess whether these effects are sustained in the longer term.

  20. [Hospital-based Health Technology Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadil, Martin; Rogalewicz, Vladimír; Kubátová, Ivana; Matloňová, Veronika; Salačová, Kristýna

    Hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) consists in implementation of assessment activities "in" or "for" hospitals; hence, it covers processes and methods supporting organization and execution of health technology assessment (HTA) at the level of individual hospitals. This process is multidisciplinary, systematic and evidence-based.HB-HTA objectives and methods differ from the classic utilization of HTA at the national regulator level. Most experience and information concerning HB-HTA has originated in two large recent projects: activities of the HB-HTA Interest Group of the HTAi international association established in 2006, and the AdHopHTA European research project (20122015).This paper describes four basic organizational models of HB-HTA, their characteristics and utilization in various countries and hospital types. Results of the AdHopHTA project are analyzed, and recommendations for HB-HTA implementation in Czech hospitals are formulated.Key words: hospital-based HTA, medical device, implementation, hospital strategy.

  1. Malignant central nervous system tumors among adolescents and young adults (15-39 years old) in 14 Southern-Eastern European registries and the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program: Mortality and survival patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakis, Marios K; Papathoma, Paraskevi; Ryzhov, Anton; Zivkovic-Perisic, Snezana; Eser, Sultan; Taraszkiewicz, Łukasz; Sekerija, Mario; Žagar, Tina; Antunes, Luis; Zborovskaya, Anna; Bastos, Joana; Florea, Margareta; Coza, Daniela; Demetriou, Anna; Agius, Domenic; Strahinja, Rajko M; Themistocleous, Marios; Tolia, Maria; Tzanis, Spyridon; Alexiou, George A; Papanikolaou, Panagiotis G; Nomikos, Panagiotis; Kantzanou, Maria; Dessypris, Nick; Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Petridou, Eleni T

    2017-11-15

    Unique features and worse outcomes have been reported for cancers among adolescents and young adults (AYAs; 15-39 years old). The aim of this study was to explore the mortality and survival patterns of malignant central nervous system (CNS) tumors among AYAs in Southern-Eastern Europe (SEE) in comparison with the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Malignant CNS tumors diagnosed in AYAs during the period spanning 1990-2014 were retrieved from 14 population-based cancer registries in the SEE region (n = 11,438). Age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated and survival patterns were evaluated via Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analyses, and they were compared with respective 1990-2012 figures from SEER (n = 13,573). Mortality rates in SEE (range, 11.9-18.5 deaths per million) were higher overall than the SEER rate (9.4 deaths per million), with decreasing trends in both regions. Survival rates increased during a comparable period (2001-2009) in SEE and SEER. The 5-year survival rate was considerably lower in the SEE registries (46%) versus SEER (67%), mainly because of the extremely low rates in Ukraine; this finding was consistent across age groups and diagnostic subtypes. The highest 5-year survival rates were recorded for ependymomas (76% in SEE and 92% in SEER), and the worst were recorded for glioblastomas and anaplastic astrocytomas (28% in SEE and 37% in SEER). Advancing age, male sex, and rural residency at diagnosis adversely affected outcomes in both regions. Despite definite survival gains over the last years, the considerable outcome disparities between the less affluent SEE region and the United States for AYAs with malignant CNS tumors point to health care delivery inequalities. No considerable prognostic deficits for CNS tumors are evident for AYAs versus children. Cancer 2017;123:4458-71. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  3. Clinical Case Registries (CCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Clinical Case Registries (CCR) replaced the former Immunology Case Registry and the Hepatitis C Case Registry with local and national databases. The CCR:HIV and...

  4. Converged Registries Solution (CRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Converged Registries platform is a hardware and software architecture designed to host individual patient registries and eliminate duplicative development effort...

  5. Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peanut plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some ...

  6. Consanguinity and occurrence of cleft lip/palate: a hospital-based registry study in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Kandasamy; Shoukri, Mohamed; Aljohar, Aziza; Shazia, Naz Subhani; Al-Twaijri, Yasmin; Al Jarba, Ibtisam

    2012-03-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of consanguinity on the occurrence of orofacial clefts. All patients with orofacial clefts registered at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh since June 1999 until December 2009 were included in this study. Patients were classified in two distinct groups: cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL ± P) and isolated cleft palate (CP). Chi-squared test was used to test independence of variables. Intracluster correlation coefficient was estimated to assess the degree of concordance between siblings. Among 1,171 total patients, CL ± P was found to be more common (64.0%). Males were more likely to be affected with CL ± P (M:F = 1.5:1) and females were more likely to be affected with CP (M:F = 0.9:1; P Consanguineous relationships were seen in 56.8% of our patients' parents. Family history was more likely to be positive for patients whose parents were consanguineous than those who were non-consanguineous (34.2% vs. 25.8%; P = 0.003), both for the CL ± P and CP groups. Recurrence among siblings did not differ between those born to consanguineous versus non-consanguineous parents. Recurrence of clefts in offspring was higher among parents affected by cleft compared to those who were not affected (51.4% vs. 11.4%; P consanguinity is important for populations with a high degree of consanguinity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Visual impairment registry of patients from North Kolkata, Eastern India: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Bandyopadhyay

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Commonest cause of visual impairment was optic atrophy followed by microphthalmos. Under-registration is a prevalent problem as the registration system is voluntary rather than mandatory, and female patients are more likely to be unregistered in this area.

  8. Hospital-Based Cancer Incidence in Nepal from 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Krishna Kanta; Huang, Zhibi; Neupane, Prakash Raj; Steel, Roberta; Poudel, Janaki Kharel

    2017-03-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world. Analyzing the incidence of cancer by site, sex and age is essential to detect the burden of cancer. Throughout the twelve hospital based cancer registries of Nepal, a total of 29,802 cancer cases with known age, were registered from January 1st 2010 to 2013 December 31st. The purpose of this retrospective study is to present the incidence of all cancer sites in both males and females for this period. This paper reviews data from all the hospital based cancer registries over a four-year period. This retrospective study has illustrated the number of cases, frequencies and crude incidence of all cancers by sex and site. For statistical analysis, SPSS (version 23.0) and Microsoft Excel 2010 were used. Over the four-year period from January 1st 2010 to 2013 December 31st the major cancer in males was identified as follows: lung cancer (17.5%) followed by stomach cancer (7.6 %) and larynx cancer (5.4%). Among females, for the same four-year period, the three common cancers were identified as cervix (18.9 %) followed by breast (15.6 %) and lung (10.2%). This retrospective study concluded that cancer is being increased by calendar years both in males and females however, the incidence of cancer is higher in females compared to males. .

  9. EMI Registry Design

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, S

    2011-01-01

    Grid services are the fundamental building blocks of today's Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). The discovery of services in the DCI is a primary function that is a precursor to other tasks such as workload and data management. In this context, a service registry can be used to fulfil such a requirement. Existing service registries, such as the ARC Information Index or UNICORE Registry, are examples that have proven themselves in production environments. Such implementations provide a centralized service registry, however, todays DCIs, such as EGI, are based on a federation model. It is therefore necessary for the service registry to mirror such a model in order for it to seamlessly fit into the operational and management requirements - a DCI built using federated approach. This document presents an architecture for a federated service registry and a prototype based on this architecture, the EMI Registry. Special attention is given to how the federated service registry is robust to environment failu...

  10. The Danish Lung Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established by the Danish Lung Cancer Group. The primary and first goal of the DLCR was to improve survival and the overall clinical management of Danish lung cancer patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish primary lung cancer patients since...... 2000 are included into the registry and the database today contains information on more than 50,000 cases of lung cancer. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information on patient characteristics such as age, sex, diagnostic procedures, histology, tumor stage, lung function, performance...... the results are commented for local, regional, and national audits. Indicator results are supported by descriptive reports with details on diagnostics and treatment. CONCLUSION: DLCR has since its creation been used to improve the quality of treatment of lung cancer in Denmark and it is increasingly used...

  11. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  12. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university...... hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment......, as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory...

  13. Revenue risk and price transparency in hospital-based laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeffrey H

    2015-11-01

    Two developments with important revenue implications for hospital laboratories demand the attention of hospital finance leaders: > Significant differences in pricing between higher-priced hospital-based laboratory services and lower-priced services delivered by commercial laboratories give patients a disincentive to use the hospital-based services. > Hospital operating revenue will be substantially affected beginning in 2017 by deep, statutory cuts in payment for the highest-volume tests on the Part B Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule.

  14. Advantages of Re-Establishing Hospital Based Schools of Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This study examined perceptions of hospital-based nursing schools among nursing professionals to determine whether this type of nursing education model is viable in the modern nursing context. Nursing education is faced with the twin problems of insufficient nurses, which creates a demand for rapid education of nurses, and ensuring adequate clinical quality of nurses, which creates a demand for more extensive undergraduate clinical training. Hospital-based nursing schools are three-year progr...

  15. The Qingdao Twin Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Haiping; Ning, Feng; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, the Qingdao Twin Registry was initiated as the main part of the Chinese National Twin Registry. By 2005, a total of 10,655 twin pairs had been recruited. Since then new twin cohorts have been sampled, with one longitudinal cohort of adolescent twins selected to explore determinants of me...

  16. The Danish HD Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, M.; Budtz-Jorgensen, E.; Boonen, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Huntington's Disease Registry (DHR) is a nationwide family registry comprising 14 245 individuals from 445 Huntington's disease (HD) families of which the largest family includes 845 individuals in 8 generations. 1136 DNA and/or blood samples and 18 fibroblast cultures are stored...

  17. The CLARIN Concept Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Ineke; Windhouwer, M.; Shkaravska, O.

    2015-01-01

    Since a few months the CLARIN Concept Registry (CCR;www.clarin.eu/conceptregistry) is operational, the open access, OpenSKOS-based registry replacing ISOcat. Although using ISOcat had been encouraged by CLARIN, it had its drawbacks: a rich data model combined with a very open update strategy turned

  18. EMI Registry Development Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, S.; Szigeti, G.; Field, L.

    2012-01-01

    This documents describes the overall development plan of the EMI Registry product, the plan focuses on the realisation of the EMI Registry specification as defined in the document. It is understood that during the course of the development phase the specification will likely evolve and the changes will be fed into the specification document.

  19. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten; Maagaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the epidemiologic and perioperative data of the first 2000 procedures in a Danish hip arthroscopy population and to describe the development of DH...

  20. Cutaneous adverse events during treatment of chronic inflammatory rheumatic conditions with tumor necrosis factor antagonists: study using the Spanish registry of adverse events of biological therapies in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M Victoria; Sanmartí, Raimon; Cañete, Juan D; Descalzo, Miguel A; Alsina, Mercè; Carmona, Loreto; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the incidence rate (IR) and risk factors of cutaneous adverse events (CAE) in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. We analyzed all patients from the BIOBADASER (Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología) registry treated with a TNF antagonist (infliximab, etanercept, or adalimumab). Data collected included age, sex, diagnosis and duration of rheumatic disease, type of TNF antagonist, and concomitant treatment. Type of CAE was classified as local or systemic cutaneous manifestation related to treatment administration (infusion reaction), infection, malignancy, or autoimmune skin disease. Time of onset of CAE and outcome were also recorded. The IRs of CAE per 1,000 patient-years of exposure with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors for CAE. A total of 5,437 patients were included, representing 17,330 patient-years of exposure. A total of 920 CAE were reported; the IRs per 1,000 patient-years were 53 (95% CI 50-57) for CAE, 28 (95% CI 25-30) for infection, 15 (95% CI 13-17) for infusion reactions, 5 (95% CI 4-6) for autoimmune skin diseases, and 3 (95% CI 2-4) for skin malignancy. The mean time between starting TNF antagonist treatment and CAE was 1.78 years. In 32% of patients, CAE required TNF antagonist withdrawal. The main risk factors for CAE were female sex and treatment with infliximab, leflunomide, and glucocorticoids. The IR of CAE in patients treated with TNF antagonists is significant and should be addressed carefully, and withdrawal of therapy is required in some cases. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Safety of Resuming Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Concomitant with the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Nationwide Registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Kim

    Full Text Available Patients who develop an active tuberculosis infection during tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibitor treatment typically discontinue TNF inhibitor and receive standard anti-tuberculosis treatment. However, there is currently insufficient information on patient outcomes following resumption of TNF inhibitor treatment during ongoing anti- tuberculosis treatment. Our study was designed to investigate the safety of resuming TNF inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis (AS patients who developed tuberculosis as a complication of the use of TNF inhibitors.Through the nationwide registry of the Korean Society of Spondyloarthritis Research, 3929 AS patients who were prescribed TNF inhibitors were recruited between June 2003 and June 2014 at fourteen referral hospitals. Clinical information was analyzed about the patients who experienced tuberculosis after exposure to TNF inhibitors. The clinical features of resumers and non-resumers of TNF inhibitors were compared and the outcomes of tuberculosis were surveyed individually.Fifty-six AS patients were treated for tuberculosis associated with TNF inhibitors. Among them, 23 patients resumed TNF inhibitors, and these patients were found to be exposed to TNF inhibitors for a longer period of time and experienced more frequent disease flare-up after discontinuation of TNF inhibitors compared with those who did not resume. Fifteen patients resumed TNF inhibitors during anti-tuberculosis treatment (early resumers and 8 after completion of anti-tuberculosis treatment (late resumers. Median time to resuming TNF inhibitor from tuberculosis was 3.3 and 9.0 months in the early and late resumers, respectively. Tuberculosis was treated successfully in all resumers and did not relapse in any of them during follow-up (median 33.8 [IQR; 20.8-66.7] months.Instances of tuberculosis were treated successfully in our AS patients, even when given concomitantly with TNF inhibitors. We suggest that early resumption of TNF inhibitors in

  2. 911 Master PSAP Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — Updated as of 5Oct2017. The Registry lists PSAPs by an FCC assigned identification number, PSAP Name, State, County, City, and provides information on any type of...

  3. Data Element Registry Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data Element Registry Services (DERS) is a resource for information about value lists (aka code sets / pick lists), data dictionaries, data elements, and EPA data...

  4. The Danish Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager; Schaarup, Susanne Zielke; Gyllenborg, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients with acute stroke and TIA. Patient outcomes are currently monitored using 30-day mortality, unplanned readmission, and for patients receiving revascularization therapy, also functional level at 3 months poststroke. Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors with potential prognostic impact are registered. The Danish Stroke Registry is a well-established clinical registry which plays a key role for monitoring and improving stroke and TIA care in Denmark. In addition, the registry is increasingly used for research.

  5. Smoking habits in lung cancer patients: a hospital based case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective, hospital based case-control study was designed to investigate the cigarette smoking history, the relationship between cigarette smoking and the risk of lung cancer in KHMC-Jordan. Six hundred cases with lung cancer (576 males, 24 females) and 600 controls were included in the study. The majority of ...

  6. A collegiate model within a hospital-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G; Kimmons, C; Martino, S

    1979-01-01

    In the current age of consumerism, educators in radiologic technology must be accountable to provide high level educational experiences for students. The authors address the issue of standardizing and upgrading education by proposing that a collegiate model be developed and implemented with a hospital-based radiography program.

  7. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Helena; Hallström, Inger; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Hospital-based home care (HBHC) is widely applied in Pediatric Oncology. We reviewed the potential effect of HBHC on children's physical health and risk of adverse events, parental and child satisfaction, quality of life of children and their parents, and costs. A search of PubMed, CINAHL...... for children with cancer....

  8. Hospital-based, acute care after ambulatory surgery center discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Justin P; Vashi, Anita A; Ross, Joseph S; Gross, Cary P

    2014-05-01

    As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. This process, however, may underestimate the acute care needs of patients after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or operative procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1 per 1,000 discharges (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8 per 1,000 discharges (95% confidence interval 31.6-32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median = 1.0/1,000 discharges [25th-75th percentile = 1.0-2.0]), whereas substantial variation existed in adjusted, hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0-39.0]). Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory care at surgery centers, hospital transfer at time of discharge from the ambulatory care center is a rare event. In contrast, the rate of need for hospital-based, acute care in the first week afterwards is nearly 30-fold greater, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  9. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  10. The Danish Stroke Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. STUDY POPULATION: All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated...... at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. MAIN VARIABLES: The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes...... of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients...

  11. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  12. The Danish Schizophrenia Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baandrup L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lone Baandrup,1 Charlotte Cerqueira,2 Lea Haller,3 Lene Korshøj,3 Inge Voldsgaard,4 Merete Nordentoft5 1Centre for Neuropsychiatric Schizophrenia Research (CNSR and Centre for Clinical Intervention and Neuropsychiatric Schizophrenia Research (CINS, Mental Health Centre Glostrup, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup, 2Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Copenhagen, 3The Danish Clinical Registries, Registry Support Centre for Health Quality and Informatics (KCKS-West, Aarhus, 4Psychosis Ward, Section P, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov, 5Mental Health Centre Copenhagen, Mental Health Services in the Capital Region of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAim of database: To systematically monitor and improve the quality of treatment and care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. In addition, the database is accessible as a resource for research.Study population: Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and receiving mental health care in psychiatric hospitals or outpatient clinics. During the first year after the diagnosis, patients are classified as incident patients, and after this period as prevalent patients.Main variables: The registry currently contains 21 clinical quality measures in relation to the following domains: diagnostic evaluation, antipsychotic treatment including adverse reactions, cardiovascular risk factors including laboratory values, family intervention, psychoeducation, postdischarge mental health care, assessment of suicide risk in relation to discharge, and assessment of global functioning.Descriptive data: The recorded data are available electronically for the reporting clinicians and responsible administrative personnel, and they are updated monthly. The registry publishes the national and regional results of all included quality measures in the annual audit reports. External researchers may

  13. Encouraging Health Information Management Graduates to Pursue Cancer Registry Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The cancer registry profession has grown dramatically since its inception in 1926. Certified tumor registrars (CTRs) have become an integral part of the cancer care team by providing quality cancer data for research, statistical purposes, public health, and cancer control. In addition, CTRs have been found to be valuable in other cancer and health-related fields. Based on the need for high-quality, accurate data, the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA), the certification body for CTRs, has increased the educational requirement for eligibility for the CTR certification exam. This has resulted in fewer individuals who are able to meet the requirements for CTR certification. In addition, the existing cancer registry workforce is, on average, older than other allied health professions, and therefore will face an increasing number of retirements in the next few years. The high demand for CTRs, the decreased pool of CTR-eligible applicants, and the aging cancer registry workforce has resulted in an existing shortage that will only get worse as the population ages and the incidence of cancer increases. Health information management (HIM) students are well suited to pursuing further training in the cancer registry field and gaining the CTR credential. HIM students or new graduates have the needed skill set and education to pursue a cancer registry career. There are many avenues HIM educational programs can take to encourage students to pursue CTR certification and a cancer registry career. Including cancer registry functions in courses throughout the HIM curriculum, bringing in cancer registry speakers, encouraging networking, and promoting the cancer registry field and profession in general are just a few of the methods that HIM programs can use to raise awareness of and promote a cancer registry career to their students. Illinois State University has used these methods and has found them to be successful in encouraging a percentage of their graduates to pursue

  14. Evaluation of Hospital-Based Palliative Care Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Karen Lynn; Rafalson, Lisa; Mariano, Kathleen; Michalek, Arthur

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated current hospital-based palliative care programs using recommendations from the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) as a framework. Seven hospitals located in Buffalo, New York were included based on the existence of a hospital-based palliative care program. Data was collected from August through October of 2013 by means of key informant interviews with nine staff members from these hospitals using a guide comprised of questions based on CAPC's recommendations. A gap analysis was conducted to analyze the current state of each hospital's program based upon CAPC's definition of a quality palliative care program. The findings identify challenges facing both existing/evolving palliative care programs, and establish a foundation for strategies to attain best practices not yet implemented. This study affirms the growing availability of palliative care services among these selected hospitals along with opportunities to improve the scope of services in line with national recommendations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program: Hospital-Based Stroke Outpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Danielle; Janzen, Shannon; McIntyre, Amanda; Vermeer, Julianne; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have considered the effectiveness of outpatient rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a hospital-based interdisciplinary outpatient stroke rehabilitation program with respect to physical functioning, mobility, and balance. The Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program provides a hospital-based interdisciplinary approach to stroke rehabilitation in Southwestern Ontario. Outcome measures from physiotherapy and occupational therapy sessions were available at intake and discharge from the program. A series of paired sample t-tests were performed to assess patient changes between time points for each outcome measure. A total of 271 patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis (56.1% male; mean age = 62.9 ± 13.9 years). Significant improvements were found between admission and discharge for the Functional Independence Measure, grip strength, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment, two-minute walk test, maximum walk test, Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, and one-legged stance (P stroke. A hospital-based, stroke-specific rehabilitation program should be considered when patients continue to experience deficits after inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cancer Registry Data

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-24

    Dr. Loria Pollack, a Senior Medical Epidemiologist, talks about the importance of cancer registry data to understanding how cancer affects the United States–now and in the future.  Created: 5/24/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/24/2017.

  17. The EuroMyositis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilleker, James B; Vencovsky, Jiri; Wang, Guochun

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The EuroMyositis Registry facilitates collaboration across the idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) research community. This inaugural report examines pooled Registry data. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of IIM cases from 11 countries was performed. Associations between clinical subtyp...

  18. Risk factors for prostate cancer: An hospital-based case-control study from Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, B; Saoba, Sushama L; Sarade, Monika N; Pinjari, Suvarna V

    2011-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer is one of the five leading sites of cancers among males in all the registries. Very little is known about risk factors for prostate cancer among the Indian population. The present study aims to study the association of lifestyle factors like chewing (betel leaf with or without tobacco, pan masala, gutka), smoking (bidi, cigarette), comorbid conditions, diet, body mass index (BMI), family history, vasectomy with prostate cancer. This an unmatched hospital-based case-control study, comprised of 123 histologically proven prostate 'cancer cases' and 167 'normal controls. Univariate and regression analysis were applied for obtaining the odds ratio for risk factors. The study revealed that there was no significant excess risk for chewers, alcohol drinkers, tea and coffee drinkers, family history of cancer, diabetes, vasectomy and dietary factors. However, patients with BMI >25 (OR = 2.1), those with hypertension history (OR = 2.5) and age >55 years (OR = 19.3) had enhanced risk for prostate cancer. In the present study age, BMI and hypertension emerged as risk factors for prostate cancer. The findings of this study could be useful to conduct larger studies in a more detailed manner which in turn can be useful for public interest domain.

  19. Obstetric and birth outcomes in pregnant women with epilepsy: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Haslina Othman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : In addition to changes in seizure frequency, pregnant women with epilepsy (WWE are at increased risk of complications during pregnancy or delivery. In the absence of a nationwide WWE registry, hospital-based studies may provide important information regarding current management and outcomes in these patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine changes in seizure frequency, and pregnancy and birth outcomes among pregnant WWE. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of pregnant patients with epilepsy, who obtained medical care (from 2006 to 2011 at one of the general hospitals in the North-Eastern State of Malaysia. Data were collected for seizure frequency before and during the pregnancy, concurrent medications, pregnancy complications, and neonatal outcomes. Results: We reviewed records of 25 patients with a total of 33 different pregnancies. All patients were treated with antiepileptic medications during their pregnancies, with 42% monotherapy and 58% polytherapy. Seizure frequency decreased in 5 (15.2%, increased in 18 (54.5% and unchanged in 10 (30.3% cases of pregnancies. Pregnancy complications were anemia, gestational diabetes mellitus, gestational hypertension, intrauterine growth retardation, premature rupture of membrane, and vaginal bleeding. Preterm deliveries were recorded in 11 (33.3% infants. Conclusion: In our setting, many patients were being on polytherapy during their pregnancies. This underscores the need for planned pregnancies so that antiepileptic medications can be optimized prior to pregnancy.

  20. Risk factors for prostate cancer: An hospital-based case-control study from Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ganesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In India, prostate cancer is one of the five leading sites of cancers among males in all the registries. Very little is known about risk factors for prostate cancer among the Indian population. Objectives : The present study aims to study the association of lifestyle factors like chewing (betel leaf with or without tobacco, pan masala, gutka, smoking (bidi, cigarette, comorbid conditions, diet, body mass index (BMI, family history, vasectomy with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods : This an unmatched hospital-based case-control study, comprised of 123 histologically proven prostate ′cancer cases′ and 167 ′normal controls. Univariate and regression analysis were applied for obtaining the odds ratio for risk factors. Results : The study revealed that there was no significant excess risk for chewers, alcohol drinkers, tea and coffee drinkers, family history of cancer, diabetes, vasectomy and dietary factors. However, patients with BMI >25 (OR = 2.1, those with hypertension history (OR = 2.5 and age >55 years (OR = 19.3 had enhanced risk for prostate cancer. Conclusions : In the present study age, BMI and hypertension emerged as risk factors for prostate cancer. The findings of this study could be useful to conduct larger studies in a more detailed manner which in turn can be useful for public interest domain.

  1. [Trends for the management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a hospitalized-based population (1980-1994)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queneau, P E; Pitard, A; Labourey, J M; Koch, S; Sauve, G; Carayon, P

    2000-05-01

    To determine the trends for the management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma between 1980 and 1994 in a hospital-based population. Data of patients from the Doubs department and hospitalized for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the University Hospital of Besançon were analyzed. Two study periods were determined: 1980-1989 and 1990-1994. One hundred and thirty five cases were diagnosed (77 male, 58 female, mean age 65.6 +/- 12.1 years). Weight loss (62.3%), pain (52.7%) and jaundice (43.3%) were the most frequently reported symptoms. Their proportion and their duration were similar according to the period. Diagnosis of the pancreatic tumor was made by ultrasonography or tomodensitometry in 97.8% patients. Distribution of tumors according to the AJCC staging was unchanged during the study. Pre-operative screening frequently underestimated tumor stage, even in the more recent period. The rate of complete resection (18.5%) did not increase. The 5-year actuarial survival rate (3.05%) remained unchanged. A metastatic spread represented the only independent prognostic factor. The management and the prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma have not fundamentally changed. Recent imaging techniques should improve staging accuracy. Advances in adjuvant therapies represent a major issue for the future.

  2. The Danish Twin Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    SKYTTHE, AXEL; KYVIK, KIRSTEN OHM; HOLM, NIELS VILSTRUP; CHRISTENSEN, KAARE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Danish Twin Registry is a unique source for studies of genetic, familial and environmental factors on life events, health conditions and diseases. Content More than 85,000 twin pairs born 1870–2008 in Denmark. Validity and coverage Four main ascertainment methods have been employed. Completeness of ascertainment varies according to birth cohorts. For birth cohorts 1870–1930 both twins should survive to age 6 years. From 1931–1968 72% of all twin pairs has been ascertained, with complete ascertainment of all live born twins since 1968. Conclusion Because twins have been identified independent of traits and on a population basis, the Danish Twin Registry is well suited for studies to understand the influence of genetic and environmental factors for a wide variety of diseases and traits. PMID:21775358

  3. The Danish Twin Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytthe, Axel; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Vilstrup Holm, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Twin Registry is a unique source for studies of genetic, familial and environmental factors on life events, health conditions and diseases. Content: More than 85,000 twin pairs born 1870-2008 in Denmark. Validity and coverage: Four main ascertainment methods have been...... employed. Completeness of ascertainment varies according to birth cohorts. For birth cohorts 1870-1930 both twins should survive to age 6 years. From 1931-1968 72% of all twin pairs has been ascertained, with complete ascertainment of all live born twins since 1968. CONCLUSION: Because twins have been...... identified independent of traits and on a population basis, the Danish Twin Registry is well suited for studies to understand the influence of genetic and environmental factors for a wide variety of diseases and traits....

  4. The Danish schizophrenia registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Haller, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database: To systematically monitor and improve the quality of treatment and care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. In addition, the database is accessible as a resource for research. Study population: Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and receiving mental health care...... to the data for use in specific research projects by applying to the steering committee. Conclusion: The Danish Schizophrenia Registry represents a valuable source of informative data to monitor and improve the quality of care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. However, continuous resources and time...

  5. The Danish Schizophrenia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Haller, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database: To systematically monitor and improve the quality of treatment and care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. In addition, the database is accessible as a resource for research. Study population: Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and receiving mental health care...... to the data for use in specific research projects by applying to the steering committee. Conclusion: The Danish Schizophrenia Registry represents a valuable source of informative data to monitor and improve the quality of care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. However, continuous resources and time...

  6. HOSPITAL-BASED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT IN IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasham, Farideh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Jamshidi, Ensiyeh

    2017-08-17

    Hospitals with health technology assessment (HTA) programs have reported its positive effects on the management of resources and costs. This study aimed to identify the barriers faced by hospital-based HTA (HBHTA) in Iran by inductive content analysis of stakeholders' and decision-makers' points of view. The key individuals and organizations that could provide rich, relevant, and diverse data in response to the research question were purposively selected for the interviews and focus group discussion. Twelve stakeholders from seven public hospitals participated in the interviews. Another eighteen stakeholders from twelve HBHTA-related organizations took part in the focus group discussion. Most of the hospitals' senior management team did not feel the need for HBHTA and believed that in Iran a systematic process like HTA faces many challenges. The stakeholders participating in this study highlighted the significance of certain points that needed to be addressed before establishing HBHTA in Iran.

  7. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the feasibility and psychosocial impact of a hospital-based home care (HBHC) program for children with cancer. PROCEDURE: A HBHC program was carried out with 51 children (0-18 years) with cancer to assess its feasibility in terms of satisfaction, care preferences, safety...... children and 43 parents in the home care group, and 47 children and 66 parents receiving standard hospital care. RESULTS: All parents in the HBHC program were satisfied and preferred home care. There were no serious adverse events associated with HBHC, and costs did not increase. When adjusting for age......, gender, diagnosis and time since diagnosis, we found significant higher HRQOL scores in parent-reported physical health (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.2-19.5) and worry (P = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.4-20.6) in the home-care group indicating better physical health and less worry for children...

  8. Hospital Based Health Technology Assessment: an example from Siena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Manzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Health Technology Assessment (HTA has emerged in recent years as a useful tool in healthcare decision-making. It is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology and provides evidence-based information on how to allocate resources. The experience of Siena University Hospital is an example of multidisciplinary hospital-based HTA. In the present paper we summarize the organization of HTA commission and the assessment methodology of the purchase, rental or sale of medical equipment and medical devices. Furthermore we illustrate the data concerning the commission activities in 2013.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v16i1.943

  9. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2016-01-01

    advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. CONCLUSION: The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality...... in handling primary brain tumor patients in Denmark by reporting indicators and facilitating a better multidisciplinary collaboration at a national level. DNOR provides a valuable resource for research.......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: DNOR has...

  10. eRegistries: Electronic registries for maternal and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøen, J Frederik; Myhre, Sonja L; Frost, Michael J; Chou, Doris; Mehl, Garrett; Say, Lale; Cheng, Socheat; Fjeldheim, Ingvild; Friberg, Ingrid K; French, Steve; Jani, Jagrati V; Kaye, Jane; Lewis, John; Lunde, Ane; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Nankabirwa, Victoria; Nyanchoka, Linda; Stone, Hollie; Venkateswaran, Mahima; Wojcieszek, Aleena M; Temmerman, Marleen; Flenady, Vicki J

    2016-01-19

    The Global Roadmap for Health Measurement and Accountability sees integrated systems for health information as key to obtaining seamless, sustainable, and secure information exchanges at all levels of health systems. The Global Strategy for Women's, Children's and Adolescent's Health aims to achieve a continuum of quality of care with effective coverage of interventions. The WHO and World Bank recommend that countries focus on intervention coverage to monitor programs and progress for universal health coverage. Electronic health registries - eRegistries - represent integrated systems that secure a triple return on investments: First, effective single data collection for health workers to seamlessly follow individuals along the continuum of care and across disconnected cadres of care providers. Second, real-time public health surveillance and monitoring of intervention coverage, and third, feedback of information to individuals, care providers and the public for transparent accountability. This series on eRegistries presents frameworks and tools to facilitate the development and secure operation of eRegistries for maternal and child health. In this first paper of the eRegistries Series we have used WHO frameworks and taxonomy to map how eRegistries can support commonly used electronic and mobile applications to alleviate health systems constraints in maternal and child health. A web-based survey of public health officials in 64 low- and middle-income countries, and a systematic search of literature from 2005-2015, aimed to assess country capacities by the current status, quality and use of data in reproductive health registries. eRegistries can offer support for the 12 most commonly used electronic and mobile applications for health. Countries are implementing health registries in various forms, the majority in transition from paper-based data collection to electronic systems, but very few have eRegistries that can act as an integrating backbone for health

  11. Melanoma of the skin in the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Klausen, Siri

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database both record data on melanoma for purposes of monitoring, quality assurance and research. However, the data quality of the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database has not been formally evaluated. METHODS: We...... estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of melanoma diagnosis for random samples of 200 patients from the Cancer Registry (n=200) and the Melanoma Database (n=200) during 2004-2014, using the Danish Pathology Registry as 'gold-standard' reference. We further validated tumor characteristics...... in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database. Additionally, we estimated the PPV of in situ melanoma diagnoses in the Melanoma Database, and the sensitivity of melanoma diagnoses in 2004-2014. RESULTS: The PPVs of melanoma in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database were 97% (95% CI, 94-99) and 100...

  12. Danish National Lymphoma Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Josefsson, Pär; Jørgensen, Judit

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish National Lymphoma Registry (LYFO) was established in order to monitor and improve the diagnostic evaluation and the quality of treatment of all lymphoma patients in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The LYFO database was established in 1982 as a seminational database including...... all lymphoma patients referred to the departments of hematology. The database became nationwide on January 1, 2000. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables include both clinical and paraclinical variables as well as details of treatment and treatment evaluation. Up to four forms are completed for each......-100 years) and a male/female ratio of 1.23:1. Patients can be registered with any of 42 different subtypes according to the World Health Organization classifications. CONCLUSION: LYFO is a nationwide database for all lymphoma patients in Denmark and includes detailed information. This information is used...

  13. Evaluation of a Hospital-Based Pneumonia Nurse Navigator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Lisa E; McDonough, Kelly; Turner, Barbara; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-based pneumonia nurse navigator program. This study used a retrospective, formative evaluation. Data of patients admitted from January 2012 through December 2014 to a large community hospital with a primary or secondary diagnosis of pneumonia, excluding aspiration pneumonia, were used. Data included patient demographics, diagnoses, insurance coverage, core measures, average length of stay (ALOS), disposition, readmission rate, financial outcomes, and patient barriers to care were collected. Descriptive statistics and parametric testing were used to analyze data. Core measure performance was sustained at the 90th percentile 2 years after the implementation of the navigator program. The ALOS did not decrease to established benchmarks; however, the SD for ALOS decreased by nearly half after implementation of the navigator program, suggesting the program decreased the number and length of extended stays. Charges per case decreased by 21% from 2012 to 2014. Variable costs decreased by 4% over a 2-year period, which increased net profit per case by 5%. Average readmission payments increased by 8% from 2012 to 2014, and the net revenue per case increased by 8.3%. The pneumonia nurse navigator program may improve core measures, reduce ALOS, and increase net revenue. Future evaluations are necessary to substantiate these findings and optimize the cost and quality performance of navigator programs.

  14. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenblum, Amanda M.; Li, Alvin Ho-ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X.

    2012-01-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of regis...

  15. The Glider registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secco, Gioel Gabrio; Rittger, Harald; Hoffmann, Stefan; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Reinecke, Holger; Lotan, Chaim; Werner, Gerald; Sievert, Horst; Foin, Nicolas; Di Mario, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Provisional stenting of the side-branch (SB) is the universally accepted gold standard while there is still controversy on the usefulness of routine dilatation of the SB ostium. Recrossing the struts of a previously deployed stent with a wire and a balloon can prove challenging and is occasionally unsuccessful, mainly because the balloon tip hits a stent strut. This prospective multicenter international registry tested the crossing ability procedural results of a new-dedicated ultrashort balloon specifically designed for side branch dilatation (Glider, TriReme Medical, Pleasanton, CA, USA). One hundred and twenty five patients (for a total of 131 bifurcation lesions) were enrolled in the registry between January 2009 and May 2012. The Glider was used as first choice in alternative to conventional balloon (group I, 72%) or as bail-out after unsuccessful previous attempt at crossing with small conventional low-profile balloons (group II, 28%). Postprocedural coronary artery dissections and in-hospital MACE (death, myocardial infarction and repeat revascularization) were assessed. Technical success was defined as the ability of the Glider to recross the struts of a previously deployed stent while procedural success was defined as less of residual 50% diameter stenosis at the origin of the SB with a final TIMI 3 and/or freedom from in-hospital MACE. Technical success was achieved, respectively, in 92% (group I), and 83% (group II). Clinical and angiographic procedural success was achieved in 98% of the lesions. In Group II, no other balloon of the same size could cross in cases where Glider could not. A total of 13 complications were observed, including nine ostial SB dissection four of which needed a second stent on the SB, one stent loss, two severe coronary spasms, and two by thrombus formation. The unique possibility offered by this short dedicated balloon to orientate its beveled tip provides an effective strategy for recrossing stent struts when conventional low

  16. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Steinbjørn Hansen Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark Aim of database: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. Study population: DNOR has registered clinical data on diagnostics and treatment of all adult patients diagnosed with glioma since January 1, 2009, which numbers approximately 400 patients each year. Main variables: The database contains information about symptoms, presurgical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI characteristics, performance status, surgical procedures, residual tumor on postsurgical MRI, postsurgical complications, diagnostic and histology codes, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Descriptive data: DNOR publishes annual reports on descriptive data. During the period of registration, postoperative MRI is performed in a higher proportion of the patients (Indicator II, and a higher proportion of patients have no residual tumor after surgical resection of the primary tumor (Indicator IV. Further data are available in the annual reports. The indicators reflect only minor elements of handling brain tumor patients. Another advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. Conclusion: The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality in handling primary brain tumor patients in Denmark by reporting indicators and facilitating a better multidisciplinary collaboration at a national level. DNOR provides a valuable resource for research. Keywords: brain neoplasms, brain cancer, glioma, clinical quality indicators

  17. Hospital-based surveillance of congenital rubella syndrome in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herini, Elisabeth Siti; Gunadi; Triono, Agung; Mulyadi, Asal Wahyuni Erlin; Mardin, Niprida; Rusipah; Soenarto, Yati; Reef, Susan E

    2017-03-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) has serious consequences, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, and severe birth defects in infants, resulting from rubella virus infection during pregnancy. However, rubella vaccine has not yet been implemented in Indonesia. This study aimed (1) to estimate the incidence of CRS in Indonesia, (2) describe the clinical features of CRS at our referral hospital, and (3) pilot a CRS surveillance system to be extended to other hospitals. We conducted a 4-month prospective surveillance study of infants aged rubella-specific IgM antibody or rubella IgG antibody levels. Of 47 suspected cases of CRS, 11/47 (23.4%), 9/47 (19.1%), and 27/47 (57.5%) were diagnosed as laboratory-confirmed, clinically compatible, and discarded CRS, respectively. The most common defects among laboratory-confirmed CRS cases were hearing impairment (100%), congenital cataracts (72.7%), microcephaly (72.7%), and congenital heart defects (45.5%). The number of laboratory-confirmed CRS cases among Indonesian infants is high. Furthermore, hearing impairment is the most common clinical feature of CRS in infants. Our findings indicate the importance of implementation of rubella vaccine in Indonesia. Conducting hospital-based surveillance of CRS in other hospitals in Indonesia may be appropriate. What is Known: •Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) has serious consequences in infants resulting from rubella virus infection during pregnancy. •The incidence of CRS in most developed countries has greatly decreased since implementation of rubella vaccination. •Rubella vaccine has not yet been implemented in many developing countries. What is New: •The number of laboratory-confirmed CRS cases among Indonesian infants was high. •Implementation of rubella vaccine into immunization programs in Indonesia is important because of the high number of CRS cases. •Our study highlights the need for ongoing prospective surveillance of CRS in Indonesia.

  18. Evaluation of an adolescent hospital-based injury prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Polgar, Denise; Girotti, Murray J; Vingilis, Evelyn; Caro, Daniel; Corbett, Bradley A; Parry, Neil

    2009-05-01

    IMPACT (Impaired Minds Produce Actions Causing Trauma) is an adolescent, hospital-based program aimed to prevent injuries and their consequences caused by alcohol or drug impairment and other high-risk behaviors. The overall objective of this evaluation was to determine the effect of the program on students' knowledge and behavior regarding drinking and driving, over time. A randomized control trial between students randomly selected to attend IMPACT and those not selected served as a control group. Students completed a questionnaire before the program and at three posttime periods (1 week, 1 month, and 6 months). Panel data models were used to analyze the effects of the experiment on students' knowledge of alcohol and crash issues and negative driving behaviors (no seat belt, driving while using a cell phone, involved in conversation, eating, annoyed with other drivers, and drowsy). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyze the effect of IMPACT on students' influence on friends and family about road safety. This study consisted of 269 students (129 IMPACT; 140 control) with an overall response rate of 84% (range, 99% presurvey to 71% at 6 months). The IMPACT group had a 57%, 38%, and 43% increase in the number of correct answers on alcohol and crash issues during the three time periods, respectively (p driving behaviors. Men and students who drove more frequently had worse driving behavior. Our evaluation demonstrates that the IMPACT program had a statistically significant, positive effect on students' knowledge of alcohol and crash issues that was sustained over time. IMPACT had an initial effect on students' behaviors in terms of peer influence toward improving road safety (i.e., buckling up, not drinking, and driving) 1 week after the program, but this effect diminished after 1 month. Other negative driving behaviors had low prevalence at baseline and were not further influenced by the program.

  19. PROFILE OF OCULAR TRAUMA IN UTTARAKHAND, A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Dhasmana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although ocular trauma is preventable public health problem throughout the world it is still one of the common causes of ophthalmic morbidity and monocular blindness. There are no published studies on pattern and severity of ocular trauma in Uttarakhand. The present study analyzes the pattern and visual outcome of ocular trauma in this region. Methods: Study design: Prospective hospital-based study. Settings: Patients of ocular trauma presenting to Ophthalmology OPD and emergency department of Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Dehradun. Participants: All ocular injury patients seen for the first time during the period January to December 2008. Results: A total of 88 patients, and 103 eyes, were studied. Men had two fold higher rate of ocular injury than women. The mean age of presentation was 31.2 + 13.6 years (range: 6 - 80 years. The predominant age group of patients was 21-40 years, 55.29 % (n = 47. Eye injuries related to road traffic accident were seen in 37.86% of eyes. Industrial workers were more frequently involved in ocular trauma (23.86%. Closed globe injuries were noted in 55 eyes (53.39% and open globe injuries were noted in 40 eyes (38.83%. Eight eyes (7.76% suffered from chemical injuries. The initial presenting visual acuity of patients with blunt ocular trauma was better than penetrating injury. Eye with better visual acuity at presentation had better visual prognosis at 6 months. Conclusion: Ocular injuries were common in young males. Road traffic accidents related eye injuries were noted in significant number of cases. Strict implementation of traffic rules, health education and preventive strategies may help to decrease the occurrence of ocular injuries.

  20. Hospital-based surveillance of enteric parasites in Kolkata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Mrinmoy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhoea is the second leading cause of illness and death in developing countries and the second commonest cause of death due to infectious diseases among children under five in such countries. Parasites, as well as bacterial and viral pathogens, are important causes of diarrhoea. However, parasitic infections are sometimes overlooked, leading after a period of time to an uncertain aetiology. In this paper we report the prevalence of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica and Cryptosporidium sp. in and around Kolkata. Findings A hospital-based laboratory surveillance study was conducted among the patients admitted between November 2007 and October 2008 to the Infectious Diseases (ID Hospital (Population = 1103 with diarrhoeal complaints. Of the 1103 samples collected, 147 were positive for Giardia lamblia, 84 for Cryptosporidium sp. and 51 for Entamoeba histolytica. For all these parasites there was a high rate of mixed infection with common enteric viruses and bacteria such as Rotavirus, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella sp. There were also cases of co-infection with all other diarrheogenic pathogens. The age group ≥ 5 years had the highest prevalence of parasites whereas the age group >5 – 10 years was predominantly infected with Giardia lamblia (p =10 – 20 years could also be considered at risk for G. lamblia (p = 0.009; OR = 2.231; 95% CI = 1.223 – 4.067. Month-wise occurrence data showed an endemic presence of G. lamblia whereas Cryptosporidium sp. and E. histolytica occurred sporadically. The GIS study revealed that parasites were more prevalent in areas such as Tangra, Tiljala and Rajarhat, which are mainly slum areas. Because most of the population surveyed was in the lower income group, consumption of contaminated water and food could be the major underlying cause of parasitic infestations. Conclusion This study provides important information on the occurrence and distribution of three important intestinal

  1. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran's Ministry of Health and Education.

  2. The New ADL Registry. ADL Registry Web Portal Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-19

    Approaches 18 19 Primary ADL Registry Contributors Contributor Records Entry Date Navy eLearning (US Navy) 2,086 08/05/2008 Joint Knowledge Development...custom catalog items (content packages) to multiple environments and platforms 2008 21 U.S. Navy Organizational Challenges  Lack of consistent...ADL Registry  http://adlregistry.adlnet.gov/  Navy eLearning Content Team  https://www.netc.navy.mil/ile  Joint Knowledge Online  http

  3. Respiratory diseases registries in the national registry of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara Gallego, Beatriz; Abaitua Borda, Ignacio; Galán Gil, Genaro; Castillo Villegas, Diego; Casanova Espinosa, Álvaro; Cano Jiménez, Esteban; Ojanguren Arranz, Iñigo; Posada de la Paz, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the registries of rare respiratory diseases included in the National Registry of Rare Diseases of the Research Institute for Rare Diseases (ISCIII), in order to publicize their existence and encourage the participation of professionals. Information is collected on the following conditions: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, idiopathic tracheal stenosis, adult pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The Danish Nephrology Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaf, James

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Nephrology Registry's (DNR) primary function is to support the Danish public health authorities' quality control program for patients with end-stage renal disease in order to improve patient care. DNR also supplies epidemiological data to several international organizations and supports epidemiological and clinical research. The study population included patients treated with dialysis or transplantation in Denmark from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2016, with retrospective data since 1964. DNR registers patient data (eg, age, sex, renal diagnosis, and comorbidity), predialysis specialist treatment, details of eight dialysis modalities (three hemodialysis and five peritoneal dialysis), all transplantation courses, dialysis access at first dialysis, treatment complications, and biochemical variables. The database is complete (nutritional and uremia status. Date and cause of death are also included. Six quality indicators are published annually, and have been associated with improvements in patient results, eg, a reduction in dialysis patient mortality, improved graft survival, and earlier referral to specialist care. Approximately, ten articles, mainly epidemiological, are published each year. DNR contains a complete description of end-stage renal disease patients in Denmark, their treatment, and prognosis. The stated aims are fulfilled.

  5. Clinical and etiological profile of epilepsy in elderly: a hospital-based study from rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Archana; Kumar, Alok

    2017-03-01

    To determine the clinical profile and etiology of epilepsy in elderly patients in rural population of India which is in a phase of demographic transition with steadily growing geriatric population. A cross-sectional, prospective, hospital-based clinicoepidemiological study was performed from October 2014 to November 2015. Patients having onset of epilepsy after 60 years were incorporated in the study. We excluded the acute symptomatic seizures. One hundred and ten patients were enrolled and were divided into three standard subgroups: subgroup A (aged 60-70), subgroup B (aged 71-80), and subgroup C (aged 81-90). Out of 110 patients, 72 (65.45%) were male and 38 (34.54%) were female. The most common etiology was cerebrovascular disease (46.36%), followed by focal cerebral calcifications single or multiple (11.81%), tumors (9.09%), trauma (6.36%) dementias (6.36%) and unknown (16.63%). In our study, the frequency of epilepsy decreases with advancing age which was 77.27% in group A (less than 70 years), 16.36% in group B and 6.36% in group C (70-90 years).The most common type of seizure in the group studied was focal 59.09% followed by generalized seizures 37.27%. Hypertension was the most common co-morbidity found in 40 (36.36%) patients. The present study proposes that epilepsy in the elderly patients have etiological relationship with stroke, focal cerebral calcifications, tumors and dementias. CNS infections account for a significant number of cases of remote symptomatic epilepsy in elderly in our region where neurocysticercosis is endemic.

  6. The Danish Nephrology Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heaf J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available James Heaf Department of Medicine, Roskilde Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde, Denmark Aim of database: The Danish Nephrology Registry's (DNR primary function is to support the Danish public health authorities' quality control program for patients with end-stage renal disease in order to improve patient care. DNR also supplies epidemiological data to several international organizations and supports epidemiological and clinical research. Study population: The study population included patients treated with dialysis or transplantation in Denmark from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2016, with retrospective data since 1964. Main variables: DNR registers patient data (eg, age, sex, renal diagnosis, and comorbidity, predialysis specialist treatment, details of eight dialysis modalities (three hemodialysis and five peritoneal dialysis, all transplantation courses, dialysis access at first dialysis, treatment complications, and biochemical variables. The database is complete (<1% missing data. Patients are followed until death or emigration. Descriptive data: DNR now contains 18,120 patients, and an average of 678 is added annually. Data for each transplantation course include donor details, tissue type, time to onset of graft function, and cause of graft loss. Registered complications include peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients, causes of peritoneal dialysis technique failure, and transplant rejections. Fifteen biochemical variables are registered, mainly describing anemia control, mineral and bone disease, nutritional and uremia status. Date and cause of death are also included. Six quality indicators are published annually, and have been associated with improvements in patient results, eg, a reduction in dialysis patient mortality, improved graft survival, and earlier referral to specialist care. Approximately, ten articles, mainly epidemiological, are published each year. Conclusion: DNR contains a complete description of end

  7. Ethico-legal aspects of hospital-based blood transfusion practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Relevant articles retrieved via PubMed/MEDLINE and Google scholar search engines were used. Results: This review found that, medical practitioners are directly or vicariously liable in professional negligence in hospital-based transfusion injuries. The potential weaknesses in hospital-based blood transfusion ...

  8. Review of patient registries in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Gabriella; Hill, Dane; Feldman, Steven R

    2016-10-01

    Patient registries are datasets containing information on patients with a particular disease or patients who are undergoing a specific treatment. Our objective was to search for and catalog the types of registries being used in dermatology and investigate their characteristics and uses. We searched Google, the Registry of Patient Registries, Orphanet, and ClinicalTrials.gov to compile a list of dermatology disease registries. We also conducted a literature review on the uses of dermatology registries using PubMed. We identified 48 dermatology patient registries, with 23 distinct diseases represented. We also identified 11 registries used for postmarketing surveillance of skin disease. Our search was limited to registries in English. Registries are commonly used for the study of rare dermatologic diseases and for postsurveillance monitoring of systemic therapies in more common dermatologic diseases, such as psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Danish National Lymphoma Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arboe B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bente Arboe,1 Pär Josefsson,2 Judit Jørgensen,3 Jacob Haaber,4 Paw Jensen,5 Christian Poulsen,6 Dorthe Rønnov-Jessen,7 Robert S Pedersen,8 Per Pedersen,9 Mikael Frederiksen,10 Michael Pedersen,1 Peter de Nully Brown1 1Department of Hematology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 2Department of Hematology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, 3Department of Hematology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 4Department of Hematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 5Department of Hematology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 6Department of Hematology, Roskilde Hospital, Roskilde, 7Department of Hematology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, 8Department of Hematology, Holstebro Hospital, Holstebro, 9Department of Hematology, Esbjerg Hospital, Esbjerg, 10Department of Hematology, Haderslev Hospital, Haderslev, Denmark Aim of database: The Danish National Lymphoma Registry (LYFO was established in order to monitor and improve the diagnostic evaluation and the quality of treatment of all lymphoma patients in Denmark. Study population: The LYFO database was established in 1982 as a seminational database including all lymphoma patients referred to the departments of hematology. The database became nationwide on January 1, 2000. Main variables: The main variables include both clinical and paraclinical variables as well as details of treatment and treatment evaluation. Up to four forms are completed for each patient: a primary registration form, a treatment form, a relapse form, and a follow-up form. Variables are used to calculate six result quality indicators (mortality 30 and 180 days after diagnosis, response to first-line treatment, and survival estimates 1, 3, and 5 years after the time of diagnosis, and three process quality indicators (time from diagnosis until the start of treatment, the presence of relevant diagnostic markers, and inclusion rate in clinical protocols. Descriptive data: Approximately 23

  10. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Amanda M; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-08-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of registrants for 27 registries (68%). Most registries are nationally operated and government-owned. Registrations in five nations expire and require renewal. Some registries provide the option to make specific organ selections in the donation decision. Just over half of donor registries provide legally binding authorization to donation. In all national donor registries, except one, the proportion of adults (15+) registered is modest (donation decision mandatory to obtain a driver's license. Registered objections in non-donor registries are rare (organ donor registries worldwide necessitates public discourse and quality improvement initiatives, to identify and support leading practices in registry use. © 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  11. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bent; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in January 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the first registry based outcome data of a national population with radiological and clinical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI......) data from DHAR between January 2012 and November 2015 were extracted. Radiological pincer-type FAI was defined as LCE > 35° and cam FAI as alpha-angle > 55°. These data were combined with FAI surgical data such as osteochondroplasty and labral repair or resection. PROMs consisting of HAGOS, EQ-5 D......, HSAS and NRS pain scores were submitted online by the patients pre-operatively and at 1 and 2-years follow-up. 2054 FAI procedures in 1835 patients were included in this study (219 patients had bilateral procedures performed). HAGOS demonstrated significant improvement in all subscales at follow up. EQ...

  12. Environmental Agents Service (EAS) Registry System of Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Environmental Agent Service (EAS) Registries is the information system encompassing the Ionizing Radiation Registry (IRR), the Agent Orange Registry (AOR), and...

  13. Determination of factors required to increase uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital-based healthcare workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, C.E.; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J.; Looijmans-van den Akker, I; Frijstein, G.; Van der Geest-Blankert, A.D.; Danhof-Pont, M.B.; De Jager, H.J.; Bos, A.A.; Smeets, E.; De Vries, M.J.; Gallee, P.M.; Lenderink, A.F.; Hak, E.

    A questionnaire study was performed in all eight University Medical Centers in The Netherlands to determine the predictors of influenza vaccination compliance in hospital-based healthcare workers (HCWs). Demographical, behavioural and organisational determinants were assessed based on behavioural

  14. Determination of factors required to increase uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital-based healthcare workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, C. E.; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J.; Looijmans-van den Akker, I.; Frijstein, G.; van der Geest-Blankert, A. D. J.; Danhof-Pont, M. B.; de Jager, H. J.; Bos, A. A.; Smeets, E.; de Vries, M. J. T.; Gallee, P. M. M.; Lenderink, A. F.; Hak, E.

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire study was performed in all eight University Medical Centers in The Netherlands to determine the predictors of influenza vaccination compliance in hospital-based healthcare workers (HCWs). Demographical, behavioural and organisational determinants were assessed based on behavioural

  15. Integration of modeling and simulation into hospital-based decision support systems guiding pediatric pharmacotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Mondick, John T; Narayan, Mahesh; Vijayakumar, Kalpana; Vijayakumar, Sundararajan

    2008-01-01

    Decision analysis in hospital-based settings is becoming more common place. The application of modeling and simulation approaches has likewise become more prevalent in order to support decision analytics...

  16. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ...

  17. The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe; Jakobsen, John; Brorson, Stig

    2012-01-01

    (70% women) were reported to the registry between January 2006 and December 2008. Mean age at surgery was 69 years (SD 12). The most common indications were a displaced proximal humeral fracture (54%) or osteoarthritis (30%). 61% were stemmed hemiarthroplasties, 28% resurfacing hemiarthroplasties, 8...

  18. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory for the ...

  19. The danish multiple sclerosis registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Stenager, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Registry was established in 1956. Content: The register comprises data on all Danes who had MS in 1949 or who have been diagnosed since. Data on new cases and updated information on persons with an MS diagnosis already notified are continuously...

  20. Marketing skills for hospital-based laboratory managers in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchwinski, J; Coggins, F

    1997-01-01

    Managers of hospital-based laboratories have begun to realize the importance of a successful outreach program in protecting against declining inpatient activity. Succeeding in the highly competitive field of outpatient testing requires some new skills and techniques that may not have been apparent when addressing normal inpatient requirements. This article provides an overview of some very basic marketing concepts and attempts to show how they can assist the hospital-based laboratory manager in developing a successful outreach program.

  1. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  2. Melanoma of the skin in the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Klausen, Siri; Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Gaist, David

    2018-01-15

    The nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database both record data on melanoma for purposes of monitoring, quality assurance and research. However, the data quality of the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database has not been formally evaluated. We estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of melanoma diagnosis for random samples of 200 patients from the Cancer Registry (n=200) and the Melanoma Database (n=200) during 2004-2014, using the Danish Pathology Registry as 'gold-standard' reference. We further validated tumor characteristics in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database. Additionally, we estimated the PPV of in situ melanoma diagnoses in the Melanoma Database, and the sensitivity of melanoma diagnoses in 2004-2014. The PPVs of melanoma in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database were 97% (95% CI, 94-99) and 100%. The sensitivity was 90% in the Cancer Registry and 77% in the Melanoma Database. The PPV of in situ melanomas in the Melanoma Database was 97% and the sensitivity was 56%. In the Melanoma Database, we observed PPVs of ulceration of 75% and Breslow thickness of 96%. The PPV of histologic subtypes varied between 87%-100% in the Cancer Registry and 93%-100% in the Melanoma Database. The PPVs for anatomical localization were 83%-95.0% in the Cancer Registry and 93%-100% in the Melanoma Database. The data quality in both the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database are high, supporting their use in epidemiologic studies.

  3. The Danish Vascular Registry, Karbase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldrup N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaj Eldrup,1,2 Charlotte Cerqueira,3 Louise de la Motte,2,4 Lisbet Knudsen Rathenborg,2,4 Allan K Hansen2,5 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, 2Karbase, The Danish Vascular Registry, Aarhus, 3Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 5Department of Vascular Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Aim: The Danish Vascular Registry (DVR, Karbase, is monitoring arterial and advanced vein interventions conducted at all vascular departments in Denmark. The main aim of the DVR is to improve the quality of treatment for patients undergoing vascular surgery in Denmark by using the registry for quality assessment and research. Study population: All patients undergoing vascular interventions (surgical and endovascular at any vascular department in Denmark are registered in the DVR. The DVR was initiated in 1989, and each year, ~9,000 procedures are added. By January 2016, .180,000 procedures have been recorded. Since 2001, data completeness has been .90% (compared to the Danish National Patient Register. Main variables: Variables include information on descriptive patient data (ie, age, sex, height, and weight and comorbidity (ie, previous cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Process variable includes waiting time (time from event to medical contact and treatment and the type of procedures conducted. Outcome variables for in-hospital complications (ie, wound complications, myocardial infarction, stroke, amputation, respiratory complications, and renal insufficiency and 30-day patency are submitted. Variables for medical treatment (antithrombotic and statin treatment, amputation, and survival are extracted from nationwide, administrative registers. Conclusion: The DVR reports outcome on key indicators for

  4. Clinical registries: governance, management, analysis and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Graeme L; Grant, Stuart W; Cosgriff, Rebecca; Dimarakis, Ioannis; Pagano, Domenico; Kappetein, Arie P; Bridgewater, Ben

    2013-10-01

    Clinical registries will have an increasingly important role to play in health-care, with a number already established in cardiac surgery. This review covers the fundamentals of establishing and managing clinical registries, including legal and ethical frameworks along with intellectual property attribution. Also discussed are important issues relating to the processing of data, data extraction and conducting analyses using registry data.

  5. 46 CFR 67.17 - Registry endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry endorsement. 67.17 Section 67.17 Shipping COAST... DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Forms of Documentation; Endorsements; Eligibility of Vessel § 67.17 Registry endorsement. (a) A registry endorsement entitles a vessel to employment in the foreign trade; trade with Guam...

  6. The Danish Vascular Registry, Karbase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Cerqueira, Charlotte; de la Motte, Louise

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Vascular Registry (DVR), Karbase, is monitoring arterial and advanced vein interventions conducted at all vascular departments in Denmark. The main aim of the DVR is to improve the quality of treatment for patients undergoing vascular surgery in Denmark by using the registry...... for quality assessment and research. STUDY POPULATION: All patients undergoing vascular interventions (surgical and endovascular) at any vascular department in Denmark are registered in the DVR. The DVR was initiated in 1989, and each year, ∼9,000 procedures are added. By January 2016, >180,000 procedures...... have been recorded. Since 2001, data completeness has been >90% (compared to the Danish National Patient Register). MAIN VARIABLES: Variables include information on descriptive patient data (ie, age, sex, height, and weight) and comorbidity (ie, previous cardiovascular disease and diabetes). Process...

  7. Rare disease registries: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Paul; Millis, Nicole; Fookes, Megan; Zurynski, Yvonne; Jaffe, Adam; Bellgard, Matthew; Winship, Ingrid; McNeil, John; Bittles, Alan H

    2017-09-01

    When registries collect accurate clinical data over time, they can act as fundamental support structures for patients and their families and powerful cost-effective instruments to support clinical trials and translational research to improve quality of care, quality of life and survival. Registries are critical for rare diseases (RD) with low prevalence and propensity for variation in treatment and outcomes. Rare Voices Australia is leading a call for action to the research and clinical community to prioritise RD data collection and develop an integrated RD Registry strategy for Australia. Financial, operational and governance challenges exist for establishing and maintaining RD registries. As a multidisciplinary team whose interests converge on RD, we highlight the need for the establishment of an Australian RD Registry Alliance. This 'umbrella' organisation will: (i) bring together existing RD registries across Australia; (ii) establish National RD Registry Standards to support interoperability and cohesion across registries; (iii) develop strategies to attract sustainable funding from government and other sources to maximise the utility of existing RD registries and support the development of new RD registries. The most important role for the Alliance would be to use the RD registries for translational research to address current knowledge gaps about RD and to improve the care for the over 1.4 million Australians estimated to live with RD. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Optimizing Outcomes with Clinical Data Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Clinical data registries are platforms to extract, store, analyze, and disseminate large amounts of clinical data. The type of data contained in clinical data registries varies by the registry, and may include patient demographics, clinical examination findings, imaging and laboratory results, procedures performed, and patient-reported outcomes. When large numbers of participants submit data to a clinical data registry the data can then be analyzed in aggregate to answer new clinical questions. Analyses on the data may be performed to show outcomes over time, compare procedures, evaluate care patterns, among others. With the launch of an otolaryngology-specific clinical data registry, Regent, facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons have the opportunity to participate in a clinical data registry for the first time. Through broad participation in the registry, the specialty has a chance to optimize patient outcomes in a manner never before possible. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Registries in European post-marketing surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvy, Jacoline C; Blake, Kevin; Slattery, Jim

    2017-01-01

    in the post-marketing setting. Methodological challenges met in conducting this study highlighted the need for a clarification of definitions and epidemiological concepts around patient registries. The results will inform the EMA Patient Registry initiative to support use of existing patient registries......PURPOSE: Regulatory agencies and other stakeholders increasingly rely on data collected through registries to support their decision-making. Data from registries are a cornerstone of post-marketing surveillance for monitoring the use of medicines in clinical practice. This study was aimed...... for a registry was made as a condition of the marketing authorisation. All centrally authorised products that received a positive opinion of the EMA Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2013 were included. Data regarding registry design and experiences were...

  10. [QUASA-the apheresis registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, J; Petzold, S; Ristau, H; Trepte, S

    2003-01-01

    Quality saving measures are required at the execution of extracorporeal LDL apheresis therapy (LDL apheresis) by the NUB guidelines of the national committee of physicians and health insurance. The saving measures apply to specialist, organizational and apparatical conditions for execution and accounting of treatment methods. Furthermore, as a result of the lawful requirements of SGB V, complementary BUB guidelines were introduced in 1999. These ought to engage the therapeutic benefit of a LDL apheresis treatment. Beyond measures for quality assurance at execution a documentation of treatment is explicitly demanded. For two years now the non-profit Quasa gGmbH has been developed the quality assurance registry for LDL apheresis with the background of those requirements. Since March 2003 the apheresis physicians can voluntarily take part in the registry initiative by internet. Beside the clinical patient's medical history, treatment relevant data are recorded. Because of the analysis of the nationally ascertained clinical data, for the first time it will be possible for the medical profession to fulfill the guidelines of quality assurance for LDL apheresis. Moreover the treating apheresis physicians can establish an EDV-based individual patient documentation. All necessary measures of data protection and data security are in process on the technical and logistic realization of this registry initiative. An epidemiological data evaluation is regularly accomplished and the results are provided to the public.

  11. Hospital-Based Palliative Care with Medicare Claims: Evidence From Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, Cordt T; Bhavsar, Nrupen A; Harker, Matthew; Bull, Janet; Taylor, Donald H

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of hospital-based palliative care has been largely anecdotal as an increasing service being provided and there is a need to understand what trends can be analyzed with Medicare data. To compare 2 methods of identifying hospital-based palliative care in the Medicare population in Colorado. Through Medicare claims data and phone surveys, we ascertained the presence of hospital-based palliative care services, number of patients receiving palliative care, and number of care visits provided during the previous year. Data were collected from every Medicare-certified hospital in Colorado during 2008 and 2013. We measured the presence of hospital-based palliative care teams and their average number of consultations through a phone survey and cross-referenced using a v-code modifier of Medicare claims indicating a palliative care consult visit. The number of hospital-based palliative care consultations increased five-fold from 2008-2013, and Medicare claims under-counted the number of these consultations compared to phone surveys. The systematic measurement of palliative care nationally is a key priority. More evidence is needed from other states to better understand the usefulness of Medicare claims in this effort.

  12. [The Perspectives and Expectations of New Nursing Graduates Regarding the Hospital-Based Nursing Students Scholarship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Shao, Jung-Hua; Shyu, Yea-Ing

    2016-10-01

    The hospital-based scholarship is a relatively recent incentive used by hospitals to recruit new nursing graduates. Few studies have explored the impact of these scholarship programs on hospital recruitment. To explore the perspectives and expectations of new nursing graduates on the application of a hospital-based scholarship for nursing students. This study used a qualitative research approach. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 20 new nursing graduates from one university in northern Taiwan in 2013. Content analysis was applied to analyze the data. Two themes were identified by participants who had applied for a hospital-based scholarship: "aspire to be a nursing-scholarship recipient and work towards this aspiration" and "look forward to receiving a nursing-scholarship and imagine possible features of the future life." One theme was identified by participants who had not applied for a hospital-based scholarship: "agree with the policy of hospital-based scholarship but resist the restrictions on their life." Although both groups agreed that the scholarship program helped relieve financial stresses, participants who had applied for the scholarship tended to hold positive and aggressive attitudes towards the nursing scholarship. Conversely, participants who had not applied for the scholarship did so due to the perceived conflicts between the scholarship and their career plans. It is recommended to consider providing career-planning assistance to new graduates and to arrange that students who sign a scholarship contract have their clinical practice in their working unit in order to improve adaptation.

  13. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects passed down ...

  14. The Development and Evaluation of a Correspondence Training Program for Tumor Registrars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, C. Dennis; Ryan, Robert F.

    A program designed to teach the medical vocabulary required of tumor registrars was developed and administered to 33 persons, 31 of whom were employed at 25 Louisiana hospitals. The training program was administered as a correspondence course covering such topics as the purposes of a tumor registry and how the registry is established; how to code…

  15. Global trauma registry mapping: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Gerard M; Cameron, Peter A; Joshipura, Manjul

    2012-07-01

    The burden of injury is very high in developing countries. Trauma systems reduce mortality; the trauma registry is a key driver of improvements in trauma care. Developing countries have begun to develop trauma systems but the level of local trauma registry activity is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine a global estimate of trauma registry activity. A structured review of the literature was performed. All abstracts referring to a trauma registry over a two-year period were included. For the trauma registry described in each abstract, the source country was recorded. An additional search of web pages posted over a one year period was conducted. Those linked to an active trauma registry website were included and the country of the trauma registry was recorded. A selection of trauma registries from countries of different levels of development were identified and compared. 571 abstracts were included in the review. Most articles utilised "general" trauma registries (436(76%)) and were based at a single hospital (279(49%)). Other registries were limited to military or paediatric populations (36(6%) and 35(6%) articles respectively). Most articles sourced registries from the US (288(50%)), followed by Australia (45(8%)), Germany (32(6%)), Canada (27(5%)), UK (13(2%)), China (13(2%)) and Israel (12(2%)). The Americas produced most trauma registry articles and South East Asia the least. The majority of trauma registry articles originated from very highly developed countries 467(82%). Least developed countries had the fewest (5(1%)). The additional search yielded 37 web pages linked to 27 different trauma registry websites. Most of these were based in the US (16(59%)). The basic features of trauma registries, such as inclusion criteria, number and type of variables and injury severity scoring, varied widely depending on the country's level of development. This review, using a combination of the number of trauma registry articles and web pages to locate active

  16. Hospital-based acute care after outpatient colonoscopy: implications for quality measurement in the ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Justin P; Burkardt, Deepika D'Cunha; Ranasinghe, Isuru; Gross, Cary P

    2014-09-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers now report immediate hospital transfer rates as a measure of quality. For patients undergoing colonoscopy, this measure may fail to capture adverse events, which occur after discharge yet still require a hospital-based acute care encounter. We conducted this study to estimate rates of immediate hospital transfer and hospital-based acute care following outpatient colonoscopy performed in ambulatory surgery centers. Using state ambulatory surgery databases from the 2009-2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent colonoscopy. Immediate hospital transfer and overall acute health care utilization in the 14 days following colonoscopy was determined from corresponding inpatient, ambulatory surgery, and emergency department databases. To compare rates across centers while accounting for differences in patient populations, we calculated risk-standardized rates using hierarchical generalized linear modeling. The final sample included 1,137,381 colonoscopy discharges from 1019 centers. At the ambulatory surgery center level, the median risk-standardized hospital transfer rate was 0.0% (interquartile range=0.0%), whereas the hospital-based acute care rate was 2.1% (interquartile range=0.6%), with few centers (N=36) having no observed encounters. No correlation was noted between the risk-standardized hospital transfer and hospital-based acute care rates (volume weighted correlation coefficient=0.04, P=0.16). Patients more frequently experience hospital-based acute care encounters after colonoscopy than the need for immediate hospital transfer. Broadening existing quality measures to include hospital-based acute care in the postdischarge period may provide a more complete measure of quality.

  17. Cost-effective management of the hospital-based hospice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, M

    1992-01-01

    As hospital-based hospice programs proliferate across the country, most are under the leadership of a nurse administrator. Nurse administrators must be prepared to manage the many components that constitute the broad scope of this role. Cost-effective management is the greatest challenge. The author explores this management role, including a discussion of hospice-program reimbursement, hospital-based program advantages, options to increase staff productivity, management of drugs and durable medical equipment, inpatient admissions, volunteer services, and fund-raising. Cost-effective measures are explored throughout the discussion, along with a history and explanation of the hospice concept of care.

  18. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...

  19. Protecting Confidentiality in Cancer Registry Data With Geographic Identifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mandi; Reiter, Jerome Phillip; Zhu, Li; Liu, Benmei; Cronin, Kathleen A; Feuer, Eric J Rocky

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program releases research files of cancer registry data. These files include geographic information at the county level, but no finer. Access to finer geography, such as census tract identifiers, would enable richer analyses-for example, examination of health disparities across neighborhoods. To date, tract identifiers have been left off the research files because they could compromise the confidentiality of patients' identities. We present an approach to inclusion of tract identifiers based on multiply imputed, synthetic data. The idea is to build a predictive model of tract locations, given patient and tumor characteristics, and randomly simulate the tract of each patient by sampling from this model. For the predictive model, we use multivariate regression trees fitted to the latitude and longitude of the population centroid of each tract. We implement the approach in the registry data from California. The method results in synthetic data that reproduce a wide range (but not all) of analyses of census tract socioeconomic cancer disparities and have relatively low disclosure risks, which we assess by comparing individual patients' actual and synthetic tract locations. We conclude with a discussion of how synthetic data sets can be used by researchers with cancer registry data. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Trauma registry in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mulat; Munie, Tadios

    2003-07-01

    A simplified trauma registry was tested in Tikur anbessa hospital, with the aim of obtaining preliminary data on the patterns and magnitude of injuries and establishing the basis towards surveillance system. All injured patients presented to the surgical and pediatric emergency department between January 1, 1999 and June 31, 1999 were included. Interns completed the registry forms, which include demographic, injury event specific, severity and outcome data. The severity was assessed by new scoring system, Kampla Trauma Score (KTS). Among the 3822 injured patients 2869(75%) were males and 953(25%) were females and 80% were below the age of 40 years. 77% of the injuries were unintentional and motor vehicle injuries accounted for 41% of all causes among which 93% of them were pedestrians. Accidental fall and interpersonal assault accounted for 21% and 20% respectively. Admitted cases were 11.6%, while 20 (.5%) died at the outpatient department with the overall mortality of 1.47%. Though burn and gunshot accounted only for 6%, the case fatality rate was highest (4%) accounting for 20% of all deaths. The magnitude of fatal injuries is underestimated and the pattern of injuries may only reflect the situation in the big cities. Motor vehicle injuries, especially pedestrian injuries are serious problem in Addis as seen in patients in Tikur Anbessa hospital and require further situational studies and urgent intervention. Establishing hospital based simplified injury surveillance system is possible in Ethiopia and it is essential to asses the magnitude of the problem and identify priority area for injury prevention and control.

  1. Structured physical exercise improves neuropsychiatric symptoms in acute dementia care : a hospital-based RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleiner, Tim; Dauth, Hannah; Gersie, Marleen; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Haussermann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary objective of this trial is to investigate the effects of a short-term exercise program on neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms in acute hospital dementia care. METHODS: Within a hospital-based randomized controlled trial, the intervention group conducted a 2-week exercise

  2. Diversity in the scope and practice of hospital-based midwives in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cronie, D.; Rijnders, M.E.B.; Buitendijk,S.E.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Not all midwives in the Netherlands are independent practitioners. One in 4 midwives registered to practice is employed in the hospital setting, where 67% of all births occur. There has not yet been an in-depth examination of hospital-based midwives' practice in the Netherlands, in the

  3. Clinical course of untreated tonic-clonic seizures in childhood: prospective, hospital based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. van Donselaar (Cees); O.F. Brouwer (Oebele); A.T. Geerts (Ada); W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); H. Stroink (Hans); A.C.B. Peters (Boudewijn)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTo assess declaration and acceleration in the disease process in the initial phase of epilepsy in children with new onset tonic-clonic seizures. STUDY DESIGN: Hospital based follow up study. SETTING: Two university hospitals, a general hospital, and a children's hospital in the

  4. The development of hospital-based palliative care services in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the recent approval of a South African (SA) National Policy Framework and Strategy for Palliative Care by the National Health Council, it is pertinent to reflect on initiatives to develop palliative care services in public hospitals. This article reviews the development of hospital-based palliative care services in the Western ...

  5. Characteristics of Hospital-Based Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Kasahara, Mari; Nakamura, Ayako

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores characteristics of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP) in Japan, a country which provides an egalitarian, low cost, and easy-access health care system. Methods: We sent a questionnaire survey to 11 leading doctors in the child abuse field in Japan, each located in different hospital-based sites. Child abuse doctors…

  6. Profile of HIV infected children: A hospital based study at Eastern Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash Poudel; Rita Pokharel; Mohit Chitlangia; Shipra Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical, laboratory, epidemiological profiles and outcome in human immunodeficiency virus infected Nepalese children. Methods: This was a hospital based prospective study. Human immunodeficiency virusinfected children presenting to pediatric immunology clinic at BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences were enrolled and followed up. Results: Median age at diagnosis among 39 enrolled children was 58 months. All children acquired infection vertically...

  7. The Danish Vascular Registry, Karbase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Cerqueira, Charlotte; de la Motte, Louise; Rathenborg, Lisbet Knudsen; Hansen, Allan K

    2016-01-01

    Aim The Danish Vascular Registry (DVR), Karbase, is monitoring arterial and advanced vein interventions conducted at all vascular departments in Denmark. The main aim of the DVR is to improve the quality of treatment for patients undergoing vascular surgery in Denmark by using the registry for quality assessment and research. Study population All patients undergoing vascular interventions (surgical and endovascular) at any vascular department in Denmark are registered in the DVR. The DVR was initiated in 1989, and each year, ∼9,000 procedures are added. By January 2016, >180,000 procedures have been recorded. Since 2001, data completeness has been >90% (compared to the Danish National Patient Register). Main variables Variables include information on descriptive patient data (ie, age, sex, height, and weight) and comorbidity (ie, previous cardiovascular disease and diabetes). Process variable includes waiting time (time from event to medical contact and treatment) and the type of procedures conducted. Outcome variables for in-hospital complications (ie, wound complications, myocardial infarction, stroke, amputation, respiratory complications, and renal insufficiency) and 30-day patency are submitted. Variables for medical treatment (antithrombotic and statin treatment), amputation, and survival are extracted from nationwide, administrative registers. Conclusion The DVR reports outcome on key indicators for monitoring the quality at all vascular departments in Denmark for the purpose of quality improvement. Furthermore, data are available for research and are being used in international collaborations on changes in clinical practices. PMID:27822118

  8. Cause-specific mortality in adult epilepsy patients from Tyrol, Austria: hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Bauer, Gerhard; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Seppi, Klaus; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating condition with a considerable increase in mortality compared to the general population. Few studies have focused on cause-specific mortality which we analyse in detail in over 4,000 well-characterized epilepsy patients. The cohort comprised of epilepsy patients ≥ 18, treated between 1970 and 2009 at the epilepsy clinic of Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, and living in the province of Tyrol, Austria. Epilepsy diagnosis was based on ILAE guidelines (1989); patients with brain tumor were excluded. Deceased patients and causes of death (ICD-codes) were obtained via record linkage to the national death registry. We computed age-, sex-, and period-adjusted standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 36 diagnoses subgroups in four major groups. Additional analyses were performed for an incidence cohort. Overall cohort: 4,295 patients, 60,649.1 person-years, 822 deaths, overall SMR 1.7 (95 % CI 1.6-1.9), highest elevated cause-specific SMR: congenital anomalies [7.1 (95 % CI 2.3-16.6)], suicide [4.2 (95 % CI 2.0-8.1)], alcohol dependence syndrome [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], malignant neoplasm of esophagus [3.1 (95 % CI 1.2-6.4)], pneumonia [2.7 (95 % CI 1.6-4.2)]. Incidence cohort: 1,299 patients, 14,215.4 person-years, 267 deaths, overall SMR 1.8 (95 % CI 1.6-2.1), highest elevated cause-specific SMR congenital anomalies [10.8 (95 % CI 1.3-39.3)], suicide [6.8 (95 % CI 1.4-19.8)], alcohol dependence syndrome (6.4 [95 % CI 1.8-16.5)], pneumonia [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], cerebrovascular disease at 3.5 (95 % CI 2.6-4.6). Mortality due to mental health problems, such as suicide or alcohol dependence syndrome, malignant neoplasms, and cerebrovascular diseases was highly increased in our study. In addition to aim for seizure freedom, we suggest improving general health promotion, including cessation of smoking, lowering of alcohol intake, and reduction of weight as well as early identification of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy.

  9. Development of a comprehensive hospital-based elder abuse intervention: an initial systematic scoping review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Du Mont

    Full Text Available Elder abuse, a universal human rights problem, is associated with many negative consequences. In most jurisdictions, however, there are no comprehensive hospital-based interventions for elder abuse that address the totality of needs of abused older adults: psychological, physical, legal, and social. As the first step towards the development of such an intervention, we undertook a systematic scoping review.Our primary objective was to systematically extract and synthesize actionable and applicable recommendations for components of a multidisciplinary intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention. A secondary objective was to summarize the characteristics of the responses reviewed, including methods of development and validation.The grey and scholarly literatures were systematically searched, with two independent reviewers conducting the title, abstract and full text screening. Documents were considered eligible for inclusion if they: 1 addressed a response (e.g., an intervention to elder abuse, 2 contained recommendations for responding to abused older adults with potential relevance to a multidisciplinary and intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention; and 3 were available in English.The extracted recommendations for care were collated, coded, categorized into themes, and further reviewed for relevancy to a comprehensive hospital-based response. Characteristics of the responses were summarized using descriptive statistics.649 recommendations were extracted from 68 distinct elder abuse responses, 149 of which were deemed relevant and were categorized into 5 themes: Initial contact; Capacity and consent; Interview with older adult, caregiver, collateral contacts, and/or suspected abuser;physical/forensic, mental, psychosocial, and environmental/functional; and care plan. Only 6 responses had been evaluated, suggesting a significant gap between development and implementation of recommendations.To address the lack of evidence to

  10. Private provider participation in statewide immunization registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Anne E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based registries have been promoted as an effective method to improve childhood immunization rates, yet rates of registry participation in the private sector are low. We sought to describe, through a national overview, the perspectives of childhood immunization providers in private practice regarding factors associated with participation or non-participation in immunization registries. Methods Two mailed surveys, one for 264 private practices identified as registry non-participants and the other for 971 identified as registry participants, from 15 of the 31 states with population-based statewide immunization registries. Frequency distributions were calculated separately for non-participants and participants regarding the physician-reported factors that influenced decisions related to registry participation. Pearson chi-square tests of independence were used to assess associations among categorical variables. Results Overall response rate was 62% (N = 756. Among non-participants, easy access to records of vaccines provided at other sites (N = 101, 68% and printable immunization records (N = 82, 55% were most often cited as "very important" potential benefits of a registry, while the most commonly cited barriers to participation were too much cost/staff time (N = 36, 38% and that the practice has its own system for recording and monitoring immunizations (N = 35, 37%. Among registry participants, most reported using the registry to input data on vaccines administered (N = 326, 87% and to review immunization records of individual patients (N = 302, 81%. A minority reported using it to assess their practice's immunization coverage (N = 110, 29% or generate reminder/recall notices (N = 54, 14%. Few participants reported experiencing "significant" problems with the registry; the most often cited was cost/staff time to use the registry (N = 71, 20%. Conclusion Most registry participants report active participation with few

  11. Southern Saskatchewan Ticagrelor Registry experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani P

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Payam Dehghani,1 Varun Chopra,1 Ali Bell,2 Sheila Kelly,1 Lori Zulyniak,2 Jeff Booker,1 Rodney Zimmermann,1 William Semchuk,2 Asim N Cheema,3 Andrea J Lavoie1 1Prairie Vascular Research Network, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, SK, 2Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region, Regina, SK, 3St Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: As ticagrelor enters into clinical use for acute coronary syndrome, it is ­important to understand patient/physician behavior in terms of appropriate use, adherence, and event rates. Methods: The Saskatchewan Registry is a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort study that identifies consecutive patients started on ticagrelor. We aimed to evaluate both on- and off-label use, identify characteristics of patients who prematurely stop ticagrelor, and describe patient/physician behavior contributing to inappropriate stoppage of this medication. Results: From April 2012 to September 2013, 227 patients were initiated on ticagrelor, with a mean age of 62.2±12.1 years. The participants were 66% men and had a mean follow up of 157.4±111.7 days. Seventy-four patients (32.4% had off-label indications. Forty-seven patients (20.7% prematurely stopped ticagrelor and were more likely to be older, women, nonwhite, present with shock, and complain of dyspnea. Twenty-six of the 47 patients stopped ticagrelor inappropriately because of patient nonadherence (18 patients and physician advice (eight patients. A composite outcome event of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 8.8% of the entire cohort and was more likely to occur in those older then 65 years, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and those who prematurely stopped ticagrelor. Conclusion: In this real-world registry of patients started on ticagrelor, a third have off-label indications and a fifth prematurely stop the medication. Premature discontinuation was an independent predictor of major

  12. The French Pompe registry. Baseline characteristics of a cohort of 126 patients with adult Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforêt, P; Laloui, K; Granger, B; Hamroun, D; Taouagh, N; Hogrel, J-Y; Orlikowski, D; Bouhour, F; Lacour, A; Salort-Campana, E; Penisson-Besnier, I; Sacconi, S; Zagnoli, F; Chapon, F; Eymard, B; Desnuelle, C; Pouget, J

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive muscle lysosomal glycogenosis, characterised by limb-girdle muscle weakness and frequent respiratory involvement. The French Pompe registry was created in 2004 with the initial aim of studying the natural history of French patients with adult Pompe disease. Since the marketing in 2006 of enzyme replacement therapy (alglucosidase alfa, Myozyme(®)), the French Pompe registry has also been used to prospectively gather the biological and clinical follow-up data of all adult patients currently treated in France. This report describes the main clinical and molecular features, at the time of inclusion in the French registry, of 126 patients followed up in 21 hospital-based neuromuscular or metabolic centres. Sixty-five men and 61 women have been included in the registry. Median age at inclusion was 49 years, and the median age at onset of progressive limb weakness was 35 years. Fifty-five percent of the patients were walking without assistance, 24% were using a stick or a walking frame, and 21% were using a wheelchair. Forty-six percent of the patients needed ventilatory assistance, which was non-invasive in 35% of the cases. When performed, muscle biopsies showed specific features of Pompe disease in less than two-thirds of the cases, confirming the importance of acid alpha-glucosidase enzymatic assessment to establish the diagnosis. Molecular analysis detected the common c.-32-13T>G mutation, in at least one allele, in 90% of patients. The French Pompe registry is so far the largest country-based prospective study of patients with Pompe disease, and further analysis will be performed to study the impact of enzyme replacement therapy on the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Service registry design: an information service approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira Pires, Luis; Wang, J.; van Oostrum, Arjen; Wijnhoven, Alphonsus B.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A service registry is a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) component that keeps a ‘catalogue’ of available services. It stores service specifications so that these specifications can be found by potential users. Discussions on the design of service registries currently focus on technical issues,

  14. The Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Caspar; Geisler, Christian Hartmann; Enggaard, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    AIM: In 2008, the Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry was founded within the Danish National Hematology Database. The primary aim of the registry is to assure quality of diagnosis and care of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Denmark. Secondarily, to evaluate...

  15. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at www...

  16. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... be shown where required on labels and markings of containers or cases filled at the wine premises... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon..., bonded wine cellar, or taxpaid wine bottling house. The registry number will be used in all...

  17. Cancer incidence and mortality in Mongolia - National Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandagdorj, Tuvshingerel; Sanjaajamts, Erdenechimeg; Tudev, Undarmaa; Oyunchimeg, Dondov; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Roder, David

    2010-01-01

    The National Cancer Registry of Mongolia began as a hospital-based registry in the early 1960s but then evolved to have a population-wide role. The Registry provides the only cancer data available from Mongolia for international comparison. The descriptive data presented in this report are the first to be submitted on cancer incidence in Mongolia to a peer-reviewed journal. The purpose was to describe cancer incidence and mortality for all invasive cancers collectively, individual primary sites, and particularly leading sites, and consider cancer control opportunities. This study includes data on new cancer cases registered in Mongolia in 2003-2007. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated as mean annual numbers per 100,000 residents. Age-standardized incidence (ASR) and age-standardized mortality (ASMR) rates were calculated from age-specific rates by weighting directly to the World Population standard. Between 2003 and 2007, 17,271 new cases of invasive cancer were recorded (52.2% in males, 47.7% in females). The five leading primary sites in males were liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, and colon/rectum; whereas in females they were liver, cervix, stomach, esophagus and breast. ASRs were lower in females than males for cancers of the liver at 63.0 and 99.1 per 100,000 respectively; cancers of the stomach at 19.1 and 42.1 per 100,000 respectively; and cancers of the lung at 8.3 and 33.2 per 100,000 respectively. Liver cancer was the most common cause of death in each gender, the ASMR being lower for females than males at 60.6 compared with 94.8 per 100,000. In females the next most common sites of cancer death were the stomach and esophagus, whereas in males, they were the stomach and lung. Available data indicate that ASRs of all cancers collectively have increased over the last 20 years. Rates are highest for liver cancer, at about four times the world average. The most common cancers are those with a primary site of liver, stomach and esophagus, for which

  18. The Danish adult diabetes registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Kristensen, Jette K.; Husted, Gitte Reventlov

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database: The aim of the Danish Adult Diabetes Registry (DADR) is to provide data from both the primary health care sector (general practice [GP]) and the secondary sector (specialized outpatient clinics) to assess the quality of treatment given to patients with diabetes. The indicators...... represent process and outcome indicators selected from the literature. Study population: The total diabetes population in Denmark is estimated to be ∼300,000 adult diabetes patients. Approximately 10% have type 1 diabetes, which is managed mainly in the secondary sector, and 90% have type 2 diabetes......, glucose-, blood pressure-, and lipid-lowering treatment (yes/no), insulin pump treatment (yes/ no), and date of last eye and foot examination. Descriptive data: In 2014, the annual report included data regarding over 38,000 patients from outpatient clinics, which is assumed to have included almost all...

  19. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...... antagonist inhibitors, beta-blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist), nonpharmacological therapy (physical training, patient education), 4-week readmission rate, and 1-year mortality. Furthermore, basic patient characteristics and prognostic factors (eg, smoking and alcohol) are recorded...

  20. Windows registry forensics advanced digital forensic analysis of the Windows registry

    CERN Document Server

    Carvey, Harlan

    2011-01-01

    Harlan Carvey brings readers an advanced book on Windows Registry - the most difficult part of Windows to analyze in forensics! Windows Registry Forensics provides the background of the Registry to help develop an understanding of the binary structure of Registry hive files. Approaches to live response and analysis are included, and tools and techniques for postmortem analysis are discussed at length. Tools and techniques will be presented that take the analyst beyond the current use of viewers and into real analysis of data contained in the Registry. This book also has a DVD containing tools, instructions and videos.

  1. Tribal linkage and race data quality for American Indians in a state cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer C; Soliman, Amr S; Tadgerson, Dan; Copeland, Glenn E; Seefeld, David A; Pingatore, Noel L; Haverkate, Rick; Banerjee, Mousumi; Roubidoux, Marilyn A

    2009-06-01

    Racial misclassification of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals as non-AI/AN in cancer registries presents problems for cancer surveillance, research, and public health practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of tribal linkages in enhancing the quality of racial information in state cancer registries. Registry Plus Link Plus 2.0 probabilistic record linkage software was used to link the Michigan state cancer registry data (1985-2004; 1,031,168 cancer cases) to the tribal membership roster (40,340 individuals) in July of 2007. A data set was created containing AI/AN cancer cases identified by the state registry, Indian Health Service (IHS) linkages, and tribal linkage. The differences between these three groups of individuals were compared by distribution of demographic, diagnostic, and county-level characteristics using multilevel analysis (conducted in 2007-2008). From 1995 to 2004, the tribal enrollment file showed linkages to 670 cancer cases (583 individuals) and the tribal linkage led to the identification of 190 AI/AN cancer cases (168 individuals) that were classified as non-AI/AN in the registry. More than 80% of tribal members were reported as non-AI/AN to the registry. Individuals identified by IHS or tribal linkages were different from those reported to be AI/AN in terms of stage at diagnosis, tumor confirmation, and characteristics of the county of diagnosis, including contract health services availability, tribal health services availability, and proportion of AI/AN residents. The data linkage between tribal and state cancer registry data sets improved racial classification validity of AI/AN Michigan cancer cases. Assessing tribal linkages is a simple, noninvasive way to improve the accuracy of state cancer data for AI/AN populations and to generate tribe-specific cancer information.

  2. On Domain Registries and Website Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwemer, Sebastian Felix

    2018-01-01

    The link of lawful domain names to unlawful content is a phenomenon that until recently has not been very topical. Traditionally, domain registries have been off the radar of content-related debates. Enforcement efforts, public discourse and academic research have focused on other intermediaries...... such as Internet access service providers, hosting platforms, and websites that link to content. This article shows that in recent years, however, that the (secondary) liability of domain registries and registrars, and more specifically country code top-level domain registries (ccTLDs) for website content, has...... been tested in several EU Member States. The article investigates tendencies in the national lower-court jurisprudence and explores to what extent the liability exemption regime of the E-Commerce Directive applies to domain registries. The analysis concludes that whereas domain registries fall under...

  3. IVOA Registry Interfaces Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Kevin; Plante, Ray; Auden, Elizabeth; Graham, Matthew; Greene, Gretchen; Hill, Martin; Linde, Tony; Morris, Dave; O`Mullane, Wil; Rixon, Guy; Stébé, Aurélien; Andrews, Kona; Benson, Kevin; Plante, Ray

    2009-11-01

    Registries provide a mechanism with which VO applications can discover and select resources--e.g. data and services--that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. This specification defines the interfaces that support interactions between applications and registries as well as between the registries themselves. It is based on a general, distributed model composed of so-called searchable and publishing registries. The specification has two main components: an interface for searching and an interface for harvesting. All interfaces are defined by a standard Web Service Description Language (WSDL) document; however, harvesting is also supported through the existing Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting, defined as an HTTP REST interface. Finally, this specification details the metadata used to describe registries themselves as resources using an extension of the VOResource metadata schema.

  4. Central registry in psychiatry: A structured review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central registry in psychiatry is being practiced in few countries and has been found useful in research and clinical management. Role of central registry has also expanded over the years. Materials and Methods: All accessible internet database Medline, Scopus, Embase were accessed from 1990 till date. Available data were systematically reviewed in structured manner and analyzed. Results: Central registry was found useful in epidemiological analysis, association studies, outcome studies, comorbidity studies, forensic issue, effective of medication, qualitative analysis etc., Conclusion: Central registry proves to be effective tool in quantitative and qualitative understanding of psychiatry practice. Findings of studies from central registry can be useful in modifying best practice and evidence based treatment in psychiatry.

  5. The Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha-Bang, Caspar; Geisler, Christian Hartmann; Enggaard, Lisbeth; Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; de Nully Brown, Peter; Frederiksen, Henrik; Bergmann, Olav Jonas; Pulczynski, Elisa Jacobsen; Pedersen, Robert Schou; Nielsen, Linda Højberg; Christiansen, Ilse; Niemann, Carsten Utoft

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Danish National Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Registry was founded within the Danish National Hematology Database. The primary aim of the registry is to assure quality of diagnosis and care of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Denmark. Secondarily, to evaluate adherence to national guidelines and to provide source data for research purposes. All patients diagnosed with CLL in Denmark from 2008 onward are included in the registry. Patients are followed in one of nine hematology centers. All centers participate in the registry and are all obliged to collect data. Predefined data are collected at the time of diagnosis, and follow-up at the time of significant events: treatment, progression, transplantation, and death. Parameters included in the International Workshop on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia criteria for diagnosis, and for decision on treatment initiation as well as characteristics included in the CLL International Prognostic Index are collected. To ensure full coverage of Danish CLL patients in the registry, both continuous queries in case of missing data, and cross-referencing with the Danish National Patient Registry are performed. Data from the registry are published in an annual report summarizing the collected data, the overall survival for yearly cohorts, and the degree of data coverage. Per year approximately 450 new patients with CLL are registered in the registry, cumulative as of July 1, 2015, 3,082 patients have been registered. The Danish National CLL Registry is based within the Danish National Hematology Database. The registry covers a cohort of all patients diagnosed with CLL in Denmark since 2008. It forms the basis for quality assessment of CLL treatment in Denmark and offers a unique opportunity for population-based research.

  6. Hospital-based bereavement services following the death of a child: a mixed study review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Leigh A; Wakefield, Claire E; Russell, Vera; Cohn, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    There has been a breadth of research on the grief experience of parents following the death of a child. However, the role and impact of hospital-based bereaved services remain unclear. To identify services offered to bereaved families in perinatal, neonatal, and pediatric hospital settings and summarize the psychosocial impact of these services and published recommendations for best practice hospital-based bereavement care. Systematic review of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method studies guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist and methodological quality appraised in accordance with the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and PsychINFO were searched to find studies describing hospital-based bereavement services/interventions for parents, siblings, and grandparents. In all, 14 qualitative, 6 quantitative, and 10 mixed method studies were identified. Nine descriptive articles were also included. Qualitatively, family members described feeling cared for and supported by staff, a reduction in sense of isolation, and improved coping and personal growth. Quantitatively, bereavement services have most effect for parents experiencing more complex mourning. It is recommended that bereavement services be theoretically driven and evidence based, offer continuity of care prior to and following the death of a child, and provide a range of interventions for the "whole family" and flexibility in service delivery. There is a role for transitional hospital-based services/interventions for families in the lead up to and following the death of a child. Further mixed method research is required to inform best practice bereavement care guidelines in the perinatal, neonatal, and pediatric hospital settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Parental Atopy and Exposure to Pets on Asthma: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Anil C. Mathew; Shaijin Steephen; Renu David; Sudha Ramalingam; Srikanth Krishnamurthy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Studies of parental atopy, exposure to pets, and the risk of asthma have provided conflicting results. We aimed to assess the relationship between asthma among adults with parental atopy, pet keeping inside, and pet keeping outside the home. This study involved a total of 159 adults. The clinically diagnosed cases were 53 adults with asthma as per Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines and 106 controls without asthma. Methods: The study design was a hospital based case-...

  8. Erectile dysfunction among diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia: A hospital-based primary care study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A Al-Turki

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Complete (severe and partial erectile dysfunction was quite common among adult diabetic patients in a hospital-based primary care setting in Saudi Arabia. It is important for primary care physicians to diagnose erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients, and to counsel them early, as most patients are hesitant to discuss their concern during a consultation. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the effect of other risk factors on erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  9. Family caregivers' burden: A hospital based study in 2010 among cancer patients from Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Lukhmana, S; S K Bhasin; Chhabra, P; Bhatia, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A large number of patients with chronic diseases like, cancer are cared for in homes by the family members in India. The vital role that these family members play as “caregivers” is well recognized, however, the burden on them is poorly understood. Aims: To assess burden and to determine the predictors of burden on family caregivers of cancer patients. Setting And Design: A cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted in National Capital Territory of Delhi. Materials And Method...

  10. Parenteral exposure to pesticides and occurence of congenital malformations: hospital-based case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Ueker, Marly Eliane; Silva, Vivianne Monteiro; Moi,Gisele Pedroso; Pignati, Wanderley Antonio; Mattos, Ines Echenique; Silva, Ageo M?rio C?ndido

    2016-01-01

    Background Most fetal defects are associated with genetic and environmental causes, among them, exposure of pregnant women to intensive pesticide use. Agribusiness is the economic basis of the state of Mato Grosso, the largest consumer of pesticides of all Brazilian states. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between past parental exposure to pesticides and the occurrence of congenital malformations in children in Mato Grosso, Brazil. Methods This hospital-based cas...

  11. Benefits of a hospital-based peer intervention program for violently injured youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibru, Daniel; Zahnd, Elaine; Becker, Marla; Bekaert, Nic; Calhoun, Deane; Victorino, Gregory P

    2007-11-01

    Exposure to violence predisposes youths to future violent behavior. Breaking the cycle of violence in inner cities is the primary objective of hospital-based violence intervention and prevention programs. An evaluation was undertaken to determine if a hospital-based, peer intervention program, "Caught in the Crossfire," reduces the risk of criminal justice involvement, decreases hospitalizations from traumatic reinjury, diminishes death from intentional violent trauma, and is cost effective. We designed a retrospective cohort study conducted between January 1998 and June 2003 at a university-based urban trauma center. The duration of followup was 18 months. Patients were 12 to 20 years of age and were hospitalized for intentional violent trauma. The "enrolled" group had a minimum of five interactions with an intervention specialist. The control group was selected from the hospital database by matching age, gender, race or ethnicity, type of injury, and year of admission. All patients came from socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. The total sample size was 154 patients. Participation in the hospital-based peer intervention program lowered the risk of criminal justice involvement (relative risk=0.67; 95% CI, 0.45, 0.99; p=0.04). There was no effect on risks of reinjury and death. Subsequent violent criminal behavior was reduced by 7% (p=0.15). Logistic regression analysis showed age had a confounding effect on the association between program participation and criminal justice involvement (relative risk=0.71; p=0.043). When compared with juvenile detention center costs, the total cost reduction derived from the intervention program annually was $750,000 to $1.5 million. This hospital-based peer intervention program reduces the risk of criminal justice system involvement, is more effective with younger patients, and is cost effective. Any effect on reinjury and death will require a larger sample size and longer followup.

  12. Hospital based patient coordination for ethnic minority patients - a health technology assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    A cross diciplinary, cross specialty, cross sectoral hospital based approach to cultural management of ethnic minority patients is effective in creating more approprite patient flows, better quality of care and increases functional level of patients. Surprisingly the aggregated effect saves...... especially on public medicine expenses and social services. Ethnic minority patients can achieve increased empowerment & Equity in type and quality of hospital care through cross dicplinary cross specialty cultural case management & support between hospital departments and primary sectors...

  13. A qualitative analysis of communication between members of a hospital-based multidisciplinary lung cancer team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, S; Callen, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how patient information is communicated between health professionals within a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team and to identify mechanisms to improve these communications. A qualitative method was employed using semi-structured in-depth interviews with a representative sample (n = 22) of members of a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team including medical, nursing and allied health professionals. Analysis was undertaken using a thematic grounded theory approach to derive key themes to describe communication patterns within the team and how communication could be improved. Two themes with sub-themes were identified: (1) characteristics of communication between team members including the impact of role on direction of communications, and doctors' dominance in communications; and (2) channels of communication including, preference for face-to-face and the suboptimal roles of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting and the hospital medical record as mediums for communication. Traditional influences of role delineation and the dominance of doctors were found to impact on communication within the multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team. Existing guidelines on implementation of multidisciplinary cancer care fail to address barriers to effective team communication. The paper-based medical record does not support team communications and alternative electronic solutions need to be used. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Incidence of Congenital Heart Disease: The 9-Year Experience of the Guangdong Registry of Congenital Heart Disease, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yanji Qu; Xiaoqing Liu; Jian Zhuang; Guanchun Chen; Jinzhuang Mai; Xiaoling Guo; Yanqiu Ou; Jimei Chen; Wei Gong; Xiangmin Gao; Yong Wu; Zhiqiang Nie

    2016-01-01

    There are 16.5 million newborns in China annually. However, the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) has not been evaluated. In 2004, we launched an active province-wide hospital-based CHD registry in the Guangdong Province of southern China. In this study, we examined the incidence of CHD and its subtypes from 2004 to 2012 and compared our findings to the literature. Our results indicate there is an increasing trend of CHD incidence. The increase in incidence occurred mainly for singl...

  15. A systematic review of cardiac rehabilitation registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poffley, Alison; Thomas, Emma; Grace, Sherry L; Neubeck, Lis; Gallagher, Robyn; Niebauer, Josef; O'Neil, Adrienne

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Despite cardiac rehabilitation being recommended in clinical practice guidelines internationally these services are underutilised, programmes are not standardised and quality improvement methods and outcomes are rarely published. National registries are an important strategy to characterise service delivery, quality and outcomes, yet the number, type and components of national cardiac rehabilitation registries have not been reported. Aims To identify and describe national and international cardiac rehabilitation registries, and summarise their key features. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature reporting on cardiac rehabilitation registries at a national and international level. A search of four databases was conducted in July 2016, with two reviewers independently screening titles/abstracts and full texts for inclusion. Data were extracted from included studies, independently checked by a second reviewer and synthesised qualitatively. Results Eleven articles were included in the review comprising seven national registries and one international registry (of 12 European countries) for a total sample of 265,608 patients. Data were most commonly provided to the registry by a web-based application, and included individual-level data (i.e. sociodemographic characteristics, medical history, and clinical measurements). When reported, service-level data most commonly included wait times, programme enrolment and completion. The overarching governance, funding modes (e.g. industry ( n = 2), government ( n = 1)), and incentives for registry participation (e.g. benchmarking, financial reimbursement, or mandatory requirement) varied widely. Conclusion The use of national and international registries for characterising cardiac rehabilitation and providing a benchmark for quality improvement is in its early stages but shows promise for national and global benchmarking.

  16. Development of a neuroscience research registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Laura; Koranne, Rahul

    2014-05-01

    There is little data on the long-term health outcomes of patients with neurological conditions treated at long-term acute care specialty hospitals. In order to learn more about these patients and the most effective way to care for them, Bethesda Hospital in St. Paul created a neuroscience research registry. The registry's target population is patients with complex neurological conditions such as aneurysm or intracranial bleed, stroke, seizures, delirium and confusion and traumatic brain injury. This article describes the development of the registry, which has enrolled 857 patients thus far, and what is being learned about those patients.

  17. [Hoogendoorn and the medical registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Dirk Hoogendoorn (1914-1990) was a solo general practitioner in the village of Wijhe (eastern part of the Netherlands) from 1941, during the time of the German occupation, until 1971. From the very beginning, he combined his practice with the recording of disease patterns. He first concentrated on infectious diseases, especially whooping cough, which was the subject of his doctoral thesis. He later set up registries in two regional hospitals. When his initiative expanded to a national organisation, he became its advisor. He nonetheless continued to produce statistics on a variety of disorders as well as on surgical procedures, even more so after his retirement. The subjects ranged from traffic accidents and tonsillectomies to the discrepancy between increased body height and the unchanging height of the tennis net, but he had the most affinity with the practice of obstetrics. He stirred up much emotion by showing that a decrease in perinatal mortality was proceeding slower in the Netherlands than in other European countries, especially by suggesting a causal relationship between this lag and the high rate of Dutch home deliveries. This debate has continued to this day.

  18. Spinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - spinal cord ... tissue) Myeloma (blood cancer that starts in the plasma cells of the bone marrow) A small number of spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Tumors that start in spinal tissue are ...

  19. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms tumor is a rare type of kidney cancer. It causes a tumor on one or both kidneys. It usually affects ... are at risk should be screened for Wilms tumor every three months until they turn eight. Symptoms ...

  20. Diagnosis and prognosis of brain tumors in clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.S. Gorlia (Thierry)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccording to the Central Brain Registry Of The United States (CBTRUS) statistical report (February 2012) the incidence rate of all primary non malignant and malignant brain and central nervous system tumors is 19.89 cases per 100.000 (11.58 for non-malignant tumors and 7.31 for malignant

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This GIS dataset contains data on power plants, based on the Energy Information Administration's EIA-860 dataset and supplemented with data from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) compiled from various EPA programs.

  2. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): TRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  3. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): BIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  4. Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR) receives and stores information on cancer diagnosis and treatment constraints compiled and sent in by the local...

  5. Linking Medicare, Medicaid, and Cancer Registry Data...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Linking Medicare, Medicaid, and Cancer Registry Data to Study the Burden of Cancers in West Virginia In the United States, the elderly carry an unequal burden of...

  6. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): LANDFILL

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of non-hazardous waste...

  7. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RADINFO

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  8. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste...

  9. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): OIL

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Oil...

  10. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RMP

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  11. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  12. Deployment of the Planetary Data Tool Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, S.; Hughes, J. S.; Joyner, R.; Crichton, D.; Law, E.

    2017-06-01

    The PDS Tool Registry enables search and discovery of tools, services, and APIs for working with data following the PDS standards. Tools and services have been submitted from the broad PDS community and multiple institutions.

  13. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ACRES

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of sites that link to...

  14. EPA Facility Registry System (FRS): NCES

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  15. Validation of defibrillator lead performance registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Elgaard; Larsen, Jacob Moesgaard; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The validity of registry data on defibrillator lead performance is described only sparsely, despite its clinical importance. This study investigated the validity of defibrillator lead performance registry data in a nationwide and population-based registry. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified.......9% (95% CI: 85.2-90.2%) with a κ value of 0.82 (95% CI:0.78-0.86) representing an almost perfect match. CONCLUSION: The validity of data on defibrillator lead performance recorded in the DPIR is excellent for the specific types of lead intervention and good for the specific reasons for defibrillator lead...... intervention. The validity of the less detailed overall reasons for lead interventions commonly used to report lead performance is also excellent. These findings indicate high registry data quality appropriate for scientific analysis and industry-independent post-marketing surveillance....

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): NEI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  17. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ICIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): CAMDBS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  19. Assessing Ontario's Personal Support Worker Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Laporte

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to the growing role of personal support workers (PSWs in the delivery of health care services to Ontarians, the Ontario government has moved forward with the creation of a PSW registry. This registry will be mandatory for all PSWs employed by publicly funded health care employers, and has the stated objectives of better highlighting the work that PSWs do in Ontario, providing a platform for PSWs and employers to more easily access the labour market, and to provide government with information for human resources planning. In this paper we consider the factors that brought the creation of a PSW registry onto the Ontario government’s policy agenda, discuss how the registry is being implemented, and provide an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of this policy change.

  20. Substance Identification Information from EPA's Substance Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Substance Registry Services (SRS) is the authoritative resource for basic information about substances of interest to the U.S. EPA and its state and tribal...

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RBLC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  2. EPA Facility Registry System (FRS): NEPT

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  3. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): NCDB

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  4. Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the registry questionnaire. You may try a different browser, or you may try from a different computer. You may also see this problem if you are in a high security environment where this is disabled by a network ...

  5. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): BRAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  6. Patient registries for substance use disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Tai B; Hu L; Ghitza UE; Sparenborg S; VanVeldhuisen P; Lindblad R

    2014-01-01

    Betty Tai,1 Lian Hu,2 Udi E Ghitza,1 Steven Sparenborg,1 Paul VanVeldhuisen,2 Robert Lindblad2 1Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2The EMMES Corporation, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: This commentary discusses the need for developing patient registries of substance use disorders (SUD) in general medical settings. A patient registry is a tool that documents the natural history of target diseases. Clinicia...

  7. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Parkinson’s Institute Sunnyvale, CA 94085-2934 This registry initiates a program of epidemiological assessments of PS among...Center. Alaska Native; Parkinson’s disease; Registry; Etiology; Epidemiology ; Ascertainment 8 23 June 2012 - 22 June 2013AnnualJuly 2013 ctanner...Investigator 4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and

  8. Definition, epidemiology and registries of pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awdish, R; Cajigas, H

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a subcategory of pulmonary hypertension (PH) that comprises a group of disorders with similar pulmonary vascular pathology. Though PH is common, the estimated incidence of IPAH is 1-3 cases per million, making it a rare disease. The hemodynamic definition of PAH is a mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest >OR = 25 mm Hg in the presence of a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure registries. These registries have been indispensable in the characterization and mapping of the natural history of the disease. Equations and risk calculators derived from registries have given clinicians a basis for risk stratification and prognostication. The sequential accumulation of data since the registries began in the 1980s allows for comparisons to be made. Patients who are differentiated by treatment eras and environments can be contrasted. Variability among inclusion criteria similarly allows for comparisons of these subpopulations. This article provides an overview of available registries, highlights insights provided by each and discusses key issues around the interpretation and extrapolation of data from PAH registries. Registries have allowed us to appreciate the improvement in survival afforded by modern therapy and enhanced detection of this disease. Moving forward, a more global approach to registries is needed, as is enhanced collaboration and centralization.

  9. Incidence of biopsy-proven bone tumors in children - A report based on the dutch pathology registration "PALGA"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Hendrik; Kroon, Herman M.; Slaar, Annelie; Hogendoorn, Pancras

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Data on childhood bone tumors are mainly confined to reports on malignant tumors or on institutional registries. Incidence figures on both benign and malignant bone tumors in childhood are lacking. Methods: From January 1999 to December 2003, 1474 newly diagnosed bone tumors in

  10. Patient registries for substance use disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Betty Tai,1 Lian Hu,2 Udi E Ghitza,1 Steven Sparenborg,1 Paul VanVeldhuisen,2 Robert Lindblad2 1Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2The EMMES Corporation, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: This commentary discusses the need for developing patient registries of substance use disorders (SUD in general medical settings. A patient registry is a tool that documents the natural history of target diseases. Clinicians and researchers use registries to monitor patient comorbidities, care procedures and processes, and treatment effectiveness for the purpose of improving care quality. Enactments of the Affordable Care Act 2010 and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act 2008 open opportunities for many substance users to receive treatment services in general medical settings. An increased number of patients with a wide spectrum of SUD will initially receive services with a chronic disease management approach in primary care. The establishment of computer-based SUD patient registries can be assisted by wide adoption of electronic health record systems. The linkage of SUD patient registries with electronic health record systems can facilitate the advancement of SUD treatment research efforts and improve patient care. Keywords: substance use disorders, primary care, registry, electronic health records, chronic care model

  11. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Grizzle, William E.; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E.

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a “confederation model” that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  12. Etiology and outcome determinants of intracerebral hemorrhage in a south Indian population, A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is paucity of methodologically sound published studies on intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH from India, on pub med/embase search. Aims: To explore etiology of ICH and correlate the causes, location, and size of hemorrhage to clinical outcome. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based descriptive study from South Indian eastern coastal town of Puducherry; 60 consecutive subjects aged > 12 years, predominantly of inbred Tamil population, with head CT evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage not associated with trauma and brain tumors, were recruited. Outcome at three months was measured using Glasgow Outcome scale, NIHSS and mortality. SPSS v 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Commonest etiological factor was hypertension, followed by bleeding diathesis, thrombolysis for myocardial infarction, and cortical vein thrombosis. Most frequent locations of hematoma were basal ganglia, thalamus, internal capsule, and cerebral and cerebellar parenchyma. Hematoma volume correlated significantly with systolic and mean arterial pressure but not with diastolic blood pressure. Poor outcome was correlated to size (P < 0.05 and intraventricular extension of hematoma (P < 0.05, and to systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure, but not to age, gender, smoking, alcoholism, ischemic heart disease, and blood sugar level. Among diabetic patients with ICH, the size of hematoma (P = 0.04 and severity of coma (P = 0.01 at admission were significantly worse compared to the non-diabetic, but not the outcome at three months [Glasgow outcome scale or mortality (P = 0.94 and 0.14]. Conclusions: The location of hemorrhage and correlation with outcome agreed with the patterns described for the non-white races in prior reports. Independence of outcome to diabetic status despite a more severe initial presentation may indicate importance of good care, even in high risk groups.

  13. [Highlights of hospital-based internal medicine in 2010: chief residents' perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Marc; Burnard, Jérôme; Cosma Rochat, Monica; Gabus, Vincent; Micheloud, Valérie Geiser; Gobin, Niels; Laurent, Jean-Christophe; Marino, Laura; Méan, Marie; Merz, Laurent; Regamey, Julien; Stadelmann, Raphaël

    2011-02-02

    Applying knowledge acquired from recent medical studies to patient care poses a daily challenge to physicians. Chief residents from the Department of Internal Medicine at the University Hospital of Lausanne carried out a review of some of the issues they considered important. The conclusions of these various publications may have a significant impact on the daily practice of hospital-based internal medicine. Modern medicine based on scientific studies is a reminder that in spite of the essential importance of clinical experience, it is crucial to confront it with the results of relevant publications from the medical literature.

  14. Risk Factors for Thyroid Cancer: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study in Korean Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Seung-Kwon; Lee, Chan Wha; Lee, Jeonghee; Kim, Jeongseon; Kim, Hyeon Suk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence of thyroid cancer in Korea has rapidly increased over the past decade, few studies have investigated its risk factors. This study examined the risk factors for thyroid cancer in Korean adults. Materials and Methods The study design was a hospital-based case-control study. Between August 2002 and December 2011, a total of 802 thyroid cancer cases out of 34,211 patients screened from the Cancer Screenee. Cohort of the National Cancer Center in South Korea were inc...

  15. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Acharya

    Full Text Available Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs.A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study.The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%, clothes (9.8% and transport (7.3%. For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007, employed house head (p = 0.011, monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees (p = 0.014, private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001, C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001, longer duration (>5days of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001, longer distance (>15km from house to hospital (p = 0.0001 and longer travel time (>240 minutes from house to hospital (p = 0.007 showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs.Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  16. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Jeevan; Kaehler, Nils; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Subedi, Sudarshan; Adhikari, Bipin

    2016-01-01

    Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study. The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar) and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%), clothes (9.8%) and transport (7.3%). For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of "days of work loss" were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007), employed house head (p = 0.011), monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees) (p = 0.014), private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001), C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001), longer duration (>5days) of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001), longer distance (>15km) from house to hospital (p = 0.0001) and longer travel time (>240 minutes) from house to hospital (p = 0.007) showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs). Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time) were associated with hidden costs. Hidden costs can be a

  17. Risk factors for prostate cancer: An hospital-based case-control study from Mumbai, India

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh, B; Saoba, Sushama L.; Sarade, Monika N.; Pinjari, Suvarna V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In India, prostate cancer is one of the five leading sites of cancers among males in all the registries. Very little is known about risk factors for prostate cancer among the Indian population. Objectives: The present study aims to study the association of lifestyle factors like chewing (betel leaf with or without tobacco, pan masala, gutka), smoking (bidi, cigarette), comorbid conditions, diet, body mass index (BMI), family history, vasectomy with prostate cancer. Materials and M...

  18. Risk factors for prostate cancer: An hospital-based case-control study from Mumbai, India

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh, B; Saoba, Sushama L.; Sarade, Monika N.; Pinjari, Suvarna V.

    2011-01-01

    Background : In India, prostate cancer is one of the five leading sites of cancers among males in all the registries. Very little is known about risk factors for prostate cancer among the Indian population. Objectives : The present study aims to study the association of lifestyle factors like chewing (betel leaf with or without tobacco, pan masala, gutka), smoking (bidi, cigarette), comorbid conditions, diet, body mass index (BMI), family history, vasectomy with prostate cancer. Mater...

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Chad; Skoog, Steven

    2008-12-01

    Juvenile granulosa cell tumor is a rare benign neoplasm of the testicular stroma that accounts for 1-5% of all prepubertal testis tumors [Metcalfe PD, Farivar-Mohseni H, Farhat W, McLorie G, Khoury A, Bagli DJ. Pediatric testicular tumors: contemporary incidence and efficacy of testicular preserving surgery. J Urol 2003;170:2412-2416; Ross JH, Rybicki L, Kay R. Clinical behavior and a contemporary management algorithm for prepubertal testis tumors: a summary of the prepubertal testis tumor registry. J Urol 2002;168:1675-1679]. A prior case series retrospectively identified a cystic testis tumor on prenatal ultrasound images which was subsequently diagnosed as a juvenile granulosa cell tumor [Bryan DE, Cain MP, Casale AJ. Juvenile granulosa-theca cell (sex cord-stromal) tumor of the infant testis. J Urol 2003;169:1497-1498]. We report a case of a prenatally diagnosed testis tumor which was subsequently diagnosed as a juvenile granulosa cell tumor.

  20. Feasibility of hospital-based blood banking: a Tanzanian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, B; Mercer, A

    1999-12-01

    The demand for blood transfusion is high in sub-Saharan Africa because of the high prevalence of anaemia and pregnancy related complications, but the practice is estimated to account for 10% of HIV infections in some regions. The main response to this problem by the international donor community is to establish vertically implemented blood transfusion services producing suitable (safe) blood at a cost of US$25-40 per unit. However, the economic sustainability of such interventions is questionable and it is argued here that hospital-based blood transfusion services operating at a basic adequate level are sufficient for low-income African countries. The results of a project aimed at improving such services in Tanzania are presented. The main findings are: (1) the cost per suitable blood unit produced was US$12.4; (2) at an HIV test sensitivity of 93.5% during the study period, discounted financial benefits of the interventions exceeded costs by a factor of between 17.2 and 37.1; (3) the cost per undiscounted year of life saved by use of these interventions was US$2.7-2.8; and (4) safe blood transfusion practices can be assured at an annual cost of US$0.07 per capita. Recommendations are made to ensure safe blood transfusion practices at hospital-based blood banks in Tanzania.

  1. Exploring information systems outsourcing in U.S. hospital-based health care delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Mark L

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the factors associated with outsourcing of information systems (IS) in hospital-based health care delivery systems, and to determine if there is a difference in IS outsourcing activity based on the strategic value of the outsourced functions. IS sourcing behavior is conceptualized as a case of vertical integration. A synthesis of strategic management theory (SMT) and transaction cost economics (TCE) serves as the theoretical framework. The sample consists of 1,365 hospital-based health care delivery systems that own 3,452 hospitals operating in 2004. The findings indicate that neither TCE nor SMT predicted outsourcing better than the other did. The findings also suggest that health care delivery system managers may not be considering significant factors when making sourcing decisions, including the relative strategic value of the functions they are outsourcing. It is consistent with previous literature to suggest that the high cost of IS may be the main factor driving the outsourcing decision.

  2. Contact lens trends over three decades in a hospital-based practice in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rajni; Mahadevan, Rajeswari; Thomas, Ann Mary; Bhattacharjee, Pradipta

    2017-09-26

    Contact lens fittings in a hospital-based practice are different from those in private practices because of specialised conditions. Few studies have been published on material preferences of such wearers, especially in long-term wearers. The aim of this study is to document contact lens prescribing trends in a hospital-based practice among long-term lens wearers and to identify their demographic profile. Subjects reporting to a contact lens clinic of a tertiary eye-care centre in India from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014, with a minimum of five years of lens wear, were included in the study. Data were collected retrospectively from the electronic medical charts of these subjects. Three hundred and sixty subjects were included in the study. The average duration of contact lens wear among the subjects was 9 ± 5 years (range: 5-35 years). The average age of the subjects was 31.38 ± 11.75 years (age range: 5-78 years). Hydrogel material and soft spherical type were preferred by most of the soft lens wearers (53 per cent). Eighty per cent of subjects followed hand hygiene and cleaning regimen practices. The preference for monthly replacement lenses and silicone hydrogel material increased over the years. Regular after-care consultations could enforce the need for compliance with hand hygiene and cleaning regimens among lens wearers. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  3. Students' perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospital-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Shehla Jabbar; Louw, Jakobus Murray; Bac, Martin; Hugo, Jannie; Rauf, Waqar-Un Nisa; Sandars, John Edward

    2016-07-07

    An innovative, three-year training programme, the Bachelor of Clinical Medical Practice (BCMP), for mid-level medical healthcare workers was started in 2009 by the Department of Family Medicine, University of Pretoria. To measure the students' perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospitalbased training. Training of students took place at clinical learning centres in rural district hospitals in the Mpumalanga and Gauteng provinces. A survey using the MedEd IQ questionnaire was performed in 2010 and 2011 to measure BCMP second- and third-year students' perceptions of instructional quality of district hospital-based training. The MedEd IQ questionnaire is composed of four subscales: preceptor activities, learning opportunities, learner involvement and the learning environment. Composite scores of instructional quality were used to present results. The preceptor activities, learning opportunities and the learning environment were considered by second- and third-year BCMP students to be of consistently high instructional quality. In the area of learner involvement, instructional quality increased significantly from second to third year. Overall, instructional quality of district hospital-based training was high for both second- and third-year BCMP students, and the instructional quality of learner involvement being significantly higher in third year students. The MedEd IQ tool was a useful tool for measuring instructional quality and to inform programme quality improvement.

  4. Activities of private clinic- or hospital-based occupational physicians in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Jiro; Sakuragi, Sonoko; Takeda, Kazuo; Mori, Youichi; Muto, Takashi; Higashi, Toshiaki; Ohashi, Fumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The present study was initiated to examine the activities of private clinic- or hospital-based occupational physicians (OPs) and to identify difficulties the OPs encountered in their occupational health service (OHS). A questionnaire was sent by mail to 557 OPs in Kyoto prefecture, Japan. Effective answers were obtained from 86 OPs who were private practitioners or physicians in hospitals and served as OPs on a part-time basis. Considering 3 h as a unit, a majority (92%) served general health examination and its follow-up, prevention of overwork, and mental health care, as well as support of workers on sick leave to return to work. OPs wished to allocate more time for maintenance and management of work and the work environment, mental health care, work area rounding, and attendance at the safety and health committee meetings. Difficulties were encountered most often in the management of mental ill health and overwork, and support of employees' return to work. Many OPs also reported difficulties with industrial hygiene-related issues such as risk assessment, and maintenance and management of work and the work environment. The present survey identified difficulties that were frequently encountered by private clinic- and hospital-based OPs in their practice of OHS; these include issues on mental health, overwork and industrial hygiene. The needs to offering OPs specific opportunities to gain information and skills in these areas are stressed.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of a Low-Cost, Hospital-Based Primary Care Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Agee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the cost-effectiveness of an insurance administration-free, hospital-based clinic designed to provide a full array of primary care services to low-income individuals at little or no cost. In addition to low/no-cost visits, individuals have the option to purchase a low-cost health insurance plan similar to any traditional health plan (eg, prescriptions, primary care, specialty care, durable medical equipment, radiology, laboratory test results. We used 3 years of data (2009-2012 on emergency department (ED visits and inpatient hospital admissions from clinic patients and patients at the community’s 2 largest private physician groups to assess the cost-effectiveness of the hospital-based clinic in terms of ED and inpatient admission costs avoided and financial sustainability of the low-cost insurance plan. Estimated annual savings in hospital inpatient and ED costs were approximately 1.4 million. Insurance plan data indicated sound fiscal sustainability with modest provider reimbursement growth and zero annual premium growth.

  6. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. A registry on a specific impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Topp, M

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the commonest disabling impairment in childhood, with a prevalence of 2-3 per 1000 live births. The Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry is a research registry that contains cases of CP from birth year 1925 and has estimated the birth prevalence since 1950. Data on children with ...

  7. Linked Registries: Connecting Rare Diseases Patient Registries through a Semantic Web Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sernadela, Pedro; González-Castro, Lorena; Carta, Claudio; van der Horst, Eelke; Lopes, Pedro; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Thompson, Mark; Thompson, Rachel; Queralt-Rosinach, Núria; Lopez, Estrella; Wood, Libby; Robertson, Agata; Lamanna, Claudia; Gilling, Mette; Orth, Michael; Merino-Martinez, Roxana; Posada, Manuel; Taruscio, Domenica; Lochmüller, Hanns; Robinson, Peter; Roos, Marco; Oliveira, José Luís

    2017-01-01

    Patient registries are an essential tool to increase current knowledge regarding rare diseases. Understanding these data is a vital step to improve patient treatments and to create the most adequate tools for personalized medicine. However, the growing number of disease-specific patient registries brings also new technical challenges. Usually, these systems are developed as closed data silos, with independent formats and models, lacking comprehensive mechanisms to enable data sharing. To tackle these challenges, we developed a Semantic Web based solution that allows connecting distributed and heterogeneous registries, enabling the federation of knowledge between multiple independent environments. This semantic layer creates a holistic view over a set of anonymised registries, supporting semantic data representation, integrated access, and querying. The implemented system gave us the opportunity to answer challenging questions across disperse rare disease patient registries. The interconnection between those registries using Semantic Web technologies benefits our final solution in a way that we can query single or multiple instances according to our needs. The outcome is a unique semantic layer, connecting miscellaneous registries and delivering a lightweight holistic perspective over the wealth of knowledge stemming from linked rare disease patient registries.

  8. Feasibility of a registry of pemphigus in Italy: two years experience. Gruppo Italiano Studi Epidemiologici in Dermatologia (GISED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, L; Bertoni, M; Cainelli, T

    1993-06-01

    There are still unanswered questions about optimal treatment strategies and long-term prognosis of pemphigus. The Italian Group for Epidemiologic Research in Dermatology (GISED) started to register pemphigus in March 1990. The registry is hospital-based, covering newly diagnosed cases referred to 33 dermatologic centers in the north and the middle-south of Italy. Serum samples were collected at the time of diagnosis, for centralized storage. In the period between March 1990 and December 1991, 110 cases were collected, with 105 retained. Median age at diagnosis was 54, and the man to woman ratio was 0.7. The median lag of diagnosis was 4 months. Seventy-four of 79 patients with pemphigus vulgaris/vegetans and 24 of the 26 with pemphigus erythematosus/foliaceus were given corticosteroid treatment. A hospital-based registry is feasible and provides useful information about both clinical aspects and management of pemphigus, serving as a basis for developing ad hoc research programs (e.g., formal epidemiologic studies and clinical research).

  9. Systematic Review of Cerebral Palsy Registries/Surveillance Groups: Relationships between Registry Characteristics and Knowledge Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Donna S; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J; Pavone, Larissa; Mutlu, Akmer; Dewald, Julius PA; Msall, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide a comprehensive summary of the body of research disseminated by Cerebral Palsy (CP) registries and surveillance programs from January 2009 through May 2014 in order to describe the influence their results have on our overall understanding of CP. Secondly, registries/surveillance programs and the work they produced were evaluated and grouped using standardized definitions and classification systems. Method A systematic review search in PubMed, CINAH and Embase for original articles published from 1 January 2009 to 20 May 2014 originating from or supported by population based CP registries and surveillance programs or population based national registries including CP were included. Articles were grouped by 2009 World CP Registry Congress aim, registry/surveillance program classification, geographical region, and the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) domain. Registry variables were assessed using the ICF-CY classification. Results Literature searches returned 177 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The majority (69%) of registry/surveillance program productivity was related to contributions as a Resource for CP Research. Prevention (23%) and Surveillance (22%) articles were other areas of achievement, but fewer articles were published in the areas of Planning (17%) and Raising the Profile of CP (2%). There was a range of registry/surveillance program classifications contributing to this productivity, and representation from multiple areas of the globe, although most of the articles originated in Europe, Australia, and Canada. The domains of the ICF that were primarily covered included body structures and function at the early stages of life. Encouragingly, a variety of CP registry/surveillance program initiatives included additional ICF domains of participation and environmental and personal factors. Interpretation CP registries and surveillance programs, including novel non-traditional ones

  10. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... examined the content, data quality, and research potential of the WDHR-CCTR. METHODS: We retrieved 2008-2012 data to examine the 1) content; 2) completeness of procedure registration using the Danish National Patient Registry as reference; 3) completeness of variable registration comparing observed vs...... expected numbers; and 4) positive predictive values as well as negative predictive values of 19 main patient and procedure variables. RESULTS: By December 31, 2012, almost 22,000 cardiac CTs with up to 40 variables for each procedure have been registered. Of these, 87% were coronary CT angiography...

  11. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... was established in January 2000 by the Danish Acute Leukemia Group and has been expanded over the years. It includes adult AML patients diagnosed in Denmark since 2000, ALL patients diagnosed since 2005, and MDS patients diagnosed since 2010. The coverage of leukemia patients exceeds 99%, and the coverage of MDS...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  12. Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Leede, E. M.; Sibinga Mulder, B. G.; Bastiaannet, E.

    2016-01-01

    Care, is a platform aiming to harmonize cancer data collection and improve cancer care by feedback. After the prior launch of the projects on colorectal, breast and upper GI cancer, EURECCA's newest project is collecting data on pancreatic cancer in several European countries. Methods National cancer...... registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between...... data. Conclusions A list of 25 shared items on pancreatic cancer coming from eleven participating registries was created, providing a basis for future prospective data collection in pancreatic cancer treatment internationally....

  13. Hospital-based shootings in the United States: 2000 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelen, Gabor D; Catlett, Christina L; Kubit, Joshua G; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang

    2012-12-01

    Workplace violence in health care settings is a frequent occurrence. Emergency departments (EDs) are considered particularly vulnerable. Gunfire in hospitals is of particular concern; however, information about such workplace violence is limited. Therefore, we characterize US hospital-based shootings from 2000 to 2011. Using LexisNexis, Google, Netscape, PubMed, and ScienceDirect, we searched reports for acute care hospital shooting events in the United States for 2000 through 2011. All hospital-based shootings with at least 1 injured victim were analyzed. Of 9,360 search "hits," 154 hospital-related shootings were identified, 91 (59%) inside the hospital and 63 (41%) outside on hospital grounds. Shootings occurred in 40 states, with 235 injured or dead victims. Perpetrators were overwhelmingly men (91%) but represented all adult age groups. The ED environs were the most common site (29%), followed by the parking lot (23%) and patient rooms (19%). Most events involved a determined shooter with a strong motive as defined by grudge (27%), suicide (21%), "euthanizing" an ill relative (14%), and prisoner escape (11%). Ambient society violence (9%) and mentally unstable patients (4%) were comparatively infrequent. The most common victim was the perpetrator (45%). Hospital employees composed 20% of victims; physician (3%) and nurse (5%) victims were relatively infrequent. Event characteristics that distinguished the ED from other sites included younger perpetrator, more likely in custody, and unlikely to have a personal relationship with the victim (ill relative, grudge, coworker). In 23% of shootings within the ED, the weapon was a security officer's gun taken by the perpetrator. Case fatality inside the hospital was much lower in the ED setting (19%) than other sites (73%). Although it is likely that not every hospital-based shooting was identified, such events are relatively rare compared with other forms of workplace violence. The unpredictable nature of this type of

  14. Establishing an institutional therapeutic apheresis registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Steven A; McCleskey, Brandi; Marques, Marisa B; Adamski, Jill

    2016-12-01

    Apheresis was first performed as a therapeutic procedure in the 1950s. The first national therapeutic apheresis (TA) registry was established in Canada in 1981 and other national registries followed, including two attempts at establishing an international TA registry. There is no national registry in the United States. Our large, academic, tertiary hospital has a very active TA service. We created a TA database to track all procedures performed by the apheresis service by transferring data from paper appointment logs and the electronic medical records into a Microsoft Access database. Retrospective data from each TA procedure performed at UAB from January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2012 were entered, including the type of procedure, indication, date, and patient demographics. Microsoft Excel was used for data analysis. During the 10-year period, our TA service treated 1,060 patients and performed 11,718 procedures. Of these patients, 70% received therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), 21% received extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP), 4.5% received red cell exchange (RCE), 4.2% received leukocytapheresis, and 0.6% underwent platelet depletion. Among the procedures, 54% were TPEs, 44% were ECPs, 1.3% were RCEs, 0.5% were leukocytaphereses, and 0.1% were platelet depletions. According to the current literature, national and international TA use is underreported. We believe that the UAB TA registry provides useful information about TA practices in our region and can serve as a model for other institutions. Furthermore, data from multiple institutional registries can be used for clinical research to increase the available evidence for the role of TA in various conditions. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:516-522, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We......-CCTR, showed that coronary CT angiographies accounted for only 23% of all nonregistered cardiac CTs, indicating >90% completeness of coronary CT angiographies in the WDHR-CCTR. The completeness of individual variables varied substantially (range: 0%-100%), but was >85% for more than 70% of all variables. Using......, making it a valuable tool for clinical epidemiological research....

  16. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypothalamic glioma; Hypothalamus - tumor ... The exact cause of hypothalamic tumors is not known. It is likely that they result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. In children, ...

  17. A web-based, patient driven registry for Angelman syndrome: the global Angelman syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Kathryn R; Tones, Megan; Simons, Chloe; Heussler, Helen; Hunter, Adam A; Cross, Meagan; Bellgard, Matthew I

    2017-08-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterised by severe global developmental delays, ataxia, loss of speech, epilepsy, sleep disorders, and a happy disposition. There is currently no cure for AS, though several pharmaceutical companies are anticipating drug trials for new therapies to treat AS. The Foundation for Angelman Therapeutics (FAST) Australia therefore identified a need for a global AS patient registry to identify patients for recruitment for clinical trials.The Global AS Registry was deployed in September 2016 utilising the Rare Disease Registry Framework, an open-source tool that enables the efficient creation and management of patient registries. The Global AS Registry is web-based and allows parents and guardians worldwide to register, provide informed consent, and enter data on individuals with AS. 286 patients have registered in the first 8 months since deployment.We demonstrate the successful deployment of the first patient-driven global registry for AS. The data generated from the Global AS Registry will be crucial in identifying patients suitable for clinical trials and in informing research that will identify treatments for AS, and ultimately improve the lives of individuals and their families living with AS.

  18. Hospital-based patient education programs and the role of the hospital librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C L

    1978-04-01

    This paper examines current advances in hospital-based patient education, and delineates the role of the hospital librarian in these programs. Recently, programs of planned patient education have been recognized by health care personnel and the public as being an integral part of health care delivery. Various key elements, including legislative action, the advent of audiovisual technology, and rising health care costs have contributed to the development of patient education programs in hospitals. As responsible members of the hospital organization, hospital librarians should contribute their expertise to patient education programs. They are uniquely trained with skills in providing information on other health education programs; in assembling, cataloging, and managing collections of patient education materials; and in providing documentation of their use. In order to demonstrate the full range of their skills and to contribute to patient care, education, and research, hospital librarians should actively participate in programs of planned patient education.

  19. The prevalence of pterygium in Al-Khobar: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerman M Alqahtani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the epidemiology of pterygium in a hospital-based population in Al-Khobar, which is located in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, non-randomized, and consecutive case study. Out of 88,666 patients who were seen in the ophthalmology clinic between January 1995 through the end of December 2010, 116 patients were diagnosed with advanced pterygium. The medical records of these patients were evaluated. Results: The overall prevalence of pterygium was found to be 0.074%. There was no significant difference by either gender, side, or by laterality (P > 0.05. A significant increase was noticed in the prevalence of pterygium with increasing age and nasal location (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The overall prevalence rate of pterygium in Al-Khobar is low when compared with results reported from other areas of the world.

  20. A Multidisciplinary Hospital-based Antimicrobial Use Program: Impact on Hospital Pharmacy Expenditures and Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Salama

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors’ hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour.

  1. Guiding principles for good practices in hospital-based health technology assessment units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Lach, Krzysztof; Pasternack, Iris

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Health technology assessment (HTA) carried out for policy decision making has well-established principles unlike hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA), which differs from the former in the context characteristics and ways of operation. This study proposes principles for good practices in HB......-HTA units. METHODS: A framework for good practice criteria was built inspired by the EFQM excellence business model and information from six literature reviews, 107 face-to-face interviews, forty case studies, large-scale survey, focus group, Delphi survey, as well as local and international validation....... In total, 385 people from twenty countries have participated in defining the principles for good practices in HB-HTA units. RESULTS: Fifteen guiding principles for good practices in HB-HTA units are grouped in four dimensions. Dimension 1 deals with principles of the assessment process aimed at providing...

  2. Perceptions of a hospital-based animal assisted intervention program: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Cai, Yun; Richards, Elizabeth; Cline, Krista; O'Haire, Marguerite E

    2016-11-01

    Research has shown that there are multiple benefits of animal assisted interventions for patients. However, the impact of interaction with these animals in staff is understudied, particularly in the acute care setting, and is thus a novel contribution to the literature on human-animal interaction. The purpose of this qualitative pilot study was to contribute to the body of knowledge surrounding the experiences and perceptions of hospital staff who have participated in a hospital-based animal assisted intervention program. Nine face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted (4 staff nurses, 3 support staff members, and 2 hospital volunteers). Five themes emerged from the respondent interviews: (1) descriptions of the therapy dogs; (2) contacts with the dogs at work; (3) connection with the dogs outside of work; (4) benefits; (5) drawbacks. Our findings reflect abundantly positive hospital staff experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The hospital-based adoption process: a primer for perinatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kerri J; Brandon, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    Although the number of women who relinquish their infants is declining, it is estimated that over 52,000 young women pursue an adoption plan every year. Perinatal nurses practicing in any facet of perinatal care may provide care for a woman implementing an adoption plan for her infant. The provision of care may include interaction with the birthfather, prospective adoptive parents, hospital social worker, and adoption agency or adoption attorney as part of the hospital-based adoption experience. Understanding infant adoption, including the history of adoption in the United States, birthfathers' rights, and knowledge of adoption resources provides nurses with essential information that will allow them to provide appropriate, sensitive, nonjudgmental care to all persons involved in the adoption process.

  4. Self-efficacy and postpartum depression teaching behaviors of hospital-based perinatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, M Cynthia; Foltz, Melissa Pinto; Scheetz, James; Myers, John A

    2010-01-01

    Based upon the Self-Efficacy Theory, this study examined the relationship between self-efficacy, self-efficacy-related variables, and postpartum depression teaching behaviors of hospital-based perinatal nurses. Findings revealed that teaching new mothers about postpartum depression is related to a perinatal nurse's self-efficacy in postpartum-depression teaching, self-esteem, and the following self-efficacy-related variables: social persuasion (supervisor's expectations for teaching); mastery (postpartum depression continuing education and teaching experience); and vicarious experience (observing other nurses teach new mothers about postpartum depression). Teaching new mothers about postpartum depression can assist mothers in overcoming barriers to depression treatment. Nurse educators and managers play an important role in encouraging postpartum depression education for perinatal nurses.

  5. The Boston Children's Hospital Academy: Development and Initial Assessment of a Hospital-Based Teaching Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Holly C; McCarty, Caitlin; Millson, Rebecca; Jiang, Hungyu; Armstrong, Elizabeth; Leichtner, Alan M

    2016-01-12

    Medical education academies play an important role in the recognition and career advancement of educators. However, hospital-based clinical faculty have unique professional development needs that may not be met by medical-school-based academies. The Boston Children's Hospital Academy was founded in 2008 to serve the needs of its clinician-educators. It was open to junior faculty scholars and to senior faculty scholars and mentors, including interprofessional educators. To maintain membership, individuals must propose and work toward an education project or serve as a project mentor. In 2012, a survey was sent to all members, and annual project reports were reviewed to assess the academy's impact. Sixty-five members completed the survey. The majority agreed that the academy created a community of educators, provided opportunities for networking and scholarship, contributed to their personal identity as an educator, and led to recognition by their chief. Projects addressed curriculum development, faculty development, learner assessment, program assessment, and resource development. They largely focused on graduate medical education and on patient safety and quality. During their tenure in the academy (mean length of membership = 2.4 years), members produced an average of 4.4 education presentations and 1.9 education publications, and 11 members were promoted. A hospital-based academy provides opportunities for interprofessional faculty development. Next steps include increasing interprofessional membership, wider dissemination of members' successes, better integration with the hospital's mission, specifically regarding graduate medical education and patient safety, and additional evaluation of the academy's impact on project completion and members' accomplishments.

  6. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving areas in hospitals in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiro, Keneth; Wallis, Lee; Ogwang, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Limited health service resources must be used in a manner which does "the most for the most". This is partly achieved through the use of a triage system. Whereas efforts have been made to introduce paediatric triage in Uganda such as Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment Plus (ETAT+), it is not clear if hospitals have local protocols for adult triage being used in each setting. To determine the presence of existing hospital triage systems, the cadre of staff undertaking triage and barriers to development/improvement of formal triage systems. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Acholi sub-region was randomly selected for the study among the three sub-regions in Northern Uganda. The study was conducted in 6 of the 7 hospitals in the region. It was a written self-administered questionnaire. Thirty-three participants from 6 hospitals consented and participated in the study. Only one hospital (16.7%) of the 6 hospitals surveyed had a formal hospital-based adult triage protocol in place. Only 2 (33.3%) hospitals had an allocated emergency department, the rest receive emergency patients/perform triage from OPD and wards. Lack of training, variation of triage protocols from hospital to another, shortage of staff on duty, absence of national guidelines on triage and poor administrative support were the major barriers to improvement/development of formal triage in all these hospitals. Formal adult hospital-based triage is widely lacking in Northern Uganda and staff do perform subjective "eyeball" judgments to make triage decisions.

  7. Costs of Providing Infusion Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Hospital-based Infusion Center Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Jordana; Ogden, Kristine; Nickman, Nancy; Halpern, Michael T; Cifaldi, Mary; Ganguli, Arijit; Bao, Yanjun; Garg, Vishvas

    2017-08-01

    Many hospital-based infusion centers treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with intravenous biologic agents, yet may have a limited understanding of the overall costs of infusion in this setting. The purposes of this study were to conduct a microcosting analysis from a hospital perspective and to develop a model using an activity-based costing approach for estimating costs associated with the provision of hospital-based infusion services (preparation, administration, and follow-up) in the United States for maintenance treatment of moderate to severe RA. A spreadsheet-based model was developed. Inputs included hourly wages, time spent providing care, supply/overhead costs, laboratory testing, infusion center size, and practice pattern information. Base-case values were derived from data from surveys, published studies, standard cost sources, and expert opinion. Costs are presented in year-2017 US dollars. The base case modeled a hospital infusion center serving patients with RA treated with abatacept, tocilizumab, infliximab, or rituximab. Estimated overall costs of infusions per patient per year were $36,663 (rituximab), $36,821 (tocilizumab), $44,973 (infliximab), and $46,532 (abatacept). Of all therapies, the biologic agents represented the greatest share of overall costs, ranging from 87% to $91% of overall costs per year. Excluding infusion drug costs, labor accounted for 53% to 57% of infusion costs. Biologic agents represented the highest single cost associated with RA infusion care; however, personnel, supplies, and overhead costs also contributed substantially to overall costs (8%-16%). This model may provide a helpful and adaptable framework for use by hospitals in informing decision making about services offered and their associated financial implications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SCM: a practical tool to implement hospital-based syndromic surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chuchu; Li, Zhongjie; Fu, Yifei; Lan, Yajia; Zhu, Weiping; Zhou, Dinglun; Zhang, Honglong; Lai, Shengjie; Buckeridge, David L; Sun, Qiao; Yang, Weizhong

    2016-06-18

    Syndromic surveillance has been widely used for the early warning of infectious disease outbreaks, especially in mass gatherings, but the collection of electronic data on symptoms in hospitals is one of the fundamental challenges that must be overcome during operating a syndromic surveillance system. The objective of our study is to describe and evaluate the implementation of a symptom-clicking-module (SCM) as a part of the enhanced hospital-based syndromic surveillance during the 41st World Exposition in Shanghai, China, 2010. The SCM, including 25 targeted symptoms, was embedded in the sentinels' Hospital Information Systems (HIS). The clinicians used SCM to record these information of all the visiting patients, and data were collated and transmitted automatically in daily batches. The symptoms were categorized into seven targeted syndromes using pre-defined criteria, and statistical algorithms were applied to detect temporal aberrations in the data series. SCM was deployed successfully in each sentinel hospital and was operated during the 184-day surveillance period. A total of 1,730,797 patient encounters were recorded by SCM, and 6.1 % (105,352 visits) met the criteria of the seven targeted syndromes. Acute respiratory and gastrointestinal syndromes were reported most frequently, accounted for 92.1 % of reports in all syndromes, and the aggregated time-series presented an obvious day-of-week variation over the study period. In total, 191 aberration signals were triggered, and none of them were identified as outbreaks after verification and field investigation. SCM has acted as a practical tool for recording symptoms in the hospital-based enhanced syndromic surveillance system during the 41st World Exposition in Shanghai, in the context of without a preexisting electronic tool to collect syndromic data in the HIS of the sentinel hospitals.

  9. Burden of traumatic injuries in Saudi Arabia: lessons from a major trauma registry in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghnam, Suliman; Alkelya, Muhamad; Al-Bedah, Khalid; Al-Enazi, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia (SA), injuries are the second leading cause of death; however, little is known about their frequencies and outcomes. Trauma registries play a major role in measuring the burden on population health. This study aims to describe the population of the only hospital-based trauma registry in the country and highlight challenges and potential opportunities to improve trauma data collection and research in SA. Using data between 2001 and 2010, this retrospective study included patients from a large trauma center in Riyadh, SA. A staff nurse utilized a structured checklist to gather information on patients' demographic, physiologic, anatomic, and outcome variables. Basic descriptive statistics by age group ( 14 years) were calculated, and differences were assessed using student t and chi-square tests. In addition, the mechanism of injury and the frequency of missing data were evaluated. 10 847 patients from the trauma registry were included. Over 9% of all patients died either before or after being treated at the hospital. Patients who were older than 14 years of age (more likely to be male) sustained traffic-related injuries and died in the hospital as compared to patients who were younger than or equal to years of age. Deceased patients were severely injured as measured by injury severity score and Glasgow Coma Scale (P < .001). Overall, the most frequent type of injury was related to traffic (52.0%), followed by falls (23.4%). Missing values were mostly prevalent in traffic-related variables, such as seatbelt use (70.2%). This registry is a key step toward addressing the burden of injuries in SA. Improved injury classification using the International Classification of Disease-external cause codes may improve the quality of the registry and allow comparison with other populations. Most importantly, injury prevention in SA requires further investment in data collection and research to improve outcomes.

  10. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  11. Odontogenic Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    TAHSİNOĞLU, Melih

    2013-01-01

    DefinitionThe neoplasms that consist of the cells considered specialized for odontogenesis, and their product (dentin, enamel, cementum) are called odontogenic tumors.ClassificationTo initiate odontogenesis, epithelium is a must. Same rule holds for the odontogenic tumors: without odontogenic epithelium, odontogenic tumors cannot be, without the induction of odontogenic epithelium odontogenic mesenchyme cannot develop.

  12. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  13. The economic characteristics of registries and their policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Luke B

    2009-02-01

    The discipline of economics supplies principles that may contribute to the discourse about investments in trauma registries and the role of the public sector, as well as the optimal use of the datasets those investments create. Principles from production economics, information economics, and public economics are employed to explore the reasons that trauma registries may be prone to underfunding, relative to their value, and to describe a threat to value maximization. The typical production activities and cost structures of registries are analyzed, along with the way registries generate social benefits. Assuming that the purpose of a trauma registry is to maximize the value or social good it creates, a number of investment, governance, and pricing principles are then proposed. Trauma registries are multiproduct enterprises. They are generally characterized by large and indivisible fixed, joint costs, and relatively low marginal costs. This implies that registries are subject to strong economies of scale and scope. Additionally, because registry data are not depleted by use, the registry's output is, technically, nonrival in consumption. The value created by registries may be maximized when a marginal-cost pricing policy is adopted. This means that the optimal price schedule for access to trauma registry data are likely to be zero, or close to zero, for some users. The economic principles presented here complement the contributions from other disciplines in discussions about the establishment of new registries or about improving some aspects of existing registries.

  14. Hospital-based home care for children with cancer: a qualitative exploration of family members' experiences in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, H; Kjaergaard, H; Schmiegelow, K; Hallström, I

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to describe the experiences of a hospital-based home care programme in the families of children with cancer. Fourteen parents, representing 10 families, were interviewed about their experiences of a hospital-based home care programme during a 4-month period in 2009 at a university hospital in Denmark. Five children participated in all or part of the interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings indicate that hospital-based home care enabled the families to remain intact throughout the course of treatment, as it decreased the strain on the family and the ill child, maintained normality and an ordinary everyday life and fulfilled the need for safety and security. According to family members of children with cancer, hospital-based home care support enhanced their quality of life during the child's cancer trajectory. Our study highlights the importance of providing hospital-based home care with consideration for the family members' need for the sense of security achieved by home care by experienced paediatric oncology nurses and regular contact with the doctor. In future studies, interviews with children and siblings could be an important source of information for planning and delivering care suited to the families' perceived needs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  16. [Short-term prognosis of transient ischemic attacks. Mexican multicenter stroke registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Antonio; Cantú, Carlos; Ruiz-Sandoval, José Luis; Villarreal-Careaga, Jorge; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Murillo-Bonilla, Luis; Fernández, José Antonio; Torres, Bertha; León, Carolina; Rodríguez-Leyva, Idelfonso; Rangel-Guerra, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    There are no data on Mexican population referring to frequency and prognosis of transient ischemic attacks (TIA). The purpose of the present study was to: (1) estimate the prevalence, vascular risk factors and short-term outcome in patients with TIA included in the first Mexican registry of cerebrovascular disease, and (2) analyze the acute care provided in these patients. This national registry of cerebrovascular diseases is a multicenter, observational, and hospital-based registry that was conducted from November 2002 to October 2004. The registry was developed to improve our knowledge in Mexico regarding risk factors profile, outcome, current diagnostic and treatment strategies, and short-term follow-up in patients with acute cerebral ischemia. Standardized data assessment was used by all centers which included information on demographics, pre-hospital events (including stroke onset and arrival to hospital), emergency department triage and workup. Short-term outcome was evaluated at day 30. Of this registry, TIA cases were selected and associated risk factors, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment were analyzed. During the study time period, 2,000 patients were enrolled; 97 (5%) with diagnosis of TIA; 51 women and 46 men, mean age 69.3 +/- 11.4 years. Among these 97 patients; 51 (52.6%) were admitted to the hospital for evaluation. The main risk factors were; age > or = 65 years in 74%, hypertension in 64%, diabetes in 45%, and dislipidemia in 36% and obesity in 31%. The affected arterial territory was carotid TIA in 74% and vertebrobasilar in 26%. TIA was attributed to atherosclerosis in 63% of the patients, cardioembolism in 17%, and small vessels disease in 5%. At 30 days follow-up; three patients died during the initial evaluation (two secondary to cardiac arrhythmia, and one secondary to pneumonia). Among 14 of the 94 survivors (14.9%) we documented an early stroke recurrence, including cerebral infarction in nine patients (9.6%) and new TIA in

  17. The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Marie; Ibfelt, Else Helene; Stauffer Larsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry (DCMR) is a population-based clinical quality database, introduced to evaluate diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic myeloid malignancies. The aim is to monitor the clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital...

  18. Costing Tool for International Cancer Registries

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-21

    A health economist at CDC talks about a new tool for estimating how much it costs to run cancer registries in developing countries.  Created: 11/21/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/21/2016.

  19. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten; Pedersen, Robert Schou; Rønnov-Jessen, Dorthe; Pedersen, Per Troellund; Dufva, Inge Høgh; Marcher, Claus Werenberg; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Friis, Lone Smidstrup

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The registry was established in January 2000 by the Danish Acute Leukemia Group and has been expanded over the years. It includes adult AML patients diagnosed in Denmark since 2000, ALL patients diagnosed since 2005, and MDS patients diagnosed since 2010. The coverage of leukemia patients exceeds 99%, and the coverage of MDS patients is currently 90%. Approximately, 250 AML patients, 25 ALL patients, and 230 MDS patients are registered in the DNLR every year. In January 2015, the registry included detailed patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment characteristics, and outcome data on more than 3,500 AML, 300 ALL, and 1,100 MDS patients. Many of the included prognostic variables have been found to be of high quality including positive predictive values and completeness exceeding 90%. These variables have been used in prognostic observational studies in the last few years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have been found to be high. In recent years, the DNLR has shown to be an important high-quality resource for clinical prognostic research.

  20. An active registry for bioinformatics web services.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettifer, S.; Thorne, D.; McDermott, P.; Attwood, T.; Baran, J.; Bryne, J.C.; Hupponen, T.; Mowbray, D.; Vriend, G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY: The EMBRACE Registry is a web portal that collects and monitors web services according to test scripts provided by the their administrators. Users are able to search for, rank and annotate services, enabling them to select the most appropriate working service for inclusion in their

  1. An international registry for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Claudius; Lablans, Martin; Ataian, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder leading to chronic upper and lower airway disease. Fundamental data on epidemiology, clinical presentation, course and treatment strategies are lacking in PCD. We have established an international PCD registry to realise an u...

  2. The Savant Syndrome Registry: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffert, Darold A; Rebedew, David L

    2015-08-01

    A registry has been established to document certain characteristics on a sizeable worldwide sample of individuals with savant syndrome, a rare but remarkable condition in which persons with developmental disabilities, brain injury, or brain disease have some spectacular "islands" of skill or ability that stand in jarring, marked contrast to overall handicap. Of the 319 savants included in the registry, 90% are congenital savants, while 10% are acquired savants. The registry includes individuals from 33 countries, with 70% from the United States or Canada. Sex distribution was 79% male vs. 21% female (4:1). This report summarizes the findings in the congenital savant syndrome category of the registry. Among the individuals with congenital savant syndrome, the most common underlying disability was Autistic Spectrum Disorder (75%); various other central nervous system (CNS) disorders were present in the other 25%. Fifty-five percent possessed a single special skill, while 45% had multiple skills. Music was the most frequent principal skill followed by art, memory, mathematics, calendar calculating, language, visual-spatial/mechanical, athletic, computer, extrasensory perception, and other skills.

  3. [History of the cancer registry in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-López, Aldo; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    A cancer registry is to record the data which let us to know the epidemiology of neoplasm, but led us take a decision in medical policy about this health problem that benefit patients. In this paper we did a brief historical review about models and attempts for having a cancer registry in Mexico. However, since 1940 "the fight against cancer" was declared, we have not had a confident cancer registry today validated and built with data from whole the country. In 1982, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was created. The design and validation of a registration card in four hospitals were the main results. In 1988, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was reinforced with a computerized system for facilitation the data capture. In 1994, it was signed the first interinstitutional agreement that led to Registro Histopatol6gico de Neoplasias Malignas. In 1996, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social established a cancer registry in children in Mexico with the intention to have data from this population.

  4. [Cardiomyopathy and ion channel diseases registry: the Szeged CardioGen Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazsó, Péter; Kákonyi, Kornél; Forster, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert

    2017-01-01

    The Szeged cardiomyopathy and ion channel diseases registry aims to establish a representative disease-specific registry based on the recruitment of patients with different cardiomyopathies and ion channel diseases followed at the Cardiology Center, University of Szeged. The registry collects patient data on the main forms of primary cardiomyopathies (hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, arrhythmogenic right ventricular, left ventricular non-compact, tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy) and ion channel diseases (long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia). Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (388 patients) make up the largest group of patients in the registry. Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (310 patients) and patients with the long QT syndrome (111 patients) form two other sizable groups. Analyzed data of the group of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy indicate similar figures with regard to disease related mortality and morbidity and clinical parameters. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(3), 101-105.

  5. Clinical Case Registries: simultaneous local and national disease registries for population quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Lisa I; Gavrilov, Sergey; Loomis, Timothy P; Halloran, James P; Phillips, Barbara R; Belperio, Pamela S; Mole, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a system-wide, patient-centric electronic medical record system (EMR) within which the authors developed the Clinical Case Registries (CCR) to support population-centric delivery and evaluation of VA medical care. To date, the authors have applied the CCR to populations with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Local components use diagnosis codes and laboratory test results to identify patients who may have HIV or HCV and support queries on local care delivery with customizable reports. For each patient in a local registry, key EMR data are transferred via HL7 messaging to a single national registry. From 128 local registry systems, over 60,000 and 320,000 veterans in VA care have been identified as having HIV and HCV, respectively, and entered in the national database. Local and national reports covering demographics, resource usage, quality of care metrics and medication safety issues have been generated.

  6. Iranian Joint Registry(Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Aslani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education.

  7. Differences in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry Compared with Western Registries

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Doo Sun; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2017-01-01

    The Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) is the first nationwide registry that reflects current therapeutic approaches and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) management in Korea. The results of the KAMIR demonstrated different risk factors and responses to medical and interventional treatments. The results indicated that the incidence of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was relatively high, and that the prevalence of dyslipidemia was relatively low with higher triglycer...

  8. Hospital-based home care for people with severe mental illness in Taiwan: a substantive grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan-Yi; Lin, Mei-Jue; Yang, Tuz-Ching; Sun, Fan-Ko

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to generate a substantive theory of hospital-based home care for people with severe mental illness in Taiwan. Despite the documented advantages of hospital-based home care services, there is a lack of information and understanding regarding the practices, functions and limitations. Currently, there is no model for how those services are to be provided and what factors will affect these services. The grounded theory method of Strauss and Corbin (Basics of Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techniques, SAGE Publications, 1990) was used to develop a substantive theory through a paradigm model, including causal conditions, context, intervening conditions, action/interaction strategies and consequences. This study was conducted in six different hospital areas in Central Taiwan in 2007-2008. Data were collected using semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Constant comparative analysis continued during the open, axial and selective coding process until data saturation occurred. Participants were selected by theoretical sampling. When theoretical saturation was achieved, 21 clients with mental illness, 19 carers and 25 professionals were interviewed. A substantive theory of hospital-based home care for people with severe mental illness in Taiwan was developed. The core category was the process of hospital-based home care in helping people with severe mental illness, with 15 categories and 33 sub-categories of the substantive theory. The substantive theory is the first to emerge from hospital-based home care services in Taiwan. Results showed those services had several effective functions for helping people with severe mental illness and their families. The recommendations based on the findings of this research can be used as a guide to improve the delivery of hospital-based home care services to community-dwelling people with severe mental illness and their carers.

  9. Arizona Alzheimer's Registry: Strategy and Outcomes of a Statewide Research Recruitment Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, K T; Langbaum, J B; Holt, C J; Chen, W; High, N; Langlois, C; Sabbagh, M; Tariot, P N

    2014-09-01

    The Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium (AAC) created the Arizona Alzheimer's Registry, a screening and referral process for people interested in participating in Alzheimer's disease related research. The goals of the Registry were to increase awareness of Alzheimer's disease research and accelerate enrollment into AAC research studies. Participation was by open invitation to adults 18 and older. Those interested provided consent and completed a written questionnaire. A subset of Registrants underwent an initial telephone cognitive assessment. Referral to AAC sites was based on medical history, telephone cognitive assessment, and research interests. A total of 1257 people consented and 1182 underwent an initial cognitive screening. Earned media (38.7%) was the most effective recruitment strategy. Participants had a mean age of 68.1 (SD 10.6), 97% were Caucasian, had 15.2 (SD 2.7) mean years of education, and 60% were female. 30% reported a family history of dementia and 70% normal cognition. Inter-rater agreement between self-reported memory status and the initial telephone cognitive assessment had a kappa of 0.31-0.43. 301 were referred to AAC sites. IThe Registry created an infrastructure and process to screen and refer a high volume of eager Registrants. These methods were found to be effective at prescreening individuals for studies, which facilitated AAC research recruitment. The established infrastructure and experiences gained from the Registry have served as the prototype for the web-based Alzheimer's Prevention Registry, a national registry focusing on Alzheimer's disease prevention research.

  10. Nordic registry-based cohort studies: Possibilities and pitfalls when combining Nordic registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret-Ouda, John; Tao, Wenjing; Wahlin, Karl; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-07-01

    All five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) have nationwide registries with similar data structure and validity, as well as personal identity numbers enabling linkage between registries. These resources provide opportunities for medical research that is based on large registry-based cohort studies with long and complete follow-up. This review describes practical aspects, opportunities and challenges encountered when setting up all-Nordic registry-based cohort studies. Relevant articles describing registries often used for medical research in the Nordic countries were retrieved. Further, our experiences of conducting this type of study, including planning, acquiring permissions, data retrieval and data cleaning and handling, and the possibilities and challenges we have encountered are described. Combining data from the Nordic countries makes it possible to create large and powerful cohorts. The main challenges include obtaining all permissions within each country, usually in the local language, and retrieving the data. These challenges emphasise the importance of having experienced collaborators within each country. Following the acquisition of data, data management requires the understanding of the differences between the variables to be used in the various countries. A concern is the long time required between initiation and completion. Nationwide Nordic registries can be combined into cohorts with high validity and statistical power, but the considerable expertise, workload and time required to complete such cohorts should not be underestimated.

  11. 42 CFR 483.156 - Registry of nurse aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry of nurse aides. 483.156 Section 483.156... That Must Be Met by States and State Agencies: Nurse Aide Training and Competency Evaluation, and Paid Feeding Assistants § 483.156 Registry of nurse aides. (a) Establishment of registry. The State must...

  12. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Registry of data users. 995.21 Section 995.21 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving NOAA...

  13. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists and...

  14. The effects of real-time telemedicine consultations between hospital based nursing and severe COPD patients discharged after exacerbation admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Sorknæs, Anne Dichmann; Madsen, H.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of daily real-time teleconsultations for one week between hospital-based nurses specialised in respiratory diseases and patients with severe COPD discharged after acute exacerbation. Patients admitted with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease...... or mean number of readmission days with AECOPD calculated at 4, 8, 12 and 26 weeks. Thus the addition of one week of teleconsultations between hospital-based nurses and patients with severe COPD discharged after hospitalisation did not significantly reduce readmissions or affect mortality....

  15. Renal Cancer Patients with Unknown Ethnicity in Cancer Registry Data: Comparisons to Patients with Known Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Butts, Elizabeth; Rockswold, Paul D; Shriver, Craig D; Zhu, Kangmin

    2015-01-01

    Information on ethnicity is important for health disparity research and health service planning. However, information on ethnicity is often incomplete in large routine databases such as cancer registries. This study aimed to compare survival status and other characteristics between cancer patients with and without information on Hispanic ethnicity in cancer registry data. The study included 2,426 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed between 1988 and 2004 and identified from the US Department of Defense (DoD)'s Automated Central Tumor Registry (ACTUR) database. There were 1,353 non-Hispanic patients, 134 Hispanic patients, and 939 patients with unknown ethnicity. Patients were followed through death, date of last contact, or censored on December 31, 2007. Patients with unknown ethnicity exhibited significantly shorter survival than non-Hispanic or Hispanic patients (Log Rank P ethnicity, patients with unknown ethnicity were more likely to have advanced tumor stage at diagnosis and more likely to have missing information on tumor grade, size, and some demographic characteristics. After adjustment for demographic, tumor and treatment variables, patients with unknown ethnicity still exhibited significantly higher mortality than non-Hispanic patients (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69; 95% CI, 1.48-1.92), while Hispanic patients were not different from non-Hispanic patients (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.71-1.28). The shorter survival in the unknown ethnicity group was consistently observed in subgroups by age, race, stage, grade, and surgical treatment, suggesting factors other than those investigated in the current study may play a role in the survival differences between patients with and without information on Hispanic ethnicity. The poor survival of patients with unknown ethnicity in ACTUR warrants further research to elucidate missing mechanisms. Improvement in collection of data by reaching out for more engagement of patients, clinicians and registrars and

  16. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Binod Kumar; Verma, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. There were 178 (84%) males and 34 (16%) females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%), 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe tattooing and consequences of tattooing.

  17. Evaluation of Current Knowledge, Awareness and Practice of Spirometry among Hospital -based Nigerian Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is a cost-effective diagnostic tool for evaluation of lung function and for case-finding in a resource-limited setting. The acceptance of this test depends on the awareness of its indications and the ability to interpret the results. No studies have assessed the knowledge of spirometry among Nigerian doctors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current knowledge, awareness and practice of spirometry among hospital-based Nigerian doctors. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional survey among 321 doctors working in Nigerian hospitals between March 2008 and June 2008. Information on knowledge, awareness, practice of and barriers to spirometry were obtained using a pre-tested, self-administered structured questionnaire and the data were then analysed. Results Of the 321 doctors that participated, 108 (33.6%) reported that they have good knowledge of spirometry. One hundred and ninety-five (60.7%) were aware of the importance of spirometry in aiding the diagnosis of respiratory diseases; 213(66.4%) were aware of the importance of spirometry in determining the severity of diseases. Medical school was the most common source of knowledge on spirometry (64.5%). Eighty-one (25.2%) doctors reported having a spirometer in their hospitals. Doctors having access to a spirometer used it more frequently for aiding the diagnosis of COPD (40.7% vs.27.5%) and for monitoring of asthma (18.5% vs.11.3%) than those without access to a spirometer. The doctors working in University Teaching Hospitals and Federal Medical Centres (FMC) (22.4% vs. 4.5%) and those having access to a spirometer (40.7 vs.11.3%) were very confident of interpreting spirometry results compared to those working in District and General Hospitals and without access to a spirometer. Irrespective of access to a spirometer or the type of hospital they were employed in, doctors reported that unavailability of a spirometer was the greatest barrier to its use (62.5%) followed by lack of awareness

  18. Tattoo practices in north-east India: A hospital-based cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Kumar Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. Results: There were 178 (84% males and 34 (16% females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%, 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. Limitations: It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. Conclusion: The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe

  19. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Binod Kumar; Verma, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. Results: There were 178 (84%) males and 34 (16%) females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%), 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. Limitations: It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. Conclusion: The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe tattooing and

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hospital-based Case Management in Cancer Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Christian N; Vedsted, Peter; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    -based CM on (i) GPs' evaluation of information from the hospital and collaboration with the hospital staff and (ii) patients' contacts with GPs during daytime and out of hours. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial allocated 280 colorectal cancer patients 1:1 to either a control group or CM intervention....... SETTING: Patients were recruited at a Danish surgical department. METHODS: An ad hoc piloted questionnaire was sent to all patients' GPs 30 weeks after patients' recruitment and the responses from the two groups of GPs were compared. Registry data on patients' contacts with general practice during daytime...... and out of hours were collected 9 months after recruitment and the data from the two groups were compared quarterly. RESULTS: CM was associated with an overall tendency towards more positive GP evaluations, which for 3 of 20 items reached statistical significance. Statistically significantly fewer GPs...

  1. Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Adults With Previous Hospital-Based Psychiatric Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Waagstein, Kristine; Winkel, Bo Gregers

    2015-01-01

    hospital contact and was identified using The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. All diagnoses in Danish registries are coded according to ICD-8 or ICD-10. All hospital records were retrieved manually. Results: Among 5,178 deaths, 395 were due to SCD and autopsies were performed on 262 (66......Introduction: Psychiatric patients have premature mortality compared to the general population. The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in psychiatric patients is unknown in a nationwide setting. The aim of this study was to compare nationwide SCD incidence rates in young individuals...... with and without previous psychiatric disease. Method: Nationwide, retrospective cohort study including all deaths in people aged 18–35 years in 2000–2006 in Denmark. The unique Danish death certificates and autopsy reports were used to identify SCD cases. Psychiatric disease was defined as a previous psychiatric...

  2. Odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysomali, Evanthia; Leventis, Minas; Titsinides, Savas; Kyriakopoulos, Vasileios; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to analyze the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors in a Greek population and compare the findings with those reported in the recent literature. Records of the Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Dental School, University of Athens, with histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors (based on the World Health Organization 2005 classification) were reviewed retrospectively from January 1970 to December 2011. A total of 652 cases of odontogenic tumors were reported. Of these, 651 (99.8%) were benign and only 1 (0.2%) was malignant. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor was the most frequent lesion (52.7%), followed by odontoma (18.9%) and ameloblastoma (16.1%). The mean age of patients was 38.0 years with a wide range (2.5-92 years). Odontogenic tumors are rare lesions and appear to show a definite geographic variation. In Athens, Greece, they are presented mainly by the keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and ameloblastoma.

  3. A test of the hypothesis that time to tumor in humans fits the "one-hit" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorvlo, A S; Enslein, K; Salsburg, D

    1980-08-01

    Data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry for 1935-1968 for 14 tumor sites were subjected to formal statistical tests of the hypothesis that the time to tumor has an exponential distribution (and hence is a result of one random "hit"). All of the resulting 270 test statistics rejected the hypothesis.

  4. Towards a national trauma registry for the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barka Ezedin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma is a major health problem in the United Arab Emirates (UAE as well as worldwide. Trauma registries provide large longitudinal databases for analysis and policy improvement. We aim in this paper to report on the development and evolution of a national trauma registry using a staged approach by developing a single-center registry, a two-center registry, and then a multi-center registry. The three registries were established by developing suitable data collection forms, databases, and interfaces to these databases. The first two registries collected data for a finite period of time and the third is underway. The steps taken to establish these registries depend on whether the registry is intended as a single-center or multi-center registry. Findings Several issues arose and were resolved during the development of these registries such as the relational design of the database, whether to use a standalone database management system or a web-based system, and the usability and security of the system. The inclusion of preventive medicine data elements is important in a trauma registry and the focus on road traffic collision data elements is essential in a country such as the UAE. The first two registries provided valuable data which has been analyzed and published. Conclusions The main factors leading to the successful establishment of a multi-center trauma registry are the development of a concise data entry form, development of a user-friendly secure web-based database system, the availability of a computer and Internet connection in each data collection center, funded data entry personnel well trained in extracting medical data from the medical record and entering it into the computer, and experienced personnel in trauma injuries and data analysis to continuously maintain and analyze the registry.

  5. Retrivability in The Danish National Hospital Registry of HIV and hepatitis B and C coinfection diagnoses of patients managed in HIV centers 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, N.; Reinholdt, H.; Omland, L.H.

    2008-01-01

    ,006 (99%) were registered with HIV in DNHR. Of these, 1,888 (93%) were registered in DNHR within one year of their first positive HIV test. A CD4 or = 100,000 copies/ml and being diagnosed after 1 January 2000, were associated with earlier registration in DNHR, both......BACKGROUND: Hospital-based discharge registries are used increasingly for longitudinal epidemiological studies of HIV. We examined completeness of registration of HIV infections and of chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) coinfections in the Danish National Hospital Registry (DNHR......) covering all Danish hospitals. METHODS: The Danish HIV Cohort Study (DHCS) encompasses all HIV-infected patients treated in Danish HIV clinics since 1 January 1995. All 2,033 Danish patients in DHCS diagnosed with HIV-1 during the 10-year period from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004 were included...

  6. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Patients with Psoriasis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Golpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psoriasis is a common, genetically determined inflammatory and proliferative disease of the skin. Psychological stress can exacerbate the disease. This study sought to investigate the depression and anxiety disorders among patients with psoriasis and control group. Method. In this hospital-based case-control study, One hundred patients with psoriasis (case referred to the dermatology department and 100 patients with otolaryngology problems and dermatological healthy volunteers (control who referred to the Otolaryngology Department of Bouali Sina Hospital in Sari, Iran, in 2007 were studied. Demographic characteristics were recorded. Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale I-II were administered to the patients in both groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and descriptive statistical tests. Results. From One-hundred patients in each group, 44 (45% were men. Depression score was 67% and 12% in psoriatic patients and control, respectively. The Beck depression scores of patients with psoriasis were significantly higher than scores of the control group (<0.05. Based on Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, anxiety was found in 45% of patients in case group and 18% of controls. Conclusion. The results revealed that psoriatic patients reported significantly higher degrees of depression and anxiety than controls. In addition, psoriatic women were more depressed than psoriatic men.

  7. Using lean Six Sigma to improve hospital based outpatient imaging satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Angelic P; Kirk, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Within the hospital based imaging department at Methodist Willowbrook, outpatient, inpatient, and emergency patients are all performed on the same equipment with the same staff. The critical nature of the patient is the deciding factor as to who gets done first and in what order procedures are performed. After an aggressive adoption of Intentional Tools, the imaging department was finally able to move from a two year mean Press Ganey, outpatient satisfaction average score of 91.2 and UHC percentile ranking of 37th to a mean average of 92.1 and corresponding UHC ranking of 60th percentile. It was at the 60th percentile ranking that the department flat lined. Using the Six Sigma DMAIC process, opportunity for further improvement was identified. A two week focus pilot was conducted specifically on areas identified through the Six Sigma process. The department was able to jump to 88th percentile ranking and a mean of 93.7. With pay for performance focusing on outpatient satisfaction and a financial incentive to improving and maintaining the highest scores, it was important to know where the imaging department should apply its financial resources to obtain the greatest impact.

  8. Behavior Assessment in Children Following Hospital-Based General Anesthesia versus Office-Based General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaQuia A. Vinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in behavior exist following dental treatment under hospital-based general anesthesia (HBGA or office-based general anesthesia (OBGA in the percentage of patients exhibiting positive behavior and in the mean Frankl scores at recall visits. This retrospective study examined records of a pediatric dental office over a 4 year period. Patients presenting before 48 months of age for an initial exam who were diagnosed with early childhood caries were included in the study. Following an initial exam, patients were treated under HBGA or OBGA. Patients were followed to determine their behavior at 6-, 12- and 18-month recall appointments. Fifty-four patients received treatment under HBGA and 26 were treated under OBGA. OBGA patients were significantly more likely to exhibit positive behavior at the 6- and 12-month recall visits p = 0.038 & p = 0.029. Clinicians should consider future behavior when determining general anesthesia treatment modalities in children with early childhood caries presenting to their office.

  9. A hospital-based study on seroprevalence of leptospirosis among febrile cases in northeastern Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafizah, A A Noor; Aziah, B D; Azwany, Y N; Imran, M Kamarul; Rusli, A Mohamed; Nazri, S Mohd; Nikman, A Mohd; Nabilah, I; Asma', H Siti; Zahiruddin, W M; Zaliha, I

    2013-06-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of leptospirosis among febrile inpatient cases in northeastern Malaysia. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 999 febrile cases admitted to 10 hospitals in northeastern Malaysia. A survey using a proforma sheet was used to obtain sociodemographic and occupational information. Serum samples were screened for leptospirosis by IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test (IgM ELISA) and confirmed by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). There was an equivalent distribution of males and females in the 999 respondents enrolled in the study. The majority were Malay (94.7%) and their mean age was 39.4 (standard deviation 17.6) years. The overall seroprevalence of leptospirosis was 8.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 6.8-10.3) (n=84). The high-risk occupational group was found to have a higher seroprevalence, which was 56% (95% CI 45.3-66.1) (n=47). The predominant serogroup was Sejroe (82.1%, 95% CI 72.6-88.8) (n=69). This study revealed a possible high seroprevalence of leptospirosis among febrile cases, indicating the need to review the importance of adding leptospirosis to the case investigation of febrile illness, especially among high-risk occupational groups in Malaysia, as well as in other endemic countries. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Serological evaluation of leptospirosis in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh: A retrospective hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velineni S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease with humans getting the infection either from rodent hosts or from domestic animals. Urine contaminated environment is the common source of infection. This is an under-reported disease in Andhra Pradesh. We report a retrospective hospital-based study on 55 patients with suspected leptospirosis. Methods : A total of 55 serum samples were collected from patients with suspected leptospirosis and subjected to serological testing by LeptoTek Dri-dot, microscopic agglutination test (MAT and IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Identification of the predominant infecting serotype was done using a panel of 12 serovars. Results: MAT analysis of all the 55 samples identified all cases to be positive. The predominant serogroup was Icterohaemorrhagiae (68% followed by Australis (22%, Autumnalis (8% and Javanica (2%. LeptoTek Dri-dot showed a sensitivity of 96% as compared to MAT. IgM ELISA done on 32 samples showed a sensitivity of 86.7% compared to MAT. Conclusions : MAT helped to identify Icterohemorrhagiae as the predominant serovar in this study. Despite the small number of samples analyzed, the data obtained establishes a need for a prospective study in this region.

  11. Hospital-based surveillance of Japanese encephalitis at a tertiary hospital in Manila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alera, Ma Theresa P; Velasco, John Mark S; Ypil-Cardenas, Charity Ann; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda N; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Gibbons, Robert V; Dimaano, Efren M; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is endemic in the Philippines but the incidence and burden of disease are not well established. We conducted a prospective hospital-based study at San Lazaro Hospital, a tertiary level hospital in Manila, from September 2005 to December 2006. Cases were determined using an in-house dengue and Japanese encephalitis (JE) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in order to detect the proportion of JE cases among the acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) cases admitted to our hospital. Fifteen patients were found to have AES, of whom 6 (40%) had confirmed JE. Of the JE cases, 4 were females and 2 were males with an age range of 3-14 years. Three of the 6 JE cases occurred during July. The most common signs and symptoms on admission among JE cases were: fever, headache, loss of appetite, neck rigidity and altered sensorium. JE likely comprises a significant proportion of hospitalized AES cases among children from Manila and nearby provinces. Further studies on the nation-wide prevalence and distribution of JE in the Philippines are needed to guide health authorities in disease control and prevention strategies.

  12. Regrets associated with providing healthcare: qualitative study of experiences of hospital-based physicians and nurses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine S Courvoisier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regret is an unavoidable corollary of clinical practice. Physicians and nurses perform countless clinical decisions and actions, in a context characterised by time pressure, information overload, complexity and uncertainty. OBJECTIVE: To explore feelings associated with regretted clinical decisions or interventions of hospital-based physicians and nurses and to examine how these regrets are coped with. METHOD: Qualitative study of a volunteer sample of 12 physicians and 13 nurses from Swiss University Hospitals using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis RESULTS: All interviewees reported at least one intense regret, which sometimes led to sleep problems, or taking sickness leave. Respondents also reported an accumulation effect of small and large regrets, which sometimes led to quitting one's unit or choosing another specialty. Respondents used diverse ways of coping with regrets, including changing their practices and seeking support from peers and family but also suppression of thoughts related to the situation and ruminations on the situation. Another coping strategy was acceptance of one's limits and of medicine's limits. Physicians reported that they avoided sharing with close colleagues because they felt they could lose their credibility. CONCLUSIONS: Since regret seems related to both positive and negative consequences, it is important to learn more about regret coping among healthcare providers and to determine whether training in coping strategies could help reduce negative consequences such as sleep problems, absenteeism, or turnover.

  13. [Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: how to proceed to evaluate innovative medical devices?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, N; van den Brink, H; Denies, F; Dervaux, B; Germe, A F; Prognon, P; Pineau, J

    2014-01-01

    Innovative medical devices offer solutions to medical problems and greatly improve patients' outcomes. Like National Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies, hospitals face numerous requests for innovative and costly medical devices. To help local decision-makers, different approaches of hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) have been adopted worldwide. The objective of the present paper is to explore HB-HTA models for adopting innovative medical devices in France and elsewhere. Four different models have been conceptualized: "ambassador" model, "mini-HTA" model, "HTA unit" model and "internal committee". Apparently, "HTA unit" and "internal committee" (or a mixture of both models) are the prevailing HB-HTA models in France. Nevertheless, some weaknesses of these models have been pointed out in previous works. Only few examples involving hospital pharmacists have been found abroad, except in France and in Italy. Finally, the harmonization of the assessment of innovative medical devices in France needs a better understanding of HB-HTA practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Public acceptance of a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine in Aceh, Indonesia: A hospital-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harapan Harapan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the acceptance towards a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine (EVV and associated factors in a non-affected country, Indonesia. Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in four regencies of Aceh, Indonesia. A set of pre-tested questionnaires was used to obtain information on acceptance towards EVV and a range of explanatory variables. Associations between EVV acceptance and explanatory variables were tested using multi-steps logistic regression analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation. Results: Participants who had knowledge on Ebola virus disease (EVD were 45.3% (192/424 and none of the participants achieved 80% correct answers on the knowledge regarding to EVD. About 73% of participants expressed their willingness to receive the EVV. Education attainment, occupation, monthly income, have heard regarding to EVD previously, socioeconomic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were associated significantly with acceptance towards EVV in univariate analysis (P < 0.05. In the final multivariate model, socio-economic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were the independent explanatory variables for EVV acceptance. Conclusions: The knowledge of EVD was low, but this minimally affected the acceptance towards EVV. However, to facilitate optimal uptake of EVV, dissemination of vaccine-related information prior to its introduction is required.

  15. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  16. Maternal correlates of birth weight of newborn: A hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarjeet Kaur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: weight of the baby at birth is considered to be a major determinant of future health and survival of the child. It is one of the important factors which determine the readiness with which the newborn baby adjusts to its surrounding. Many maternal socio-biological factors influence birth weight. Objective: To determine maternal socio-biological factors influencing birth weight of newborn. Methodology: Hospital based cross- sectional study undertaken in Obstetrics and Gynaecology ward of Nehru hospital, Gorakhpur. The study period extended from July 2011 to August 2012. The study subject included recently delivered mothers and data was collected on semi-structured interview schedule to know various socio-biological variables such as mother’s age, parity, inter-pregnancy interval etc, influencing the low birth weight of newborn. Chi-Square test was applied to observe the significance of association.  Results: The overall proportion of low birth weight baby came out to be 32.06%. Out of various socio-biological factors taken the factors which came out to be statistically significant were age of mother, parity, inter-pregnancy interval, SLI, education. The factors which were not statistically significant were father’s education, religion. Conclusions:  It was concluded that teenage pregnancy, non-utilization of antenatal care practices, anaemia, illiteracy are unfavorable predictors of birth weight of newborn babies.

  17. Determination of factors required to increase uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital-based healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, C E; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J; Looijmans-van den Akker, I; Frijstein, G; Van der Geest-Blankert, A D J; Danhof-Pont, M B; De Jager, H J; Bos, A A; Smeets, E; De Vries, M J T; Gallee, P M M; Lenderink, A F; Hak, E

    2011-04-01

    A questionnaire study was performed in all eight University Medical Centers in The Netherlands to determine the predictors of influenza vaccination compliance in hospital-based healthcare workers (HCWs). Demographical, behavioural and organisational determinants were assessed based on behavioural and implementation models. Multivariable regression analysis was applied to assess the independent predictors for influenza vaccine uptake. Age >40 years, the presence of a chronic illness, awareness of personal risk and awareness of risk of infecting patients, trust in the effectiveness of the vaccine to reduce the risk of infecting patients, the HCWs' duty to do no harm and their duty to ensure continuity of care, finding vaccination useful despite the constant flow of visitors and having knowledge of the Health Council's advice, social influence and convenient time for vaccination were all independently associated with vaccine uptake. The accuracy of the prediction model was very high (area under the receiver operating curve: 0.95). Intervention programmes to increase influenza vaccine uptake among HCWs should target the relevant determinants identified in this study. Copyright © 2010 the Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical and Morphological Spectrum of Hydatid disease – A 14 years hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilasma Ghartimagar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Hydatid disease is endemic in sheep and cattle-raising areas world wide. Its prevalence is high in Nepal. The study was carried out to determine the clinical, radiological and pathological presentations of hydatid disease. Method This was a retrospective study of all hydatid disease cases reported in Department of Pathology, from August 1996 to July 2010. All the clinical, radiological and pathological data were collected and collated. Result A total of 51 cases of hydatidosis were studied. Patients presented with related symptoms in 47 cases, 92.16% with CI (84.78,99.54 and asymptomatic in 4 cases, 7.84% with CI (0.46, 15.22. Involvement of liver and lung was found in 35 cases (68.63% and 10 cases (19.61% respectively. Involvement of other organs like kidney, pelvis and broad ligament were seen in 6 of the cases. 29 cases, 56.86% with CI ( 43.2, 70.46 had solitary cyst while rest of the cases had multiloculated cyst. All cases had radiological correlation and histopathological confirmation. Conclusion Most cases presented with organ related vague symptoms, however it should be considered as a differential diagnosis especially in asymptomatic cases and cases with unusual sites. Imaging studies is useful in preoperative diagnosis and postoperative histopathology is confirmatory. A multi centric hospital based study will help to decrease the incidience.

  19. Pattern and prognostic factor of ocular injuries in southwest Ethiopia: a hospital based prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisay Bekele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the pattern, severity, and prognostic factors of ocular injuries in the southwest Ethiopia.METHODS:A prospective hospital based study was done on all patients presented with ocular injury to Jimma University Specialized Hospital from Apr. to Sep. 2009. Each patient underwent a detailed interview and a standard comprehensive ocular examination. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13 and PRESULTS:The overall prevalence of ocular injury was 3.03%. Nearly 99% of ocular injuries were mechanical. The majority of the ocular injuries(53.2%were work-related and none of these patients had eye protection at the time of injury. Out of 170 globe injuries, 57.6% were closed globe injury and 42.4% were open globe injuries. Closed globe injuries were less severe and had significantly better visual outcome than open globe injuries(PPCONCLUSION: Most ocular injuries occurred in the workplace,and a significantly larger proportion of patients with ocular injury developed monocular blindness. For the prevention of serious injuries, eye health education and safety strategies should be applied both at home and work place.

  20. Correlation of Serum Zinc Level with Simple Febrile Seizures: A Hospital based Prospective Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Gattoo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile seizures are one of the most common neurological conditions of childhood. It seems that zinc deficiency is associated with increased risk of febrile seizures.Aim: To estimate the serum Zinc level in children with simple Febrile seizures and to find the correlation between serum zinc level and simple Febrile seizures.Materials and Methods: The proposed study was a hospital based prospective case control study which included infants and children aged between 6 months to 5 years, at Post Graduate Department of Pediatrics, (SMGS Hospital, GMC Jammu, northern India. A total of 200 infants and children fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included. Patients were divided into 100(cases in Group A with simple febrile seizure and 100(controls in Group B of children with acute febrile illness without seizure. All patients were subjected to detailed history and thorough clinical examination followed by relevant investigations.Results: Our study had slight male prepondance of 62% in cases and 58% in controls . Mean serum zinc level in cases was 61.53±15.87 ugm/dl and in controls it was 71.90+18.50 ugm/dl .Serum zinc level was found significantly low in cases of simple febrile seizures as compaired to controls ,with p value of

  1. Family caregivers' burden: A hospital based study in 2010 among cancer patients from Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhmana, S; Bhasin, S K; Chhabra, P; Bhatia, M S

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients with chronic diseases like, cancer are cared for in homes by the family members in India. The vital role that these family members play as "caregivers" is well recognized, however, the burden on them is poorly understood. To assess burden and to determine the predictors of burden on family caregivers of cancer patients. A cross-sectional, hospital based study conducted in National Capital Territory of Delhi. 200 family caregivers of cancer patients were selected by systematic random sampling and interviewed using standard, validated Hindi version of Zarit Burden Interview. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were carried out using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (version 17.0). The study population consisted of 90 (45%) males and 110 (55%) female caregivers aged 18-65 years. 113 (56.5%) caregivers reported no or minimal burden while 75 (37.5%) caregivers reported mild to moderate burden. Using logistic regression marital status, education and type of family of caregivers, occupation of cancer patients and type of treatment facility were found to be the predictors of burden on caregivers. In view of the substantial burden on family caregivers coupled with lack of adequate number of cancer hospitals, there is a public-health imperative to recognize this important group. All levels of health-staff in cancer hospitals in developing countries should be sensitized to the various burdens faced by family caregivers.

  2. Estimates of Hospital Based Emergency Department Visits due to Dental Implant Failures in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2016-06-01

    Objective of the current study is to provide nationally representative estimates of hospital based emergency department (ED) visits attributed to dental implant failures in the United States. The Nationwide Emergency Department sample for the years 2008-2010 was used. All ED visits with a diagnosis of "dental implant failures" were selected for analysis. Patient demographics were examined. Outcomes of interest included disposition status following the ED visit and ED charges. During the study period, a total of 1200 ED visits were due to dental implant failures. Most ED visits with dental implant failures occurred among those aged dental implant occurred in 31.7% of patients while post-osseointegration mechanical failure of dental implant occurred in 30.4% of patients. Following an ED visit, 82.8% were discharged routinely and 13.3% of patients were admitted as in-patients into the same hospital following the ED visit. The mean ED charge per visit was $1167. Highest proportions of these ED visits were comprised of those aged implant failures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sustainability of Endovenous Iron Deficiency Anaemia Treatment: Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment in IBD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, A; Stojanovic, J; Kheiraoui, F; Proli, E M; Scaldaferri, F; Volpe, M; Di Pietro, M L; Gasbarrini, A; Fabrizio, L; Boccia, S; Favaretti, C

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the main extraintestinal manifestation affecting patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The Health Technology Assessment approach was applied to evaluate the sustainability of intravenous (IV) iron formulations in the Italian hospital setting, with particular focus on ferric carboxymaltose. Data on the epidemiology of IBD and associated IDA, in addition to the efficacy and safety of IV iron formulations currently used in Italy, were retrieved from scientific literature. A hospital-based cost-analysis of the outpatient delivery of IV iron treatments was performed. Organizational and ethical implications were discussed. IDA prevalence in IBD patients varies markedly from 9 to 73%. IV iron preparations were proven to have good efficacy and safety profiles, and ferric carboxymaltose provided a fast correction of haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels in iron-deficient patients. Despite a higher price, ferric carboxymaltose would confer a beneficial effect to the hospital, in terms of reduced cost related to individual patient management and additionally to the patient by reducing the number of infusions and admissions to healthcare facilities. Ethically, the evaluation is appropriate due to its efficacy and compliance. This assessment supports the introduction of ferric carboxymaltose in the Italian outpatient setting.

  4. Telehealth coordinators in hospital based telehealth services: Who are they and what do they do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirippulige, Sisira; Armfield, Nigel R; Greenup, Phil; Bryett, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Many studies have identified the importance of 'telehealth coordinators' for successful telehealth implementation and operation. However, little is known about the telehealth coordinators' functions, the skills and competencies required and the reasons for their influence. This study aimed to examine the key functions of telehealth coordinators in the Queensland public health system, their perceptions about their role, and the level of competencies to support this role. All telehealth coordinators within Queensland Health Telehealth Services were invited to complete a questionnaire. We collected: (i) demographic information; (ii) details of their telehealth work; and (iii) information about knowledge and skills relevant to their telehealth coordinator role. Eighteen of 20 (90%) participants completed and submitted the survey. Telehealth coordinators were responsible for a range of tasks relating to telehealth consultations, technical assistance, administration, research, promotion and marketing. Nearly all telehealth coordinators (n = 17, 94%) were confident in carrying out the tasks of their job. The majority of telehealth coordinators (n = 13, 72%) thought education and training relating to telehealth would help improve their job. The top three topics that telehealth coordinators were keen to learn about were: (i) examples of clinical use of telehealth; (ii) types of technologies used; and (iii) telehealth clinical and business models. Our participants were all hospital-based; as the use of telehealth is growing outside of the traditional hospital settings, the role of telehealth coordinators is likely to change. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. The prevalence of trauma and childhood adversity in an urban, hospital-based violence intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Theodore J; Purtle, Jonathan; Rich, Linda J; Rich, John A; Adams, Erica J; Yee, Garrett; Bloom, Sandra L

    2013-08-01

    Hospitals represent a promising locus for preventing recurrent interpersonal violence and its psychological sequella. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to assess the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among victims of interpersonal violence participating in a hospital-based violence intervention program. Participants completed PTSD and ACE screenings four to six weeks after violent injury, and data were exported from a case management database for analysis. Of the 35 program participants who completed the ACE and/or PTSD screenings, 75.0% met full diagnostic criteria for PTSD, with a larger proportion meeting diagnostic criteria for symptom-specific clusters. For the ACE screening, 56.3% reported three or more ACEs, 34.5% reported five or more ACEs, and 18.8% reported seven or more ACEs. The median ACE score was 3.5. These findings underscore the importance of trauma-informed approaches to violence prevention in urban hospitals and have implications for emergency medicine research and policy.

  6. Organochlorine pesticides accumulation and breast cancer: A hospital-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting-Ting; Zuo, An-Jun; Wang, Ji-Gang; Zhao, Peng

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the accumulation status of organochlorine pesticides in breast cancer patients and to explore the relationship between organochlorine pesticides contamination and breast cancer development. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in 56 patients with breast cancer and 46 patients with benign breast disease. We detected the accumulation level of several organochlorine pesticides products (β-hexachlorocyclohexane, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, polychlorinated biphenyls-28, polychlorinated biphenyls-52, pentachlorothioanisole, and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane) in breast adipose tissues of all 102 patients using gas chromatography. Thereafter, we examined the expression status of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), and Ki-67 in 56 breast cancer cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we analyzed the risk of breast cancer in those patients with organochlorine pesticides contamination using a logistic regression model. Our data showed that breast cancer patients suffered high accumulation levels of pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane and polychlorinated biphenyls-52. However, the concentrations of pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane and polychlorinated biphenyls-52 were not related to clinicopathologic parameters of breast cancer. Further logistic regression analysis showed polychlorinated biphenyls-52 and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane were risk factors for breast cancer. Our results provide new evidence on etiology of breast cancer.

  7. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. History, data collection and validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Rasmussen, S; Stenager, E

    2001-01-01

    The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry was formally established in 1956 but started operating in 1949 with a nationwide prevalence survey. Since then, the Registry has continued collecting data on new and old cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) or suspected MS from multiple sources. The Registry...... has formerly been estimated at about 90%, higher for cohorts with older onset and lower for cohorts with onset close to follow-up. The estimated validity of the diagnosis for autopsy cases classified as definite MS in the Registry is 94%. A long-term nationwide Registry has proved to be a valuable...

  8. The Italian Registry of kernicterus and hyperbilirubinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesi, Simone; Dani, Carlo; Raimondi, Francesco; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2012-10-01

    to monitor the incidence of cases of kernicterus and severe hyperbilirubinemia in Italy over time, and to describe each single registered event with sufficient information in order to identify one or more possible failures in the management of jaundice. the Task Force on hyperbilirubinemia of the Italian Society of Neonatology will draw up national guidelines for management of jaundice in the newborn and a national registry of kernicterus and hyperbilirubinemia for newborns with a gestational age greater than 34. the choice of the inclusion criteria for the registry and the minimum information necessary to describe each single event registered are reported and will be discussed at the national congress of the Italian Society of Neonatology next October 2012.

  9. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steinbjørn; Nielsen, Jan; Laursen, René J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively registered data on patients with gliomas since January 2009. The purpose of this study was to describe the establishment of the DNOR and further to evaluate the database...... Pathology Registry. The data validity of important clinical variables was evaluated by a random sample of 100 patients from the DNOR using the medical records as reference. RESULTS: A total of 2241 patients were registered in the DNOR by December 2014 with an overall patient completeness of 92 %, which...... of patient registration was very high (92 %) and the validity of the most important patient data was good. The DNOR is a newly established national database, which is a reliable source for future scientific studies and clinical quality assessments among patients with gliomas....

  10. An active registry for bioinformatics web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifer, S; Thorne, D; McDermott, P; Attwood, T; Baran, J; Bryne, J C; Hupponen, T; Mowbray, D; Vriend, G

    2009-08-15

    The EMBRACE Registry is a web portal that collects and monitors web services according to test scripts provided by the their administrators. Users are able to search for, rank and annotate services, enabling them to select the most appropriate working service for inclusion in their bioinformatics analysis tasks. Web site implemented with PHP, Python, MySQL and Apache, with all major browsers supported. (www.embraceregistry.net).

  11. Development of a PTSD Population Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    experience in design of clinical trials and observational studies, and has published more than 200 articles in peer-review journals. He has served on...Statistics Team Leader at the DCC. She is also currently the Principal Investigator of the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) Data Coordinating...PsycINFO database for articles related to the prevalence, epidemiology, or screening of PTSD among armed forces personnel and veterans. We identified

  12. 77 FR 9665 - Submission for OMB Emergency Review; Comment Request: A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Multi- Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI... Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request... several centers in Asia thereby increasing the cancer burden in these populations, but the causes remain...

  13. 77 FR 56854 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based Case...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the... Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI) (OMB No. 0925-0654). Type of Information... lymphoma overall and specifically for populations in Asia will be examined. Patients from 19 participating...

  14. Parental experiences with a hospital-based bereavement program following the loss of a child to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Levin-Russman, Elyse; Gioiella, Marie Elena; Adams, Jeffrey M

    2017-06-01

    The death of a child from cancer is an intense and life-changing loss for a parent. Guided by the principles of patient- and family-centered care, hospital-based caregivers developed a program to provide bereavement support for parents through phone calls and mailings. The aim of the present qualitative phenomenological study was to understand how parents experienced participating in this bereavement program. A total of eight parents from six families participated in a focus-group evaluation of the two-year hospital-based bereavement program. Two social work clinicians/researchers independently analyzed the transcript of the focus group to define themes. Four themes were identified: (1) lived experience of grief, (2) importance of relationships with the hospital-based team, (3) bereavement support from hospital-based providers, and (4) extending bereavement care. Participants indicated the value of ongoing communication and connection with members of the healthcare team, who were often central to a family's life for years during their child's cancer treatment. Parents also provided suggestions for extending bereavement support through continued contact with providers and informal annual gatherings, as well as through a peer (parent-to-parent) support program.

  15. Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Teams Can Prevent Unnecessary Child Abuse Reports and Out-of-Home Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Gregory H.; Makoroff, Kathi L.; Malott, Heidi A.; Shapiro, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine how often and for what reasons a hospital-based multidisciplinary child abuse team concluded that a report of alleged or suspected child abuse was unnecessary in young children with fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was completed of all children less than 12 months of age who, because of fractures, were referred to…

  16. Policymaking through healthcare registries in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örnerheim, Mattias

    2016-09-04

    Healthcare registries, otherwise known in Sweden as national quality registries (NQRs), have progressed from being a patient-focused system supporting medical results to become the basis of a health policy steering instrument called regional comparisons (RCs). This article seeks to explain RCs as an unintended consequence of the NQR development, by utilizing the concepts of policy entrepreneurs and streams of impact: the problem stream (problem perceived), the policy stream (what is valid), and the political stream (governmental objectives). The empirical contribution lies in insights on how the RCs have developed as an unintended consequence of entrepreneurial deliberate action in the process of creating NQRs. These findings are based on documents, interviews, and previous research in the social sciences. The article also argues for a critical understanding of public knowledge management (PKM) related to experiences in the development of NQRs regarding how to use knowledge in healthcare government. This article highlights how knowledge generated in quality systems based on registries could imply a stronger role for authorities in exerting control over the medical profession. It also discusses the potential use of research evidence on NQRs as a base for more efficient policymaking. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Forensic Analysis of the Windows 7 Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawla Abdulla Alghafli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of digital evidence of crimes from storage media is an increasingly time consuming process as the capacity of the storage media is in a state of constant growth. It is also a difficult and complex task for the forensic investigator to analyse all of the locations in the storage media. These two factors, when combined, may result in a delay in bringing a case to court. The concept of this paper is to start the initial forensic analysis of the storage media in locations that are most likely to contain digital evidence, the Windows Registry. Consequently, the forensic analysis process and the recovery of digital evidence may take less time than would otherwise be required. In this paper, the Registry structure of Windows 7 is discussed together with several elements of information within the Registry of Windows 7 that may be valuable to a forensic investigator. These elements were categorized into five groups which are system, application, networks, attached devices and the history lists. We have discussed the values of identified elements to a forensic investigator. Also, a tool was implemented to perform the function of extracting these elements and presents them in usable form to a forensics investigator.

  18. Pindborg tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Santhosh Kumar Caliaperoumal; Gowri, S.; J.Dinakar

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references.

  19. Pindborg tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar Caliaperoumal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT, also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references.

  20. Pindborg tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S; Dinakar, J

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references.

  1. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parts of the body; most commonly, the lungs, liver, bone, and/or brain. About 10% are stage IV. Stage V: Cancer is found in both kidneys at diagnosis (also called bilateral tumors). About 5% are stage V. Surgery is most often used to treat Wilms tumor. For stages I through IV, a ...

  2. Selection of quality indicators for hospital-based emergency care in Denmark, informed by a modified-Delphi process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Michael Moesmann; Eiset, Andreas Halgreen; Mackenhauer, Julie; Odby, Annette; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Kurland, Lisa; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2016-02-03

    In 2013, Danish policy-makers on a nationwide level decided to set up a national quality of care database for hospital-based emergency care in Denmark including the selection of quality indicators. The aim of the study was to describe the Delphi process that contributed to the selection of quality indicators for a new national database of hospital-based emergency care in Denmark. The process comprised a literature review followed by a modified-Delphi survey process, involving a panel of 54 experts (senior clinicians, researchers and administrators from the emergency area and collaborating specialties). Based on the literature review, we identified 43 potential indicators, of which eight were time-critical conditions. We then consulted the Expert panel in two consecutive rounds. The Expert panel was asked to what extent each indicator would be a good measure of hospital-based emergency care in Denmark. In each round, the Expert panel participants scored each indicator on a Likert scale ranging from one (=disagree completely) through to six (=agree completely). Consensus for a quality indicator was reached if the median was greater than or equal to five (=agree). The Delphi process was followed by final selection by the steering group for the new database. Following round two of the Expert panel, consensus was reached on 32 quality indicators, including three time-critical conditions. Subsequently, the database steering group chose a set of nine quality indicators for the initial version of the national database for hospital-based emergency care. The two-round modified Delphi process contributed to the selection of an initial set of nine quality indicators for a new a national database for hospital-based emergency care in Denmark. Final selection was made by the database steering group informed by the Delphi process.

  3. INTRODUCTION OF INNOVATIVE MEDICAL DEVICES AT FRENCH UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS: AN OVERVIEW OF HOSPITAL-BASED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT INITIATIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Billaux, Mathilde; Borget, Isabelle; Pineau, Judith; Prognon, Patrice; van den Brink, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Local health technology assessment (HTA) to determine whether new health technologies should be adopted is now a common practice in many healthcare organizations worldwide. However, little is known about hospital-based HTA activities in France. The objective of this study was to explore hospital-based HTA activities in French university hospitals and to provide a picture of organizational approaches to the assessment of new and innovative medical devices. Eighteen semi-structured interviews with hospital pharmacists were conducted from October 2012 to April 2013. Six topics were discussed in depth: (i) the nature of the institution concerned; (ii) activities relating to innovative medical devices; (iii) the technology assessment and decision-making process; (iv) the methodology for technology assessment; (v) factors likely to influence decisions and (vi) suggestions for improving the current process. The interview data were coded, collated and analyzed statistically. Three major types of hospital-based HTA processes were identified: medical device committees, innovation committees, and "pharmacy & management" processes. HTA units had been set up to support medical device and innovation committees for technology assessment. Slow decision making was the main limitation to both these committee-based approaches. As an alternative, "pharmacy & management" processes emerged as a means of rapidly obtaining a formal assessment. This study provides an overview of hospital-based HTA initiatives in France. We hope that it will help to promote hospital-based HTA activities in France and discussions about ways to improve and harmonize practices, through the development of national guidelines and/or a French mini-HTA tool, for example.

  4. Cancer patients use hospital-based care until death: a further analysis of the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuse, Jan J; van der Linden, Yvette M; Post, Wendy J; Wanders, Rinus; Gans, Rijk O B; Leer, Jan Willem H; Reyners, Anna K L

    2011-10-01

    To describe health care utilization (HCU) at the end of life in cancer patients. These data are relevant to plan palliative care services, and to develop training programs for involved health care professionals. The Dutch Bone Metastasis Study (DBMS) was a nationwide study proving equal effectiveness of single fraction palliative radiotherapy compared with multiple fractions for painful bone metastases in 1157 patients. The 860 (74%) patients who died during follow-up were included in the current analysis. The main outcome was the frequency of hospital-based (outpatient contact or admission) and/or general practitioner (GP) contact during the last 12 weeks of life. Changes in HCU towards death were related to data on quality of life and pain intensity using a multilevel regression model. Hospital-based HCU was reported in 1801 (63%) returned questionnaires, whereas GP contact was stated in 1246 (43%). In 573 (20%) questionnaires, both types of HCU were reported. In multilevel regression analyses, the frequency of outpatient contacts remained constant during the weeks towards death, whereas the frequency of GP contacts increased. Lower valuation of quality of life was related to both GP- and hospital-based HCU. There was a high consumption of hospital-based HCU in the last 12 weeks of life of cancer patients with bone metastases. Hospital-based HCU did not decrease during the weeks towards death, despite an increase in GP contacts. Future planning of palliative care and training programs should encompass close collaboration between medical specialists and GPs to optimize end-of-life care.

  5. Hospital-based health technology assessment for innovative medical devices in university hospitals and the role of hospital pharmacists: learning from international experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Lelong, Anne-Sophie; Prognon, Patrice; Pineau, Judith

    2013-04-01

    Several models of hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) have been developed worldwide, for the introduction of innovative medical devices and support evidence-based decision making in hospitals. Two such models, the HTA unit and mini-HTA models, are widespread in university hospitals and involve various stakeholders. The purpose of this work was to highlight the potential role of hospital pharmacists in hospital-based HTA activities. We searched for articles, reviews, and letters relating to hospital-based HTA, as defined by the Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment Worldwide Survey published by the Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Society, in the Health Technology Assessment database, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and hospital pharmacy journals. The number of university hospitals performing hospital-based HTA has increased since the 2008 Hospital-Based Health Technology Assessment Worldwide Survey. Our own experience and international findings show that hospital pharmacists already contribute to hospital-based HTA activities and have developed study interpretation skills and a knowledge of medical devices. Promoting multidisciplinary approaches is one of the key success factors in hospital-based HTA. Hospital pharmacists occupy a position between hospital managers, clinicians, health economists, biomedical engineers, and patients and can provide a new perspective. In the future, hospital pharmacists are likely to become increasingly involved in hospital-based HTA activities.

  6. Leydig cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - Leydig cell; Testicular tumor - Leydig; Testicular neoplasm ... The cause of this tumor is unknown. There are no known risk factors for this tumor. Unlike germ cell tumors of the testicles, this tumor ...

  7. Assessment of the prevalence of periodontal diseases and treatment needs: A hospital-based study.

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    Bansal, Monika; Mittal, Neelam; Singh, Tej Bali

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal diseases are the most prevalent oral diseases worldwide especially in developing countries like India. The objective of this cross-sectional survey was to determine the prevalence of periodontal diseases and treatment needs (TNs) in a hospital-based population. Totally, 500 men and women (15-74 years) were recruited and periodontal status of each study subject and sextant was evaluated on the basis of community periodontal index of TNs, and thereafter TN for each subject and sextant was categorized on the basis of the highest code recorded during the examination. A total of 500 subjects (59% males and 41% females) was divided into seven age groups, that is, 15-19, 20-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-74 years and sextants were included from the 486 subjects. Healthy periodontium, bleeding on probing, calculus, shallow pockets, and deep pockets were found in 3.9%, 6.58%, 50.61%, 20.98%, and 17.90% subjects, respectively. Males were more affected with shallow and deep pockets as compared to females. Periodontal diseases in the early stages were more prevalent in the younger age groups, whereas advanced stages were more prevalent in older age groups. 17.90% subjects and 11.48% sextants need complex treatment. About 77.98% subjects and 73.15% sextants require either oral hygiene instructions or oral hygiene instructions and oral prophylaxis. Only 3.9% subjects and 15.36% sextants were healthy and needed no treatment. Periodontal diseases were found to be 96.30% in the study population and the results indicate that majority of the population need primary and secondary level of preventive program to reduce the chances of initiation or progression of periodontal diseases thereby improving their systemic health overall.

  8. Prevalence of snoring and craniofacial features in Malaysian children from hospital-based medical clinic population.

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    Banabilh, Saeed M; Asha'ari, Zamzil Amin; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Ab

    2008-08-01

    Snoring is considered as the most common clinical symptom of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. However, many snoring studies were done in western population, and data from around Asia is scarce. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of snoring among Malaysian children from hospital-based medical clinic population setting and to compare the craniofacial features of children with and without snoring using cephalometric analysis. A cross-sectional study among children aged 7-15 years were carried out in Hospital Kuala Terengganu. Sleep behavior questionnaire (Berlin questionnaire) was given to 500 children. The respondents were divided into snoring and non-snoring groups. Thirty children from each group were randomly selected to undergo a cephalometric X-ray. For each lateral cephalometric radiograph, 17 parameters consisting bony, soft tissue, and angular measurements were recorded using computer software VixWin2000. Independent t test was used to analyze the data. The results indicated that the whole questionnaire respondents were 317 (46 snoring and 271 non-snoring), hence, the prevalence of snoring in our survey population was 14.51%. The cephalometric X-ray showed that the snoring children manifested a significant different craniofacial features, such as narrow airway at the level of the soft palate and oropharynx (p < 0.05), more inferiorly positioned hyoid bone (p < 0.05), longer vertical airway length from posterior nasal spine to the base of epiglottis (p < 0.05), more protruding maxilla, and anterior-posterior discrepancy of maxilla and mandible (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our snorer children exhibit significant craniofacial differences compared to non-snorer groups.

  9. 'Rapid discharge': issues for hospital-based nurses in discharging cancer patients home to die.

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    Tan, Yung Ying; Blackford, Jeanine

    2015-09-01

    To explore issues for hospital-based nurses in arranging rapid home discharge for imminently dying cancer patients in a Singapore acute hospital. Dying at home is an important measure of a 'good death'. For hospitalised terminally ill patients, achieving home death can be of paramount importance to them and their family. Nurses experience many challenges in discharging imminently dying cancer patients home, due to time limitations and complex needs of patients and their families. Qualitative interpretive description. Using purposive sampling, 14 registered nurses from an oncology ward in a Singapore hospital were recruited to participate in individual, semi-structured interviews. Nursing issues in facilitating rapid discharge fell into three categories: time, discharge processes and family preparation. Decisions to die at home appeared solely family/patient driven, and were made when death appeared imminent. Discharge then became time-critical, as nurses needed to complete multiple tasks within short timeframes. Stress was further exacerbated by nurses' inexperience and the infrequent occurrence of rapid discharge, as well as absence of standardised discharge framework for guidance. Together, the lack of time and discharge processes to enable smooth hospital-to-home transition potentially affected nurses' capacity to adequately prepare families, and may contribute to caregiver anxiety. Rapid discharge processes are needed as sudden patient/family decisions to die at home will continue. Earlier involvement of palliative care and implementation of a discharge pathway can potentially help nurses address their multiple responsibilities to ensure a successful transition from hospital to home. Recognition of nursing issues and challenges during rapid discharge has implications for clinical improvements in supporting nurses during this challenging situation. Results of this study can be used to inform the conceptualisation of clinical interventions to facilitate urgent

  10. Development of New Quality Measures for Hospital-Based Care of Suicidal Youth.

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    Parast, Layla; Bardach, Naomi S; Burkhart, Q; Richardson, Laura P; Murphy, J Michael; Gidengil, Courtney A; Britto, Maria T; Elliott, Marc N; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    2017-10-31

    To develop, validate, and test the feasibility of implementation of 4 new quality measures assessing emergency department (ED) and inpatient care for suicidal youth. Four quality measures were developed to assess hospital-based care for suicidal youth. These measures, focused on counseling caregivers about restricting access to lethal means of self-harm and benefits and risks of antidepressant medications, were operationalized into 2 caregiver surveys that assessed ED and inpatient quality, respectively. Survey field tests included caregivers of youth who received inpatient and/or ED care for suicidality at 1 of 2 children's hospitals between July 2013 and June 2014. We examined the feasibility of obtaining measure scores and variation in scores. Multivariate models examined associations between quality measure scores and 4 validation metrics: modified Child Hospital Consumer Assessments of Health Care Providers and Systems, communication composites, hospital readmissions, and ED return visits. Response rates were 35% (ED) and 31% (inpatient). Most caregivers reported receiving counseling to restrict their child's access to lethal means of self-harm (90% in the ED and 96% in the inpatient setting). In the inpatient setting, caregivers reported higher rates of counseling on benefits (95%) of newly prescribed antidepressants than risks (physical adverse effects 85%, increased suicidality 72%). Higher scores on the latter measure were associated with higher nurse (P < .001) and doctor (P < .01) communication composite scores. Measure scores were not associated with readmissions or ED return visits. These new quality measures evaluate key aspects of care for suicidal youth, and they may facilitate assessing quality of care for this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and albuminuria in rural Zambia: a hospital-based survey.

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    Rasmussen, Jon B; Thomsen, Jakúp A; Rossing, Peter; Parkinson, Shelagh; Christensen, Dirk L; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2013-09-01

    To assess albuminuria in rural Zambia among patients with diabetes mellitus only (DM group), hypertension only (HTN group) and patients with combined DM and HTN (DM/HTN group). A cross-sectional survey was conducted at St. Francis Hospital in the Eastern province of Zambia. Albumin-creatinine ratio in one urine sample was used to assess albuminuria. Other information obtained included age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c ), random capillary glucose, time since diagnosis, medication and family history of DM or HTN. A total of 193 participants were included (DM group: n = 33; HTN group: n = 92; DM/HTN group: n = 68). The participants in the DM group used insulin more frequently as diabetes medication than the DM/HTN group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the DM group was younger and had lower BMI, WC and BP than the two other groups. In the DM group, HTN group and DM/HTN group, microalbuminuria was found in 12.1%, 19.6% and 29.4% (P = 0.11), and macroalbuminuria was found in 0.0%, 3.3% and 13.2% (P = 0.014), respectively. The urine albumin (P = 0.014) and albumin-creatinine ratio (P = 0.0006) differed between the three groups. This hospital-based survey in rural Zambia found a lower frequency of albuminuria among the participants than in previous studies of patients with DM or HTN in urban sub-Saharan Africa. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres.

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    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-03-25

    To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors' needs. 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0-60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs' directors' most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were 'somewhat interested' or 'very interested' in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention.

  13. Profile of HIV infected children: A hospital based study at Eastern Nepal

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    Prakash Poudel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinical, laboratory, epidemiological profiles and outcome in human immunodeficiency virus infected Nepalese children. Methods: This was a hospital based prospective study. Human immunodeficiency virusinfected children presenting to pediatric immunology clinic at BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences were enrolled and followed up. Results: Median age at diagnosis among 39 enrolled children was 58 months. All children acquired infection vertically. Unsafe sex (74.4% and intravenous drug use (25.6% were the major risk behaviors in fathers. At presentation, 20.8% children were asymptomatic, 54.0% were malnourished, 41.0% were in WHO clinical stage 1, 17.9% were in stage 4, 74.4% were anemic, 17.9% had thrombocytopenia and median CD4 count was 543. Fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, skin eruptions and oral lesions were common presenting features (16.2%, 16.2%, 13.5%, 10.8%, and 8.1% respectively out of 74 features. Tuberculosis (16.0%, chronic otitis media (12.0%, scabies (10.7%, bacterial pneumonia (9.3% and oropharyngeal candidiasis (6.7% were common opportunistic infections. Antiretroviral treatment was started in 18 (46.2% cases at median age of 67 months. Median change in CD4 count at follow up was significantly different between the groups receiving and not receiving antiretroviral treatment (+192 vs. -72; P=0.045. Conclusions: Infection in children is vertical. Undernutrition, anemia, fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, skin eruptions, and ear discharge are common presenting features. Opportunistic infections are common and tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection followed by chronic ear infection, scabies, candidiasis and bacterial pneumonia. Timely antiretroviral treatment improves immune response.

  14. Risk factors for multiple myeloma: a hospital-based case-control study in Northwest China.

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    Wang, Qixia; Wang, Yiwei; Ji, Zhaohua; Chen, Xiequn; Pan, Yaozhu; Gao, Guangxun; Gu, Hongtao; Yang, Yang; Choi, Bernard C K; Yan, Yongping

    2012-10-01

    The distinctive racial/ethnic and geographic distribution of multiple myeloma (MM) suggests that both family history and environmental factors may contribute to its development. A hospital-based case-control study consisting of 220 confirmed MM cases and 220 individually matched patient controls, by sex, age and hospital was carried out at 5 major hospitals in Northwest China. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on demographics, family history, and the frequency of food items consumed. Based on multivariate analysis, a significant association between the risk of MM and family history of cancers in first degree relatives was observed (OR=4.03, 95% CI: 2.50-6.52). Fried food, cured/smoked food, black tea, and fish were not significantly associated with the risk of MM. Intake of shallot and garlic (OR=0.60, 95% CI: 0.43-0.85), soy food (OR=0.52, 95% CI: 0.36-0.75) and green tea (OR=0.38, 95% CI: 0.27-0.53) was significantly associated with a reduced risk of MM. In contrast, intake of brined vegetables and pickle was significantly associated with an increased risk (OR=2.03, 95% CI: 1.41-2.93). A more than multiplicative interaction on the decreased risk of MM was found between shallot/garlic and soy food. Our study in Northwest China found an increased risk of MM with a family history of cancer, a diet characterized by low consumption of garlic, green tea and soy foods, and high consumption of pickled vegetables. The effect of green tea in reducing the risk of MM is an interesting new finding which should be further confirmed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Environmental and Personal Factors Related to Asthma Severity among Children: Hospital Based Study, Egypt

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    Omaima Ibrahim AboElkheir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood asthma is a complex disorder in which many environmental and personal factors play a role. However, the contribution of these factors to asthma severity is poorly understood. This study aims to determine the relationship between environmental exposures, personal factors and asthma severity among asthmatic children. Methods: This cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted on 180 asthmatic children; they were divided into mild, moderate and severe asthma according to forced expiratory volume in first second. Environmental factors (indoor and outdoor, food allergy, history of other allergic diseases, family history of allergic disorders, time trend of attacks as well as asthma outcome were reported. Results: Children with severe asthma were younger than those with mild or moderate asthma. Severe asthma was significantly linked to family history of allergy, presence of co-morbid allergic diseases, fish, egg and milk allergy, as well as exposure to passive smoking (73.7% and poor housing conditions. Also, it was significantly linked to presence of unauthorized factories in residential area (31.6 %, p=0.001. As well as, contact with pets (42.1%. Children with severe asthma had more limitations of physical activities (73.7%, missed school days (81.5%, with poor school performance (p=0.04 than those with mild moderate or asthma. Conclusion: Severe asthma was linked to female gender and younger age, co-morbid allergic diseases, family history of atopy and food allergy. It was higher among children residing in places with unauthorized factories and living in substandard housing condition. Children with severe asthma had poor asthma outcome.

  16. A systematic model improves hepatitis C virus birth cohort screening in hospital-based primary care.

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    Goel, A; Sanchez, J; Paulino, L; Feuille, C; Arend, J; Shah, B; Dieterich, D; Perumalswami, P V

    2017-06-01

    Despite national and local governing board recommendations in the United States of America to perform an HCV screening test in baby boomers, screening rates remain low. Our goal was to study the impact of an HCV screening and link-to-care programme with patient navigation in two New York City primary care practices. This was a 2-year prospective study of patients born between 1945-1965 ("baby boomers") with encounters at two primary care practices at the Mount Sinai Hospital between November 1, 2013 and November 30, 2015. Baseline HCV screening rates were collected for four months. A multifaceted intervention was sequentially implemented involving electronic alerts, housestaff education, data feedback and patient navigation. HCV screening rates and link to care, defined as attending an appointment with a viral hepatitis specialist, were compared before and after these interventions. There were 14 642 primary care baby boomer patients of which 4419 (30.2%) were newly screened during the study. There was a significant increase in HCV screening rates from 55% to 75% (P<.01) with an HCV seropositive rate of 3.3%. Factors associated with being HCV seropositive included older age (P<.01), male sex (P<.01), African American race (P<.01) and receiving care in the housestaff practice (P<.01). With patient navigation, 78 of 84 (93%) newly diagnosed HCV-infected persons were referred to a specialist and 60 (77%) attended their first appointment. A structured, multifaceted HCV screening programme using well-studied principles identifies a large number of undiagnosed baby boomers within hospital-based primary care and improves access to specialty providers in a timely manner. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Prevalence and severity of periodontal diseases among Nepalese adults - a hospital based study

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    J Rajkarnikar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of periodontal diseases among adults visiting the dental department of a hospital based in Jorpati. Methods Four hundred and seventeen patients were randomly taken from a dental hospital situated in Jorpati during the time period of March 2013 to August 2013. All patients visiting the dental department who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The data included patients overall information along with their chief complaint, gingival bleeding on probing (BOP, probing depth (PD, frequency of brushing, adverse habits and the diagnosis of the patients examined. Results We found that 52.5% suffered from gingivitis and 47.5% suffered from periodontitis. Also 28.3% suffered from localized and 18% suffered from generalized form of periodontitis. There was no statistically significant difference in the gender when the prevalence of periodontal disease was compared. 51.4% of male and 44.4% of female was seen to be affected with periodontitis. Also habits like smoking and intake of smokeless tobacco was seen to be associated with periodontitis. Regarding the age group more number of patients in the age group of >50 years were seen to be suffering from periodontitis (84.3% as compared to age group of <35 years (25.9%. Conclusion There is high prevalence of periodontitis and gingivitis in the studied population. Periodontitis was seen to be more prevalent as age advanced which can be attributed mainly to untreated gingivitis. However, no significant difference was seen in the prevalence of periodontitis with respect to gender. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i1.12762 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(1; 11-16

  18. Hospital-based program to increase child safety restraint use among birthing mothers in China.

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    Xiaojun Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a hospital-based educational program to increase child safety restraint knowledge and use among birthing mothers. METHODS: A prospective experimental and control study was performed in the Obstetrics department of hospitals. A total of 216 new birthing mothers from two hospitals (114 from intervention hospital and 102 from comparison hospital were recruited and enrolled in the study. Intervention mothers received a height chart, an 8-minute video and a folded pamphlet regarding child safety restraint use during their hospital stay after giving birth. Evaluation data on the child safety seat (CSS awareness, attitudes, and use were collected among both groups before and after the intervention. An additional phone interview was conducted among the intervention mothers two months after discharge. RESULTS: No significant differences existed between groups when comparing demographics. Over 90% of the intervention mothers found the educational intervention to be helpful to some extent. A significantly higher percentage of mothers in the intervention than the comparison group reported that CSS are necessary and are the safest seating practice. Nearly 20% of the intervention mothers actually purchased CSS for their babies after the intervention. While in both the intervention and comparison group, over 80% of mothers identified the ages of two through five as needing CSS, fewer than 50% of both groups identified infants as needing CSS, even after the intervention. CONCLUSION: The results indicated that child safety restraint education implemented in hospitals helps increase birthing mothers' overall knowledge and use of CSS. Further efforts are needed to address specific age-related needs to promote car seats use among infants.

  19. Hospital-based program to increase child safety restraint use among birthing mothers in China.

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    Chen, Xiaojun; Yang, Jingzhen; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Chen, Kangwen; Liu, Xiangxiang; Li, Liping

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate a hospital-based educational program to increase child safety restraint knowledge and use among birthing mothers. A prospective experimental and control study was performed in the Obstetrics department of hospitals. A total of 216 new birthing mothers from two hospitals (114 from intervention hospital and 102 from comparison hospital) were recruited and enrolled in the study. Intervention mothers received a height chart, an 8-minute video and a folded pamphlet regarding child safety restraint use during their hospital stay after giving birth. Evaluation data on the child safety seat (CSS) awareness, attitudes, and use were collected among both groups before and after the intervention. An additional phone interview was conducted among the intervention mothers two months after discharge. No significant differences existed between groups when comparing demographics. Over 90% of the intervention mothers found the educational intervention to be helpful to some extent. A significantly higher percentage of mothers in the intervention than the comparison group reported that CSS are necessary and are the safest seating practice. Nearly 20% of the intervention mothers actually purchased CSS for their babies after the intervention. While in both the intervention and comparison group, over 80% of mothers identified the ages of two through five as needing CSS, fewer than 50% of both groups identified infants as needing CSS, even after the intervention. The results indicated that child safety restraint education implemented in hospitals helps increase birthing mothers' overall knowledge and use of CSS. Further efforts are needed to address specific age-related needs to promote car seats use among infants.

  20. Epidemiological study of road traffic accident cases in Greater Noida: Hospital Based Study

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    Rupali Roy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Road accidents are associated with numerous problems each of which needs to be addressed separately [1]. Accidents, therefore, can be studied in terms of agent, host and environmental factors and epidemiologically classified into time, place and person distribution [2]. Objectives: 1.To assess the prevalence of RTAs coming to hospital and 2.To know the epidemiological factors related to RTAs and associated prevalence in hospital based study. Methodology: This cross sectional study was conducted at SMSR, Gr Noida, in 2012. The study group consisted of all the RTA victims reporting to casualty in the last one year. The victims of the accidents were interviewed on a pretested semi structured performa. Results: In that one year period total number of reported accident cases was 144. The age groups of the study subjects were between 13-65 years. Out of total study subjects, only 16 were female. Again out of the total accident cases 45% were attended by police and of all injured, 45.8% were driver by occupation (7% without driving license. Among these drivers, 11% were not attentive during driving because of various reasons. Ambulance services had reached in 46.5% cases. Fracture was the most common type (60% of injury among all types of injuries. Among the applicable population only 33% wore helmet or seat belts. Conclusions: Only half of the total accident cases were attended by police and again only half of them received ambulance services. One third injuries were because of not wearing seat belt and helmets.

  1. Unintentional Injuries and Violence among Adults in Northern Jordan: A Hospital-Based Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Manal M.; Shakhatreh, Mohammed K.; Al-sheyab, Nihaya

    2017-01-01

    Injuries (unintentional and intentional) are the main cause of death and disability worldwide, including Jordan. The main purpose of this hospital-based retrospective study was to identify characteristics, causes, and risk factors of unintentional injuries and violence among all adult patients who approached the Accidents and Emergency department because of injury in Northern Jordan. Data were collected retrospectively from four major hospitals from January 2008 to January 2013. A total of 2425 Jordanian individuals who accessed and were treated by the four hospitals were included in this study. The findings show that the majority of patients who approached the Accidents and Emergency departments in the four hospitals were males (n = 2044, 87.16%) versus females (n = 301, 12.8%). Violence was the most common reason of injury (70.66%), followed by road traffic crashes (23.21%). The most common anatomical locations of reported injuries were the head (38.74%), followed by abdomen/pelvis and lower back, among males and females (9.93%). Violence had a high significant effect on the site of injuries. Patients who had been injured to the head because of a stab wound or fighting were substantially over-involved in head injuries, with injury rates 3.88 and 7.51 times higher than those who had been injured to the head due to gunshot, respectively. Even patients who had been injured to the head because of assault show much higher involvement in injury risk than non-assault patients (Odds Ratio = 8.46). These findings highlight the need for a large national study to confirm the findings. It also draws attention to the importance of public awareness and to special injury prevention programs that not only focus on saving lives and lessening the number of injuries, illnesses, and fatalities, but also to limit the social and economic burden of injury among adults in Northern Jordan. PMID:28338614

  2. A hospital-based surveillance for Japanese encephalitis in Bali, Indonesia

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    Nisalak Ananda

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis (JE is presumed to be endemic throughout Asia, yet only a few cases have been reported in tropical Asian countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. To estimate the true disease burden due to JE in this region, we conducted a prospective, hospital-based surveillance with a catchment population of 599,120 children less than 12 years of age in Bali, Indonesia, from July 2001 through December 2003. Methods Balinese children presenting to any health care facility with acute viral encephalitis or aseptic meningitis were enrolled. A "confirmed" diagnosis of JE required the detection of JE virus (JEV-specific IgM in cerebrospinal fluid, whereas a diagnosis of "probable JE" was assigned to those cases in which JEV-specific IgM was detected only in serum. Results In all, 86 confirmed and 4 probable JE cases were identified. The annualized JE incidence rate was 7.1 and adjusted to 8.2 per 100,000 for children less than 10 years of age over the 2.5 consecutive years of study. Only one JE case was found among 96,920 children 10–11 years old (0.4 per 100,000. Nine children (10% died and 33 (37% of the survivors had neurological sequelae at discharge. JEV was transmitted in Bali year-round with 70% of cases in the rainy season. Conclusion JE incidence and case-fatality rates in Bali were comparable to those of other JE-endemic countries of Asia. Our findings contradict the common wisdom that JE is rare in tropical Asia. Hence, the geographical range of endemic JE is broader than previously described. The results of the study support the need to introduce JE vaccination into Bali.

  3. Association of Sauropus androgynus and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome: a hospital-based case-control study.

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    Ger, L P; Chiang, A A; Lai, R S; Chen, S M; Tseng, C J

    1997-05-01

    In late April 1995, an outbreak of a poorly defined respiratory illness related to the ingestion of leaves of Sauropus androgynus was observed in southern Taiwan. To further evaluate the association between S. androgynus and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, a hospital-based case-control study was conducted with one case group and three different control groups at Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung between April and September 1995. A total of 54 cases (50 females, 4 males), 54 age- and sex-matched neighborhood controls, 54 matched routine physical check-up controls, and 54 matched self-referred patron controls (who had ingested S. androgynus yet without obstructive physiology) were interviewed for clinical symptoms, history of S. androgynus consumption, and potential confounding factors. All 54 cases (100%) ingested S. androgynus compared with only five (9%) neighborhood controls (matched odds ratio (OR) incalculable, p 4,500 vs. 413-2,063 g, matched OR 10.0 (95% CI 1.9-53.0)); duration of consumption (> 45 vs. 6-24 days, matched OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.2-3.8)); and midterm interruption (< 2 vs. 2-5 days per week, matched OR 2.6 (95% CI 1.1-6.1)). Additionally, multiple conditional logistic regression analysis of cases and self-referred patron controls revealed that a larger total amount of S. androgynus consumption, preparation of S. androgynus food without cooking, and ingesting S. androgynus food prepared by a vendor were the significant risk factors associated with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome.

  4. Pattern of congenital malformations in newborn: a hospital-based study

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    Mohamed El Koumi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Birth defects, encountered frequently by pediatricians, are important causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. Birth defects can be classified based on their severity, pathogenic mechanism or whether they involve a single system or multiple systems. This hospital based prospective descriptive study highlights the prevalence of congenital anomalies (CAs in one year, among liveborn neonates delivered in a university hospital. Design and methods: All women giving birth to babies were included. Demographic details, associated risk factors and the type of CAs in babies were recorded. Diagnosis of CAs was based on clinical evaluation, radiographic examination and chromosomal analysis of newborn whenever recommended. Results: The overall incidence of CAs among liveborn neonates was 2.5%, as most of the cases were referred to Zagazig University Hospital for delivery. The musculoskeletal system (23% was the most commonly involved; followed by central nervous system (20.3%. Involvement of more than one system was observed in (28.6% cases. Out of the maternal and fetal risk factors, parental consanguinity, maternal undernutrition and obesity, positive history of an anomaly in the family, low birth weight(LBW, and prematurity were significantly associated with higher frequency of CAs(p <0.05, with non-significant differences for maternal age and the sex of the neonates. Conclusion : The current study highlighted the point prevalence of congenital anomalies in one year in zagazig university hospital in Egypt. The present study revealed a high prevalence of congenital anomalies in our locality and stressed upon the importance of carrying out a thorough clinical examination of all neonates at birth.

  5. Incidence of Reye's syndrome in France: a hospital-based survey.

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    Autret-Leca, E; Jonville-Béra, A P; Llau, M E; Bavoux, F; Saudubray, J M; Laugier, J; Devictor, D; Barbier, P

    2001-08-01

    At the time of the study no information was available in France about the incidence of Reye's Syndrome (RS) and no warnings about RS and aspirin. The objective was to evaluate the incidence of RS in France by a hospital-based study. For a period of 1 year from November 1995 to November 1996, all French paediatric departments were required to report any child under 15 years with unexplained noninflammatory encephalopathy (i.e., CDC consciousness level stage I or deeper with normal CSF) and a threefold (or greater) increase in serum aminotransferase and/or ammonia. All suspected cases were classified by a panel of experts as probable RS or excluded RS. In 10% of randomly selected paediatric departments we checked that every suspected case had been reported. Forty-six suspected cases were reported during the year of the survey, of which 14 were classified as RS. Five of these 14 cases had a metabolic disorder. Nine children were definitively diagnosed as having RS (i.e., an estimated incidence of RS of 0.79/1,000,000 children, i.e., below 15/year). Eight children had been exposed to aspirin, four to aspirin alone and four to aspirin and acetaminophen. On the basis of these results the incidence of RS in France in 1996-1997 was not substantially different from that of countries where warning labels were already in use, but it was higher than in the US after 1994. This was probably due to the reduction in aspirin prescription in France because of warnings in Europe and the US and also because many cases of RS are now identified as metabolic disease. On the basis of these results and because the relationship between aspirin and RS has already been proved, public and professional warnings concerning RS on aspirin-containing products in cases of varicella and viral febrile illness have been adopted by the French Drugs Agency.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Qom Shahid Beheshti Hospital based on EFQM (European Foundation for Quality Management

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    Mahmoud Parham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: performance evaluation is an important tool for measuring achievement of an organization’ quality objectives and performance excellence. Among the models of organizational excellence currently used to evaluate the quality of services in hospitals, European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM have been more welcoming in hospitals. This study was done with the aim of evaluating the performance of Qom shahid beheshti hospital based on EFQM excellence model and identification of strengths and areas in need of improvement.Methods: This study was conducted using cross-sectional method during summer 2011. The Tool for data gathering was a standard self-assessment questionnaire based on EFQM excellence model. The study population was staff managers of Qom shahid beheshti hospital, who were selected through census method. Data were collected in the form of nonuplet criteria of EFQM model, and analyzed by descriptive tests.Result: The scores that were obtained based on nonuplet criteria of EFQM were as follows: 48.4% for leadership, 44.9% for policy and strategy, 48.6% for employees, 49.5% for resources and contributions, 46.4% for processes, 42.1% for the results of customer, 38.6% for the results of employees, 44% for society results, and 42.4% for key performance results. The highest and lowest scores were related to resources and contributions and results of employees, respectively. Total scores of the hospital were 447 out of 1000.Conclusion: Considering that the assessment process of board of trustees hospitals is using EFQM evaluation model in addition to accreditation standards, therefore, in this research, the strengths and weaknesses were identified using this model and some recommendations were given to the hospital.

  7. A hospital-based retrospective study on frequency and distribution of viral Hepatitis

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    Jimmy Antony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem throughout the world. It is the inflammation of the liver due to the infection of any of the five main hepatic viruses A to E and it affects the liver through different modes of transmission. This study mainly aims at the frequency and distribution of viral hepatitis based on age and sex during a time period of 5 years. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective study of 5 years at a tertiary level hospital in Kerala state in India. Medical records department of the hospital follow the guidelines of International Classification of Diseases-10 for coding the diseases. The data on frequency and distribution of viral hepatitis based on age and sex during a period of 5 years from April 2005 to March 2010 were collected and analyzed and ′z′ test was used for finding out the difference in proportions. Result: Out of 818 cases, 76.03% were males and 23.96% were females. The preponderance of males was apparent in all types of viral hepatitis infection. The high risk groups were the adults in the age group of 20-39 years. The main cause in the present study was hepatitis E virus (HEV and followed by hepatitis A virus (HAV. Of total viral hepatitis cases, 31.54% were due to HAV, 6.35% hepatitis B virus, 0.85% hepatitis C virus and 61.24% were due to HEV respectively. In the present study, there was no case of hepatitis D virus has reported. The case fatality rate of viral hepatitis in the present study was minor than 1% (0.98%; whereas males were 0.96%; females of 1.02%. Conclusion: Taking the safety measures including vaccination and proper management of waste materials are the only solution to control or eradicate this infection.

  8. Violent reinjury risk assessment instrument (VRRAI) for hospital-based violence intervention programs.

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    Kramer, Erik J; Dodington, James; Hunt, Ava; Henderson, Terrell; Nwabuo, Adaobi; Dicker, Rochelle; Juillard, Catherine

    2017-09-01

    Violent injury is the second most common cause of death among 15- to 24-year olds in the US. Up to 58% of violently injured youth return to the hospital with a second violent injury. Hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs) have been shown to reduce injury recidivism through intensive case management. However, no validated guidelines for risk assessment strategies in the HVIP setting have been reported. We aimed to use qualitative methods to investigate the key components of risk assessments employed by HVIP case managers and to propose a risk assessment model based on this qualitative analysis. An established academic hospital-affiliated HVIP served as the nexus for this research. Thematic saturation was reached with 11 semi-structured interviews and two focus groups conducted with HVIP case managers and key informants identified through snowball sampling. Interactions were analyzed by a four-member team using Nvivo 10, employing the constant comparison method. Risk factors identified were used to create a set of models presented in two follow-up HVIP case managers and leadership focus groups. Eighteen key themes within seven domains (environment, identity, mental health, behavior, conflict, indicators of lower risk, and case management) and 141 potential risk factors for use in the risk assessment framework were identified. The most salient factors were incorporated into eight models that were presented to the HVIP case managers. A 29-item algorithmic structured professional judgment model was chosen. We identified four tiers of risk factors for violent reinjury that were incorporated into a proposed risk assessment instrument, VRRAI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Excess morbidity and mortality in patients with craniopharyngioma: a hospital-based retrospective cohort study.

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    Wijnen, Mark; Olsson, Daniel S; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Hammarstrand, Casper; Janssen, Joseph A M J L; van der Lely, Aart J; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M

    2018-01-01

    Most studies in patients with craniopharyngioma did not investigate morbidity and mortality relative to the general population nor evaluated risk factors for excess morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine excess morbidity and mortality, as well as their determinants in patients with craniopharyngioma. Hospital-based retrospective cohort study conducted between 1987 and 2014. We included 144 Dutch and 80 Swedish patients with craniopharyngioma identified by a computer-based search in the medical records (105 females (47%), 112 patients with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma (50%), 3153 person-years of follow-up). Excess morbidity and mortality were analysed using standardized incidence and mortality ratios (SIRs and SMRs). Risk factors were evaluated univariably by comparing SIRs and SMRs between non-overlapping subgroups. Patients with craniopharyngioma experienced excess morbidity due to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (SIR: 4.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.8-6.8) and cerebral infarction (SIR: 4.9, 95% CI: 3.1-8.0) compared to the general population. Risks for malignant neoplasms, myocardial infarctions and fractures were not increased. Patients with craniopharyngioma also had excessive total mortality (SMR: 2.7, 95% CI: 2.0-3.8), and mortality due to circulatory (SMR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1-4.5) and respiratory (SMR: 6.0, 95% CI: 2.5-14.5) diseases. Female sex, childhood-onset craniopharyngioma, hydrocephalus and tumour recurrence were identified as risk factors for excess T2DM, cerebral infarction and total mortality. Patients with craniopharyngioma are at an increased risk for T2DM, cerebral infarction, total mortality and mortality due to circulatory and respiratory diseases. Female sex, childhood-onset craniopharyngioma, hydrocephalus and tumour recurrence are important risk factors. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  10. Prevalence of tobacco in Darbhanga district: A hospital-based cross-sectional study.

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    Gupta, Jatin; Wesly, Swarnalatha J; Gupta, Kanupriya

    2017-01-01

    Chewing tobacco, smoking, and consumption of alcoholic beverages have become common social habits in India. No study has been conducted so far in this part of Bihar regarding the prevalence of tobacco. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of tobacco use, its influences, triggers, and associated oral lesions. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted. Patients who consume tobacco in any form were selected and were interviewed through a pretested structured questionnaire in relation to their tobacco habits, its influences, and triggers. In addition, clinical examination was carried out to check for any tobacco-related oral lesions. The overall prevalence of tobacco use was 16.69%, out of which 14.48% were males and 2.21% were females. The most affected age group was from 19 to 50 years. 13.45% were below 18 years of age. 43.40% males and 77.42% females having the tobacco habit were illiterates. The majority of individuals were addicted due to peer pressure and friends, some acquired it, due to loneliness, stress, and for adapting themselves in the work place. Females frequently used smokeless for cleaning teeth. The most common oral mucosal lesion in both males (53.26%) and females (18.55%) was tobacco hyperkeratosis. The present study reflects the high prevalence rates of tobacco use among various sections of society. Apart from mass against tobacco products, authorities should focus on strict enforcement of law and promote research for creating new and harmless replacement products.

  11. Clinical patient registry recruitment and retention: a survey of patients in two chronic disease registries

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    Daniel H. Solomon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collection of routine clinical data in the setting of research registries can serve an important role in understanding real world care. However, relatively little is known about the patient experience in registries, motivating us to survey patients enrolled in two chronic disease registries. Methods We conducted similar surveys in two disease-based registries based at one academic medical center in the US. One group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA had been enrolled in a registry, and we focused on retention factors. In a second group of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD recently enrolled or considering enrollment, we examined factors that would influence their enrollment and willingness to answer frequent questionnaires and give biospecimens. The surveys were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the two cohorts were compared using nonparametric and chi-square tests. Results We received 150 (50% completed surveys from RA and 169 (63% from IBD patients. Mean age of subjects was 62 years in RA and 43 in IBD with more women respondents with RA (83% than IBD (62%. The two groups described very similar factors as the top three motivations for participation: desire to help others, desire to improve care of own disease, and ease of volunteering. Preferred methods of surveying included mail, e-mail, but telephone was not favored; age was an important correlate of this preference. Respondents preferred surveys either every 1–3 months (28.7% RA and 55.0% IBD or every 4–6 months (50.7% RA and 29.0% IBD. They differed in the preference for payment for answering surveys with 68.0% with RA answering that no payment was necessary but only 36.1% with IBD felt similarly. Conclusions Patients engaged in clinical registries demonstrate a high level of commitment to improve care and many report a willingness to answer questions relatively frequently.

  12. Clinical patient registry recruitment and retention: a survey of patients in two chronic disease registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel H; Shadick, Nancy A; Weinblatt, Michael E; Frits, Michelle; Iannaccone, Christine; Zak, Agnes; Korzenik, Joshua R

    2017-04-17

    The collection of routine clinical data in the setting of research registries can serve an important role in understanding real world care. However, relatively little is known about the patient experience in registries, motivating us to survey patients enrolled in two chronic disease registries. We conducted similar surveys in two disease-based registries based at one academic medical center in the US. One group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had been enrolled in a registry, and we focused on retention factors. In a second group of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) recently enrolled or considering enrollment, we examined factors that would influence their enrollment and willingness to answer frequent questionnaires and give biospecimens. The surveys were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the two cohorts were compared using nonparametric and chi-square tests. We received 150 (50%) completed surveys from RA and 169 (63%) from IBD patients. Mean age of subjects was 62 years in RA and 43 in IBD with more women respondents with RA (83%) than IBD (62%). The two groups described very similar factors as the top three motivations for participation: desire to help others, desire to improve care of own disease, and ease of volunteering. Preferred methods of surveying included mail, e-mail, but telephone was not favored; age was an important correlate of this preference. Respondents preferred surveys either every 1-3 months (28.7% RA and 55.0% IBD) or every 4-6 months (50.7% RA and 29.0% IBD). They differed in the preference for payment for answering surveys with 68.0% with RA answering that no payment was necessary but only 36.1% with IBD felt similarly. Patients engaged in clinical registries demonstrate a high level of commitment to improve care and many report a willingness to answer questions relatively frequently.

  13. Recent trends in population-based cancer registries in Japan: the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries and drastic changes in the historical registry.

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    Matsuda, Tomohiro; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2015-02-01

    Cancer registration in Japan has a long history spanning over 60 years; the first population-based cancer registry was established in Miyagi prefecture in 1951. The progress made in the regional population-based cancer registries in terms of standardization and quality improvement during the 10 years of the third comprehensive strategy for cancer control was highlighted in the history of cancer registration in Japan. However, there were still weak points regarding local government-oriented cancer registries that remained, e.g., the reporting of cancer cases to the population-based cancer registries was not a mandatory task for medical institutions. After the Cancer Control Act in 2006, the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries was finally enacted in Japan on December 6, 2013. According to that Act, hospital managers must report information on any primary cancer that was first diagnosed in their institutions from January 1, 2016 to the prefectural governors. Given the increasing number of cases and amount of information recorded, it would have been almost impossible to maintain our cancer registries using the same system, and changes were required to obtain reliable cancer statistics. This was particularly important in Japan, because the country is facing a hyper-aging society, with two to three million cancer patients requiring entry of detailed information. We appreciate the long history of the Japanese cancer registry, but it is necessary to make dramatic changes to bring the registry up to date and to be able to track the increasing amount of information.

  14. National registry of hemoglobinopathies in Spain (REPHem).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, Elena; Bellón, José M; de la Cruz, María; Beléndez, Cristina; Berrueco, Rubén; Ruiz, Anna; Elorza, Izaskun; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; Cervera, Aurea; Vallés, Griselda; Salinas, J Antonio; Coll, M Teresa; Bermúdez, Mar; Prudencio, Marta; Argilés, Bienvenida; Vecilla, Cruz

    2017-07-01

    Although highly prevalent throughout the world, the accurate prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in Spain is unknown. This study presents data on the national registry of hemoglobinopathies of patients with thalassemia major (TM), thalassemia intermedia (TI), and sickle cell disease (SCD) in Spain created in 2014. Fifty centers reported cases retrospectively. Data were registered from neonatal screening or from the first contact at diagnosis until last follow-up or death. Data of the 715 eligible patients were collected: 615 SCD (497 SS, 64 SC, 54 SBeta phenotypes), 73 thalassemia, 9 CC phenotype, and 18 other variants. Most of the SCD patients were born in Spain (65%), and 51% of these were diagnosed at newborn screening. Median age at the first diagnosis was 0.4 years for thalassemia and 1.0 years for SCD. The estimated incidence was 0.002 thalassemia cases and 0.03 SCD cases/1,000 live births. Median age was 8.9 years (0.2-33.7) for thalassemia and 8.1 years (0.2-32.8) for SCD patients. Stroke was registered in 16 SCD cases. Transplantation was performed in 43 TM and 23 SCD patients at a median age of 5.2 and 7.8 years, respectively. Twenty-one patients died (3 TM, 17 SCD, 1 CC) and 200 were lost to follow-up. Causes of death were related to transplantation in three patients with TM and three patients with SCD. Death did not seem to be associated with SCD in six patients, but nine patients died secondary to disease complications. Overall survival was 95% at 15 years of age. The registry provides data about the prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in Spain and will permit future cohort studies and the possibility of comparison with other registries. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF ORAL CANCER: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

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    Kapil H Agrawal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is heading towards various types of non-communicable diseases, which are also known as modern epidemics. Among these modern epidemics cancer is among the ten commonest cause of mortality in developing countries including India. Oral cancer is a major problem in India and accounts for 50-70% of all the cancers diagnosed. Ninety percent (90% of oral cancers in South East Asia including India are linked to tobacco chewing and tobacco smoking. Research question: What is the profile of Oral cancer (Oral cavity cases reported in the hospital? Objective: To study the clinico-epidemiological profile associated with Oral cancer cases. Methods: Study Design: Hospital based, Cross -sectional study. Settings: Shri Siddhivinayak Ganapati Cancer Hospital, Miraj, Maharashtra. Participants and Sample size: As it is a time bound study sample size comprised of all the confirmed cases of oral cancer reported in the hospital during the study period. The study was carried out from 1st March 2005 to 28th February 2006. Study variables included demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, enquiries regarding modifiable risk factors such as tobacco usage, alcohol consumption, site involved (within oral cavity, staging, histopathological examination, treatment modality used. Data entry and statistical analysis was done using Microsoft excel. Data presented in form of percentages and proportions. Results: Out of the total 160 cases, majority of the subjects were above 40 years age. 36 (22% of subjects were young adults (below 40 years age. 125 (78% subjects were male. Most of the subjects belonged to upper lower and lower middle socio-economic scale according to modified Kuppuswamy classification. It was observed that 139 (87% cases consumed tobacco in all forms. Out of these, ninety cases consumed tobacco in chewable form. Tobacco was chewed mainly in the form of gutka. Only ten (10 female subjects chewed tobacco. No female subjects smoked. The most

  16. OCCURRENCE OF DISSOCIATED VERTICAL DEVIATION IN HORIZONTAL CONCOMITANT HETEROTROPIA: A HOSPITAL-BASED STUDY

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    Sagar Karmakar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD is a poorly understood supranuclear strabismic disorder in which there is slow upward and sometimes temporal movement of one eye with cortical suppression of vision in that eye when it is occluded. In DVD, one eye get dissociated from the fellow eye, so they don’t follow Hering's and Sherrington's laws of innervation. DVD is also a marker of disruption of normal binocular function, which causes unbalanced input to vestibular system resulting in latent nystagmus with a cyclovertical component. To overcome this cyclovertical component, vertical vergence is invoked for which vision is aided in the fixing eye, but unfortunately it also produces DVD of the fellow eye. DVD is most commonly associated with infantile esotropia. AIM  To determine whether age of onset of strabismus is related to the development of dissociated vertical deviation in patients with horizontal concomitant heterotropia (HCH. To find out the occurrence of dissociated vertical deviation among patients with horizontal concomitant heterotropia and also to calculate how many of them is suffering from refractive error.  DESIGN This is a cross-sectional, observational hospital-based study. MATERIALS AND METHOD This study was done in 100 children presenting with horizontal concomitant heterotropia randomly chosen in the age group 5 yrs.–19 yrs. attending outpatient department and squint clinic of Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Kolkata. After taking proper history regarding time of onset of strabismus, age of onset of DVD, they underwent a full ophthalmic examination including visual acuity assessment, cycloplegic refraction, assessment and measurement of squint and DVD, and stereopsis. RESULT Mean age of horizontal concomitant heterotropes was 9.28 yrs. ± 3.94 yrs. of which 48% were male and 52% were female. Among horizontal concomitant heterotropes 24% were exotropes and 76% esotropes. The mean age of onset of strabismus

  17. Anemia among adult HIV patients in Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional study

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    Melese H

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hermela Melese,1 Molla Mesele Wassie,2 Haile Woldie,2 Abilo Tadesse,3 Nebiyu Mesfin3 1HIV Follow-up Care Clinic, Debre-Tabor Hospital, Debre‑Tabor, 2Department of Human Nutrition, Institute of Public Health, 3Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Background: Anemia is a major public health problem in HIV patients around the world. It has a negative effect on the quality of life of HIV patients and progression of the HIV disease. In the sub-Saharan African setting, including Ethiopia where both HIV infection and under-nutrition are expected to be high, there is a paucity of data on the matter. This study was aimed to reveal the magnitude and factors associated with anemia among adult HIV patients in Debre-Tabor Hospital, northwest Ethiopia. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was used among adult HIV patients in Debre-Tabor Hospital from April 1 to May 30, 2015. The diagnosis of anemia was made following the 2011 World Health Organization recommendation on hemoglobin cut-off points. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression was carried out to assess factors associated with anemia. Results: A total of 377 patients’ charts were reviewed. Most of the participants (n=237, 62.9% were taking antiretroviral treatment (ART. The overall prevalence of anemia was 23% (95% CI: 19.1, 27.6. Being ART-naïve (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.37; 95% CI: 1.59, 7.14, having treatment history with anti-tuberculosis (TB drug (AOR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.19, 8.67, taking zidovudine (ZDV-containing ART regimen (AOR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.03, 4.57, and having recent CD4+ T-lymphocytes count of <200 cells/µL (AOR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.04, 4.36 were associated with occurrence of anemia among adult HIV patients. Conclusion and recommendation: Anemia continues to be a major co-morbidity among adult HIV patients in Ethiopia. Adult HIV patients who are taking ZDV-containing ART

  18. Intracranial hemorrhage in full-term newborns: a hospital-based cohort study

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    Brouwer, Annemieke J.; Groenendaal, Floris; Koopman, Corine; Vries, Linda S. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, PO Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger-Jan A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Han, Sen K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurosurgery, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with parenchymal involvement has been diagnosed more often in full-term neonates due to improved neuroimaging techniques. The aim of this study is to describe clinical and neuroimaging data in the neonatal period and relate imaging findings to outcome in a hospital-based population admitted to a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). From our neuroimaging database, we retrospectively retrieved records and images of 53 term infants (1991-2008) in whom an imaging diagnosis of ICH with parenchymal involvement was made. Clinical data, including mode of delivery, clinical manifestations, neurological symptoms, extent and site of hemorrhage, neurosurgical intervention, and neurodevelopmental outcomes, were recorded. Seventeen of the 53 term infants had infratentorial ICH, 20 had supratentorial ICH, and 16 had a combination of the two. Seizures were the most common presenting symptom (71.7%), another ten infants (18.9%) presented with apneic seizures, and five infants had no clinical signs but were admitted to our NICU because of perinatal asphyxia (n = 2), respiratory distress (n = 2), and development of posthemorrhagic ventricular dilatation (n = 1). Continuous amplitude-integrated electroencephalography recordings were performed in all infants. Clinical or subclinical seizures were seen in 48/53 (90.6%) infants; all received anti-epileptic drugs. Thirteen of all 53 (24.5%) infants died. The lowest mortality rate was seen in infants with supratentorial ICH (10%). Three infants with a midline shift required craniotomy, six infants needed a subcutaneous reservoir due to outflow obstruction, and three subsequently required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The group with poor outcome (death or developmental quotient (DQ) <85) had a significantly lower 5-min Apgar score (p =.006). Follow-up data were available for 37/40 survivors aged at least 15 months. Patients were assessed with the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales

  19. CLINICO PATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF BENIGN BREAST LUMP – A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

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    Anindita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Despite the fact that in majority of cases the initial symptom of benign breast disease is a lump, which can be easily detected by the patient herself by self-examination they generally present at a very late stage and this poses a great difficulty in their management. Early and appropriate diagnosis of breast disease is of utmost importance. AIM The aim of the study was to find out the relative frequency and commonest site of occurrence of benign breast disorder and their relationship with age, parity, menstrual cycle, and socio-economic status and also to find out the accuracy of investigative procedures in their diagnosis. DESIGN This is a cross sectional, interventional. Hospital based study. MATERIALS AND METHOD This study was done in 58 female patients in the age group 10 yrs. to 55 yrs. presenting with clinically benign breast lumps randomly chosen from outpatient department and indoor wards of The Calcutta Medical Research Institute, Kolkata. After taking an accurate history and proper clinical examination these patients were sequentially studied by radiological methods (Ultrasonography and mammography, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and histopathology of removed specimen. Patients were enquired about their age, chief complaints, menstrual history, and use of oral pill, marital status, parity, lactation and socioeconomic status. RESULTS 79% of the benign breast lumps were found to be between 10–35 years, Fibro adenoma being the commonest one (41.38% and fibrocystic disease the second most common (29.31%. Breast lump were more common among unmarried and nulliparous females (48.27%, commonest site being upper and outer quadrant (38.8%. 69% patients were associated with an abnormal menstrual status. 76% of the cases were accurately diagnosed by clinical examination, 70% by mammography, 88% by FNAC and 84% by ultrasonography. CONCLUSION This clinicopathological study of benign breast lump is a small endeavour on our part

  20. Parenteral exposure to pesticides and occurence of congenital malformations: hospital-based case-control study.

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    Ueker, Marly Eliane; Silva, Vivianne Monteiro; Moi, Gisele Pedroso; Pignati, Wanderley Antonio; Mattos, Ines Echenique; Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido

    2016-08-12

    Most fetal defects are associated with genetic and environmental causes, among them, exposure of pregnant women to intensive pesticide use. Agribusiness is the economic basis of the state of Mato Grosso, the largest consumer of pesticides of all Brazilian states. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between past parental exposure to pesticides and the occurrence of congenital malformations in children in Mato Grosso, Brazil. This hospital-based case-control study was conducted in Cuiabá, the capital of Mato Grosso, from March to October 2011. Data was collected in all public, private, and health plan referral hospitals that provide care for pregnant women in the state of Mato Grosso and were situated in Cuiabá. Cases were children under 5 years of age with congenital malformations classified in Chapter XVIII of the International Classification of Diseases-10 and controls were children within the same age range, without congenital malformations, treated at the same hospitals. Malformation-related data was obtained from the patients' medical records. Socioeconomic data and information about parental exposure to pesticides were obtained in an interview with the mother using a standardized questionnaire. We conducted multivariate logistic regression to assess the relation between parent report of past pesticide use and congenital malformations. We also assessed effect modification to verify whether low maternal education level modified the association between exposure and our outcome. We observed positive effect modification of the association of paternal past exposure to pesticide and congenital malformation in the offspring by maternal education for mothers with low educational level (OR = 8.40, 95 % CI 2.17-32.52), father's work related to farming (OR = 4.65, 95 % CI 1.03-20.98) and paternal past exposure to pesticides (OR = 4.15, 95 % CI 1.24-13.66). These findings provide further evidence that paternal exposure to

  1. Integration of modeling and simulation into hospital-based decision support systems guiding pediatric pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Mondick, John T; Narayan, Mahesh; Vijayakumar, Kalpana; Vijayakumar, Sundararajan

    2008-01-28

    Decision analysis in hospital-based settings is becoming more common place. The application of modeling and simulation approaches has likewise become more prevalent in order to support decision analytics. With respect to clinical decision making at the level of the patient, modeling and simulation approaches have been used to study and forecast treatment options, examine and rate caregiver performance and assign resources (staffing, beds, patient throughput). There us a great need to facilitate pharmacotherapeutic decision making in pediatrics given the often limited data available to guide dosing and manage patient response. We have employed nonlinear mixed effect models and Bayesian forecasting algorithms coupled with data summary and visualization tools to create drug-specific decision support systems that utilize individualized patient data from our electronic medical records systems. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic nonlinear mixed-effect models of specific drugs are generated based on historical data in relevant pediatric populations or from adults when no pediatric data is available. These models are re-executed with individual patient data allowing for patient-specific guidance via a Bayesian forecasting approach. The models are called and executed in an interactive manner through our web-based dashboard environment which interfaces to the hospital's electronic medical records system. The methotrexate dashboard utilizes a two-compartment, population-based, PK mixed-effect model to project patient response to specific dosing events. Projected plasma concentrations are viewable against protocol-specific nomograms to provide dosing guidance for potential rescue therapy with leucovorin. These data are also viewable against common biomarkers used to assess patient safety (e.g., vital signs and plasma creatinine levels). As additional data become available via therapeutic drug monitoring, the model is re-executed and projections are revised. The management of

  2. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

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    Svensson J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jannet Svensson,1 Charlotte Cerqueira,2 Per Kjærsgaard,3 Lene Lyngsøe,4 Niels Thomas Hertel,5 Mette Madsen,6 Henrik B Mortensen,1 Jesper Johannesen1 1Pediatric and Adolescent Department, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev and Gentofte, Herlev, 2Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 3Pediatric Department, County Hospital Herning, Herning, 4Pediatric and Adolescent Department, Nordsjællands Hospital, Hillerød, 5HC Andersen Childrens Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 6Pediatric Department, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Aim: The aims of the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes (DanDiabKids are to monitor and improve the quality of care for children and adolescents with diabetes in Denmark and to follow the incidence and prevalence of diabetes. Study population: The study population consists of all children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (<18 years of age will be included. Main variables: The variables in the registry are the quality indicators, demographic variables, associated conditions, diabetes classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy, neuropathy, number of severe hypoglycemic events, and hospitalization with ketoacidosis. Descriptive data: The number of children diagnosed with diabetes is increasing with ~3% per year mainly for type 1 diabetes (ie, 296 new patients <15 years of age were diagnosed in 2014. The disease management has changed dramatically with more children treated intensively with multiple daily injections, insulin pumps

  3. Hospital-based prevalence of chronic kidney disease among the newly registered patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Khanam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is proved to be a major public health issue worldwide and an important contributor to the overall non-communicable disease burden. It increases risk of mortality, end-stage renal disease and accelerated cardiovascular disease (CVD. Diabetes is the biggest contributor to CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. In Bangladesh, very few data on CKD is available. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients at BIRDEM (Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, a referral center for diabetes in Bangladesh. Methods: The study included all diabetic patients aged 18 - 80 years and were registered in the year 2012. Socio-demographic (age, sex, residence, income, literacy, clinical (obesity, blood pressure and biochemical (blood glucose, lipids, eGFR information were collected from the BIRDEM registry. CKD was defined according to the K/ DOQI guidelines. Results: A total of 1317 type 2 diabetic patients of age 18 to 80 years were studied. Of them, men and women were 54.7% and 45.3%, respectively. The overall prevalence of CKD (eGFR ≤60 (ml/min/m2 was 13.9%. The prevalence was significantly higher in women than men (21.3 v. 7.8%, p50y, higher sBP (≥140mmHg and taking oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA were significant. Conclusions: Thus, the study concludes that the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients is quite high in Bangladesh. The female diabetic patients with older age and with higher SBP bear the brunt of CKD. Considering high prevalence of CKD with severe lifelong complications it is of utmost importance for early detection and intervention at the primary health care (PHC level.

  4. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, L.; Schultz-Larsen, K.; Fristrup, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... who refused referral were recruited in relation to a systematic falls screening programme performed by preventive home visitors. Accepters were selected among 72 participants successively completing the falls assessment clinic programme. The time between the interviews was 12 months; different levels...... of knowledge were expected, owing to accepters' participation in the programme. Interview transcriptions were thematically analysed. The analysis was directed towards identification of barriers to falls assessment. Results: Barriers to participation were categorized as being either within or outside the falls...

  5. The Italian registry of cystic echinococcosis (RIEC): the first prospective registry with a European future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, F; Rossi, P; Galati, F; Mariconti, M; Nicoletti, G J; Rinaldi, F; Casulli, A; Pozio, E; Brunetti, E

    2015-05-07

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), a worldwide zoonosis, is highly endemic in southern and eastern Europe. Its actual prevalence is unknown due to the lack of efficient reporting systems designed to take into account the particular features of the disease. Neglect of CE makes diagnosis and clinical management difficult outside referral centres, with inconsistencies in clinical practice and often unnecessary procedures carried out that have associated risks and costs. The Italian registry of CE (RIEC) is a prospective multicentre registry of CE patients seen from January 2012 in Italian health centres; data are voluntarily submitted to the registry. Its aims are to show the prevalence of CE in Italy, bring the importance of this infection to the attention of health authorities, encourage public health policies towards its control, and stimulate biological, epidemiological and clinical research on CE. From January 2012 to February 2014, a total 346 patients were enrolled in 11 centres, outnumbering national reports of many CE-endemic European countries. We discuss preliminary data and challenges of the RIEC, template for the European registry of CE, which has been implemented within the Seventh Framework Programme project HERACLES (Human cystic Echinococcosis ReseArch in CentraL and Eastern Societies) since September 2014.

  6. Japan Pancreatic Cancer Registry; 30th year anniversary: Japan Pancreas Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Shinichi; Toma, Hiroki; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakao, Akimasa; Hatori, Takashi; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Akio; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-10-01

    Since 1981, the Japan Pancreas Society has been hosting a nationwide pancreatic cancer registry. To commemorate its 30th anniversary, we review its history and latest achievement. During 3 decades, more than 350 leading institutions in Japan contributed voluntarily to register and periodic follow-up. The registry was modified to protect privacy by encrypting and hash algorithm. From 1981 to 2007, 32,619 cumulative records were analyzed. The overall survival of invasive cancer was improved significantly. More patients with earlier stage or with intraductal and cystic neoplasms underwent resection. The strongest prognostic factor of Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) stage IIA and IIB tubular adenocarcinoma in the pancreatic head was histological grade, followed by tumor size, extent of lymph node dissection, and postoperative chemotherapy. The 5-year survival rate of Union for International Cancer Control stage 0 reached 85%. The improvement of survival of patients with invasive cancer in Japan can be attributed to the introduction of effective chemotherapies, regionalization, and the earlier diagnosis and treatment. Simple definition of "early pancreatic cancer" is needed. At the 30th year anniversary, the Japan Pancreas Society nationwide pancreatic cancer registry is more shining than ever for current perspectives and for future diagnostic and treatment tactics.

  7. eRegistries: governance for electronic maternal and child health registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Sonja L; Kaye, Jane; Bygrave, Lee A; Aanestad, Margunn; Ghanem, Buthaina; Mechael, Patricia; Frøen, J Frederik

    2016-09-23

    The limited availability of maternal and child health data has limited progress in reducing mortality and morbidity among pregnant women and children. Global health agencies, leaders, and funders are prioritizing strategies that focus on acquiring high quality health data. Electronic maternal and child health registries (eRegistries) offer a systematic data collection and management approach that can serve as an entry point for preventive, curative and promotive health services. Due to the highly sensitive nature of reproductive health information, careful consideration must be accorded to privacy, access, and data security. In the third paper of the eRegistries Series, we report on the current landscape of ethical and legal governance for maternal and child health registries in developing countries. This research utilizes findings from two web-based surveys, completed in 2015 that targeted public health officials and health care providers in 76 countries with high global maternal and child mortality burden. A sample of 298 public health officials from 64 countries and 490 health care providers from 59 countries completed the online survey. Based on formative research in the development of the eRegistries Governance Guidance Toolkit, the surveys were designed to investigate topics related to maternal and child health registries including ethical and legal issues. According to survey respondents, the prevailing legal landscape is characterized by inadequate data security safeguards and weak support for core privacy principles. Respondents from the majority of countries indicated that health information from medical records is typically protected by legislation although legislation dealing specifically or comprehensively with data privacy may not be in place. Health care provider trust in the privacy of health data at their own facilities is associated with the presence of security safeguards. Addressing legal requirements and ensuring that privacy and data security

  8. A MiniReview of the Use of Hospital-based Databases in Observational Inpatient Studies of Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Cars, Thomas; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    pharmacoepidemiological studies in hospital settings and the underlying databases to provide an overview of research questions addressed by such databases. The studies were retrieved by chain searching. We included pharmacoepidemiological studies in hospital settings containing data on inpatient drug use. Twelve...... data. Twenty studies were selected and discussed to illustrate the diversity of inpatient pharmacoepidemiological studies. Hospital-based databases had mainly been used for drug utilization studies and research in adverse drug reactions.Five studies within comparative effectiveness were found...

  9. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to reveal the vast diversity of genetic and epigenetic alterations that exist between brain tumors. This biological ... social workers, psychologists, and nurses. A supportive family environment is also helpful. Surgery GBM’s capacity to wildly ...

  10. Evaluating the completeness of the national ALS registry, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Wendy E; Wagner, Laurie; Wu, Ruoming; Mehta, Paul

    2017-10-11

    Our objective was to evaluate the completeness of the United States National ALS Registry (Registry). We compared persons with ALS who were passively identified by the Registry with those actively identified in the State and Metropolitan Area ALS Surveillance project. Cases in the two projects were matched using a combination of identifiers, including, partial social security number, name, date of birth, and sex. The distributions of cases from the two projects that matched/did not match were compared and Chi-square tests conducted to determine statistical significance. There were 5883 ALS cases identified by the surveillance project. Of these, 1116 died before the Registry started, leaving 4767 cases. We matched 2720 cases from the surveillance project to those in the Registry. The cases identified by the surveillance project that did not match cases in the Registry were more likely to be non-white, Hispanic, less than 65 years of age, and from western states. The methods used by the Registry to identify ALS cases, i.e. national administrative data and self-registration, worked well but missed cases. These findings suggest that developing strategies to identify and promote the Registry to those who were more likely to be missing, e.g. non-white and Hispanic, could be beneficial to improving the completeness of the Registry.

  11. HEREDITARY COLORECTAL CANCER REGISTRY: A CLEVELAND CLINIC FOUNDATION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Church, MBCHB

    2017-07-01

    SUMMARY: the Cleveland Clinic approach to hereditary colorectal cancer is described. This is multidisciplinary, involving several specialties and both genetic counseling and mental health services within the registry.

  12. Recurrence of perinatal death in Northern Tanzania: a registry based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahande, Michael J; Daltveit, Anne K; Mmbaga, Blandina T; Obure, Joseph; Masenga, Gileard; Manongi, Rachel; Lie, Rolv T

    2013-08-29

    Perinatal mortality is known to be high in Sub-Saharan Africa. Some women may carry a particularly high risk which would be reflected in a high recurrence risk. We aim to estimate the recurrence risk of perinatal death using data from a hospital in Northern Tanzania. We constructed a cohort study using data from the hospital based KCMC Medical Birth Registry. Women who delivered a singleton for the first time at the hospital between 2000 and 2008 were followed in the registry for subsequent deliveries up to 2010 and 3,909 women were identified with at least one more delivery within the follow-up period. Recurrence risk of perinatal death was estimated in multivariate models analysis while adjusting for confounders and accounting for correlation between births from the same mother. The recurrence risk of perinatal death for women who had lost a previous baby was 9.1%. This amounted to a relative risk of 3.2 (95% CI: 2.2 - 4.7) compared to the much lower risk of 2.8% for women who had had a surviving baby. Recurrence contributed 21.2% (31/146) of perinatal deaths in subsequent pregnancies. Preeclampsia, placental abruption, placenta previa, induced labor, preterm delivery and low birth weight in a previous delivery with a surviving baby were also associated with increased perinatal mortality in the next pregnancy. Some women in Tanzanian who suffer a perinatal loss in one pregnancy are at a particularly high risk of also losing the baby of a subsequent pregnancy. Strategies of perinatal death prevention that target pregnant women who are particularly vulnerable or already have experienced a perinatal loss should be considered in future research.

  13. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Sue Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design: All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion: Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9 virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control.

  14. The Danish National Multiple Myeloma Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimsing, Peter; Holmström, Morten O; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfelt; Andersen, Niels Frost; Gregersen, Henrik; Pedersen, Robert Schou; Plesner, Torben; Pedersen, Per Trøllund; Frederiksen, Mikael; Frølund, Ulf; Helleberg, Carsten; Vangsted, Annette; de Nully Brown, Peter; Abildgaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The Danish National Multiple Myeloma Registry (DMMR) is a population-based clinical quality database established in January 2005. The primary aim of the database is to ensure that diagnosis and treatment of plasma cell dyscrasia are of uniform quality throughout the country. Another aim is to support research. Patients are registered with their unique Danish personal identification number, and the combined use of DMMR, other Danish National registries, and the Danish National Cancer Biobank offers a unique platform for population-based translational research. All newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering MM, solitary plasmacytomas, and plasma cell leukemia in Denmark are registered annually; ~350 patients. Amyloid light-chain amyloidosis, POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes syndrome), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance with polyneuropathy have been registered since 2014. The main registered variables at diagnosis are patient demographics, baseline disease characteristics, myeloma-defining events, clinical complications, prognostics, first- and second-line treatments, treatment responses, progression free, and overall survival. Up to June 2015, 2,907 newly diagnosed patients with MM, 485 patients with smoldering MM, 64 patients with plasma cell leukemia, and 191 patients with solitary plasmacytomas were registered. Registration completeness of new patients is ~100%. A data validation study performed in 2013-2014 by the Danish Myeloma Study Group showed >95% data correctness. The DMMR is a population-based data validated database eligible for clinical, epidemiological, and translational research.

  15. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): CAMDBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS). Administered by the EPA Clean Air Markets Division, within the Office of Air and Radiation, CAMDBS supports the implementation of market-based air pollution control programs, including the Acid Rain Program and regional programs designed to reduce the transport of ozone. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to CAMDBS facilities once the CAMDBS data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  16. The Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahr-Wagner L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lene Rahr-Wagner, Martin Lind Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Sports Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Abstract: The Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry was established in 2005 as a web-based nationwide clinical database with the purpose of improving the monitoring and quality of both primary and revision knee ligament reconstructions in Denmark. All primary and revision anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions as well as collateral ligament and multiligament reconstructions are recorded. Main variables include sex, age, cause of injury, objective ligament instability, and surgical data, such as affected ligament, graft- and implant choice, operation technique among other things. The operating surgeon prospectively collects the data. Hence, detailed preoperative, intraoperative, and 1-year follow-up data are recorded by the operating surgeon using a standardized form and a secured Internet portal. The number of procedures registered in the database each year is ~2,500 and the first 9 years, in total, 22,775 procedures have been registered. Since the beginning of the database multiple papers have been published in international peer-reviewed journals, improving the knowledge of patients treated with knee ligament reconstruction surgery. This paper reviews the content, organization, and published research from the Danish Knee Ligament Reconstruction Registry. Keywords: ligament reconstruction, anterior cruciate ligament, operation technique, database, graft choice, femoral tunnel drilling, patient-reported outcome measure

  17. Implications for registry-based vaccine effectiveness studies from an evaluation of an immunization registry: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea Kimberly M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based electronic immunization registries create the possibility of using registry data to conduct vaccine effectiveness studies which could have methodological advantages over traditional observational studies. For study validity, the base population would have to be clearly defined and the immunization status of members of the population accurately recorded in the registry. We evaluated a city-wide immunization registry, focusing on its potential as a tool to study pertussis vaccine effectiveness, especially in adolescents. Methods We conducted two evaluations – one in sites that were active registry participants and one in sites that had implemented an electronic medical record with plans for future direct data transfer to the registry – of the ability to match patients' medical records to registry records and the accuracy of immunization records in the registry. For each site, records from current pediatric patients were chosen randomly. Data regarding pertussis-related immunizations, clinic usage, and demographic and identifying information were recorded; for 11–17-year-old subjects, information on MMR, hepatitis B, and varicella immunizations was also collected. Records were then matched, when possible, to registry records. For records with a registry match, immunization data were compared. Results Among 350 subjects from sites that were current registry users, 307 (87.7% matched a registry record. Discrepancies in pertussis-related data were common for up-to-date status (22.6%, number of immunizations (34.7%, dates (10.2%, and formulation (34.4%. Among 442 subjects from sites that planned direct electronic transfer of immunization data to the registry, 393 (88.9% would have matched a registry record; discrepancies occurred frequently in number of immunizations (11.9%, formulation (29.1%, manufacturer (94.4%, and lot number (95.1%. Inability to match and immunization discrepancies were both more common

  18. Use of administrative hospital registry data and a civil registry to measure survival and other outcomes after cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen HT

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Toft Sørensen, Timothy L LashDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus, DenmarkFor many decades, cancer registries have been a cornerstone in monitoring cancer occurrence in different populations. Cancer registries in the Nordic countries are characterized by a high level of completeness and excellent data quality.1 Cancer diagnoses are often validated through several procedures, with documentation of clinical evidence for the diagnosis. Cancer registries have proven very useful in monitoring cancer incidence, contributing significantly to our understanding of its origin and development. Some registries also have been used to monitor cancer survival at the population level.1

  19. The Danish National Multiple Myeloma Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimsing P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peter Gimsing,1 Morten O Holmström,2 Tobias Wirenfelt Klausen,3 Niels Frost Andersen,4 Henrik Gregersen,5 Robert Schou Pedersen,6 Torben Plesner,7 Per Trøllund Pedersen,8 Mikael Frederiksen,9 Ulf Frølund,2 Carsten Helleberg,3 Annette Vangsted,1 Peter de Nully Brown,1 Niels Abildgaard,10   On behalf of the Danish Myeloma Study Group 1Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 2Department of Hematology, Roskilde Sygehus, Roskilde, 3Department of Hematology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, 4Department of Hematology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 5Department of Hematology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 6Department of Hematology, Holstebro Hospital, Holstebro, 7Department of Hematology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, 8Department of Hematology, Hospital of Southwestern Jutland, Esbjerg, 9Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, 10Department of Hematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Aim: The Danish National Multiple Myeloma Registry (DMMR is a population-based clinical quality database established in January 2005. The primary aim of the database is to ensure that diagnosis and treatment of plasma cell dyscrasia are of uniform quality throughout the country. Another aim is to support research. Patients are registered with their unique Danish personal identification number, and the combined use of DMMR, other Danish National registries, and the Danish National Cancer Biobank offers a unique platform for population-based translational research.Study population: All newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma (MM, smoldering MM, solitary plasmacytomas, and plasma cell leukemia in Denmark are registered annually; ~350 patients. Amyloid light-chain amyloidosis, POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes syndrome, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance with

  20. Design of a prospective, multinational registry to evaluate patients hospitalized with hyponatremia: the HN Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauptman PJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Paul J Hauptman,1 Arthur Greenberg,2 Joseph G Verbalis,3 Alpesh Amin,4 Samuel Sigal,5 Jun Chiong,6 Sandra Chase,7 Joseph Dasta81Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; 4University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 5New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 6Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 7Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA; 8University of Texas at Austin, TX, USABackground: Hyponatremia is a prevalent condition in patients hospitalized across a broad range of conditions, including heart failure, cirrhosis, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH secretion. Whether present on admission or developing during hospitalization, hyponatremia has been associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stays, and higher costs. Little is known, however, about its management and outcomes outside of clinical trial settings.Methods: The Hyponatremia Registry (HN Registry is a prospective, observational, multicenter, multinational study of patients hospitalized with either hypervolemic hyponatremia (cirrhosis and heart failure in the United States or euvolemic hyponatremia (SIADH in both the United States and Europe. Study enrollment began in September 2010 at community, tertiary, and academic medical centers. Overall, the HN Registry is expected to enroll >5,000 patients with hyponatremia, at >280 sites. Data will be used to characterize demographic and clinical characteristics of patients hospitalized with hyponatremia, evaluate the comparative effectiveness of available treatment modalities, and document and compare length of hospital stay as a reflection of resource use associated with hospital management.Discussion: Despite better understanding of the clinical consequences, economic impact, and prognostic significance of euvolemic and hypervolemic

  1. Exploring data sources for road traffic injury in Cameroon: Collection and completeness of police records, newspaper reports, and a hospital trauma registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillard, Catherine; Kouo Ngamby, Marquise; Ekeke Monono, Martin; Etoundi Mballa, Georges Alain; Dicker, Rochelle A; Stevens, Kent A; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-12-01

    Road traffic injury surveillance systems are a cornerstone of organized efforts at injury control. Although high-income countries rely on established trauma registries and police databases, in low- and middle-income countries, the data source that provides the best collection of road traffic injury events in specific low- and middle-income country contexts without mature surveillance systems is unclear. The objective of this study was to compare the information available on road traffic injuries in 3 data sources used for surveillance in the sub-Saharan African country of Cameroon, providing potential insight on data sources for road traffic injury surveillance in low- and middle-income countries. We assessed the number of events captured and the information available in Yaoundé, Cameroon, from 3 separate sources of data on road traffic injuries: trauma registry, police records, and newspapers. Data were collected from a single-hospital trauma registry, police records, and the 6 most widely circulated newspapers in Yaoundé during a 6-month period in 2009. The number of road traffic injury events, mortality, and other variables included commonly in injury surveillance systems were recorded. We compared these sources using descriptive analysis. Hospital, police, and newspaper sources recorded 1,686, 273, and 480 road traffic injuries, respectively. The trauma registry provided the most complete data for the majority of variables explored; however, the newspaper data source captured 2, mass casualty, train crash events unrecorded in the other sources. Police data provided the most complete information on first responders to the scene, missing in only 7%. Investing in the hospital-based trauma registry may yield the best surveillance for road traffic injuries in some low- and middle-income countries, such as Yaoundé, Cameroon; however, police and newspaper reports may serve as alternative data sources when specific information is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  2. Venous disease patient registries available in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Fedor; Obi, Andrea; Schul, Marlin; Hofmann, Lawrence V; Kasper, Gregory; Wakefield, Thomas

    2017-10-19

    Patient registries are beneficial in that they allow the collection of prospective data focused on a specific medical issue. These registries give providers a "real-world" view of patient outcomes. Many medical disciplines have a long history of developing and using patient registries; the first patient registry for chronic venous disease in the United States was launched in 2011, fairly recently in comparison. Registries included in this review were identified by surveying members of major academic societies that focus on the care of chronic venous disease and by searching MEDLINE and Embase databases using Ovid interface. Medical directors of four of the five databases available in the United States completed a standard questionnaire, and the answers served as the basis for this review. This review is not a comparison of registries; it does, however, describe the common and unique features of four venous registries currently available in the United States with the purpose of increasing awareness of and fostering participation in these registries. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Review of military and civilian trauma registries : Does consensus matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Thijs T C F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357301714; de Graaf, Johan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413649393; Huizinga, Eelco P; Champion, Howard R; Hoencamp, Rigo; Leenen, Luke P H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071390596

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structural collection of data from combat injuries is important to improve provided care and the outcome of (combat) casualties. Trauma registries are used in civilian and military health care systems for systematic administration of injury data. However, these registries often use

  4. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for recording...

  5. 14 CFR 47.19 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 FAA Aircraft Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other...

  6. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  7. 76 FR 14366 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 390 and 391 RIN 2126-AA97 National Registry of... National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners (NRCME) published on December 1, 2008. In the comments on...'s certificate had been issued to a commercial motor vehicle driver by a medical examiner listed on...

  8. Design and implementation of an ICU incident registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Sabine; Cornet, Ronald; de Jonge, Evert

    2007-01-01

    Due to its complexity intensive care is vulnerable to errors. On the ICU adults of the AMC (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) the available registries used for error reporting did not give insight in the occurrence of unwanted events, and did not lead to preventive measures. Therefore, a new registry has

  9. Design and implementation of an ICU incident registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Sabine; Cornet, Ronald; de Jonge, Evert

    2005-01-01

    Due to its complexity intensive care is vulnerable to errors. On the ICU Adults of the AMC (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) the available registries used for error reporting did not give insight in the occurrence of unwanted events, and did not lead to preventive measures. Therefore, a new registry has

  10. An international registry on autoinflammatory diseases: the Eurofever experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toplak, N.; Frenkel, J.; Ozen, S.; Lachmann, H.J.; Woo, P.; Kone-Paut, I.; Benedetti, F. de; Neven, B.; Hofer, M.; Dolezalova, P.; Kummerle-Deschner, J.; Touitou, I.; Hentgen, V.; Simon, A.; Girschick, H.; Rose, C.; Wouters, C.; Vesely, R.; Arostegui, J.; Stojanov, S.; Ozgodan, H.; Martini, A.; Ruperto, N.; Gattorno, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the demographic data from the first 18 months of enrollment to an international registry on autoinflammatory diseases in the context of the Eurofever project. METHODS: A web-based registry collecting baseline and clinical information on autoinflammatory diseases and related

  11. Sustained Uptake of a Hospital-Based Handwashing with Soap and Water Treatment Intervention (Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 Days [CHoBI7]): A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Jung, Danielle S; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K M; Monira, Shirajum; Sack, David A; Mahamud-ur Rashid; Mahmud, Md Toslim; Mustafiz, Munshi; Rahman, Zillur; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Winch, Peter J; Leontsini, Elli; Perin, Jamie; Begum, Farzana; Zohura, Fatema; Biswas, Shwapon; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, R Bradley; Alam, Munirul

    2016-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years of age globally. The time patients and caregivers spend at a health facility for severe diarrhea presents the opportunity to deliver water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We recently developed Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 days (CHoBI7), a 1-week hospital-based handwashing with soap and water treatment intervention, for household members of cholera patients. To investigate if this intervention could lead to sustained WASH practices, we conducted a follow-up evaluation of 196 intervention household members and 205 control household members enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the CHoBI7 intervention 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Compared with the control arm, the intervention arm had four times higher odds of household members' handwashing with soap at a key time during 5-hour structured observation (odds ratio [OR]: 4.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.61, 8.49) (18% versus 50%) and a 41% reduction in households in the World Health Organization very high-risk category for stored drinking water (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.96) (58% versus 34%) 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Furthemore, 71% of observed handwashing with soap events in the intervention arm involved the preparation and use of soapy water, which was promoted during the intervention, compared to 9% of control households. These findings demonstrate that the hospital-based CHoBI7 intervention can lead to significant increases in handwashing with soap practices and improved stored drinking water quality 6 to 12 months post-intervention. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  12. Protocol for hospital based-surveillance of cerebral palsy (CP) in Hanoi using the Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease Surveillance mechanism (PAEDS-Vietnam): a study towards developing hospital-based disease surveillance in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Gulam; Van Bang, Nguyen; Dũng, Trịnh Quang; Giang, Nguyen Thi Huong; Chau, Cao Minh; Van Anh, Nguyen Thi; Van Thuong, Nguyen; Badawi, Nadia; Elliott, Elizabeth J

    2017-11-09

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, management and outcomes of cerebral palsy (CP) in low-income and middle-income countries including Vietnam are unknown because of the lack of mechanisms for standardised collection of data. In this paper, we outline the protocol for developing a hospital-based surveillance system modelled on the Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease Surveillance (PAEDS) system in Australia. Using PAEDS-Vietnam we will define the aetiology, motor function and its severity, associated impairments, and nutritional and rehabilitation status of children with CP in Hanoi, Vietnam. These essential baseline data will inform future health service planning, health professional education and training, and family support. This is a hospital-based prospective surveillance of children with CP presenting to the rehabilitation, neurology and general paediatric services at the National Children's Hospital and St Paul Hospital in Hanoi. We will use active, prospective daily case-finding for all children with CP aged CP, known risk factors for CP, and nutrition, immunisation, education and rehabilitation status. This study was approved by the Hanoi Medical University Institutional Review Board (decision no 1722) and The University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee (approval no 2016/456). Establishment of PAEDS-Vietnam will enable hospital-based surveillance of CP for the first time in Vietnam. It will identify preventable causes of CP, patient needs and service gaps, and facilitate early diagnosis and intervention. Study findings will be disseminated through local and international conferences and peer-reviewed publications. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Increased morbidity associated with weekend paediatric road traffic injuries: 10-year analysis of trauma registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Brett; Fauteux-Lamarre, Emmanuelle; As, Arjan Bastiaan van

    2016-06-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a significant cause of paediatric morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a disproportionate number of these injuries occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Adult data from LMICs suggest that weekends are particularly high-risk for RTIs, but whether children are at increased risk of RTI on weekends has not previously been investigated in any setting. This study sought to assess patterns in paediatric RTI presentations using hospital-based trauma surveillance data in Cape Town, South Africa. Data was analysed from Childsafe South Africa's prospectively collected trauma registry for injured children below 13 years of age presenting to a tertiary paediatric referral Trauma Department between 2004 and 2013. During the 10-year study period, a total of 71,180 patients presented with traumatic injuries, of which 8,815 (12.4%) resulted from RTIs. RTI patients had a mean age of 5.2±3.6 years, and were predominantly males and pedestrians. RTIs were more common on weekends than weekdays (2.98 vs. 2.19 patients/day, ptrauma (15.5% vs. 11.2%, ptrauma patients (injury score 1.66 vs. 1.46 and 1.43, both ptrauma ward (1.14 vs. 0.79 patients/day, ptrauma ward (ptrauma surveillance data to inform targeted community prevention strategies for improving child road safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Jannet; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Per

    2016-01-01

    classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy......AIM: The aims of the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes (DanDiabKids) are to monitor and improve the quality of care for children and adolescents with diabetes in Denmark and to follow the incidence and prevalence of diabetes. STUDY POPULATION: The study population consists of all...... children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (diabetes...

  15. The Danish registry of diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Varis Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database: To monitor the development of diabetic eye disease in Denmark and to evaluate the accessibility and effectiveness of diabetic eye screening programs with focus on interregional variations. Target population: The target population includes all patients diagnosed with diabetes....... Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments...... and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014-2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables: The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data...

  16. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Jannet; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Per

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aims of the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes (DanDiabKids) are to monitor and improve the quality of care for children and adolescents with diabetes in Denmark and to follow the incidence and prevalence of diabetes. STUDY POPULATION: The study population consists of all...... children diagnosed with diabetes before the age of 15 years since 1996. Since 2015, every child followed up at a pediatric center (diabetes...... classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy...

  17. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Jannet; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Kjærsgaard, Per

    2016-01-01

    classification, family history of diabetes, growth parameters, self-care, and treatment variables. The quality indicators are selected based on international consensus of measures of good clinical practice. The indicators are metabolic control as assessed by HbA1c, blood pressure, albuminuria, retinopathy......AIM: The aims of the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes (DanDiabKids) are to monitor and improve the quality of care for children and adolescents with diabetes in Denmark and to follow the incidence and prevalence of diabetes. STUDY POPULATION: The study population consists of all...... changed dramatically with more children treated intensively with multiple daily injections, insulin pumps, and increased number of self-monitored blood glucose values per day. These initiatives have resulted in a significant improvement in HbA1c over the years and a decrease in the number of children...

  19. Tumoral calcinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao M

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral calcinosis is an unusual clinical disorder in which large masses of calcium are deposited in the periarticular tissues of the body. The characteristic clinical, radiological and histopathological features of this disorder occurring in three middle aged female patients are reported.

  20. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Human Development (NICHD) National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) See all related organizations Publications Tumores de la glándula pituitaria Order NINDS Publications Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  1. Benign Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain. Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, ...

  2. I RBH - First Brazilian Hypertension Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso de; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Brandão, Andréa Araújo; Malachias, Marcus V Bolívar; Gomes, Marco Mota; Moreno Júnior, Heitor; Barbosa, Eduardo Costa Duarte; Póvoa, Rui Manoel Dos Santos

    2016-08-01

    A registry assessing the care of hypertensive patients in daily clinical practice in public and private centers in various Brazilian regions has not been conducted to date. Such analysis is important to elucidate the effectiveness of this care. To document the current clinical practice for the treatment of hypertension with identification of the profile of requested tests, type of administered treatment, level of blood pressure (BP) control, and adherence to treatment. National, observational, prospective, and multicenter study that will include patients older than 18 years with hypertension for at least 4 weeks, following up in public and private centers and after signing a consent form. The study will exclude patients undergoing dialysis, hospitalized in the previous 30 days, with class III or IV heart failure, pregnant or nursing, with severe liver disease, stroke or acute myocardial infarction in the past 30 days, or with diseases with a survival prognosis profile, metabolic syndrome, and adherence to treatment. The primary outcomes will be hospitalization due to hypertensive crisis, cardiocirculatory events, and cardiovascular death, while secondary outcomes will be hospitalization for heart failure and requirement of dialysis. A subgroup analysis of 15% of the sample will include noninvasive central pressure evaluation at baseline and study end. The estimated sample size is 3,000 individuals for a prevalence of 5%, sample error of 2%, and 95% confidence interval. The results will be presented after the final evaluation, which will occur at the end of a 1-year follow-up. The analysis of this registry will improve the knowledge and optimize the treatment of hypertension in Brazil, as a way of modifying the prognosis of cardiovascular disease in the country.

  3. I RBH - First Brazilian Hypertension Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Brandão Veiga Jardim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: A registry assessing the care of hypertensive patients in daily clinical practice in public and private centers in various Brazilian regions has not been conducted to date. Such analysis is important to elucidate the effectiveness of this care. Objective: To document the current clinical practice for the treatment of hypertension with identification of the profile of requested tests, type of administered treatment, level of blood pressure (BP control, and adherence to treatment. Methods: National, observational, prospective, and multicenter study that will include patients older than 18 years with hypertension for at least 4 weeks, following up in public and private centers and after signing a consent form. The study will exclude patients undergoing dialysis, hospitalized in the previous 30 days, with class III or IV heart failure, pregnant or nursing, with severe liver disease, stroke or acute myocardial infarction in the past 30 days, or with diseases with a survival prognosis < 1 year. Evaluations will be performed at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up. The parameters that will be evaluated include anthropometric data, lifestyle habits, BP levels, lipid profile, metabolic syndrome, and adherence to treatment. The primary outcomes will be hospitalization due to hypertensive crisis, cardiocirculatory events, and cardiovascular death, while secondary outcomes will be hospitalization for heart failure and requirement of dialysis. A subgroup analysis of 15% of the sample will include noninvasive central pressure evaluation at baseline and study end. The estimated sample size is 3,000 individuals for a prevalence of 5%, sample error of 2%, and 95% confidence interval. Results: The results will be presented after the final evaluation, which will occur at the end of a 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: The analysis of this registry will improve the knowledge and optimize the treatment of hypertension in Brazil, as a way of

  4. A Suggested Model for Building Robust Biomedical Implants Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloufi, Bader; Alshagathrah, Fahad; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    Registries are an essential source of information for clinical and non-clinical decision-makers; because they provide evidence for post-market clinical follow-up and early detection of safety signals for biomedical implants. Yet, many of todays biomedical implants registries are facing a variety of challenges relating to a poorly designed dataset, the reliability of inputted data and low clinician and patient participation. The purpose of this paper is to present a best practice model for the implementation and use of biomedical implants registries to monitor the safety and effectiveness of implantable medical devices. Based on a literature review and an analysis of multiple national relevant registries, we identified six factors that address contemporary challenges and are believed to be the keys for building a successful biomedical implants registry, which include: sustainable development, international comparability, data reliability, purposeful design, ease of patient participation, and collaborative development at the national level.

  5. [Neonatal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Carla; Rocha, Gustavo; Grilo, Marta; Bianchi, Ricardo; Sotto Mayor, Tânia; Monteiro, Joaquim; Guimarães, Hercília

    2010-01-01

    Tumors affecting the fetus and newborn differ from those found in older children and adults, leading to new diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. To evaluate the main clinical aspects related to neonatal tumors. Retrospective analysis of clinical data from newborn patients admitted to the Service of Neonatology of São João Hospital between 1996 and 2006, with the diagnosis of tumor or neoplasia. Total = 32 cases, 16M/16F, birth weight: 3146 g (965-4590), gestational age 38 weeks (28-41), seven (22%) preterm, C-section rate 75% (n = 24), two with EXIT procedure. Teratoma (n = 8); lymphangioma (n = 7), neuroblastoma (n = 6), haemangioma (n = 5), other solid tumors (n = 6); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 1). Prenatal diagnosis 50% (n = 16). Teratoma: immature (n = 3); mature (n = 5), sacrococcygeal location (n = 5); cervical (n = 3); total macroscopic resection (n = 8). Cystic lymphangioma: cervical location (n = 5); cervicothoracic location (n = 1); thoracoabdominal location (n = 1); total macroscopic resection (n = 7). NEUROBLASTOMA: abdominal location (n = 5); cervical location (n = 1); deletion 1p (n = 0); oncogene n-myc amplification (n = 0); stage I (n = 1); IIB (n = 1); III (n = 3); IV (n = 1). Chemotherapy (n = 5), according to the (n = 2), surgical resection (n = 4). Four patients remain without disease and two present with residual disease. OTHER SOLID TUMORS: Large haemangiomas (n = 5); scaly papiloma (n = 1); juvenile xanthogranuloma (n = 1); lipoblastoma (n = 1); nephroma (n = 1); nonclassified neoplasm, possible nervous sheath sarcoma (n = 1). All patients showed a good clinical evolution. Acute lymphoblast leukemia (n = 1), deceased. Pre-natal diagnosis allows the planning of a careful multidisciplinary approach. In these rare entities it is crucial to pursue international collaboration, ideally workgroup committees, aiming for better clinical knowledge and an improved prognosis.

  6. Estimating the cost of operating cancer registries: Experience in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Esther; Pardo, Constanza; Arias, Nelson; Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Navarro, Edgar; Uribe, Claudia; Yepez, María Clara; Jurado, Daniel; Garci, Luz Stella; Piñeros, Marion; Edwards, Patrick; Beebe, Maggie Cole; Tangka, Florence; Subramanian, Sujha

    2016-12-01

    Maintaining population-based registries requires adequate and sustained resources; however, to date there has been no systematic evaluation to identify the resource needs for cancer registration in most countries, including Colombia. A systematic assessment of the costs can quantify the funding required and identify processes to improve efficiency of cancer registries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) International Registry Costing Tool (IntRegCosting Tool) was tailored specifically for the Colombian registries and was used to collect resource use data from five regional population-based cancer registries: Barranquilla, Bucaramanga, Cali, Manizales, and Pasto. The registries provided cost data for the year 2013 and cancer cases corresponding to the year 2010. We identified an almost threefold variation in the average cost per case (77,932 to 214,082 Colombian pesos or US $41 to US $113 in 2013) across the registries, but there were also substantial differences in data collection approaches, types of data collected, and activities performed. Cost per inhabitant varied between 95 and 415 Colombian pesos (US $0.05 to US $0.22). Between 20% and 45% of the total cost was due to fixed cost activities. The detailed economic information presented in this study constitutes a valuable source of activity-based cost data that registries can use to compare operations, assess key factors that lead to differences in cost per case, and identify potential approaches to improve efficiencies. Furthermore, the knowledge gained from studying the Colombian registries can help inform the planning and operations of other registries in the region. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Differences in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry Compared with Western Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Doo Sun; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2017-11-01

    The Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) is the first nationwide registry that reflects current therapeutic approaches and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) management in Korea. The results of the KAMIR demonstrated different risk factors and responses to medical and interventional treatments. The results indicated that the incidence of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was relatively high, and that the prevalence of dyslipidemia was relatively low with higher triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rates were high for both STEMI and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) with higher use of drug-eluting stents (DESs). DES were effective and safe without increased risk of stent thrombosis in Korean AMI patients. Triple antiplatelet therapy, consisting of aspirin, clopidogrel, and cilostazol, was effective in preventing adverse clinical outcomes after PCI. Statin therapy was effective in Korean AMI patients, including those with very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and those with cardiogenic shock. The KAMIR score had a greater predictive value than Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores for long-term mortality in AMI patients. Based on these results, the KAMIR will be instrumental for establishing new therapeutic strategies and effective methods for secondary prevention of AMI and guidelines for Asian patients. Copyright © 2017. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  8. Differences in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry Compared with Western Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) is the first nationwide registry that reflects current therapeutic approaches and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) management in Korea. The results of the KAMIR demonstrated different risk factors and responses to medical and interventional treatments. The results indicated that the incidence of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) was relatively high, and that the prevalence of dyslipidemia was relatively low with higher triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rates were high for both STEMI and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) with higher use of drug-eluting stents (DESs). DES were effective and safe without increased risk of stent thrombosis in Korean AMI patients. Triple antiplatelet therapy, consisting of aspirin, clopidogrel, and cilostazol, was effective in preventing adverse clinical outcomes after PCI. Statin therapy was effective in Korean AMI patients, including those with very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and those with cardiogenic shock. The KAMIR score had a greater predictive value than Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores for long-term mortality in AMI patients. Based on these results, the KAMIR will be instrumental for establishing new therapeutic strategies and effective methods for secondary prevention of AMI and guidelines for Asian patients. PMID:29035427

  9. Limitations of drug registries to evaluate orphan medicinal products for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, Carla E. M.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Aymé, Ségolène; Manuel, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Orphan drugs are often approved under exceptional circumstances, requiring submission of additional data on safety and effectiveness through registries. These registries are mainly focused on one drug only and data is frequently incomplete. Some registries also address phenotypic heterogeneity and

  10. Students' perceptions of the relative advantages and disadvantages of community-based and hospital-based teaching: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, M; Martin, J; Murray, E

    2000-08-01

    To obtain the perceptions of first-year clinical medical students of the relative advantages and disadvantages of community-based and hospital-based clinical teaching. A qualitative study. A purposive sample of first-year clinical medical students who had experienced both community-based and hospital-based teaching was invited to participate in individual semistructured interviews or focus groups. Interviews and focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed to facilitate content analysis of the data. A total of 24 students participated in individual interviews and a further 18 took part in focus groups. Respondents identified advantages and disadvantages specific to teaching in each setting. Chief advantages of hospital-based learning were perceived to include learning about specialties and the management of acute conditions, and gaining experience of procedures and investigations. Community-based learning was perceived as particularly appropriate for learning about psychosocial issues in medicine, for increasing students' awareness of patient autonomy and for improving communication skills. In addition, aspects of organization and of teaching methods employed by community tutors, although not site-specific, were viewed as conducive to a positive educational experience. Students perceived some areas, such as clinical skills acquisition, to be equally well learned in either setting. As community-based teaching forms a greater proportion of the undergraduate medical experience, medical educators must find ways of determining the specific advantages that community and hospital settings can contribute to undergraduate learning and of using these resources effectively to develop comprehensive and integrated curricula. Innovations in teaching methods may also be necessary to provide an effective educational experience and promote active learning.

  11. Consumer Choice Between Hospital-Based and Freestanding Facilities for Arthroscopy: Impact on Prices, Spending, and Surgical Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Brown, Timothy T; Whaley, Christopher; Bozic, Kevin J

    2015-09-16

    Hospital-based outpatient departments traditionally charge higher prices for ambulatory procedures, compared with freestanding surgery centers. Under emerging reference-based benefit designs, insurers establish a contribution limit that they will pay, requiring the patient to pay the difference between that contribution limit and the actual price charged by the facility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of reference-based benefits on consumer choices, facility prices, employer spending, and surgical outcomes for orthopaedic procedures performed at ambulatory surgery centers. We obtained data on 3962 patients covered by the California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS) who underwent arthroscopy of the knee or shoulder in the three years prior to the implementation of reference-based benefits in January 2012 and on 2505 patients covered by CalPERS who underwent arthroscopy in the two years after implementation. Control group data were obtained on 57,791 patients who underwent arthroscopy and were not subject to reference-based benefits. The impact of reference-based benefits on consumer choices between hospital-based and freestanding facilities, facility prices, employer spending, and surgical complications was assessed with use of difference-in-differences multivariable regressions to adjust for patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and geographic location. By the second year of the program, the shift to reference-based benefits was associated with an increase in the utilization of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers by 14.3 percentage points (95% confidence interval, 8.1 to 20.5 percentage points) for knee arthroscopy and by 9.9 percentage points (95% confidence interval, 3.2 to 16.7 percentage points) for shoulder arthroscopy and a corresponding decrease in the use of hospital-based facilities. The mean price paid by CalPERS fell by 17.6% (95% confidence interval, -24.9% to -9.6%) for knee procedures and by 17

  12. Glocal clinical registries: pacemaker registry design and implementation for global and local integration--methodology and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V

    2013-01-01

    The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework. Such approach has the potential to facilitate

  13. Tumor thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravina, Mudalsha; Hess, Søren; Chauhan, Mahesh Singh

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Thrombosis in cancer may manifest itself as venous thromboembolic disease or tumor thrombosis (TT). We present our experience with incidentally detected TT on FDG PET/CT in 21 oncologic patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all FDG PET/CT examinations during a 5-year......-one patients were included; the most common malignancies were renal cell carcinoma (n=6), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=3), and lung cancer (n=3). Indication for the scan was initial staging (n=15) and suspected recurrence (n=6). Several vessels were affected, the most common was the inferior vena cava (n=14......), but most other major branches of the venous vasculature was represented, and some patients had thrombi in several vessels. FDG uptake was linear in 7 patients, linear with a dilated vessel in 6 patients, and focal in 7 patients. The mean SUVmax of the primary tumors was 10.3 (range, 2.6-31.2; median, 6...

  14. The EpiCom Survey-Registries Across Europe, Epidemiological Research and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Langholz, Ebbe

    2017-01-01

    The 2015 EpiCom survey evaluated population, patient, and research registries across Europe. Information was collected from 38 countries. The registries included those falling within the remit of national statistics, hospital databases, twin and multiplex registries, inflammatory bowel disease [IBD......] registries and biobanks, and cancer and surgical registries. The scale and nature of registries were investigated, and where possible a contact detail for each registry was obtained.The survey demonstrated 33 birth and death registers across Europe. It also highlighted ethical and legal challenges in linking......-JCC online] depicts active registries in each of the participating countries....

  15. Epidemiology of pediatric trauma and its pattern in urban India: A tertiary care hospital-based experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Kundal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The high incidence of pediatric trauma on roads and falls indicate the need for more supervision during playing and identification of specific risk factors for these injuries in our setting. This study shows that these epidemiological parameters could be a useful tool to identify burden and research priorities for specific type of injuries. A comprehensive trauma registry in our set up seems to be important for formulating policies to reduce pediatric trauma burden.

  16. Quality of care in oncology: quality indicators in testicular cancer: a hospital-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Hermans; Vulsteke, Christof; Peter, Dekuyper; Anthony, Van Baelen; Stefan, Huybrechts; Denis, Wulfrank; Ximena, Elzo-Kraemer; Elisabeth, Van Eycken; Filip, Ameye

    2018-02-01

    The Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE) conducted a literature search leading to twelve quality indicators for testicular cancer. Data obtained from three nationwide databases, showed only five fully measurable quality indicators, one was partially measurable, and two could be determined using a proxy indicator. The four remaining indicators could not be assessed. In this study, we aimed to investigate if these quality indicators were registered and measurable in a medium-volume center. In our medium-volume cancer center new testicular cancer diagnoses were registered since 2003. 48 patients were diagnosed with testicular cancer between 2004 and 2014. Through medical file review we measured and evaluated the predefined set of indicators. The results were pooled in a database and compared to the KCE report (KCE Reports 149A. D2010/10.273/96). All 12 indicators could be measured in the entire patient cohort of 48 patients. Mean age was 34.9 years (range 16-85). In comparison with the KCE report, we documented higher rates of tumor marker assessment (98% vs. 73%), staging imaging (100% vs. 95%), multidisciplinary board discussion (100% vs. 58%), orchidectomy (98% vs. 84%), follow-up imaging (100% vs. 54%), and active surveillance (77% vs. 21%). In contrast, we found a lower rate of radiotherapy (6% vs. 20.3%) and chemotherapy (41.6% vs. 53%). Two patients were lost to follow-up, the remaining 46 patients are still alive. Four patients relapsed, all were seminomas. Implementation of quality indicators for testicular cancer is feasible for a medium-volume peripheral cancer center.

  17. PSYCHOLOGICAL MORBIDITY IN PATIENTS WITH TINNITUS : A HOSPITAL BASED CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tinnitus is not a disease but a symptom of hearing sound when no external sound is present. Studies have shown that some people, the sound causes anxiety or interferes with concentration, incr eased awareness of depression and personality disorders. To this purpose we evaluated the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in chronic tinnitus using MINI interview. METHODS: A sample of 53 male and female patients with tinnitus between the age of 13 and 50 years participated in the study. Patients with ear infections , disease of th e heart or blood vessels , Meniere's disease , brain tumors , exposure to certain medications, a previous head injury and earwax were excluded. The subjects so chosen, were explained the nature of the study. Da ta was collected from outpatient ENT Clinics regarding demographic and clinical profiles from these patients. Each subject was then administered Mini International Neuropsychaitric Interview (M.I.N.I RESULTS: More numbers of females were there than males and majority were in between 30 - 39 years. Both married and unmarried people were equally affected. Middle class and upper lower classes were most affected. The prevalence of psychiatric co morbidity in these tinnitus patients follows in descending order: M ajor depressive disorder>>Social Phobia > Suicide > Panic - disorder > Obsessive – compulsive – disorder > Agarophobia = Dysthymic - disorder=Generalized - anxiety. CONCLUSION : We observed that the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in chronic tinnitus patients were as follows in descending order Major - depressive - disorder >> Social - Phobia > Suicide > Pani c - disorder > Obsessive - compulsive – disorder > Agarophobia = Dysthymic disorder=Generalized - anxiety . Treatment of this psychiatric morbidity with medications and psychotherapy may likely reduce the severity of tinnitus in many of these patients.

  18. First 25 years of the Hungarian congenital abnormality registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeizel, A E

    1997-05-01

    The Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry was established in 1962 based on obligatory notification of cases with congenital abnormalities by physicians. However, continuous and expert evaluation of data started in 1970 when the Registry was moved to the National Institute of Public Health. Later several other systems, including the Nationwide Evaluation of Multimalformed Infants, Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, and Surveillance of Germinal Mutations, were based on the Registry. Data and results of the first 25 years of the Registry are evaluated from three different aspects: 1) evaluation of the originally planned and later adopted missions of the Registry; 2) quality control of the Registry is based on the proportion of misdiagnoses, completeness of notifications, and pathogenetically oriented classification; 3) outcome evaluation indicated the different quality of recorded data in lethal, severe, and mild congenital abnormalities. The data base of the Registry was appropriate to estimate the proportion of preventable congenital abnormalities due to the four different preventive programs and to evaluate the pregnancy outcomes after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

  19. The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bak M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marie Bak,1 Else Helene Ibfelt,2 Thomas Stauffer Larsen,3 Dorthe Rønnov-Jessen,4 Niels Pallisgaard,5 Ann Madelung,6 Lene Udby,1 Hans Carl Hasselbalch,1 Ole Weis Bjerrum,7 Christen Lykkegaard Andersen1,7 1Department of Hematology, Zealand University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde, 2Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, 3Department of Hematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 4Department of Hematology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, 5Department of Surgical Pathology, Zealand University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde, 6Department of Surgical Pathology, Zealand University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Næstved, 7Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Aim: The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry (DCMR is a population-based clinical quality database, introduced to evaluate diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic myeloid malignancies. The aim is to monitor the clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital departmental levels and serve as a platform for research. Study population: The DCMR has nationwide coverage and contains information on patients diagnosed at hematology departments from January 2010 onward, including patients with essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, myelofibrosis, unclassifiable myeloproliferative neoplasms, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and chronic myeloid leukemia. Main variables: Data are collected using standardized registration forms (so far up to four forms per patient, which are consecutively filled out online at time of diagnosis, after 2-year and 5-year follow-ups, and at end of follow-up. The forms include variables that describe clinical/paraclinical assessments, treatment, disease progression, and survival – disease-specific variables – as well as variables that are identical for all chronic myeloid malignancies. Descriptive

  20. A Hospital Based Clinical Study on Corneal Blindness in a Tertiary Eye Care Centre in North Telangana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Veladanda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide there are nearly 2.7 million blind people due to corneal disease which is a major causes of blindness in the world today and remains second only to cataract. Aim & Objective: The present hospital based retrospective study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of corneal blindness in patients attending tertiary eye care center in Chalmeda Anand Rao Institute of Medical Sciences, Karimnagar. Material and Methods: A hospital-based study was conducted over a period of 1 year from August 2014 to August 2015. Participants were patients attending outpatient department of Chalmeda Anand Rao Institute of Medical Sciences. Detailed history was taken and comprehensive ocular examination including Snellen E-chart for visual acuity, slit lamp bio microscopy, contact tonometry, posterior segment evaluation through B-scan and dilated retinal evaluation when indicated was performed at out patient department. Results: Overall, 33,566 patients were examined. Proportion of corneal blindness was 3.9% (CI-95% 3.6% - 4.3%. The proportion increased with age in elderly patients (5.7% and was higher among the females (5.2% compared to males (2.8%. The most common cause of corneal blindness in our study was ocular trauma which was 59.5%. Conclusion: The study ?findings demonstrate that currently ocular trauma, corneal ulceration, infectious keratitis, postsurgical bullous keratopathy, and corneal degenerations are responsible for the major burden of corneal blindness among the patients attending outpatient department.

  1. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C; Vander Stappen, François; Bawiec, Christopher R; Janssens, Guillaume; Lewin, Peter A; Prieels, Damien; Solberg, Timothy D; Sehgal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  2. Special Needs Dentistry: Interdisciplinary Management of Medically-Complex Patients at Hospital-Based Dental Units in Tasmania, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing awareness of the interactions between oral and general health has led to the establishment of Special Needs Dentistry as a dental specialty in many countries. This specialty assists with the interdisciplinary management of patients between the medical and dental professions particularly those with complex medical problems, intellectual and physical impairments, and psychiatric conditions that may affect their oral health or the manner in which they receive treatment. However, little is known about the utilisation of specialised services provided to facilitate individuals with these needs. Aim: The aim of this study was to understand current utilisation of hospital-based dental services established to provide medically-necessary dental care. Methods: A retrospective review of the demographics and medical status of patients treated at referral hospital-based dental clinics in the state of Tasmania was completed for the month of August 2015. Results: Patients treated at these units had a variety of medical backgrounds. Most (46.4% were referred from medical professionals within the hospital. On average, patients treated at these units had 2.56 medical conditions and were taking 3.59 medications each. Many of these were chronic medical conditions known to have an interaction with oral health. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the growing recognition of dynamic interactions between oral and general health and the importance of these hospitalbased units and interprofessional relationships in providing timely and holistic health care to these patients.

  3. The role of physician engagement on the impact of the hospital-based practice improvement module (PIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverzagie, Kelly J; Bernabeo, Elizabeth C; Reddy, Siddharta G; Holmboe, Eric S

    2009-10-01

    Physicians play an important role in hospital quality improvement (QI) activities. The Hospital-Based Practice Improvement Module (Hospital PIM) is a web-based assessment tool designed by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) to facilitate physician involvement in QI as a part of maintaining certification. The primary objective of this study is to explore the impact of the Hospital PIM on physicians participating in hospital-based QI. Qualitative design consisting of semistructured telephone interviews. A purposeful sample of 21 early-completers of the Hospital PIM. Grounded-theory analysis was used to analyze transcripts of the semistructured telephone interviews. Physician completers of the Hospital PIM describe the impact in a variety of ways, including new learning about QI principles and activities, added value to their practice, and enhanced QI experience. An emerging theme was the mediating role of physician engagement in relation to the overall impact of the Hospital PIM. Four case studies illustrate these findings. Facilitators and barriers that influence the overall experience of the PIM are described. The impact of completing the Hospital PIM is mediated by the degree of physician engagement with the QI process. Physicians who become engaged with the Hospital PIM and QI process may be more likely to report successful experiences in implementing QI activities in hospital settings than those who do not become engaged. Copyright 2009 Society of Hospital Medicine

  4. Clinical Spectrum, Risk Factors, and Behavioral Abnormalities among Dementia Subtypes in a North Indian Population: A Hospital-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kushwaha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: As variability in the clinical profile of dementia subtypes had been reported with regional differences across the world, we conducted a retrospective hospital-based study in a North Indian population. Methods: We retrieved patient records from 2007 to 2014 for details of clinical evaluation, diagnosis, neuroimaging, biochemical investigations, and follow-up of 1,876 patients with dementia (PwD, and the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Of the total PwD, Alzheimer disease (AD accounted for 30% followed by vascular dementia (VaD 26%, mixed dementia (MD 21%, Parkinson-related dementia 11%, frontotemporal dementia (FTD 7%, and infective dementia 5%. Of all PwD excluding the infective group (n = 1,777, 63% were men, 39% were from rural areas, 87% had behavioral abnormalities along with cognitive deficits, and 73% had impaired ADLs. Among dementia subtypes, a positive family history, cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, and behavioral abnormalities were found to be distributed. However, there existed a predominance of specific behavioral pattern in each subtype. The mean duration of follow-up varied from 2.9 ± 2.3 (VaD to 3.6 ± 2.1 (AD and greater than 30% were found to be stable on treatment (except in dementia with Lewy body. Conclusions: This large hospital-based study provides a distribution pattern and clinical spectrum of dementia subtypes in a North Indian population.

  5. Positive psychological impact of treating victims of politically motivated violence among hospital-based health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Shimon; Wexler, Isaiah D; Alkalay, Yasmin; Meiner, Zeev; Kreitler, Shulamith

    2008-01-01

    Health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence are at risk for traumatic stress symptoms. Few studies have assessed the positive psychological impact of politically motivated violence on health care workers. In this study, the level of positive psychological impact among health care workers with recurrent exposure to victims of politically motivated violence was examined. A validated questionnaire survey of health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence during 2000-2005 in two hospital settings was conducted. Positive psychological impact was assessed by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and traumatic stress symptoms were assessed using the Revised Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Inventory. Subjects included physicians (surgeons and anesthesiologists), nurses, and psychotherapists. The rate of response to the mail-in questionnaires was 68.3% (n = 138). The sample consisted of 70 physicians, 37 nurses, and 31 hospital-based psychotherapists. Positive psychological impact was noted for the entire sample and among all professions. Traumatic stress symptoms predicted positive psychological impact for the entire sample and for each profession, and there was a curvilinear relationship between traumatic stress symptoms and positive psychological impact. Women experienced greater levels of positive psychological impact. Hospital-based health care providers treating victims of politically motivated violence experience both positive and negative psychological impact. Individuals who are more traumatized by their experience are more likely to also have a positive psychological impact. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Nationwide registry-based analysis of cancer clustering detects strong familial occurrence of Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eevi Kaasinen

    Full Text Available Many cancer predisposition syndromes are rare or have incomplete penetrance, and traditional epidemiological tools are not well suited for their detection. Here we have used an approach that employs the entire population based data in the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR for analyzing familial aggregation of all types of cancer, in order to find evidence for previously unrecognized cancer susceptibility conditions. We performed a systematic clustering of 878,593 patients in FCR based on family name at birth, municipality of birth, and tumor type, diagnosed between years 1952 and 2011. We also estimated the familial occurrence of the tumor types using cluster score that reflects the proportion of patients belonging to the most significant clusters compared to all patients in Finland. The clustering effort identified 25,910 birth name-municipality based clusters representing 183 different tumor types characterized by topography and morphology. We produced information about familial occurrence of hundreds of tumor types, and many of the tumor types with high cluster score represented known cancer syndromes. Unexpectedly, Kaposi sarcoma (KS also produced a very high score (cluster score 1.91, p-value <0.0001. We verified from population records that many of the KS patients forming the clusters were indeed close relatives, and identified one family with five affected individuals in two generations and several families with two first degree relatives. Our approach is unique in enabling systematic examination of a national epidemiological database to derive evidence of aberrant familial aggregation of all tumor types, both common and rare. It allowed effortless identification of families displaying features of both known as well as potentially novel cancer predisposition conditions, including striking familial aggregation of KS. Further work with high-throughput methods should elucidate the molecular basis of the potentially novel predisposition conditions

  7. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  8. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  9. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  10. Benign Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Benign Liver Tumors Back A tumor is an abnormal growth ... health risk. Frequently Asked Questions How are benign liver tumors detected? In most cases, benign liver tumors ...

  11. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  12. Brain tumor (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  13. Paper 6: EUROCAT member registries: organization and activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenlees, Ruth; Neville, Amanda; Addor, Marie-Claude

    2011-01-01

    EUROCAT is a network of population-based congenital anomaly registries providing standardized epidemiologic information on congenital anomalies in Europe. There are three types of EUROCAT membership: full, associate, or affiliate. Full member registries send individual records of all congenital...... anomalies covered by their region. Associate members transmit aggregate case counts for each EUROCAT anomaly subgroup by year and by type of birth. This article describes the organization and activities of each of the current 29 full member and 6 associate member registries of EUROCAT....

  14. Holt Oram syndrome: a registry-based study in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Boban, Ljubica; Greenlees, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    : The study was based on data collected during 1990-2011 by 34 registries. The registries are population-based and use multiple sources of information to collect data on all types of birth using standardized definitions, methodology and coding. Diagnostic criteria for inclusion in the study were the presence......BACKGROUND: Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by upper limb anomalies and congenital heart defects. We present epidemiological and clinical aspects of HOS patients using data from EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) registries. METHODS...

  15. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  16. Italian registry of cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francone, Marco [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologie, Università di L’Aquila (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pontone, Gianluca [IRCCS Centro Cardiologico Monzino (Italy); Lovato, Luigi [Policlinico S. Orsola Bologna (Italy); Matta, Gildo [Azienda ospedaliera G Brotzu Cagliari (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Maffei, Erica [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pradella, Silvia [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (Italy); Carbone, Iacopo [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marano, Riccardo [Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica Roma (Italy); Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Ospedale Galliera, Genova (Italy); Chiodi, Elisabetta [Ospedale S. Anna Ferrara (Italy); Donato, Rocco [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria G. Martino, Me (Italy); Sbarbati, Stefano [Ospedale Madre Giuseppina Vannini, Roma (Italy); De Cobelli, Francesco [IRCCS S. Raffaele, Università Vita Salute, Milano (Italy); Di Renzi, Paolo [Fate Bene Fratelli Isola tiberina, Roma (Italy); Ligabue, Guido; Mancini, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena (Italy); Palmieri, Francesco [Diparimento di Diagnostica per immagini e radiologia interventistica, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: Forty sites were involved in this multicenter and multivendor registry, which sought to evaluate indications, spectrum of protocols, impact on clinical decision making and safety profile of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Data were prospectively collected on a 6-month period and included 3376 patients (47.2 ± 19 years; range 1–92 years). Recruited centers were asked to complete a preliminary general report followed by a single form/patient. Referral physicians were not required to exhibit any specific certificate of competency in CMR imaging. Results: Exams were performed with 1.5 T scanners in 96% of cases followed by 3 T (3%) and 1 T (1%) magnets and contrast was administered in 84% of cases. The majority of cases were performed for the workup of inflammatory heart disease/cardiomyopathies representing overall 55.7% of exams followed by the assessment of myocardial viability and acute infarction (respectively 6.9% and 5.9% of patients). In 49% of cases the final diagnosis provided was considered relevant and with impact on patient's clinical/therapeutic management. Safety evaluation revealed 30 (0.88%) clinical events, most of which due to patient's preexisting conditions. Radiological reporting was recorded in 73% of exams. Conclusions: CMR is performed in a large number of centers in Italy with relevant impact on clinical decision making and high safety profile.

  17. Adenoid cystic breast carcinoma: is axillary staging necessary in all cases? Results from the California Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kari; Grabowski, Julia; Saltzstein, Sidney L; Sadler, Georgia R; Blair, Sarah L

    2011-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an uncommon type of breast cancer. There are limited data about its epidemiology, tumor characteristics, and outcomes. Using a large, population-based data base, this study aimed to identify specific characteristics of patients with adenoid cystic breast cancer, investigate its natural history, and determine its long-term prognosis. The California Cancer Registry, a population-based registry, was reviewed from the years 1988 to 2006. The data were analyzed with relation to patient age, tumor size and stage, and overall survival. Relative cumulative actuarial survival was determined using the Berkson-Gage life table method. A total of 244 cases of invasive adenoid cystic cancer were identified in women during this time period. The patients' median age was 61.9 years. Most cases were diagnosed in non-Hispanic White women (82%, n = 200), followed by African American (6%, n = 15), Asian/Pacific-Islander (5.7%, n = 14) and Hispanic women (4.4%, n = 12). The remainder of the patients was of unknown or other ethnicity. Tumors were between 1 and 140 mm in size. At the time of diagnosis, 92% (n = 225) of patients had localized disease, 5% (n = 12) of patients had regional disease, and even fewer (n = 7) had either distant or unknown staged disease. Lymph node involvement was not present in any tumors smaller than 1.4 cm. The relative cumulative survival of patients with adenoid cystic breast carcinoma was 95.6% at 5 years and 94.9% at 10 years. ACC of the breast is a rare disease with an overall good prognosis. Knowing that this cancer usually presents as localized disease, with lymph node involvement seen only with larger tumors, can help clinicians plan the operative management of these tumors. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Psoriatic Arthritis Registry of Turkey: results of a multicentre registry on 1081 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Umut; Bayindir, Özün; Ferhat Öksüz, Mustafa; Doğru, Atalay; Kimyon, Gezmiş; Tarhan, Emine Figen; Erden, Abdulsamet; Yavuz, Şule; Can, Meryem; Çetin, Gözde Yıldırım; Kılıç, Levent; Küçükşahin, Orhan; Omma, Ahmet; Ozisler, Cem; Solmaz, Dilek; Bozkirli, Emine Duygu Ersözlü; Akyol, Lütfi; Pehlevan, Seval Masatlıoğlu; Gunal, Esen Kasapoglu; Arslan, Fatos; Yılmazer, Barış; Atakan, Nilgun; Aydın, Sibel Zehra

    2017-02-01

    The aim was to assess the characteristics of PsA, find out how well the disease is controlled in real life, demonstrate the treatments and identify the unmet needs. The PsA registry of Turkey is a multicentre Web-based registry established in 2014 and including 32 rheumatology centres. Detailed data regarding demographics for skin and joint disease, disease activity assessments and treatment choices were collected. One thousand and eighty-one patients (64.7% women) with a mean (sd) PsA duration of 5.8 (6.7) years were enrolled. The most frequent type of PsA was polyarticular [437 (40.5%)], followed by oligoarticular [407 (37.7%)] and axial disease [372 (34.4%)]. The mean (sd) swollen and tender joint counts were 1.7 (3) and 3.6 (4.8), respectively. Of these patients, 38.6% were on conventional synthetic DMARD monotherapy, 7.1% were on anti-TNF monotherapy, and 22.5% were using anti-TNF plus conventional synthetic DMARD combinations. According to DAS28, 86 (12.4%) patients had high and 105 (15.2%) had moderate disease activity. Low disease activity was achieved in 317 (45.7%) patients, and 185 (26.7%) were in remission. Minimal disease activity data could be calculated in 247 patients, 105 of whom (42.5%) had minimal disease activity. The major differences among sexes were that women were older and had less frequent axial disease, more fatigue, higher HAQ scores and less remission. The PsA registry of Turkey had similarities with previously published registries, supporting its external validity. The finding that women had more fatigue and worse functioning as well as the high percentage of active disease state highlight the unmet need in treatment of PsA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_RMP

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  20. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_TSD

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of Hazardous Waste...

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_TSCA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  2. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_WWTP_NPDES

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of Waste Water Treatment...

  3. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_INACTIVE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste...

  4. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AFS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  5. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_CERCLIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  6. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains data on wastewater treatment plants, based on EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS), EPA's Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS)...

  7. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ALL FRS INTERESTS LAYER

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data provides location and attribute information on all facilities in EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for a internet web feature service . The FRS is an...

  8. Human embryonic stem cell registries: value, challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Mai X; Smith, Kelly P; Stein, Gary S

    2008-10-15

    The accelerating pace of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has created an urgent need for the development of hESC registries, information repositories intended to gather, organize and disseminate hESC information. Although of enormous value to this evolving field, registries face significant challenges to their development. These challenges include addressing the legal and ethical issues surrounding hESC derivation as well as complex intellectual property concerns. In addition to these issues, registries must develop tools to efficiently gather, validate and present many different types of hESC information from a variety of sources. Given the pace and regulatory complexities of this field, it is important that registries develop cooperative mechanisms to avoid duplication and more efficiently support hESC research. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AFS_MAJOR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  10. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in...

  11. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in...

  12. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are...

  13. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_EPLAN

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  14. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): CERCLIS_NPL

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that are...

  15. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_LQG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): PCS_NPDES

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  17. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AQS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_TRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_RCRATSD

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  20. Manifestations of Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension From the Intracranial Hypertension Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaswamy, Lalitha

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the Ohio State University, Oregon Health and Science University and Rosalind Franklin School of Medicine examined the presenting manifestations, demographics and treatment strategies in children enrolled in the Intracranial Hypertension Registry (IHR).

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_ACTIVE

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of active hazardous...

  2. Functional Principles of Registry-based Service Discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, V.; Tan, C.; Hartel, Pieter H.; den Hartog, Jeremy; Scholten, Johan

    As Service Discovery Protocols (SDP) are becoming increasingly important for ubiquitous computing, they must behave according to predefined principles. We present the functional Principles of Service Discovery for robust, registry-based service discovery. A methodology to guarantee adherence to

  3. Functional Principles of Registry-based Service Discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, V.; Tan, C.; Hartel, Pieter H.; den Hartog, Jeremy; Scholten, Johan

    2005-01-01

    As Service Discovery Protocols (SDP) are becoming increasingly important for ubiquitous computing, they must behave according to predefined principles. We present the functional Principles of Service Discovery for robust, registry-based service discovery. A methodology to guarantee adherence to

  4. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA_TRANS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  5. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Facility Registry Service (FRS) Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This GIS dataset contains data on wastewater treatment plants, based on EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) and NPDES, along with Clean Watersheds Needs Survey...

  6. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): PCS_NPDES_MAJOR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that are...

  7. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_FRP

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to Facility...

  8. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are...

  9. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studies suggested a link with exposure to trace elements, solvents, radiation, and agricultural chemicals. No confirmed link ... Links Registry Testimonials External Research Get the Facts Infographic Research Resources Biorepository ALS Biorepository Pilot ALS Biorepository ...

  10. Physicians' perceptions, attitudes and expectations regarding the role of hospital-based pharmacists in the West Bank, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Maher R; Alayasa, Kawther S; Alshahed, Qusai N; Hawwa, Ahmed F

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the perceptions, expectations and experiences of physicians with regard to hospital-based pharmacists in the West Bank, Palestine. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 250 physicians practising in four general hospitals in the West Bank, Palestine. The main sections of the questionnaire comprised a series of statements pertaining to physicians' perceptions, expectations and experiences with pharmacists. One hundred and fifty seven questionnaires were completed and returned (response rate, 62.8%). The majority of respondents were most comfortable with pharmacists detecting and preventing prescription errors (76.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 69.5-81.2%) and patient education (57.9%; CI 51.2-63.4%) but they were not comfortable with pharmacists suggesting the use of prescription medications to patients (56.7%; CI 49.8-62.4%). Most physicians (62.4%; CI 56.8-69.1%) expected the pharmacist to educate their patients about the safe and appropriate use of their medication. However, approximately one-third (31.7%; CI 26.0-39.6%) did not expect pharmacists to be available for consultation during rounds. Physicians' experiences with pharmacists were less favourable; whereas 77% (CI 70.2-81.5%) of the physicians agreed that pharmacists were always a reliable source of information, only 11.5% (CI 6.2-16.4%) agreed that pharmacists appeared to be willing to take responsibility for solving any drug-related problems. The present study showed that hospital physicians are more likely to accept traditional pharmacy services than newer clinical services for hospital-based pharmacists in the West Bank, Palestine. Pharmacists should therefore interact more positively and more frequently with physicians. This will close the gap between the physicians' commonly held perceptions of what they expect pharmacists to do and what pharmacists can actually do, and gain support for an extended role of hospital-based pharmacists in future patient therapy management.

  11. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: Opportunities for a National Registry Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenholc, Alexandre; Dodge, Jason; Bréguet, Magali; Sauthier, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    In rare entities such as gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), only multi-institutional registries can gather significant number of patients to build up valuable clinical databases. No Canada-wide GTD registry currently exists. We conducted a survey among members of the Canadian Society of Gynecologic Oncology (GOC) to investigate their interest in a pan-Canadian GTD registry. We also took the opportunity to explore their management of GTD. An electronic survey was conducted. The target group was the entire GOC Canadian Membership. The survey consisted of 25 questions. The survey participation rate was 39% (67/171). Seventy-six percent of responders treat patients with molar pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), and the majority treat only 5 or less cases of molar pregnancy and 5 or less cases of GTN per year. In cases of low-risk GTN, 80% of responders use generally recommended single-agent chemotherapy regimens. In cases of high-risk GTN, 76% use generally recommended multiagent chemotherapy regimens. Most respondents do not submit either molar pregnancy or GTN patients to any formal registry, although the vast majority (92%) would do so if they had access to a registry, given that most believe that a registry can or probably can help patients with GTD. Responders indicated that the jurisdiction of such a registry should be national (59%), provincial (25%), and regional (11%). Despite some variation, responders were generally knowledgeable about contemporary management issues. Canadian Society of Gynecologic Oncology members acknowledge generally low exposure to GTD patients in Canada and support the creation of a national GTD registry to facilitate optimal patient care, education, and research.

  12. Architecture for Variable Data Entry into a National Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, William

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch perinatal registry required a new architecture due to the large variability of the submitted data from midwives and hospitals. The purpose of this article is to describe the healthcare information architecture for the Dutch perinatal registry. requirements analysis, design, development and testing. The architecture is depicted for its components and preliminary test results. The data entry and storage work well, the Data Marts are under preparation.

  13. Cancer-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome: analysis of 85 cases from a national registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesesne, J B; Rothschild, N; Erickson, B; Korec, S; Sisk, R; Keller, J; Arbus, M; Woolley, P V; Chiazze, L; Schein, P S

    1989-06-01

    A registry of suspected cases of cancer-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (C-HUS) was established in May 1984. Records of 85 patients from the registry, all with history of cancer, hematocrit less than or equal to 25%, platelet count less than 100,000, and serum creatinine greater than or equal to 1.6 mg/dL were subjected to in-depth analysis. Eighty-nine percent of patients had adenocarcinoma, including 26% with gastric cancer. Microangiopathic hemolysis was reported in 83 patients; coagulation studies were normal with rare exception. Bone marrow examination ruled out chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression in 68 of 85. Thirty-five percent of patients were without evident cancer at time of syndrome development. Mitomycin (MMC) was part of the treatment regimen in 84 patients; all but nine received a cumulative dose greater than 60 mg. Pulmonary edema, generally noncardiogenic, developed in 65% of patients, often after blood product transfusions. C-HUS has a high mortality: over 50% of patients died of or with syndrome, most within 8 weeks of syndrome development. Conventional treatment was ineffective, although ten of 21 treated with staphylococcal protein A (SPA) immunopheresis showed significant responses. Statistical analysis found only absence of obvious tumor and treatment with SPA to suggest favorable prognosis. C-HUS is distinguishable from related syndromes such as childhood HUS, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), consumption coagulopathy, and microangiopathic hemolysis associated with advanced carcinoma. MMC is likely involved in the development of C-HUS; the risk of developing C-HUS after treatment with MMC is between 4% and 15%. However, possible bias in patients referred to the registry and reports of non-MMC C-HUS cases must be remembered. Recommendations include careful monitoring of renal and hematologic function in patients treated with MMC, aggressive nontransfusion in patients with suspected C-HUS, and consideration of treatment with SPA

  14. Risk of malignancy with systemic psoriasis treatment in the Psoriasis Longitudinal Assessment Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, David; Ho, Vincent; Lebwohl, Mark G; Leite, Luiz; Hopkins, Lori; Galindo, Claudia; Goyal, Kavitha; Langholff, Wayne; Fakharzadeh, Steven; Srivastava, Bhaskar; Langley, Richard G

    2017-11-01

    The effect of systemic therapy on malignancy risk among patients with psoriasis is not fully understood. Evaluate the impact of systemic treatment on malignancy risk among patients with psoriasis in the Psoriasis Longitudinal Assessment and Registry (PSOLAR). Nested case-control analyses were performed among patients with no history of malignancy. Cases were defined as first malignancy (other than nonmelanoma skin cancer) in the Psoriasis Longitudinal Assessment and Registry, and controls were matched by age, sex, geographic region, and time on registry. Study therapies included methotrexate, ustekinumab, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors. Exposure was defined as 1 or more doses of study therapy within 12 months of malignancy onset and further stratified by duration of therapy. Multivariate conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders, was used to estimate odds ratios of malignancies associated with therapy. Among 12,090 patients, 252 malignancy cases were identified and 1008 controls were matched. Treatment with methotrexate or ustekinumab for more than 0 months to less than 3 months, 3 months to less than 12 months, or 12 months or longer was not associated with increased malignancy risk versus no exposure. Longer-term (≥12 months) (odds ratio, 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.15; P = .01), but not shorter-term treatment, with a TNF-α inhibitor was associated with increased malignancy risk. Cases and controls could belong to 1 or more therapy categories. Long-term (≥12 months) treatment with a TNF-α inhibitor, but not methotrexate and ustekinumab, may increase risk for malignancy in patients with psoriasis. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Utility of rare disease registries in latin america.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana Maria; Kerstenezky, Marcelo; Linares, Adriana; Politei, Juan; Kohan, Regina; Ospina, Sandra; Varas, Carmen; Villalobos, Jacobo; Amartino, Hernán; Franco, Sergio; Valadez, Guilhermo; Giugliani, Roberto; Guerra, Patricio; Sanches, Luz

    2011-01-01

    There are many registries in Latin America as dialysis and kidney transplantation, breast cancer, primary immunodeficiency, acute coronary syndromes, but the focus here are the registries of lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) because is our experience. Registry of Gaucher disease, Fabry disease, Pompe disease, and mucopolysaccharidosis type I are comprehensive observational voluntary programs that aim to collect clinical and laboratory data of initiation, progression, and evolution of those diseases, with and without treatment, using questionnaires of quality of life and/or skills and functions. There are two more programs of LSD: Hunter outcome survey and Fabry outcome survey. The registries are a kind of phase IV clinical trials, postmarketing studies delineate additional information including the drug's risks, benefits, and optimal use, and in addition we have data from natural history. The demographics of the Gaucher, Fabry, MPS I, and Pompe Registries show that a total of patients, being 16%, 8%, 15%, and 7%, respectively, of this population, and 19%, 19%, 18%, and 13%, respectively, of all physicians participating in the program are from Latin America. In the Gaucher Registry, we can observe that the percentage of children in Latin America (29%) is bigger than the rest of the world (20%), what can mean more severe disease in this population. These diseases are rare, and a database of clinical data from a larger number of patients gives us the opportunity to know about the natural history of these diseases, their phenotypic variability, and the response to specific enzyme replacement therapy in our population.

  16. The Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR): an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2013-02-01

    The primary aim of the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR) is on understanding developmental changes in genetic, environmental, and neurobiological influences on internalizing and externalizing disorders, with antisocial behavior and disordered eating representing our particular areas of interest. The MSUTR has two broad components: a large-scale, population-based registry of child, adolescent, and adult twins and their families (current N ~20,000) and a series of more focused and in-depth studies drawn from the registry (current N ~4,000). Participants in the population-based registry complete a family health and demographic questionnaire via mail. Families are then recruited for one or more of the intensive, in-person studies from the population-based registry based on their answers to relevant items in the registry questionnaire. These in-person assessments target a variety of biological, genetic, and environmental phenotypes, including multi-informant measures of psychiatric and behavioral phenotypes, census and neighborhood informant reports of twin neighborhood characteristics, buccal swab and salivary DNA samples, assays of adolescent and adult steroid hormone levels, and/or videotaped interactions of child twin families. This article provides an overview of the MSUTR and describes current and future research directions.

  17. Presenting an Evaluation Model for the Cancer Registry Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Asadi, Farkhondeh; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Farough; Shahbodaghi, Reihaneh

    2017-12-01

    As cancer is increasingly growing, cancer registry is of great importance as the main core of cancer control programs, and many different software has been designed for this purpose. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive evaluation model is essential to evaluate and compare a wide range of such software. In this study, the criteria of the cancer registry software have been determined by studying the documents and two functional software of this field. The evaluation tool was a checklist and in order to validate the model, this checklist was presented to experts in the form of a questionnaire. To analyze the results of validation, an agreed coefficient of %75 was determined in order to apply changes. Finally, when the model was approved, the final version of the evaluation model for the cancer registry software was presented. The evaluation model of this study contains tool and method of evaluation. The evaluation tool is a checklist including the general and specific criteria of the cancer registry software along with their sub-criteria. The evaluation method of this study was chosen as a criteria-based evaluation method based on the findings. The model of this study encompasses various dimensions of cancer registry software and a proper method for evaluating it. The strong point of this evaluation model is the separation between general criteria and the specific ones, while trying to fulfill the comprehensiveness of the criteria. Since this model has been validated, it can be used as a standard to evaluate the cancer registry software.

  18. [Lazio dialysis registry: natives vs foreigners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Anteo; Lapucci, Enrica; Baglio, Giovanni; Di Giulio, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of foreigners was observed in Italy even among chronic dialysis patients. We compared demographic, clinical, treatment characteristics and survival probability between groups of Italian and foreign patients with chronic dialysis in Lazio. We analysed data from the Lazio Dialysis and Transplantation Registry from 2004 to 2012 (4,076 prevalent chronic dialysis patients in 31-12-2012). Among 7,970 incident patients, we evaluated, by country of birth, survival probability by using Kaplan-Meier method and mortality risk, through multiple Cox regression. We observed an increase of foreigners among chronic dialysis patients in Lazio from 2004 (4.4%) up to 2012 (7.6%, test for trend: pforeign patients were younger (53.816.3 vs. 68.713.6) and more frequently: women (42.7% vs. 37.7%), HbsAg-positive (18.1% vs. 13.9%), not vaccinated if HBV susceptible (26.8% vs. 20.9%), late referral (21.6% vs. 12.9%) and suitable for kidney transplantation (21.7% vs. 9.9%). Foreigners compared with Italians had higher survival probability at 1 year (91.9% vs. 84.7%) and 5 years (74,6% vs. 51,5%) after chronic dialysis has been started. We observed a lower mortality risk (HR=0.71;IC95%:0.58-0.87) among foreign patients even after adjustment for many potential confounding factors. Our findings suggest that health status and treatment of end stage renal disease, including access to kidney transplantation, were similar between groups of Italian and foreign patients in Lazio. Observed differences in patients' characteristics were probably attributable to younger age of foreigners. However, further analyses are needed to fully explain higher survival probability in chronic dialysis among foreigners compared with Italians.

  19. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in cancer immunotherapy: report of the international registry on CIK cells (IRCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeel, Leonard Christopher; Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Coch, Christoph; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2015-05-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent an exceptional T cell population uniting a T cell and natural killer cell like phenotype in their terminally differentiated CD3(+)CD56(+) subset, which features non-MHC-restricted tumor-killing activity. CIK cells are expandable from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mature following the addition of certain cytokines. CIK cells have provided encouraging results in initial clinical studies and revealed synergistic antitumor effects when combined with standard therapeutic procedures. Therefore, we established the international registry on CIK cells in order to collect and evaluate data about clinical trials using CIK cells for the treatment of cancer patients. Moreover, our registry is expected to set new standards on the reporting of results from clinical trials using CIK cells. Clinical responses, overall survival (OS), adverse reactions and immunologic effects were analyzed in 45 studies present in our database. These studies investigated 22 different tumor entities altogether enrolling 2,729 patients. A mean response rate of 39 % and significantly increased OS, accompanied by an improved quality of life, were reported. Interestingly, side effects of CIK cell treatment were minor. Mild fevers, chills, headache and fatigue were, however, seen regularly after CIK cell infusion. Moreover, CIK cells revealed numerous immunologic effects such as changes in T cell subsets, tumor markers, cytokine secretion and HBV viral load. Due to their easy availability and potent antitumor activity, CIK cells emerged as a promising immunotherapy approach in oncology and may gain major importance on the prognosis of cancer.

  20. One of a Kind - The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, a regional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (www.pactr.org), was established in early 2007 as the AIDS, TB and Malaria (ATM) Clinical Trials Registry with the aim of piloting the concept of a registry that would cater to the specific needs of African trialists. In 2009 the ATM Registry expanded its remit to include all diseases for all ...

  1. Continuous quality improvement programs provide new opportunities to drive value innovation initiatives in hospital-based radiology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Schomer, Don F

    2009-07-01

    Imaging services constitute a huge portion of the of the total dollar investment within the health care enterprise. Accordingly, this generates competition among medical specialties organized along service lines for their pieces of the pie and increased scrutiny from third-party payers and government regulators. These market and political forces create challenge and opportunity for a hospital-based radiology practice. Clearly, change that creates or builds greater value for patients also creates sustainable competitive advantage for a radiology practice. The somewhat amorphous concept of quality constitutes a significant value driver for innovation in this scenario. Quality initiatives and programs seek to define and manage this amorphous concept and provide tools for a radiology practice to create or build more value. Leadership and the early adoption of these inevitable programs by a radiology practice strengthens relationships with hospital partners and slows the attrition of imaging service lines to competitors.

  2. Clinical Signs, Causes, and Risk Factors of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Diseases: a Hospital-based Case-control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsa Yousefichaijan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background This retrospective study aimed to determine the epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors of chronic kidney diseases (CKD in patients < 18 years old at a single referral center. Materials and Methods In a hospital-based case control study, 66 CKD patients less than 18 years old were compared to 81 control patients (also under 18 without CKD. A patient was defined as a CKD case with renal injury and/or had a glomerular filtration rate (GFR of Results Fever, chills, and urinary tract infections were the most common clinical signs in the referred patients. Urinary tract infection (39.5% and growth failure (12.9% were the most important causes in referred pediatric CKD. After controlling the effect of confounding variables, household income, using packed water for drinking, percentile of body mass index (BMI, and gestational age were the significant predictors of pediatric CKD (P

  3. Some clinico-epidemiological aspect of bronchiolitis among infants and young children--a hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, P K; Saha, J B; Basu, K; Lahiri, S; Sarkar, G N

    2003-01-01

    A hospital based prospective study was carried out from 1st October 1998 to 30th September 1999 on children with clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis in OPD and indoor patients of the Department of Paediatric Medicine, Medical College Kolkata. The objective of the study was to find out the proportional case rate and clinico epidemiological features of the disease. The effectiveness of nebulized salbutamol among bronchiolitis children was also looked into. The proportional case rate was found to be 4.65%. Low birth weight (LBW)/premature babies (51.11%) malnutrition (40%), nonimmunization (55.55%) & non breastfeeding practices (48.88%) were significant risk factors for severe bronchiolitis. Response to nebulized salbutamol was remarkably higher (70%) in 6m to 12m age group.

  4. A hospital-based child and adolescent overweight and obesity treatment protocol transferred into a community healthcare setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Pernille Maria; Gamborg, Michael Orland; Trier, Cæcilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the pandemic of child and adolescent overweight and obesity, improvements in overweight and obesity treatment availability and accessibility are needed. METHODS: In this prospective study, we investigated if reductions in body mass index (BMI) standard deviation scores (SDS...... was invested per child per year. CONCLUSION: BMI SDS and WC were reduced after 1.5 years of treatment. Hence, this community-based overweight and obesity treatment program may help accommodate the need for improvements in treatment availability and accessibility.......) and waist circumference (WC) would occur during 1.5 years of community-based overweight and obesity treatment based upon an effective hospital-based overweight and obesity treatment protocol, The Children's Obesity Clinics' Treatment protocol. Height, weight, and WC were measured at all consultations...

  5. Do Cervical Cancer Patients Diagnosed with Opportunistic Screening Live Longer? An Arkhangelsk Cancer Registry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena E. Roik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to compare cervical cancer (СС patients diagnosed with and without screening in terms of: (i sociodemographic and clinical characteristics; (ii factors associated with survival; and (iii, and levels of risk. A registry-based study was conducted using data from the Arkhangelsk Cancer Registry. It included women with newly diagnosed malignant neoplasm of the uterine cervix during the period of 1 January 2005 to 11 November 2016 (N = 1548. The Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Cox regression were applied. Most participants who were diagnosed by screening were at stage I and died less frequently from CC than those diagnosed without screening. The latter group was also diagnosed with СС at a younger age and died younger. Younger individuals and urban residents diagnosed with stage I and II, squamous cell carcinoma had longer survival times. Cox regression modeling indicated that the hazard ratio for death among women with CC diagnosed without screening was 1.61 (unadjusted and 1.37 (adjusted. CC diagnosed by screening, cancer stage, patient residence, histological tumor type, and age at diagnosis were independent prognostic variables of longer survival time with CC. Diagnosis of CC made within a screening program improved survival.

  6. Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry Surveillance - four states, 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mary G; Tong, Xin; McGruder, Henraya; Yoon, Paula; Rosamond, Wayne; Winquist, Andrea; Hinchey, Judith; Wall, Hilary K; Pandey, Dilip K

    2009-11-06

    Each year, approximately 795,000 persons in the United States experience a new or recurrent stroke. Data from the prototype phase (2001-2004) of the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry (PCNASR) suggested that numerous acute stroke patients did not receive treatment according to established guidelines. This report summarizes PCNASR data collected during 2005-2007 from Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, the first states to have PCNASRs implemented in and led by state health departments. PCNASR was established by CDC in 2001 to track and improve the quality of hospital-based acute stroke care. The prototype phase (2001-2004) registries were led by CDC-funded clinical investigators in academic and medical institutions, whereas the full implementation of the 2005-2007 statewide registries was led by CDC-funded state health departments. Health departments in each state recruit hospitals to collect data. To be included in PCNASR, patients must be aged >or=18 years and have a clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or transient ischemic attack (TIA) or an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code indicative of a stroke or TIA. Data for patients who are already hospitalized at the time of stroke are not included. The following 10 performance measures of care, based on established guidelines for care of acute stroke patients, were developed by CDC in partnership with neurologists who specialize in stroke care: 1) received deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, 2) received antithrombotic therapy at discharge, 3) received anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation, 4) received tissue plasminogen activator (among eligible patients), 5) received antithrombotic therapy within 48 hours of admission or by the end of the second hospital day, 6) received lipid level testing, 7) received dysphagia screening, 8) received stroke education, 9

  7. The European Renal Association ? European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry Annual Report 2014: a summary

    OpenAIRE

    Pippias, Maria; Kramer, Anneke; Noordzij, Marlies; Afentakis, Nikolaos; Alonso de la Torre, Ram?n; Amb?hl, Patrice M.; Aparicio Madre, Manuel I.; Arribas Monz?n, Felipe; ?sberg, Anders; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Bouzas Caama?o, Encarnaci?n; Bubic, Ivan; Caskey, Fergus J.; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Cernevskis, Harijs

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This article summarizes the European Renal Association ? European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry?s 2014 annual report. It describes the epidemiology of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 2014 within 35 countries. Methods: In 2016, the ERA-EDTA Registry received data on patients who in 2014 where undergoing RRT for ESRD, from 51 national or regional renal registries. Thirty-two registries provided individual patient level da...

  8. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2011 experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J; Wax, Paul M; Schwartz, Tayler; Finkelstein, Yaron; Gorodetsky, Rachel; Brent, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). ToxIC is a prospective registry, which exclusively compiles suspected and confirmed toxic exposure cases cared for at the bedside by medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The Registry aims to fulfill two important gaps in the field: a real-time toxicosurveillance system to identify current poisoning trends and a powerful research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows extraction of information from medical records making it the most robust multicenter database on chemical toxicities in existence. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered in a database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2011 was tabulated. 2010 data was also included so that cumulative total numbers could be described as well. The current report is a summary of the data collected in 2011 in comparison to 2010 entries and also includes cumulative data through December 31st, 2011. During 2011, 28 sites with 49 specific institutions contributed a total of 6,456 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the registry at the end of 2011 was 10,392. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultations in 2011, accounting for 53 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdoses, which occurred in 48 % of patients, including intentional (37 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,492 entries in 23 % of cases), non-opioid analgesics (1,368 cases in 21 % of cases), opioids (17 %), antidepressants (16 %), stimulants/sympathomimetics (12 %), and ethanol (8 %). N-acetylcysteine was the most commonly administered antidote during 2011, similar to 2010, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab fragments (CroFab) were

  9. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2014 Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Campleman, Sharan L; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry was queried for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender, ethnicity), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. In 2014, 9172 cases were entered in the Registry across 47 active member sites. Females accounted for 51.1 % of cases. The majority (65.1 %) of cases were adults between the ages of 19 and 65. Caucasians made up the largest identified ethnic group (48.9 %). Most Registry cases originated from the inpatient setting (93.5 %), with a large majority of these consultations coming from the emergency department or inpatient admission services. Intentional and unintentional pharmaceutical exposures continued to be the most frequent reasons for consultation, accounting for 61.7 % of cases. Among cases of intentional pharmaceutical exposure, 62.4 % were associated with a self-harm attempt. Non-pharmaceutical exposures accounted for 14.1 % of Registry cases. Similar to the past years, non-opioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Clinical signs or symptoms were noted in 81.9 % of cases. There were 89 recorded fatalities (0.97 %). Medical treatment (e.g., antidotes, antivenom, chelators, supportive care) was rendered in 62.3 % of cases. Patient demographics and exposure characteristics in 2014 Registry cases remain similar to prior years. The majority of consultations arose in the acute care setting (emergency department or inpatient) and involved exposures to pharmaceutical products. Among exposures, non-opioid analgesics, sedative/hypnotics, and opioids were the most frequently

  10. Establishment of an Australian National Genetic Heart Disease Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Vohra, Jitendra; Weintraub, Robert G; Davis, Andrew; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry has recently been established, with the aim to enroll every family in Australia with a genetically determined cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmic disorder. The Registry seeks to further our understanding of the impact and burden of disease in this population; increase awareness and provide education to health professionals and families; and establish a large cardiac genetic cohort as a resource for approved research studies. The Registry is currently recruiting families with inherited cardiomyopathies (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and primary arrhythmogenic disorders (e.g. long QT syndrome), with scope to expand this in the future. Affected individuals, as well as their first-degree (at-risk) family members are eligible to enroll. Participants are currently being recruited from cardiac genetics clinics in approved recruitment sites and hope to expand to other Australian centres including general cardiology practice in the future. A significant focus of the Registry is to improve understanding and create awareness of inherited heart diseases, which includes ensuring families are aware of genetic testing options and current clinical screening recommendations for at-risk family members. A Registry Advisory Committee has been established under the NHMRC Guidelines, and includes a representative from each major recruitment centre. This committee approves all decisions relating to the Registry including approval of research studies. A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry will provide a valuable resource to further our knowledge of the clinical and genetic aspects of these diseases. Since most of the current data about the prevalence, natural history and outcomes of genetic heart diseases has emanated from the United States and Europe, characterising these Australian populations will be of significant benefit, allowing for more informed and specific health care planning and resource provision.

  11. Cholecystokinin expression in tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2016-01-01

    in different neuroendocrine tumors; cerebral gliomas and astrocytomas and specific pediatric tumors. Tumor hypersecretion of CCK was recently reported in a patient with a metastatic islet cell tumor and hypercholecystokininemia resulting in a novel tumor syndrome, the cholecystokininoma syndrome. This review...

  12. Spatial analysis of myocardial infarction in Iran: National report from the Iranian myocardial infarction registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myocardial infarction (MI is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Iran. No spatial analysis of MI has been conducted to date. The present study was conducted to determine the pattern of MI incidence and to identify the associated factors in Iran by province. Materials and Methods: This study has two parts. One part is prospective and hospital-based, and the other part is an ecological study. In this study, the data of 20,750 new MI cases registered in Iranian Myocardial Infarction Registry in 2012 were used. For spatial analysis in global and local, spatial autocorrelation, Moran′s I, Getis-Ord, and logistic regression models were used. Data were analyzed by Stata software and ArcGIS 9.3. Results: Based on autocorrelation coefficient, a specific pattern was observed in the distribution of MI incidence in different provinces (Moran′s I: 0.75, P < 0.001. Spatial pattern of incidence was approximately the same in men and women. MI incidence was clustering in six provinces (North Khorasan, Yazd, Kerman, Semnan, Golestan, and Mazandaran. Out of the associated factors with clustered MI in six provinces, temperature, humidity, hypertension, smoking, and body mass index (BMI could be mentioned. Hypertension, smoking, and BMI contributed to clustering with, respectively, 2.36, 1.31, and 1.31 odds ratio. Conclusion: Addressing the place-based pattern of incidence and clarifying their epidemiologic dimension, including spatial analysis, has not yet been implemented in Iran. Report on MI incidence rate by place and formal borders is useful and is used in the planning and prioritization in different levels of health system.

  13. Thyroid cancer and multiple primary tumors in the SEER cancer registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronckers, Cécile M.; McCarron, Peter; Ron, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence rates have increased steadily in the United States and elsewhere. Radiation exposure at a young age is a strong risk factor, but otherwise the etiology is unclear. To explore etiologic clues, we studied the risk of thyroid cancer after an earlier primary cancer, as well as

  14. [Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szporek, Bozena J; Cieślik, Tadeusz; Jedrzejewski, Piotr W; Lipiarz, Ludwik Z

    2005-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which was first described by Pindborg in 1955 representing only 1% of all odontogenic tumors. The tumor has an ectodermal odontogenic origin. This tumor are considered benign but can be locally aggressive in nature with recurrence rates of 10-15% reported. Surgical treatment varies from simply enucleation to partial resection of the affected bone. Since 1973 three cases only of the Pinborg tumor have been presented in the Polish literature. We described the case of a 44-year-old man with Pindborg tumor in the right maxilla. Standard x-ray examinations and CT scan were performed in order to obtain information about tumor's localization. Autors discuss the radiologic features of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor and treatment method and the relevant literature.

  15. Epidemiology of hypospadias in Europe: a registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Jorieke E H; Loane, Maria; Vrijheid, Martine; Pierini, Anna; Nijman, Rien J M; Addor, Marie-Claude; Barisic, Ingeborg; Béres, Judit; Braz, Paula; Budd, Judith; Delaney, Virginia; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsøyr, Kari; Martos, Carmen; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Catherine; Tucker, David; Wellesley, Diana; Zymak-Zakutnia, Natalya; Bakker, Marian K; de Walle, Hermien E K

    2015-12-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital malformation. The prevalence of hypospadias has a large geographical variation, and recent studies have reported both increasing and decreasing temporal trends. It is unclear whether hypospadias prevalence is associated with maternal age. To analyze the prevalence and trends of total hypospadias, isolated hypospadias, hypospadias with multiple congenital anomalies, hypospadias with a known cause, and hypospadias severity subtypes in Europe over a 10-year period and to investigate whether maternal age is associated with hypospadias. We included all children with hypospadias born from 2001 to 2010 who were registered in 23 EUROCAT registries. Information on the total number of births and maternal age distribution for the registry population was also provided. We analyzed the total prevalence of hypospadias and relative risks by maternal age. From 2001 to 2010, 10,929 hypospadias cases were registered in 5,871,855 births, yielding a total prevalence of 18.61 per 10,000 births. Prevalence varied considerably between different registries, probably due to differences in ascertainment of hypospadias cases. No significant temporal trends were observed with the exceptions of an increasing trend for anterior and posterior hypospadias and a decreasing trend for unspecified hypospadias. After adjusting for registry effects, maternal age was not significantly associated with hypospadias. Total hypospadias prevalence was stable in 23 EUROCAT registries from 2001 to 2010 and was not significantly influenced by maternal age.

  16. Construction and management of ARDS/sepsis registry with REDCap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoqing; Kozlowski, Natascha; Wu, Sulong; Jiang, Mei; Huang, Yongbo; Mao, Pu; Liu, Xiaoqing; He, Weiqun; Huang, Chaoyi; Li, Yimin; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-09-01

    The study aimed to construct and manage an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)/sepsis registry that can be used for data warehousing and clinical research. The workflow methodology and software solution of research electronic data capture (REDCap) was used to construct the ARDS/sepsis registry. Clinical data from ARDS and sepsis patients registered to the intensive care unit (ICU) of our hospital formed the registry. These data were converted to the electronic case report form (eCRF) format used in REDCap by trained medical staff. Data validation, quality control, and database management were conducted to ensure data integrity. The clinical data of 67 patients registered to the ICU between June 2013 and December 2013 were analyzed. Of the 67 patients, 45 (67.2%) were classified as sepsis, 14 (20.9%) as ARDS, and eight (11.9%) as sepsis-associated ARDS. The patients' information, comprising demographic characteristics, medical history, clinical interventions, daily assessment, clinical outcome, and follow-up data, was properly managed and safely stored in the ARDS/sepsis registry. Data efficiency was guaranteed by performing data collection and data entry twice weekly and every two weeks, respectively. The ARDS/sepsis database that we constructed and manage with REDCap in the ICU can provide a solid foundation for translational research on the clinical data of interest, and a model for development of other medical registries in the future.

  17. Spine Tango in Turkish: Development of a Local Registry System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcek, Alp Ozgun; Bulduk, Erkut B; Civi, Soner; Emmez, Hakan; Kaymaz, Memduh

    2017-01-01

    Successfully established registry systems, rather than personal efforts to collect data, are required to record, analyze, compare and secure patient related data. Unfortunately, our country does not have such patient registry systems for spinal pathologies and surgeries at this time. In order to fill this gap in patient management in Turkey, the authors adopted already established Spine Tango registry system in a unique way answering the requirements of our health system. This article aims to present the adaptation process of Spine Tango forms for use in Turkish and describe the first implementation with 50 patients treated for spinal pathologies in a tertiary referral center. In 2011, an effort was initiated by the first author to translate the original Spine Tango forms into Turkish. Funding for this project was provided by authors themselves. With the assistance of a Spine Tango team, the translation process was completed. The Turkish forms were then used in an academic institution with a high spinal workload. A local solution was developed by the authors using commercially available software and mobile instruments. This system was tested with 50 spine patients from June 2012 to January 2013. The analysis of the data gathered using the new Turkey Spine Tango registry system was successful. In an environment of exponentially increasing medical data, successfully established registry systems have the potential to facilitate patient management. The authors recommend the use of Turkish Spine Tango forms for clinics performing spinal interventions.

  18. Evaluation of data quality at the Gambia national cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Yusuke; Bah, Ebrima; Wild, Christopher P; Hall, Andrew J

    2013-02-01

    The Gambia National Cancer Registry (GNCR) is one of the few nationwide population-based cancer registries in sub-Saharan Africa. Most registries in sub-Saharan Africa are limited to cities; therefore, the GNCR is important in providing estimates of cancer incidence in rural Africa. Our study assesses the quality of its data. The methods proposed by Bray and Parkin, and Parkin and Bray (Eur J Cancer 2009;45:747-64) were applied to the registry data from 1990 to 2009 to assess comparability, validity and completeness. The system used for classification and coding of neoplasms followed international standards. The percentage of cases morphologically verified was 18.1% for men and 33.1% for women, and that of death certificate only cases was 6.6 and 3.6%, respectively. Incidence rates in rural regions were lower than in the urban part of the country, except amongst young male adults. Comparison with other West African registries showed that the incidences of liver and uterine cervical cancer were comparable, but those of prostate and breast in The Gambia were relatively low. The overall completeness was estimated at 50.3% using the capture-recapture method. The GNCR applies international standard practices to data collection and handling, providing valuable data on cancer incidence in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the data are incomplete in the rural and elderly populations probably because of health care access and use. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  19. Hospital-at-home Integrated Care Program for Older Patients With Orthopedic Processes: An Efficient Alternative to Usual Hospital-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closa, Conxita; Mas, Miquel À; Santaeugènia, Sebastià J; Inzitari, Marco; Ribera, Aida; Gallofré, Miquel

    2017-09-01

    To compare outcomes and costs for patients with orthogeriatric conditions in a home-based integrated care program versus conventional hospital-based care. Quasi-experimental longitudinal study. An acute care hospital, an intermediate care hospital, and the community of an urban area in the North of Barcelona, in Southern Europe. In a 2-year period, we recruited 367 older patients attended at an orthopedic/traumatology unit in an acute hospital for fractures and/or arthroplasty. Patients were referred to a hospital-at-home integrated care unit or to standard hospital-based postacute orthogeriatric unit, based on their social support and availability of the resource. We compared home-based care versus hospital-based care for Relative Functional Gain (gain/loss of function measured by the Barthel Index), mean direct costs, and potential savings in terms of reduction of stay in the acute care hospital. No differences were found in Relative Functional Gain, median (Q25-Q75) = 0.92 (0.64-1.09) in the home-based group versus 0.93 (0.59-1) in the hospital-based group, P =.333. Total health service direct cost [mean (standard deviation)] was significantly lower for patients receiving home-based care: €7120 (3381) versus €12,149 (6322), P home-based care [10.1 (7)] than in patients discharged to the postacute orthogeriatric hospital-based unit [15.3 (12) days, P home integrated care program was suitable for managing older patients with orthopedic conditions who have good social support for home care. It provided clinical care comparable to the hospital-based model, and it seems to enable earlier acute hospital discharge and lower direct costs. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival Prediction in Head and Neck Cancer: Impact of Tumor and Patient Specific Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Datema (Frank)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHead and neck cancer accounts for almost 5% of all malignant tumors in the Netherlands. The most up‐todate Dutch Cancer Registry (NCR) database from 2009 reported 2878 new patients with an invasive carcinoma of the lip, oral cavity, pharynx and larynx (general incidence 17:100.000). In