WorldWideScience

Sample records for hospital infection control

  1. Infection control in Indonesian Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Duerink, Daphne Offra

    2009-01-01

    The studies in this thesis were performed as part of the AMRIN (Antimicrobial Resistance in Indonesia) study that addressed antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic usage and infection control in Indonesia. They are the first studies that give insight into the incidence of healthcare-associated infections, determinants for carriage of resistant bacteria in Indonesian individuals and the implementation of measures for the prevention of the spread of bacteria and nosocomial infections in Indonesian...

  2. Infection control in Indonesian Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duerink, Daphne Offra

    2009-01-01

    The studies in this thesis were performed as part of the AMRIN (Antimicrobial Resistance in Indonesia) study that addressed antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic usage and infection control in Indonesia. They are the first studies that give insight into the incidence of healthcare-associated

  3. Organization of infection control in European hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S; Zingg, W; Ahmad, R; Kyratsis, Y; Behnke, M; Schwab, F; Pittet, D; Gastmeier, P

    2015-12-01

    The Prevention of Hospital Infections by Intervention and Training (PROHIBIT) survey was initiated to investigate the status of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) prevention across Europe. This paper presents the methodology of the quantitative PROHIBIT survey and outlines the findings on infection control (IC) structure and organization including management's support at the hospital level. Hospitals in 34 countries were invited to participate between September 2011 and March 2012. Respondents included IC personnel and hospital management. Data from 309 hospitals in 24 countries were analysed. Hospitals had a median (interquartile range) of four IC nurses (2-6) and one IC doctor (0-2) per 1000 beds. Almost all hospitals (96%) had defined IC objectives, which mainly addressed hand hygiene (87%), healthcare-associated infection reduction (84%), and antibiotic stewardship (66%). Senior management provided leadership walk rounds in about half of hospitals, most often in Eastern and Northern Europe, 65% and 64%, respectively. In the majority of hospitals (71%), sanctions were not employed for repeated violations of IC practices. Use of sanctions varied significantly by region (P hospitals should be a public health priority. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Hospital design for better infection control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateef Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical design and infrastructure of a hospital or institution is an essential component of its infection control measure. Thus is must be a prerequisite to take these into consideration from the initial conception and planning stages of the building. The balance between designing a hospital to be an open, accessible and public place and the control to reduce the spread of infections diseases is a necessity. At Singapore General Hospital, many lessons were learnt during the SARS outbreak pertaining to this. During and subsequent to the SARS outbreak, many changes evolved in the hospital to enable us to handle and face any emerging infectious situation with calm, confidence and the knowledge that staff and patients will be in good stead. This paper will share some of our experiences as well as challenges

  5. Infection prevention and control practices in children's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Jeffrey M; Virgallito, Mary; Newland, Jason G; Sammons, Julia S; Thorell, Emily A; Coffin, Susan E; Pavia, Andrew T; Sandora, Thomas J; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-05-01

    We surveyed hospital epidemiologists at 28 Children's Hospital Association member hospitals regarding their infection prevention and control programs. We found substantial variability between children's hospitals in both the structure and the practice of these programs. Research and the development of evidence-based guidelines addressing infection prevention in pediatrics are needed.

  6. [Critical role of clinical laboratories in hospital infection control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The hospital infection control and prevention is recognized to be more and more important according to the advances in modern medical treatment and care. Clinical microbiology laboratory play critical roles in the hospital infection control as a member of infection control team (ICT). They are the first in a hospital to identify outbreak of MRSA in NICU and molecular epidemiological analysis of the isolates lead proper intervention of ICT to the concerned ward. From a viewpoint of infectious disease specialist, rapid and precise microbiological information is essential for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Each medical technologist need to make efforts to understand the characteristics of the examinations for infectious diseases and send out information useful for clinical practices. In our hospital, with the participation of all members of medical technologists, rapid reporting system was developed for blood culture examinations, which greatly contribute to the appropriate treatment of bloodstream infections. Collaborations of clinical microbiology laboratory with other members of ICT realize high quality hospital infection control. They also need to be aware of themselves as good practitioners of infection control measures to prevent hospital infections.

  7. [Infection control and safety culture in German hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sonja; Schwab, Frank; Gropmann, Alexander; Behnke, Michael; Gastmeier, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are the most frequent adverse events in the healthcare setting and their prevention is an important contribution to patient safety in hospitals. To analyse to what extent safety cultural aspects with relevance to infection control are implemented in German hospitals. Safety cultural aspects of infection control were surveyed with an online questionnaire; data were analysed descriptively. Data from 543 hospitals with a median of [IQR] 275 [157; 453] beds were analysed. Almost all hospitals (96.6 %) had internal guidelines for infection control (IC) in place; 82 % defined IC objectives, most often regarding hand hygiene (HH) (93 %) and multidrug resistant organisms (72 %) and less frequently for antibiotic stewardship (48 %) or prevention of specific HAI. In 94 % of hospitals, a reporting system for adverse events was in place, which was also used to report low compliance with HH, outbreaks and Clostridium difficile-associated infections. Members of the IC team were most often seen to hold daily responsibility for IC in the hospital, but rarely other hospital staff (94 versus 19 %). Safety cultural aspects are not fully implemented in German hospitals. IC should be more strongly implemented in healthcare workers' daily routine and more visibly supported by hospital management.

  8. Mathematical modelling : a tool for hospital infection control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, H; Hellriegel, B

    Health-care-associated infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens have become a menace in hospitals worldwide and infection control measures have lead to vastly different outcomes in different countries. During the past 6 years, a theoretical framework based on mathematical models has

  9. Mathematical modelling: a tool for hospital infection control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, Hajo; Hellriegel, B.

    2006-01-01

    Health-care-associated infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens have become a menace in hospitals worldwide and infection control measures have lead to vastly different outcomes in different countries. During the past 6 years, a theoretical framework based on mathematical models has

  10. Mathematical modelling: a tool for hospital infection control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, Hajo; Hellriegel, B

    2006-01-01

    Health-care-associated infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens have become a menace in hospitals worldwide and infection control measures have lead to vastly different outcomes in different countries. During the past 6 years, a theoretical framework based on mathematical models has

  11. Hospital infection prevention and control issues relevant to extensive floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Mundy, Linda M; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Glen Mayhall, C

    2013-02-01

    The devastating clinical and economic implications of floods exemplify the need for effective global infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies for natural disasters. Reopening of hospitals after excessive flooding requires a balance between meeting the medical needs of the surrounding communities and restoration of a safe hospital environment. Postflood hospital preparedness plans are a key issue for infection control epidemiologists, healthcare providers, patients, and hospital administrators. We provide recent IPC experiences related to reopening of a hospital after extensive black-water floods necessitated hospital closures in Thailand and the United States. These experiences provide a foundation for the future design, execution, and analysis of black-water flood preparedness plans by IPC stakeholders.

  12. [Infection control and hygiene management in equine hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Birgit; Janssen, Traute; Gehlen, Heidrun; Vincze, Szilvia; Borchers, Kerstin; Wieler, Lothar H; Barton, Ann Kristin; Lübke-Becker, Antina

    2014-01-01

    With the rising importance of nosocomial infections in equine hospitals, increased efforts with regard to biosecurity and infection control are necessary. This even more since nosocomial infections are often associated with multi-drug resistant pathogens. Consequently, the implementation of targeted prevention programs is essential. Since nosocomial infections are usually multifactorial events, realization of only a single measure is rarely effective to overcome nosocomial spread in clinical practice. Equine patients may be colonized at admission with multi-drug resistant pathogens such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and/or extended spectrum beta lactamase-producing (ESBL-) Enterobacteriaceae. Regardless of their individual resistance properties, these bacteria are common and usually unnoticed colonizers of either the nasopharynx or the intestinal tract. Also viral diseases caused by equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) and EHV-4 may reach a clinic by patients which are latently infected or in the incubation period. To prevent nosocomal outbreaks, achieve an interruption in the infection chain and to eradicate infectious agents from the hospital environment, a professional hospital management is necessary. This should be adapted to both the wide range of pathogens causing nosocomial infections and the individual needs of equine patients. Amongst others, this approach includes a risk classification of equine patients at admission and information/enlightenment of the animal owners at discharge. An efficient management of inpatients, a targeted hygiene management and clear responsibilities with respect to biosecurity together with a surveillance of nosocomial infections form the cornerstone of infection control in equine hospitals.

  13. Where does infection control fit into a hospital management structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannigan, E T; Murray, E; Holmes, A

    2009-12-01

    To be effective, infection prevention and control must be integrated into the complex and multiple interlinking systems within a hospital's management structure. Each of the systems must consider how activity associated with it can be optimised to minimise infection risk to patients. The components of an organisational structure to achieve these quality assurance and patient safety aims are discussed. The use of performance management tools in relation to infection control metrics is reviewed, and the use of hospital-acquired infection as a proxy indicator for deficiencies of system management is considered. Infection prevention and control cannot be the role and responsibility of a single individual or a small dedicated team; rather it should be a priority at all levels and integrated within all management systems, including the research and educational agendas.

  14. Building new hospitals: a UK infection control perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, J M; Constantine, C E; Orr, K E

    2006-03-01

    Infection control input is vital throughout the planning, design and building stages of a new hospital project, and must continue through the commissioning (and decommissioning) process, evaluation and putting the facility into full clinical service. Many hospitals continue to experience problems months or years after occupying the new premises; some of these could have been avoided by infection control involvement earlier in the project. The importance of infection control must be recognized by the chief executive of the hospital trust and project teams overseeing the development. Clinical user groups and contractors must also be made aware of infection control issues. It is vital that good working relationships are built up between the infection control team (ICT) and all these parties. ICTs need the authority to influence the process. This may require their specific recognition by the Private Finance Initiative National Unit, the Department of Health or other relevant authorities. ICTs need training in how to read design plans, how to write effective specifications, and in other areas with which they may be unfamiliar. The importance of documentation and record keeping is paramount. External or independent validation of processes should be available, particularly in commissioning processes. Building design in relation to infection control needs stricter national regulations, allowing ICTs to focus on more local usage issues. Further research is needed to provide evidence regarding the relationship between building design and the prevalence of infection.

  15. Why sensitive bacteria are resistant to hospital infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Esther; Luangasanatip, Nantasit; Bonten, Marc J; Cooper, Ben S

    2017-01-01

    Large reductions in the incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have been observed in response to multifaceted hospital-based interventions. Reductions in antibiotic-sensitive strains have been smaller or non-existent. It has been argued that since infection control measures, such as hand hygiene, should affect resistant and sensitive strains equally, observed changes must have largely resulted from other factors, including changes in antibiotic use. We used a mathematical model to test the validity of this reasoning. We developed a mechanistic model of resistant and sensitive strains in a hospital and its catchment area. We assumed the resistant strain had a competitive advantage in the hospital and the sensitive strain an advantage in the community. We simulated a hospital hand hygiene intervention that directly affected resistant and sensitive strains equally. The annual incidence rate ratio (IRR) associated with the intervention was calculated for hospital- and community-acquired infections of both strains. For the resistant strain, there were large reductions in hospital-acquired infections (0.1 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.6) and smaller reductions in community-acquired infections (0.2 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9). These reductions increased in line with increasing importance of nosocomial transmission of the strain. For the sensitive strain, reductions in hospital acquisitions were much smaller (0.6 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9), while community acquisitions could increase or decrease (0.9 ≤ IRR ≤ 1.2). The greater the importance of the community environment for the transmission of the sensitive strain, the smaller the reductions. Counter-intuitively, infection control interventions, including hand hygiene, can have strikingly discordant effects on resistant and sensitive strains even though they target them equally. This follows from differences in their adaptation to hospital- and community-based transmission. Observed lack of

  16. Research progress on influencing factors of hospital infection and prevention and control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wenlong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hospital infections are associated with the emergence of hospitals. As the understanding of hospital infections deepen and prevention and control measures improve, hospital infections have become manageable. In recent years, affected by the increase in invasive treatment technology, antimicrobial abuse, and other factors, the control of hospital infection has encountered new problems. This paper reviews the influencing factors of hospital infections and their prevention and control measures.

  17. Why sensitive bacteria are resistant to hospital infection control

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Esther; Luangasanatip, Nantasit; Bonten, Marc J; Cooper, Ben S

    2017-01-01

    Background: Large reductions in the incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have been observed in response to multifaceted hospital-based interventions. Reductions in antibiotic-sensitive strains have been smaller or non-existent. It has been argued that since infection control measures, such as hand hygiene, should affect resistant and sensitive strains equally, observed changes must have largely resulted from other factors, including changes in antibiotic use. We used a mathematical model to test the validity of this reasoning. Methods: We developed a mechanistic model of resistant and sensitive strains in a hospital and its catchment area. We assumed the resistant strain had a competitive advantage in the hospital and the sensitive strain an advantage in the community. We simulated a hospital hand hygiene intervention that directly affected resistant and sensitive strains equally. The annual incidence rate ratio ( IRR) associated with the intervention was calculated for hospital- and community-acquired infections of both strains. Results: For the resistant strain, there were large reductions in hospital-acquired infections (0.1 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.6) and smaller reductions in community-acquired infections (0.2 ≤ IRR ≤  0.9). These reductions increased in line with increasing importance of nosocomial transmission of the strain. For the sensitive strain, reductions in hospital acquisitions were much smaller (0.6 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9), while communityacquisitions could increase or decrease (0.9 ≤ IRR ≤ 1.2). The greater the importance of the community environment for the transmission of the sensitive strain, the smaller the reductions. Conclusions: Counter-intuitively, infection control interventions, including hand hygiene, can have strikingly discordant effects on resistant and sensitive strains even though they target them equally, following differences in their adaptation to hospital and community

  18. Validation of a proposal for evaluating hospital infection control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Pavanello Rodrigues; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida

    2011-02-01

    To validate the construct and discriminant properties of a hospital infection prevention and control program. The program consisted of four indicators: technical-operational structure; operational prevention and control guidelines; epidemiological surveillance system; and prevention and control activities. These indicators, with previously validated content, were applied to 50 healthcare institutions in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the hospitals and indicator scores, and Cronbach's α coefficient was used to evaluate the internal consistency. The discriminant validity was analyzed by comparing indicator scores between groups of hospitals: with versus without quality certification. The construct validity analysis was based on exploratory factor analysis with a tetrachoric correlation matrix. The indicators for the technical-operational structure and epidemiological surveillance presented almost 100% conformity in the whole sample. The indicators for the operational prevention and control guidelines and the prevention and control activities presented internal consistency ranging from 0.67 to 0.80. The discriminant validity of these indicators indicated higher and statistically significant mean conformity scores among the group of institutions with healthcare certification or accreditation processes. In the construct validation, two dimensions were identified for the operational prevention and control guidelines: recommendations for preventing hospital infection and recommendations for standardizing prophylaxis procedures, with good correlation between the analysis units that formed the guidelines. The same was found for the prevention and control activities: interfaces with treatment units and support units were identified. Validation of the measurement properties of the hospital infection prevention and control program indicators made it possible to develop a tool for evaluating these programs

  19. Infection control resources in New York State hospitals, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricof, Rachel L; Schabses, Karolina A; Tserenpuntsag, Boldtsetseg

    2008-12-01

    In July 2005, New York State legislation requiring the mandatory reporting of specific hospital-associated infections (HAIs) was passed by the legislature and signed by the governor. In an effort to measure the impact of this legislation on infection control resources, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) conducted a baseline survey in March 2007. This report presents an overview of the methods and results of this survey. An electronic survey of infection control resources and responsibilities was conducted by the NYSDOH on their secure data network. The survey contained questions regarding the number and percent time for infection prevention and control professional (ICP) and hospital epidemiologist (HE) staff members, ICP/HE educational background and certification, infection control program support services, activities and responsibilities of infection prevention and control program staff, and estimates of time dedicated to various activities, including surveillance. Practitioners in 222 of 224 acute care hospitals (99%) responded. The average number of ICPs per facility depended on the average daily census of acute care beds and ranged from a mean of 0.64 full-time equivalent (FTE) ICP in facilities with an average daily census of or = 900 beds. Averaging the ICP resources over the health care settings for which they were responsible revealed that the "average full-time ICP" was responsible for 151 acute care facility beds, 1.3 intensive care units (ICUs) (average, 16 ICU beds), 21 long-term care facility beds, 0.6 dialysis centers, 0.5 ambulatory surgery centers, 4.8 ambulatory/outpatient clinics, and 1.1 private practice offices. The ICPs reported that 45% of their time is dedicated to surveillance. Other activities for which ICPs reported at least partial responsibility include staff education, quality assurance, occupational health, emergency preparedness, construction, central supply/processing, and risk management. This survey was designed to

  20. Humans, 'things' and space: costing hospital infection control interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, K; Graves, N; Halton, K; Barnett, A G

    2013-07-01

    Previous attempts at costing infection control programmes have tended to focus on accounting costs rather than economic costs. For studies using economic costs, estimates tend to be quite crude and probably underestimate the true cost. One of the largest costs of any intervention is staff time, but this cost is difficult to quantify and has been largely ignored in previous attempts. To design and evaluate the costs of hospital-based infection control interventions or programmes. This article also discusses several issues to consider when costing interventions, and suggests strategies for overcoming these issues. Previous literature and techniques in both health economics and psychology are reviewed and synthesized. This article provides a set of generic, transferable costing guidelines. Key principles such as definition of study scope and focus on large costs, as well as pitfalls (e.g. overconfidence and uncertainty), are discussed. These new guidelines can be used by hospital staff and other researchers to cost their infection control programmes and interventions more accurately. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Status of hospital infection control measures at seven major tertiary care hospitals of northern Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, A.; Shah, S.I.H.; Naseem, S.; Absar, S.A.; Safi-Ullah; Ambreen, T.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the availability and implementation of various hospital infection control measures at tertiary care hospitals. Study Design: Survey. Place and Duration of Study: National Institute of Science and Technology, Islamabad, from June through August 2008. Methodology: Seven tertiary care very busy hospitals were selected; one from Islamabad, 5 from Rawalpindi, and one from Lahore. A detailed proforma was designed addressing all the issues pertaining to hospital infection control measures. Air sampling was done and growth yielded was identified by standard methods. Results: Analyses revealed that all of the hospitals had an Infection Control Committee. Microbiological diagnostic facilities were adequate at all the hospitals and overall microorganism yield was very high. Antibiotic policy was claimed by most, not available on ground. Majority of the operation theatres were without proper air flow system and autoclaves were not being regularly monitored. There was no proper disposal for sharps and needles. Incineration was not the usual mode for infectious waste. Conclusion: The results of the present study imply availability of proper hospital infection control policies with need of strict implementation of such measures. (author)

  2. Infection Control and Prevention: A Review of Hospital-Acquired Infections and the Economic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Deoine; Kemmerly, Sandra A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million patients suffer from hospital-acquired infections every year and nearly 100,000 of them die. Most of these medical errors are preventable. Hospital-acquired infections result in up to $4.5 billion in additional healthcare expenses annually. The U.S. government has responded to this financial loss by focusing on healthcare quality report cards and by taking strong action to curb healthcare spending. The Medicare Program ha...

  3. Status of infection control policies and organisation in European hospitals, 2001: the ARPAC study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struelens, M.J.; Wagner, D.; Bruce, J.; MacKenzie, F.M.; Cookson, B.; Voss, A.; Broek, P.J.J.A. van den; Gould, I.

    2006-01-01

    Patient safety in hospital care depends on effective infection control (IC) programmes. The Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control (ARPAC) study assessed the organisation, components and human resources of IC programmes in European hospitals. A questionnaire survey of policies and

  4. Development of a Clinical Data Warehouse for Hospital Infection Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Mary F.; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M.; Trick, William E.; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse. PMID:12807807

  5. Development of a clinical data warehouse for hospital infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Mary F; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M; Trick, William E; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse.

  6. Is There a Correlation Between Infection Control Performance and Other Hospital Quality Measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lyndsay M; Morgan, Daniel J; Pineles, Lisa; Li, Shanshan; Sulis, Carol; Bowling, Jason; Drees, Marci; Jacob, Jesse T; Anderson, Deverick J; Warren, David K; Harris, Anthony D

    2017-06-01

    Quality measures are increasingly reported by hospitals to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), yet there may be tradeoffs in performance between infection control (IC) and other quality measures. Hospitals that performed best on IC measures did not perform well on most CMS non-IC quality measures. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:736-739.

  7. Controlling nosocomial infection based on structure of hospital social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Taro; Masuda, Naoki

    2008-10-07

    Nosocomial infection (i.e. infection in healthcare facilities) raises a serious public health problem, as implied by the existence of pathogens characteristic to healthcare facilities such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and hospital-mediated outbreaks of influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome. For general communities, epidemic modeling based on social networks is being recognized as a useful tool. However, disease propagation may occur in a healthcare facility in a manner different from that in a urban community setting due to different network architecture. We simulate stochastic susceptible-infected-recovered dynamics on social networks, which are based on observations in a hospital in Tokyo, to explore effective containment strategies against nosocomial infection. The observed social networks in the hospital have hierarchical and modular structure in which dense substructure such as departments, wards, and rooms, are globally but only loosely connected, and do not reveal extremely right-skewed distributions of the number of contacts per individual. We show that healthcare workers, particularly medical doctors, are main vectors (i.e. transmitters) of diseases on these networks. Intervention methods that restrict interaction between medical doctors and their visits to different wards shrink the final epidemic size more than intervention methods that directly protect patients, such as isolating patients in single rooms. By the same token, vaccinating doctors with priority rather than patients or nurses is more effective. Finally, vaccinating individuals with large betweenness centrality (frequency of mediating connection between pairs of individuals along the shortest paths) is superior to vaccinating ones with large connectedness to others or randomly chosen individuals, which was suggested by previous model studies.

  8. Hospital adoption of automated surveillance technology and the implementation of infection prevention and control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Helen; Shortell, Stephen M; Milstein, Arnold; Vanneman, Megan

    2011-05-01

    This research analyzes the relationship between hospital use of automated surveillance technology (AST) for identification and control of hospital-acquired infections (HAI) and implementation of evidence-based infection control practices. Our hypothesis is that hospitals that use AST have made more progress implementing infection control practices than hospitals that rely on manual surveillance. A survey of all acute general care hospitals in California was conducted from October 2008 through January 2009. A structured computer-assisted telephone interview was conducted with the quality director of each hospital. The final sample includes 241 general acute care hospitals (response rate, 83%). Approximately one third (32.4%) of California's hospitals use AST for monitoring HAI. Adoption of AST is statistically significant and positively associated with the depth of implementation of evidence-based practices for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ventilator-associated pneumonia and adoption of contact precautions and surgical care infection practices. Use of AST is also statistically significantly associated with the breadth of hospital implementation of evidence-based practices across all 5 targeted HAI. Our findings suggest that hospitals using AST can achieve greater depth and breadth in implementing evidenced-based infection control practices. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A concealed observational study of infection control and safe injection practices in Jordanian governmental hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawajfah, Omar M; Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    The recognized international organizations on infection prevention recommend using an observational method as the gold standard procedure for assessing health care professional's compliance with standard infection control practices. However, observational studies are rarely used in Jordanian infection control studies. This study aimed to evaluate injection practices among nurses working in Jordanian governmental hospitals. A cross-sectional concealed observational design is used for this study. A convenience sampling technique was used to recruit a sample of nurses working in governmental hospitals in Jordan. Participants were unaware of the time and observer during the observation episode. A total of 384 nurses from 9 different hospitals participated in the study. A total of 835 injections events were observed, of which 73.9% were performed without handwashing, 64.5% without gloving, and 27.5% were followed by needle recapping. Handwashing rate was the lowest (18.9%) when injections were performed by beginner nurses. Subcutaneous injections were associated with the lowest rate (26.7%) of postinjection handwashing compared with other routes. This study demonstrates the need for focused and effective infection control educational programs in Jordanian hospitals. Future studies should consider exploring the whole infection control practices related to waste disposal and the roles of the infection control nurse in this process in Jordanian hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating effectiveness of infection control efforts in hospitals using information in microbiological laboratory databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihiro; Itoga, Masamichi; Kimura, Masahiko; Inoue, Fumio; Minakawa, Satoko; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Ozaki, Hiromi; Saito, Yumiko; Takahashi, Mikiko; Fujishima, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Sumie; Ogawa, Shin; Kitayama, Yuko; Kudo, Kazumi; Minami, Kazushi; Abo, Fumiko; Takano, Yasuyuki; Ohdaira, Naotake; Hamada, Satoshi; Ueki, Shigeharu; Hirokawa, Makoto; Kayaba, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-01

    To analyze the quality of infection control activities, bacteriological data relevant to infection control was evaluated through the microbiological data warehouse networking hospitals in two medical regions. Data regarding bacterial test results of 19 hospitals were extracted from two microbiological laboratory information data bases. The rate of MRSA among total S. aureus was used as a general indicator of infection control activities. The occupancy rate of nasal or pharyngeal swabs among MRSA-positive bacteriological samples was used as an indicator of attention paid for infection control in intensive care wards. The number of blood culture sets per examined patient was utilized as an indicator for life-long vocational education on updated medical practice relevant to infectious diseases. The rate of MRSA was significantly higher in secondary private hospitals. The occupancy rate of nasal or pharyngeal swabs was significantly higher in tertiary hospitals. The average number of blood culture set per examined patient were 1.55, 1.54 and 1.39 in tertiary, secondary public and secondary private hospitals, respectively; however, there were no statistical differences between groups. Data bases of microbiological test results shared by hospital laboratories are useful for evaluating regional infection control activities.

  11. The rate of following infection control principles in educational hospitals of Khorramabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    tahereh Toulabi

    2006-11-01

    Results: The degree of following infection control principles in most of the personnel’s was medium (53.7% and in hand washing was low (90%. Wards status about physical environment (47.83%, resources and equipment (78.3% were medium level. Conclusion: Continuous education of personnel in different job categories, using instruments and methods to reduce infection, improvement of resources and equipment and physical environment, establishment of National Nosocomial Infection surveillance system (NNISS, yearly epidemiological investigations and performing regular microbiological cultures are the most important strategies for infection control, that must be performed in educational hospitals.

  12. [Ethical issues linked to the professional practice of nurses in a hospital infection control committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Débora Cristina Ignácio; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative work was developed according to Bardin's method of content analysis. It aimed at finding out the perceptions of nurses that are members of a Hospital Infection Control Commission about ethical issues that are inherent to their professional practice as well as understanding the clinical nurses opinion regarding the professional practice of the nurses that are members of the Hospital Infection Control Commission, considering the ethical aspects. In order to achieve an ethical, efficient and effective professional practice, there is a need for governmental changes and professional recognition through autonomy, respect and exclusivity in the Service of Hospital Infection Control, as well as improvements regarding information, the care provided to the patient and professional secret. The predominance of bureaucratic activities and team work were mentioned by the clinical nurses as differentiating factors of the activities performed by nurses that are members of the Commission.

  13. Quantitative assessment of organizational culture within hospitals and its relevance to infection prevention and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M A; Waisfisz, B; Frank, U

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that organizational culture (OC) is an important driver of infection prevention and control (IPC) behaviour among healthcare workers. This study examined OC in seven European hospitals using a validated assessment tool based on Hofstede's model, and identified significant variations in OC scores. Hospitals with low prevalence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) exhibited high scores for change facilitation and change readiness, whereas hospitals with high prevalence of MRSA exhibited low scores for these determinants. It is possible to use tools, available outside health care, to study OC within hospitals and gain better insight into IPC behaviour change strategies. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Waterborne microorganisms and biofilms related to hospital infections: strategies for prevention and control in healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelletti, Raquel Vannucci; Moraes, Ângela Maria

    2016-02-01

    Water is the main stimulus for the development of microorganisms, and its flow has an important role in the spreading of contaminants. In hospitals, the water distribution system requires special attention since it can be a source of pathogens, including those in the form of biofilms often correlated with resistance of microorganisms to various treatments. In this paper, information relevant to cases of nosocomial infections involving water circuits as a source of contaminants is compiled, with emphasis on the importance of microbiological control strategies to prevent the installation, spreading and growth of microorganisms in hospitals. An overview of the worldwide situation is provided, with emphasis on Brazilian hospitals. Different approaches normally used to control the occurrence of nosocomial infections due to waterborne contaminants are analyzed, and the use of the polysaccharide chitosan for this specific application is briefly discussed.

  15. Surveillance of surgical site infection after cholecystectomy using the hospital in Europe link for infection control through surveillance protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanic, Branko; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Augustin, Goran; Milosevic, Milan; Plecko, Vanda; Kalenic, Smilja; Fiolic, Zlatko; Vanek, Maja

    2013-06-01

    The third most common healthcare-associated infection is surgical site infection (SSI), accounting for 14%-16% of infections. These SSIs are associated with high morbidity, numerous deaths, and greater cost. A prospective study was conducted to assess the incidence of SSI in a single university hospital in Croatia. We used the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol for surveillance. The SSIs were classified using the standard definition of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system. The overall incidence of SSI was 1.44%. The incidence of infection in the open cholecystectomy group was 6.06%, whereas in the laparoscopic group, it was only 0.60%. The incidence density of in-hospital SSIs per 1,000 post-operative days was 5.76. Patients who underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy were significantly younger (53.65±14.65 vs. 64.42±14.17 years; pconcept for the monitoring of SSI, but in the case of cholecystectomy, additional factors such as antibiotic appropriateness, gallbladder entry, empyema of the gallbladder, and obstructive jaundice must be considered.

  16. Why sensitive bacteria are resistant to hospital infection control [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther van Kleef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large reductions in the incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have been observed in response to multifaceted hospital-based interventions. Reductions in antibiotic-sensitive strains have been smaller or non-existent. It has been argued that since infection control measures, such as hand hygiene, should affect resistant and sensitive strains equally, observed changes must have largely resulted from other factors, including changes in antibiotic use. We used a mathematical model to test the validity of this reasoning. Methods: We developed a mechanistic model of resistant and sensitive strains in a hospital and its catchment area. We assumed the resistant strain had a competitive advantage in the hospital and the sensitive strain an advantage in the community. We simulated a hospital hand hygiene intervention that directly affected resistant and sensitive strains equally. The annual incidence rate ratio (IRR associated with the intervention was calculated for hospital- and community-acquired infections of both strains. Results: For the resistant strain, there were large reductions in hospital-acquired infections (0.1 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.6 and smaller reductions in community-acquired infections (0.2 ≤ IRR ≤  0.9. These reductions increased in line with increasing importance of nosocomial transmission of the strain. For the sensitive strain, reductions in hospital acquisitions were much smaller (0.6 ≤ IRR ≤ 0.9, while communityacquisitions could increase or decrease (0.9 ≤ IRR ≤ 1.2. The greater the importance of the community environment for the transmission of the sensitive strain, the smaller the reductions. Conclusions: Counter-intuitively, infection control interventions, including hand hygiene, can have strikingly discordant effects on resistant and sensitive strains even though they target them equally, following differences in their adaptation to hospital and

  17. Effectiveness of hospital-wide methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection control policies differs by ward specialty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Sadsad

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies.

  18. [Practical aspects of implementation quality management system ISO 9001:2000 by hospital infection control team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemski, Arkadiusz; Czerniak, Beata; Frankowska, Krystyna; Gonia, Ewa; Salińska, Teresa; Motuk, Andrzej; Sobociński, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the Board of the Jan Biziel Hospital in Bydgoszcz decided to include procedures of health services in the implementation process within the confines of ISO 9001:2000 certification. The hospital infection control team that has operated in the hospital since 1989 performed the analysis of the forms of activities to date and on that basis the team prepared original plan of quality management. In April 2007, this plan was successfully accepted by the certifying team. The aim of this study is to present the aforementioned plan which is the result of 18 years experience of the team. At the same time, I hope that this study will be very helpful for all professionals interested in hospital epidemiology, especially in the context of implementing quality management systems.

  19. Implementation of tuberculosis infection control measures in designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China: are we doing enough to prevent nosocomial tuberculosis infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Min; Gu, Hua; Wang, Xiaomeng; Qiu, Wei; Shen, Jian; Jiang, Jianmin

    2016-03-03

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures are very important to prevent nosocomial transmission and protect healthcare workers (HCWs) in hospitals. The TB infection control situation in TB treatment institutions in southeastern China has not been studied previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures in TB-designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China. Cross-sectional survey using observation and interviews. All TB-designated hospitals (n=88) in Zhejiang Province, China in 2014. Managerial, administrative, environmental and personal infection control measures were assessed using descriptive analyses and univariate logistic regression analysis. The TB-designated hospitals treated a median of 3030 outpatients (IQR 764-7094) and 279 patients with confirmed TB (IQR 154-459) annually, and 160 patients with TB (IQR 79-426) were hospitalised in the TB wards. Most infection control measures were performed by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including regular monitoring of TB infection control in high-risk areas (49%), shortening the wait times (42%), and providing a separate waiting area for patients with suspected TB (46%) were sometimes neglected. N95 respirators were available in 85 (97%) hospitals, although only 44 (50%) hospitals checked that they fit. Hospitals with more TB staff and higher admission rates of patients with TB were more likely to set a dedicated sputum collection area and to conduct annual respirator fit testing. TB infection control measures were generally implemented by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including separation of suspected patients, regular monitoring of infection control practices, and regular fit testing of respirators should be strengthened. Infection measures for sputum collection and respirator fit testing should be improved in hospitals with lower admission rates of patients with TB. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  20. Comparison of Control of Clostridium difficile Infection in Six English Hospitals Using Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, David W; Fawley, Warren N; Rajgopal, Anu; Settle, Christopher; Mortimer, Kalani; Goldenberg, Simon D; Dawson, Susan; Crook, Derrick W; Peto, Tim E A; Walker, A Sarah; Wilcox, Mark H

    2017-08-01

    Variation in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates between healthcare institutions suggests overall incidence could be reduced if the lowest rates could be achieved more widely. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of consecutive C. difficile isolates from 6 English hospitals over 1 year (2013-14) to compare infection control performance. Fecal samples with a positive initial screen for C. difficile were sequenced. Within each hospital, we estimated the proportion of cases plausibly acquired from previous cases. Overall, 851/971 (87.6%) sequenced samples contained toxin genes, and 451 (46.4%) were fecal-toxin-positive. Of 652 potentially toxigenic isolates >90-days after the study started, 128 (20%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 17-23%) were genetically linked (within ≤2 single nucleotide polymorphisms) to a prior patient's isolate from the previous 90 days. Hospital 2 had the fewest linked isolates, 7/105 (7%, 3-13%), hospital 1, 9/70 (13%, 6-23%), and hospitals 3-6 had similar proportions of linked isolates (22-26%) (P ≤ .002 comparing hospital-2 vs 3-6). Results were similar adjusting for locally circulating ribotypes. Adjusting for hospital, ribotype-027 had the highest proportion of linked isolates (57%, 95% CI 29-81%). Fecal-toxin-positive and toxin-negative patients were similarly likely to be a potential transmission donor, OR = 1.01 (0.68-1.49). There was no association between the estimated proportion of linked cases and testing rates. WGS can be used as a novel surveillance tool to identify varying rates of C. difficile transmission between institutions and therefore to allow targeted efforts to reduce CDI incidence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  1. Determining the Status Quo of Infection Prevention and Control Standards in the Hospitals of Iran: A Case Study in 23 Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Shojaee, Jalil; Moosazadeh, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Background: Applying Prevention and Control of Infection (PCI) standards in hospitals reduces probable risks to patients, staff and visitors; it also increases efficiency, and ultimately improves productivity of hospitals. Objective: The current study aimed to determine the status quo of international standards of PCI in hospitals located in the north of Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 23 hospitals. Data collection tool was a questionnaire with confirm...

  2. Controlling urinary tract infections associated with intermittent bladder catheterization in geriatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, R; Gaujard, S; Pergay, V; Pornon, P; Martin Gaujard, G; Vieux, C; Bourguignon, L

    2015-07-01

    Controlling urinary tract infections (UTIs) associated with intermittent catheterization in geriatric patients. After a local epidemiological study identified high rates of UTI, a multi-disciplinary working group implemented and evaluated corrective measures. In 2009, a one-month prospective study measured the incidence of UTI, controlled for risk factors and exposure, in six geriatric hospitals. In 2010, a self-administered questionnaire on practices was administered to physicians and nurses working in these geriatric units. In 2011, the working group developed a multi-modal programme to: improve understanding of micturition, measurement of bladder volume and indications for catheter drainage; limit available medical devices; and improve prescription and traceability procedures. Detailed training was provided to all personnel on all sites. The epidemiological study was repeated in 2012 to assess the impact of the programme. Over 1500 patients were included in the 2009 study. The incidence of acquired infection was 4.8%. The infection rate was higher in patients with intermittent catheters than in patients with indwelling catheters (29.7 vs 9.9 UTI per 100 patients, P = 0.1013) which contradicts the literature. In 2010, the 269 responses to the questionnaire showed that staff did not consider catheterization to place patients at risk of infection, staff had poor knowledge of the recommended indications and techniques, and the equipment varied widely between units. Following implementation of the programme, the study was repeated in 2012 with over 1500 patients. The frequency of UTI in patients with intermittent catheters fell to rates in the published literature. Multi-modal programmes are an effective means to control UTI. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fact-finding survey of nosocomial infection control in hospitals in Vietnam and application to training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Hung, Nguyen Viet; Thu, Truong Anh

    2009-12-01

    Nosocomial infection control is crucial for improving the quality of medical care. It is also indispensable for implementing effective control measures for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the possible occurrence of a human influenza pandemic. The present authors, in collaboration with Vietnamese hospital staff, performed a fact-finding survey of nosocomial infection control in hospitals in northern Vietnam and compared the results with those of a survey conducted 4 years previously. Remarkable improvement was recognized in this period, although there were considerable differences between the central hospitals in Hanoi and local hospitals. In the local hospitals, basic techniques and the systems for infection control were regarded as insufficient, and it is necessary to improve these techniques and systems under the guidance of hospitals in the central area. Based on the results of the survey, programs were prepared and training courses were organized in local hospitals. Evaluation conducted after the training courses showed a high degree of satisfaction among the trainees. The results of the survey and the training courses conducted during the study period are expected to contribute to the improvement of nosocomial infection control in remote areas of Vietnam.

  4. A survey of infection control practices of consultant anaesthesiologists in teaching hospitals of pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaqub, K.M.; Tariq, M.; Janjua, S.; Masroor, R.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the infection control practices of Anaesthesiologist in the teaching hospitals of Pakistan. Cross-sectional survey. The survey was closed after allowing 6 months for return of the replies. A questionnaire was distributed to 170 consultant anaesthesiologist randomly selected from all over Pakistan. Out of these, 90 (53%) were returned and analyzed. To reduce self-report bias, the forms were filled anonymously. Thirty four percent of the respondents always used masks, and only 9% used gloves in their every day practice. Only 18% of respondents stated that they always washed their hands after every patient contact and 54% reported that they always used aseptic technique for placing an indwelling cannula. Most respondents had a good knowledge of universal precautions for prevention of occupational transmission of infection. Five percent of the anaesthetists reported frequently or always reusing syringes for more than one patient. The practice of reusing syringes was significantly greater when the same consultants were anaesthetizing patients in private clinics rather than in their primary institutions (p 5, in 58% of cases. Whereas most responding anaesthesiologist exhibit appropriate infection control behaviour, there are several potentially hazardous practices that continue unabated. (author)

  5. [Inspection by infection control team of the University Hospital, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Hideki; Tsukikawa, Wakana; Takagi, Yuzo; Suda, Hideaki

    2006-06-01

    Factors affecting infection are the existence of infectious microorganisms, sensitivity of hosts, number of microorganisms, and infectious routes. Efforts to prevent infection focus on not allowing these factors to reach the threshold level. Inspection by an infection control team (ICT) of a hospital is one countermeasure for preventing nosocomial infection. We summarize here the problems for complete prevention of nosocomial infection based on the results of inspection by our ICT, so that staff working in the hospital can recognize the importance of preventing nosocomial infection. The following were commonly observed problems in our clinics found by the ICT : (1) incomplete practice of standard precautions and/or isolation precautions, (2) noncompliance with guidelines for the prevention of cross-infection, and (3) inappropriate management of medical rejectamenta. Infection control can be accomplished by strictly observing the standard precautions and isolation precautions. The ICT inspection round in the hospital could be an effective metaff working in the hod to clarify and overcome the problems involved in infection.

  6. Environmental viral contamination in a pediatric hospital outpatient waiting area: implications for infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Nikki; Cloutman-Green, Elaine; Klein, Nigel; Spratt, David A

    2014-08-01

    Nosocomial outbreaks of viral etiology are costly and can have a major impact on patient care. Many viruses are known to persist in the inanimate environment and may pose a risk to patients and health care workers. We investigate the frequency of environmental contamination with common health care-associated viruses and explore the use of torque-teno virus as a marker of environmental contamination. Environmental screening for a variety of clinically relevant viruses was carried out over 3 months in a UK pediatric hospital using air sampling and surface swabbing. Swabs were tested for the presence of virus nucleic acid by quantitative polymerase chain reactions. Viral nucleic acid was found on surfaces and in the air throughout the screening period, with adenovirus DNA being the most frequent. Door handles were frequently contaminated. Torque-teno virus was also found at numerous sites. Evidence of environmental contamination with viral pathogens is present in health care environments and may be indicative of an infectious virus being present. Screening for viruses should be included in infection control strategies. Torque-teno virus may provide a better marker of contamination and reduce time and cost of screening for individual viruses. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Screening and contact precautions – A survey on infection control measures for multidrug-resistant bacteria in German university hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena M. Biehl

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To assess the scope of infection control measures for multidrug-resistant bacteria in high-risk settings, a survey among university hospitals was conducted. Fourteen professionals from 8 sites participated. Reported policies varied largely with respect to the types of wards conducting screening, sample types used for screening and implementation of contact precautions. This variability among sites highlights the need for an evidence-based consensus of current infection control policies.

  8. Determining the status quo of infection prevention and control standards in the hospitals of iran: a case study in 23 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, Jalil; Moosazadeh, Mahmood

    2014-02-01

    Applying Prevention and Control of Infection (PCI) standards in hospitals reduces probable risks to patients, staff and visitors; it also increases efficiency, and ultimately improves productivity of hospitals. The current study aimed to determine the status quo of international standards of PCI in hospitals located in the north of Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 23 hospitals. Data collection tool was a questionnaire with confirmed validity and reliability. . In this regard, 260 managers, section supervisors and infection control nurses participated in the study according to census basis. SPSS software version 16 was employed to analyze the data through descriptive and analytical statistics. Among the studied hospitals, 18 hospitals were public. Hospitals enjoyed 77.2% of leadership and programming, 80.8% of focus of programs, 67.4% of isolating methods, 88.2% of hand health and protection techniques, 78.8% of improving patient's safety and quality, 90.3% of training personnel, and 78.7% of the average status quo of PCI standards. This study revealed that PCI standards were significantly observed in the studied hospitals and that there were necessary conditions for full deployment of nosocomial infection surveillance.

  9. Strategies to promote infection prevention and control in acute care hospitals with the help of infection control link nurses: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Daniel; Meng, Michael; Kugler, Christiane; Mattner, Frauke

    2018-02-01

    Infection control link nurses (ICLNs) are important backup personnel for the prevention and control of infections in hospitals. To identify facilitators and barriers for the implementation of and long-term collaboration with ICLNs. We conducted a systematic literature review, following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Inclusion criteria were defined as description of de novo implementation of an ICLN system, strengthening of an existing ICLN system, or analysis of an ICLN system. In 10 publications, facilitators and barriers were identified for mode of selection of ICLN candidates, characteristics and responsibilities of ICLNs, composition of a training curriculum, educational strategies, and external influencing factors. Experienced nurses with an interest in infection control seemed appropriate candidates. The importance of psychological skills in addition to technical knowledge was emphasized. A clear definition of responsibilities was important. Viable tasks for ICLNs included surveillance and teaching activities and the implementation of prevention measures. Ongoing teaching was superior to a single course. Management support was pivotal for success. Research on ICLNs is scarce. The potential to decrease health care-associated infections with the help of ICLNs has been demonstrated. The training in psychological skills in addition to technical knowledge deserves more attention. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Staffing for infectious diseases, clinical microbiology and infection control in hospitals in 2015: results of an ESCMID member survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Y; Nir-Paz, R; Pulcini, C; Cookson, B; Beović, B; Tacconelli, E; Nathwani, D; Vatcheva-Dobrevska, R; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Hell, M; Saenz, H; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to assess the current status of infectious diseases (ID), clinical microbiology (CM) and infection control (IC) staffing in hospitals and to analyse modifiers of staffing levels. We conducted an Internet-based survey of European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases members and affiliates, collecting data on hospital characteristics, ID management infrastructure, ID/IC-related activities and the ratio of physicians per 100 hospital beds. Regression analyses were conducted to examine factors associated with the physician-bed ratio. Five hundred sixty-seven hospital responses were collected between April and June 2015 from 61 countries, 81.2% (384/473) from Europe. A specialized inpatient ward for ID patients was reported in 58.4% (317/543) of hospitals. Rates of antibiotic stewardship programmes (ASP) and surveillance activities in survey hospitals were high, ranging from 88% to 90% for local antibiotic guidelines and 70% to 82% for programmes monitoring hospital-acquired infections. The median ID/CM/IC physician per 100 hospital beds ratio was 1.12 (interquartile range 0.56-2.13). In hospitals performing basic ASP and IC (including local antibiotic guidelines and monitoring device-related or surgical site infections), the ratio was 1.21 (interquartile range 0.57-2.14). Factors independently associated with higher ratios included compliance with European Union of Medical Specialists standards, smaller hospital size, tertiary-care institution, presence of a travel clinic, beds dedicated to ID and a CM unit. More than half of respondents estimated that additional staffing is needed for appropriate IC or ID management. No standard of physician staffing for ID/CM/IC in hospitals is available. A ratio of 1.21/100 beds will serve as an informed point of reference enabling ASP and infection surveillance. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthcare Associated Infections - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI) measures - provider data. These measures are developed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and collected...

  12. Environmental scan of infection prevention and control practices for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Wrechelle; Geransar, Rose; Clayden, Nancy; Jones, Jessica; de Grood, Jill; Joffe, Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Missaghi, Bayan; Pearce, Craig; Ghali, William; Conly, John

    2017-10-01

    Ward closure is a method of controlling hospital-acquired infectious diseases outbreaks and is often coupled with other practices. However, the value and efficacy of ward closures remains uncertain. To understand the current practices and perceptions with respect to ward closure for hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada. A Web-based environmental scan survey was developed by a team of infection prevention and control (IPC) experts and distributed to 235 IPC professionals at acute care sites across Canada. Data were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A total of 110 completed responses showed that 70% of sites reported at least 1 outbreak during 2013, 44% of these sites reported the use of ward closure. Ward closure was considered an "appropriate," "sometimes appropriate," or "not appropriate" strategy to control outbreaks by 50%, 45%, and 5% of participants, respectively. System capacity issues and overall risk assessment were main factors influencing the decision to close hospital wards following an outbreak. Results suggest the use of ward closure for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in Canadian acute care health settings is mixed, with outbreak control methods varying. The successful implementation of ward closure was dependent on overall support for the IPC team within hospital administration. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceptions of healthcare professionals regarding the main challenges and barriers to effective hospital infection control in Mongolia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ider Bat-Erdene

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not fully understood why healthcare decision-makers of developing countries often give low priority to infection control and why they are unable to implement international guidelines. This study aimed to identify the main perceived challenges and barriers that hinder the effective implementation of infection control programmes in Mongolia. Methods In 2008, qualitative research involving 4 group and 55 individual interviews was conducted in the capital city of Mongolia and two provincial centres. Results A total of 87 health professionals participated in the study, including policy and hospital-level managers, doctors, nurses and infection control practitioners. Thematic analysis revealed a large number of perceived challenges and barriers to the formulation and implementation of infection control policy. These challenges and barriers were complex in nature and related to poor funding, suboptimal knowledge and attitudes, and inadequate management. The study results suggest that the availability of infection control policy and guidelines, and the provision of specific recommendations for low-resource settings, do not assure effective implementation of infection control programmes. Conclusions The current infection control system in Mongolia is likely to remain ineffective unless the underlying barriers and challenges are adequately addressed. Multifaceted interventions with logistical, educational and management components that are specific to local circumstances need to be designed and implemented in Mongolia. The importance of international peer support is highlighted.

  14. Physical Plant Design and Engineering Controls to Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Conly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the environment as a reservoir for microorganisms implicated in disease transmission in the hospital setting has been increasingly recognized, especially with respect to dialysis units, ventilation in specialized areas, and the proper use of disinfectants (1. Inherent within the environmental setting is the importance of physical plant design. Several studies have underscored the importance of optimizing design standards to maximize patient and health care worker (HCW safety, including the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in patients (2-6. Ulrich et al (7 recently completed an evidence-based review, entitled 'The role of the physical environment in the hospital of the 21st century: A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity', for the Center for Health Design in California (USA, which was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Ulrich and colleagues identified over 600 studies that examined the hospital environment and its effects on staff effectiveness, patient safety, patient and family stress, quality and costs. They suggested that one of the important elements in improving patient safety is the reduction of the risk of hospital-acquired infections through improved facility design.

  15. Challenges of implementing national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection in acute care hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma

    2009-03-01

    Of the 49 acute care hospitals in Ireland that responded to the survey questionnaire drafted by the Infection Control Subcommittee of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre\\'s Strategy for the Control of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland, 43 reported barriers to the full implementation of national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection; these barriers included poor infrastructure (42 hospitals), inadequate laboratory resources (40 hospitals), inadequate staffing (39 hospitals), and inadequate numbers of isolation rooms and beds (40 hospitals). Four of the hospitals did not have an educational program on hand hygiene, and only 17 had an antibiotic stewardship program.

  16. Evaluation of blood stream infections by Candida in three tertiary hospitals in Salvador, Brazil: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goreth Barberino

    Full Text Available Invasive infections caused by Candida spp. are an important problem in immunocompromised patients. There is scarce data on the epidemiology of blood stream candidiasis in Salvador, Brazil. This study evaluates the risk factors associated with candidemia, among patients admitted to three tertiary, private hospitals, in Salvador, Brazil. We conducted a case-control, retrospective study to compare patients with diagnosis of candidemia in three different tertiary hospitals in Salvador, Brazil. Patients were matched for nosocomial, acquired infections, according to the causal agent: cases were defined by positive blood cultures for Candida species. Controls were those patients who had a diagnosis of systemic bacterial infection, with a positive blood culture to any bacteria, within the same time period (± 30 days of case identification. The groups were compared for the main known risk factors for candidemia and for mortality rates. A hundred thirty-eight patients were identified. Among the 69 cases, only 14 were diagnosed as infected by Candida albicans. Candida species were defined in only eight cultures: C. tropicalis (4 cases, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. guillermondi, C. formata (1 case each. The main risk factors, identified in a univariate analysis, were: presence of a central venous catheter (CVC, use of parenteral nutrition support (PNS, previous exposure to antibiotics, and chronic renal failure (CRF. No association was detected with surgical procedures, diabetes mellitus, neutropenia or malignancies. Patients were more likely to die during the hospitalization period, but the rates of death caused by the infections were similar for cases and controls. The length of hospitalization was similar for both groups, as well as the time for a positive blood culture. Blood stream infection by Candida spp. is associated with CVC, PNS, previous use of antibiotics, and CRF. The higher mortality rate for cases probably better reflects the severity

  17. Analysis of hospital infection control awareness of ultrasound room office personnel in Busan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, JJung Hoon; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    146 people working in the ultrasound room in Busan were surveyed, and their perception of hospital infection was analyzed. According to the results of the survey, academic background showed the highest number in terms of awareness and performance of personal hygiene management and hand washing management, and the group with experience of infection education showed the highest number in terms of awareness of ultrasound equipment hygiene, and the group with less than college education showed the highest number in terms of performance of ultrasound equipment hygiene. The difference was statistically significant. Based on the results of this study, performance was lower than awareness in general. This result indicates that the degree of performance is inadequate. Therefore, it can be concluded that individuals need to change their perception of personal hygiene and take interest in it through infection education.

  18. Analysis of hospital infection control awareness of ultrasound room office personnel in Busan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, JJung Hoon; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo

    2015-01-01

    146 people working in the ultrasound room in Busan were surveyed, and their perception of hospital infection was analyzed. According to the results of the survey, academic background showed the highest number in terms of awareness and performance of personal hygiene management and hand washing management, and the group with experience of infection education showed the highest number in terms of awareness of ultrasound equipment hygiene, and the group with less than college education showed the highest number in terms of performance of ultrasound equipment hygiene. The difference was statistically significant. Based on the results of this study, performance was lower than awareness in general. This result indicates that the degree of performance is inadequate. Therefore, it can be concluded that individuals need to change their perception of personal hygiene and take interest in it through infection education

  19. Cross-infection and infection control in dentistry: Knowledge, attitude and practice of patients attended dental clinics in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla K. Ibrahim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the level of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP of patients attended dental clinics at King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH regarding cross infections and infection control in dentistry. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 225 patients who attended the dental clinics of KAUH, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2014. A standardized, confidential, anonymous, interviewing questionnaire was used. Knowledge about dental infections was assessed by 12 MCQs. The attitudes were assessed through answering seven statements on a three- point Likert scale. Patients’ self reported practices were also evaluated. Descriptive and inferential statistics were done.Results of the study revealed that 39.5%, 38.7% and 21.8% of the participants obtained poor, fair and satisfactory level of knowledge about infections and infection control in dentistry, respectively. Social media was the commonest source of information about dental infection. Participant's educational level was significantly associated with the level of knowledge about dental infection. Patients had positive attitudes towards infection control in dentistry. Regarding self-reported practice, only few participants would ask dentists about sterilization of dental instruments (9.3%, wearing face mask (13.3% and gloves (16.4% if they don’t do so. In conclusion, our participants had good attitudes towards infection control in dentistry. However, their knowledge and practice need improvements. Conduction of educational programs is needed through social media, mass media, schools and public places. These programs involve both patients and providers. Keywords: Patient safety, Cross infection, Dental infection, Infection control, Emerging diseases, KAP

  20. Infection Control: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staph infections - hospital (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Infection Control updates ... infections when visiting Staph infections - hospital Related Health Topics Hepatitis HIV/AIDS MRSA National Institutes of Health ...

  1. Procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy and hospitalization in patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzen Christoph

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower respiratory tract infections like acute bronchitis, exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and community-acquired pneumonia are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics, mainly because of physicians' difficulties to distinguish viral from bacterial cause and to estimate disease-severity. The goal of this trial is to compare medical outcomes, use of antibiotics and hospital resources in a strategy based on enforced evidence-based guidelines versus procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Methods and design: We describe a prospective randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with an open intervention. We aim to randomize over a fixed recruitment period of 18 months a minimal number of 1002 patients from 6 hospitals in Switzerland. Patients must be >18 years of age with a lower respiratory tract infections Discussion: Use of and prolonged exposure to antibiotics in lower respiratory tract infections is high. The proposed trial investigates whether procalcitonin-guidance may safely reduce antibiotic consumption along with reductions in hospitalization costs and antibiotic resistance. It will additionally generate insights for improved prognostic assessment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Trial registration: ISRCTN95122877

  2. Cost-benefit of infection control interventions targeting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, L; Avni, T; Rubinovitch, B; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) incur significant costs. We aimed to examine the cost and cost-benefit of infection control interventions against MRSA and to examine factors affecting economic estimates. We performed a systematic review of studies assessing infection control interventions aimed at preventing spread of MRSA in hospitals and reporting intervention costs, savings, cost-benefit or cost-effectiveness. We searched PubMed and references of included studies with no language restrictions up to January 2012. We used the Quality of Health Economic Studies tool to assess study quality. We report cost and savings per month in 2011 US$. We calculated the median save/cost ratio and the save-cost difference with interquartile range (IQR) range. We examined the effects of MRSA endemicity, intervention duration and hospital size on results. Thirty-six studies published between 1987 and 2011 fulfilled inclusion criteria. Fifteen of the 18 studies reporting both costs and savings reported a save/cost ratio >1. The median save/cost ratio across all 18 studies was 7.16 (IQR 1.37-16). The median cost across all studies reporting intervention costs (n = 31) was 8648 (IQR 2025-19 170) US$ per month; median savings were 38 751 (IQR 14 206-75 842) US$ per month (23 studies). Higher save/cost ratios were observed in the intermediate to high endemicity setting compared with the low endemicity setting, in hospitals with 6 months. Infection control intervention to reduce spread of MRSA in acute-care hospitals showed a favourable cost/benefit ratio. This was true also for high MRSA endemicity settings. Unresolved economic issues include rapid screening using molecular techniques and universal versus targeted screening. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  3. The value of intermittent point-prevalence surveys of healthcare-associated infections for evaluating infection control interventions at Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesser, N; Emary, K; Soklin, S; Peng An, K; Sophal, S; Chhomrath, S; Day, N P J; Limmathurotsakul, D; Nget, P; Pangnarith, Y; Sona, S; Kumar, V; Moore, C E; Chanpheaktra, N; Parry, C M

    2013-04-01

    There are limited data on the epidemiology of paediatric healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and infection control in low-income countries. We describe the value of intermittent point-prevalence surveys for monitoring HCAI and evaluating infection control interventions in a Cambodian paediatric hospital. Hospital-wide, point-prevalence surveys were performed monthly in 2011. Infection control interventions introduced during this period included a hand hygiene programme and a ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) care bundle. Overall HCAI prevalence was 13.8/100 patients at-risk, with a significant decline over time. The highest HCAI rates (50%) were observed in critical care; the majority of HCAIs were respiratory (61%). Klebsiella pneumoniae was most commonly isolated and antimicrobial resistance was widespread. Hand hygiene compliance doubled to 51.6%, and total VAP cases/1000 patient-ventilator days fell from 30 to 10. Rates of HCAI were substantial in our institution, and antimicrobial resistance a major concern. Point-prevalence surveys are effective for HCAI surveillance, and in monitoring trends in response to infection control interventions.

  4. Use of prophylactic Saccharomyces boulardii to prevent Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized patients: a controlled prospective intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Jeppe West; Chehri, Mahtab; Schønning, Kristian; Rasmussen, Steen Christian; Anhøj, Jacob; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Petersen, Andreas Munk

    2018-05-03

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common complication to antibiotic use. Saccharomyces boulardii has shown effect as a prophylactic agent. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of S. boulardii in preventing CDI in unselected hospitalized patients treated with antibiotics. We conducted a 1 year controlled prospective intervention study aiming to prescribe Sacchaflor (S. boulardii 5 × 10 9 , Pharmaforce ApS) twice daily to hospitalized patients treated with antibiotics. Comparable departments from three other hospitals in our region were included as controls. All occurrences of CDI in patients receiving antibiotics were reported and compared to a baseline period defined as 2 years prior to intervention. Results were analyzed using run chart tests for non-random variation in CDI rates. In addition, odds ratios for CDI were calculated. S. boulardii compliance reached 44% at the intervention hospital, and 1389 patients were treated with Sacchaflor. Monthly CDI rates dropped from a median of 3.6% in the baseline period to 1.5% in the intervention period. S. boulardii treatment was associated with a reduced risk of CDI at the intervention hospital: OR = 0.06 (95% CI 0.02-0.16). At two control hospitals, CDI rates did not change. At one control hospital, the median CDI rate dropped from 3.5 to 2.4%, possibly reflecting the effects of simultaneous multifaceted intervention against CDI at that hospital. The results from this controlled prospective interventional study indicate that S. boulardii is effective for the prevention of CDI in an unselected cohort of mainly elderly patients from departments of internal medicine.

  5. Infection prevention and control interventions in the first outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in an equine hospital in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Karin; Nyman, Görel; Widgren, Stefan; Johnston, Christopher; Grönlund-Andersson, Ulrika; Ransjö, Ulrika

    2012-03-08

    The first outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in horses in Sweden occurred in 2008 at the University Animal Hospital and highlighted the need for improved infection prevention and control. The present study describes interventions and infection prevention control in an equine hospital setting July 2008 - April 2010. This descriptive study of interventions is based on examination of policy documents, medical records, notes from meetings and cost estimates. MRSA cases were identified through clinical sampling and telephone enquiries about horses post-surgery. Prospective sampling in the hospital environment with culture for MRSA and genotyping of isolates by spa-typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Interventions focused on interruption of indirect contact spread of MRSA between horses via staff and equipment and included: Temporary suspension of elective surgery; and identification and isolation of MRSA-infected horses; collaboration was initiated between authorities in animal and human public health, human medicine infection control and the veterinary hospital; extensive cleaning and disinfection was performed; basic hygiene and cleaning policies, staff training, equipment modification and interior renovation were implemented over seven months.Ten (11%) of 92 surfaces sampled between July 2008 and April 2010 tested positive for MRSA spa-type 011, seven of which were from the first of nine sampling occasions. PFGE typing showed the isolates to be the outbreak strain (9 of 10) or a closely related strain. Two new cases of MRSA infection occurred 14 and 19 months later, but had no proven connections to the outbreak cases. Collaboration between relevant authorities and the veterinary hospital and formation of an infection control committee with an executive working group were required to move the intervention process forward. Support from hospital management and the dedication of staff were essential for

  6. [Validation of the structure and resources of nosocomial infection control team in hospitals ascribed to VINCat program in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limón, Enrique; Pujol, Miquel; Gudiol, Francesc

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to validate the structure of the infection control team (ICT) in the hospitals adhered to VINCat program and secondary objective was to establish the consistency of resources of each center with the requirements established by the program. Qualitative research consisting of an ethnographic study using participant observation during the years 2008-2010. The centers were stratified in three groups by complexity and beds. The instrument was a semistructured interview to members of the ICT. The transcription of the interview was sent to informants for validation. In November 2010 a questionnaire regarding human resources and number hours dedicated to the ICT was sent. During 2008-2010, 65 centers had been adhered to VINCat program. In 2010, the ICT of Group I hospitals had a mean of two physician, one in full-time and one nurse for every 230 beds. In Group II, one physician part-time and one nurse per 180 beds and in Group III a physician and a nurse for every 98 beds, both part-time. In 2010, all hospitals had a structured ICT, an operative infection committee, and a hospital member representing the center at the program as well as enough electronic resources. The hospitals participating in the program have now VINCat an adequate surveillance structure and meet the minimum technical and human resources required to provide high-quality data. However human resources are not guaranteed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  7. Infrastructure and contamination of the physical environment in three Bangladeshi hospitals: putting infection control into context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimi, Nadia Ali; Sultana, Rebeca; Luby, Stephen P; Islam, Mohammed Saiful; Uddin, Main; Hossain, Mohammad Jahangir; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Nahar, Nazmun; Gurley, Emily S

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the physical structure and environmental contamination in selected hospital wards in three government hospitals in Bangladesh. The qualitative research team conducted 48 hours of observation in six wards from three Bangladeshi tertiary hospitals in 2007. They recorded environmental contamination with body secretions and excretions and medical waste and observed ward occupant handwashing and use of personal protective equipment. They recorded number of persons, number of open doors and windows, and use of fans. They measured the ward area and informally observed waste disposal outside the wards. They conducted nine focus group discussions with doctors, nurses and support staff. A median of 3.7 persons were present per 10 m(2) of floor space in the wards. A median of 4.9 uncovered coughs or sneezes were recorded per 10 m(2) per hour per ward. Floors in the wards were soiled with saliva, spit, mucous, vomitus, feces and blood 125 times in 48 hours. Only two of the 12 patient handwashing stations had running water and none had soap. No disinfection was observed before or after using medical instruments. Used medical supplies were often discarded in open containers under the beds. Handwashing with soap was observed in only 32 of 3,373 handwashing opportunities noted during 48 hours. Mosquitoes and feral cats were commonly observed in the wards. The physical structure and environment of our study hospitals are conducive to the spread of infection to people in the wards. Low-cost interventions on hand hygiene and cleaning procedures for rooms and medical equipment should be developed and evaluated for their practicality and effectiveness.

  8. Infrastructure and contamination of the physical environment in three Bangladeshi hospitals: putting infection control into context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ali Rimi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the physical structure and environmental contamination in selected hospital wards in three government hospitals in Bangladesh. METHODS: The qualitative research team conducted 48 hours of observation in six wards from three Bangladeshi tertiary hospitals in 2007. They recorded environmental contamination with body secretions and excretions and medical waste and observed ward occupant handwashing and use of personal protective equipment. They recorded number of persons, number of open doors and windows, and use of fans. They measured the ward area and informally observed waste disposal outside the wards. They conducted nine focus group discussions with doctors, nurses and support staff. RESULTS: A median of 3.7 persons were present per 10 m(2 of floor space in the wards. A median of 4.9 uncovered coughs or sneezes were recorded per 10 m(2 per hour per ward. Floors in the wards were soiled with saliva, spit, mucous, vomitus, feces and blood 125 times in 48 hours. Only two of the 12 patient handwashing stations had running water and none had soap. No disinfection was observed before or after using medical instruments. Used medical supplies were often discarded in open containers under the beds. Handwashing with soap was observed in only 32 of 3,373 handwashing opportunities noted during 48 hours. Mosquitoes and feral cats were commonly observed in the wards. CONCLUSIONS: The physical structure and environment of our study hospitals are conducive to the spread of infection to people in the wards. Low-cost interventions on hand hygiene and cleaning procedures for rooms and medical equipment should be developed and evaluated for their practicality and effectiveness.

  9. Hospital-acquired Legionella infections: an update on the procedures for controlling environmental contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, P; Bargellini, A; Marchegiano, P; Vecchi, E; Marchesi, I

    2016-01-01

    The waterborne healthcare-associated infections are mainly sustained by Legionella and Pseudomonas spp. Various water factors and plumbing characteristics, and the interaction with other water microorganisms are considered to be predictive of Legionella contamination. It is therefore mandatory to organize plans of surveillance, prevention and control in order to avoid disease appearance in immunosuppressed patients, with higher risk of death. Guidelines for the prevention of Legionnaires' disease have been published, benefiting those who face this problem, but definitive standardized solutions do not exist yet. Here we describe fifteen years of activity, during which our study group gathered interesting data on the control of Legionella contamination. Water disinfection is not generally sufficient to control the risk of infection, but a complex water safety plan should be developed, including system maintenance, training of staff and implementation of a clinical surveillance system aimed at early detection of cases. Concerning the control measures, we evaluated the effectiveness of different treatments suggested to reduce Legionella spp contamination, comparing our results with the current literature data. The performance ranking was highest for the filter, followed by boilers at high temperature, monochloramine and, at a lower level, chlorine dioxide; the effectiveness of hyperchlorination was limited, and thermal shock was even more ineffective.

  10. Working relationships of infection prevention and control programs and environmental services and associations with antibiotic-resistant organisms in Canadian acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutman, Dick E; Ford, B Douglas; Sopha, Keith

    2014-04-01

    Environmental contamination in hospitals with antibiotic-resistant organisms (AROs) is associated with patient contraction of AROs. This study examined the working relationship of Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) and Environmental Services and the impact of that relationship on ARO rates. Lead infection control professionals completed an online survey that assessed the IPAC and Environmental Services working relationship in their acute care hospital in 2011. The survey assessed cleaning collaborations, staff training, hospital cleanliness, and nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) infection, and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The survey was completed by 58.3% of hospitals (119 of 204). Two-thirds (65.8%; 77 of 117) of the respondents reported that their cleaners were adequately trained, and 62.4% (73 of 117) reported that their hospital was sufficiently clean. Greater cooperation between IPAC and Environmental Services was associated with lower rates of MRSA infection (r = -0.22; P = .02), and frequent collaboration regarding cleaning protocols was associated with lower rates of VRE infection (r = -0.20; P = .03) and CDI (r = -0.31; P Environmental Services, and this was associated with lower rates of ARO. Deficits in the adequacy of cleaning staff training and hospital cleanliness were identified. The promotion of collaborative working relationships and additional training for Environmental Services workers would be expected to lower ARO rates. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Implications of design on infection prevention and control practice in a novel hospital unit: the Medical Ward of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSteelandt, Amanda; Conly, John; Ghali, William; Mather, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The physical design of hospital wards is associated with transmission of pathogenic organisms and hospital-acquired infections. A novel hospital unit, the Medical Ward of the 21st Century (W21C), optimizes features for infection prevention and control practices. Ethnographic research on the W21C versus conventional hospital wards examined the experiential and behavioural elements of the different designs. Three recurring themes emerged regarding the design features on the W21C and included visual cues, 'having a place for things', and less sharing of spaces and materials. Observational data of healthcare worker practices demonstrated significantly higher compliance with hand hygiene opportunities on the W21C compared with older hospital units. These findings suggest how the physical design of a hospital ward may enhance infection prevention and control practices.

  12. Questionnaire-based survey on structural quality of hospitals and nursing homes for the elderly, their staffing with infection control personal, and implementation of infection control measures in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, A; Assadian, O; Helfrich, J; Krüger, C; Pfenning, I; Ryll, S; Perner, A; Loczenski, B

    2013-01-01

    From January to May 2012, 1,860 hospitals throughout Germany received a questionnaire encompassing 77 items. Additionally, 300 outpatient care services and 310 nursing homes for elderly in Berlin also received a 10-item questionnaire asking on their implemented infection control practices. All questionnaires were anonymous. A total of 229 completed questionnaires from hospitals, 14 questionnaires from outpatient care services, and 16 questionnaires from nursing homes were eligible for further analysis. The lack of Infection Control physicians was identified as the largest issue. In hospitals sized 400-999 beds a gap of 71%, and in hospitals sized ≥1,000 beds a gap of 17% was reported. Depending on the number of hospital beds, 13-29% of hospitals sized ≥100 beds reported not havening one infection control nurse. Since based on the number of beds in larger institutions or in facilities caring for high-risk patients several infection control nurses may be required, the deficiency in infection control nurses may even be higher, particularly in secondary and tertiary care facilities. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that the legal requirements for surveillance and reporting of notifiable infectious diseases have not yet been implemented in 11% of the facilities. The implementation of antibiotic strategies did show significant gaps. However, deficiencies in the implemented measures for the prevention of surgical site infections were less frequent. Yet 12% of the participants did not have a dedicated infection control concept for their surgical services. Eight percent of hospitals were not prepared for an outbreak management and 10% did not have established regulations for wearing surgical scrubs. Deficiencies in waste disposal and the control of air-conditioning systems were also noted. Based on the results of this survey, conclusions on the optimal resource allocation for further improvement of patient safety may be drawn. While all participating nursing homes had

  13. [Evaluation of practices for the prevention and control of bloodstream infections in a government hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Jaquelline Maria; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida; Soares, Naury de Jesus Danzi; Nunes, Bruna Kosar

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to observe clinical procedures in order to evaluate the practices used for the control and prevention of bloodstream infections associated with short-term central venous catheters (BSI-ACVC). The study data came from 5877 assessments distributed among selected practices. The results revealed the following adherence rates among the practices selected: 91.6% for recording the indication and permanence time of the CVC, 51.5% for adhering to the care and maintenance of the dressing at the CVC insertion site and its devices, 10.7% for hand hygiene practices while performing procedures related to the CVC, and 0.0% for the practices related to the insertion of the central venous catheter (CVC). The results demonstrate the need for further elaboration of strategies that ensure sustainable compliance practices for prevention and control BSI-ACVC in the institution being assessed.

  14. Medical and health economic evaluation of prevention- and control measures related to MRSA infections or -colonisations at hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczak, Dieter; Schöffmann, Christine

    2010-03-16

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are dangerous agents of nosocomial infections. In 2007 the prevalence of MRSA is 20.3% in Germany (Oxacilline-resistance according to EUCAST-criteria [EUCAST = European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing]). Which measurements are effective in the prevention and control of MRSA-infections in the hospital?How effective are contact precautions, screening, decolonisation, education and surveillance?Which recommendations can be given to health care politics on the basis of cost-effectiveness studies?Have there been any adverse effects on patients and clinical staff?What kind of liability problems exist? Based on a systematic review of the literature studies are included which have been published in German or English language since 2004. 1,508 articles have been found. After having surveyed the full text, 33 medical, eight economic and four ethical/juridical studies are included for the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) report. The key result of the HTA report is that different measurements are effective in the prevention and control of MRSA-infections in hospitals, though the majority of the studies has a low quality. Effective are the conduction of differentiated screening measurements if they take into account the specific endemic situation, the use of antibiotic-control programs and the introduction and control of hygienic measurements. The break even point of preventive and control measurements cannot be defined because the study results differ too much. In the future it has to be more considered that MRSA-infections and contact precautions lead to a psycho-social strain for patients. It is hardly possible to describe causal efficacies because in the majority of the studies confounders are not sufficiently considered. In many cases bundles of measurements have been established but not analyzed individually. The internal and external validity of the studies is too weak to evaluate single interventions

  15. Medical and health economic evaluation of prevention- and control measures related to MRSA infections or -colonisations at hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczak, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are dangerous agents of nosocomial infections. In 2007 the prevalence of MRSA is 20.3% in Germany (Oxacilline-resistance according to EUCAST-criteria [EUCAST = European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing]. Objectives: * Which measurements are effective in the prevention and control of MRSA-infections in the hospital? * How effective are contact precautions, screening, decolonisation, education and surveillance? * Which recommendations can be given to health care politics on the basis of cost-effectiveness studies? * Have there been any adverse effects on patients and clinical staff? * What kind of liability problems exist?MethodsBased on a systematic review of the literature studies are included which have been published in German or English language since 2004. Results: 1,508 articles have been found. After having surveyed the full text, 33 medical, eight economic and four ethical/juridical studies are included for the Health Technology Assessment (HTA report. The key result of the HTA report is that different measurements are effective in the prevention and control of MRSA-infections in hospitals, though the majority of the studies has a low quality. Effective are the conduction of differentiated screening measurements if they take into account the specific endemic situation, the use of antibiotic-control programs and the introduction and control of hygienic measurements. The break even point of preventive and control measurements cannot be defined because the study results differ too much. In the future it has to be more considered that MRSA-infections and contact precautions lead to a psycho-social strain for patients. Discussion: It is hardly possible to describe causal efficacies because in the majority of the studies confounders are not sufficiently considered. In many cases bundles of measurements have been established but not analyzed individually. The

  16. Staph infections - hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to treat ordinary staph germs. What are Risk Factors for Staph Infection? Many healthy people normally have ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  17. Genital infections and risk of premature rupture of membranes in Mulago Hospital, Uganda: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakubulwa, Sarah; Kaye, Dan K; Bwanga, Freddie; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Mirembe, Florence M

    2015-10-16

    Inflammatory mediators that weaken and cause membrane rupture are released during the course of genital infections among pregnant women. We set out to determine the association of common genital infections (Trichomonas vaginalis, syphilis, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis, Group B Streptococcus, Bacterial vaginosis, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 and candidiasis) and premature rupture of membranes in Mulago hospital, Uganda. We conducted an unmatched case-control study among women who were in the third trimester of pregnancy at New Mulago hospital, Uganda. The cases had PROM and the controls had intact membranes during latent phase of labour in the labour ward. We used interviewer-administered questionnaires to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics, obstetric and medical history. Laboratory tests were conducted to identify T. vaginalis, syphilis, N. gonorrhea, C. trachomatis, Group B Streptococcus, Bacterial vaginosis, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) and candidiasis. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI of the association between genital infections and PROM. There was an association between PROM and abnormal vaginal discharge (OR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.10-3.70 and AOR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.18-4.47), presence of candidiasis (OR = 0.27, 95% CI 0.14-0.52 and AOR = 0.22, 95% CI 0.10-0.46) and T. vaginalis (OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.18-7.56 and AOR = 4.22, 95% CI 1.51-11.80). However, there was no association between PROM and presence of C. trachomatis (OR = 2.05, 95% CI 0.37-11.49) and HSV-2 serostatus (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.63-2.09). Few or no patients with Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, Group B streptococcus or syphilis were identified among the cases and controls. Co-infection of Trichomoniasis and candidiasis was not associated with PROM (AOR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.16-11.10). Co infection with T. vaginalis and C. trachomatis was associated with PROM (OR = 3.09, 95% CI 1.21-7.84 and AOR = 4.22, 95% CI 1

  18. Contact among healthcare workers in the hospital setting: developing the evidence base for innovative approaches to infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Krista M; Langley, Joanne M; McGeer, Allison; Hupert, Nathaniel; Tellier, Raymond; Henry, Bonnie; Halperin, Scott A; Johnston, Lynn; Pourbohloul, Babak

    2018-04-17

    Nosocomial, or healthcare-associated infections (HAI), exact a high medical and financial toll on patients, healthcare workers, caretakers, and the health system. Interpersonal contact patterns play a large role in infectious disease spread, but little is known about the relationship between health care workers' (HCW) movements and contact patterns within a heath care facility and HAI. Quantitatively capturing these patterns will aid in understanding the dynamics of HAI and may lead to more targeted and effective control strategies in the hospital setting. Staff at 3 urban university-based tertiary care hospitals in Canada completed a detailed questionnaire on demographics, interpersonal contacts, in-hospital movement, and infection prevention and control practices. Staff were divided into categories of administrative/support, nurses, physicians, and "Other HCWs" - a fourth distinct category, which excludes physicians and nurses. Using quantitative network modeling tools, we constructed the resulting HCW "co-location network" to illustrate contacts among different occupations and with locations in hospital settings. Among 3048 respondents (response rate 38%) an average of 3.79, 3.69 and 3.88 floors were visited by each HCW each week in the 3 hospitals, with a standard deviation of 2.63, 1.74 and 2.08, respectively. Physicians reported the highest rate of direct patient contacts (> 20 patients/day) but the lowest rate of contacts with other HCWs; nurses had the most extended (> 20 min) periods of direct patient contact. "Other HCWs" had the most direct daily contact with all other HCWs. Physicians also reported significantly more locations visited per week than nurses, other HCW, or administrators; nurses visited the fewest. Public spaces such as the cafeteria had the most staff visits per week, but the least mean hours spent per visit. Inpatient settings had significantly more HCW interactions per week than outpatient settings. HCW contact patterns and spatial

  19. Identifying the Infection Control Areas Requiring Modifications in Thoracic Surgery Units: Results of a Two-Year Surveillance of Surgical Site Infections in Hospitals in Southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, Grzegorz; Rogoziński, Paweł; Żaloudik, Elżbieta; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Różańska, Anna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is considered to be a priority in infection control. The objective of this study is the analysis of results of active targeted surveillance conducted over a two-year period in the Department of Thoracic Surgery at the Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Center in Bystra, in southern Poland. The retrospective analysis was carried out on the basis of results of active monitoring of SSI in the 45-bed Department of Thoracic Surgery at the Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Center in Bystra between April 1, 2014 and April 30, 2016. Surgical site infections were identified based on the definitions of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) taking into account the time of symptom onset, specifically, whether the symptoms occurred within 30 d after the surgical procedure. Detection of SSI relied on daily inspection of incisions by a trained nurse, analysis of medical and nursing entries in the computer system, and analysis of all results of microbiologic tests taken in the unit and in the operating room. In the study period, data were collected regarding 1,387 treatment procedures meeting the registration criteria. Forty cases of SSI were detected yielding an incidence rate of 3%. Most cases (55%) were found in the course of hospitalization and 45% were detected after the patient's discharge. The SSIs were classified as follows: superficial, 37.5%; deep infections, 7.5%; and organ/space infection, 55%. Among patients who were diagnosed with SSI, most were male (77.5%). For patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score I-II the incidence rate was 2%; ASA score III or more, 3.7%. The incidence rate varied from 0.3% in clean surgical site to 6.5% in clean-contaminated site. The study validated the usefulness of targeted surveillance in monitoring SSIs in patients hospitalized in thoracic surgery departments. Surgical site infection surveillance identified areas of care requiring modifications, namely

  20. Training infection control and hospital hygiene professionals in Europe, 2010: agreed core competencies among 33 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusaferro, S; Cookson, B; Kalenic, S; Cooper, T; Fabry, J; Gallagher, R; Hartemann, P; Mannerquist, K; Popp, W; Privitera, G; Ruef, C; Viale, P; Coiz, F; Fabbro, E; Suetens, C; Varela Santos, C

    2014-12-11

    The harmonisation of training programmes for infection control and hospital hygiene (IC/HH) professionals in Europe is a requirement of the Council recommendation on patient safety. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control commissioned the 'Training Infection Control in Europe' project to develop a consensus on core competencies for IC/HH professionals in the European Union (EU). Core competencies were drafted on the basis of the Improving Patient Safety in Europe (IPSE) project's core curriculum (CC), evaluated by questionnaire and approved by National Representatives (NRs) for IC/HH training. NRs also re-assessed the status of IC/HH training in European countries in 2010 in comparison with the situation before the IPSE CC in 2006. The IPSE CC had been used to develop or update 28 of 51 IC/HH courses. Only 10 of 33 countries offered training and qualification for IC/HH doctors and nurses. The proposed core competencies are structured in four areas and 16 professional tasks at junior and senior level. They form a reference for standardisation of IC/HH professional competencies and support recognition of training initiatives.

  1. Compliance with the national palestinian infection prevention and control protocol at governmental paediatric hospitals in gaza governorates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljedi, Ashraf; Dalo, Shareef

    2014-08-01

    Nosocomial infections are a significant burden for both patients and the healthcare system. For this reason, infection prevention and control (IPC) practices are extremely important. The Palestinian Ministry of Health adopted the national IPC Protocol in 2004. This study aimed to assess the compliance of healthcare providers (HCPs) with the Protocol in three governmental paediatric hospitals in Gaza governorates. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from February to November 2010. Data were collected from a sample of doctors, nurses and physiotherapists (N = 334) using a self-administered questionnaire and observation checklists to record HCP practices and assess the hospital environment. The response rate was 92%. The most important reasons for non-compliance with the IPC Protocol were the absence of an education programme (61.5%), lack of knowledge (52.4%) and the scarcity of required supplies (46.9%). Only 2.3% of respondents had a copy of the IPC Protocol, while 65.8% did not know of its existence. Only 16.9% had participated in training sessions regarding general IPC practices. The observation checklist regarding HCP practices revealed low levels of compliance in hand washing (45.9%), wearing gloves (40.7%) and using antiseptics/disinfectants (49.16%). The health facilities checklist indicated that there was a lack of certain essential equipment and materials, such as covered waste containers and heavy-duty gloves. Due to the lack of HPC knowledge, the authors recommend that the IPC Protocol be made available in all hospitals. In addition, a qualified team should implement intensive IPC education and training programmes and facilities should provide the required equipment and materials.

  2. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium Findings of Device-Associated Infections Rate in an Intensive Care Unit of a Lebanese University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanj, SS; Kanafani, ZA; Sidani, N; Alamuddin, L; Zahreddine, N; Rosenthal, VD

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the rates of device-associated healthcare-associated infections (DA-HAI), microbiological profile, bacterial resistance, length of stay (LOS), excess mortality and hand hygiene compliance in one intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital member of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in Beirut, Lebanon. Materials and Methods: An open label, prospective cohort, active DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted on adults admitted to a tertiary-care ICU in Lebanon from November 2007 to March 2010. The protocol and methodology implemented were developed by INICC. Data collection was performed in the participating ICUs. Data uploading and analyses were conducted at INICC headquarters on proprietary software. DA-HAI rates were recorded by applying the definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We analyzed the DA-HAI, mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLA-BSI), and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates, microorganism profile, excess LOS, excess mortality, and hand hygiene compliance. Results: A total of 666 patients hospitalized for 5,506 days acquired 65 DA-HAIs, an overall rate of 9.8% [(95% confidence interval (CI) 7.6–12.3], and 11.8 (95% CI 9.1–15.0) DA-HAIs per 1000 ICU-days. The CLA-BSI rate was 5.2 (95% CI 2.8–8.7) per 1000 catheter-days; the VAP rate was 8.1 (95% CI 5.5–11.7) per 1000 ventilator-days; and the CAUTI rate was 4.1 (95% CI 2.6–6.2) per 1000 catheter-days. LOS of patients was 7.3 days for those without DA-HAI, 13.8 days for those with CLA-BSI, 18.8 days for those with VAP. Excess mortality was 40.9% [relative risk (RR) 3.14; P 0.004] for CLA-BSI. Mortality of VAP and CAUTI was not significantly different from patients without DA-HAI. Escherichia coli was the most common isolated microorganism. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 84.9% (95% CI 82

  3. International nosocomial infection control consortium findings of device-associated infections rate in an intensive care unit of a Lebanese university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Kanj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the rates of device-associated healthcare-associated infections (DA-HAI, microbiological profile, bacterial resistance, length of stay (LOS, excess mortality and hand hygiene compliance in one intensive care unit (ICU of a hospital member of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC in Beirut, Lebanon. Materials and Methods: An open label, prospective cohort, active DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted on adults admitted to a tertiary-care ICU in Lebanon from November 2007 to March 2010. The protocol and methodology implemented were developed by INICC. Data collection was performed in the participating ICUs. Data uploading and analyses were conducted at INICC headquarters on proprietary software. DA-HAI rates were recorded by applying the definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. We analyzed the DA-HAI, mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP, central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLA-BSI, and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI rates, microorganism profile, excess LOS, excess mortality, and hand hygiene compliance. Results: A total of 666 patients hospitalized for 5,506 days acquired 65 DA-HAIs, an overall rate of 9.8% [(95% confidence interval (CI 7.6-12.3], and 11.8 (95% CI 9.1-15.0 DA-HAIs per 1000 ICU-days. The CLA-BSI rate was 5.2 (95% CI 2.8-8.7 per 1000 catheter-days; the VAP rate was 8.1 (95% CI 5.5-11.7 per 1000 ventilator-days; and the CAUTI rate was 4.1 (95% CI 2.6-6.2 per 1000 catheter-days. LOS of patients was 7.3 days for those without DA-HAI, 13.8 days for those with CLA-BSI, 18.8 days for those with VAP. Excess mortality was 40.9% [relative risk (RR 3.14; P 0.004] for CLA-BSI. Mortality of VAP and CAUTI was not significantly different from patients without DA-HAI. Escherichia coli was the most common isolated microorganism. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 84.9% (95% CI 82

  4. Why sensitive bacteria are resistant to hospital infection control [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kleef, Esther; Luangasanatip, Nantasit; Bonten, Marc J.; Cooper, Ben S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Large reductions in the incidence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile have been observed in response to multifaceted hospital-based interventions. Reductions in antibiotic-sensitive strains have been smaller or non-existent. It has been

  5. Performance of the Operating Room Personnel in following of the standards of Infection Control in the Educational Hospitals of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rostaminejad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Surgical wound infection is one of the common nosocomial infections. During operation, members of the surgical team which are in contact with the tissue incision should observe the standards of infection control in the operating room since it has a great role in prevention and control of these infections. The present study aimed to determine the performance of the operating room personnel in observing the standards of infection control in educational hospitals of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2009. Materials & Methods: Forty two operating room personnel participated in this cross-sectional analytic-descriptive study. A check list was used for unnoticeably collecting the data about the performance of personnel in respect of infection control standards at three different times. Their performances were classified into four levels (very weak, weak, moderate and good and the results were shown as absolute and relative frequency distribution. Data were analyzed using Chi-square and Fischer exact test by the SPSS software. Results: Performance of personnel in following the standards of infection control in this study was moderate. Conclusion: The results indicate that the participants of the study do not follow some of the standards of infection control in the operating rooms. Therefore, further activities of the committees of infection control and using of new antiseptic for surgical scrub are recommended.

  6. Controlling Hospital-Acquired Infection: Focus on the Role of the Environment and New Technologies for Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY There is increasing interest in the role of cleaning for managing hospital-acquired infections (HAI). Pathogens such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multiresistant Gram-negative bacilli, norovirus, and Clostridium difficile persist in the health care environment for days. Both detergent- and disinfectant-based cleaning can help control these pathogens, although difficulties with measuring cleanliness have compromised the quality of published evidence. Traditional cleaning methods are notoriously inefficient for decontamination, and new approaches have been proposed, including disinfectants, steam, automated dispersal systems, and antimicrobial surfaces. These methods are difficult to evaluate for cost-effectiveness because environmental data are not usually modeled against patient outcome. Recent studies have reported the value of physically removing soil using detergent, compared with more expensive (and toxic) disinfectants. Simple cleaning methods should be evaluated against nonmanual disinfection using standardized sampling and surveillance. Given worldwide concern over escalating antimicrobial resistance, it is clear that more studies on health care decontamination are required. Cleaning schedules should be adapted to reflect clinical risk, location, type of site, and hand touch frequency and should be evaluated for cost versus benefit for both routine and outbreak situations. Forthcoming evidence on the role of antimicrobial surfaces could supplement infection prevention strategies for health care environments, including those targeting multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:25278571

  7. Risk factors and control of hospital acquired infections: a comparison between Wikipedia and scientific literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maggi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: nowadays Wikipedia is one of the main on-line sources of general information. It contains several items about nosocomial infections and their prevention, together of items on virtually every scientific topic.This study aims to assess whether Wikipedia can be considered a reliable source for professional updating, concerning Healthcare-associated Infections (HAI.Methods: Wikipedia has been searched in order to gather items on HAI. 387 items were found with a search string. The field of research was reduced at those articles (27 items containing exhaustive information in relation to prevention of HAI. The messages contained in those articles were than compared with the recommendations of a selected guideline (NICE 2003, completed by a literature search, with the aim of testing their reliability and exhaustivity.Results: 15 Wiki items were found and 51 messages selected. NICE guidelines contained 119 recommendations and 52 more recommendations has been found in a further literature search. 45.1% of Wikipedia’s messages were even found in the guidelines. On this percentage, 21.6% completely agreed with the messages of the guidelines, 15.7% partially agreed, 3.9% disagreed and 3.9% showed different level of evidence in different articles. Moreover, 54.9% of Wikipedia’s messages were not included in the guidelines and 84.2% of the recommendations contained in the guidelines were not present in Wikipedia.Conclusions: Wikipedia should not be considered as a reliable source for professional updating on HAI.

  8. Impact of an infection-control program on nurses' knowledge and attitude in pediatric intensive care units at Cairo University hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Yasmine S; Labib, John R; Abouelhamd, Walaa A

    2014-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a prominent problem among patients in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) as it could result in significant morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, and increase in medical care costs. The role of nurses is extremely important in preventing hazards and sequela of healthcare-associated infections. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a health education program regarding infection-control measures on nurses' knowledge and attitude in PICUs at Cairo University hospitals. This was a pre-post test interventional study in which a convenient sample of 125 nurses was taken from the nursing staff in different PICUs at Cairo University hospitals. The study took place in three phases. In the first phase, the nursing staff's knowledge, attitude and practice concerning infection-control measures were tested using a self-administered pretested questionnaire and an observation checklist. The second phase included health education sessions in the form of powerpoint and video presentations; and in the third phase the nurses' knowledge and attitude on infection-control measures were reassessed. A significantly higher level of knowledge was revealed in the postintervention phase as compared with the preintervention phase with regards to the types of nosocomial infections (94.4 vs. 76.8%, Pcontrol nosocomial infections (89.6 vs. 68%, Pcontrol measures could protect them completely from acquiring infection (79.2 vs. 65.6%, P=0.033). Statistically significant higher total knowledge and attitude scores were revealed in the postintervention phase as compared with the preintervention one (PHospital (88%), whereas it was the lowest in the emergency pediatric unit (65%). There is scope for improvement in knowledge and attitude after educational program was offered to the nursing staff. Educational training programs should be multidisciplinary interventions in the era of quality control to help healthcare workers realize the importance of basic

  9. Tailored interventions to improve antibiotic use for lower respiratory tract infections in hospitals: a cluster-randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.A.; Hulscher, M.E.J.L.; Trap-Liefers, J.; Akkermans, R.P.; Kullberg, B.J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on the most effective approach to increase the quality of antibiotic use for lower respiratory tract infections at hospitals. METHODS: One thousand nine hundred six patients with community-acquired pneumonia or an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  10. Successful control of resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using antibiotic stewardship and infection control programs at a Chinese university hospital: a 6-year prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu L

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Lei Liu,1 Bin Liu,1 Yu Li,2 Wei Zhang1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China Objective: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is emerging as a highly multidrug-resistant (MDR nosocomial pathogen. Data on the efficacy of infection control measures in endemic situations are lacking. We investigated the effect of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS and infection control programs (ICPs in controlling the resistance of P. aeruginosa at a tertiary hospital center.Methods: Susceptibility and resistance were investigated using broth microdilution, as per the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Antibiotic use was restricted through AMS, which included a classification management system for antibiotic use. The ICPs included environmental cleaning and disinfection, hand hygiene, active surveillance of P. aeruginosa, and education about infection control.Results: A total of 2,241 P. aeruginosa isolates were evaluated between 2012 and 2017. Sensitivity and resistance of the isolates to the antipseudomonal antimicrobials colistin and tigecycline were stable. The sensitivity and resistance to other antipseudomonal antimicrobials improved after 2014, after the AMS and ICPs were implemented in 2013. The use of alcohol-based hand gel significantly increased from 0.6 to 10.9 L per 1,000 patient-days (PD during the study period (P=0.005. The incidence rates of extensively drug-resistant (XDR and MDR P. aeruginosa showed a sustained decrease from 2013 (4.9 and 22% to 2017 (1 and 15%, respectively. The yearly consumption of antimicrobial agents also showed a sustained and significant decrease from 45 defined daily doses (DDDs per 1,000 PD to 38.15 DDDs per 1,000 PD (P=0.04. A significant correlation was found between the incidence rate of MDR P. aeruginosa and the

  11. [Does the hospital cost of care differ for inflammatory bowel disease patients with or without gastrointestinal infections? A case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Köhler, F; Kräplin, T; Hartmann, M; Lerch, M M; Stallmach, A

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal Infections have been implicated as possible causes of exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or risk factors for severe flares in general. The introduction of the G-DRG reimbursement system has greatly increased the pressure to provide cost effective treatment in German hospitals. Few studies have compared the costs of treating IBD patients with or without gastrointestinal infections and none of them have specifically considered the German reimbursement situation. We performed a single center case-control retrospective chart review from 2002 to 2011 of inpatients with IBD (Department of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital Jena) with an exacerbation of their disease. The presence of gastrointestinal infections (Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, adeno-, rota-, norovirus and Clostridium difficile) was assessed in all inpatients with Cohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD patients with gastrointestinal infections (n = 79) were matched for age to IBD patients who were negative for gastrointestinal pathogens (n = 158). Patient level costing (PLC) was used to express the total cost of hospital care for each patient; PLC comprised a weighted daily bed cost plus cost of all medical services provided (e. g., endoscopy, microbiology, pathology) calculated according to an activity-based costing approach. All costs were discounted to 2012 values. Gastrointestinal infections in IBD patients were not associated with an increase in mortality (0%); however, they were associated with 2.3-fold higher total hospital charges (6499.10 € vs. 2817.00 €; p = 0.001) and increased length of stay in hospital (14.5 vs. 9.4 days; p costs, especially in UC. Inpatient hospital costs differ significantly for IBD patients with and without gastrointestinal infections, especially in ulcerative colitis, when care was provided in a single university hospital. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing Every Other Day on Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Infections in the Surgical ICU: A Single-Center, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Joshua T; Ashton, Carol M; Bui, Lan N; Pham, Vy P; Shirkey, Beverly A; Blackshear, Jolene E; Bersamin, Jimmy B; Pomer, Rubie May L; Johnson, Michael L; Magtoto, Audrey D; Butler, Michelle O; Tran, Shirley K; Sanchez, Leah R; Patel, Jessica G; Ochoa, Robert A; Hai, Shaikh A; Denison, Karen I; Graviss, Edward A; Wray, Nelda P

    2016-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that compared with daily soap and water bathing, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate bathing every other day for up to 28 days decreases the risk of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection in surgical ICU patients. This was a single-center, pragmatic, randomized trial. Patients and clinicians were aware of treatment-group assignment; investigators who determined outcomes were blinded. Twenty-four-bed surgical ICU at a quaternary academic medical center. Adults admitted to the surgical ICU from July 2012 to May 2013 with an anticipated surgical ICU stay for 48 hours or more were included. Patients were randomized to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine every other day alternating with soap and water every other day (treatment arm) or to bathing with soap and water daily (control arm). The primary endpoint was a composite outcome of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection. Of 350 patients randomized, 24 were excluded due to prior enrollment in this trial and one withdrew consent. Therefore, 325 were analyzed (164 soap and water versus 161 chlorhexidine). Patients acquired 53 infections. Compared with soap and water bathing, chlorhexidine bathing every other day decreased the risk of acquiring infections (hazard ratio = 0.555; 95% CI, 0.309-0.997; p = 0.049). For patients bathed with soap and water versus chlorhexidine, counts of incident hospital-acquired infections were 14 versus 7 for catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 13 versus 8 for ventilator-associated pneumonia, 6 versus 3 for incisional surgical site infections, and 2 versus 0 for primary bloodstream infection; the effect was consistent across all infections. The absolute risk reduction for acquiring a hospital-acquired infection was 9.0% (95% CI, 1.5-16.4%; p

  13. 75 FR 22816 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), regarding the practice of hospital infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections... policy statements regarding prevention of healthcare- associated infections and healthcare-related...

  14. 75 FR 50770 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), regarding: (1) The practice of hospital infection control; strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance... and other policy statements regarding prevention of healthcare- associated infections and healthcare...

  15. Role of water quality assessments in hospital infection control: Experience from a new oncology center in eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Bhalchandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality assessment and timely intervention are essential for health. Microbiology, total dissolved solids (TDS and free residual chlorine were measured for water quality maintenance in an oncology center in India. Impact of these interventions over a period of 22 months has been demonstrated with four cardinal events. Pseudomonas in hospital water was controlled by adequate chlorination, whereas high TDS in the central sterile supply department water was corrected by the installation of electro-deionization plant. Contaminated bottled water was replaced using quality controlled hospital supply. Timely detection and correction of water-related issues, including reverse osmosis plant was possible through multi-faceted approach to water quality.

  16. Abstract: Implementing Infection Control Measures in Neonatology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background Neonatal infection is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Objective The project's objective is to facilitate quality improvement by reduction of hospital-acquired infection (HAI) in hospitalized neonates. Methods Current infection control practices were surveyed and three main areas were ...

  17. Capacity of English NHS hospitals to monitor quality in infection prevention and control using a new European framework: a multilevel qualitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Michiyo; Ahmad, Raheelah; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Birgand, Gabriel; Johnson, Alan P; Holmes, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Objective (1) To assess the extent to which current English national regulations/policies/guidelines and local hospital practices align with indicators suggested by a European review of effective strategies for infection prevention and control (IPC); (2) to examine the capacity of local hospitals to report on the indicators and current use of data to inform IPC management and practice. Design A national and local-level analysis of the 27 indicators was conducted. At the national level, documentary review of regulations/policies/guidelines was conducted. At the local level data collection comprised: (a) review of documentary sources from 14 hospitals, to determine the capacity to report performance against these indicators; (b) qualitative interviews with 3 senior managers from 5 hospitals and direct observation of hospital wards to find out if these indicators are used to improve IPC management and practice. Setting 2 acute English National Health Service (NHS) trusts and 1 NHS foundation trust (14 hospitals). Participants 3 senior managers from 5 hospitals for qualitative interviews. Primary and secondary outcome measures As primary outcome measures, a ‘Red-Amber-Green’ (RAG) rating was developed reflecting how well the indicators were included in national documents or their availability at the local organisational level. The current use of the indicators to inform IPC management and practice was also assessed. The main secondary outcome measure is any inconsistency between national and local RAG rating results. Results National regulations/policies/guidelines largely cover the suggested European indicators. The ability of individual hospitals to report some of the indicators at ward level varies across staff groups, which may mask required improvements. A reactive use of staffing-related indicators was observed rather than the suggested prospective strategic approach for IPC management. Conclusions For effective patient safety and infection prevention in

  18. Effects of national antibiotic stewardship and infection control strategies on hospital-associated and community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections across a region of Scotland: a non-linear time-series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawes, Timothy; Lopez-Lozano, José-María; Nebot, Cesar A; Macartney, Gillian; Subbarao-Sharma, Rashmi; Dare, Ceri Rj; Wares, Karen D; Gould, Ian M

    2015-12-01

    Restriction of antibiotic consumption to below predefined total use thresholds might remove the selection pressure that maintains antimicrobial resistance within populations. We assessed the effect of national antibiotic stewardship and infection prevention and control programmes on prevalence density of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections across a region of Scotland. This non-linear time-series analysis and quasi-experimental study explored ecological determinants of MRSA epidemiology among 1,289,929 hospital admissions and 455,508 adults registered in primary care in northeast Scotland. Interventions included antibiotic stewardship to restrict use of so-called 4C (cephalosporins, co-amoxiclav, clindamycin, and fluoroquinolones) and macrolide antibiotics; a hand hygiene campaign; hospital environment inspections; and MRSA admission screening. Total effects were defined as the difference between scenarios with intervention (observed) and without intervention (predicted from time-series models). The primary outcomes were prevalence density of MRSA infections per 1000 occupied bed days (OBDs) in hospitals or per 10,000 inhabitants per day (IDs) in the community. During antibiotic stewardship, use of 4C and macrolide antibiotics fell by 47% (mean decrease 224 defined daily doses [DDDs] per 1000 OBDs, 95% CI 154-305, p=0·008) in hospitals and 27% (mean decrease 2·52 DDDs per 1000 IDs, 0·65-4·55, p=0·031) in the community. Hospital prevalence densities of MRSA were inversely related to intensified infection prevention and control, but positively associated with MRSA rates in neighbouring hospitals, importation pressures, bed occupancy, and use of fluoroquinolones, co-amoxiclav, and third-generation cephalosporins, or macrolide antibiotics that exceeded hospital-specific thresholds. Community prevalence density was predicted by hospital MRSA rates and above-threshold use of macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and clindamycin. MRSA prevalence

  19. Detecting the Norovirus Season in Sweden Using Search Engine Data – Meeting the Needs of Hospital Infection Control Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Zetterqvist, Inga; Hulth, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus outbreaks severely disrupt healthcare systems. We evaluated whether Websök, an internet-based surveillance system using search engine data, improved norovirus surveillance and response in Sweden. We compared Websök users' characteristics with the general population, cross-correlated weekly Websök searches with laboratory notifications between 2006 and 2013, compared the time Websök and laboratory data crossed the epidemic threshold and surveyed infection control teams about their perception and use of Websök. Users of Websök were not representative of the general population. Websök correlated with laboratory data (b = 0.88-0.89) and gave an earlier signal to the onset of the norovirus season compared with laboratory-based surveillance. 17/21 (81%) infection control teams answered the survey, of which 11 (65%) believed Websök could help with infection control plans. Websök is a low-resource, easily replicable system that detects the norovirus season as reliably as laboratory data, but earlier. Using Websök in routine surveillance can help infection control teams prepare for the yearly norovirus season. PMID:24955857

  20. Detecting the norovirus season in Sweden using search engine data--meeting the needs of hospital infection control teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Zetterqvist, Inga; Hulth, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus outbreaks severely disrupt healthcare systems. We evaluated whether Websök, an internet-based surveillance system using search engine data, improved norovirus surveillance and response in Sweden. We compared Websök users' characteristics with the general population, cross-correlated weekly Websök searches with laboratory notifications between 2006 and 2013, compared the time Websök and laboratory data crossed the epidemic threshold and surveyed infection control teams about their perception and use of Websök. Users of Websök were not representative of the general population. Websök correlated with laboratory data (b = 0.88-0.89) and gave an earlier signal to the onset of the norovirus season compared with laboratory-based surveillance. 17/21 (81%) infection control teams answered the survey, of which 11 (65%) believed Websök could help with infection control plans. Websök is a low-resource, easily replicable system that detects the norovirus season as reliably as laboratory data, but earlier. Using Websök in routine surveillance can help infection control teams prepare for the yearly norovirus season.

  1. An integrative review of infection prevention and control programs for multidrug-resistant organisms in acute care hospitals: a socio-ecological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Chantal; Taylor, Geoffrey; Sales, Anne; Marck, Patricia Beryl

    2011-06-01

    The infection rates of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) are increasing in Canada and the United States. The prevention and control of MDRO infections remain an important issue in acute care hospitals. Although comprehensive infection prevention and control programs have been recommended, there is little evidence to date of their effectiveness or of what aspects are most important. Our objectives were to review and critique the literature on the relationship between an MDRO infection and control program and MDRO rates in acute care hospitals. Studies including original research published between January 1, 1998, and May 14, 2009, were identified through MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PUBMED, The Cochrane Library, and expert consultation. A comprehensive search strategy was developed with a librarian to find studies that covered the main subject areas of this integrative review. Of the 1,382 papers retrieved, 47 were reviewed, and 32 studies met the inclusion criteria. The interventions in the included studies were assessed using the tier 1/tier 2 framework. A total of 18 (56.25%) studies had an administrative measure as an intervention; 20 (62.5%) studies had education and training of health care personnel; 8 (25.0%) studies had judicious use of antimicrobial agents; 17 (53.1%) studies used surveillance; 24 (75.0%) studies had infection control precautions to prevent transmission; 7 studies (21.9%) introduced environmental measures; and 9 (28.1%) studies used patient decolonization. Although all the 32 studies were quasiexperimental studies, only 2 (5.9%) studies provided sample size calculations, and only 5 studies reported confounding factors. Whereas 27 used an interrupted time series design and 2 were controlled pre- and post-intervention designs, 3 were pre- and post-intervention without control groups. This integrative review demonstrated that the evidence of the relationship between MDRO infection prevention and control programs and the rates of MDRO is weak

  2. Risk factors for hospital admission due to acute lower respiratory tract infection in Guarani indigenous children in southern Brazil: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Andrey M; Coimbra, Carlos E A; Werneck, Guilherme L

    2013-05-01

    To assess risk factors associated with hospital admission due to acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI) in indigenous Guarani children <5 years of age in southern Brazil. Population-based matched case-control study from May 2007 to June 2008 in 81 Guarani villages. Cases were defined as hospital admissions due to confirmed ALRTI. Two controls free from acute respiratory infection, matched according to age, sex and place of residence, were selected for each case at the time of the case's hospitalisation. Both cases and controls were recruited by a surveillance routine established for the study. The analysis was performed on 120 cases and 201 controls. The risk factors that remained significantly associated with hospitalisation due to ALRTI in the hierarchical multivariate conditional logistic regression were: low stable monthly per capita household income (infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Guarani children. Our study provides the first evidence about their determinants in indigenous peoples in Brazil that can help to better understand the epidemiology of respiratory infections in indigenous children. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Adaptive Architecture and the Prevention of Infections in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khai Tran van

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches has shown that climate change may spark global epidemics. The objectives of hospital design consistent with a high standard of sustainable architecture must not only be the tropicalization of buildings but also a system to confront the impact of infectious diseases which arise from climate change. Infection control is the discipline concerned with preventing nosocomial or healthcare-associated infection. Infection control addresses factors related to the spread of infections within the hospital building, including prevention, monitoring and management measures. As the application of new technologies such as the Heating, ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC with high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA has application range within stamina, the study suggests the need to adopt an integrated adaptive hospital design strategy to prevent infection.

  4. Capacity of English NHS hospitals to monitor quality in infection prevention and control using a new European framework: a multilevel qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Michiyo; Ahmad, Raheelah; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Birgand, Gabriel; Johnson, Alan P; Holmes, Alison

    2017-01-23

    (1) To assess the extent to which current English national regulations/policies/guidelines and local hospital practices align with indicators suggested by a European review of effective strategies for infection prevention and control (IPC); (2) to examine the capacity of local hospitals to report on the indicators and current use of data to inform IPC management and practice. A national and local-level analysis of the 27 indicators was conducted. At the national level, documentary review of regulations/policies/guidelines was conducted. At the local level data collection comprised: (a) review of documentary sources from 14 hospitals, to determine the capacity to report performance against these indicators; (b) qualitative interviews with 3 senior managers from 5 hospitals and direct observation of hospital wards to find out if these indicators are used to improve IPC management and practice. 2 acute English National Health Service (NHS) trusts and 1 NHS foundation trust (14 hospitals). 3 senior managers from 5 hospitals for qualitative interviews. As primary outcome measures, a 'Red-Amber-Green' (RAG) rating was developed reflecting how well the indicators were included in national documents or their availability at the local organisational level. The current use of the indicators to inform IPC management and practice was also assessed. The main secondary outcome measure is any inconsistency between national and local RAG rating results. National regulations/policies/guidelines largely cover the suggested European indicators. The ability of individual hospitals to report some of the indicators at ward level varies across staff groups, which may mask required improvements. A reactive use of staffing-related indicators was observed rather than the suggested prospective strategic approach for IPC management. For effective patient safety and infection prevention in English hospitals, routine and proactive approaches need to be developed. Our approach to evaluation can

  5. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) recommendations "Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections" in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Grünewald, Miriam; Otto, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt's hospitals in autumn, 2015. In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt's 17 hospitals, inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of 5 wards were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters) and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model. Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%). In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change. Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two nurses. Against this background, a sufficient

  6. [The Importance of Vector Management for Prevention of Hospital Infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    Many researches show that cockroaches, ants, some other arthropods and also rodents in hospitals, can act as potential vectors of medically important bacteria, fungi and parasites. The results of microbiological studies show that these animals play a significant role in the epidemiology of hospital infections. These vectors may be found inside of the kitchens, patient rooms, toilets, medicine stores, canteen and wards in health care environments. The importance of vector control in order to prevent the spread of nosocomial infections in healthcare facilities was discussed in this paper. This study also gives information on integrated control methods for vectors in hospitals.

  7. Factors associated with hospitalization of children with acute odontogenic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klačar Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the sociodemographic and clinical features of odontogenic infections between hospitalized and nonhospitalized children and to show what were the risk factors in children that could predict the course of odontogenic infection and indicate the need for hospital treatment. The design of our study was of the case-control type. The two study groups consisted of 70 inpatients and 35 outpatients with odontogenic infections who were treated at Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Clinical Center in Kragujevac, Serbia. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected retrospectively from patients' hospital records. The following characteristics were significantly associated with hospital treatment of children with acute odontogenic infection: living in a village (OR =7.26,[1.43-36.96], multi-spatial infection (OR =0.04, [0.00-0.91], and affection of upper face (OR = 0.01, [0.00-0.86]. Tooth extraction was important intervention in the treatment regimen and reduced frequency of hospitalization (OR=0.07, [0.01-0.70]. The differences between hospitalized and non-hospitalized children were not significant in regard to: ethnicity, employment of parents, anatomical region of infection, side of the facial infection, source of infection (posterior or anterior deciduous or permanent teeth, and treatment (drainage and incision, oral or parenteral antibiotics. In children with acute odontogenic infection it is necessary to do tooth extraction in timely manner, especially if the source of infection is tooth from upper jaw and if it is multi-spatial infection.

  8. INFECTION PREVENTION IN PEDIATRIC HOSPITAL ADMISSION: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Menezes Castilhos Azevedo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize and evaluate the measures of prevention and control of HI in pediatric hospitalization units. It was adopted as the method literature review. The following databases were consulted: Scielo, LILACS, PubMed and Google Scholar, as well as text books and legislation on the subject. The research was carried out from May to December 2015. Inclusion criteria were publications in the period between 1996 and 2015 that were available in the Portuguese or Spanish language. Nineteen publications were eligible, among them: 14 articles, 3 book chapters, 1 final graduation paper and 1 doctoral thesis. Data was consulted in existing legislation with regard to infection control. The results showed as key measures for proper prevention and Hospital Infection control in pediatric inpatient units: the proper use of insulation and precautions, the guidance and education of relatives and companions of hospitalized children and continuing education of staff nursing, highlighting the importance of hand washing in hospital infection control. It is important that the nursing professional has adequate knowledge of the country's legislation on the infection control in the hospital environment, so you can require that guidelines and regulations described in this are met by health care facilities, thereby helping to quality care to hospitalized children.

  9. Infection control in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, P D

    1988-02-01

    The level of socio-political and economic development achieved by a country determines the quality and quantity of the health care its citizens receive. These factors also govern the amount of attention given to hospital-acquired infection. The problems of infection control in 'developing' countries include, first, the international problems that arise from clashes of personality and viewpoint among those responsible for it, exacerbated in some places by ethnic or religious traditions. Second are problems imposed by factors that affect the spectrum of infectious disease, and third is a variable deficiency of human and financial resources. In the search for solutions, an analysis suggests that nurses are particularly suited to take the lead in the prevention of infection, so that a special initiative directed towards their education in the rapidly developing science of hospital infection and its control is likely to be the most cost effective and appropriate initial approach. This needs to be accompanied by parallel improvements in the education of medical undergraduates. Anything else should be applied in response to measured need, and then only as money and manpower permit. Careful thought is required to avoid squandering scarce resources by applying inappropriate infection control technology.

  10. Hospital infection: vision of professional nursing staff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarciane da Silva Monteiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The hospital-acquired infection (HAI is defined as a serious public health problem, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. The role of nursing staff on this issue is essential in ensuring solving and quality care, minimizing damages that may arise as a result of the care offered to patients. From this discussion, this study aimed to understand the vision of the nursing team professionals about HAI. Method: This is a qualitative, descriptive study. The data collection was performed using a semi-structured interview. We used the Bardin Content Analysis. Results: The categories that emerged were: Definition of HAI; Implemented prevention measures; Difficulties in controlling the HAI, and coping strategies. The study found a clear understanding of what is a HAI for nurses, however, for practical nurses that understanding appeared wrongly. Hand washing and the use of PPE were the main measures mentioned in prevention. The low uptake of the above measures and the problems of working in teams were listed challenges. Conclusion: Therefore, lifelong learning is an important instrument to promote changes in practice. It is essential that HIC act with professionals raising their awareness about the importance of play in the prevention and control of potential complications, ensuring the safety and quality of care directed to the patient. KEYWORDS: Cross Infection. Nursing. Qualitative research.

  11. Controlling hospital library theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Theresa M; Marchok, Catherine

    2003-04-01

    At Capital Health System/Fuld Campus (formerly Helene Fuld Medical Center), the Health Sciences Library lost many books and videocassettes. These materials were listed in the catalog but were missing when staff went to the shelves. The hospital had experienced a downsizing of staff, a reorganization, and a merger. When the library staff did an inventory, $10,000 worth of materials were found to be missing. We corrected the situation through a series of steps that we believe will help other libraries control their theft. Through regularly scheduling inventories, monitoring items, advertising, and using specific security measures, we have successfully controlled the library theft. The January 2002 inventory resulted in meeting our goal of zero missing books and videocassettes. We work to maintain that goal.

  12. Nosocomial infections and related factors in southern khorasan hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Bijari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nosocomial infections are defined as infections occurring during a patient's stay at hospital (48-72h after admission.Nosocomial infections are one of the important problems of health. This study aimed was determine the prevalence of nosocomial infections, and related factors in hospitals with more than 100 beds in south Khorasan Province. Materials and Methods: In this crass-sectional study, an investigator-administered questionnaire was completed for each patient with nosocomial infections diagnosis in hospitals with more than 100 beds in South Khorasan. This questionnaire conation demographic characteristic of patients, department, duration of admission, kind of pathogen and risk factors that was designed according to standard questionnaire of Iranian Nasocomial infections surveillance system (INIS of Center for communicable Disease Control, Ministry of Health. Data were analyzed with SPSS 16 software. Results and discussion: Number of patients with nosocomial infection was 358. The incidence of nosocomial infection was 0.9%. ICU had the highest incidence rate (17.3%. The most common nosocomial infection was pneumonia (43%, and urinary tract infection (UTI (15.1%. In 33.5% culture result were negative. In other cases, culture results showed klebsiella spp. (12.8% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.8% were the most prevalent bacteria. Most factors associated with nosocomial infection in patients were urinary catheters (70.4%, suction (66.8% and tracheal tube (54.2%. 24% of patients expired. The results showed lower ratio of nosocomial infection, that the main reason is failure to detection and reporting of actual cases of nosocomial infection. Promoting detection and reporting system for Prevention and control of nosocomial infection was recommended

  13. Prevention of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in European hospitals: moving beyond policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, M.A.; Hulscher, M.; Scicluna, E.A.; Richards, J.; Azanowsky, J.M.; Xuereb, D.; Huis, A. van; Moro, M.L.; Maltezou, H.C.; Frank, U.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia can be reduced with improved infection control and antibiotic stewardship. AIM: To survey infection control and antibiotic stewardship practices within European hospitals and to identify initiatives that

  14. Hospital infections waste and its proper disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, A.Q.; Memon, A.A.; Mahar, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    Hazardous hospital waste is a unique in several ways. There are a large variety of wastes but volume is a small relative to industrial wastes. Hospital infections solid waste is getting to be serious problem day by day. This waste contribute to the overall pollution in the city; much of it is also hazardous, thus putting at risk the health of those who come into contact with it. This paper addresses the various aspects of incineration, recycling and landfill process with detailed illustration. Hospital waste management in rural hospitals of Pakistan with particular reference to Gambat Hospital is discussed in this paper, including study of existing waste management system, estimation of waste production per day from different sources of Hospital and suitable waste management system is recommended. (author)

  15. 42 CFR 482.42 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Hospital Functions § 482.42 Condition of participation: Infection control. The hospital must provide a... be an active program for the prevention, control, and investigation of infections and communicable... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 482...

  16. Patient referral patterns and the spread of hospital-acquired infections through national health care networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2004 to measure the connectedness between hospitals. This allowed us to reconstruct the network of hospitals in the Netherlands. We used mathematical models to assess the effect of different patient referral patterns on the potential spread of hospital-acquired infections between hospitals, and between categories of hospitals (University medical centers, top clinical hospitals and general hospitals. University hospitals have a higher number of shared patients than teaching or general hospitals, and are therefore more likely to be among the first to receive colonized patients. Moreover, as the network is directional towards university hospitals, they have a higher prevalence, even when infection control measures are equally effective in all hospitals. Patient referral patterns have a profound effect on the spread of health care-associated infections like hospital-acquired MRSA. The MRSA prevalence therefore differs between hospitals with the position of each hospital within the health care network. Any comparison of MRSA rates between hospitals, as a benchmark for hospital hygiene, should therefore take the position of a hospital within the network into account.

  17. Nosocomial infections and their control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmed Khan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are also known as hospital-acquired/associated infections. National Healthcare Safety Network along with Centers for Disease Control for surveillance has classified nosocomial infection sites into 13 types with 50 infection sites, which are specific on the basis of biological and clinical criteria. The agents that are usually involved in hospital-acquired infections include Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Legionella and Enterobacteriaceae family members, namely, Proteus mirablis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens. Nosocomial pathogens can be transmitted through person to person, environment or contaminated water and food, infected individuals, contaminated healthcare personnel's skin or contact via shared items and surfaces. Mainly, multi-drug-resistant nosocomial organisms include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia, whereas Clostridium difficile shows natural resistance. Excessive and improper use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in healthcare settings, is elevating nosocomial infections, which not only becomes a big health care problem but also causes great economic and production loss in the community. Nosocomial infections can be controlled by measuring and comparing the infection rates within healthcare settings and sticking to the best healthcare practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides the methodology for surveillance of nosocomial infections along with investigation of major outbreaks. By means of this surveillance, hospitals can devise a strategy comprising of infection control practices.

  18. Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections - implementation of the recommendations of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) in nursing homes for the elderly in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Gasteyer, Stefanie; Müller, Maria; Samoiski, Yvonne; Serra, Nicole; Westphal, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections range among the most frequent infections not only in hospital patients but also in residents of long-term care facilities for the elderly. Urinary catheters are the greatest risk factor for urinary tract infections. In the guidance paper on the "prevention of infections in nursing homes" (2005) as well as in the updated recommendations for the "prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections" (2015), the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) has recommended adequate preventive measures. In 2015, the implementation of these KRINKO recommendations was investigated. All of Frankfurt's 40 nursing homes were evaluated using a checklist based on the KRINKO recommendations. The evaluation included assessing the availability of operating instructions, appropriate indications for the placement of catheters etc. Age, sex and duration of catheterization, as well as current and previous infections within the past 6 months were documented for every resident with a catheter. In 35 (87.5%) of the nursing homes, operating instructions for the handling of urinary tract catheters were available. The decision as to whether a catheter is indicated is made by physicians, while its placement is often delegated to the nursing service. Typically, silicon catheters are used. In three-quarters of the nursing homes, regular intervals of 4-6 weeks for changing catheters were reported. On the respective survey day, 7.3% of the residents were catheterized. On the survey day, 3.6% (4.2%) and in the previous 6 months a total of 28% (28.9%) of the residents had a urinary tract infection (prevalence of antibiotic therapy in parentheses). Ciprofloxacin was used most often followed by cefuroxime and cotrimoxazole. In the current evaluation, fewer nursing home residents were catheterized than in previous years and the rate of urinary tract infections was low. This indicates an increasingly cautious and apparently appropriate

  19. Ultrasonically nebulised electrolysed oxidising water: a promising new infection control programme for impressions, metals and gypsum casts used in dental hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G; Yu, X; Gu, Z

    2008-04-01

    Controlling the transmission of infectious diseases by impressions, metals and dental casts in dental hospitals remains a challenge. Current disinfection methods have various drawbacks. This study introduced and provided a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of using ultrasonically nebulised, electrolysed oxidising water (UNEOW) as a new infection control programme. UNEOW was produced from freshly generated electrolysed oxidising water (EOW). Samples of impressions, titanium and gypsum were subjected to the following treatments: (1) immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10min; (2) immersion in EOW for 10min; (3) exposure to UNEOW for 15, 30 and 45min; (4) no disinfection (control). Bactericidal efficacy was examined using Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores as indicators. Dimensional accuracy, surface quality, and effect of corrosion were also evaluated for the different samples. Results showed that except for B. subtilis var. niger spores on gypsum casts, the bacterial reduction log(10) values after 30-45min treatment with UNEOW were all above 4. The impression dimensional changes showed no difference between control and UNEOW groups, but both were significantly lower than the EOW and sodium hypochlorite groups (Pimpressions and gypsum casts. No assessable corrosion was found on the titanium surface after a 45min treatment with UNEOW. The findings indicated that use of UNEOW is a feasible and promising approach for controlling the transmission of infectious diseases by impressions, gypsum casts and denture metals in dental facilities.

  20. Clostridium difficile infection among hospitalized HIV-infected individuals : epidemiology and risk factors: results from a case-control study (2002-2013)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Bella, Stefano; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Garcia-Almodovar, Esther; Gallone, Maria Serena; Taglietti, Fabrizio; Topino, Simone; Galati, Vincenzo; Johnson, Emma; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: HIV infection is a risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) yet the immune deficiency predisposing to CDI is not well understood, despite an increasing incidence of CDI among such individuals. We aimed to estimate the incidence and to evaluate the risk factors of CDI among

  1. [Impact of HIV infection in hospital environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Avilés, P; López Benito, I; Berbegal Serra, J

    1998-12-01

    Retrospective study to review the admissions at the Hospital Marina Alta due to infection for HIV or its complications and look for risk factors. Clinical charts of patients admitted at the hospital from 1989 to 1996 were analyzed. From 11,932 admissions, 199 (1.7%) were due to patients with infection from HIV, resulting in the 2.4% of the total stay. The medium stays were higher (8.6 +/- 7.4 vs 6 +/- 4.5) more re-admissions (42.7% vs 25.5%) and higher mortality (11% vs 7.8%). The parasitic infestations of the nervous central system and cardiovascular were the most numerous number of admissions and also the longer stays. Throughout the years we saw a increase in the patients at the outpatient clinic with HIV infection and a paradogic decrease in the inpatient admissions, and also a decrease in the media stay and total stays. There is a decrease in the admissions at the inpatient level in contrast with a increment of the prevalence in the outpatients with HIV infection. The improved treatments, the experience of the physicians, the use of the Day Hospital and the use of the service of Home Care Hospitalization allows to keep more patients with less admissions and more outpatient visits.

  2. Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections – implementation of the recommendations of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO in nursing homes for the elderly in Frankfurt am Main, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heudorf, Ursel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary tract infections range among the most frequent infections not only in hospital patients but also in residents of long-term care facilities for the elderly. Urinary catheters are the greatest risk factor for urinary tract infections. In the guidance paper on the “prevention of infections in nursing homes” (2005 as well as in the updated recommendations for the “prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” (2015, the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO has recommended adequate preventive measures. In 2015, the implementation of these KRINKO recommendations was investigated.Method: All of Frankfurt’s 40 nursing homes were evaluated using a checklist based on the KRINKO recommendations. The evaluation included assessing the availability of operating instructions, appropriate indications for the placement of catheters etc. Age, sex and duration of catheterization, as well as current and previous infections within the past 6 months were documented for every resident with a catheter.Results: In 35 (87.5% of the nursing homes, operating instructions for the handling of urinary tract catheters were available. The decision as to whether a catheter is indicated is made by physicians, while its placement is often delegated to the nursing service. Typically, silicon catheters are used. In three-quarters of the nursing homes, regular intervals of 4–6 weeks for changing catheters were reported. On the respective survey day, 7.3% of the residents were catheterized. On the survey day, 3.6% (4.2% and in the previous 6 months a total of 28% (28.9% of the residents had a urinary tract infection (prevalence of antibiotic therapy in parentheses. Ciprofloxacin was used most often followed by cefuroxime and cotrimoxazole.Discussion: In the current evaluation, fewer nursing home residents were catheterized than in previous years and the rate of urinary tract infections was low

  3. Parvovirus B19 infection in hospital workers: community or hospital acquisition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, S F; Török, T J; Thorp, J A; Hedrick, J; Erdman, D D; Zaki, S R; Hinkle, C J; Bayer, W L; Anderson, L J

    1995-10-01

    A suspected nosocomial outbreak of parvovirus B19 infection in a maternity ward was investigated in February 1994. Questionnaires were administered and sera collected from maternity ward staff (n = 91), other ward staff in the same hospital (n = 101), and maternity ward staff at a nearby hospital (n = 81). Blood donors (n = 265) were used as community controls. Recent infection (parvovirus B19 IgM positivity) in susceptible persons (parvovirus B19 IgG-negative or IgM-positive) was common among all 4 groups (23%-30%). This high rate of recent infection occurred during a large community outbreak of fifth disease. Environmental samples collected from a room where a stillborn parvovirus B19-infected fetus was delivered were positive for parvovirus B19 DNA. Thus, this suspected nosocomial outbreak actually reflected transmission outside the hospital, but contaminated environmental surfaces were identified as one potential source for transmission of parvovirus B19.

  4. Effectiveness of simple control measures on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection status and characteristics with susceptibility patterns in a teaching hospital in Peshawar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Salman; Rafiq, Muhammad Imran; Khan, Taimur; Rafiq, Maria; Khan, Mah Muneer

    2015-09-01

    To determine the effectiveness of simple control measures on the infection status and characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus including susceptibility patterns among health professionals and patients in a teaching hospital. The cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2013 to January 2014, and comprised samples collected from healthcare personnel and patients in the various units of Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar. The specimens were collected before and one month after the implementation of simple control measures for outbreak prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. These were tested for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility. Data about methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, wound characteristics and susceptibility patterns was collected and effectiveness of simple control measures was determined. SPSS 20 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 390 isolates, 180(46.2%) were Staphylococcus aureus; 77(19.7%) from healthcare personnel and 103(26.4%) from patients. Of these, 164(42.1%) were methicillin-sensitive and 16(4.1%) were methicillin-resistant. Among the patients, 38(15.1%) methicillin-sensitive and 8(3.2%) methicillin-resistant isolates were recovered from wounds or skin and soft tissues. Pus with 33(13.1%) and 4(1.6%) cases respectively was the second most common source. Among methicillin-resistant isolates, resistance to Linezolid was 0%, all were resistant to Oxacillin, Cefoxitin, Amoxicillin, Cefotaxime and Cephradine, and resistance to both Co-Amoxiclav and Ciprofloxacin was 87.5%. After one month of implementation of simple control measures, the number of methicillin-resistant cases among healthcare professionals and patients dropped from 4(2.9%) and 7(10.8%) to 1(0.7%) and 5(2.7%), respectively. Methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus differed in their anti-microbial susceptibility profiles. Selection of antibiotics

  5. State of Infection Prevention in US Hospitals Enrolled in NHSN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Herzig, Carolyn T. A.; Weiner, Lindsey M.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Dick, Andrew; Larson, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background This report provides a national cross-sectional snapshot of infection prevention and control programs and clinician compliance with the implementation of processes to prevent healthcare associated infections (HAI) in intensive care units (ICUs). Methods All hospitals, except for Veterans Affairs hospitals, enrolled in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) were eligible to participate. Participation included: 1) completion of a survey that assessed presence of evidence-based prevention policies and clinician adherence, and 2) joining our NHSN research group. Descriptive statistics were computed. Facility characteristics and HAI rates by ICU type were compared between respondents and non-respondents. Results Of the 3,374 eligible hospitals, 975 hospitals provided data (29% response rate) on 1,653 ICUs; and, there were complete data on the presence of policies in 1,534 ICUs. The average number of infection preventionists (IPs) per 100 beds was 1.2. Certification of IP staff varied across institutions and the average hours per week of data management and secretarial support were generally low. There was variation in the presence of policies and clinician adherence to these policies. There were no differences in HAI rates between respondents and non-respondents. Conclusions Guidelines around IP staffing in acute care hospitals should be updated. In future publications we will analyze the associations between HAI rates and infection prevention and control program characteristics, presence of and clinician adherence to evidence-based policies. PMID:24485365

  6. Evaluation of hospital disinfection as a means of controlling endemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of hospital environment disinfection as a means of controlling endemic nosocomial pathogens in a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria was evaluated. Disinfectant used in the Hospital was collected from the Infection Control unit and prepared in different concentrations. The isolated bacterial species from the ...

  7. Randomized, controlled, multicentre clinical trial of the antipyretic effect of intravenous paracetamol in patients admitted to hospital with infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaganos, Thomas; Tseti, Ioulia K; Tziolos, Nikolaos; Soumelas, Georgios-Stefanos; Koupetori, Marina; Pyrpasopoulou, Athina; Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos; Tsokos, Nikolaos; Karagiannis, Asterios; Sympardi, Styliani; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2017-04-01

    No randomized study has been conducted to investigate the use of intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen, APAP) for the management of fever due to infection. The present study evaluated a new ready-made infusion of paracetamol. Eighty patients with a body temperature onset ≥38.5°C in the previous 24 h due to infection were randomized to a single administration of placebo (n = 39) or 1 g paracetamol (n = 41), and their temperature was recorded at standard intervals. Rescue medication with 1 g paracetamol was allowed. Serum samples were collected for the measurement of APAP and its metabolites. The primary endpoint was defervescence, defined as a core temperature ≤37.1°C. During the first 6 h, defervescence was achieved in 15 (38.5%) patients treated with placebo compared with 33 (80.5%) patients treated with paracetamol 1 g (P paracetamol 1 g was 3 h. Rescue medication was given to 15 (38.5%) and five (12.2%) patients allocated to placebo and paracetamol, respectively (P = 0.007); nine (60.0%) and two (40.0%) of these patients, respectively, experienced defervescence. No further antipyretic medication was needed for patients becoming afebrile with rescue medication. Serum glucuronide-APAP concentrations were significantly greater in the serum of patients who did not experience defervescence with paracetamol. The efficacy of paracetamol was not affected by serum creatinine. No drug-related adverse events were reported. The 1 g paracetamol formulation has a rapid and sustainable antipyretic effect on fever due to infection. Its efficacy is dependent on hepatic metabolism. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Natural ventilation for reducing airborne infection in hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Hua [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Li, Yuguo; Ching, W.H.; Sun, H.Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Seto, W.H.; Ching, Patricia [Department of Microbiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-03-15

    High ventilation rate is shown to be effective for reducing cross-infection risk of airborne diseases in hospitals and isolation rooms. Natural ventilation can deliver much higher ventilation rate than mechanical ventilation in an energy-efficient manner. This paper reports a field measurement of naturally ventilated hospital wards in Hong Kong and presents a possibility of using natural ventilation for infection control in hospital wards. Our measurements showed that natural ventilation could achieve high ventilation rates especially when both the windows and the doors were open in a ward. The highest ventilation rate recorded in our study was 69.0 ACH. The airflow pattern and the airflow direction were found to be unstable in some measurements with large openings. Mechanical fans were installed in a ward window to create a negative pressure difference. Measurements showed that the negative pressure difference was negligible with large openings but the overall airflow was controlled in the expected direction. When all the openings were closed and the exhaust fans were turned on, a reasonable negative pressure was created although the air temperature was uncontrolled. The high ventilation rate provided by natural ventilation can reduce cross-infection of airborne diseases, and thus it is recommended for consideration of use in appropriate hospital wards for infection control. Our results also demonstrated a possibility of converting an existing ward using natural ventilation to a temporary isolation room through installing mechanical exhaust fans. (author)

  9. Multimodal supervision programme to reduce catheter associated urinary tract infections and its analysis to enable focus on labour and cost effective infection control measures in a tertiary care hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Namita; Sissodia, Pushpa

    2012-10-01

    Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI) contribute 30%-40% of all the nosocomial infections and they are associated with substantially increased institutional death rates. A multimodal supervision program which incorporates training of the staff with respect to infection control measures can be effective in reducing the CAUTIs in hospitals. To assess the impact of a multimodal UTI supervision program on the CAUTI rates over a year, from January 2009 to December 2009, in a tertiary care hospital in India. A 215 bedded tertiary care private hospital. The CAUTI rates were analyzed for the first 6 months (January 2009-June 2009). A UTI supervision program was instituted in the month of July 2009, which included training with respect to the standard protocols for the sample collection and diagnosis, the bundle components of the urinary catheter checklist and hand hygiene practices. The impact was assessed as per the CAUTI rates in the subsequent months. The average CAUTI rate was reduced by 47.1% (from 10.6 to 5.6) after the introduction of the supervision program. This study presented the mean age of the patients with CAUTIs as 54.5 years and it showed an approximately equal contribution of both the sexes (52.94% in males and 47.05% in females). The impact analysis of the supervision program showed a reduction of 8.7% (from 23 days to 21 days) during the average duration of the catheterization. The adherence to the components of the urinary catheter check list was increased by 44.4% (p=0.069) and the hand hygiene compliance was increased by 56.4% (p=0.004) respectively after the interventions. Components like bladder irrigation and practising perineal cleaning were found to show no effect on the CAUTI rates. The most common labour and cost effective infection control measures as revealed by the supervision programme were adherence to the urinary catheter checklist components (indication for catheter insertion and change, asepsis maintenance during and

  10. 42 CFR 494.30 - Condition: Infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of potentially infectious waste; and (ii) Cleaning and disinfection of contaminated surfaces, medical... adjacent hospital or other public areas. (a) Standard: Procedures for infection control. The facility must...

  11. The impact of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection on outcomes of hospitalized patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagu, Tara; Stefan, Mihaela S; Haessler, Sarah; Higgins, Thomas L; Rothberg, Michael B; Nathanson, Brian H; Hannon, Nicholas S; Steingrub, Jay S; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2014-07-01

    To examine the impact of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (HOCDI) on the outcomes of patients with sepsis. Most prior studies that have addressed this issue lacked adequate matching to controls, suffered from small sample size, or failed to consider time to infection. Retrospective cohort study. We identified adults with a principal or secondary diagnosis of sepsis who received care at 1 of the institutions that participated in a large multihospital database between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2010. Among eligible patients with sepsis, we identified patients who developed HOCDI during their hospital stay. We used propensity matching and date of diagnosis to match cases to patients without Clostridium difficile infections and compared outcomes between the 2 groups. Of 218,915 sepsis patients, 2368 (1.08%) developed HOCDI. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in HOCDI patients than controls (25% vs 10%, P Clostridium difficile infections was 5.1 days longer than controls (95% confidence interval: 4.4-5.8) and the median-adjusted cost increase was $4916 (P Clostridium difficile infection was associated with increased mortality, LOS, and cost. Our results can be used to assess the cost-effectiveness of prevention programs and suggest that efforts directed toward high-risk patient populations are needed. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. [Hospital hygiene - outbreak management of nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2012-04-01

    According to §6, section 3 of the German Protection against Infections Act [Infektionsschutzgesetz (IfSG)] an outbreak is defined as the occurrence in large numbers of nosocomial infections for which an epidemiological relationship is probable or can be assumed. About 2-10% of nosocomial infections in hospitals (about 5% in intensive care wards) occur within the framework of an outbreak. The heaped occurrence of nosocomial infections can be declared according to the prescribed surveillance of nosocomial infections (§23 IfSG) when, in the course of this assessment, a statistically significant increase in the rate of infections becomes apparent. On the other hand, the occurrence of an outbreak can also be recognized through the vigilance of all involved personnel and a general sensibilization towards this subject. The names of patients involved in outbreaks need not be reported to the responsible health authorities. As a consequence of the report the health authorities become involved in the investigation to determine the cause and its elimination, and to provide support and advice. The outbreak management should be oriented on the respective recommendations of the Robert Koch Institute. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  14. Infection control in design and construction work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, William H

    2015-01-01

    To clarify how infection control requirements are represented, communicated, and understood in work interactions through the medical facility construction project life cycle. To assist project participants with effective infection control management by highlighting the nature of such requirements and presenting recommendations to aid practice. A 4-year study regarding client requirement representation and use on National Health Service construction projects in the United Kingdom provided empirical evidence of infection control requirement communication and understanding through design and construction work interactions. An analysis of construction project resources (e.g., infection control regulations and room data sheets) was combined with semi-structured interviews with hospital client employees and design and construction professionals to provide valuable insights into the management of infection control issues. Infection control requirements are representationally indistinct but also omnipresent through all phases of the construction project life cycle: Failure to recognize their nature, relevance, and significance can result in delays, stoppages, and redesign work. Construction project resources (e.g., regulatory guidance and room data sheets) can mask or obscure the meaning of infection control issues. A preemptive identification of issues combined with knowledge sharing activities among project stakeholders can enable infection control requirements to be properly understood and addressed. Such initiatives should also reference existing infection control regulatory guidance and advice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach During 3 Years in 6 Hospitals in 3 Mexican Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe; Sobreyra-Oropeza, Martha; Rosenthal, Víctor Daniel; Higuera, Francisco; Armas-Ruiz, Alberto; Pérez-Serrato, Irma; Torres-Hernández, Héctor; Zamudio-Lugo, Irma; Flores-Ruiz, Eric M; Campuzano, Roberto; Mena-Brito, Jorge; Sánchez-López, Martha; Chávez-Gómez, Amalia; Rivera-Morales, Jaime; Valero-Rodríguez, Julián E

    2015-06-10

    To evaluate the impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional hand hygiene (HH) approach in Mexico, and analyze predictors of poor HH compliance. From June 2002 to April 2006, we conducted a prospective, observational, before-and-after study in 8 intensive care units (ICUs) from 6 hospitals in 3 cities of Mexico. The approach included administrative support, availability of supplies, education and training, reminders in the workplace, process surveillance, and performance feedback. A total of 13,201 observations for HH opportunities were done in each ICU, during randomly selected 30-minute periods. Overall, HH compliance increased from 45% to 79% (95% confidence interval [CI], 69.1-86.5; P = 0.01). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that several variables were significantly associated with poor HH compliance: males versus females (61% versus 66%; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96; P = 0.0001), physicians versus nurses (62% versus 67%; 95% CI, 0.91-0.97; P = 0.0001), and adult versus neonatal ICUs (67% versus 54%; 95% CI, 0.79-0.84; P = 0.0001), among others. Hand hygiene programs should focus on variables found to be predictors of poor HH compliance.

  16. Infection control in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed F; Askari, Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is critical for health care personnel to recognize and appreciate the detrimental impact of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections. The economic, clinical, and social expenses to patients and hospitals are overwhelming. To limit the incidence of ICU-acquired infections, aggressive infection control measures must be implemented and enforced. Researchers and national committees have developed and continue to develop evidence-based guidelines to control ICU infections. A multifaceted approach, including infection prevention committees, antimicrobial stewardship programs, daily reassessments-intervention bundles, identifying and minimizing risk factors, and continuing staff education programs, is essential. Infection control in the ICU is an evolving area of critical care research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Infecção hospitalar nos hospitais escola: uma análise sobre seu controle Infección hospitalaria en los hospitales de enseñanza: análisis crítico sobre su control Hospital infection at school hospitals: an analysis of its control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milca Severino Pereira

    1996-01-01

    CCIH; criterios para diagnosticar IH; métodos de colecta de datos, tipos de vigilancia epidemiológica, medidas de prevención, control y participación del enfermero. El análisis de datos fue de tipo cualitativo y cuantitativo. RESULTADO: Prevalece, para la colecta de datos, la vigilancia general (66,6% y asociación de los métodos pasivo y activo (48,4%. Medidas preventivas y control fueron mencionadas por 67 CCIH, relacionadas al tracto urinario (54 CCIH, respiratorio (48 CCIH, herida quirúrgica (36 CCIH y sistema Vascular (21 CCIH. El control antimicrobiano es realizado por 54 CCIH. Varios obstáculos fueron mencionados destacándose la falta de consonancia existente entre las CCIH y los equipos de las unidades de hospitalización. CONCLUSlÓN: Los problemas a la operacionalización del control de IH son, en su esencia, de carácter filosófico, educacional y administrativo. Se evidencia la importancia de implantar metodologías que faciliten el control de IH, indicando que la adopción del proceso de Enfermería, como instrumento, podrá resultar un gran beneficio, tanto para la CCIH como para el paciente.The purpose of this study is to identify methodologies of vigilance and-hospital infection control, to analyze nurse's actuation in the context of hospital infection control and to associate nurse's actuation on the control of hospital infection and the execution of nursing process. It is an analytic-descriptive study developed at 81 Commissions of Hospital infection Control (CCIH at School Hospitals from 21 Brazilian states through a questionnaire, The variables studied were: characteristics and functioning of CCIH; criteria to diagnose hospital infection; methods of data collection; types of epidemiological vigilance, prevention and control measures and nurse's participation. The analysis of data was qualitative and quantitative. The results showed that in the collection of data prevailed general vigilance (66, 6% and the association of passive and active

  18. 75 FR 3912 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ..., Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID), regarding: (1) The practice of hospital infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial... healthcare-associated infections Recovery Act efforts; discussion on the draft guideline for prevention of...

  19. A pilot randomised controlled trial in intensive care patients comparing 7 days' treatment with empirical antibiotics with 2 days' treatment for hospital-acquired infection of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scawn, N; Saul, D; Pathak, D; Matata, B; Kemp, I; Stables, R; Lane, S; Haycox, A; Houten, R

    2012-09-01

    Management of cardiac intensive care unit (ICU) sepsis is complicated by the high incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which mimics sepsis but without an infective cause. This pilot randomised trial investigated whether or not, in the ICU, 48 hours of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment was adequate to safely treat suspected sepsis of unknown and unproven origin and also the predictive power of newer biomarkers of sepsis. The main objective of this pilot study was to provide preliminary data on the likely safety and efficacy of a reduced course of antibiotics for the treatment of ICU infections of unknown origin. A pilot, single-centre, open-label randomised trial. This study was carried out in the ICU of a tertiary heart and chest hospital. Patients being treated within the ICU were recruited into the trial if the intensivist was planning to commence antibiotics because of evidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and a strong suspicion of infection but there was no actual known source for that infection. Broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment administered for 48 hours (experimental) compared with treatment for 7 days (control). The primary outcome was a composite outcome of the rate of death or initiation of antibiotic therapy after the completion of the treatment schedule allocated at randomisation. Secondary outcomes included the duration of mechanical ventilation and ICU and hospital stay; the incidence of infection with Clostridium difficile (B. S. Weeks & E. Alcamo) Jones & Bartlett International Publishers, 2008, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (B. S. Weeks & E. Alcamo) Jones & Bartlett International Publishers, 2008; resource utilisation and costs associated with each of the two pilot arms; the ratio of patients screened to patients eligible to patients randomised; the incidence of crossover between groups; and the significance of newer biomarkers for sepsis for predicting patients' need for further antibiotics

  20. Surveillance for hospital-acquired infections on surgical wards in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp-Hopmans, Titia E. M.; Blok, Hetty E. M.; Troelstra, Annet; Gigengack-Baars, Ada C. M.; Weersink, Annemarie J. L.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Verhoef, Jan; Mascini, Ellen M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine incidence rates of hospital-acquired infections and to develop preventive measures to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections. METHODS: Prospective surveillance for hospital-acquired infections was performed during a 5-year period in the wards housing general and

  1. Organizational culture and its implications on infection prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hospital acquired infections are becoming common in our hospitals lately. These infections are difficult to treat and maybe life threatening. Hospital acquired infection  can be minimized or eradicated by good Infection Prevention and Control guidelines and good hand hygiene practices. The success of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program in any hospital is largely impacted by the organizational culture.  In any health care setting the management is challenged by the organizational culture to change of any kind. Where implementation of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program is easily implemented in some hospitals it is very difficult in others. Moreover, hand hygiene is not only biomedical practice but also has more behavioral factors. 

  2. [Risk management of hospital infections as a supporting tool for the improvement of hospital quality - some European examples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Mateusz; Witczak, Izabela; Kiedik, Dorota

    Prevention and control of nosocomial infections is one of the main pillars of security in each medical facility. This affects the quality of services and helps to minimize the economic losses incurred as a result of such infections. (Prolonged hospitalization, expensive antibiotic therapies, court costs of damages). Nosocomial infections occur in every medical facility in the hospitals in terms of risk of infection compared to other medicinal entities are at greater risk of environmental (number of hospitalizations for one bed, the amount of disinfectants, etc.). The number and diverse category of employment of medical and auxiliary, which should meet certain standards for the prevention of hospital infections, has an impact on the incidence of infection. It is impossible to eliminate hospital-acquired infections, but can be limited by appropriate measures, ranging from monitoring through the use of risk management methods, which are one of the elements supporting the improvement of the quality of medical entities. Hospital infection is a threat not only for patients but also for workers exposed to the risk of so-called occupational exposure. A comprehensive approach including elements of active surveillance and effective monitoring can help to minimize the risk of nosocomial infections.

  3. Can rapid integrated polymerase chain reaction-based diagnostics for gastrointestinal pathogens improve routine hospital infection control practice? A diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, Louise; Macfarlane-Smith, Louissa; Buchanan, James; Anson, Luke; Davies, Kerrie; O'Connor, Lily; Ashwin, Helen; Pike, Graham; Dingle, Kate E; Peto, Timothy Ea; Wordsworth, Sarah; Walker, A Sarah; Wilcox, Mark H; Crook, Derrick W

    2014-08-01

    Every year approximately 5000-9000 patients are admitted to a hospital with diarrhoea, which in up to 90% of cases has a non-infectious cause. As a result, single rooms are 'blocked' by patients with non-infectious diarrhoea, while patients with infectious diarrhoea are still in open bays because of a lack of free side rooms. A rapid test for differentiating infectious from non-infectious diarrhoea could be very beneficial for patients. To evaluate MassCode multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the simultaneous diagnosis of multiple enteropathogens directly from stool, in terms of sensitivity/specificity to detect four common important enteropathogens: Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp. and norovirus. A retrospective study of fixed numbers of samples positive for C. difficile (n = 200), Campylobacter spp. (n = 200), Salmonella spp. (n = 100) and norovirus (n = 200) plus samples negative for all these pathogens (n = 300). Samples were sourced from NHS microbiology laboratories in Oxford and Leeds where initial diagnostic testing was performed according to Public Health England methodology. Researchers carrying out MassCode assays were blind to this information. A questionnaire survey, examining current practice for infection control teams and microbiology laboratories managing infectious diarrhoea, was also carried out. MassCode assays were carried out at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. Further multiplex assays, carried out using Luminex, were run on the same set of samples at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. The questionnaire was completed by various NHS trusts. Sensitivity and specificity to detect C. difficile, Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and norovirus. Nucleic acids were extracted from 948 clinical samples using an optimised protocol (200 Campylobacter spp., 199 C. difficile, 60 S. enterica, 199 norovirus and 295 negative samples; some samples contained more than one pathogen). Using the Mass

  4. Point prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in two teaching hospitals of Amhara region in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallew WW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Walelegn Worku Yallew,1 Abera Kumie,2 Feleke Moges Yehuala3 1Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, 2School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 3Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: Hospital-acquired infection (HAI is a major safety issue affecting the quality of care of hundreds of millions of patients every year, in both developed and developing countries, including Ethiopia. In Ethiopia, there is no comprehensive research that presents the whole picture of HAIs in hospitals. The objective of this study was to examine the nature and extent of HAIs in Ethiopia. Methods: A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted in two teaching hospitals. All eligible inpatients admitted for at least 48 hours on the day of the survey were included. The survey was conducted in dry and wet seasons of Ethiopia, that is, in March to April and July 2015. Physicians and nurses collected the data according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of HAIs. Coded and cleaned data were transferred to SPSS 21 and STATA 13 for analysis. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the prevalence of HAIs and relationship between explanatory and outcome variables. Results: A total of 908 patients were included in this survey, the median age of the patients was 27 years (interquartile range: 16–40 years. A total of 650 (71.6% patients received antimicrobials during the survey. There were 135 patients with HAI, with a mean prevalence of 14.9% (95% confidence interval 12.7–17.1. Culture results showed that Klebsiella spp. (22.44% and Staphylococcus aureus (20.4% were the most commonly isolated HAI-causing pathogens in these hospitals. The association of patient age and hospital type with the occurrence of HAI was

  5. Can National Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) Data Differentiate Hospitals in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnick, Max; Morgan, Daniel J; Sorkin, John D; Macek, Mark D; Brown, Jessica P; Rheingans, Penny; Harris, Anthony D

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether patients using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare website (http://medicare.gov/hospitalcompare) can use nationally reported healthcare-associated infection (HAI) data to differentiate hospitals. DESIGN Secondary analysis of publicly available HAI data for calendar year 2013. METHODS We assessed the availability of HAI data for geographically proximate hospitals (ie, hospitals within the same referral region) and then analyzed these data to determine whether they are useful to differentiate hospitals. We assessed data for the 6 HAIs reported by hospitals to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). RESULTS Data were analyzed for 4,561 hospitals representing 88% of registered community and federal government hospitals in the United States. Healthcare-associated infection data are only useful for comparing hospitals if they are available for multiple hospitals within a geographic region. We found that data availability differed by HAI. Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) data were most available, with 82% of geographic regions (ie, hospital referral regions) having >50% of hospitals reporting them. In contrast, 4% of geographic regions had >50% of member hospitals reporting surgical site infections (SSI) for hysterectomies, which had the lowest availability. The ability of HAI data to differentiate hospitals differed by HAI: 72% of hospital referral regions had at least 1 pair of hospitals with statistically different risk-adjusted CDI rates (SIRs), compared to 9% for SSI (hysterectomy). CONCLUSIONS HAI data generally are reported by enough hospitals to meet minimal criteria for useful comparisons in many geographic locations, though this varies by type of HAI. CDI and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) are more likely to differentiate hospitals than the other publicly reported HAIs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1167-1171.

  6. Assessment of Risk Factors, Treatment and Hospital Stay in Complicated Urinary Tract Infections in Men Caused by Pseudomonas: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Selçuk Özger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is known that Pseudomonas has been isolated more frequently in health care-related urinary tract infections (UTIs. It was aimed to determine the risk factors and empiric therapies due to antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas-related male UTIs, and assess the effect of Pseudomonas isolation on treatment and length of hospital stay. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between January 2011 and January 2013 with 228 male health care-related complicated UTI patients hospitalized in the Urology and Infectious Diseases Inpatient Clinics at Gazi University Faculty of Medicine. Three hundred UTI attacks in 228 patients were evaluated retrospectively with regard to agents. Results: Pseudomonas was isolated in 37 of 300 complicated UTI attacks in 228 male patients. Nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization were determined as the risk factors for Pseudomonas related with health care-related UTI. It was understood that nephrolithiasis increased Pseudomonas isolated UTI risk 3.5 fold and recurrent UTI increased the risk 8.9 fold. The antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas was higher than other agents. Pseudomonas related UTIs prolonged the duration of hospital stay and antibiotic treatment. Conclusion: In the presence of nephrolithiasis, recurrent UTI and internal urinary catheterization, drugs against Pseudomonas would be appropriate empiric treatment for health care-related complicated UTI. Ciprofloxacin use should be restricted when local antibiotic resistance, which leads empiric treatment, is taken into consideration. Increases in hospital stay and antibiotic treatment duration were thought to be associated with recurrent infection frequency and high antibiotics resistance in Pseudomonas related UTIs.

  7. Hospital Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence as a risk factor for hospital-associated CDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron C; Polgreen, Linnea A; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2016-07-01

    Environmental risk factors for Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) have been described at the room or unit level but not the hospital level. To understand the environmental risk factors for CDI, we investigated the association between institutional- and individual-level CDI. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project state inpatient databases for California (2005-2011). For each patient's hospital stay, we calculated the hospital CDI incidence rate corresponding to the patient's quarter of discharge, while excluding each patient's own CDI status. Adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, we ran a pooled logistic regression to determine individual CDI risk attributable to the hospital's CDI rate. There were 10,329,988 patients (26,086 cases and 10,303,902 noncases) who were analyzed. We found that a percentage point increase in the CDI incidence rate a patient encountered increased the odds of CDI by a factor of 1.182. As a point of comparison, a 1-percentage point increase in the CDI incidence rate that the patient encountered had roughly the same impact on their odds of acquiring CDI as a 55.8-day increase in their length of stay or a 60-year increase in age. Patients treated in hospitals with a higher CDI rate are more likely to acquire CDI. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiology of hospital acquired urinary tract infections in a medical college hospital in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh S Kamat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital Acquired Urinary Tract Infection (HAUTI is the commonest among the nosocomial infections, and hospital specific data concerning its magnitude and attributes is essential to its effective control. Materials and Methods: Prospective study was undertaken among 498 in-patients at the medical college hospital in Goa, employing the clinico-bacteriologic criteria of CDC, Atlanta, in the representative medicine and surgery wards. Antimicrobial sensitivity was tested using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Statistical Analysis: Statistical significance of association was tested using the chi-square test and the unpaired t-test at 5% level of significance, while the strength of association was expressed as the Odd′s ratio with 95% confidence interval calculated by Wolff′s method. Results: While the overall infection rate was 8.03/100 admissions, 33.6% of the catheterized patients developed HAUTI. Effect of gender was found to remain restricted to the development of HAUTI among females at an earlier age and earlier in time series compared to males, but no overall difference in incidence in the two sexes. The factors significantly associated with HAUTI included: duration of hospitalization, per urethral catheterization and the duration of catheterization. E. coli, Pseudomonas, Kebsiella, and Candida accounted for over 90% of the isolates, and 73.5% of these were resistant to all the antibiotics for which sensitivity was tested. The remaining isolates demonstrated sensitivity to amikacin and/or cefoperazone-sulbactam. Conclusion: High infection rate coupled with widespread isolation polyantimicrobial resistant nosocomial pathogens emphasizes the importance of meticulous surveillance of nosocomial infections in the hospital, with due attention to antibiotic prescription practices.

  9. Risk factors associated with multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii nosocomial infections at a tertiary care hospital in Makkah, Saudi Arabia - a matched case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gethamy, Manal M; Faidah, Hani S; Adetunji, Hamed Ademola; Ashgar, Sami S; Mohanned, Tayeb K; Mohammed, Al-Haj; Khurram, Muhammad; Hassali, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine risk factors for multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) nosocomial infections in intensive care units in a tertiary care hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Methods We performed a hospital-based, matched case–control study in patients who were admitted to Al Noor Specialist Hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 August 2012. The study included cases of A. baumannii nosocomial infection and controls without infection. Controls were matched to cases by age and ward of admission. Results The most frequent site of infection was the respiratory tract (77.3%). Susceptibility to antimicrobial MDR-AB was 92.0% for ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, while it was 83.3% for imipenem, 83.0% for trimethoprim, 79.0% for amikacin, and 72.7% for gentamicin. Multiple logistic regression of risk factors showed that immunosuppression (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.5–5.6; p = 0.002), clinical outcome (OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.3–0.9; p = 0.01), invasive procedures (OR = 7.9; 95% CI 1.8–34.2; p = 0.002), a central venous catheter (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.5–5.6; p = 0.000), and an endotracheal tube (OR = 3.4; 95% CI 1.6–7.3; p = 0.001) were associated with MDR-AB. Conclusions Acinetobacter nosocomial infections are associated with admission to the ICU (Intensive care unit) and exposure to invasive procedures. PMID:28480813

  10. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO recommendations “Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heudorf, Ursel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt’s hospitals in autumn, 2015.Material and methods: In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt’s , inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model.Results: Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%. In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change.Conclusion: Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two

  11. Prevalence of Epstein Barr Virus Infection and Effecting Factors in Renal Allograft Recipients for Controlling Ptld in Imam Khomeini Hospital from 2001 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Salari lak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: EBV is categorized as Herpesviridans and by nature is a Lymph crypto Virus. Studies have demonstrated that EBV will infect 80 to 90 percent of patients during the first year and there is a close relation between kidney malfunction and EBV infection. Reactivation of the virus excites the immune system, and ultimately leads to rejection of kidney. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and identify the affecting factors of EBV infection among renal allograft recipients. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 68 renal allograft recipients hospitalized in Imam Khomeini medical center from 2001 to 2004. Blood sample was taken from subjects before kidney transplantation and it was being taken every 3 months during the first year after transplantation. Elisa Serologic tests were implemented to determine the antibody virus EBV antigens, such as VCAIgM, VCAIgG and EBNAIgG. Information about patients was obtained from their medical records and necessary forms were filled. Types of prescribed immunosuppressive agents and the status of kidney rejection was closely observed to identify the factors affecting rejection. Results: This study showed that EBV infection was previously developed in 85.3 %of subjects (58 patients and Active Infection was found in14.7 % of subjects (10 patients. EBV Seronegativity and Primary infection was not found in this sturdy. Active infection and secondary EBV was detected in 58.8% of subjects (40 patients during the first year after transplantation. 95.6 % (65 of recipients before transplantation were seropositive for EBNAIgG and after transplantation, 100% (All of them were positive. 92.6 % (63 of recipients before transplantation were seropositive forVCAIgG and after transplantation, 96.9% (66 of them were positive. 95.6% of recipients (65 of them were seropositive for EBNAIgG before transplantation, while after transplantation the rate was 100% (all of the recipients. Active and

  12. Molecular epidemiology and spatiotemporal analysis of hospital-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a tertiary care hospital in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusri, S; Chongsuvivatwong, V; Rivera, J I; Silpapojakul, K; Singkhamanan, K; McNeil, E; Doi, Y

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major hospital-acquired pathogen in Thailand that has a negative effect on patient survival. The nature of its transmission is poorly understood. To investigate the genotypic and spatiotemporal pattern of A. baumannii infection at a hospital in Thailand. The medical records of patients infected with A. baumannii at an 800-bed tertiary care hospital in southern Thailand between January 2010 and December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. A. baumannii was identified at the genomospecies level. Carbapenemase genes were identified among carbapenem-resistant isolates associated with A. baumannii infection. A spatiotemporal analysis was performed by admission ward, time of infection and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) groups of A. baumannii. Nine PFGE groups were identified among the 197 A. baumannii infections. All A. baumannii isolates were assigned to International Clonal Lineage II. bla OXA-23 was the most prevalent carbapenemase gene. Outbreaks were observed mainly in respiratory and intensive care units. The association between PFGE group and hospital unit was significant. Spatiotemporal analysis identified 20 clusters of single PFGE group infections. Approximately half of the clusters involved multiple hospital units simultaneously. A. baumannii transmitted both within and between hospital wards. Better understanding and control of the transmission of A. baumannii are needed. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical investigation of airborne infection in naturally ventilated hospital wards with central-corridor type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qi; Qian, Hua; Liu, Li

    2018-01-01

    Natural ventilation is believed to control airborne infection due to high ventilation rates while an undesired flow pattern may cause infection transmission in hospital wards. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was carried out in this study to investigate the impact of airflow pattern....... The results not only give direct evidence to strongly support World Health Organization’s recommendation but also suggest required amendment of the Chinese standard GB 51039-2014 to improve ventilation arrangement in general hospital wards in China. Our findings are useful for improving the future design...... of general hospital wards for airborne infection control....

  14. Hospital Contacts With Infection and Risk of Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Finn Rising; Benros, Michael E; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    Infections and immune responses have been suggested to play an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Several studies have reported associations between maternal infections during pregnancy and the child's risk of schizophrenia; however, infection during childhood and adolescence...... a hospital contact with infection before their schizophrenia diagnosis (45%). Our results indicate that individuals who have had a hospital contact with infection are more likely to develop schizophrenia (relative risk [RR] = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.32-1.51) than individuals who had not had such a hospital contact....... Bacterial infection was the type of infection that was associated with the highest risk of schizophrenia (RR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.47-1.82). Our study does not exclude that a certain type of infection may have a specific effect; yet, it does suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a wide range...

  15. Controle de infecção oral em pacientes internados: uma abordagem direcionada aos médicos intensivistas e cardiologistas Oral infection control in hospitalized patients: an approach to cardiologist and intensive care units doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kahn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar o grau de conhecimento médico sobre medicina periodontal e verificar a existência de algum protocolo de controle de infecção da cavidade oral em pacientes internados em hospitais. Para tal, 110 médicos cardiologistas e intensivistas lotados em cinco hospitais no município do Rio de Janeiro foram entrevistados. Dentre os indivíduos, 75,4% afirmaram ter conhecimento sobre o termo medicina periodontal; entretanto, apenas 30% declararam já ter lido algo a respeito. Apenas 2,7% dos médicos possuem o hábito de coletar informações sobre a história odontológica de seus pacientes e 58,2% afirmaram que essa conduta é condicional ao quadro apresentado pelo paciente. Com base nos dados obtidos, pode-se concluir que o conhecimento sobre medicina periodontal e, consequentemente, sobre a importância do controle do biofilme oral na manutenção da saúde sistêmica, apresenta-se pouco difundido entre a classe médica. Verificou-se não haver setor ou pessoa responsável pelo controle de infecção oral dentro dos hospitais avaliados e, consequentemente, a não existência de qualquer protocolo, eficaz ou não, de controle de infecção oral nessas unidades.This paper aims to find the current level of periodontal med-care knowledge, as well as the possible existence of some oral infection control protocol regarding hospitalized patients. Our sample gathered 110 cardiologists and intensive care units doctors selected from medical teams of five Rio de Janeiro hospitals. Preliminary numbers: 75.4% said to have heard something about Periodontal Medicine, although only 30% out of this group admitted to have read something concerning such subject. On the other side, only 2.7% of the sample informed to do consistent information searching along their patients anamnese, while 58.2% out of this group admitted such procedure conditional to the patient's general state at the due moment. Through such numbers, we

  16. ICMR programme on Antibiotic Stewardship, Prevention of Infection & Control (ASPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandy, Sujith J; Michael, Joy Sarojini; Veeraraghavan, Balaji; Abraham, O C; Bachhav, Sagar S; Kshirsagar, Nilima A

    2014-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and hospital infections have increased alarmingly in India. Antibiotic stewardship and hospital infection control are two broad strategies which have been employed globally to contain the problems of resistance and infections. For this to succeed, it is important to bring on board the various stakeholders in hospitals, especially the clinical pharmacologists. The discipline of clinical pharmacology needs to be involved in themes such as antimicrobial resistance and hospital infection which truly impact patient care. Clinical pharmacologists need to collaborate with faculty in other disciplines such as microbiology to achieve good outcomes for optimal patient care in the hospital setting. The ASPIC programme was initiated by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in response to the above need and was designed to bring together faculty from clinical pharmacology, microbiology and other disciplines to collaborate on initiating and improving antibiotic stewardship and concurrently curbing hospital infections through feasible infection control practices. This programme involves the participation of 20 centres per year throughout the country which come together for a training workshop. Topics pertaining to the above areas are discussed in addition to planning a project which helps to improve antibiotic stewardship and infection control practices in the various centres. It is hoped that this programme would empower hospitals and institutions throughout the country to improve antibiotic stewardship and infection control and ultimately contain antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Hospital-acquired infections in a Nigerian tertiary health facility: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital-acquired infections in a Nigerian tertiary health facility: An audit of surveillance reports. ... This study evaluated the occurrence of HAI in a foremost tertiary health facility over a 5-year period for the purpose of reinforcing control efforts. Materials and Methods: A retrospective survey of records from the infection control ...

  18. Saccharomyces boulardii for the prevention of hospital onset Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatley, Elizabeth A; Wilde, Ashley M; Nailor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Probiotics, including Saccharomyces boulardii, have been advocated for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effects of the removal of S. boulardii from an automatic antibiotic order set and hospital formulary on hospital onset C. difficile infection rates. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients with hospital onset C. difficile infection during the 13 months prior (control group) and the 13 months after (study group) removal of an automatic order set linking S. boulardii capsules to certain broad spectrum antibiotics. A large 800+ bed tertiary hospital. Among all hospitalized patients, the rate of hospital onset C. difficile infection was 0.99 per 1000 patient days while the S. boulardii protocol was active compared with 1.04 per 1000 patient days (p=0.10) after S. boulardii was removed from the formulary. No difference in the rate of hospital onset C. difficile infection was detected in patients receiving the linked broad spectrum antibiotics during and after the removal of the protocol (1.25% vs. 1.51%, respectively; p=0.70). Removal of S. boulardii administration to patients receiving broad spectrum antibiotics and the hospital formulary did not impact the rate of hospital onset C. difficile infection in either the hospital population or patients receiving broad spectrum antibiotics.

  19. The most frequent hospital-acquired infections related to medical interventions in hospitals in Vojvodina province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosić Gorana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections associated with medical procedures, or hospital-acquired infections (HAIs, occur in all hospitals worldwide. An integrated infection-control program with HAI surveillance as its cornerstone can reduce the incidence of HAIs and contribute to economic benefits. The aim of this paper was to report the prevalence and epidemiological features of HAI in hospitals in Vojvodina, Serbia. The study population examined herein was compromised of all of the patients present in the ward at least 48 hours before the day of surveillance. It also included patients that were scheduled for discharge or transfer, and those temporarily absent from the ward for examinations or diagnostic procedures. Data were collected using uniform questionnaires, created by the scientific board of the study. Data from paper questionnaires were entered into a specially created electronic database and analyzed using standard statistical methods. A total of 2 435 patients were included in the study. The frequency of patients with HAI was 6.6% (95% CI: 5.6%-7.6%, and the prevalence of infection was 7.1% (95% CI: 6.1%-8.1%. HAI prevalence was significantly different depending on the ward, ranging from 1.7% in the gynecology department to 18.1% in intensive care departments. The most common type of HAI was pneumonia, representing 20.9% of all reported HAIs. The second most frequently reported type of HAI was surgical site infection (19.8%, followed by urinary tract infection (17.4%, gastro-intestinal infection (14.5% and bloodstream infection (11.0%. The most commonly found microorganisms were Enterococcus spp. (14.5%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.5%, Acinetobacter spp. (13.7%, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (12.1%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.5% and Clostridium difficile (7.3%. The most frequently used antibiotics in therapy were third generation cephalosporins to which most of the isolates showed resistance. Although the consumption of carbapenems in this sample was only

  20. Cannulae and infection control in theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are those that are not present or incubating when an individual enters hospital, but are acquired while in hospital. At any one time, 8% of patients have an infection acquired in hospital (Department of Health (DH), 2008). On average, an infection adds 3-10 days to the length of a patient's stay in hospital. It can cost pound4000- pound10 000 more to treat a patient with an infection than one without an infection (DH, 2008). It is not surprising, then, that attention has been focused on tackling HAIs and, in particular, in-dwelling devices such as cannulae that have a potential for causing infections.

  1. Patients' Hand Washing and Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverstick, Stacy; Goodrich, Cara; Freeman, Regi; James, Shandra; Kullar, Rajkiran; Ahrens, Melissa

    2017-06-01

    Hand hygiene is important to prevent hospital-acquired infections. Patients' hand hygiene is just as important as hospital workers' hand hygiene. Hospital-acquired infection rates remain a concern across health centers. To improve patients' hand hygiene through the promotion and use of hand washing with soap and water, hand sanitizer, or both and improve patients' education to reduce hospital-acquired infections. In August 2013, patients in a cardiothoracic postsurgical step-down unit were provided with individual bottles of hand sanitizer. Nurses and nursing technicians provided hand hygiene education to each patient. Patients completed a 6-question survey before the intervention, at hospital discharge and 1, 2, and 3 months after the intervention. Hospital-acquired infection data were tracked monthly by infection prevention staff. Significant correlations were found between hand hygiene and rates of infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci ( P = .003) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( P = .01) after the intervention. After the implementation of hand hygiene interventions, rates of both infections declined significantly and patients reported more staff offering opportunities for and encouraging hand hygiene. This quality improvement project demonstrates that increased hand hygiene compliance by patients can influence infection rates in an adult cardiothoracic step-down unit. The decreased infection rates and increased compliance with hand hygiene among the patients may be attributed to the implementation of patient education and the increased accessibility and use of hand sanitizer. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  2. Is single room hospital accommodation associated with differences in healthcare-associated infection, falls, pressure ulcers or medication errors? A natural experiment with non-equivalent controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Michael; Maben, Jill; Murrells, Trevor; Griffiths, Peter

    2016-07-01

    A wide range of patient benefits have been attributed to single room hospital accommodation including a reduction in adverse patient safety events. However, studies have been limited to the US with limited evidence from elsewhere. The aim of this study was to assess the impact on safety outcomes of the move to a newly built all single room acute hospital. A natural experiment investigating the move to 100% single room accommodation in acute assessment, surgical and older people's wards. Move to 100% single room accommodation compared to 'steady state' and 'new build' control hospitals. Falls, pressure ulcer, medication error, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile rates from routine data sources were measured over 36 months. Five of 15 time series in the wards that moved to single room accommodation revealed changes that coincided with the move to the new all single room hospital: specifically, increased fall, pressure ulcer and Clostridium difficile rates in the older people's ward, and temporary increases in falls and medication errors in the acute assessment unit. However, because the case mix of the older people's ward changed, and because the increase in falls and medication errors on the acute assessment ward did not last longer than six months, no clear effect of single rooms on the safety outcomes was demonstrated. There were no changes to safety events coinciding with the move at the new build control site. For all changes in patient safety events that coincided with the move to single rooms, we found plausible alternative explanations such as case-mix change or disruption as a result of the re-organization of services after the move. The results provide no evidence of either benefit or harm from all single room accommodation in terms of safety-related outcomes, although there may be short-term risks associated with a move to single rooms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Infection prevention needs assessment in Colorado hospitals: rural and urban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sara M; Gilmartin, Heather; Rich, Karen L; Price, Connie S

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to conduct a needs assessment for infection prevention programs in both rural and urban hospitals in Colorado. Infection control professionals (ICPs) from Colorado hospitals participated in an online survey on training, personnel, and experience; ICP time allocation; and types of surveillance. Responses were evaluated and compared based on hospital status (rural or urban). Additionally, rural ICPs participated in an interview about resources and training. Surveys were received from 62 hospitals (77.5% response); 33 rural (75.0% response) and 29 urban (80.6% response). Fifty-two percent of rural ICPs reported multiple job responsibilities compared with 17.2% of urban ICPs. Median length of experience for rural ICPs was 4.0 years compared with 11.5 years for urban ICPs (P = .008). Fifty-one percent of rural ICPs reported no access to infectious disease physicians (0.0% urban) and 81.8% of rural hospitals reported no antimicrobial stewardship programs (31.0% urban). Through the interviews it was revealed that priorities for rural ICPs were training and communication. Our study revealed numerous differences between infection prevention programs in rural versus urban hospitals. An infection prevention outreach program established in Colorado could potentially address the challenges faced by rural hospital infection prevention departments. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hospital-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in a paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is an important preventable cause of increased ... between July 2003 and December 2010, who developed a hospital-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, was undertaken to describe the trend in ..... Bacterial nosocomial pneumonia in.

  5. Original Article Hospital Acquired Infection in Obafemi Awolowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-07

    Aug 7, 2011 ... This study assesses the pattern of hospital acquired infections. (HAIs) and state of hygiene ... Unfortunately, due to inadequate resources and commitment to ... Turkey, India and Mexico (Rosenthal et al., 2005;. Salomao et al.

  6. Differences in microbiological profile between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Teresa; Ribeiro, Orquídea; Aragão, Irene; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Sarmento, António

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological profiles were analysed and compared for intra-abdominal, urinary, respiratory and bloodstream infections according to place of acquisition: community-acquired, with a separate analysis of healthcare-associated, and hospital-acquired. Prospective cohort study performed at a university tertiary care hospital over 1 year. Inclusion criteria were meeting the Centers for Disease Control definition of intra-abdominal, urinary, respiratory and bloodstream infections. A total of 1035 patients were included in the study. More than 25% of intra-abdominal infections were polymicrobial; multi-drug resistant gram-negatives were 38% in community-acquired, 50% in healthcare-associated and 57% in hospital-acquired. E. coli was the most prevalent among urinary infections: 69% in community-acquired, 56% in healthcare-associated and 26% in hospital-acquired; ESBL producers' pathogens were 10% in healthcare-associated and 3% in community-acquired and hospital-acquired. In respiratory infections Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most prevalent in community-acquired (54%) and MRSA in healthcare-associated (24%) and hospital-acquired (24%). A significant association was found between MRSA respiratory infection and hospitalization in the previous year (adjusted OR = 6.3), previous instrumentation (adjusted OR = 4.3) and previous antibiotic therapy (adjusted OR = 5.7); no cases were documented among patients without risk factors. Hospital mortality rate was 10% in community-acquired, 14% in healthcare-associated and 19% in hospital-acquired infection. This study shows that healthcare-associated has a different microbiologic profile than those from community or hospital acquired for the four main focus of infection. Knowledge of this fact is important because the existing guidelines for community-acquired are not entirely applicable for this group of patients.

  7. Hospital ownership: a risk factor for nosocomial infection rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, C; Behnke, M; Geffers, C; Gastmeier, P

    2018-03-26

    In some countries, a relationship between hospital ownership and the occurrence of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) rates has been described. To investigate the association between hospital ownership and occurrence of HCAI in Germany. Five different components of the German national nosocomial infection surveillance system were analysed with regard to the influence of hospital ownership in the period 2014-2016. Endpoints included ventilator-associated pneumonia, central-venous-catheter-associated bloodstream infections, urinary-catheter-associated urinary tract infections, surgical site infections (SSI) following hip prosthesis and colon surgery, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and hand rub consumption per 1000 patient-days. Three hospital ownership types (public, non-profit and private) were analysed using univariate and multi-variate methods. The distribution of hospitals according to the three ownership types was similar in all components. In total, 661 intensive care units (ICUs), 149 departments performing colon procedures, and 349 departments performing hip prosthesis were included. In addition, 568 hospitals provided their MRSA rates and 236 provided their CDI rates, and 1833 ICUs and 12,934 non-ICUs provided their hand rub consumption data. In general, the differences between the hospital types were rather small and not significant for the ICUs. In the multi-variate analysis, public hospitals had a lower SSI rate following hip prosthesis (odds ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.99). Hospital ownership was not found to have a major influence on the incidence of HCAI in Germany. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Taking advantage of public reporting: An infection composite score to assist evaluating hospital performance for infection prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; Skierczynski, Boguslow; Bufalino, Angelo; Groves, Clariecia; Roberts, Phillip; Heavens, Michelle; Hendrich, Ann; Haydar, Ziad

    2016-12-01

    The standardized infection ratio (SIR) evaluates individual publicly reported health care-associated infections, but it may not assess overall performance. We piloted an infection composite score (ICS) in 82 hospitals of a single health system. The ICS is a combined score for central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, colon and abdominal hysterectomy surgical site infections, and hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and Clostridium difficile infections. Individual facility ICSs were calculated by normalizing each of the 6 SIR events to the system SIR for baseline and performance periods (ICS ib and ICS ip , respectively). A hospital ICS ib reflected its baseline performance compared with system baseline, whereas a ICS ip provided information of its outcome changes compared with system baseline. Both the ICS ib (baseline 2013) and ICS ip (performance 2014) were calculated for 63 hospitals (reporting at least 4 of the 6 event types). The ICS ip improved in 36 of 63 (57.1%) hospitals in 2014 when compared with the ICS ib in 2013. The ICS ib 2013 median was 0.96 (range, 0.13-2.94) versus the 2014 ICS ip median of 0.92 (range, 0-6.55). Variation was more evident in hospitals with ≤100 beds. The system performance score (ICS sp ) in 2014 was 0.95, a 5% improvement compared with 2013. The proposed ICS may help large health systems and state hospital associations better evaluate key infectious outcomes, comparing them with historic and concurrent performance of peers. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring of rotavirus infection in a paediatric hospital by RNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the spring of 1987 and the autumn of 1988, stool specimens were collected from infants and young children in the paediatric unit at H. F. Verwoerd Hospital, Pretoria, and examined for the presence of rotaviruses to assess the potential for hospital-acquired infection in the paediatric wards. Stool samples were also ...

  10. SAMJ Monitoring of rotavirus infection in a paediatric hospital by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the spring of 1987 and the autumn of 1988, stool specimens were collected from infants and young children in the paediatric unit at H. F. Verwoerd Hospital, Pretoria, and examined for the presence of rotaviruses to assess the potential for hospital-acquired infection in the paediatric wards. Stool samples were also ...

  11. A multicenter qualitative study on preventing hospital-acquired urinary tract infection in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint, Sanjay; Kowalski, Christine P; Forman, Jane; Damschroder, Laura; Hofer, Timothy P; Kaufman, Samuel R; Creswell, John W; Krein, Sarah L

    2008-04-01

    Although urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection, there is little information about why hospitals use or do not use a range of available preventive practices. We thus conducted a multicenter study to understand better how US hospitals approach the prevention of hospital-acquired UTI. This research is part of a larger study employing both quantitative and qualitative methods. The qualitative phase consisted of 38 semistructured phone interviews with key personnel at 14 purposefully sampled US hospitals and 39 in-person interviews at 5 of those 14 hospitals, to identify recurrent and unifying themes that characterize how hospitals have addressed hospital-acquired UTI. Four recurrent themes emerged from our study data. First, although preventing hospital-acquired UTI was a low priority for most hospitals, there was substantial recognition of the value of early removal of a urinary catheter for patients. Second, those hospitals that made UTI prevention a high priority also focused on noninfectious complications and had committed advocates, or "champions," who facilitated prevention activities. Third, hospital-specific pilot studies were important in deciding whether or not to use devices such as antimicrobial-impregnated catheters. Finally, external forces, such as public reporting, influenced UTI surveillance and infection prevention activities. Clinicians and policy makers can use our findings to develop initiatives that, for example, use a champion to promote the removal of unnecessary urinary catheters or exploit external forces, such public reporting, to enhance patient safety.

  12. Staffing and structure of infection prevention and control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Dick, Andrew; Pogorzelska, Monika; Horan, Teresa C; Furuya, E Yoko; Larson, Elaine

    2009-06-01

    The nature of infection prevention and control is changing; however, little is known about current staffing and structure of infection prevention and control programs. Our objectives were to provide a snapshot of the staffing and structure of hospital-based infection prevention and control programs in the United States. A Web-based survey was sent to 441 hospitals that participate in the National Healthcare Safety Network. The response rate was 66% (n = 289); data were examined on 821 professionals. Infection preventionist (IP) staffing was significantly negatively related to bed size, with higher staffing in smaller hospitals (P hospital epidemiologists were reported to have authority to close beds for outbreaks always or most of the time (n = 225, 78%). Only 32% (n = 92) reported using an electronic surveillance system to track infections. This study is the first to provide a comprehensive description of current infection prevention and control staffing, organization, and support in a select group of hospitals across the nation. Further research is needed to identify effective staffing levels for various hospital types as well as examine how the IP role is changing over time.

  13. High Variability in Nosocomial Clostridium difficile Infection Rates Across Hospitals After Colorectal Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquina, Christopher T; Probst, Christian P; Becerra, Adan Z; Hensley, Bradley J; Iannuzzi, James C; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2016-04-01

    Hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection is associated with adverse patient outcomes and high medical costs. The incidence and severity of C. difficile has been rising in both medical and surgical patients. Our aim was to assess risk factors and variation associated with the development of nosocomial C. difficile colitis among patients undergoing colorectal resection. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study included segmental colectomy and proctectomy cases in New York State from 2005 to 2013. The study cohort included 150,878 colorectal resections. Patients with a documented previous history of C. difficile infection or residence outside of New York State were excluded. A diagnosis of C. difficile colitis either during the index hospital stay or on readmission within 30 days was the main measure. C. difficile colitis occurred in 3323 patients (2.2%). Unadjusted C. difficile colitis rates ranged from 0% to 11.3% among surgeons and 0% to 6.8% among hospitals. After controlling for patient, surgeon, and hospital characteristics using mixed-effects multivariable analysis, significant unexplained variation in C. difficile rates remained present across hospitals but not surgeons. Patient factors explained only 24% of the total hospital-level variation, and known surgeon and hospital-level characteristics explained an additional 8% of the total hospital-level variation. Therefore, ≈70% of the hospital variation in C. difficile infection rates remained unexplained by captured patient, surgeon, and hospital factors. Furthermore, there was an ≈5-fold difference in adjusted C. difficile rates across hospitals. A limited set of hospital and surgeon characteristics was available. Colorectal surgery patients appear to be at high risk for C. difficile infection, and alarming variation in nosocomial C. difficile infection rates currently exists among hospitals after colorectal resection. Given the high morbidity and cost associated with C. difficile colitis

  14. [Influence of serious infections due to Gram-negative bacteria on the hospital economy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, B; Gómez, J; Gómez Vargas, J; Guerra, B; Ruiz Gómez, J; Simarro, E; Baños, V; Canteras, M; Valdes, M

    2000-12-01

    Nosocomial infections due to Gram-negative bacteria are very important since they are associated with high morbidity and high hospital costs. A prospective study of 250 inpatients was carried out, 200 of whom had Gram-negative bacterial infections. Patients were divided into groups of 50 according to the localization of the infection (urinary, surgical wound, respiratory tract and bacteremia), with a control group of 50 patients with similar characteristics but no infection. We calculated the cost for the different groups by multiplying the average length of hospital stay in days by the daily cost of the stay. Significant differences were observed in the average length of stay per patient according to the type of infection and how it was acquired. In terms of cost, nosocomial infection due to Gram-negative bacteria was 1,049,139 pesetas more expensive than community-acquired infection. The cost of the stay for patients with postsurgical infection due to Gram-negative bacteria was 1,108, 252 pesetas more expensive than for the group of control patients. Nosocomial infection due to Gram-negative bacteria is associated with a prolongation in hospital stay of 9 to 28 days, which is the factor that most reflects the cost that can be attributed to nosocomial infection. Consensual and protocolized measures which allow for better clinical management need to be developed.

  15. Risk Factors for Hospitalization for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Kristensen, Kim; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    of gestational age. Plurality was associated with a decreased risk in children born between 23 and 36 weeks of gestation, whereas young maternal age, maternal asthma, single parenthood, maternal smoking, being born small for gestational age, Caesarian section, male gender and day care were associated...... with an increased risk of hospitalization for RSV infection in term children. In postterm children, young maternal age, male sex, being born small for gestational age and maternal smoking were associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for RSV. Asthma hospitalization before the RSV infection and siblings...

  16. Knowledge, awareness and practice of infection control by health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Training workshop on infection control should be organized for all ICU health care ... across the world are infected at any given time. ... er during the course of their stay in the hospital.4,5 The ... which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, ..... Batuduwaarachchi VR, Balasubramanium M, Bal-.

  17. Quality control analysis at the hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1979-01-01

    Quality control analysis is an integral part of quality assurance. In a system as with radiopharmaceuticals where part of the finishing of the product takes place at individual hospitals, the need for quality control analysis at the hospital can be discussed. Data are presented that stresses the importance of quality control by the manufacturer as a basis for limitation of such work at hospitals. A simplified programme is proposed

  18. Clinical patterns, epidemiology and risk factors of community-acquired urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers: a prospective hospital case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Basima A; Hayajneh, Wail A; Ayoub, Abeer M; Ababneh, Mera A; Al Momani, Miral A

    2018-05-10

    To assess incidence rate, risk factors and susceptibility patterns associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae in community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs). A prospective, case-control study was conducted at a tertiary teaching hospital from Jan 2015 to Dec 2016. The results of microbiology cultures were initially screened to include only patients with positive E. coli or K. pneumoniae urine cultures. Afterwards, clinical symptoms were assessed to confirm the UTI. To investigate the risk factors, patients with a positive urine culture for ESBL-producing isolates were assigned as cases, while patients with non-ESBL were assigned as controls. Out of 591 patients included in this study, 57.5% (n = 340) were included in the control group and 42.5% (n = 251) were in the case group. The incidence rate of ESBL-producing isolates was 3.465 cases per 1000-patient hospital admissions. Male gender (OR = 1.856, 95% CI = 1.192-2.889, p = 0.006), pediatrics (OR = 1.676, 95% CI = 1.117-2.517, p = 0.013), patients with comorbidity (OR = 1.542, 95% CI = 1.029-2.312, p = 0.036) and UTI in the previous 12 months (OR = 1.705, 95% CI = 1.106-2.628, p = 0.016) were independently associated with a higher risk of infection. The resistance rate for most commonly prescribed antibiotics was high. Our results suggest that the incidence of ESBL producers among CA-UTIs is high. Male gender, pediatrics, comorbidity and UTI in the previous 12 months were associated with a higher risk for infection. Continuous surveillance and prudent antibiotic use by healthcare professionals are important factors for effective control of ESBL associated infections.

  19. Device-associated infection rates and mortality in intensive care units of Peruvian hospitals: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium Tasas de infección asociadas a aparatos y mortalidad en unidades de cuidados intensivos de hospitales peruanos: datos del Consorcio Internacional para el Control de las Infecciones Nosocomiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Cuellar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To measure device-associated infection (DAI rates, microbiological profiles, bacterial resistance, and attributable mortality in intensive care units (ICUs in hospitals in Peru that are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC. METHODS: Prospective cohort surveillance of DAIs was conducted in ICUs in four hospitals applying the definitions for nosocomial infections of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (CDC-NNIS and National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN. RESULTS: From September 2003 to October 2007 1 920 patients hospitalized in ICUs for an aggregate of 9 997 days acquired 249 DAIs, accounting for a rate of 13.0% and 24.9 DAIs per 1 000 ICU-days. The ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP rate was 31.3 per 1 000 ventilator-days; the central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI rate was 7.7 cases per 1 000 catheter-days; and the rate for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI was 5.1 cases per 1 000 catheter-days. Extra mortality for VAP was 24.5% (RR 2.07, P OBJETIVOS: Determinar las tasas de infecciones asociadas a aparatos (IAA, sus perfiles microbiológicos y la resistencia bacteriana, así como la mortalidad atribuible a estas infecciones en unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI de hospitales de Perú, miembros del Consorcio Internacional para el Control de las Infecciones Nosocomiales (INICC. MÉTODOS: Se hizo un seguimiento retrospectivo de cohorte de las IAA en las UCI de cuatro hospitales, según las definiciones de infección nosocomial del Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia de Infecciones Nosocomiales de los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC-NNIS y de la Red Nacional de Seguridad Sanitaria (NHSN, de los Estados Unidos de América. RESULTADOS: De septiembre de 2003 a octubre de 2007, 1 920 pacientes hospitalizados en las UCI, con un total de 9 997 días, adquirieron

  20. Medical Device-Associated Candida Infections in a Rural Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin C. Deorukhkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health care associated infections (HCAIs add incrementally to the morbidity, mortality, and cost expected of the patient’s underlying diseases alone. Approximately, about half all cases of HCAIs are associated with medical devices. As Candida medical device-associated infection is highly drug resistant and can lead to serious life-threatening complications, there is a need of continuous surveillance of these infections to initiate preventive and corrective measures. The present study was conducted at a rural tertiary care hospital of India with an aim to evaluate the rate of medical device-associated Candida infections. Three commonly encountered medical device-associated infections (MDAI, catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI, intravascular catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI, and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP, were targeted. The overall rate of MDAI in our hospital was 2.1 per 1000 device days. The rate of Candida related CA-UTI and CR-BSI was noted as 1.0 and 0.3, respectively. Untiring efforts taken by team members of Hospital Acquired Infection Control Committee along with maintenance of meticulous hygiene of the hospital and wards may explain the low MDAI rates in our institute. The present surveillance helped us for systematic generation of institutional data regarding MDAI with special reference to role of Candida spp.

  1. First step to reducing infection risk as a system: evaluation of infection prevention processes for 71 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; Heavens, Michelle; Ratcliffe, Carol J; Hendrich, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Hospitals can better focus their efforts to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs) if they identify specific areas for improvement. We administered a 96-question survey to infection preventionists at 71 Ascension Health hospitals to evaluate opportunities for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, central line-associated bloodstream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and surgical site infection. Seventy-one (100%) infection preventionists completed the survey. The majority of hospitals had established policies for urinary catheter placement and maintenance (55/70, 78.6%), central venous catheter maintenance (68/71, 95.8%), and care for the mechanically ventilated patient (62/66, 93.9%). However, there was variation in health care worker practice and evaluation of competencies and outcomes. When addressing device need, 55 of 71 (77.5%) hospitals used a nurse-driven evaluation of urinary catheter need, 26 of 71 (36.6%) had a team evaluation for central venous catheters on transfer out of intensive care, and 53 of 57 (93%) assessed daily ventilator support for continued need. Only 19 of 71 (26.8%) hospitals had annual nursing competencies for urinary catheter placement and maintenance, 29 of 71 (40.8%) for nursing venous catheter maintenance, and 38 of 66 (57.6%) for appropriate health care worker surgical scrubbing. We suggest evaluating infection prevention policies and practices as a first step to improvement efforts. The next steps include implementing spread of evidence-based practices, with focus on competencies and feedback on performance. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure for prevention of health care-associated infections in Brazilian hospitals: A countrywide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoveze, Maria Clara; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco; Kiffer, Carlos; Barth, Afonso Luís; Carneiro, Irna Carla do Rosário Souza; Giamberardino, Heloisa Ilhe Garcia; Rodrigues, Jorge Luiz Nobre; Santos Filho, Lauro; de Mello, Maria Júlia Gonçalves; Pereira, Milca Severino; Gontijo Filho, Paulo; Rocha, Mirza; de Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos

    2016-01-01

    Minimal structure is required for effective prevention of health care-associated infection (HAI). The objective of this study was to evaluate the structure for prevention of HAI in a sample of Brazilian hospitals. This was a cross-sectional study from hospitals in 5 Brazilian regions (n = 153; total beds: 13,983) classified according to the number of beds; 11 university hospitals were used as reference for comparison. Trained nurses carried out the evaluation by using structured forms previously validated. The evaluation of conformity index (CI) included elements of structure of the Health Care-Associated Prevention and Control Committee (HAIPCC), hand hygiene, sterilization, and laboratory of microbiology. The median CI for the HAIPCC varied from 0.55-0.94 among hospital categories. Hospitals with >200 beds had the worst ratio of beds to sinks (3.9; P hospitals with hospitals (3.3; P hospitals were more likely to have their own laboratory of microbiology than other hospitals. This study highlights the need for public health strategies aiming to improve the structure for HAI prevention in Brazilian hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  4. Radiation hazard control in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denley, H.V.

    1981-02-01

    This manual is designed to aid in the training of hospital personnel engaged in work with the more common sources of ionizing radiation. It emphasizes the essentials of safety procedures for users of radioisotopes and x-rays

  5. Multi-centre point prevalence survey of hospital-acquired infections in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labi, Appiah-Korang; Obeng-Nkrumah, Noah; Owusu, Enid; Bjerrum, Stephanie; Bediako-Bowan, Antoinette; Sunkwa-Mills, Gifty; Akuffo, Christiana; Fenny, Ama Pokua; Opintan, Japheth Awuletey; Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel; Debrah, Samuel; Damale, Nelson; Bannerman, Cynthia; Newman, Mercy Jemima

    2018-05-03

    There is a paucity of data describing hospital acquired infections (HAIs) in Africa. To describe the prevalence and distribution of HAIs in acute care hospitals in Ghana. Between September and December 2016, point prevalence surveys were conducted in participating hospitals using protocols of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. We reviewed medical records of eligible inpatients at or before 8am on the day of survey to identify HAIs present at the time of survey. Ten hospitals were surveyed, representing 32.9% of all acute care beds in government hospitals. Of 2107 inpatients surveyed, 184 HAIs were identified among 172 patients, corresponding to an overall prevalence of 8.2%. The prevalence values in hospitals ranged from 3.5 to 14.4% with higher proportion of infections in secondary and tertiary care facilities. The most frequent HAIs were surgical site infections (32.6%), bloodstream infections (19.5%), urinary tract infections (18.5%), and respiratory tract infections (16.3%). Device-associated infections accounted for 7.1% of HAIs. For 12.5% of HAIs, a microorganism was reported; the most isolated microorganism was Escherichia coli. Approximately 61% of all patients surveyed were on antibiotics; 89.5% of patients with an HAI received at least one antimicrobial agent on the day of survey. The strongest independent predictors for HAI were the presence of invasive device before onset of infection and duration of hospital stay. We recorded a low HAI burden compared to findings from other low and middle income countries. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. [Prevalence of nosocomial infections in two hospitals in Conakry (Guinea)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Alpha Kabinet; Doumbouya, Naman; Sow, Mamadou Saliou; Konaté, Bintou; Dabo, Yacouba; Panzo, Daniel Agbo; Keita, Mamady

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections can be prevented by applying simple hygiene rules. However, they have not been sufficiently studied in the Republic of Guinea. For this purpose, we conducted a one-day study in the Conakry University Hospital surgery wards and intensive care units. Fourteen units (12 surgical wards and 2 intensive care units) participated in the study. A total of 310 patients were included. A nosocomial infection was observed in 62 patients, [20%, 95%CI 15.9-24.8%]. Surgical site infections were significantly more frequent with 42/62 cases [67.7%, 95%CI 55.3-78.1%, p = 0.0001] than other types of infections (urinary tract, skin and digestive) with 20/62 cases [32.3% 95%CI 21.9-44.6%]. The average hospital stay of 29.1 ± 23.4 days [95%CI, 23.2 ± 35.04] for patients with nosocomial infection was significantly different (p = 0.0001) from that observed in patients without nosocomial infection: 15.9 ± 16.3 days [95%CI, 13.8 ± 17.9]. Staphylococcus aureus was the pathogen most commonly isolated: 32/62 (51.6%; 95%CI 39.5-63.6%). Escherichia coli infection was identified in the bladder catheters of 13 patients [20.9%, 95%CI 12.7-32.6%]. Finally, five deaths were observed among the 62 patients with nosocomial infection. This study shows that nosocomial infections are common in Conakry University Hospital. Further studies must be conducted to identify the risk factors for nosocomial infections and to propose solutions.

  7. Bacterial infections in burn patients at a burn hospital in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekrami, Alireza; Kalantar, Enayat

    2007-12-01

    The major challenge for a burn team is nosocomial infection in burn patients, which is known to cause over 50% of burn deaths. Most studies on infection in burn patients focus on burn wound infection, whereas other nosocomial infections in these patients are not well described. We undertook this study to determine three types of nosocomial infections viz., burn wound infection, urinary tract infection, and blood stream infection in burn patients in a burn hospital in Iran. During the one year period (May 2003 to April 2004), 182 patients were included in this study. Blood, urine and wound biopsy samples were taken 7 and 14 days after admission to Taleghani Burn hospital. Isolation and identification of microorganisms was done using the standard procedure. Disk diffusion test were performed for all the isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility. Of the 182 patients, 140 (76.9%) acquired at least one type of infection of the 140, 116 patients (82.8%) were culture positive on day 7 while 24 (17.2%) on 14 days after admission. Primary wound infection was most common (72.5%), followed by blood stream (18.6%) and urinary tract infections (8.9 %). The microorganisms causing infections were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (20.2%), and Acinetobacter baumanni (10.4%). Among these isolates P. aeruginosa was found to be 100 per cent resistant to amikacin, gentamicin , carbenicillin, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin and ceftazidime; 58 per cent of S. aureus and 60 per cent of coagulase negative Staphylococcus were methicillin resistant. High prevalence of nosocomial infections and the presence of multidrug resistant bacteria, and methicillin resistant S. aureus in patients at Taleghani Burn Hospital suggest continuous surveillance of burn infections and develop strategies for antimicrobial resistance control and treatment of infectious complications.

  8. Infection Rate in 1033 Elective Neurosurgical Procedures at a University Hospital in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei; Liu, Xiyao; Wang, Zhanxiang

    2017-09-01

    Objective  Infection following surgery is a serious complication, especially in neurosurgery. The aim of the study is to report the change of incidence rates of infection in patients undergoing elective neurosurgical procedures at a university hospital in South China as well as the risk factors. Material and Methods  The medical records and postoperative courses for patients undergoing 1,033 neurosurgical procedures from 2008 to 2014 were reviewed retrospectively to determine the incidence of neurosurgical infection, the identity of the offending organisms, and the factors associated with infection. Results  A total of 33 patients (40 cases) experienced postoperative infection representing 3.19% of the study population. Twenty cases were incision infections (1.94%), and 20 were cranial/spinal infections (1.94%) including 15 intracranial infections and 5 intraspinal infections. The 2.4-fold greater incidence of postoperative infection in 2008 to 2010 was compared with that in 2011 to 2014 with perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis ( p neurosurgery (1.08%). The most common offending organism was Staphylococcus aureus (27.5%). Foreign body implantation, operative time > 4 hours, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak (13 infections in 158 patients; p <0.001) were risk factors for infections ( p <0.05). Conclusion  The neurosurgical infection rate is usually low with perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis even in developing countries. Less foreign body implantation, shorter operative times, and controlling CSF leak could reduce infection rates. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Photodynamic antimicrobial polymers for infection control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin P McCoy

    Full Text Available Hospital-acquired infections pose both a major risk to patient wellbeing and an economic burden on global healthcare systems, with the problem compounded by the emergence of multidrug resistant and biocide tolerant bacterial pathogens. Many inanimate surfaces can act as a reservoir for infection, and adequate disinfection is difficult to achieve and requires direct intervention. In this study we demonstrate the preparation and performance of materials with inherent photodynamic, surface-active, persistent antimicrobial properties through the incorporation of photosensitizers into high density poly(ethylene (HDPE using hot-melt extrusion, which require no external intervention except a source of visible light. Our aim is to prevent bacterial adherence to these surfaces and eliminate them as reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, thus presenting a valuable advance in infection control. A two-layer system with one layer comprising photosensitizer-incorporated HDPE, and one layer comprising HDPE alone is also described to demonstrate the versatility of our approach. The photosensitizer-incorporated materials are capable of reducing the adherence of viable bacteria by up to 3.62 Log colony forming units (CFU per square centimeter of material surface for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and by up to 1.51 Log CFU/cm(2 for Escherichia coli. Potential applications for the technology are in antimicrobial coatings for, or materials comprising objects, such as tubing, collection bags, handrails, finger-plates on hospital doors, or medical equipment found in the healthcare setting.

  10. Ventilator associated pneumonia and infection control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alp Emine

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. The incidence of VAP varies from 7% to 70% in different studies and the mortality rates are 20–75% according to the study population. Aspiration of colonized pathogenic microorganisms on the oropharynx and gastrointestinal tract is the main route for the development of VAP. On the other hand, the major risk factor for VAP is intubation and the duration of mechanical ventilation. Diagnosis remains difficult, and studies showed the importance of early initiation of appropriate antibiotic for prognosis. VAP causes extra length of stay in hospital and intensive care units and increases hospital cost. Consequently, infection control policies are more rational and will save money.

  11. Infection control practice in countries with limited resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alp Emine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nosocomial infections and their control are a world-wide challenge. The prevalence of nosocomial infections is generally higher in developing countries with limited resources than industrialized countries. In this paper we aimed to further explain the differences with regard to infection control challenges between Turkey, a country with "limited" resources, and the Netherlands, a country with "reasonable" resources. Infrastructure of hospitals, low compliance of hand hygiene, understaffing, overcrowding, heavy workload, misuse of personal protective equipments, late establishment of infection control programme are major problems in limited-resources countries. These problems cause high infection rates and spread of multi-drug resistant pathogens. To improve the control and prevention of infections in countries with limited resources, a multi-facet approach is needed.

  12. Strategy and technology to prevent hospital-acquired infections: Lessons from SARS, Ebola, and MERS in Asia and West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rajakaruna, Sanjeewa Jayachandra; Liu, Wen-Bin; Ding, Yi-Bo; Cao, Guang-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are serious problems for healthcare systems, especially in developing countries where public health infrastructure and technology for infection preventions remain undeveloped. Here, we characterized how strategy and technology could be mobilized to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control in hospitals during the outbreaks of Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Asia and West Afr...

  13. Burden of Clostridium difficile infection: Associated hospitalization in a cohort of middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingxi; Glass, Kathryn; Liu, Bette; Korda, Rosemary J; Riley, Thomas V; Kirk, Martyn D

    2017-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of infectious diarrhea in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to describe and compare length of stay (LOS), costs, and in-hospital deaths for C difficile infection (CDI) and non-CDI hospitalizations, in a cohort of middle-aged and older Australians. We used survey data from the 45 and Up Study, linked to hospitalization and death data. We calculated the average LOS and costs per hospitalization, and the proportion of in-hospital deaths for CDI and non-CDI hospitalizations. We then compared hospitalizations with CDI as a secondary diagnosis to non-CDI hospitalizations by stratifying hospitalizations based on principal diagnosis and then using generalized linear models to compare LOS and in-hospital costs, and logistic regression for in-hospital deaths, adjusting for age and sex. There were 641 CDI hospitalizations during 2006-2012. The average LOS was 17 days; the average cost per hospitalization was AUD 12,704; and in 7.3% of admissions (47 out of 641) the patient died. After adjusting for age and sex, hospitalizations with CDI were associated with longer LOS, higher costs, and a greater proportion of in-hospital deaths compared with hospitalizations with similar principal diagnosis but without CDI. CDI places additional burden on the Australian hospital system, with CDI patients having relatively lengthy hospital stays and high costs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of a prevention bundle on Clostridium difficile infection rates in a hospital in the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bionca M; Yin, Jingjing; Blomberg, Doug; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai

    2016-12-01

    We sought to assess the impact of a multicomponent prevention program on hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infections in a hospital in the Southeastern United States. We collected retrospective data of 140 patients from years 2009-2014 and applied the Poisson regression model for analysis. We did not find any significant associations of increased risk of Clostridium difficile infections for the preintervention group. Further studies are needed to test multifaceted bundles in hospitals with high infection rates. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. "Hospital at home" for neuromuscular disease patients with respiratory tract infection: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Savoia, Francesca; Pipitone, Emanuela; Nordio, Beatrice; Gallina, Giulia; Paladini, Luciana; Concas, Alessandra; Arcaro, Giovanna; Gallan, Federico; Pegoraro, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The "hospital-at-home" model may provide adequate care without an adverse effect on clinical outcome, and is generally well received by users. Our objective was to compare hospital-at-home and in-patient hospital care for neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with respiratory tract infections. We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial in a university teaching hospital offering secondary care service to a population of approximately 500,000. We recruited selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infection for whom hospital admission had been recommended after medical assessment. Hospital-at-home was provided as an alternative to in-patient admission. The main outcome measures were need for hospitalization, treatment failure, time to recovery, death during the first 3 months following exacerbation, and cost of patient care. Among 59 consecutive NMD patients eligible for the study, 53 met the criteria for hospital-at-home. Twenty-six subjects were randomized to home care and 27 to hospital care. No significant differences were found in treatment failure (8/26 vs 13/27, P = .19), time to recovery (8.9 ± 4.6 vs 9 ± 8.9 d, P = .21), or mortality at 3 months (3/26 vs 4/27 deaths, P = .42) between the groups. Hospital-at-home failure was independently correlated with type of NMD (P = .004) with an odds ratio of failure of 17.3 (95% CI 2.1 to infinity) for subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The total and daily direct cost of patient healthcare was significantly lower for the subjects who were successfully treated at home, compared to the hospitalized individuals. Hospital-at-home is an effective alternative to hospital admission for selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infections.

  16. Recurrence rate of clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Kim, Jason; Latta, Dan; Smathers, Sarah; McGowan, Karin L; Zaoutis, Theodore; Mamula, Petar; Baldassano, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    The incidence and associated morbidity of Clostridium difficile (CD) infection has been increasing at an alarming rate in North America. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in the USA. Patients with CDAD have longer average hospital admissions and additional hospital costs. Evidence has demonstrated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher incidence of CD in comparison to the general population. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of recurrence of CD in hospitalized pediatric patients with IBD compared to hospitalized controls. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether infection with CD resulted in a more severe disease course of IBD. This was a nested case control retrospective study of hospitalized pediatric patients. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed with stool Toxin A and B analysis. The following data were obtained from the medical records: demographic information, classification of IBD including location of disease, IBD therapy, and prior surgeries. In addition, prior hospital admissions within 1 year and antibiotic exposure were recorded. The same information was recorded following CD infection. Cases were patients with IBD and CD; two control populations were also studied: patients with CD but without IBD, and patients with IBD but without CD. For aim 1, a total of 111 eligible patients with IBD and CD infection and 77 eligible control patients with CD infection were included. The rate of recurrence of CD in the IBD population was 34% compared to 7.5% in the control population (P < 0.0001). In evaluating the effect of CD infection on IBD disease severity, we compared the 111 IBD patients with CD to a second control population of 127 IBD patients without CD. 57% of IBD-CD patients were readmitted with an exacerbation of disease within 6 months of infection with CD and 67% required escalation of therapy following CD infection, compared to 30% of IBD patients without CD (P

  17. Prevention of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in European hospitals: moving beyond policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M A; Hulscher, M; Scicluna, E A; Richards, J; Azanowsky, J-M; Xuereb, D; Huis, A; Moro, M L; Maltezou, H C; Frank, U

    2014-08-01

    There is evidence that meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia can be reduced with improved infection control and antibiotic stewardship. To survey infection control and antibiotic stewardship practices within European hospitals and to identify initiatives that correlate with reduced MRSA prevalence. Online questionnaires were sent to European hospitals about their surveillance, hand hygiene, intravenous device management, admission screening, isolation, antibiotic prescribing, hospital demographics and MRSA blood culture isolates during 2010. In all, 269 replies were received from hospitals in 29 European countries. Lower MRSA prevalence showed significant association with presence of incidence surveillance, performance of root cause analysis, mandatory training requirements for hand hygiene, accountability measures for persistent non-compliance, and multi-stakeholder teamwork in antibiotic prescribing. Presence of policies on intravenous catheter insertion and management showed no variation between different MRSA prevalence groups. However, low-prevalence hospitals reported more competency assessment programmes in insertion and maintenance of peripheral and central venous catheters. Hospitals from the UK and Ireland reported the highest uptake of infection control and antibiotic stewardship practices that were significantly associated with low MRSA prevalence, whereas Southern European hospitals exhibited the lowest. In multiple regression analysis, isolation of high-risk patients, performance of root cause analysis, obligatory training for nurses in hand hygiene, and undertaking joint ward rounds including microbiologists and infectious disease physicians remained significantly associated with lower MRSA prevalence. Proactive infection control and antibiotic stewardship initiatives that instilled accountability, ownership, teamwork, and validated competence among healthcare workers were associated with improved MRSA outcomes. Copyright

  18. Infection prevention and control in deployed military medical treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Green, Andrew D; Crouch, Helen K; English, Judith F; Pool, Jane; Yun, Heather C; Murray, Clinton K

    2011-08-01

    Infections have complicated the care of combat casualties throughout history and were at one time considered part of the natural history of combat trauma. Personnel who survived to reach medical care were expected to develop and possibly succumb to infections during their care in military hospitals. Initial care of war wounds continues to focus on rapid surgical care with debridement and irrigation, aimed at preventing local infection and sepsis with bacteria from the environment (e.g., clostridial gangrene) or the casualty's own flora. Over the past 150 years, with the revelation that pathogens can be spread from patient to patient and from healthcare providers to patients (including via unwashed hands of healthcare workers, the hospital environment and fomites), a focus on infection prevention and control aimed at decreasing transmission of pathogens and prevention of these infections has developed. Infections associated with combat-related injuries in the recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have predominantly been secondary to multidrug-resistant pathogens, likely acquired within the military healthcare system. These healthcare-associated infections seem to originate throughout the system, from deployed medical treatment facilities through the chain of care outside of the combat zone. Emphasis on infection prevention and control, including hand hygiene, isolation, cohorting, and antibiotic control measures, in deployed medical treatment facilities is essential to reducing these healthcare-associated infections. This review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma.

  19. Surveillance of nosocomial infections in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta, 1999-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Widodo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection are one of the main problem in hospital which are associated with significant morbidity, mortality and increased economic cost. Surveillance should be attempted regularly to obtain local data of incidence of nosocomial infections, types of infection, pathogen and resistance pattern. We reported the results of nosocomial surveillance in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta, in year 1999 to 2002. The data were obtained from surveillance, conducted by Nosocomial Infection Control Committee. Surveillance were performed to patient in risk of nosocomial infections such as underwent surgical procedure, urinary catheter, peripheral or central venous catheter, ventilator and other invasive procedure. Criteria for nosocomial infection which were used, based on technical guidelines of nosocomial infection in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, year 1999; which referred to CDC definition of nosocomial infections. Incidence rate of nosocomial infections in year 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 were 1.1, 0.9, 0.6 and 0.4 % respectively. Type of nosocomial infection include catheter related, surgical wound, urinary tract and respiratory tract infections, ranged between 0 to 5.6 %. Gram negative bacteria consist of Pseudomonas sp, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis were the most common nosocomial pathogen. Gram positive bacteria consist of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus anhemolyticus. Trend of increasing incidence of Gram positive nosocomial infection also showed in our surveillance. Mostly Gram negative bacteria had been resistant to penicillin, co amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and 3rd generation cephalosporin, but still sensitive to 4th generation cephalosporin and aminoglycoside. The Gram positive bacteria were still sensitive to penicillin, co amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, 4th generation cephalosporin and aminoglycoside. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 107

  20. State of infection prevention in US hospitals enrolled in the National Health and Safety Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Weiner, Lindsey M; Furuya, E Yoko; Dick, Andrew; Larson, Elaine

    2014-02-01

    This report provides a national cross-sectional snapshot of infection prevention and control programs and clinician compliance with the implementation of processes to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs) in intensive care units (ICUs). All hospitals, except Veterans Affairs hospitals, enrolled in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) were eligible to participate. Participation involved completing a survey assessing the presence of evidence-based prevention policies and clinician adherence and joining our NHSN research group. Descriptive statistics were computed. Facility characteristics and HAI rates by ICU type were compared between respondents and nonrespondents. Of the 3,374 eligible hospitals, 975 provided data (29% response rate) on 1,653 ICUs, and there were complete data on the presence of policies in 1,534 ICUs. The average number of infection preventionists (IPs) per 100 beds was 1.2. Certification of IP staff varied across institutions, and the average hours per week devoted to data management and secretarial support were generally low. There was variation in the presence of policies and clinician adherence to these policies. There were no differences in HAI rates between respondents and nonrespondents. Guidelines for IP staffing in acute care hospitals need to be updated. In future work, we will analyze the associations between HAI rates and infection prevention and control program characteristics, as well as the inplementation of and clinician adherence to evidence-based policies. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neonatal bloodstream infections in a pediatric hospital in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Alexandra Yasmin; Thieu Chuong, Do Huu; Phuong, Cam Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Septicemia and bloodstream infections (BSIs) are major causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. We prospectively recorded all positive blood cultures (BSI) among neonates admitted consecutively to a tertiary pediatric hospital in Vietnam during a 12-month period. Among...

  2. Caesarean Section and Hospitalization for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Fisker, Niels; Haerskjold, Ann

    2015-01-01

    regression with adjustment for prematurity, asphyxia, birth weight, multiple births, single parenthood, maternal smoking during pregnancy, older siblings, and asthma diagnoses up to 2 weeks before hospitalization for RSV infection, to compare the effects of acute or elective CS versus vaginal delivery...

  3. a profile of wound infections in national hospital abuja

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    The current spread of multi -drug resistant bacteria has further heightened the need for regular bacteriological review of infected woundsand regular antibiotics ... Aim: To determine the distributionof theisolates from wound specimens submitted to the medical microbiology laboratory of National. Hospital Abuja for ...

  4. Manual of infection prevention and control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damani, N. N

    2012-01-01

    .... Unlike other books on infection control, the main strength of this book is to provide clear, up-to-date and practical guidance in infection control in an easy to read format which can act as a quick...

  5. Point prevalence & risk factor assessment for hospital-acquired infections in a tertiary care hospital in Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velu Nair

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: HAI prevalence showed a progressive reduction over successive rounds of survey. Conscious effort needs to be taken by all concerned to reduce the duration of hospital stay. Use of medical devices should be minimized and used judiciously. Healthcare infection control should be a priority of every healthcare provider. Such surveys should be done in different healthcare settings to plan a response to reducing HAI.

  6. Guidelines for radriopharmaceutical quality control in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This document has been prepared to assist hospital administrators in ensuring that adequate quality control is performed on radiopharmaceuticals administered to their patients. Three sets of guidelines are presented, the degree of sophistication being dependent on the amount of hospital involvement in the radiopharmaceutical preparation

  7. [Malaria and HIV infection: clinical and biological aspects at Donka National Hospital in Conakry, Guinea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bald, I; Camara, A; Baldé, O; Magassouba, N F; Bah, M S; Makanéra, A; Gamy, E P

    2010-08-01

    Malaria and HIV/AIDS are two of the most widespread infectious diseases encountered in sub-Saharan Africa. Even minor interactions between these two diseases could have substantial effects on public health. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between malaria and HIV infection. Study was carried out over an 8-month period (April 1, 2003 to November 30, 2003) in the Tropical and Infectious Diseases Department of the Donka National Hospital in Conakry, Guinea. A total of 89 malaria patients including 41 cases with HIV infection and 48 controls without HIV infection were included. All patients were hospitalized during the study and provided informed consent. Results showed that malaria affected all age groups in the same proportion. Mean patient age was 34 years (range, 15 and 76 years). Males were more frequently infected with a sex ratio of 1.05. The average number of malaria episodes was higher in cases (malaria with HIV-infection than in controls (malaria without HIV infection). Hyperthermia was observed in most cases (68.29%) and controls (77.08%). Severe anemia was observed in 26.82% of cases versus 10.41% of controls. Low parasite density was observed in 73.17% of cases as compared to 68.75% of controls. The recovery rate was higher in the control group than in case group: 27.08% versus 14.63%. The death rate was higher in the case group than in the control group: 21.95% versus 6.25%. These findings demonstrate a link between malaria and HIV. The frequency of malaria episodes was higher in patients with HIV infection than patients without HIV infection and the outcome of malarial episodes was better in patients without HIV infection.

  8. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483.65 Public... Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to provide a safe, sanitary, and comfortable environment and to help prevent the...

  9. 38 CFR 52.190 - Infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Infection control. 52.190... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.190 Infection control. The program management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to prevent the development and...

  10. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The facility management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to provide a safe, sanitary, and...

  11. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460.74 Public...) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.74 Infection control. (a) Standard procedures. The PACE organization must follow accepted policies and standard procedures with respect to infection control, including...

  12. The human microbiota: novel targets for hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Johnson, J Kristie; Harris, Anthony D

    2016-05-01

    Hospital-acquired infections are increasing in frequency due to multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs), and the spread of MDROs has eroded our ability to treat infections. Health care professionals cannot rely solely on traditional infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship to prevent MDRO transmission. We review research on the microbiota as a target for infection control interventions. We performed a literature review of key research findings related to the microbiota as a target for infection control interventions. These data are summarized and used to outline challenges, opportunities, and unanswered questions in the field. The healthy microbiota provides protective functions including colonization resistance, which refers to the microbiota's ability to prevent colonization and/or expansion of pathogens. Antibiotic use and other exposures in hospitalized patients are associated with disruptions of the microbiota that may reduce colonization resistance and select for antibiotic resistance. Novel methods to exploit protective mechanisms provided by an intact microbiota may provide the key to preventing the spread of MDROs in the health care setting. Research on the microbiota as a target for infection control has been limited. Epidemiologic studies will facilitate progress toward the goal of manipulating the microbiota for control of MDROs in the health care setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pattern of nosocomial infection in two intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital in karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, M.F.; Hassan, Y.; Abdullah, M.; Shakeel, J.; Memon, A.R.; Razvi, M.F.; Saleem, S.; Shakeel, J.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the pattern of nosocomial infections in two ICUs' of a teaching hospital in terms of frequency, common sites of infection, the pathogens involved and the antibiotic sensitivity patterns. It was conducted in two medical ICUs (Neurology and Nephrology) of a public tertiary care hospital. Data was collected prospectively on patients suspected to have developed nosocomial infection after 48 hours of admission to the ICU according to objective. There were 101 cases of suspected nosocomial infection out of a total of 254 patients. The frequency of nosocomial infection was 39.7%. UTI developed in 44.6%, while 27% had blood stream infection, and 21% had pneumonia. Each of the three major sites of infection was strongly associated with the use of invasive devices. Escherichia (E.) coli was the most common organism isolated followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella. E. coli and Klebsiella showed a maximum sensitivity to Imipenem followed by Tazocin (pipericillin + tazobactam). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to Amikacin and Fosfomycin. The high frequency of nosocomial infection suggests that more strict measures regarding invasive devices should be taken in future to control the infection and limit the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms. (author)

  14. Pathology Laboratories and Infection Prevention and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory health care workers are vulnerable to infection with the Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs while receiving, handling and disposing biological samples. Ideally the infrastructure of the lab should be according to the best practices like good ventilation, room pressure differential, lighting, space adequacy, hand hygiene facilities, personal protective equipments, biological safety cabinets etc. Disinfection of the environment, and specific precautions with sharps and microbial cultures should follow the protocols and policies of the Infection Prevention and Control Practices (IPAC. If Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Legionella pneumophila are expected, diagnostic tests should be performed in a bio-safety level 3 facilities (for agents which may cause serious or potentially lethal disease in healthy adults after inhalation. Laboratory access should be limited only to people working in it.Along with the advent of new technologies and advanced treatment we are now facing problems with the dreadful HAIs with Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms (AROs which is taking a pandemic form. According to WHO, hundreds of millions of patients develop HAI every year worldwide and as many as 1.4 million occur each day in hospitals alone. The principal goals for hospital IPAC programs are to protect the patient, protect the health care worker (HCW, visitors, and other persons in the health environment, and to accomplish the previous goals in a cost-effective manner like hand hygiene, surveillance, training of the HCWs, initiating awareness programs and making Best Practices and Guidelines to be followed by everyone in the hospital.The initiation for the best practices in the Pathology Laboratories can be either Sporadic or Organizational. Sporadic initiation is when the laboratories make their own IPAC policies. It has been seen that in few centres these policies have been conceptualized but not materialized. Organizational initiation is much more

  15. [Controlling and operation management in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagts, Dierk A

    2010-03-01

    The economical pressure on the health system and especially on hospitals is growing rapidly. Hence, economical knowledge for people in medical executive positions becomes imperative. In advanced and forward-looking hospitals controlling is gaining more and more weight, because it takes over a coordinative responsibility. Ideally controlling is navigating the teamwork of managers (CEOs) and medical executives by weighing medical necessities and economical framework. Controlling is contributing to evaluate an optimal efficiency of a hospital in a highly competitive surrounding by providing medical and economical data on a regular basis. A close, open-minded and trusting cooperation between all people, who are involved, is imperative. Hence, controlling in the proper meaning of the word can not flourish in dominant and hierarchic hospital structures. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart * New York.

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections in neonates in a hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rabea, A A; Burwen, D R; Eldeen, M A; Fontaine, R E; Tenover, F; Jarvis, W R

    1998-09-01

    To identify risk factors for Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSI) in neonates in a hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Two case-control studies among hospitalized neonates during February 15-May 14, 1991, and a procedural and microbiological investigation. Hospital A, a maternity and children's hospital in KSA. Case patients had a blood culture positive for K pneumoniae after >2 days of hospitalization and had no evidence of a nonblood primary site of infection. When the 20 case patients were compared with controls, hospitalization in a critical-care unit (odds ratio [OR], 5.5; 95% confidence interval [CI95], 1.20-51.1; P=.03) was identified as a risk factor. When the case patients were compared with a second set of controls matched by critical-care status, receipt of a particular intravenous fluid (D10%/0.2NS; OR, 11.0; CI95, 1.42-85.2; P=.009) or a blood product (OR undefined; P=.04) were identified as risk factors. Infusates were administered via umbilical catheters for most case and control patients (19/20 vs 15/20, P>.05); catheters were manipulated more frequently in patients in critical-care units. Umbilical catheter tip, skin, or mucus membrane K pneumoniae colonization occurred in 47% and 53% of evaluated case and control patients, respectively. Available K pneumoniae isolates from blood cultures and colonization sites had identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Emphasis on handwashing, careful preparation and administration of infusates, and aseptic technique for catheter insertion, maintenance, and manipulation was temporally associated with resolution of the epidemic. This outbreak was probably due to infusion therapy practices that led to BSI in nursery patients colonized with K pneumoniae. Both catheter-related infections and extrinsic contamination of infusates may have occurred. Hospital personnel should be aware of their potential to spread nosocomial pathogens from person to person and should implement Centers for

  17. The effect of hand hygiene compliance on hospital-acquired infections in an ICU setting in a Kuwaiti teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa Y; Mousa, Haifa Al; Al-Abdulghani, Khaled A; Rotimi, Vincent O

    2013-02-01

    Hand washing is widely accepted as the cornerstone of infection control in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nosocomial infections are frequently viewed as indicating poor compliance with hand washing guidelines. To determine the hand hygiene (HH) compliance rate among healthcare workers (HCWs) and its effect on the nosocomial infection rates in the ICU of our hospital, we conducted an interventional study. The study spanned a period of 7 months (February 2011-August 2011) and consisted of education about HH indications and techniques, workplace reminder posters, focused group sessions, and feedback on the HH compliance and infection rates. The WHO HH observation protocol was used both before and after a hospital-wide HH campaign directed at all staff members, particularly those in the ICU. Compliance was measured by direct observation of the HCWs, using observation record forms in a patient-directed manner, with no more than two patients observed simultaneously. The overall HH compliance rate was calculated by dividing the number of HH actions by the total number of HH opportunities. The nosocomial infection rates for the pre- and post-interventional periods were also compared to establish the effect of the intervention on rate of infections acquired within the unit. The overall rate of HH compliance by all the HCWs increased from 42.9% pre-intervention to 61.4% post-intervention, P<0.001. Individually, the compliance was highest among the nurses, 49.9 vs. 82.5%, respectively (P<0.001) and lowest among the doctors, 38.6 vs. 43.2%, respectively (P=0.24). The effect of the increase in the HH compliance rate on the nosocomial infection rate was remarkable. There were significant reductions in the following: the rate of overall health care-associated infections/1000 patient-days, which fell from 37.2 pre-intervention to 15.1 post-intervention (P<0.001); the rate of bloodstream infections, which fell from 18.6 to 3.4/1000 central-line-days (P<0.001); and the rate of lower

  18. Infection control for SARS in a tertiary neonatal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, P C; So, K W; Leung, T F; Cheng, F W T; Lyon, D J; Wong, W; Cheung, K L; Fung, K S C; Lee, C H; Li, A M; Hon, K L E; Li, C K; Fok, T F

    2003-09-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly discovered infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, which can readily spread in the healthcare setting. A recent community outbreak in Hong Kong infected a significant number of pregnant women who subsequently required emergency caesarean section for deteriorating maternal condition and respiratory failure. As no neonatal clinician has any experience in looking after these high risk infants, stringent infection control measures for prevention of cross infection between patients and staff are important to safeguard the wellbeing of the work force and to avoid nosocomial spread of SARS within the neonatal unit. This article describes the infection control and patient triage policy of the neonatal unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong. We hope this information is useful in helping other units to formulate their own infection control plans according to their own unit configuration and clinical needs.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for tuberculosis infection among hospital workers in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Luu Thi; Hang, Nguyen Thi Le; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Yanai, Hideki; Toyota, Emiko; Sakurada, Shinsaku; Thuong, Pham Huu; Cuong, Vu Cao; Nanri, Akiko; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Matsushita, Ikumi; Harada, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Kazue; Tuan, Le Anh; Keicho, Naoto

    2009-08-27

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) to health care workers (HCWs) is a global issue. Although effective infection control measures are expected to reduce nosocomial TB, HCWs' infection has not been assessed enough in TB high burden countries. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of TB infection and its risk factors among HCWs in Hanoi, Viet Nam. A total of 300 HCWs including all staff members in a municipal TB referral hospital received an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube(TM), followed by one- and two-step tuberculin skin test (TST) and a questionnaire-based interview. Agreement between the tests was evaluated by kappa statistics. Risk factors for TB infection were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Among the participants aged from 20 to 58 years (median = 40), prevalence of TB infection estimated by IGRA, one- and two-step TST was 47.3%, 61.1% and 66.3% respectively. Although the levels of overall agreement between IGRA and TST were moderate, the degree of agreement was low in the group with BCG history (kappa = 0.29). Working in TB hospital was associated with twofold increase in odds of TB infection estimated by IGRA. Increased age, low educational level and the high body mass index also demonstrated high odds ratios of IGRA positivity. Prevalence of TB infection estimated by either IGRA or TST is high among HCWs in the hospital environment for TB care in Viet Nam and an infection control program should be reinforced. In communities with heterogeneous history of BCG vaccination, IGRA seems to estimate TB infection more accurately than any other criteria using TST.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for tuberculosis infection among hospital workers in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luu Thi Lien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transmission of tuberculosis (TB to health care workers (HCWs is a global issue. Although effective infection control measures are expected to reduce nosocomial TB, HCWs' infection has not been assessed enough in TB high burden countries. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of TB infection and its risk factors among HCWs in Hanoi, Viet Nam. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 300 HCWs including all staff members in a municipal TB referral hospital received an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube(TM, followed by one- and two-step tuberculin skin test (TST and a questionnaire-based interview. Agreement between the tests was evaluated by kappa statistics. Risk factors for TB infection were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Among the participants aged from 20 to 58 years (median = 40, prevalence of TB infection estimated by IGRA, one- and two-step TST was 47.3%, 61.1% and 66.3% respectively. Although the levels of overall agreement between IGRA and TST were moderate, the degree of agreement was low in the group with BCG history (kappa = 0.29. Working in TB hospital was associated with twofold increase in odds of TB infection estimated by IGRA. Increased age, low educational level and the high body mass index also demonstrated high odds ratios of IGRA positivity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence of TB infection estimated by either IGRA or TST is high among HCWs in the hospital environment for TB care in Viet Nam and an infection control program should be reinforced. In communities with heterogeneous history of BCG vaccination, IGRA seems to estimate TB infection more accurately than any other criteria using TST.

  1. Endemic nosocomial infections and misuse of antibiotics in a maternity hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Naser Eldin; Gedebou, Messele; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh

    2002-02-01

    Patients admitted during a 6-month period to a maternity hospital in Saudi Arabia were studied for nosocomial infections and misuse of antibiotics. Patient history and diagnosis on admission and subsequent clinical and laboratory data were analysed. Infection developing from 72 h after admission was considered nosocomial. Therapeutic and prophylactic data as recorded on the patients' charts were assessed for possible misuse of antibiotics. Of 3439 patients, 136 (4.0%) developed nosocomial infection: 2.0%, 8.9% and 37.7% in obstetric, gynaecologic and nursery patients, respectively. Infections among adults were mostly found in the urinary (44.4%) and lower genital (33.3%) tracts. Among newborns, over 70% of cases were eye and ear (29.8%), skin (26.2%) and blood (19.0%) infections. Gram-negative bacteria caused 65.7% of the infections. Over 90% of the bacterial isolates were multidrug-resistant. About 24% of patients received single or multiple antibiotics; 57.2% were misused. The minimal hospital cost estimate for both nosocomial infections and misused antibiotics was US $318,705. The findings of this study, the first of its type in this region, should prompt improved infection control measures as well as educational and antibiotic restriction interventions.

  2. [Preliminary result on the nosocomial infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome in one hospital of Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yao; Jiang, Yong; Xing, Yu-bin; Zhong, Guang-lin; Wang, Lei; Sun, Zheng-ji; Jia, Hong; Chang, Qing; Wang, Yong; Ni, Bin; Chen, Shi-ping

    2003-07-01

    To study the transmission route of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nosocomial infection. Ten identified SARS patients were selected from a general hospital in March. Survey was carried out through a standardized questionnaire provided by Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Contents of the questionnaire would include: history of contact with SARS patient, route of infection, methods used for protection and so on. (1) Distribution os SARS patients were confined to 3 wards: 4, 5, and 6 on the 7, 8, 12, 13 and 14 floors in the west unit of the inpatient building. Most of the inpatients were elderly and having severe original diseases. (2) Index patients were the first generation source of transmission and they infected inpatients and medical staff, making them the second generation. People with latent infection who had close contact with SARS patients might also serve as the possible source of transmission. (3) The major transmission routes were: near distant droplet infection and close contact infection. There was also a clue to the probability of aerosol or droplet nuclei infection through air-conditioning and ventilation system. Nosocomial infection appeared to be the main characteristic of the SARS epidemic in the early stage of this hospital. Other than close contact and near space airborne transmission of SARS virus, the possibility of long-distance aerosol transmission called for further epidemiological and experimental studies in the future.

  3. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  4. High infection control rate and function after routine one-stage exchange for chronically infected TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Barbe, Bruno; Gaudias, Jeannot; Boeri, Cyril; Argenson, Jean-Noël

    2013-01-01

    Many surgeons consider two-stage exchange the gold standard for treating chronic infection after TKA. One-stage exchange is an alternative for infection control and might provide better knee function, but the rates of infection control and levels of function are unclear. We asked whether a one-stage exchange protocol would lead to infection control rates and knee function similar to those after two-stage exchange. We followed all 47 patients with chronically infected TKAs treated with one-stage exchange between July 2004 and February 2007. We monitored for recurrence of infection and obtained Knee Society Scores. We followed patients a minimum of 3 years or until death or infection recurrence. Three of the 47 patients (6%) experienced a persistence or recurrence of the index infection with the same pathogen isolated. Three patients (6%) had control of the index infection but between 6 and 17 months experienced an infection with another pathogen. The 3-year survival rates were 87% for being free of any infection and 91% for being healed of the index infection. Twenty-five of the 45 patients (56%) had a Knee Society Score of more than 150 points. While routine one-stage exchange was not associated with a higher rate of infection recurrence failure, knee function was not improved compared to that of historical patients having two-stage exchange. One stage-exchange may be a reasonable alternative in chronically infected TKA as a more convenient approach for patients without the risks of two operations and hospitalizations and for reducing costs. The ideal one stage-exchange candidate should be identified in future studies.

  5. Knowledge, attitude, and infection control practices of two tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-02

    Apr 2, 2014 ... This study assessed the effects of the implementation of the policy in a tertiary hospital in Port Harcourt, ... malpractice suit in developing countries, not only for the ... Infection control policy has however been shown to reduce the burden of ..... SSIs‑activities that mirror the plan‑do‑check‑act that is applied in ...

  6. Urinary tract infection in Children Hospitalized at Constanta Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pînzaru Anca Daniela

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pediatrics, the urinary tract infection is one of the most frequent bacterial infection, representing an important health problem due to its high incidence, wide etiology, asymptomatic evolution, and multiple and sever complications, relapses and sequelae.” Material and Method: We evaluated 45 children, aged between 6 months and 16 years, diagnosed and treated for urinary tract infection at the Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital, of Constanta County, in a period of 3 years and 6 months. Results: During studied period, between January 2014 and June 2017 from a total of 9343 patients admitted to the Constanta Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital, we selected 45 children (4.81‰ diagnosed with urinary tract infection. The average age of children with urinary tract infections was 5 years and 5 months. The gender distribution revealed a 2:1 balance in girl’s favor. The most affected group of age was 1-3 years. Fever was the dominating symptom. Urine cultures were positive for 37 cases, meanwhile for eight cases had been negative. The predominant germs are E. coli for female and for male Proteus. We noticed that for E. coli the highest sensitivity is preserved to Ertapenem -15 cases, followed by Ceftriaxone and Ciprofloxacin -10 cases each, and Gentamycin -9 cases. Conclusions: Pediatric urinary tract infection should be considered in every patient under 3 years with unexplained fever.

  7. Prevention of common healthcare-associated infections in humanitarian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Richard A; Chua, Arlene C

    2016-08-01

    Humanitarian medical organizations focus on vulnerable patients with increased risk for healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and are obligated to minimize them in inpatient departments (IPDs). However, in doing so humanitarian groups face considerable obstacles. This report will focus on approaches to reducing common HAIs that the authors have found to be helpful in humanitarian settings. HAIs are common in humanitarian contexts but there are few interventions or guidelines adapted for use in poor and conflict-affected settings to improve prevention and guide surveillance. Based on existing recommendations and studies, it appears prudent that all humanitarian IPDs introduce a basic infection prevention infrastructure, assure high adherence to hand hygiene with wide accessibility to alcohol-based hand rub, and develop pragmatic surveillance based on clinically evident nosocomial infection. Although microbiology remains out of reach for most humanitarian hospitals, rapid tests offer the possibility of improving the diagnosis of HAIs in humanitarian hospitals in the decade ahead. There is a dearth of new studies that can direct efforts to prevent HAIs in IPDs in poor and conflict-affected areas and there is a need for practical, field-adapted guidelines from professional societies, and international bodies to guide infection prevention efforts in humanitarian environments.

  8. Burden of Clostridium difficile Infections in French Hospitals in 2014 From the National Health Insurance Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Soline; Blein, Cécile; Andremont, Antoine; Bandinelli, Pierre-Alain; Galvain, Thibaut

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the hospital stays of patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and to measure the hospitalization costs of CDI (as primary and secondary diagnoses) from the French national health insurance perspective DESIGN Burden of illness study SETTING All acute-care hospitals in France METHODS Data were extracted from the French national hospitalization database (PMSI) for patients covered by the national health insurance scheme in 2014. Hospitalizations were selected using the International Classification of Diseases, 10 th revision (ICD-10) code for CDI. Hospital stays with CDI as the primary diagnosis or the secondary diagnosis (comorbidity) were studied for the following parameters: patient sociodemographic characteristics, mortality, length of stay (LOS), and related costs. A retrospective case-control analysis was performed on stays with CDI as the secondary diagnosis to assess the impact of CDI on the LOS and costs. RESULTS Overall, 5,834 hospital stays with CDI as the primary diagnosis were included in this study. The total national insurance costs were €30.7 million (US $33,677,439), and the mean cost per hospital stay was €5,267±€3,645 (US $5,777±$3,998). In total, 10,265 stays were reported with CDI as the secondary diagnosis. The total national insurance additional costs attributable to CDI were estimated to be €85 million (US $93,243,725), and the mean additional cost attributable to CDI per hospital stay was €8,295±€17,163, median, €4,797 (US $9,099±$8,827; median, $5,262). CONCLUSION CDI has a high clinical and economic burden in the hospital, and it represents a major cost for national health insurance. When detected as a comorbidity, CDI was significantly associated with increased LOS and economic burden. Preventive approaches should be implemented to avoid CDIs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:906-911.

  9. Nosocomial Infections and Antibiotic Administration in Pediatric Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkarim Hamedi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial Infections (NI are a frequent and relevant problem, in other hands; those are responsible of mortality especially in pediatric ICU( Intensive Care Unit and NICUs (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Healthcare-associated infections are important in wide-ranging concern in the medical field. The most cause of Nosocomial infection include: bloodstream infection, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and wound infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of the three most common NI in the Pediatric department.        Materials and Methods: We performed a prospective study in a single Pediatric department during 12 months. Children were assessed for 3 NI: wound infections, pneumonia and urinary tract infections (UTI, as the same method as Center of Disease Control criteria. All patients were followed up and individuals who had have NI and their treatment was entered in this study.          Results: In this study 811 patients were hospitalized that 60% of them were male and were older than 60 months. The main causes of hospitalization include: toxicity, seizure, respiratory infection and fever. Among them 15 cases had NI (1.87%. The most NI occurred in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU and it was followed in aspect of intubation. The most cultured organism was pseudomonas that they suspected to ceftazidime and isolate from blood and endotracheal tube.           Conclusion:  NI presence was associated with increased mortality and length of stay in hospital. This study highlights the importance of NIs in children admitted to a pediatric department especially PICU in a developing country. Clinical monitoring of NIs and bacterial resistance profiles are required in all pediatric units.

  10. A Brief Discussion of Improving Quality Management and Prevention of Infection in Disinfection Supply Department of Local Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-lin HU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In order to improve the quality management of supply department in our hospital, develop the quality of our nursing work, control hospital infection. Methods: Make scientific and standard working procedures, pay attention to training of staff in supply department, make strict rules and regulations, attach importance to process management, improve the quality of nursing work, reinforce the protection of our staff. Results: We improved the method of management, developed the level of management. Conclusion: Supply Department up to standards, scientific and standardized level through a series of management measures, plays an important role in controlling Infection of hospital.

  11. Hospital risk management of cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, F; Zhang, J; Feng, J; Yang, H

    2016-10-01

    The epidemiology of cutaneous herpes simplex infection (CHSI) has dramatically changed over the past several decades. Valaciclovir is one of a new generation of antiviral medications that has expanded treatment options for the most common cutaneous manifestations of herpes simplex virus. However, the efficacy and safety of formulations with different doses of valaciclovir remain unclear. To carry out hospital risk management by ascertaining the incidence and risk of CHSI in patients during treatment with varying doses of valaciclovir. The PubMed, MEDLINE and Web of Science electronic databases were systematically searched from database inception to date of searching. Efficacy of drug treatment was measured by average easement score (AES). Safety was characterized as the proportion of patients with drug adverse reactions (DARs) such as fever, dizziness, headache, anxiety, irritability and yellowing of the skin. Outcomes for continuous and dichotomous data were estimated by standard mean difference (SMD) and risk ratio (RR), respectively. Five randomized controlled trials involving 1753 randomized participants for efficacy assessment and 1874 randomized participants for safety assessment were identified. Valaciclovir dose increasing from 1000 mg/day improved AES only moderately, but significantly promoted the incidence of DARs. Twice-daily treatment showed no increase in therapeutic effect but greatly increased DAR incidence. The valaciclovir dose that produced a reduction in AES was 1000 mg/day: SMD = -0.73 (95% CI -0.98 to 0.48; P < 0.01) and RR = 0.95 (95% CI 0.81-1.09; P < 0.002). Increasing the daily dose of valaciclovir does not substantially improve therapeutic efficacy for CHSI but may raise DAR incidence. Drug doses of 1000 and 2000 mg/day show no significant difference in efficacy scores, but the latter exhibits a higher incidence of DARs. The dose-dependent, long-term efficacy and safety of valaciclovir remain to be explored. © 2016 British Association of

  12. An image-guided tool to prevent hospital acquired infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Melinda; Szilágyi, László; Lehotsky, Ákos; Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Balázs

    2011-03-01

    Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) represent the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and claims hundreds of thousands of lives annually in the rest of the world. This paper presents a novel low-cost mobile device|called Stery-Hand|that helps to avoid HAI by improving hand hygiene control through providing an objective evaluation of the quality of hand washing. The use of the system is intuitive: having performed hand washing with a soap mixed with UV re ective powder, the skin appears brighter in UV illumination on the disinfected surfaces. Washed hands are inserted into the Stery-Hand box, where a digital image is taken under UV lighting. Automated image processing algorithms are employed in three steps to evaluate the quality of hand washing. First, the contour of the hand is extracted in order to distinguish the hand from the background. Next, a semi-supervised clustering algorithm classies the pixels of the hand into three groups, corresponding to clean, partially clean and dirty areas. The clustering algorithm is derived from the histogram-based quick fuzzy c-means approach, using a priori information extracted from reference images, evaluated by experts. Finally, the identied areas are adjusted to suppress shading eects, and quantied in order to give a verdict on hand disinfection quality. The proposed methodology was validated through tests using hundreds of images recorded in our laboratory. The proposed system was found robust and accurate, producing correct estimation for over 98% of the test cases. Stery-Hand may be employed in general practice, and it may also serve educational purposes.

  13. Spectrums of opportunistic infections and malignancies in HIV-infected patients in tertiary care hospital, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-related opportunistic infections (OIs and malignancies continued to cause morbidity and mortality in Chinese HIV-infected individuals. The objective for this study is to elucidate the prevalence and spectrums of OIs and malignancies in HIV-infected patients in the Beijing Ditan Hospital. METHODS: The evaluation of the prevalence and spectrums of OIs and malignancies was conducted by using the clinical data of 834 HIV-infected patients admitted in the Beijing Ditan hospital from January 1, 2009, to November 30, 2012. RESULTS: The prevalence and spectrums of OIs and malignancies varied contingent on geographic region, transmission routes, and CD4 levels. We found that tuberculosis was most common OI and prevalence was 32.5%, followed by candidiasis(29.3%, Pneumocystis pneumonia(PCP(22.4%, cytomegalovirus(CMV infection(21.7%, other fungal infections(16.2%, mycobacterium avium complex(MAC(11.3%, cryptococcosis(8.0%, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy(PML(4.4%, Cerebral Toxoplasmosis(3.5% and Penicillium marneffei infection(1.4%; while Lymphoma(2.9%, Kaposi's sarcoma(0.8% and cervix carcinoma(0.3% were emerged as common AIDS-defining malignancies. Pulmonary OI infections were the most prevalent morbidity and mortality in patients in the AIDS stage including pulmonary tuberculosis (26.6% and PCP (22.4%. CMV infection(21.7% was most common viral infection; Fungal OIs were one of most prevalent morbidity in patients in the AIDS stage, including oral candidiasis (29.3%, other fungal infection (16.2%, Cryptococcosis (8.0% and Penicillium marneffei infection (1.4%. We found the low prevalence of AIDS-defining illnesses in central neural system in this study, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (4.4%, cerebral toxoplasmosis (3.5%, tuberculosis meningitis (3.2%, cryptococcal meningitis (2.4% and CMV encephalitis (1.1%. In-hospital mortality rate was 4.3 per 100 person-years due to severe OIs, malignancies, and medical

  14. Population versus hospital controls for case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Min; Holman, D'Arcy

    2011-12-15

    Correct control selection is crucial to the internal validity of case-control studies. Little information exists on differences between population and hospital controls in case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospital setting. We conducted three parallel case-control studies on leukemia, breast and colorectal cancers in China between 2009 and 2010, using population and hospital controls to separately match 540 incident cases by age, gender and residency at a 1:1 ratio. Demographic and lifestyle factors were measured using a validated questionnaire in face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using conditional logistic regression analyses. The two control groups had closely similar exposure distributions of 15 out of 16 factors, with the only exception being that hospital controls were less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93). For exposure of green tea drinking, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) comparing green tealeaves intake ≥ 1000 grams annually with non-drinkers were 0.51 (0.31, 0.83) and 0.21 (0.27, 0.74) for three cancers combined, 0.06 (0.01, 0.61) and 0.07 (0.01, 0.47) for breast cancer, 0.52 (0.29, 0.94) and 0.45 (0.25, 0.82) for colorectal cancer, 0.65 (0.08, 5.63) and 0.57 (0.07, 4.79) for leukemia using hospital and population controls respectively. The study found that hospital controls were comparable with population controls for most demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors measured, but there was a slight difference between the two control groups. Hospital outpatients provide a satisfactory control group in hospital-based case-control study in the Chinese hospital setting.

  15. Population versus hospital controls for case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Correct control selection is crucial to the internal validity of case-control studies. Little information exists on differences between population and hospital controls in case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospital setting. Methods We conducted three parallel case-control studies on leukemia, breast and colorectal cancers in China between 2009 and 2010, using population and hospital controls to separately match 540 incident cases by age, gender and residency at a 1:1 ratio. Demographic and lifestyle factors were measured using a validated questionnaire in face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were obtained using conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The two control groups had closely similar exposure distributions of 15 out of 16 factors, with the only exception being that hospital controls were less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93. For exposure of green tea drinking, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs comparing green tealeaves intake ≥ 1000 grams annually with non-drinkers were 0.51 (0.31, 0.83 and 0.21 (0.27, 0.74 for three cancers combined, 0.06 (0.01, 0.61 and 0.07 (0.01, 0.47 for breast cancer, 0.52 (0.29, 0.94 and 0.45 (0.25, 0.82 for colorectal cancer, 0.65 (0.08, 5.63 and 0.57 (0.07, 4.79 for leukemia using hospital and population controls respectively. Conclusions The study found that hospital controls were comparable with population controls for most demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors measured, but there was a slight difference between the two control groups. Hospital outpatients provide a satisfactory control group in hospital-based case-control study in the Chinese hospital setting.

  16. Surgical site infections in Italian Hospitals: a prospective multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippolito Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSI remain a major clinical problem in terms of morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs. Nearly 60% of SSI diagnosis occur in the postdischarge period. However, literature provides little information on risk factors associated to in-hospital and postdischarge SSI occurrence. A national prospective multicenter study was conducted with the aim of assessing the incidence of both in-hospital and postdisharge SSI, and the associated risk factors. Methods In 2002, a one-month, prospective national multicenter surveillance study was conducted in General and Gynecological units of 48 Italian hospitals. Case ascertainment of SSI was carried out using standardized surveillance methodology. To assess potential risk factors for SSI we used a conditional logistic regression model. We also reported the odds ratios of in-hospital and postdischarge SSI. Results SSI occurred in 241 (5.2% of 4,665 patients, of which 148 (61.4% during in-hospital, and 93 (38.6% during postdischarge period. Of 93 postdischarge SSI, sixty-two (66.7% and 31 (33.3% were detected through telephone interview and questionnaire survey, respectively. Higher SSI incidence rates were observed in colon surgery (18.9%, gastric surgery (13.6%, and appendectomy (8.6%. If considering risk factors for SSI, at multivariate analysis we found that emergency interventions, NNIS risk score, pre-operative hospital stay, and use of drains were significantly associated with SSI occurrence. Moreover, risk factors for total SSI were also associated to in-hospital SSI. Additionally, only NNIS, pre-operative hospital stay, use of drains, and antibiotic prophylaxis were associated with postdischarge SSI. Conclusion Our study provided information on risk factors for SSI in a large population in general surgery setting in Italy. Standardized postdischarge surveillance detected 38.6% of all SSI. We also compared risk factors for in-hospital and postdischarge SSI

  17. A Classification System for Hospital-Based Infection Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Ganney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of infection within semi-closed environments such as hospitals, whether inherent in the environment (such as Clostridium difficile (C.Diff or Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA or imported from the wider community (such as Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs, are difficult to manage. As part of our work on modelling such outbreaks, we have developed a classification system to describe the impact of a particular outbreak upon an organization. This classification system may then be used in comparing appropriate computer models to real outbreaks, as well as in comparing different real outbreaks in, for example, the comparison of differing management and containment techniques and strategies. Data from NLV outbreaks in the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust (the Trust over several previous years are analysed and classified, both for infection within staff (where the end of infection date may not be known and within patients (where it generally is known. A classification system consisting of seven elements is described, along with a goodness-of-fit method for comparing a new classification to previously known ones, for use in evaluating a simulation against history and thereby determining how ‘realistic’ (or otherwise it is.

  18. A classification system for hospital-based infection outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganney, Paul S; Madeo, Maurice; Phillips, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Outbreaks of infection within semi-closed environments such as hospitals, whether inherent in the environment (such as Clostridium difficile (C.Diff) or Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or imported from the wider community (such as Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs)), are difficult to manage. As part of our work on modelling such outbreaks, we have developed a classification system to describe the impact of a particular outbreak upon an organization. This classification system may then be used in comparing appropriate computer models to real outbreaks, as well as in comparing different real outbreaks in, for example, the comparison of differing management and containment techniques and strategies. Data from NLV outbreaks in the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust (the Trust) over several previous years are analysed and classified, both for infection within staff (where the end of infection date may not be known) and within patients (where it generally is known). A classification system consisting of seven elements is described, along with a goodness-of-fit method for comparing a new classification to previously known ones, for use in evaluating a simulation against history and thereby determining how 'realistic' (or otherwise) it is.

  19. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; Sharma, D K; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 20 children with HAI (cases) and 35 children without HAI (controls), admitted to the PICU during the study period (January 2012 to June 2012), were matched for gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Each patient's length of stay was obtained prospectively. Costs of healthcare were estimated according to traditional and time driven activity based costing methods approach. The median extra length of PICU stay for children with HAI (cases), compared with children with no HAI (controls), was seven days (IQR 3-16). The mean total costs of patients with and without HAI were ' 2,04,787 (US$ 3,413) and ' 56,587 (US$ 943), respectively and the mean difference in the total cost between cases and controls was ' 1,48,200 (95% CI 55,716 to 2,40,685, pcosts for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care.

  20. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates ...

  1. A prevenção e o controle de infecções: um estudo de caso com enfermeiras La prevención y el control de infecciones hospitalarias: un estudio de caso con enfermeras The prevention and control of hospital infection: a case study with nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Teresinha Fontana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudo de Caso, do tipo descritivo, realizado com enfermeiras, cujo objetivo foi conhecer a estrutura físico-administrativa dos hospitais desta região e sua interface com a atuação das enfermeiras na prevenção e controle das infecções hospitalares. Vinte e oito enfermeiras participaram. Coletaram-se os dados através de observação da área física dos hospitais, dos documentos de avaliação e inspeção do Setor de Vigilância Sanitária da 12ª CRS e através de entrevistas com as enfermeiras. Da análise pode-se concluir que, para a promoção da saúde, para a redução de danos ao paciente internado e para a segurança do profissional e do usuário, há necessidade de se fazer uma reflexão profunda das ações de prevenção e controle das infecções hospitalares no cotidiano dessas instituições.Estudio de caso, del tipo descriptivo, realizado con enfermeras, cuyo objetivo fue conocer la estructura fisico-administrativa de los hospitales de esta Coordinadoría y su relación con la actuación de las enfermeras en la prevención y control de infecciones hospitalares. Veinte y ocho enfermeras participaron . Se colectaron los datos a través de observación, del area fisica en los hospitales, de los documentos de evaluación e inspección del Sector de Vigilância Sanitária de la 12ª CRS y a través de entrevistas con las enfermeras. Del análisis se puede concluir que para la promoción de la salud, para la redución de danos al paciente internado y para la seguridad del profesional y del usuario hay la necesidad de hacer una reflexión profunda de las acciones de prevención y control de las infecciones hospitalares en el cotidiano de las instituciones.A descriptive case study carried out with nurses. Its main purpose is getting to know the physical and administrative structure of the hospitals in this area, as well as their averal policy regarding the nurses' action in the prevention ans control of hospital infection. Twenty

  2. BCG Vaccination at Birth and Rate of Hospitalization for Infection Until 15 Months of Age in Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Ravn, Henrik; Birk, Nina Marie

    2018-01-01

    Background: The bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis might reduce the non-tuberculosis-related child mortality rate in low-income settings. We tested the hypothesis that BCG vaccination at birth would reduce early childhood hospitalization for infection in Denmark, a high...... analysis, we observed 588 hospitalizations for infection (mean, 0.28 hospitalization per child) among the 2129 children allocated to receive the BCG vaccine and 595 hospitalizations for infection (mean, 0.28 hospitalization per child) among the 2133 children allocated to the control group (hazard ratio [HR...... months in Danish children. In future studies, the role of maternal BCG-vaccination, premature birth, and cesarean delivery needs further exploration....

  3. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  4. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  5. Relationship between sharps disposal containers and Clostridium difficile infections in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika

    2015-10-01

    Sharps disposal containers are ubiquitous in health care facilities; however, there is paucity of data on their potential role in pathogen transmission. This study assessed the relationship between use of single-use versus reusable sharps containers and rates of Clostridium difficile infections in a national sample of hospitals. A 2013 survey of 1,990 hospitals collected data on the use of sharps containers. Responses were linked to the 2012 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset. Bivariate and multivariable negative binomial regression were conducted to examine differences in C difficile rates between hospitals using single-use versus reusable containers. There were 604 hospitals who completed the survey; of these, 539 provided data on use of sharps containers in 2012 (27% response rate). Hospitals had, on average, 289 beds (SD ± 203) and were predominantly non-for-profit (67%) and nonteaching (63%). Most used reusable sharps containers (72%). In bivariate regression, hospitals using single-use containers had significantly lower rates of C difficile versus hospitals using reusable containers (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.846, P = .001). This relationship persisted in multivariable regression (IRR = 0.870, P = .003) after controlling for other hospital characteristics. This is the first study to show a link between use of single-use sharps containers and lower C difficile rates. Future research should investigate the potential for environmental contamination of reusable containers and the role they may play in pathogen transmission. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Substantial shifts in ranking of California hospitals by hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection following adjustment for hospital characteristics and case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, David M; Phelan, Michael J; Cao, Chenghua; Billimek, John; Datta, Rupak; Nguyen, Hoanglong; Kwark, Homin; Huang, Susan S

    2014-10-01

    States have established public reporting of hospital-associated (HA) infections-including those of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-but do not account for hospital case mix or postdischarge events. Identify facility-level characteristics associated with HA-MRSA infection admissions and create adjusted hospital rankings. A retrospective cohort study of 2009-2010 California acute care hospitals. We defined HA-MRSA admissions as involving MRSA pneumonia or septicemia events arising during hospitalization or within 30 days after discharge. We used mandatory hospitalization and US Census data sets to generate hospital population characteristics by summarizing across admissions. Facility-level factors associated with hospitals' proportions of HA-MRSA infection admissions were identified using generalized linear models. Using state methodology, hospitals were categorized into 3 tiers of HA-MRSA infection prevention performance, using raw and adjusted values. Among 323 hospitals, a median of 16 HA-MRSA infections (range, 0-102) per 10,000 admissions was found. Hospitals serving a greater proportion of patients who had serious comorbidities, were from low-education zip codes, and were discharged to locations other than home were associated with higher HA-MRSA infection risk. Total concordance between all raw and adjusted hospital rankings was 0.45 (95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.51). Among 53 community hospitals in the poor-performance category, more than 20% moved into the average-performance category after adjustment. Similarly, among 71 hospitals in the superior-performance category, half moved into the average-performance category after adjustment. When adjusting for nonmodifiable facility characteristics and case mix, hospital rankings based on HA-MRSA infections substantially changed. Quality indicators for hospitals require adequate adjustment for patient population characteristics for valid interhospital performance comparisons.

  7. Radioactive hospital wastes. Radiations under control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondeelle, A.; Delmotte, H.; Gauron, C.

    2006-07-01

    A set of articles proposes an overview of legal and regulatory evolutions regarding radioactive hospital wastes. These legal measures and evolutions are notably present in the Public Health code, in the Labour code. An article outlines the role of the radiation protection expert in the process of elimination of contaminated wastes (four major steps for this elimination are indicated; peculiarities of the hospital are outlined, as well as control procedures and the importance of training and information). An article describes the specific activity of the Creteil incinerator which comprises a unit for the incineration of care activity wastes under a very constraining regulation

  8. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1-4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A-F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011-2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12-24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV-Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV-bocavirus / bocavirus-influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12-24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis.

  9. Healthcare Associated Infections of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Case-Control-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjiang Yao

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most widespread and dangerous pathogens in healthcare settings. We carried out this case-control-control study at a tertiary care hospital in Guangzhou, China, to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, risk factors and clinical outcomes of MRSA infections.A total of 57 MRSA patients, 116 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA patients and 102 S. aureus negative patients were included in this study. We applied the disk diffusion method to compare the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 18 antibiotics between MRSA and MSSA isolates. Risk factors of MRSA infections were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. We used Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression analysis to assess the hospital stay duration and fatality for patients with MRSA infections.The MRSA group had significantly higher resistance rates for most drugs tested compared with the MSSA group. Using MSSA patients as controls, the following independent risk factors of MRSA infections were identified: 3 or more prior hospitalizations (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-5.8, P = 0.007, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 5.9, 95% CI 1.7-20.7, P = 0.006, and use of a respirator (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.0-12.9, P = 0.046. With the S. aureus negative patients as controls, use of a respirator (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.0-13.9, P = 0.047 and tracheal intubation (OR 8.2, 95% CI 1.5-45.1, P = 0.016 were significant risk factors for MRSA infections. MRSA patients had a longer hospital stay duration and higher fatality in comparison with those in the two control groups.MRSA infections substantially increase hospital stay duration and fatality. Thus, MRSA infections are serious issues in this healthcare setting and should receive more attention from clinicians.

  10. Journal of the Nigerian Infection Control Association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of the Nigerian Infection Control Association publishes articles which deal with clinical medicine, basic medical science, dental sciences, pharmaceutical, veterinary sciences, nursing services and medical education and other related disciplines which are pertinent to infection control. Language of Publication: ...

  11. Classification of Infections in Intensive Care Units: A Comparison of Current Definition of Hospital-Acquired Infections and Carrier State Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Žurek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rate of nosocomial infection appears to depend on whether it is calculated using the Center for Disease Control (CDC or carrier state criteria. The objective of this study was to differentiate between primary endogenous (PE, secondary endogenous (SE and exogenous (EX infections, and to compare this classification with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Methods: Children hospitalized for more than 72 h at pediatric intensive care unit during 2004–2005 were enrolled. Children, who had the infection before the admission, and or did not develop an infection within the hospitalization were excluded. Surveillance samples were sampled on admission, and then twice a week. Diagnostic samples were obtained when infection was suspected based on the clinical condition and laboratory findings. Infections were evaluated as PE, SE and EX, and their incidences were compared with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Results: One hundred seventy eight patients were enrolled in the study. Forty-four patients (24.7% develop infection. Twenty-seven patients (61.3% had PE, 10 patients (22.7% had SE, and 7 patients (15.9% had EX infection. Secondary endogenous and EX infections are considered as nosocomial, thus 17 patients (38.6% had a nosocomial infection. Thirty-one patients (70.5% met CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Seventeen patients (55% were classified as PE, and 14 patients (45% as SE or EX infections.Conclusion: Seventy percent of infections (31 out of 44 patients met the CDC criteria for nosocomial infections, but only 39% of infections (17 out of 44 patients were classified as nosocomial based on carrier state classification.

  12. Classification of infections in intensive care units: a comparison of current definition of hospital-acquired infections and carrier state criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Jiří; Fedora, Michal

    2012-06-01

    The rate of nosocomial infection appears to depend on whether it is calculated using the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or carrier state criteria. The objective of this study was to differentiate between primary endogenous (PE), secondary endogenous (SE) and exogenous (EX) infections, and to compare this classification with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Children hospitalized for more than 72 h at pediatric intensive care unit during 2004-2005 were enrolled. Children, who had the infection before the admission, and or did not develop an infection within the hospitalization were excluded. Surveillance samples were sampled on admission, and then twice a week. Diagnostic samples were obtained when infection was suspected based on the clinical condition and laboratory findings. Infections were evaluated as PE, SE and EX, and their incidences were compared with CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. One hundred seventy eight patients were enrolled in the study. Forty-four patients (24.7%) develop infection. Twenty-seven patients (61.3%) had PE, 10 patients (22.7%) had SE, and 7 patients (15.9%) had EX infection. Secondary endogenous and EX infections are considered as nosocomial, thus 17 patients (38.6%) had a nosocomial infection. Thirty-one patients (70.5%) met CDC criteria for nosocomial infections. Seventeen patients (55%) were classified as PE, and 14 patients (45%) as SE or EX infections. Seventy percent of infections (31 out of 44 patients) met the CDC criteria for nosocomial infections, but only 39% of infections (17 out of 44 patients) were classified as nosocomial based on carrier state classification.

  13. Hospital cost of Clostridium difficile infection including the contribution of recurrences in French acute-care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Monnier, A; Duburcq, A; Zahar, J-R; Corvec, S; Guillard, T; Cattoir, V; Woerther, P-L; Fihman, V; Lalande, V; Jacquier, H; Mizrahi, A; Farfour, E; Morand, P; Marcadé, G; Coulomb, S; Torreton, E; Fagnani, F; Barbut, F

    2015-10-01

    The impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on healthcare costs is significant due to the extra costs of associated inpatient care. However, the specific contribution of recurrences has rarely been studied. The aim of this study was to estimate the hospital costs of CDI and the fraction attributable to recurrences in French acute-care hospitals. A retrospective study was performed for 2011 on a sample of 12 large acute-care hospitals. CDI costs were estimated from both hospital and public insurance perspectives. For each stay, CDI additional costs were estimated by comparison to controls without CDI extracted from the national DRG (diagnosis-related group) database and matched on DRG, age and sex. When CDI was the primary diagnosis, the full cost of stay was used. A total of 1067 bacteriological cases of CDI were identified corresponding to 979 stays involving 906 different patients. Recurrence(s) were identified in 118 (12%) of these stays with 51.7% of them having occurred within the same stay as the index episode. Their mean length of stay was 63.8 days compared to 25.1 days for stays with an index case only. The mean extra cost per stay with CDI was estimated at €9,575 (median: €7,514). The extra cost of CDI in public acute-care hospitals was extrapolated to €163.1 million at the national level, of which 12.5% was attributable to recurrences. The economic burden of CDI is substantial and directly impacts healthcare systems in France. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hospitalization of childhood rotavirus infection from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W S; Veerasingam, P D; Goh, A Y T; Chua, K B

    2003-01-01

    To determine the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children admitted to an urban hospital in a developing country from South-East Asia. Retrospective review of cases of acute gastroenteritis admitted to the children's ward of the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between 1996 and 1999. During the study period, 333 cases (24%) of 1362 stool samples, obtained from children admitted with acute diarrhoea, were positive for rotavirus. Acute gastroenteritis constituted 8.2%, and rotavirus infection 1.6% of all the paediatric admissions each year. Of the 271 cases analysed, 72% of the affected population were less than 2 years of age. Peak incidence of admissions was between January to March, and September to October. Dehydration was common (92%) but electrolyte disturbances, lactose intolerance (5.2%), prolonged diarrhoea (2.6%) and cow's milk protein intolerance was uncommon. No deaths were recorded. Rotavirus infection was a common cause of childhood diarrhoea that required hospital admission in an urban setting in Malaysia.

  15. Daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections in a Turkish university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Ata

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies associated nosocomial infections with increased hospital costs due to extra days in hospital, staff time, extra investigations and drug treatment. The cost of antibiotic treatment for these infections represents a significant part of hospital expenditure. This prospective observational study was designed to determine the daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections per infected adult patient in Akdeniz University Hospital. Methods All adult patients admitted to the ICUs between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2003 who had only one nosocomial infection during their stay were included in the study. Infection sites and pathogens, antimicrobial treatment of patient and it's cost were recorded. Daily antibiotic costs were calculated per infected patient. Results Among the 8460 study patients, 817 (16.6% developed 1407 episodes of nosocomial infection. Two hundred thirty three (2.7% presented with only one nosocomial infection. Mean daily antibiotic cost was $89.64. Daily antibiotic cost was $99.02 for pneumonia, $94.32 for bloodstream infection, $94.31 for surgical site infection, $52.37 for urinary tract infection, and $162.35 for the other infections per patient. The treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was the most expensive infection treated. Piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin were the most prescribed antibiotics, and meropenem was the most expensive drug for treatment of the nosocomial infections in the ICU. Conclusions Daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections is an important part of extra costs that should be reduced providing rational antibiotic usage in hospitals.

  16. Use of prophylactic Saccharomyces boulardii to prevent Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jeppe West; Chehri, Mahtab; Schønning, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common complication to antibiotic use. Saccharomyces boulardii has shown effect as a prophylactic agent. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of S. boulardii in preventing CDI in unselected hospitalized patients treated with antibiotics. We conducted a 1 year...... controlled prospective intervention study aiming to prescribe Sacchaflor (S. boulardii 5 × 109, Pharmaforce ApS) twice daily to hospitalized patients treated with antibiotics. Comparable departments from three other hospitals in our region were included as controls. All occurrences of CDI in patients...... receiving antibiotics were reported and compared to a baseline period defined as 2 years prior to intervention. Results were analyzed using run chart tests for non-random variation in CDI rates. In addition, odds ratios for CDI were calculated. S. boulardii compliance reached 44% at the intervention...

  17. Herpes–Zoster Infection in a Tertiary Hospital in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniolli, Luciana; Azambuja, Aline; Rodrigues, Camila; Borges, Rafael; Goldani, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background herpes zoster (HZ) is a common infection with potential complications requiring hospital care, especially for patients with multiple comorbities. However, there is little information on HZ from hospital registries. Methods we searched for hospital-based records of B02 code (ICD-10) between March 2000 and January 2017 at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, a tertiary, university hospital in south Brazil. To avoid misclassifications, we considered clinical evaluation for the diagnosis of cutaneous HZ and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), ophthalmological evaluation for ophthalmic HZ and the combination of clinical, radiologic and cerebrospinal fluid analysis for HZ meningo-encephalitis (ME). We analyzed conditions associated with immune dysregulation, complications, length of hospital stay, and mortality. Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier estimator were used for statistical analyses. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results there were 847 records for this period, of which 801 were confirmed according to our criteria and included in the analysis. Most patients were women (n = 448; 60%), with an average of 48.8 years, standard deviation of 22.2. There were more diagnoses in the inpatients group (74.4%), and fewer in the emergency room (22.4%) and outpatient (3.3%). The median length of hospital stay was 7 days (2-10, P25-P75) when HZ was the main reason for admission. Most patients presented cutaneous HZ (n = 743, 92.8%). There were fewer cases of PHN (6.1%), ophthalmic HZ (7.6%) and ME (4.1%). Seventy percent had some kind of immune dysregulation; more frequently AIDS (31%), use of immunosuppressive agents (18.7%) and malignant disease (16.2%). We followed the subjects for a median of 28.2 (2.8-77.5) months. During this period, there were 105 (13.1%) deaths. Five were related to HZ ME. The 30-day overall mortality rate was 1.5%. There was no statistical difference in cumulative survival (graph 1, P = 0.05) or incidence of

  18. A reliable user authentication and key agreement scheme for Web-based Hospital-acquired Infection Surveillance Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yu; Tseng, Yi-Ju; Chung, Yufang; Chen, Yee-Chun; Lai, Feipei

    2012-08-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet, both digitization and electronic orientation are required on various applications in the daily life. For hospital-acquired infection control, a Web-based Hospital-acquired Infection Surveillance System was implemented. Clinical data from different hospitals and systems were collected and analyzed. The hospital-acquired infection screening rules in this system utilized this information to detect different patterns of defined hospital-acquired infection. Moreover, these data were integrated into the user interface of a signal entry point to assist physicians and healthcare providers in making decisions. Based on Service-Oriented Architecture, web-service techniques which were suitable for integrating heterogeneous platforms, protocols, and applications, were used. In summary, this system simplifies the workflow of hospital infection control and improves the healthcare quality. However, it is probable for attackers to intercept the process of data transmission or access to the user interface. To tackle the illegal access and to prevent the information from being stolen during transmission over the insecure Internet, a password-based user authentication scheme is proposed for information integrity.

  19. Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Nicholas; Hofer, Adam; Greene, M Todd; Borlaug, Gwen; Pritchett, Jenny; Scallon, Tina; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-03-01

    Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains challenging across the spectrum of health care. There are limited data on prevention practices for CDI in the rural health care setting. An electronic survey was administered to 21 rural facilities in Wisconsin, part of the Rural Wisconsin Health Cooperative. Data were collected on hospital characteristics and practices to prevent endemic CDI. Fifteen facilities responded (71%). Nearly all respondent facilities reported regular use of dedicated patient care items, use of gown and gloves, private patient rooms, hand hygiene, and room cleaning. Facilities in which the infection preventionist thought the support of his/her leadership to be "Very good" or "Excellent" employed significantly more CDI practices (13.3 ± 2.4 [standard deviation]) compared with infection preventionists who thought there was less support from leadership (9.8 ± 3.0, P = .033). Surveillance for CDI was highly variable. The most frequent barriers to implementation of CDI prevention practices included lack of adequate resources, lack of a physician champion, and difficulty keeping up with new recommendations. Although most rural facilities in our survey reported using evidence-based practices for prevention of CDI, surveillance practices were highly variable, and data regarding the impact of these practices on CDI rates were limited. Future efforts that correlate CDI prevention initiatives and CDI incidence will help develop evidence-based practices in these resource-limited settings. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of an ultraviolet room disinfection protocol to decrease nursing home microbial burden, infection and hospitalization rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Christine R; Taneli, Yavuz; Neiman, Tammy; Dyer, Elaine M; Arzaga, Alvin Jason A; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2017-03-03

    The focus of nursing home infection control procedures has been on decreasing transmission between healthcare workers and residents. Less evidence is available regarding whether decontamination of high-touch environmental surfaces impacts infection rates or resident outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine if ultraviolet disinfection is associated with changes in: 1) microbial counts and adenosine triphosphate counts on high-touch surfaces; and 2) facility wide nursing home acquired infection rates, and infection-related hospitalization. The study was conducted in one 160-bed long-term care facility. Following discharge of each resident, their room was cleaned and then disinfected using a newly acquired ultraviolet light disinfection device. Shared living spaces received weekly ultraviolet light disinfection. Thirty-six months of pretest infection and hospitalization data were compared with 12 months of posttest data. Pre and posttest cultures were taken from high-touch surfaces, and luminometer readings of adenosine triphosphate were done. Nursing home acquired infection rates were analyzed relative to hospital acquired infection rates using analysis of variance procedures. Wilcoxon signed rank tests, The Cochran's Q, and Chi Square were also used. There were statistically significant decreases in adenosine triphosphate readings on all high-touch surfaces after cleaning and disinfection. Culture results were positive for gram-positive cocci or rods on 33% (n = 30) of the 90 surfaces swabbed at baseline. After disinfectant cleaning, 6 of 90 samples (7.1%) tested positive for a gram-positive bacilli, and after ultraviolet disinfection 4 of the 90 samples (4.4%) were positive. There were significant decreases in nursing home acquired relative to hospital-acquired infection rates for the total infections (p = .004), urinary tract infection rates (p = .014), respiratory system infection rates (p = .017) and for rates of infection of the skin

  1. Development and validation of measures to assess prevention and control of AMR in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Mindy; Ramanujam, Rangaraj; Sutherland, Jason; Vaughn, Thomas; Diekema, Daniel; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2007-06-01

    The rapid spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in the US hospitals poses serious quality and safety problems. Expert panels, identifying strategies for optimizing antibiotic use and preventing AMR spread, have recommended hospitals undertake efforts to implement specific evidence-based practices. To develop and validate a measurement scale for assessing hospitals' efforts to implement recommended AMR prevention and control measures. Surveys were mailed to infection control professionals in a national sample of 670 US hospitals stratified by geographic region, bedsize, teaching status, and VA affiliation. : Four hundred forty-eight infection control professionals participated (67% response rate). Survey items measured implementation of guideline recommendations, practices for AMR monitoring and feedback, AMR-related outcomes (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence and outbreaks [MRSA]), and organizational features. "Derivation" and "validation" samples were randomly selected. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify factors underlying AMR prevention and control efforts. Multiple methods were used for validation. We identified 4 empirically distinct factors in AMR prevention and control: (1) practices for antimicrobial prescription/use, (2) information/resources for AMR control, (3) practices for isolating infected patients, and (4) organizational support for infection control policies. The Prevention and Control of Antimicrobial Resistance scale was reliable and had content and construct validity. MRSA prevalence was significantly lower in hospitals with higher resource/information availability and broader organizational support. The Prevention and Control of Antimicrobial Resistance scale offers a simple yet discriminating assessment of AMR prevention and control efforts. Use should complement assessment methods based exclusively on AMR outcomes.

  2. Clinical correlates and outcomes in a group of Puerto Ricans with systemic lupus erythematosus hospitalized due to severe infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán-González, Patricia; Shum, Lee Ming; González-Sepúlveda, Lorena

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus patients hospitalized due to infections vary among different ethnic populations. Thus, we determined the outcomes and associated factors in a group of Hispanics from Puerto Rico with systemic lupus erythematosus admitted due to severe infections. Methods: Records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients admitted to the Adult University Hospital, San Juan, Puerto Rico, from January 2006 to December 2014 were examined. Demographic parameters, lupus manifestations, comorbidities, pharmacologic treatments, inpatient complications, length of stay, readmissions, and mortality were determined. Patients with and without infections were compared using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results: A total of 204 admissions corresponding to 129 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were studied. The mean (standard deviation) age was 34.7 (11.6) years; 90% were women. The main causes for admission were lupus flare (45.1%), infection (44.0%), and initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (6.4%). The most common infections were complicated urinary tract infections (47.0%) and soft tissue infections (42.0%). In the multivariate analysis, patients admitted with infections were more likely to have diabetes mellitus (odds ratio: 4.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.23–14.41), exposure to aspirin prior to hospitalization (odds ratio: 4.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–15.80), and higher mortality (odds ratio: 6.00, 95% confidence interval: 1.01–35.68) than those without infection. Conclusion: In this population of systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 44% of hospitalizations were due to severe infections. Patients with infections were more likely to have diabetes mellitus and higher mortality. Preventive and control measures of infection could be crucial to improve survival in these patients.

  3. Validação de proposta de avaliação de programas de controle de infecção hospitalar Validación de propuesta de evaluación de programas de control de infección hospitalaria Validation of a proposal for evaluating hospital infection control programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Pavanello Rodrigues Silva

    2011-02-01

    las unidades de análisis que lo compone. Lo mismo ocurrió para actividades de control y prevención: se identificó interface con unidades de tratamiento e interface con unidades de apoyo. CONCLUSIONES: La validación de las propiedades de medidas de los indicadores de programas de control de infección hospitalaria permite desarrollar herramienta de evaluación de dichos programas de forma ética y científica para diagnóstico de calidad en el área.OBJECTIVE: To validate the construct and discriminant properties of a hospital infection prevention and control program. METHODS: The program consisted of four indicators: technical-operational structure; operational prevention and control guidelines; epidemiological surveillance system; and prevention and control activities. These indicators, with previously validated content, were applied to 50 healthcare institutions in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the hospitals and indicator scores, and Cronbach's α coefficient was used to evaluate the internal consistency. The discriminant validity was analyzed by comparing indicator scores between groups of hospitals: with versus without quality certification. The construct validity analysis was based on exploratory factor analysis with a tetrachoric correlation matrix. RESULTS: The indicators for the technical-operational structure and epidemiological surveillance presented almost 100% conformity in the whole sample. The indicators for the operational prevention and control guidelines and the prevention and control activities presented internal consistency ranging from 0.67 to 0.80. The discriminant validity of these indicators indicated higher and statistically significant mean conformity scores among the group of institutions with healthcare certification or accreditation processes. In the construct validation, two dimensions were identified for the operational prevention and control guidelines

  4. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  5. Risk factors for recurrent hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection in a Japanese university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikone M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mayu Hikone,1 Yusuke Ainoda,1,2 Sayaka Tago,2 Takahiro Fujita,2 Yuji Hirai,2 Kaori Takeuchi,2 Kyoichi Totsuka31Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh General Hospital, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo Women's Medical University, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Kitatama Hospital, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is a highly prevalent hospital-associated infection. Although most patients respond well to discontinuation of antibiotics, 20%–30% of patients relapse. To initiate early therapeutic measures, the risk factors for recurrent CDI must be identified, although very few Japanese studies have used standard surveillance definitions to identify these risk factors.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with health care facility-onset CDI between August 2011 and September 2013. Patients with diarrhea who were positive for Clostridium difficile (via an enzyme immunoassay were defined as having CDI. Clinical data (eg, demographics, comorbidities, medication, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes were evaluated, and multivariate analysis was used to identify risk factors that were associated with recurrent CDI.Results: Seventy-six health care facility-onset CDI cases were identified, with an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Fourteen cases (18.4% were recurrent, with 13 patients having experienced a single recurrent episode and one patient having experienced three recurrent episodes. The 30-day and 90-day mortality rates were 7.9% and 14.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that recurrent patients were more likely to have underlying malignant disease (odds ratio: 7.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–52.2; P=0.03 and a history of intensive care unit hospitalization (odds ratio: 49.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.01–2,470; P=0.049.Conclusion: Intensive care unit hospitalization and malignancy are risk factors for recurrent

  6. Effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections: open randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardweg, M.T. van den; Boonacker, C.W.; Rovers, M.M.; Hoes, A.W.; Schilder, A.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections. DESIGN: Open randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 11 general hospitals and two academic centres. PARTICIPANTS: 111 children aged 1-6 with recurrent upper respiratory tract

  7. Infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Raabe Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website.

  8. [Infection prevention in Dutch hospitals; results say more than process indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, Marc J M; Friedrich, Alexander; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Voss, Andreas; Vos, Margreet C

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch Health Care Inspectorate investigated the preparedness of Dutch hospitals for the emergence of antibiotic resistance, and concluded that hospitals are not well prepared and are insufficiently aware that infection prevention is a prerequisite for patient safety. These conclusions are based on observations of process indicators of current practice guidelines, without including the available outcome indicators that demonstrate the persistently low incidence of infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria in Dutch hospitals. The conclusions may have negative effects on the quality of infection prevention in Dutch hospitals. Therefore, it is advisable to use outcome indicators rather than process indicators to evaluate the quality of infection prevention.

  9. Dengue infection and miscarriage: a prospective case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chiong Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito borne infection worldwide. Vertical transmissions after maternal dengue infection to the fetus and pregnancy losses in relation to dengue illness have been reported. The relationship of dengue to miscarriage is not known. METHOD: We aimed to establish the relationship of recent dengue infection and miscarriage. Women who presented with miscarriage (up to 22 weeks gestation to our hospital were approached to participate in the study. For each case of miscarriage, we recruited 3 controls with viable pregnancies at a similar gestation. A brief questionnaire on recent febrile illness and prior dengue infection was answered. Blood was drawn from participants, processed and the frozen serum was stored. Stored sera were thawed and then tested in batches with dengue specific IgM capture ELISA, dengue non-structural protein 1 (NS1 antigen and dengue specific IgG ELISA tests. Controls remained in the analysis if their pregnancies continued beyond 22 weeks gestation. Tests were run on 116 case and 341 control sera. One case (a misdiagnosed viable early pregnancy plus 45 controls (39 lost to follow up and six subsequent late miscarriages were excluded from analysis. FINDINGS: Dengue specific IgM or dengue NS1 antigen (indicating recent dengue infection was positive in 6/115 (5·2% cases and 5/296 (1·7% controls RR 3·1 (95% CI 1·0-10 P = 0·047. Maternal age, gestational age, parity and ethnicity were dissimilar between cases and controls. After adjustments for these factors, recent dengue infection remained significantly more frequently detected in cases than controls (AOR 4·2 95% CI 1·2-14 P = 0·023. INTERPRETATION: Recent dengue infections were more frequently detected in women presenting with miscarriage than in controls whose pregnancies were viable. After adjustments for confounders, the positive association remained.

  10. [Prevalence and associated factors with hospitalization for treatment of urinary tract infection during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenhaar, Arnildo Agostinho; Albernaz, Elaine Pinto

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated factors of the hospitalization of pregnant women for treatment of urinary tract infection and the repercussions on the health of the newborn, and the absence of a urine exam during the prenatal period. A cross-sectional design, where were eligible all mothers of newborns with births occurring between January 1st and December 31, 2010 in Rio Grande (RS). Mothers were interviewed in the two maternity hospitals in the city. Information was collected regarding hospitalization for urinary tract infection, the prenatal assistance and sociodemographic conditions. Statistical analyses were performed by levels and controlled for confounding using Poisson regression. Of the 2,288 women eligible for the study, 2.9% were hospitalized for treatment of urinary tract infection and was higher, after adjustment, in woman with lowest economic status (3.1% the lowest and 2.1% the highest), younger (4.0% in adolescents and 1.8% in those over 30 years), had less education (3.1% had seven years or less of studying and 1.2% had 12 years or more) and did not live with a partner (4.3% living without partner and 2.6% living with partner). Pathologies of the newborn associated with hospitalization, were preterm birth (4.1% in pre-term and 2.7% in those at term) and low birth weight (6.4% in low and 2.6% in those in normal). Of the women who underwent prenatal care, 23.6% had not done the urine test as recommended and, after adjustment, and the risk for not done the test was higher among those with lower socioeconomic status (34.4% in lower and 14.4% in the highest level), less educated (32.3% with seven years or less of studying and 11.0% with 12 years or more) and not living with a partner (32.7% living without partner and 22.0% living with partner). The high rate of hospitalization reflects the lack of effectiveness of screening for urinary tract infection during pregnancy. The socioeconomic profile of women who required hospitalization and who

  11. A tool to assess knowledge, attitude and behavior of indonesian health care workers regarding infection control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duerink, D.O.; Hadi, U.; Lestari, E.S.; Roeshadi, D.; Wahyono, H.; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Meulen, R.G.; Broek, P.J.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    Aim: to investigate knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire and to evaluate the use of the questionnaire as a tool. Methods: we investigated knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in

  12. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (Punit, simple, low-cost and sustainable interventions led to the control of a high incidence of bacterial nosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental contamination and hospital-acquired infection: factors that are easily overlooked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, C; Knibbs, L D; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2015-10-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the reasons for and factors contributing to healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Different solutions have been proposed over time to control the spread of HAI, with more focus on hand hygiene than on other aspects such as preventing the aerial dissemination of bacteria. Yet, it emerges that there is a need for a more pluralistic approach to infection control; one that reflects the complexity of the systems associated with HAI and involves multidisciplinary teams including hospital doctors, infection control nurses, microbiologists, architects, and engineers with expertise in building design and facilities management. This study reviews the knowledge base on the role that environmental contamination plays in the transmission of HAI, with the aim of raising awareness regarding infection control issues that are frequently overlooked. From the discussion presented in the study, it is clear that many unknowns persist regarding aerial dissemination of bacteria, and its control via cleaning and disinfection of the clinical environment. There is a paucity of good-quality epidemiological data, making it difficult for healthcare authorities to develop evidence-based policies. Consequently, there is a strong need for carefully designed studies to determine the impact of environmental contamination on the spread of HAI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Reducing hospital associated infection: a role for social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tony; Langley, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Although hand hygiene is seen as the most important method to prevent the transmission of hospital associated infection in the UK, hand hygiene compliance rates appear to remain poor. This research aims to assess the degree to which social marketing methodology can be adopted by a particular organisation to promote hand hygiene compliance. The research design is based on a conceptual framework developed from analysis of social marketing literature. Data collection involved taped interviews given by nursing staff working within a specific Hospital Directorate in Manchester, England. Supplementary data were obtained from archival records of the hand hygiene compliance rates. Findings highlighted gaps in the Directorate's approach to the promotion of hand hygiene compared to what could be using social marketing methodology. Respondents highlighted how the Directorate failed to fully optimise resources required to endorse hand hygiene practice and this resulted in poorer compliance. From the experiences and events documented, the study suggests how the emergent phenomena could be utilised by the Directorate to apply a social marketing approach which could positively influence hand hygiene compliance. The paper seeks to explore the use of social marketing in nursing to promote hand hygiene compliance and offer a conceptual framework that provides a way of measuring the strength of the impact that social marketing methodology could have.

  15. Mixed Infections and their Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-29

    of cultures are available. Anaerobes predominate in abscesses in ’.he vulvo- vaginal , buttocks, perirectal, finger, and head areas, but aerobes are 7...trauma-induced infections is that most of them are polymicrobial, including multiple aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Furthermore, due to the depletion...species of Gram-negative aerobic • . bacteria and at least one obligate anaerobe such as Bacteroides, Peptostrepto- coccus, or Peptococcus. Cutaneous

  16. Neonatal blood stream infections in tertiary referral hospitals in Kurdistan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhoo, Bahram; Lahurpur, Fariba; Delpisheh, Ali; Rasouli, Mohammad Aziz; Afkhamzadeh, Abdorrahim

    2015-06-09

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The aim of the present study was to determine bacterial agents and their susceptibility patterns to antibiotics and to investigate the risk factors associated with BSI. This was a nested case-control study carried out from September 2009 to June 2010 in the NICU wards in Sanandaj hospitals western Iran. Cases were patients with BSI and controls were other patients who had negative blood culture. Bacteriologic diagnosis and antibiotic susceptibility pattern was performed based on the Edward & Ewings and the National Committee of Clinical Laboratory (NCCL) Standards. Of 472 patients who hospitalized in NICU, 6.4% had BSI (n = 30) including 17girls (56.7%) and 13 boys (43.3%). Enterobacter SPP was the predominant isolated bacteria from blood culture (36.7%). The maximum antibiotic resistance and sensitivity were observed by Tetracycline and Ciprofloxacin respectively. Risk factors associated with BSI were age ≤ 7 days (p = 0.001), previous antibiotic consumption (p = 0.013), and low birth weight (LBW), (p = 0.001). Gram negative bacteria and Entrobacter in particular are the most common pathogens. Improving prenatal health care, standards of infection control and choosing accurate antibiotics are recommended to avoid BSI in neonatal intensive care units.

  17. Hospital-acquired infections associated with poor air quality in air-conditioned environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pinheiro da Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Individuals living in cities increasingly spend more time indoors in air-conditioned environments. Air conditioner contamination can be caused by the presence of aerosols from the external or internal environment, which may be associated with disease manifestations in patients present in this type of environment. Therefore, the aim of this review was to assess the air quality in air-conditioned hospital environments as a risk factor for hospital-acquired infections – HAI – as the air can be a potential source of infection, as well as assess the exposure of professionals and patients to different pollutants. Material and Methods: A literature review was performed in the LILACS, MEDLINE, SCIELO, SCIENCE DIRECT databases, CAPES thesis database and Ministry of Health – Brazil, including studies published between 1982 and 2008. The literature search was grouped according to the thematic focus, as follows: ventilation, maintenance and cleaning of systems that comprehend the environmental quality standard. Discussion and Conclusion: Outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections associated with Aspergillus, Acinetobacter, Legionella, and other genera such as Clostridium and Nocardia, which were found in air conditioners, were observed, thus indicating the need for air-conditioning quality control in these environments.

  18. Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Mobeen H; Jackson, Mary Anne

    2017-11-01

    Since the American Academy of Pediatrics published its statement titled "Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings" in 2007, there have been significant changes that prompted this updated statement. Infection prevention and control is an integral part of pediatric practice in ambulatory medical settings as well as in hospitals. Infection prevention and control practices should begin at the time the ambulatory visit is scheduled. All health care personnel should be educated regarding the routes of transmission and techniques used to prevent the transmission of infectious agents. Policies for infection prevention and control should be written, readily available, updated every 2 years, and enforced. Many of the recommendations for infection control and prevention from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for hospitalized patients are also applicable in the ambulatory setting. These recommendations include requirements for pediatricians to take precautions to identify and protect employees likely to be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials while on the job. In addition to emphasizing the key principles of infection prevention and control in this policy, we update those that are relevant to the ambulatory care patient. These guidelines emphasize the role of hand hygiene and the implementation of diagnosis- and syndrome-specific isolation precautions, with the exemption of the use of gloves for routine diaper changes and wiping a well child's nose or tears for most patient encounters. Additional topics include respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette strategies for patients with a respiratory tract infection, including those relevant for special populations like patients with cystic fibrosis or those in short-term residential facilities; separation of infected, contagious children from uninfected children when feasible; safe handling and disposal of needles and other sharp medical devices; appropriate use of personal

  19. Diabetes mellitus and infection: an evaluation of hospital utilization and management costs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the number of diabetics that seek medical treatment in emergency departments or require hospitalization for infection management in the United States. This study also assesses the socioeconomic impact of inpatient infection management among diabetics. We accessed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to perform a retrospective analysis on diabetics presenting to the emergency department or hospitalized for infection management from 2006 to 2011. Emergency Department: Since 2006, nearly 10 million diabetics were annually evaluated in the emergency department. Infection was the primary reason for presentation in 10% of these visits. Among those visits, urinary tract infection was the most common infection, accounting for over 30% of emergency department encounters for infections. Other common infections included sepsis, skin and soft tissue infections, and pneumonia. Diabetics were more than twice as likely to be hospitalized for infection management than patients without diabetes. Hospitalization: Since 2006, nearly 6 million diabetics were annually hospitalized. 8-12% of these patients were hospitalized for infection management. In 2011, the inpatient care provided to patients with DM, and infection was responsible for over $48 billion dollars in aggregate hospital charges. Diabetics commonly present to the emergency department and require hospitalization for infection management. The care provided to diabetics for infection management has a large economic impact on the United States healthcare system. More efforts are needed to develop cost-effective strategies for the prevention of infection in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Avaliação da existência de controle de infecção oral nos pacientes internados em hospitais do estado do Rio de Janeiro Evaluating the existence of oral infection control in patients admitted in state hospitals in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kahn

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar a existência de um protocolo de controle de infecção oral nos hospitais do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Foram avaliados 62 hospitais da rede pública e privada. Quando questionados se existia na instituição algum procedimento destinado aos pacientes internados (no caso de UTIs, 39% dos hospitais pesquisados responderam positivamente. Das instituições pesquisadas, apenas 15% possuem um protocolo regular para o controle de placa nos pacientes internados. Pesquisas têm demonstrado a inter-relação da doença periodontal com doenças sistêmicas, como doenças cardiovasculares, osteoporose, nascimento de bebês de baixo peso e parto prematuro, diabetes e doenças respiratórias. A cavidade oral tem sido considerada como um potente reservatório de patógenos respiratórios. Diante destes fatos, evidencia-se a importância da higiene bucal como um meio de se prevenir patologias diversas. Desta forma, existe a necessidade de se criar um protocolo de controle de infecção da cavidade oral para contribuir para a redução da mortalidade de pacientes internados e propor medidas preventivas para este fim.The aim of the present study is to ascertain whether an oral infection control protocol is being used in Rio de Janeiro State hospitals. Sixty two hospitals, both public and private have been surveyed. When asked whether any procedure was being adopted with admitted patients (in case of ICU patients, 39% of the hospitals responded positively. Among all institutions surveyed, only 15% conduct a regular plaque control protocol in admitted patients. Studies have shown that there is an inter-relationship between periodontal disease and systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, preterm births and low birthweight, diabetes and respiratory diseases. The oral cavity is considered a potent reservoir of respiratory pathogens. Based on these findings, it has become evident that oral hygiene is

  1. Hospital visitors as controls in case-control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnar Azevedo S Mendonça

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Selecting controls is one of the most difficult tasks in the design of case-control studies. Hospital controls may be inadequate and random controls drawn from the base population may be unavailable. The aim was to assess the use of hospital visitors as controls in a case-control study on the association of organochlorinated compounds and other risk factors for breast cancer conducted in the main hospital of the "Instituto Nacional de Câncer" -- INCA (National Cancer Institute in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil. METHODS: The study included 177 incident cases and 377 controls recruited among female visitors. Three different models of control group composition were compared: Model 1, with all selected visitors; Model 2, excluding women visiting relatives with breast cancer; and Model 3, excluding all women visiting relatives with any type of cancer. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to test the associations. RESULTS: Age-adjusted OR for breast cancer associated with risk factors other than family history of cancer, except smoking and breast size, were similar in the three models. Regarding family history of all cancers, except for breast cancer, there was a decreased risk in Models 1 and 2, while in Model 3 there was an increased risk, but not statistically significant. Family history of breast cancer was a risk factor in Models 2 and 3, but no association was found in Model 1. In multivariate analysis a significant risk of breast cancer was found when there was a family history of breast cancer in Models 2 and 3 but not in Model 1. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that while investigating risk factors unrelated to family history of cancer, the use of hospital visitors as controls may be a valid and feasible alternative.

  2. Hospital organisation, management, and structure for prevention of health-care-associated infection: a systematic review and expert consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Walter; Holmes, Alison; Dettenkofer, Markus; Goetting, Tim; Secci, Federica; Clack, Lauren; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Magiorakos, Anna-Pelagia; Pittet, Didier

    2015-02-01

    Despite control efforts, the burden of health-care-associated infections in Europe is high and leads to around 37,000 deaths each year. We did a systematic review to identify crucial elements for the organisation of effective infection-prevention programmes in hospitals and key components for implementation of monitoring. 92 studies published from 1996 to 2012 were assessed and ten key components identified: organisation of infection control at the hospital level; bed occupancy, staffing, workload, and employment of pool or agency nurses; availability of and ease of access to materials and equipment and optimum ergonomics; appropriate use of guidelines; education and training; auditing; surveillance and feedback; multimodal and multidisciplinary prevention programmes that include behavioural change; engagement of champions; and positive organisational culture. These components comprise manageable and widely applicable ways to reduce health-care-associated infections and improve patients' safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clostridium difficile infection is associated with increased risk of death and prolonged hospitalization in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Julia Shaklee; Localio, Russell; Xiao, Rui; Coffin, Susan E; Zaoutis, Theoklis

    2013-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality among adults. However, outcomes are poorly defined among children. A retrospective cohort study was performed among hospitalized children at 41 children's hospitals between January 2006 and August 2011. Patients with CDI (exposed) were matched 1:2 to patients without CDI (unexposed) based on the probability of developing CDI (propensity score derived from patient characteristics). Exposed subjects were stratified by C. difficile test date, suggestive of community-onset (CO) versus hospital-onset (HO) CDI. Outcomes were analyzed for matched subjects. We identified 5107 exposed and 693 409 unexposed subjects. Median age was 6 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2-13 years) for exposed and 8 years (IQR, 3-14 years) for unexposed subjects. Of these, 4474 exposed were successfully matched to 8821 unexposed by propensity score. In-hospital mortality differed significantly (CDI, 1.43% vs matched unexposed, 0.66%; P cost were significant: 5.55 days (95% CI, 4.54-6.56 days) and $18 900 (95% CI, $15 100-$22 700) for CO-CDI, and 21.60 days (95% CI, 19.29-23.90 days) and $93 600 (95% CI, $80 000-$107 200) for HO-CDI. Pediatric CDI is associated with increased mortality, longer LOS, and higher costs. These findings underscore the importance of antibiotic stewardship and infection control programs to prevent this disease in children.

  4. 75 FR 63844 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare...), regarding the practice of healthcare infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance, and...

  5. Hospital management of Clostridium difficile infection: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanafer, N; Voirin, N; Barbut, F; Kuijper, E; Vanhems, P

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of the epidemic Clostridium difficile 027 strain has renewed interest in infection control practices. To review the effectiveness of different practices to reduce hospital C. difficile infection (CDI) in non-outbreak settings. Data sources were identified by a MEDLINE search in English and French. The ORION statement was used to extract key data from articles describing interventions to manage CDI. Twenty-one studies, published between 1982 and December 2013, were reviewed. Most studies were before-after interventions, and a few studies were planned, formal, prospective investigations. The effects of the following single or combined interventions were described: antibiotic management; environmental disinfection and/or cleaning; hand hygiene; bathing; surveillance; cohorting; and isolation of infected patients in private rooms. With many methodological weaknesses and some inadequate research reporting, the observed reduction in CDI may not be entirely attributable to interventions. Although infection control programmes involving education and handwashing/gloving protocols were found to have contributed to a reduction in the incidence of CDI, these measures were usually a component of multi-faceted interventions that did not provide for evaluation of the relative impact of each factor. Appropriate environmental disinfection and antibiotic stewardship would appear to offer the most effective benefits. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hospitalization for Pneumonia among Individuals With and Without HIV Infection, 1995-2007: A Danish Population-Based, Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogaard, Ole S; Lohse, Nicolai; Gerstoft, Jan

    2008-01-01

    ). Risk factors were assessed by Poisson regression. Results. @nbsp; The study included 3516 persons with HIV infection and 328,738 persons without HIV infection, which provided 23,677 person-years and 2,944,760 person-years of observation, respectively. Incidence rates of pneumonia in HIV......-infected individuals decreased from 50.6 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.9-59.7 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years) during 1995-1996 to 19.7 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 16.2-23.8 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years) during 2005-2007. Compared......-infected population. Methods. @nbsp; This was an observational cohort study conducted during 1995-2007. Each member of a Danish population-based nationwide cohort of HIV-infected individuals was matched with up to 99 control individuals from the general population. Data on age, mortality, emigration, and hospital...

  7. Prospective surveillance of healthcare associated infections in a Cambodian pediatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasco Hearn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare associated infections (HAI are the most common preventable adverse events following admission to healthcare facilities. Data from low-income countries are scarce. We sought to prospectively define HAI incidence at Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC, a Cambodian pediatric referral hospital. Methods Prospective HAI surveillance was introduced for medical admissions to AHC. Cases were identified on daily ward rounds and confirmed using locally adapted Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC definitions. During the surveillance period, established infection prevention and control (IPC activities continued, including hand hygiene surveillance. In addition, antimicrobial stewardship practices such as the creation of an antimicrobial guideline smartphone app were introduced. Results Between 1st January and 31st December 2015 there were 3,263 medical admissions and 102 HAI cases. The incidence of HAI was 4.6/1,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval 3.8–5.6 and rates were highest amongst neonates. Median length of stay was significantly longer in HAI cases: 25 days versus 5 days for non-HAI cases (p < 0.0001. All-cause in-hospital mortality increased from 2.0 to 16.1% with HAI (p < 0.0001. Respiratory infections were the most common HAI (54/102; 52.9%. Amongst culture positive infections, Gram-negative organisms predominated (13/16; 81.3%. Resistance to third generation cephalosporins was common, supporting the use of more expensive carbapenem drugs empirically in HAI cases. The total cost of treatment for all 102 HCAI cases combined, based on additional inpatient days, was estimated to be $299,608. Conclusions Prospective HAI surveillance can form part of routine practice in low-income healthcare settings. HAI incidence at AHC was relatively low, but human and financial costs remained high due to increased carbapenem use, prolonged admissions and higher mortality rates.

  8. Perceptions of Clostridium difficile infections among infection control professionals in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Chiu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Huang, I-Hsiu; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2017-08-01

    High Clostridium difficile colonization and infection rates among hospitalized patients had been noted in Taiwan. Nevertheless, the cognition about clinical diagnosis and management of CDI among infection control professionals in Taiwan is not clear. A 24-item survey questionnaire about the diagnosis, therapy, or infection control policies toward CDI was distributed in the annual meeting of the Infectious Disease Society of Taiwan (IDST) in October 2015 and Infectious Control Society of Taiwan (ICST) in April 2016. Totally 441 individuals responded to the survey, and 280 (63.5%) participants would routinely monitor the prevalence of CDI and 347 (78.7%) reported the formulation of infection control policies of CDI in their hospital, including contact precaution (75.7%), wearing gloves (88.9%) or dressing (80.0%) at patient care, single room isolation (49.7%), preference of soap or disinfectant-based sanitizer (83.2%) and avoidance of alcohol-based sanitizer (63.3%), and environmental disinfection with 1000 ppm bleach (87.1%). For the timing of contact precaution discontinuation isolation for CDI patients, most (39.9%) participants suggested the time point of the absence of C. difficile toxin in feces. To treat mild CDI, most (61.9%) participants preferred oral metronidazole, and for severe CDI 26.1% would prescribe oral vancomycin as the drug of choice. There were substantial gaps in infection control polices and therapeutic choices for CDI between international guidelines and the perceptions of medical professionals in Taiwan. Professional education program and the setup of guideline for CDI should be considered in Taiwan. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Healthcare-associated infection in Burkina Faso: an assessment in a district hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Hien

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, few data are available on healthcare-associated infections. In Burkina Faso, there has been a failure to take into account risk management and patient safety in the quality assurance program. The main objective of our study was to carry out an assessment of healthcare-associated infection in a first level hospital. We conducted a crosssectional study in June 2011 in the care units of Ziniaré District Hospital (Ziniaré, Burkina Faso. The hospital has been divided in three components: i hospital population (care providers, in-patients and patients’ guardians; ii healthcare and services organization; iii hospital environment. We included: care providers of the clinical services, hospital inpatients and patients’ guardians, hospitalization infrastructure and nursing units, and all the documents relating to standards and protocols. Data collection has been done by direct observation, interviews and biological samples taken at different settings. In hospital population, care providers and patients’ guardians represented a high source of infection: adherence to hygiene practice on the part of care providers was low (12/19, and no patients’ guardian experienced good conditions of staying in the hospital. In healthcare and services organization, healthcare waste management represented a high-risk source of infection. In hospital environment, hygiene level of the infrastructure in the hospital rooms was low (6.67%. Prevalence of isolated bacteria was 71.8%. Urinary-tract catheters infections were the most significant in our sample, followed by surgical-site infections. In total, 56.26% (9/19 of germs were -Lactamase producers (ESBL. They were represented by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our analysis identified clearly healthcare-associated infection as a problem in Ziniaré district hospital. Hence, a national program of quality assurance in the hospitals should now integrate the risk infectious management

  10. Antimicrobial-resistant infections among postpartum women at a Ugandan referral hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Bebell

    Full Text Available Puerperal sepsis causes 10% of maternal deaths in Africa, but prospective studies on incidence, microbiology and antimicrobial resistance are lacking.We performed a prospective cohort study of 4,231 Ugandan women presenting to a regional referral hospital for delivery or postpartum care, measured vital signs after delivery, performed structured physical exam, symptom questionnaire, and microbiologic evaluation of febrile and hypothermic women. Malaria rapid diagnostic testing, blood and urine cultures were performed aseptically and processed at Epicentre Mbarara Research Centre. Antimicrobial susceptibility and breakpoints were determined using disk diffusion per EUCAST standards. Hospital diagnoses, treatments and outcomes were abstracted from patient charts.Mean age was 25 years, 12% were HIV-infected, and 50% had cesarean deliveries. Approximately 5% (205/4176 with ≥1 temperature measurement recorded developed postpartum fever or hypothermia; blood and urine samples were collected from 174 (85%, and 17 others were evaluated clinically. Eighty-four (48% had at least one confirmed source of infection: 39% (76/193 clinical postpartum endometritis, 14% (25/174 urinary tract infection (UTI, 3% (5/174 bloodstream infection. Another 3% (5/174 had malaria. Overall, 30/174 (17% had positive blood or urine cultures, and Acinetobacter species were the most common bacteria isolated. Of 25 Gram-negatives isolated, 20 (80% were multidrug-resistant and cefepime non-susceptible.For women in rural Uganda with postpartum fever, we found a high rate of antibiotic resistance among cultured urinary and bloodstream infections, including cephalosporin-resistant Acinetobacter species. Increasing availability of microbiology testing to inform appropriate antibiotic use, development of antimicrobial stewardship programs, and strengthening infection control practices should be high priorities.

  11. Doripenem in hospital infections: a focus on nosocomial pneumonia, complicated intra-abdominal infections, and complicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Shien Lo

    2009-06-01

    . Judicious use should be considered when using doripenem as a first-line agent or drug of choice for serious infections. Doripenem is a well-tolerated drug with common adverse effects including headache, nausea and diarrhea. Caution should be used in patients with hypersensitivity to carbapenems and adverse reactions to β-lactam agents. Dosage adjustment is needed for patients with renal impairment. Doripenem has demonstrated economic and clinical benefits. It has been shown to reduce hospital length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation for intensive care unit (ICU patients. Therefore, doripenem is a welcome addition to our limited armamentarium of antibiotics available to treat serious bacterial infections in hospitalized patients.Keywords: doripenem, nosocomial pneumonia, intra-abdominal infections, urinary tract infections

  12. Maternal antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and hospitalization with infection in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Jessica Eden; Wu, Chunsen; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2018-01-01

    not receive pre-hospitalization antibiotics, this association was present only in those born vaginally. Higher risks of infection-related hospitalization occurred when pregnancy antibiotic prescriptions were closer to birth and in mothers receiving more pregnancy antibiotics. Children born to mothers exposed...... hospitalization with infection. Methods: We used population-based Danish national databases for pregnancies between 1995 and 2009. Infants were followed from birth until their first infection-related hospitalization, death, 14th birthday, emigration or end-2009. Exposure was maternal antibiotics prescribed before...... and during pregnancy. Outcome was infection-related hospitalization. Results: 141 359 (18%) mothers had at least one antibiotic prescription during pregnancy, 230 886 (29.4% of those with complete data) in the 18 months before pregnancy. Of 776 657 live-born singletons, 443 546 infection...

  13. Discourse of 'transformational leadership' in infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteyko, Nelya; Carter, Ronald

    2008-10-01

    The article explores the impact of the ;transformational leadership' style in the role of modern matron with regards to infection control practices. Policy and guidance on the modern matron role suggest that it is distinctive in its combination of management and clinical components, and in its reliance on transformational leadership. Senior nurses are therefore expected to motivate staff by creating high expectations, modelling appropriate behaviour, and providing personal attention to followers by giving respect and responsibility. In this article, we draw on policy documents and interview data to explore the potential impact of this new management style on infection control practices. Combining the techniques of discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, we identify examples where matrons appear to disassociate themselves from the role of ;an empowered manager' who has control over human and financial resources to resolve problems in infection control efficiently.

  14. Infection Status of Hospitalized Diarrheal Patients with Gastrointestinal Protozoa, Bacteria, and Viruses in the Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lim, Yi-Young; Jeon, Ji-Hye; Yu, Jae-Ran; Kim, Tong-Soo; Lee, Won-Ja; Cho, Seung-Hak; Lee, Deog-Yong; Park, Mi-Seon; Jeong, Hye-Sook; Chen, Doo-Sung; Ji, Yeong-Mi; Kwon, Mi-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    To understand protozoan, viral, and bacterial infections in diarrheal patients, we analyzed positivity and mixed-infection status with 3 protozoans, 4 viruses, and 10 bacteria in hospitalized diarrheal patients during 2004-2006 in the Republic of Korea. A total of 76,652 stool samples were collected from 96 hospitals across the nation. The positivity for protozoa, viruses, and bacteria was 129, 1,759, and 1,797 per 10,000 persons, respectively. Especially, Cryptosporidium parvum was highly mixed-infected with rotavirus among pediatric diarrheal patients (29.5 per 100 C. parvum positive cases), and Entamoeba histolytica was mixed-infected with Clostridium perfringens (10.3 per 100 E. histolytica positive cases) in protozoan-diarrheal patients. Those infected with rotavirus and C. perfringens constituted relatively high proportions among mixed infection cases from January to April. The positivity for rotavirus among viral infection for those aged ≤ 5 years was significantly higher, while C. perfringens among bacterial infection was higher for ≥ 50 years. The information for association of viral and bacterial infections with enteropathogenic protozoa in diarrheal patients may contribute to improvement of care for diarrhea as well as development of control strategies for diarrheal diseases in Korea. PMID:20585526

  15. Methods for identifying surgical wound infection after discharge from hospital: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Peter J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infections are a common complication of surgery that add significantly to the morbidity of patients and costs of treatment. The global trend towards reducing length of hospital stay post-surgery and the increase in day case surgery means that surgical site infections (SSI will increasingly occur after hospital discharge. Surveillance of SSIs is important because rates of SSI are viewed as a measure of hospital performance, however accurate detection of SSIs post-hospital discharge is not straightforward. Methods We conducted a systematic review of methods of post discharge surveillance for surgical wound infection and undertook a national audit of methods of post-discharge surveillance for surgical site infection currently used within United Kingdom NHS Trusts. Results Seven reports of six comparative studies which examined the validity of post-discharge surveillance methods were located; these involved different comparisons and some had methodological limitations, making it difficult to identify an optimal method. Several studies evaluated automated screening of electronic records and found this to be a useful strategy for the identification of SSIs that occurred post discharge. The audit identified a wide range of relevant post-discharge surveillance programmes in England, Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; however, these programmes used varying approaches for which there is little supporting evidence of validity and/or reliability. Conclusion In order to establish robust methods of surveillance for those surgical site infections that occur post discharge, there is a need to develop a method of case ascertainment that is valid and reliable post discharge. Existing research has not identified a valid and reliable method. A standardised definition of wound infection (e.g. that of the Centres for Disease Control should be used as a basis for developing a feasible, valid and reliable approach to defining post

  16. The relationship of hospital charges and volume to surgical site infection after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Rebecca; Ensor, Kelsey; Qian, Edward; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of hospital volume and charges on the rate of surgical site infections for total hip replacements (THRs) in New York State (NYS). In NYS, higher volume hospitals have higher charges after THR. The study team analyzed 93,620 hip replacements performed in NYS between 2008 and 2011. Hospital charges increased significantly from $43,713 in 2008 to $50,652 in 2011 (P<.01). Compared with lower volume hospitals, patients who underwent THR at the highest volume hospitals had significantly lower surgical site infection rates (P=.003) and higher total hospital charges (P<.0001). The study team found that in the highest volume hospitals, preventing one surgical site infection was associated with $1.6 million dollars in increased charges. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  17. Reasons for hospitalization in HIV-infected children in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dicko, Fatoumata; Desmonde, Sophie; Koumakpai, Sikiratou

    2014-01-01

    %) died during hospitalization and four (3%) were transferred out. The leading causes of hospitalization were WHO stage 3 opportunistic infections (37%), non-AIDS-defining events (28%), cachexia and other WHO stage 4 events (25%). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, most causes of hospitalizations were HIV related...

  18. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers and infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassens, Mareli M.; van Schalkwyk, Cari; du Toit, Elizabeth; Roest, Eline; Lombard, Carl J.; Enarson, Donald A.; Beyers, Nulda; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2013-01-01

    Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB

  19. Primary pneumocystis infection in infants hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hans Henrik; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Lundgren, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    with 431 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) by using a real-time PCR assay. In 68 episodes in 67 infants, P. jirovecii was identified. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of a positive signal compared with the first quartile of age (7-49 days) was 47.4 (11.0-203), 8.7 (1......Acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection early in life has been confirmed by serologic studies. However, no evidence of clinical illness correlated with the primary infection has been found in immunocompetent children. We analyzed 458 nasopharyngeal aspirates from 422 patients hospitalized.......9-39.7), and 0.6 (0.1-6.7) for infants in the second (50-112 days), third (113-265 days), and fourth (268-4,430 days) age quartiles, respectively. Infants with an episode of upper RTI (URTI) were 2.0 (1.05-3.82) times more likely to harbor P. jirovecii than infants with a lower RTI. P. jirovecii may manifest...

  20. Plastic surgeons' self-reported operative infection rates at a Canadian academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wendy Ky; Kaur, Manraj Nirmal; Thoma, Achilleas

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection rates are of great interest to patients, surgeons, hospitals and third-party payers. While previous studies have reported hospital-acquired infection rates that are nonspecific to all surgical services, there remain no overall reported infection rates focusing specifically on plastic surgery in the literature. To estimate the reported surgical site infection rate in plastic surgery procedures over a 10-year period at an academic hospital in Canada. A review was conducted on reported plastic surgery surgical site infection rates from 2003 to 2013, based on procedures performed in the main operating room. For comparison, prospective infection surveillance data over an eight-year period (2005 to 2013) for nonplastic surgery procedures were reviewed to estimate the overall operative surgical site infection rates. A total of 12,183 plastic surgery operations were performed from 2003 to 2013, with 96 surgical site infections reported, corresponding to a net operative infection rate of 0.79%. There was a 0.49% surgeon-reported infection rate for implant-based procedures. For non-plastic surgery procedures, surgical site infection rates ranged from 0.04% for cataract surgery to 13.36% for high-risk abdominal hysterectomies. The plastic surgery infection rate at the study institution was found to be site infection rates. However, these results do not report patterns of infection rates germane to procedures, season, age groups or sex. To provide more in-depth knowledge of this topic, multicentre studies should be conducted.

  1. Surgical site infections in an abdominal surgical ward at Kosovo Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raka, Lul; Krasniqi, Avdyl; Hoxha, Faton; Musa, Ruustem; Mulliqi, Gjyle; Krasniqi, Selvete; Kurti, Arsim; Dervishaj, Antigona; Nuhiu, Beqir; Kelmendi, Baton; Limani, Dalip; Tolaj, Ilir

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal surgical site infections (SSI) cause substantial morbidity and mortality for patients undergoing operative procedures. We determined the incidence of and risk factors for SSI after abdominal surgery in the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). Prospective surveillance of patients undergoing abdominal surgery was performed between December 2005 and June 2006. CDC definitions were followed to detect SSI and study forms were based on Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. A total of 253 surgical interventions in 225 patients were evaluated. The median age of patients was 42 years and 55.1% of them were male. The overall incidence rate of SSI was 12%. Follow-up was achieved for 84.1% of the procedures. For patients with an SSI, the median duration of hospitalization was 9 days compared with 4 days for those without an SSI (p 2, use of antibiotic prophylaxis and NNIS class of > 2 were all significant at p < .001. The SSI rates for the NNIS System risk classes 0, 1 and 2-3 were 4.2%, 46.7% and 100%, respectively. SSI caused considerable morbidity among surgical patients in UCCK. Appropriate active surveillance and infection control measures should be introduced during preoperative, intra-operative, and postoperative care to reduce infection rates.

  2. Risk of cardiac pacemaker pocket infection in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswinder Singh Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The risk of pacemaker pocket infections (PPIs is rare with good antisepsis techniques and use of advanced antibiotics. However, injudicious antibiotic usage leads to the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria, which may cause PPI. Few reports exist about the microbial spectrum of the PPI from our country, prompting us to study the same. Methods: We conducted this retrospective observational study for 3 years (January 2013–February 2016 from all the patients with PPI. We collected the relevant clinical samples (blood and pus for the microbial culture using a standard protocol. We included 100 samples collected from the medical staff and the hospital environment as a control sample. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods and a P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Our data showed that 17 out of 160 (10.6% patients had PPI. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus sp. was isolated in 7 (41.2% patients, followed by Staphylococcus aureus in 4 patients (23.5%. Other isolated bacteria include multidrug-resistant Burkholderia cepacia (n = 3, Mycobacterium abscessus (n = 2 and polymicrobial infection in a single patient. One out of hundred surveillance samples grew B. cepacia. Conclusion: Our data revealed a high incidence of Gram-positive cocci causing PPI. Every hospital should formulate their antibiotic policy based on the pattern of the hospital flora and their drug sensitivity.

  3. Clostridium Difficile Infection in Acute Care Hospitals: Systematic Review and Best Practices for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louh, Irene K; Greendyke, William G; Hermann, Emilia A; Davidson, Karina W; Falzon, Louise; Vawdrey, David K; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Calfee, David P; Furuya, E Yoko; Ting, Henry H

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in acute-care hospitals is a priority for hospitals and clinicians. We performed a qualitative systematic review to update the evidence on interventions to prevent CDI published since 2009. DESIGN We searched Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, the ISI Web of Knowledge, and grey literature databases from January 1, 2009 to August 1, 2015. SETTING We included studies performed in acute-care hospitals. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS We included studies conducted on hospitalized patients that investigated the impact of specific interventions on CDI rates. INTERVENTIONS We used the QI-Minimum Quality Criteria Set (QI-MQCS) to assess the quality of included studies. Interventions were grouped thematically: environmental disinfection, antimicrobial stewardship, hand hygiene, chlorhexidine bathing, probiotics, bundled approaches, and others. A meta-analysis was performed when possible. RESULTS Of 3,236 articles screened, 261 met the criteria for full-text review and 46 studies were ultimately included. The average quality rating was 82% according to the QI-MQCS. The most effective interventions, resulting in a 45% to 85% reduction in CDI, included daily to twice daily disinfection of high-touch surfaces (including bed rails) and terminal cleaning of patient rooms with chlorine-based products. Bundled interventions and antimicrobial stewardship showed promise for reducing CDI rates. Chlorhexidine bathing and intensified hand-hygiene practices were not effective for reducing CDI rates. CONCLUSIONS Daily and terminal cleaning of patient rooms using chlorine-based products were most effective in reducing CDI rates in hospitals. Further studies are needed to identify the components of bundled interventions that reduce CDI rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:476-482.

  4. Creating a meaningful infection control program: one home healthcare agency's lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, Renee McCoy; Browning, Sarah Via

    2014-03-01

    Creating a meaningful infection control program in the home care setting proved to be challenging for agency leaders of one hospital-based home healthcare agency. Challenges arose when agency leaders provided infection control (IC) data to the hospital's IC Committee. The IC Section Chief asked for national benchmark comparisons to align home healthcare reporting to that of the hospital level. At that point, it was evident that the home healthcare IC program lacked definition and structure. The purpose of this article is to share how one agency built a meaningful IC program.

  5. Consensus statement: patient safety, healthcare-associated infections and hospital environmental surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Christine; Al Mousa, Haifaa; Duse, Adriano; Gallagher, Rose; Koburger, Torsten; Lingaas, Egil; Petrosillo, Nicola; Škrlin, Jasenka

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections have serious implications for both patients and hospitals. Environmental surface contamination is the key to transmission of nosocomial pathogens. Routine manual cleaning and disinfection eliminates visible soil and reduces environmental bioburden and risk of transmission, but may not address some surface contamination. Automated area decontamination technologies achieve more consistent and pervasive disinfection than manual methods, but it is challenging to demonstrate their efficacy within a randomized trial of the multiple interventions required to reduce healthcare-associated infection rates. Until data from multicenter observational studies are available, automated area decontamination technologies should be an adjunct to manual cleaning and disinfection within a total, multi-layered system and risk-based approach designed to control environmental pathogens and promote patient safety.

  6. THE QUALITY OF AIR IN HOSPITAL ENVIRONMENTS CLIMATIZED AND ITS INFLUENCE IN THE OCCURRENCE OF INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Staciarini Anders

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Climatized environment is defined as the environment where temperature and humidity are controlled.We have made a review of literature, from 1990 to 2001, through data base MEDLINE, LILACS and Ministry ofHealth – Brazil. The aim of this study was to analyze the air quality in climatized environment and the last as a riskfactor for hospital infection – HI. Twenty-three articles where analyzed and gathered by the focused theme;patterns and principles for maintaining the air quality; air quality and isolation of microorganism; air quality andoccurrence of infection. The standard of quality quotes: ventilation, maintenance and cleanness of climatizationsystems. Aspergillus, Legionella, Acinetobacter, Clostridium, Nocardia, among others where found in airconditioned devices and the first three ones being responsable for booms of HI.

  7. Ischaemia-modified albumin: a marker of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Ferdinando A; Domenicali, Marco; Baldassarre, Maurizio; Bartoletti, Michele; Naldi, Marina; Laggetta, Maristella; Bertucci, Carlo; Colecchia, Antonio; Viale, Pierluigi; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Patients with cirrhosis present structural changes of human serum albumin (HSA) affecting non-oncotic functions. Ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA), which reflects the capacity to bind cobalt, has been associated to patient mortality during acute-on-chronic liver failure. This study aimed to assess whether circulating IMA is elevated in advanced cirrhosis and its relationship with severity of cirrhosis and specific complications. A total of 127 cirrhotic patients hospitalized for an acute complication of the disease and 44 healthy controls were enrolled. Plasma IMA and IMA to albumin ratio (IMAr) were measured with a cobalt-binding assay. HSA isoforms carrying post-transcriptional molecular changes were assessed with HPLC-ESI-MS. The effect of endotoxemia on IMA was evaluated in rats with CCl4 -cirrhosis. IMA/IMAr is significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls, but no correlations were found with prognostic scores. IMA did not correlate with the altered HSA isoforms. Ascites, renal impairment and hepatic encephalopathy did not influence IMA/IMAr levels. In contrast, IMA/IMAr is significantly higher in infected than non-infected patients. ROC curves showed that IMA/IMAr had similar discriminating performances for bacterial infection as C-reactive protein (CRP). Moreover, CRP and IMA were independently associated with bacterial infection. Consistently, endotoxin injection significantly increased IMA in cirrhotic, but not in healthy rats. IMA is elevated in patients with advanced cirrhosis. The IMA level does not correlate with disease severity scores, but it is specifically associated to bacterial infection, showing a discriminating performance similar to CRP. Further investigations to assess IMA as a novel diagnostic test for bacterial infection are advocated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Urinary Tract Infections Among Hospitalized Adults in the Early Post-Liver Transplant Period: Prevalence, Risk Factors, Causative Agents, and Microbial Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Jafarpour, Zahra; Firoozifar, Mohammad; Malek Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Rasekh, Razieh; Khosravifard, Leila; Janghorban, Parisa

    2017-02-01

    Urinary tract infections are among the most common infections after liver transplant, especially soon after surgery. This study analyzed urinary tract infections or bacteriuria, their causative agents, and related risk factors in the early period after liver transplant in hospitalized adult transplant recipients in the main liver transplant referral center in Iran. In this prospective study, 389 consecutive adult patients who underwent liver transplant at the Nemazee Teaching Hospital were enrolled between October 2014 and October 2015. Risk factors were compared for patients who developed urinary tract infections or bacteriuria ("infection group "; n = 63 [16.2% ]) and patients without evidence of infection ("control group "; n = 211 [54.2% ]). Patients with sites of infection other than the urinary tract were excluded. Antimicrobial sus ceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method. Univariate and multivariate analyses compared variables between the 2 groups. Seventy-nine episodes of urinary tract infections or bacteriuria occurred in the infection group. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that female sex, hospitalization 2 to 7 days before transplant, and frequency of abdominal exploration were 11.0, 5.9, and 3.0 times more common in the infection group than in the control group. The chance of infection rises 1.1 times with each one unit increase of body mass index. The most common infection causes were gram-negative bacteria (n = 50; 63.3%), predominantly Escherichia coli (n = 24; 30.4%); followed by gram-positive bacteria (n = 20; 25.3%), predominantly Enterococcus species (n = 14; 17.8%) that had a high incidence of vancomycin resistance (n = 10; 71.4%); and non-Candida albicans species isolates (n = 9; 11.4%). Urinary tract infections are a common infection in hospitalized adult patients soon after liver transplant. Female sex, hospitalization shortly before transplant, more frequent abdominal exploration, and higher

  9. Association Between Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Subsequent Infective Endocarditis and In-Hospital Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueiro, Ander; Linke, Axel; Latib, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Limited data exist on clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients who had infective endocarditis after undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVE: To determine the associated factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients who had infective...... endocarditis after TAVR. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The Infectious Endocarditis after TAVR International Registry included patients with definite infective endocarditis after TAVR from 47 centers from Europe, North America, and South America between June 2005 and October 2015. EXPOSURE: Transcatheter...... aortic valve replacement for incidence of infective endocarditis and infective endocarditis for in-hospital mortality. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Infective endocarditis and in-hospital mortality after infective endocarditis. RESULTS: A total of 250 cases of infective endocarditis occurred in 20...

  10. Auxiliares e Técnicos de enfermagem e controle de infecção hospitalar em centro cirúrgico: mitos e verdades Auxiliares y técnicos de enfermería y control de infección hospitalaria en centro quirúrgico: mitos y verdades Nursing auxiliaries and technicians and hospital infection control in surgical centers: myths and truths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Regina Melon Kunzle

    2006-06-01

    ía infectada y rutina de limpieza, enfermedades ocupacionales, infección hospitalaria, infección del área quirúrgica y tiempo operatorio, pudimos detectar mitos y rituales referentes al control de infección, que están relacionados sobre todo a la cultura de quienes los practican, perpetuando resistencia a los cambios.This analytical and descriptive study is aimed at detecting concepts that translate myths and truths on hospital infection among nursing auxiliaries and technicians at the surgical centers of three hospitals. The data collection instrument consisted of 28 affirmative statements (15 true and 13 false encompassing factors related to the patient, the surgical team, the environment, and procedures. The statements contain a three-point scale (I agree, I am in doubt, I disagree. We received 72% of adequate answers and 28% of non-adequate, which indicates that perioperative nursing professionals have satis-factory knowledge of hospital infection control. In the items use of safety footwear, rings and other objects, hair as a pathogen, hand scrubbing, use of humid gown and surgical area, infected surgery and cleaning routine, occupational diseases, hospital infection, surgical site infection and surgery time we were able to detect myths and rituals about infection control, which are mainly related to the culture of those who practice them, thus perpetuating resistance to change.

  11. Viral etiologies of hospitalized acute lower respiratory infection patients in China, 2009-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzhao Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs are an important cause of acute illnesses and mortality worldwide and in China. However, a large-scale study on the prevalence of viral infections across multiple provinces and seasons has not been previously reported from China. Here, we aimed to identify the viral etiologies associated with ALRIs from 22 Chinese provinces. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Active surveillance for hospitalized ALRI patients in 108 sentinel hospitals in 24 provinces of China was conducted from January 2009-September 2013. We enrolled hospitalized all-age patients with ALRI, and collected respiratory specimens, blood or serum collected for diagnostic testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human influenza virus, adenoviruses (ADV, human parainfluenza virus (PIV, human metapneumovirus (hMPV, human coronavirus (hCoV and human bocavirus (hBoV. We included 28,369 ALRI patients from 81 (of the 108 sentinel hospitals in 22 (of the 24 provinces, and 10,387 (36.6% were positive for at least one etiology. The most frequently detected virus was RSV (9.9%, followed by influenza (6.6%, PIV (4.8%, ADV (3.4%, hBoV (1.9, hMPV (1.5% and hCoV (1.4%. Co-detections were found in 7.2% of patients. RSV was the most common etiology (17.0% in young children aged <2 years. Influenza viruses were the main cause of the ALRIs in adults and elderly. PIV, hBoV, hMPV and ADV infections were more frequent in children, while hCoV infection was distributed evenly in all-age. There were clear seasonal peaks for RSV, influenza, PIV, hBoV and hMPV infections. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings could serve as robust evidence for public health authorities in drawing up further plans to prevent and control ALRIs associated with viral pathogens. RSV is common in young children and prevention measures could have large public health impact. Influenza was most common in adults and influenza vaccination should be implemented on a wider scale in China.

  12. National infection prevention and control programmes: Endorsing quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempliuk, Valeska; Ramon-Pardo, Pilar; Holder, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Core components Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In addition to pain and suffering, HAIs increase the cost of health care and generates indirect costs from loss of productivity for patients and society as a whole. Since 2005, the Pan American Health Organization has provided support to countries for the assessment of their capacities in infection prevention and control (IPC). More than 130 hospitals in 18 countries were found to have poor IPC programmes. However, in the midst of many competing health priorities, IPC programmes are not high on the agenda of ministries of health, and the sustainability of national programmes is not viewed as a key point in making health care systems more consistent and trustworthy. Comprehensive IPC programmes will enable countries to reduce the mobility, mortality and cost of HAIs and improve quality of care. This paper addresses the relevance of national infection prevention and control (NIPC) programmes in promoting, supporting and reinforcing IPC interventions at the level of hospitals. A strong commitment from national health authorities in support of national IPC programmes is crucial to obtaining a steady decrease of HAIs, lowering health costs due to HAIs and ensuring safer care.

  13. Role of duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay on the rate of catheter-related hospital-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hazmi H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamdan Al-HazmiDivision of Urology, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: Our aim is to prove that duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay (LOS are associated with the rate of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI, while taking into account type of urinary catheter used, the most common organisms found, patient diagnosis on admission, associated comorbidities, age, sex, precautions that should be taken to avoid UTI, and comparison with other studies.Methods: The study was done in a university teaching hospital with a 920-bed capacity; this hospital is a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study was done on 250 selected patients during the year 2010 as a retrospective descriptive study. Patients were selected as purposive sample, all of them having been exposed to urinary catheterization; hospital-acquired UTI were found in 100 patients. Data were abstracted from the archived patients' files in the medical record department using the annual infection control logbook prepared by the infection control department. The data collected were demographic information about the patients, clinical condition (diagnosis and the LOS, and possible risk factors for infection such as duration of catheterization, exposure to invasive devices or surgical procedures, and medical condition.Results: There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and duration of catheterization: seven patients had UTI out of 46 catheterized patients (15% at 3 days of catheterization, while 30 patients had UTI out of 44 catheterized patients (68% at 8 days of catheterization (median 8 days in infected patients versus 3 days in noninfected patients; P-value <0.05, which means that the longer the duration of catheterization, the higher the UTI rate. There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and LOS

  14. Viral infections, prevalence and costs: A5-year, hospital based, retrospective observational study in shiraz, iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabayan, B.; Zamiri, N.; Chohedry, A.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients suffering from viral infections attend to health care centers. Data gathered from viral infections is limited to specific cases such as AIDS, viral hepatitis and Influenza. There is a significant lack of reliable documentation about other viral infections. In this study the prevalence and related costs of viral infections in hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were reviewed. In this cross-sectional study the data were extracted from files of 1319 patients with viral infection admitted in two university hospitals during a five year period (1999-2004). The frequencies of different viral infections along with their demographic data were analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 29.24 with the range of 90 years. Hospitalization days were 8636 in 40 different wards in two hospitals. US$ 30.84 was the daily mean cost for each admitted patient. Viral meningitis was most frequent (14.2%) and 8.4% of patients died during hospitalization. This study confirms the necessity of expanding management programs for viral infections especially hepatitis B in youths in Iran. Unspecified viral infections cost much more than specified viral diseases. Viral infection costs can be reduced by finding more sensitive and specific diagnostic methods. (author)

  15. Epidemiology of infective endocarditis in a large Belgian non-referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poesen, K; Pottel, H; Colaert, J; De Niel, C

    2014-06-01

    Guidelines for diagnosis of infective endocarditis are largely based upon epidemiological studies in referral hospitals. Referral bias, however, might impair the validity of guidelines in non-referral hospitals. Recent studies in non-referral care centres on infective endocarditis are sparse. We conducted a retrospective epidemiological study on infective endocarditis in a large non-referral hospital in a Belgian city (Kortrijk). The medical record system was searched for all cases tagged with a putative diagnosis of infective endocarditis in the period 2003-2010. The cases that fulfilled the modified Duke criteria for probable or definite infective endocarditis were included. Compared to referral centres, an older population with infective endocarditis, and fewer predisposing cardiac factors and catheter-related infective endocarditis is seen in our population. Our patients have fewer prosthetic valve endocarditis as well as fewer staphylococcal endocarditis. Our patients undergo less surgery, although mortality rate seems to be highly comparable with referral centres, with nosocomial infective endocarditis as an independent predictor of mortality. The present study suggests that characteristics of infective endocarditis as well as associative factors might differ among non-referral hospitals and referral hospitals.

  16. Low Compliance to Handwashing Program and High Nosocomial Infection in a Brazilian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Lizandra Ferreira de Almeida e; Rocha, Lilian Alves; Nunes, Maria José; Gontijo Filho, Paulo Pinto

    2012-01-01

    Background. It is a fact that hand hygiene prevents nosocomial infection, but compliance with recommended instructions is commonly poor. The purpose of this study was to implement a hand hygiene program for increase compliance with hand hygiene and its relationship with nosocomial infection (NI) and MRSA infection/colonization rates. Methods. Compliance to hand hygiene was evaluated in a hospital by direct observation and measured of health care-associated infections, including methicillin re...

  17. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martijn P; Notermans, Daan W; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance.......Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance....

  18. Controlling for endogeneity in attributable costs of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from a Canadian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Smith, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    Decisions regarding the optimal provision of infection prevention and control resources depend on accurate estimates of the attributable costs of health care-associated infections. This is challenging given the skewed nature of health care cost data and the endogeneity of health care-associated infections. The objective of this study is to determine the hospital costs attributable to vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) while accounting for endogeneity. This study builds on an attributable cost model conducted by a retrospective cohort study including 1,292 patients admitted to an urban hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Attributable hospital costs were estimated with multivariate generalized linear models (GLMs). To account for endogeneity, a control function approach was used. The analysis sample included 217 patients with health care-associated VRE. In the standard GLM, the costs attributable to VRE are $17,949 (SEM, $2,993). However, accounting for endogeneity, the attributable costs were estimated to range from $14,706 (SEM, $7,612) to $42,101 (SEM, $15,533). Across all model specifications, attributable costs are 76% higher on average when controlling for endogeneity. VRE was independently associated with increased hospital costs, and controlling for endogeneity lead to higher attributable cost estimates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of fascial space infections in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fascial space infections of the head and neck region, usually odontogenic in origin, are routinely treated as an out-patient procedure. Untreated or rapidly spreading odontogenic infections can be potentially life threatening. The present study is a review of patients with orofacial infections who required ...

  20. Empowering patients in the hospital as a new approach to reducing the burden of health care-associated infections: The attitudes of hospital health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Holly; Chughtai, Abrar A; Kaur, Rajneesh; Phillipson, Lyn; Novytska, Yuliya; Travaglia, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    Any approach promoting a culture of safety and the prevention of health care-associated infections (HCAIs) should involve all stakeholders, including by definition the patients themselves. This qualitative study explored the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers toward the concept of patient empowerment focused on improving infection control practices. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 29 staff from a large hospital in Sydney, Australia. There was virtually unanimous agreement among the participants that patients should be thought of as a stakeholder and should have a role in the prevention of HCAI. However, the degree of patient responsibility and level of system engagement varied. Although very few had previously been exposed to the concept of empowerment, they were accepting of the idea and were surprised that hospitals had not yet adopted the concept. However, they felt that a lack of support, busy workloads, and negative attitudes would be key barriers to the implementation of any empowerment programs. Although the World Health Organization has recommended that patients have a role in encouraging hand hygiene as a means of preventing infection, patient engagement remains an underused method. By extending the concept of patient empowerment to a range of infection prevention opportunities, the positive impact of this intervention will not only extend to the patient but to the system itself. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cockroaches ’ bacterial infections in wards of hospitals, Hamedan city, west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejati Jalil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the relationship between different species of cockroaches with their bacterial infection in different wards of Hamedan county hospitals, western Iran. Methods: Using sticky trap, hand collection and glass trap, 250 cockroaches were collected from 14 wards of 5 hospitals. After having their identification determined by detection key, all of them were used to isolate bacteria from cuticle and alimentary tract. Results: From four identified species, Blatella germanica were the most common in all of the wards (88.8% and next was the Periplaneta Americana (8%. 20 bacteria species isolated from cockroaches' surface and 21 from digestive organ. Escherichia coli were the most predominant bacteria isolated from external surface (26.5 % as well as alimentary tract (30.8%. The frequency of investigated bacteria on cockroaches' body surface was not significantly different between Periplaneta Americana and Blattella germanica except for Kllebsiella oxytoca (P<0.001 and Providensia Spp (P=0.035. Also, frequency of detected bacteria in cockroaches' digestive organ was not significantly different between these two species. Furthermore, the frequency of bacteria isolated from the cockroaches' external surface was not significantly different from that of digestive organ except for shigella disantery (P<0.001, Pseudomonas aeroginosa (P<0.001 and Klebsiella oxytoca (P=0.01 3. Conclusions: Since cockroaches can carry pathogenic bacteria, so their existence in the hospitals could be a serious public health problem. It is suggested to compile programs in order to control cockroaches especially in the hospitals.

  2. Prolonged outbreak of Serratia marcescens in Tartu University Hospital: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Vivika; Mitt, Piret; Pisarev, Heti; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Telling, Kaidi; Naaber, Paul; Maimets, Matti

    2012-10-31

    The aim of our study was to investigate and control an outbreak and identify risk factors for colonization and infection with Serratia marcescens in two departments in Tartu University Hospital. The retrospective case-control study was conducted from July 2005 to December 2006. Molecular typing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to confirm the relatedness of Serratia marcescens strains. Samples from the environment and from the hands of personnel were cultured. The outbreak involved 210 patients, 61 (29%) developed an infection, among them 16 were invasive infections. Multivariate analysis identified gestational age, arterial catheter use and antibiotic treatment as independent risk factors for colonization and infection with Serratia marcescens. Molecular typing was performed on 83 Serratia marcescens strains, 81 of them were identical and 2 strains were different. Given the occasionally severe consequences of Serratia marcescens in infants, early implementation of aggressive infection control measures involving patients and mothers as well as the personnel is of utmost importance.

  3. Clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter vis a vis non-Acinetobacter infections in an Indian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyendu Asim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Acinetobacter infections are a major nosocomial infection causing epidemics of infection in the Intensive Care Units (ICU. Aims: This study estimates the clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter infections and compares them with those of non-Acinetobacter bacterial infections. Settings and Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study carried out for 6 months in the medicine ICU of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided in two groups, one group with Acinetobacter infections and the other with non-Acinetobacter infections. The data was collected for infection, length of stay (LOS, mortality and cost along with patient demographics from the hospital records for analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 15.0. The LOS and cost of treatment (COT for the two groups were compared using the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 220 patients were studied out of which 91 had Acinetobacter infections. The median LOS was 20 days in Group-A and 12 days in Group-B (P < 0.0001. The median COT was INR 125,862 in Group-A and INR 68,228 in the Group-B (P < 0.0001. Mortality in Group-A and Group-B was 32.97 and 32.56 (P = 0.949 respectively. Conclusion: The burden of Acinetobacter infections in ICUs is increasing with the increase in LOS and COT for the patients. The infection control team has to play a major role in reducing the rate of nosocomial infections.

  4. Focus on Infection Control in Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biblio Alert! New Resources for Child Care Health and Safety, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The first in a series intended to provide child caregivers, parents, schools, health departments, and regulatory agencies with recent resources on child health and safety, this bibliography cites sources on the topic of controlling infections in child care settings. The list of annotated references contains background information and resource…

  5. Case-mix adjustment approach to benchmarking prevalence rates of nosocomial infection in hospitals in Cyprus and Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsotakis, Evangelos I; Dimitriadis, Ioannis; Roumbelaki, Maria; Vounou, Emelia; Kontou, Maria; Papakyriakou, Panikos; Koliou-Mazeri, Maria; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Vrouchos, George; Troulakis, George; Gikas, Achilleas

    2008-08-01

    To examine the effect of heterogeneous case mix for a benchmarking analysis and interhospital comparison of the prevalence rates of nosocomial infection. Cross-sectional survey. Eleven hospitals located in Cyprus and in the region of Crete in Greece. The survey included all inpatients in the medical, surgical, pediatric, and gynecology-obstetrics wards, as well as those in intensive care units. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria were used to define nosocomial infection. The information collected for all patients included demographic characteristics, primary admission diagnosis, Karnofsky functional status index, Charlson comorbidity index, McCabe-Jackson severity of illness classification, use of antibiotics, and prior exposures to medical and surgical risk factors. Outcome data were also recorded for all patients. Case mix-adjusted rates were calculated by using a multivariate logistic regression model for nosocomial infection risk and an indirect standardization method.Results. The overall prevalence rate of nosocomial infection was 7.0% (95% confidence interval, 5.9%-8.3%) among 1,832 screened patients. Significant variation in nosocomial infection rates was observed across hospitals (range, 2.2%-9.6%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the mean predicted risk of nosocomial infection across hospitals ranged from 3.7% to 10.3%, suggesting considerable variation in patient risk. Case mix-adjusted rates ranged from 2.6% to 12.4%, and the relative ranking of hospitals was affected by case-mix adjustment in 8 cases (72.8%). Nosocomial infection was significantly and independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6 [95% confidence interval, 2.1-6.1]). The first attempt to rank the risk of nosocomial infection in these regions demonstrated the importance of accounting for heterogeneous case mix before attempting interhospital comparisons.

  6. [Detection and Analysis of Human Parainfluenza Virus Infection in Hospitalized Adults with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Qiao; Liu, Xue-Wei; Zhou, Tao; Pei, Xiao-Fang

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the prevalence and gene characteristics of different groups of human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) infection in hospitalized adults with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI). RT-PCR was used to detect HPIV hemagglutinin (HA) DNA,which was extracted from sputum samples of 1 039 adult patients with ARI from March,2014 to June,2016. The HA gene amplified from randomly selected positive samples were sequenced to analyze the homology and variation. 10.6% (110/1 039) of these samples were positive for HPIV,including 8 cases of HPIV-1,22 cases of HPIV-2,46 cases of HPIV-3 and 34 cases of HPIV-4. Detectable rate varied among different groups of HPIV according to seasons of the year and ages of patients. No significant differences were found between the positive samples and the reference sequences. Compared with different reference strains of different regions,the genetic distance of nucleotide is the smallest between the strains tested in this study and the reference strains of other provinces and cities in China. In Chengdu region,HPIV virus is highly detected in ARI,all subtypes were detected with HPIV-3 being the main subtype.

  7. 环节控制内镜引起医院感染的因素及对策在医院感染中的作用%The Role of Key Point Control of Endoscope Sterilizing and Infection Analyzing in Hospital Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴荞; 张玉

    2017-01-01

    目的:分析我院内镜清洗消毒存在的问题,有针对性地制定措施,控制医院感染。方法对全院内镜集中回收、清洗消毒、检查包装、灭菌等环节进行质量控制流程管理。结果规范化、精细化流程管理使内镜清洗消毒质量得到保障,内镜消毒效果平均合格率从70.83%升到100.00%,有效地降低了内镜使用中发生感染的风险。结论集中处置后加强内镜的清洗消毒和灭菌监测,能够控制内镜引起的院内感染。%Objective To analyze the problems exist in endoscope cleaning and disinfection in our hospital, and establish some measures to improve the hospital infection.MethodsTo process the quality control to retrieve, cleaning, disinfection, check up, packaging, sterilization.Results The standardization and ifning management guaranteed the quality of endoscope cleaning and disinfection. The percent of pass increased from 70.83% to 100.00%. The risk of infection during usage of endoscope declined effectively.Conclusion Concentrated treatment of endoscope cleaning and disinfection could control the hospital infection.

  8. Clostridium difficile Infection Is Associated With Increased Risk of Death and Prolonged Hospitalization in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Julia Shaklee; Localio, Russell; Xiao, Rui; Coffin, Susan E.; Zaoutis, Theoklis

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality among adults. However, outcomes are poorly defined among children. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed among hospitalized children at 41 children's hospitals between January 2006 and August 2011. Patients with CDI (exposed) were matched 1:2 to patients without CDI (unexposed) based on the probability of developing CDI (propensity score derived from patient characteristics). Exposed subjects were stratified by C. difficile test date, suggestive of community-onset (CO) versus hospital-onset (HO) CDI. Outcomes were analyzed for matched subjects. Results We identified 5107 exposed and 693 409 unexposed subjects. Median age was 6 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2–13 years) for exposed and 8 years (IQR, 3–14 years) for unexposed subjects. Of these, 4474 exposed were successfully matched to 8821 unexposed by propensity score. In-hospital mortality differed significantly (CDI, 1.43% vs matched unexposed, 0.66%; P cost were significant: 5.55 days (95% CI, 4.54–6.56 days) and $18 900 (95% CI, $15 100–$22 700) for CO-CDI, and 21.60 days (95% CI, 19.29–23.90 days) and $93 600 (95% CI, $80 000–$107 200) for HO-CDI. Conclusions Pediatric CDI is associated with increased mortality, longer LOS, and higher costs. These findings underscore the importance of antibiotic stewardship and infection control programs to prevent this disease in children. PMID:23532470

  9. Cardiovascular Topics Blood pressure control at a hospital day clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-02-01

    Feb 1, 1999 ... control in a hospital day clinic population receiving cal- cium channel ... we had showed poor control of blood pressure in this hospital-based population .... Assessment of com- .... Program are obering: 19 almost half of newly treated hyper- tensives will di ... blood pressure control and quality of life. There is ...

  10. Study of the role of mobile phones in the transmission of Hospital acquired infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana M Angadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The inanimate objects like mobile phones in the immediate environment of the patients can act as a source of infection. Infectious agents from patients can be transferred on to the hands of the health care workers and in the absence of adequate hand hygiene practices can be transferred on to the mobile phones during their use and this can serve as a vehicle for the transmission of nosocomial pathogens from one patient to another. Aim: To evaluate the role of mobile phones in the transmission of pathogens by health care workers in health care centres. Materials and Methods: Mobile phones and hands were tested for micro-organisms before and after application of a disinfectant. A total of 60 mobile phones were tested for micro organisms, 30 from the health care workers (study group and 30 from relatives of patients attending Out Patient Department (control group. Swabs taken from their hands were also cultured. Results: Hands of all the health care workers and 27 mobile phones showed microorganisms on them. Only Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. The hands and mobile phones of 11 health care workers were contaminated with Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA was isolated from the hands of 24 (80% and mobile phones of 16 (53.3% health care workers. Ethyl alcohol was found to be 100% effective in disinfecting hands and mobile phones. Conclusions: To prevent the potential spread of infections through mobile phones, strict infection control practices, hand hygiene, and routine decontamination of mobile phones with alcohol should be advocated to prevent the spread of infection in the hospital settings.

  11. Trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and in-hospital mortality among HIV-infected patients between 1993 and 2013: Impact of hepatitis C co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Héctor; Mena, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Osorio, Iria; Pértega, Sonia; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Martínez, Guillermo; Pedreira, José; Poveda, Eva

    2017-01-01

    New patterns in epidemiological characteristics of people living with HIV infection (PLWH) and the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) have changed the profile of hospital admissions in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and mortality rates in HIV patients and to analyze the role of HCV co-infection. A retrospective cohort study conducted on all hospital admissions of HIV patients between 1993 and 2013. The study time was divided in two periods (1993-2002 and 2003-2013) to be compared by conducting a comparative cross-sectional analysis. A total of 22,901 patient-years were included in the analysis, with 6917 hospital admissions, corresponding to 1937 subjects (75% male, mean age 36±11 years, 37% HIV/HCV co-infected patients). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (5-16), and the 30-day hospital re-admission rate was 20.1%. A significant decrease in hospital admissions related with infectious and psychiatric diseases was observed in the last period (2003-2013), but there was an increase in those related with malignancies, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality remained high (6.8% in the first period vs. 6.3% in the second one), with a progressive increase of non-AIDS-defining illness deaths (37.9% vs. 68.3%, P<.001). The admission rate significantly dropped after 1996 (4.9% yearly), but it was less pronounced in HCV co-infected patients (1.7% yearly). Hospital admissions due to infectious and psychiatric disorders have decreased, with a significant increase in non-AIDS-defining malignancies, cardiovascular, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality is currently still high, but mainly because of non-AIDS-defining illnesses. HCV co-infection increased the hospital stay and re-admissions during the study period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y

  12. Opportunistic infection manifestation of HIV-AIDS patients in Airlangga university hospital Surabaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmarawati, T. P.; Putranti, A.; Rachman, B. E.; Hadi, U.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    Opportunistic infections are common in HIV-infected patients especially those who progress to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. There are many factors involved in the prevalence of opportunistic infections. We investigated the patterns of opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients admitted to Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya. This study was an observational study, conducted in adults patients with HIV infection from January 2016 to September 2017. Data collected from the medical records of the patients. The number of samples in this study was 58. The mean age was 42.9 years, mostly male. Most patients admitted were in clinical stadium III or IV. Heterosexual transmission is a common risk factor in patients. The most prevalent opportunistic infections found in patients were oral candidiasis (58.6%), followed by pulmonary tuberculosis (41.4%) and pneumonia/PCP (41.4%). Other infections found were toxoplasmosis, chronic diarrhea, cytomegalovirus, meningitis TB, hepatitis C, amoebiasis, and cerebritis. Opportunistic infections occurred more often in age≥40 years and increased as clinical stadium get worse. From the results, we conclude that oral candidiasis and pulmonary tuberculosis were the most common opportunistic infections found in Airlangga University Hospital. The pattern of opportunistic infections in this study could help the hospital to set priorities related to the management of patients.

  13. The impact of economic recession on infection prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, M; Fitzpatrick, F

    2015-04-01

    The economic recession that began in 2007 led to austerity measures and public sector cutbacks in many European countries. Reduced resource allocation to infection prevention and control (IPC) programmes is impeding prevention and control of tuberculosis, HIV and vaccine-preventable infections. In addition, higher rates of infectious disease in the community have a significant impact on hospital services, although the extent of this has not been studied. With a focus on quick deficit reduction, preventive services such IPC may be regarded as non-essential. Where a prevention programme succeeds in reducing disease burden to a low level, its very success can undermine the perceived need for the programme. To mitigate the negative effects of recession, we need to: educate our political leaders about the economic benefits of IPC; better quantify the costs of healthcare-associated infection; and evaluate the effects of budget cuts on healthcare outcomes and IPC activities. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Sue Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design: All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion: Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9 virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control.

  15. Epidemic of medical errors and hospital-acquired infections: systemic and social causes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charney, William

    2012-01-01

    ...) and pharmaceutical errors combined are the second or third leading killer of Americans annually: approximately 300,000 die from a combination of medical errors, hospital acquired infections (HAIs...

  16. Assessing the nosocomial infections' rate and the antibiotic resistance pattern among the patient hospitalized in beheshti hospital during 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Kadkhodaei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Nosocomial infection is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and length of stay. Detection of infection, identify the etiology of bacterial antibiotic resistance pattern, is necessary given the widespread use of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant organisms. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 288 patients admitted to the Beheshti Hospitals in Kashan based on NNIS definitions according to the state of Health and Medical education. In this study infections and antibiotic resistance symptoms were found. Data analyses were performed with Chi-square test. Results: Among the 288 patients studied, with mean out of hospital infection was 0.80%. Most cases of infection associated were pneumonia. The highest rates of infection were in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU with 51.7%. Nosocomial infection in ICU wards was associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The most common types were ventilator-associated pneumonia. Among the microorganisms, negative Gram was seen more. The common pathogens were including Acinetobacter, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella. Antimicrobial resistance was generally increasing and had emerged from selective pressure from antibiotic use and transmission through health staff. Conclusion: This study showed a correlation between antibiotic use and resistance of microorganisms is significant. Hence, it seems that reducing aggressive acts and conduct hygiene education and monitoring act of antibiotics is necessary to prevent antibiotic resistance.

  17. Assessing the magnitude and trends in hospital acquired infections in Canadian hospitals through sequential point prevalence surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Taylor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare acquired infections (HAI are an important public health problem in developed countries, but comprehensive data on trends over time are lacking. Prevalence surveys have been used as a surrogate for incidence studies and can be readily repeated. Methods The Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program conducted prevalence surveys in 2002 and 2009 in a large network of major Canadian acute care hospitals. NHSN definitions of HAI were used. Use of isolation precautions on the survey day was documented. Results In 2009, 9,953 acute care inpatients were surveyed; 1,234 infections (124/1000 were found, compared to 111/1000 in 2002, (p < 0.0001. There was increased prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI and Clostridium difficile, offset by decreases in pneumonia and bloodstream infection. Use of isolation precautions increased from 77 to 148 per 1000 patients (p < 0.0001, attributable to increased use of contact precautions in patients infected or colonized with antimicrobial resistant organisms. Conclusion Between 2002 and 2009 HAI prevalence increased by 11.7 % in a network of major Canadian hospitals due to increases in Clostridium difficile and urinary tract infection. The use of isolation precautions increased by 92.2 % attributable to increased contact isolation. National prevalence surveys are useful tools to assess evolving trends in HAI.

  18. Online continuing interprofessional education on hospital-acquired infections for Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Medina-Presentado

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: Implementation of this educational program showed the feasibility of a continent-wide interprofessional massive course on hospital acquired-infections in Latin America, in the two main languages spoken in the region. Next steps included a new edition of this course and a “New Challenges” course on hospital-acquired infections, which were successfully implemented in the second semester of 2015 by the same institutions.

  19. Prevalence of Nosocomial Infection in Different Wards of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Falahi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The CDC defines a nosocomial infection as a localized or systemic condition caused by an adverse reaction to the presence of an infectious agent(s or its toxin(s. It is an infection that occurs between 48 to 72 hours after admission of patients in the hospital or as soon after the hospital discharge and on the admission time, patients don't have this infection. Objectives This study aimed to characterize the prevalence of nosocomial infection in Ghaem hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Methods This retrospective study was conducted in all wards of the Ghaem hospital, Mashhad during the 1 year period (2013; the data were collected from the wards records and HIS system and analyzed by the SPSS software (version16. Results In the present study, of total 35979 hospitalized patients in different wards of the Ghaem hospital was reported 1.1% of nosocomial infection. In the meantime, overall, the most prevalent organism was Acinetobacter baumannii with a prevalence of 37.2% and the minimum was linked to the Bacillus species with a prevalence 0.3%. The highest and lowest prevalence of the nosocomial infection was in the ICU and CCU with 49.9% and 0.3%, respectively. In general, among all wards of the mentioned hospital, the most frequent nosocomial infection was pneumonia (47.4% and the lowest belonged to CSF (2.3%. Conclusions In our study, the ICU ward was accounted for the highest rate of nosocomial infection, due to the critical importance of this ward. Preventive measures and survivelance system for reduction of nosocomial infections is needed.

  20. Socioeconomic impact on device-associated infections in pediatric intensive care units of 16 limited-resource countries: international Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Jarvis, William R; Jamulitrat, Silom; Silva, Cristiane Pavanello Rodrigues; Ramachandran, Bala; Dueñas, Lourdes; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Ersoz, Gulden; Novales, María Guadalupe Miranda; Khader, Ilham Abu; Ammar, Khaldi; Guzmán, Nayide Barahona; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; Seliem, Zeinab Salah; Espinoza, Teodora Atencio; Meng, Cheong Yuet; Jayatilleke, Kushlani

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium prospective surveillance study from January 2004 to December 2009 in 33 pediatric intensive care units of 16 countries and the impact of being in a private vs. public hospital and the income country level on device-associated health care-associated infection rates. Additionally, we aim to compare these findings with the results of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network annual report to show the differences between developed and developing countries regarding device-associated health care-associated infection rates. A prospective cohort, active device-associated health care-associated infection surveillance study was conducted on 23,700 patients in International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium pediatric intensive care units. The protocol and methodology implemented were developed by International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium. Data collection was performed in the participating intensive care units. Data uploading and analyses were conducted at International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium headquarters on proprietary software. Device-associated health care-associated infection rates were recorded by applying Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network device-associated infection definitions, and the impact of being in a private vs. public hospital and the income country level on device-associated infection risk was evaluated. None. Central line-associated bloodstream infection rates were similar in private, public, or academic hospitals (7.3 vs. 8.4 central line-associated bloodstream infection per 1,000 catheter-days [p infection rates in lower middle-income countries were higher than low-income countries or upper middle-income countries (12.2 vs. 5.5 central line-associated bloodstream infections per 1,000 catheter-days [p infection rates were similar in academic, public and private

  1. Impact of Glycemic Control on Risk of Infections in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mor, Anil; Dekkers, Olaf M; Nielsen, Jens S

    2017-01-01

    Infections are a major clinical challenge for type 2 diabetes patients, but little is known about the impact of glycemic control. We used Cox regression analyses to examine the association between baseline and time-varying HbA1c values and development of community antiinfective-treated and hospital.......51, 1.79) for the latest updated HbA1c. Our findings provide evidence for an association of current hyperglycemia with infection risk in type 2 diabetes patients.......-treated infections in 69,318 patients with type 2 diabetes diagnosed between 2000 and 2012 in Northern Denmark. Incidence rates were 394/1,000 patient-years for community-treated infections and 63/1,000 patient-years for hospital-treated infections. The adjusted hazard ratios for community-treated infection at an Hb...

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Infection Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Johnston

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past year, several situations have occurred in Canada in which patients who had recently undergone a surgical procedure were subsequently diagnosed with confirmed or suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. This raised concerns over contamination of surgical instruments: which instruments might have been contaminated from direct exposure to tissues; can instruments become cross-contaminated by exposure to other contaminated instruments; what assessment is necessary to determine cross-contamination; and what should be done with instruments that have been contaminated. Additionally, should there be a patient traceback in the face of potential but unproven exposure? Unfortunately, there are no easy answers to most of the above questions. Australia, the United Kingdom and the World Health Organization have developed guidelines for the infection control management of patients with CJD, as well as instruments and devices that come into contact with them and their tissues (1-3. Health Canada's draft CJD infection control guidelines, withdrawn from the Health Canada Web site until safety concerns regarding sodium hydroxide can be addressed, closely mirrored recommendations made in those documents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for CJD are under revision. However, a recent American publication made recommendations on what procedures should be used for reprocessing items that have been in contact with the prion protein (PrP (4. These recommendations differ substantially from the draft Canadian guidelines. This article reviews current knowledge about CJD, and highlights some of the infection control concerns and controversies.

  3. Altered immune parameters correlate with infection-related hospitalizations in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Elizabeth; Castañeda, Diana; Jaramillo, Sonia; Iregui, Alejandro; Quiñonez, Tatiana; Rodríguez, Jairo A; Herrera, Eddy; Gómez, Ana Milena; Rondón, Martin A; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A; Mesa, Martha C

    2016-07-01

    In addition to previously studied immunological variables, the relative expression of IFNGR2, IFNAR1, CD18, and CD275 (all encoded in chromosome 21) on circulating leucocytes and multifunctional T cells (evaluated by an intracellular cytokine/proliferation assay) were compared between children with Down syndrome (DS) and healthy controls (HC). As previously reported, numbers of lymphocytes, CD4(+) T cells, Treg cells, B cells, and levels of serum IgM were decreased, and levels of IgG and IgA were increased in children with DS. Moreover, the relative expression of CD18 on T and B cells (previously and not previously reported, respectively) were elevated in DS children (p⩽0.01). Age and numbers of B and Treg cells moderately correlated with retrospectively identified infection related hospitalizations (rho: 0.300-0.460, p⩽0.003). Age and the numbers of Treg cells also correlated with prospectively identified infection related hospitalizations. Future studies are necessary to clarify the role of these parameters in the immunity of DS patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Infants 1-90 days old hospitalized with human rhinovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Jeffrey M; Taylor, Charla S; Cumpio, Joven; Novak, Susan M; She, Rosemary C; Steinberg, Evan A; Marlowe, Elizabeth M

    2014-09-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a common cause of respiratory illness in children. The impact of HRV infection on 1- to 90-day-old infants is unclear. We hypothesized that HRV infection would be clinically similar to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in the hospitalized infants. We conducted a retrospective study of hospitalized infants, who were 1-90 days old, with HRV or RSV within the Southern California Kaiser Permanente network over a 1-year period (August 2010 to October 2011). We identified 245 hospitalized infants who underwent respiratory virus testing. HRV was found in 52 infants (21%) compared to 79 infants (32%) with RSV (P = 0.008). Infants with HRV infection experienced longer hospital stays compared to those with RSV (median length of stay 4 days vs. 3 days, P = 0.009) and had fewer short hospital stays ≤3 days (P = 0.029). There was a trend in infants with HRV infection to be younger (P = 0.071) and have more fevers (P = 0.052). Recent advances in diagnostics allow for identification of a broad range of viral pathogens in infants. Compared to RSV, HRV was associated with longer hospital stays. Additional studies and improved, more specific testing, methods are needed to further define the effects of HRV infection in infants 1-90 days old. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Neurologic infections in a Nigerian university teaching hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neurologic infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality especially worldwide but much more in the African continent. The frequency of the different types of neurologic infections and their mortality in this part of Nigeria is not known. Objectives: To review cases admitted into the main tertiary ...

  6. Maternal Infection Requiring Hospitalization during Pregnancy and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atladottir, Hjordis O.; Thorsen, Poul; Ostergaard, Lars; Schendel, Diana E.; Lemcke, Sanne; Abdallah, Morsi; Parner, Erik T.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal infection has been suggested to cause deficiencies in fetal neurodevelopment. In this study we included all children born in Denmark from 1980, through 2005. Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and maternal infection were obtained through nationwide registers. Data was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards…

  7. Successful control of a hospital-wide outbreak of OXA-48 producing Enterobacteriaceae in the Netherlands, 2009 to 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dautzenberg, M. J.; Ossewaarde, J. M.; de Kraker, M. E.; van der Zee, A.; van Burgh, S.; de Greeff, S. C.; Bijlmer, H. A.; Grundmann, H.; Stuart, J. W. Cohen; Fluit, A. C.; Troelstra, A.; Bonten, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2011, after notification of Klebsiella pneumoniae(KP)(OXA-48);(CTX-M-15) in two patients, nosocomial transmission was suspected in a Dutch hospital. Hospital-wide infection control measures and an outbreak investigation were initiated. A total of 72,147 patients were categorised into

  8. [Prevalence and clinical characteristics of coronavirus NL63 infection in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infections in Changsha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Bing; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Gao, Han-Chun; Zhao, Xin; Zhong, Li-Li; Zhou, Qiong-Hua; Hou, Yun-De; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to explore the prevalence and clinical characteristics of human coronavirus NL63 infection in hospitalized children with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI) in Changsha. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) samples were collected from 1185 hospitalized children with ALRTI at the People's Hospital of Hunan province, between September 2008 and October 2010. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to screen for coronavirus NL63, which is a 255 bp fragment of a part of N gene. All positive amplification products were confirmed by sequencing and compared with those in GenBank. The overall frequency of coronavirus NL63 infection was 0.8%, 6 (60%) out of the coronavirus NL63 positive patients were detected in summer, 2 in autumn, 1 in spring and winter, respectively. The patients were from 2 months to two and a half years old. The clinical diagnosis was bronchopneumonia (60%), bronchiolitis (30%), and acute laryngotracheal bronchitis (10%). Four of the 10 cases had critical illness, 4 cases had underlying diseases, and 7 cases had mixed infection with other viruses. The homogeneity of coronavirus NL63 with those published in the GenBank at nucleotide levels was 97%-100%. Coronavirus NL63 infection exists in hospitalized children with acute lower respiratory tract infection in Changsha. Coronavirus NL63 infections are common in children under 3 years of age. There is significant difference in the infection rate between the boys and the girls: the boys had higher rate than the girls. The peak of prevalence of the coronavirus NL63 was in summer. A single genetic lineage of coronavirus NL63 was revealed in human subjects in Changsha. Coronavirus NL63 may also be one of the lower respiratory pathogen in China.

  9. Controlling Legal Risk for Effective Hospital Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jun Park

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the types of medical malpractice, medical errors, and medical disputes in a university hospital for the proposal of countermeasures that maximize the efficiency of hospital management, medical departments, and healthcare providers. Materials and Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed and analyzed 55 closed civil lawsuits among 64 medical lawsuit cases carried out in Pusan National University Hospital from January 2000 to April 2013 using medical records, petitions, briefs, and data from the Medical Dispute Mediation Committee. Results: Of 55 civil lawsuits, men were the main plaintiffs in 31 cases (56.4%. The average period from medical malpractice to malpractice proceeding was 16.5 months (range, 1 month to 6.4 years, and the average period from malpractice proceeding to the disposition of a lawsuit was 21.7 months (range, 1 month to 4 years and 11 months. Conclusions: Hospitals can effectively manage their legal risks by implementing a systematic medical system, eliminating risk factors in administrative service, educating all hospital employees on preventative strategies, and improving customer service. Furthermore, efforts should be made to establish standard coping strategies to manage medical disputes and malpractice lawsuits, operate alternative dispute resolution methods including the Medical Dispute Mediation Committee, create a compliance support center, deploy a specialized workforce including improved legal services for employees, and specialize the management-level tasks of the hospital.

  10. Spatial Distribution of Infection Risk of SARS Transmission in a Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    The classical Wells-Riley model for predicting risk of airborne transmission of diseases assumes a uniform spatial distribution of the infected cases in an enclosed space. A new mathematical model is developed here for predicting the spatial distribution of infection risk of airborne transmitted ......, such as inpatients in a hospital ward, passengers in an airplane etc....

  11. [Outbreak of hospital acquired Legionnaires' disease in patients of ophthalmic ward. Nosocomial Legionella infections for the first time observed in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Pancer, Katarzyna; Krogulska, Bozena; Matuszewska, Renata

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to describe the criteria used for identification of first and so far the only one outbreak of hospital bacterial infections due to L. pneumophila. The infected persons were patients hospitalized at ophthalmic ward for more than 10 days. Four patients were found ill among 27 hospitalized (15%) at ophthalmic ward and 3 of them died (75%) in spite treatment in intensive care unit. The source of infection was found in the hospital hot water system. It was shown that L. pneumophila sg 1 and sg 2-14 were settled in the tanks and pipelines of hot water installations. The high number of L. pneumophila sg I and sg 2-14 colony forming units (> 10 000 cfu /100 ml) were found in the water specimens taken from the hospital water system, showing the high risk of Legionella infection for patients. Cleaning and disinfection of hot water system was repeated three times using composition every time modified as stronger mechanical, thermal and chemical methods. Complete elimination of Legionella from hot water system was achieved after cutting off deadlegs of water and replacement of both old hot water reservoirs with new ones. Collected experience served for preparation of guidelines for control and prevention of Legionella infections in hospital buildings, published on National Institute of Hygiene web site A month later Polish Ministry of Health published the Directives concerning the quality of drinking water to which the control of Legionella infection has been included.

  12. The Practice of Hospital Intranet Terminal Access Control Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Shi-tao; TANG Li-ming

    2016-01-01

    Along with the increasingly urgent management needs of intranet terminals in hospital, and large scaled deployment of terminal management system, terminal access control has become one of the standard functions of terminal management. This paper mainly aims at some simple research for the system construction of hospital intranet terminal access control.

  13. Unique factors rural Veterans' Affairs hospitals face when implementing health care-associated infection prevention initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrod, Molly; Manojlovich, Milisa; Kowalski, Christine P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Health care-associated infection (HAI) is costly to hospitals and potentially life-threatening to patients. Numerous infection prevention programs have been implemented in hospitals across the United States. Yet, little is known about infection prevention practices and implementation in rural hospitals. The purpose of this study was to understand the infection prevention practices used by rural Veterans' Affairs (VA) hospitals and the unique factors they face in implementing these practices. This study used a sequential, mixed methods approach. Survey data to identify the HAI prevention practices used by rural VA hospitals were collected, analyzed, and used to inform the development of a semistructured interview guide. Phone interviews were conducted followed by site visits to rural VA hospitals. We found that most rural VA hospitals were using key recommended infection prevention practices. Nonetheless, a number of challenges with practice implementation were identified. The 3 most prominent themes were: (1) lack of human capital including staff with HAI expertise; (2) having to cultivate needed resources; and (3) operating as a system within a system. Rural VA hospitals are providing key infection prevention services to ensure a safe environment for the veterans they serve. However, certain factors, such as staff expertise, limited resources, and local context impacted how and when these practices were used. The creative use of more accessible alternative resources as well as greater flexibility in implementing HAI-related initiatives may be important strategies to further improve delivery of these important services by rural VA hospitals. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Comparing between results and complications of doing voiding cystourethrogram in the first week following urinary tract infection and in 2-6 weeks after urinary tract infection in children referring to a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Shahsavari, Someyeh; Pakniyat, Abdolghader

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common genitourinary disease in children so about 40% of the children with urinary tract infection suffering from reflux that caused some consequences such as pyelonephritis and kidney parenchymal injury. This research was conducted to compare the timing of voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) in children with urinary tract infection in first week and after the first week of urinary tract infection. This research is a case-control study that both case and control groups include 208 children from 1 month to 12 years old with the complain of urinary tract infection. In case group, the VCUG was performed at the first week of infection and in control group, the VCUG was performed after the first week of infection. complication such as dysuria was observed in two-thirds of children who VCUG was performed during first week after urinary tract infection. Parents stress in case group was more than the other (P=0.015). For overall, the incidence of reflux in case and control groups was 49.5% and 50%, respectively. The mean of reflux grading in right kidney in case group was lower than control group resulting in significant differences between two groups. According to higher grade of stress in parents and complications due to VCUG at the first week of urinary tract infection, it is suggested that VCUG be conducted on selective patients in the hospital at the first week of urinary tract infection and during hospitalization.

  15. Cleaning Hospital Room Surfaces to Prevent Health Care-Associated Infections: A Technical Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer H; Sullivan, Nancy; Leas, Brian F; Pegues, David A; Kaczmarek, Janice L; Umscheid, Craig A

    2015-10-20

    The cleaning of hard surfaces in hospital rooms is critical for reducing health care-associated infections. This review describes the evidence examining current methods of cleaning, disinfecting, and monitoring cleanliness of patient rooms, as well as contextual factors that may affect implementation and effectiveness. Key informants were interviewed, and a systematic search for publications since 1990 was done with the use of several bibliographic and gray literature resources. Studies examining surface contamination, colonization, or infection with Clostridium difficile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or vancomycin-resistant enterococci were included. Eighty studies were identified-76 primary studies and 4 systematic reviews. Forty-nine studies examined cleaning methods, 14 evaluated monitoring strategies, and 17 addressed challenges or facilitators to implementation. Only 5 studies were randomized, controlled trials, and surface contamination was the most commonly assessed outcome. Comparative effectiveness studies of disinfecting methods and monitoring strategies were uncommon. Future research should evaluate and compare newly emerging strategies, such as self-disinfecting coatings for disinfecting and adenosine triphosphate and ultraviolet/fluorescent surface markers for monitoring. Studies should also assess patient-centered outcomes, such as infection, when possible. Other challenges include identifying high-touch surfaces that confer the greatest risk for pathogen transmission; developing standard thresholds for defining cleanliness; and using methods to adjust for confounders, such as hand hygiene, when examining the effect of disinfecting methods.

  16. Estimating the Direct Medical Economic Burden of Health Care-Associated Infections in Public Tertiary Hospitals in Hubei Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Xinliang; Cui, Dan; Wang, Quan; Mao, Zongfu; Fang, Liang; Zhang, Furong; Yang, Ping; Wu, Huiling; Ren, Nili; He, Jianyun; Sun, Jing

    2017-07-01

    This study estimated the attributable direct medical economic burden of health care-associated infections (HAIs) in China. Data were extracted from hospitals' information systems. Inpatient cases with HAIs and non-HAIs were grouped by the propensity score matching (PSM) method. Attributable hospitalization expenditures and length of hospital stay were measured to estimate the direct medical economic burden of HAIs. STATA 12.0 was used to conduct descriptive analysis, bivariate χ 2 test, paired Z test, PSM ( r = 0.25σ, nearest neighbor 1:1 matching), and logistic regress analysis. The statistically significant level was set at .05. The HAIs group had statistically significant higher expenditures and longer hospitalization stay than the non-HAIs group during 2013 to 2015 ( P economic burden of HAIs calls for more effective HAI surveillance and better control with appropriate incentives.

  17. Multi-state survey of healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortaleza, C Magno Castelo Branco; Padoveze, M C; Kiffer, C R Veiga; Barth, A L; Carneiro, Irna C do Rosário Souza; Giamberardino, H I Garcia; Rodrigues, J L Nobre; Santos Filho, L; de Mello, M J Gonçalves; Pereira, M Severino; Gontijo Filho, P Pinto; Rocha, M; Servolo de Medeiros, E A; Pignatari, A C Campos

    2017-06-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) challenge public health in developing countries such as Brazil, which harbour social inequalities and variations in the complexity of healthcare and regional development. To describe the prevalence of HCAIs in hospitals in a sample of hospitals in Brazil. A prevalence survey conducted in 2011-13 enrolled 152 hospitals from the five macro-regions in Brazil. Hospitals were classified as large (≥200 beds), medium (50-199 beds) or small sized (48 h of admission to the study hospitals at the time of the survey were included. Trained epidemiologist nurses visited each hospital and collected data on HCAIs, subjects' demographics, and invasive procedures. Univariate and multivariate techniques were used for data analysis. The overall HCAI prevalence was 10.8%. Most frequent infection sites were pneumonia (3.6%) and bloodstream infections (2.8%). Surgical site infections were found in 1.5% of the whole sample, but in 9.8% of subjects who underwent surgical procedures. The overall prevalence was greater for reference (12.6%) and large hospitals (13.5%), whereas medium- and small-sized hospitals presented rates of 7.7% and 5.5%, respectively. Only minor differences were noticed among hospitals from different macro-regions. Patients in intensive care units, using invasive devices or at extremes of age were at greater risk for HCAIs. Prevalence rates were high in all geographic regions and hospital sizes. HCAIs must be a priority in the public health agenda of developing countries. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Healthcare-associated infection in Burkina Faso: an assessment in a district hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Hien; Koiné Maxime Darbo; Laurent Ouédraogo; Salifou Konfé; Sylvain Zeba; Lassana Sangaré; Sidzabda C. Compaoré; Jean Bosco Ouédraogo; Edgard M. Ouendo; Michel Makoutodé; Nicolas Meda

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, few data are available on healthcare-associated infections. In Burkina Faso, there has been a failure to take into account risk management and patient safety in the quality assurance program. The main objective of our study was to carry out an assessment of healthcare-associated infection in a first level hospital. We conducted a crosssectional study in June 2011 in the care units of Ziniaré District Hospital (Ziniaré, Burkina Faso). The hospital has been divided in t...

  19. Predicting hospital-acquired infections by scoring system with simple parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Jui Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital-acquired infections (HAI are associated with increased attributable morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospitalization, and economic costs. A simple, reliable prediction model for HAI has great clinical relevance. The objective of this study is to develop a scoring system to predict HAI that was derived from Logistic Regression (LR and validated by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN simultaneously. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 476 patients from all the 806 HAI inpatients were included for the study between 2004 and 2005. A sample of 1,376 non-HAI inpatients was randomly drawn from all the admitted patients in the same period of time as the control group. External validation of 2,500 patients was abstracted from another academic teaching center. Sixteen variables were extracted from the Electronic Health Records (EHR and fed into ANN and LR models. With stepwise selection, the following seven variables were identified by LR models as statistically significant: Foley catheterization, central venous catheterization, arterial line, nasogastric tube, hemodialysis, stress ulcer prophylaxes and systemic glucocorticosteroids. Both ANN and LR models displayed excellent discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]: 0.964 versus 0.969, p = 0.507 to identify infection in internal validation. During external validation, high AUC was obtained from both models (AUC: 0.850 versus 0.870, p = 0.447. The scoring system also performed extremely well in the internal (AUC: 0.965 and external (AUC: 0.871 validations. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a scoring system to predict HAI with simple parameters validated with ANN and LR models. Armed with this scoring system, infectious disease specialists can more efficiently identify patients at high risk for HAI during hospitalization. Further, using parameters either by observation of medical devices used or data obtained from EHR also provided good prediction

  20. Infection control education: how to make an impact--tools for the job.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Mark

    2007-06-01

    Infection control education is difficult and time consuming, but there is persuasive evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness. When Infection Control practitioners are educating and influencing healthcare workers, compliance with the well-established guidance on implementation of health service research is advisable, and thus educative efforts must be repeated and administered as part of a concerted and multifaceted approach. Infection Control education must be specifically designed for and targeted at the groups of staff concerned, and medical staff pose especial problems. Recruitment of clinical champions from peer groups, and direct approaches from medical members of the Infection Control team are usually needed. Familiarity with only a limited range of published evidence is needed to answer the majority of clinicians who challenge Infection Control practices, and referral to higher medical and managerial authority is required very infrequently and as a last resort. Some recent initiatives in the NHS in England may make Infection Control education more difficult, and these are reviewed. New sanctions have been made available to hospitals and Infection control teams in the UK with the passing of the Health Act in 2006, and the effects of these allied to educative interventions on benchmarks such as hospitals' MRSA bacteraemia rates will be observed with interest.

  1. Intelligent energy efficiency control in hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nykaenen, E., Email: esa.nykanen@vtt.fi

    2012-06-15

    The concern of European society for the well-being of its residents and the sustainability of the environment has led to the consciousness that energy savings need to be at the top of the political agenda. Until recently, the focus of energy reduction has been on schools and offices. Hospitals, however, also use large amounts of energy. Therefore, the project will address specifically the hospital domain. HosPilot will address the two main technology areas Lighting and HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning), thus covering the largest part of the energy-consuming areas. By adding intelligence, ICT (Information and Communication Technology) will play a vital role to achieve significant energy reduction in the complex environment of a hospital. (orig.)

  2. Guide: Monitoring Programme for unannounced inspections undertaken against the National Standards for the Prevention and Control of Healthcare Associated Infections

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This is a guide to the Health Information and Quality Authority?s (the Authority) programme of monitoring service providers? compliance with the National Standards for the Prevention and Control of Healthcare Associated Infections (referred to in this guide as the Infection, Prevention and Control Standards). This guide explains the approach that the Authority takes when monitoring the compliance of service providers ? including hospitals ? with the Infection, Prevention and Control Standards...

  3. Avaliação das práticas de prevenção e controle de infecção da corrente sanguínea em um hospital governamental Evaluación de las prácticas de prevención y control de infección de la corriente sanguínea en un hospital estatal Evaluation of practices for the prevention and control of bloodstream infections in a government hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaquelline Maria Jardim

    2013-02-01

    el cuidado y mantenimiento de la CVC seleccionado. Los resultados demuestran la necesidad de una mayor elaboración de estrategias que aseguren el cumplimiento de las prácticas sostenibles de prevención y control ITS-ACVC en la institución que se evalúa, la mayor parte de las prácticas.The aim of this study was to observe clinical procedures in order to evaluate the practices used for the control and prevention of bloodstream infections associated with short-term central venous catheters (BSI-ACVC. The study data came from 5877 assessments distributed among selected practices. The results revealed the following adherence rates among the practices selected: 91.6% for recording the indication and permanence time of the CVC, 51.5% for adhering to the care and maintenance of the dressing at the CVC insertion site and its devices, 10.7% for hand hygiene practices while performing procedures related to the CVC, and 0.0% for the practices related to the insertion of the central venous catheter (CVC. The results demonstrate the need for further elaboration of strategies that ensure sustainable compliance practices for prevention and control BSI-ACVC in the institution being assessed.

  4. Automated surveillance system for hospital-acquired urinary tract infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Condell, Orla; Gubbels, Sophie; Nielsen, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Danish Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA) is an automated surveillance system using hospital administrative, microbiological, and antibiotic medication data. AIM: To define and evaluate the case definition for hospital-acquired urinary tract infection (HA-UTI) and to de......BACKGROUND: The Danish Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA) is an automated surveillance system using hospital administrative, microbiological, and antibiotic medication data. AIM: To define and evaluate the case definition for hospital-acquired urinary tract infection (HA-UTI......) and to describe surveillance data from 2010 to 2014. METHODS: The HA-UTI algorithm defined a laboratory-diagnosed UTI as a urine culture positive for no more than two micro-organisms with at least one at ≥10(4)cfu/mL, and a probable UTI as a negative urine culture and a relevant diagnosis code or antibiotic...... treatment. UTI was considered hospital-acquired if a urine sample was collected ≥48h after admission and UTI was calculated per 10,000 risk-days. For validation, prevalence was calculated for each day and compared to point prevalence survey (PPS) data. FINDINGS: HAIBA...

  5. Vital Signs: Preventing Antibiotic-Resistant Infections in Hospitals - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Lindsey M; Fridkin, Scott K; Aponte-Torres, Zuleika; Avery, Lacey; Coffin, Nicole; Dudeck, Margaret A; Edwards, Jonathan R; Jernigan, John A; Konnor, Rebecca; Soe, Minn M; Peterson, Kelly; McDonald, L Clifford

    2016-03-11

    Health care-associated antibiotic-resistant (AR) infections increase patient morbidity and mortality and might be impossible to successfully treat with any antibiotic. CDC assessed health care-associated infections (HAI), including Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and the role of six AR bacteria of highest concern nationwide in several types of health care facilities. During 2014, approximately 4,000 short-term acute care hospitals, 501 long-term acute care hospitals, and 1,135 inpatient rehabilitation facilities in all 50 states reported data on specific infections to the National Healthcare Safety Network. National standardized infection ratios and their percentage reduction from a baseline year for each HAI type, by facility type, were calculated. The proportions of AR pathogens and HAIs caused by any of six resistant bacteria highlighted by CDC in 2013 as urgent or serious threats were determined. In 2014, the reductions in incidence in short-term acute care hospitals and long-term acute care hospitals were 50% and 9%, respectively, for central line-associated bloodstream infection; 0% (short-term acute care hospitals), 11% (long-term acute care hospitals), and 14% (inpatient rehabilitation facilities) for catheter-associated urinary tract infection; 17% (short-term acute care hospitals) for surgical site infection, and 8% (short-term acute care hospitals) for CDI. Combining HAIs other than CDI across all settings, 47.9% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methicillin resistant, 29.5% of enterococci were vancomycin-resistant, 17.8% of Enterobacteriaceae were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype, 3.6% of Enterobacteriaceae were carbapenem resistant, 15.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant, and 52.6% of Acinetobacter species were multidrug resistant. The likelihood of HAIs caused by any of the six resistant bacteria ranged from 12% in inpatient rehabilitation facilities to 29% in long-term acute care hospitals. Although

  6. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection in Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmajaya, R.

    2018-03-01

    Installation of ventriculoperitoneal shunts (VP) represented a substantial progress in the neurosurgical management of hydrocephalus in children. However, infection is the most commonpostoperative complication of aventriculoperitoneal shunt. It is important because it is related to substantial morbidity and mortality, and exerts a negative impact on the quality of life of patients. We retrospectively analyzed all 20 cases of shunt infection from 2013 to 2016. The types of infections found were exposed shunts15 cases (75%), and 5 cases of ventriculitis (25%). Length of infection time which calculated from the beginning of surgery was 350.20 days or 11 months. The most common pathogen types are S. epidermidis followed by P. aeruginosa, E. coli, and A. baumanii. There were many risk factors for shunt infection, but the interesting fact was the level of pre-operative albumin. There was a significant difference between low albumin levels (<3.0) and normal albumin (≥3.0) levels against the risk of exposure shunt, p = 0.015. It means there is asignificant difference between low pre-operative albumin and normal level for the risk of theexposed shunt.

  7. Preparation and control of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1979-01-01

    This guidebook covers the work commonly organized as part of the work in the hospital. It does not cover the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals on an industrial scale. The work is characterized by the small scale on which manufacture and preparation of radiopharmaceuticals take place

  8. [Survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus control measures in hospitals participating in the VINCat program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena-Galindo, Nieves; Hornero-Lopez, Anna; Freixas-Sala, Núria; Bella-Cueto, Feliu; Pérez-Jové, Josefa; Limon-Cáceres, Enric; Gudiol-Munté, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    VINCat is a nosocomial infection surveillance program in hospitals in Catalonia. The aim of the study was to determine the surveillance and control measures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in these centres. An e-mail survey was carried out from January to March 2013 with questions related to the characteristics of the hospitals and their control measures for MRSA. A response was received from 53 hospitals (>500 beds: 7; 200-500 beds: 14;prevent MRSA in hospitals participating in the VINCat program. Most of the centres have an MRSA protocol, however compliance with it should be improved, especially in areas such as active detection on admission in patients at risk, hand hygiene adherence, cleaning frequency and optimising the use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of staff infection control training on infection-related quality measures in US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasjit; Stone, Patricia W; Travers, Jasmine L; Cohen, Catherine C; Herzig, Carolyn T A

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in US nursing home residents. Ongoing training of nursing home staff is vital to the implementation of infection prevention and control processes. Our aim was to describe associations between methods, frequency, and timing of staff infection prevention and control training and infection-related quality measures. In this national survey of nursing homes, timing of staff infection prevention and control training was associated with reduced indwelling urinary catheter use. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Infection control challenges in deployed US military treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Crouch, Helen K

    2009-04-01

    Personnel sustaining combat-related injuries in current overseas conflicts continue to have their care complicated by infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms, including Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, and Pseudomonas. Although presumed to be due to multiple factors both within and outside of the combat theater, concern has been raised about the difficulties in establishing and maintaining standard infection control (IC) practices in deployed medical treatment facilities and in the evacuation of the injured back to the United States. Level III facilities (hospitals capable of holding patients >72 hours) in Iraq and Afghanistan and the evacuation system from Iraq to the continental US were reviewed by an expert IC-infectious disease team. All reviewed facilities had established IC programs, but these were staffed by personnel with limited IC experience, often without perceived adequate time dedicated to perform their duties, and without uniform levels of command emphasis or support. Proper hand hygiene between patients was not always ideal. Isolation and cohorting of patients to decrease multidrug-resistant organism colonization and infection varied among facilities. Review of standard operating procedures found variability among institutions and in quality of these documents. Application of US national and theater-specific guidelines and of antimicrobial control measures also varied among facilities. Effective IC practices are often difficult to maintain in modern US hospitals. In the deployed setting, with ever-changing personnel in a less than optimal practice environment, IC is even more challenging. Standardization of practice with emphasis on the basics of IC practice (e.g., hand hygiene and isolation procedures) needs to be emplaced and maintained in the deployed setting.

  11. Contributing risk factors for orthopedic device related infections in sina hospital, tehran, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, A; Zehtab, M J; Babagolzadeh, H; Ashraf, H

    2011-02-01

    In spite of decreasing incidence of orthopedic device-related infections to 1%, nowadays, device-related infection still remains a diagnostic, therapeutic and cost-related problem. The objective of this study is to evaluate the contributing risk factors for orthopedic device-related infections in Sina Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Three hundred and thirty patients who underwent orthopedic device implantation from 2002-2006 were enrolled; among them, 110 patients were complicated with infection. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for device related infections. Patients with infection were older compared to those without infection. The Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest organism. A correlation was observed between wound infection and external fixation, an underlying health condition, and addiction which were independent risk factors for a device related infection. Orthopedic device-related infection puts a great financial burden on patients and hospital resources and could lead to morbidity and mortality in patients. So, appropriate pre and postoperative wound care for dirty wounds, especially when external fixators are used, and in patients with poor conditions or addiction should be done with more caution.

  12. Infection after open heart surgery in Golestan teaching hospital of Ahvaz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashibi, Roohangiz; Mohammadi, Mohammad Javad; Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Yousefi, Farid; Salmanzadeh, Shokrolah; Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Varnaseri, Mehran; Ramazani, Asghar; Moogahi, Sasan

    2018-02-01

    The present study surveyed demographic and infection data which were obtained after open heart surgery (OHS) through patient's admission in Golestan teaching hospital, Ahvaz metropolitan city of Iran, taking into account the confirmed location of the infection, microorganism and antibiotic susceptibility. The occurrence of infection among patients during 48 to 72 h after surgery and hospital admission is the definition of Nosocomial infections (NIs) (Salmanzadeh et al., 2015) [1]. All of them after OHS were chosen for this study. In this paper, type of catheter, fever, type of microorganism, antibiotic susceptibility, location of the infection and outcome (live or death) were studied (Juhl et al., 2017; Salsano et al., 2017) [2], [3]. After the completion of the observations and recording patients' medical records, the coded data were fed into EXCELL. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 16.

  13. The Role of Rotavirus Infection Requiring Treatment in a Hospital in Children with Diarrheal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.Yu. Stepanova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the prognostic and diagnostic value of some clinical and biological factors in the development of acute intestinal rotavirus infection in children. We observed 161 children aged 1 month to 6 years. 81 children were diagnosed with rotavirus infection, and 80 — with secretory diarrhea of unknown origin. Treatment of children was carried out in a hospital. Analysis of clinical and anamnestic data enabled to choose the most prognostically and diagnostically important predictors out of 117 studied risk factors. The authors investigated the association of clinical and biological factors with the severity of rotavirus infection, which would highlight the groups of children with high risk of rotavirus infection, which requires treatment in a hospital. The practical application of the results of this work should be the optimization of early diagnostics of rotavirus infections and timeliness of preventive measures.

  14. Estimating potential infection transmission routes in hospital wards using wearable proximity sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Vanhems

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contacts between patients, patients and health care workers (HCWs and among HCWs represent one of the important routes of transmission of hospital-acquired infections (HAI. A detailed description and quantification of contacts in hospitals provides key information for HAIs epidemiology and for the design and validation of control measures. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used wearable sensors to detect close-range interactions ("contacts" between individuals in the geriatric unit of a university hospital. Contact events were measured with a spatial resolution of about 1.5 meters and a temporal resolution of 20 seconds. The study included 46 HCWs and 29 patients and lasted for 4 days and 4 nights. 14,037 contacts were recorded overall, 94.1% of which during daytime. The number and duration of contacts varied between mornings, afternoons and nights, and contact matrices describing the mixing patterns between HCW and patients were built for each time period. Contact patterns were qualitatively similar from one day to the next. 38% of the contacts occurred between pairs of HCWs and 6 HCWs accounted for 42% of all the contacts including at least one patient, suggesting a population of individuals who could potentially act as super-spreaders. CONCLUSIONS: Wearable sensors represent a novel tool for the measurement of contact patterns in hospitals. The collected data can provide information on important aspects that impact the spreading patterns of infectious diseases, such as the strong heterogeneity of contact numbers and durations across individuals, the variability in the number of contacts during a day, and the fraction of repeated contacts across days. This variability is however associated with a marked statistical stability of contact and mixing patterns across days. Our results highlight the need for such measurement efforts in order to correctly inform mathematical models of HAIs and use them to inform the design and evaluation of

  15. Prevalence, features and risk factors for malaria co-infections amongst visceral leishmaniasis patients from Amudat Hospital, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika van den Bogaart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY: Due to geographic overlap of malaria and visceral leishmaniasis (VL, co-infections may exist but have been poorly investigated. To describe prevalence, features and risk factors for VL-malaria co-infections, a case-control analysis was conducted on data collected at Amudat Hospital, Uganda (2000-2006 by Médecins sans Frontières. Cases were identified as patients with laboratory-confirmed VL and malaria at hospital admission or during hospitalization; controls were VL patients with negative malaria smears. A logistic regression analysis was performed to study the association between patients' characteristics and the occurrence of the co-infection. RESULTS: Of 2414 patients with confirmed VL, 450 (19% were positively diagnosed with concomitant malaria. Most co-infected patients were males, residing in Kenya (69%. While young age was identified by multivariate analysis as a risk factor for concurrent VL and malaria, particularly the age groups 0-4 (odds ratio (OR: 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.52-3.92 and 5-9 years (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.45-3-45, mild (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88 and moderate (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.27-0.77 anemia negatively correlated with the co-morbidity. VL patients harboring skin infections were nearly three times less likely to have the co-infection (OR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17-0.72, as highlighted by the multivariate model. Anorexia was slightly more frequent among co-infected patients (OR: 1.71; 95% CI: 0.96-3.03. The in-hospital case-fatality rate did not significantly differ between cases and controls, being 2.7% and 3.1% respectively (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.46-1.63. CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent malaria represents a common condition among young VL patients living in the Pokot region of Kenya and Uganda. Although these co-morbidities did not result in a poorer prognosis, possibly due to early detection of malaria, a positive trend towards more severe symptoms was identified, indicating that routine

  16. Prevalence of infection in patients with temporary catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiane de Rezende Ramim Borges

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of infection related to the provisional catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital and evaluate the risk factors associated with these infections.  A cross-sectional study analyzed by descriptive statistics and parametric tests. It was found that out of 129 patients, 48.8 % had catheter-related infection in hemodialysis, 65 % were male, 33.3 % were 60 years old and over, and 88 % of patients were admitted to intensive care unit. The prevalence of infection in this group was high, and the vast majority of diagnoses of infection were empirical. Given this, it is suggested to establish the routine culture of the catheter tip in all cases of suspected catheter infection to improve the quality of patient care, and the relentless pursuit of the causes that trigger the infection process in line with good practice from across the healthcare team.

  17. Burkholderia cepacia infection at A university Teaching Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty five isolates of B. cepacia, representing 1.4% of all isolates, were obtained at the Microbiology Laboratory of a University Teaching Hospital in Lagos between January 1996 and December 1997. Identification of isolates was done using analytical profile index systems (Biomerieux, France) and sensitivity testing was ...

  18. Urinary tract infections at aga Khan University hospital nairobi - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-11

    Jun 11, 2013 ... (Uti) are normally treated empirically and urine culture is usual ordered for as a last ... symptomatic Uti in patients at aga Khan University hospital by looking at the trends of Uti ... in the context of pyelonephritis in pregnancy(9).

  19. HIV Infection in hospitalized under-5 children with acute watery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-31

    Dec 31, 2011 ... HIV with acute watery diarrhea as a clinical manifesta- tion.5,6,9,10 This study therefore attempts to find out the prevalence of HIV among children admitted into the. Diarrhoea Treatment and Training Unit of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria. This study will help in identifying ...

  20. Care of HIV-infected adults at Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and associated costs, in order to inform clinical practice, health service ... Setting. The outpatient department of a public sector, academic hospital in Soweto, South Africa. Design. ... primary care leveL The average cost per consultation was. R112.03. ... HIV-related illness, care strategies and costs of HIVlAJDS care is ...

  1. Impact of participation in the California Healthcare-Associated Infection Prevention Initiative on adoption and implementation of evidence-based practices for patient safety and health care-associated infection rates in a cohort of acute care general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Helen Ann; McMenamin, Sara B; Simon, Lisa Payne; Jacobsen, Diane; Vanneman, Megan; Shortell, Stephen; Milstein, Arnold

    2013-04-01

    In 2008, hospitals were selected to participate in the California Healthcare-Associated Infection Prevention Initiative (CHAIPI). This research evaluates the impact of CHAIPI on hospital adoption and implementation of evidence-based patient safety practices and reduction of health care-associated infection (HAI) rates. Statewide computer-assisted telephone surveys of California's general acute care hospitals were conducted in 2008 and 2010 (response rates, 80% and 76%, respectively). Difference-in-difference analyses were used to compare changes in process and HAI rate outcomes in CHAIPI hospitals (n = 34) and non-CHAIPI hospitals (n = 149) that responded to both waves of the survey. Compared with non-CHAIPI hospitals, CHAIPI hospitals demonstrated greater improvements between 2008 and 2010 in adoption (P = .021) and implementation (P = .012) of written evidence-based practices for overall patient safety and prevention of HAIs and in assessing their compliance (P = .033) with these practices. However, there were no significant differences in the changes in HAI rates between CHAIPI and non-CHAIPI hospitals over this time period. Participation in the CHAIPI collaborative was associated with significant improvements in evidence-based patient safety practices in hospitals. However, determining how evidence-based practices translate into changes in HAI rates may take more time. Our results suggest that all hospitals be offered the opportunity to participate in an active learning collaborative to improve patient safety. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a known opportunistic pathogen frequently causing serious infections. It exhibits innate resistance to a wide range of antibiotics thus causing high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Objective: This study was done to determine the distribution and the antibiotic susceptibility ...

  3. Plasmodium malariae Infection Associated with a High Burden of Anemia: A Hospital-Based Surveillance Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Langford

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium malariae is a slow-growing parasite with a wide geographic distribution. Although generally regarded as a benign cause of malaria, it has been associated with nephrotic syndrome, particularly in young children, and can persist in the host for years. Morbidity associated with P. malariae infection has received relatively little attention, and the risk of P. malariae-associated nephrotic syndrome is unknown.We used data from a very large hospital-based surveillance system incorporating information on clinical diagnoses, blood cell parameters and treatment to describe the demographic distribution, morbidity and mortality associated with P. malariae infection in southern Papua, Indonesia. Between April 2004 and December 2013 there were 1,054,674 patient presentations to Mitra Masyarakat Hospital of which 196,380 (18.6% were associated with malaria and 5,097 were with P. malariae infection (constituting 2.6% of all malaria cases. The proportion of malaria cases attributable to P. malariae increased with age from 0.9% for patients under one year old to 3.1% for patients older than 15 years. Overall, 8.5% of patients with P. malariae infection required admission to hospital and the median length of stay for these patients was 2.5 days (Interquartile Range: 2.0-4.0 days. Patients with P. malariae infection had a lower mean hemoglobin concentration (9.0 g/dL than patients with P. falciparum (9.5 g/dL, P. vivax (9.6g/dL and mixed species infections (9.3g/dL. There were four cases of nephrotic syndrome recorded in patients with P. malariae infection, three of which were in children younger than 5 years old, giving a risk in this age group of 0.47% (95% Confidence Interval; 0.10% to 1.4%. Overall, 2.4% (n = 16 of patients hospitalized with P. malariae infection subsequently died in hospital, similar to the proportions for the other endemic Plasmodium species (range: 0% for P. ovale to 1.6% for P. falciparum.Plasmodium malariae infection is

  4. A tool to assess knowledge, attitude and behavior of Indonesian health care workers regarding infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerink, D O; Hadi, U; Lestari, E S; Roeshadi, Djoko; Wahyono, Hendro; Nagelkerke, N J D; Van der Meulen, R G; Van den Broek, P J

    2013-07-01

    to investigate knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire and to evaluate the use of the questionnaire as a tool. we investigated knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire to identify problem areas, barriers and facilitators. The target was to include at least 50% of all health care workers (physicians, nurses, assistant nurses and infection control nurses) in each hospital, department and profession. Differences between demographic variables and scores for individual questions and groups of questions were compared using the chi-square statistic and analysis of variance and Spearman's rho was used to test for correlations between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. more than half of the health care workers of the participating departments completed the questionnaire. Of the 1036 respondents (44% nurses, 37% physicians and 19% assistant nurses), 34% were vaccinated against hepatitis B, 77% had experienced needle stick accidents and 93% had been instructed about infection control. The mean of the correct answers to the knowledge questions was 44%; of the answers to the attitude questions 67% were in agreement with the correct attitude; obstacles to compliance with infection control guidelines were perceived in 30% of the questions and the mean self-reported compliance was 63%. Safe handling of sharps, hand hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment were identified as the most important aspects for interventions. Significant positive correlations were found between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. the questionnaire in conjunction with site visits and interviews was a valuable strategy to identify trouble spots in the hospitals and to determine barriers to facilitators of change that should be taken into

  5. Effect of effort-reward imbalance and burnout on infection control among Ecuadorian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colindres, C V; Bryce, E; Coral-Rosero, P; Ramos-Soto, R M; Bonilla, F; Yassi, A

    2018-06-01

    Nurses are frequently exposed to transmissible infections, yet adherence to infection control measures is suboptimal. There has been inadequate research into how the psychosocial work environment affects compliance with infection control measures, especially in low- and middle-income countries. To examine the association between effort-reward imbalance, burnout and adherence to infection control measures among nurses in Ecuador. A cross-sectional study linking psychosocial work environment indicators to infection control adherence. The study was conducted among 333 nurses in four Ecuadorian hospitals. Self-administered questionnaires assessed demographic variables, perceived infection risk, effort-reward imbalance, burnout and infection control adherence. Increased effort-reward imbalance was found to be a unique incremental predictor of exposure to burnout, and burnout was a negative unique incremental predictor of nurses' self-reported adherence with infection control measures. Results suggest an effort-reward imbalance-burnout continuum, which, at higher levels, contributes to reduce adherence to infection control. The Ecuadorean government has made large efforts to improve universal access to health care, yet this study suggests that workplace demands on nurses remain problematic. This study highlights the contribution of effort-reward-imbalance-burnout continuum to the chain of infection by decreased adherence to infection control of nurses. Health authorities should closely monitor the effect of new policies on psychosocial work environment, especially when expanding services and increasing public accessibility with limited resources. Additionally, organizational and psychosocial interventions targeting effort-reward imbalance and burnout in nurses should be considered part of a complete infection prevention and control strategy. Further study is warranted to identify interventions that best ameliorate effort-reward imbalance and burnout in low- and middle

  6. Impact of respiratory infection in the results of cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Newton Guimarães Andrade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To assess the impact of respiratory tract infection in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to mortality and to identify patients at higher risk of developing this complication.Methods:Cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Recovery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, using information from a database consisting of a total of 900 patients operated on in this hospital during the period from 01/07/2008 to 1/07/2009. We included patients whose medical records contained all the information required and undergoing elective surgery, totaling 109 patients with two excluded. Patients were divided into two groups, WITH and WITHOUT respiratory tract infection, as the development or respiratory tract infection in hospital, with patients in the group without respiratory tract infection, the result of randomization, using for the pairing of the groups the type of surgery performed. The outcome variables assessed were mortality, length of hospital stay and length of stay in intensive care unit. The means of quantitative variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and student t-test.Results:The groups were similar (average age P=0.17; sex P=0.94; surgery performed P=0.85-1.00 Mortality in the WITH respiratory tract infection group was significantly higher (P<0.0001. The times of hospitalization and intensive care unit were significantly higher in respiratory tract infection (P<0.0001. The presence of respiratory tract infection was associated with the development of other complications such as renal failure dialysis and stroke P<0.00001 and P=0.002 respectively.Conclusion:The development of respiratory tract infection postoperative cardiac surgery is related to higher mortality, longer periods of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay.

  7. Impact of respiratory infection in the results of cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Isaac Newton Guimarães; de Araújo, Diego Torres Aladin; de Moraes, Fernando Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of respiratory tract infection in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery in relation to mortality and to identify patients at higher risk of developing this complication. Methods Cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Recovery of Cardiothoracic Surgery, using information from a database consisting of a total of 900 patients operated on in this hospital during the period from 01/07/2008 to 1/07/2009. We included patients whose medical records contained all the information required and undergoing elective surgery, totaling 109 patients with two excluded. Patients were divided into two groups, WITH and WITHOUT respiratory tract infection, as the development or respiratory tract infection in hospital, with patients in the group without respiratory tract infection, the result of randomization, using for the pairing of the groups the type of surgery performed. The outcome variables assessed were mortality, length of hospital stay and length of stay in intensive care unit. The means of quantitative variables were compared using the Wilcoxon and student t-test. Results The groups were similar (average age P=0.17; sex P=0.94; surgery performed P=0.85-1.00) Mortality in the WITH respiratory tract infection group was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The times of hospitalization and intensive care unit were significantly higher in respiratory tract infection (P<0.0001). The presence of respiratory tract infection was associated with the development of other complications such as renal failure dialysis and stroke P<0.00001 and P=0.002 respectively. Conclusion The development of respiratory tract infection postoperative cardiac surgery is related to higher mortality, longer periods of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay. PMID:26313727

  8. Impact of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection: hospitalization and patient quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark H; Ahir, Harblas; Coia, John E; Dodgson, Andrew; Hopkins, Susan; Llewelyn, Martin J; Settle, Chris; Mclain-Smith, Susan; Marcella, Stephen W

    2017-09-01

    Data quantifying outcomes of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) are lacking. We sought to determine the UK hospital resource use and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) associated with rCDI hospitalizations. A non-interventional study in six UK acute hospitals collected retrospective clinical and resource use data from medical records of 64 adults hospitalized for rCDI and 64 matched inpatient controls with a first episode only (f)CDI. Patients were observed from the index event (date rCDI/fCDI confirmed) for 28 days (or death, if sooner); UK-specific reference costs were applied. HRQoL was assessed prospectively in a separate cohort of 30 patients hospitalized with CDI, who completed the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire during their illness. The median total management cost (post-index) was £7539 and £6294 for rCDI and fCDI, respectively (cost difference, P = 0.075); median length of stay was 21 days and 15.5 days, respectively (P = 0.269). The median cost difference between matched rCDI and fCDI cases was £689 (IQR=£1873-£3954). Subgroup analysis demonstrated the highest median costs (£8542/patient) in severe rCDI cases. CDI management costs were driven primarily by hospital length of stay, which accounted for >85% of costs in both groups. Mean EQ-5D index values were 46% lower in CDI patients compared with UK population values (0.42 and 0.78, respectively); EQ visual analogue scale scores were 38% lower (47.82 and 77.3, respectively). CDI has considerable impact on patients and healthcare resources. This multicentre study provides a contemporaneous estimate of the real-world UK costs associated with rCDI management, which are substantial and comparable to fCDI costs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Hospital-acquired urinary tract infection point prevalence in Turkey: Differences in risk factors among patient groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the point prevalence of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and to investigate risk factors for pathogen type (E. coli vs. others) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positivity among nosocomial UTI patients. Methods A questionnaire consisting of 44 questions on demographic data and risk factors of UTI cases was sent to 51 tertiary care hospitals. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results The overall prevalence of UTI was 1.82% (483/26534). The prevalence of UTI was higher in intensive care units (ICUs) with 6.77% versus 1.45% outside ICUs. Hospitals of the Ministry of Health (compared to university hospitals), hospitals in less developed provinces and hospitals with bed capacity urinary catheter were more likely to have received immunosuppressive therapy, current corticosteroid use, renal transplantation and uterine prolapsus and less likely to have another infection outside the urinary tract, as compared to catheterized patients. Among the 422 culture-positive patients, the most common pathogen was E. coli (45.5%). The risk factors increasing the likelihood of E. coli in urine culture were being female, history of urinary tract operation, no use of antibiotics in the preceding three months and infection outside the urinary tract. There were 247 patients with E. coli or Klebsiella spp. positive in culture. Among these, 61% (n=151) were ESBL- positive. Among patients having E. coli/Klebsiella positive in culture, antibiotic use in the preceding three months and history of urinary tract operation were the independent risk factors significantly increasing the risk of ESBL. Conclusions The reasons underlying the high prevalence of nosocomial UTIs, and a better understanding of the risk factors might lead to improved control of these infections. PMID:24188193

  10. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dinh Phu

    Full Text Available Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs. We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs across Vietnam.Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included.Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing. Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012 of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012] were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855 acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855 developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76, urinary catheter (OR 2.12, no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94, and surgery after admission (OR 1.66. 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%], and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%], with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287 patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively.A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts.

  11. Hospitalization stay and costs attributable to Clostridium difficile infection: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, L; Beriot-Mathiot, A

    2014-09-01

    In most healthcare systems, third-party payers fund the costs for patients admitted to hospital for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) whereas, for CDI cases arising as complications of hospitalization, not all related costs are refundable to the hospital. We therefore aimed to critically review and categorize hospital costs and length of hospital stay (LOS) attributable to Clostridium difficile infection and to investigate the economic burden associated with it. A comprehensive literature review selected papers describing the costs and LOS for hospitalized patients as outcomes of CDI, following the use of statistics to identify costs and LOS solely attributable to CDI. Twenty-four studies were selected. Estimated attributable costs, all ranges expressed in US dollars, were $6,774-$10,212 for CDI requiring admission, $2,992-$29,000 for hospital-acquired CDI, and $2,454-$12,850 where no categorization was made. The ranges for LOS values were 5-13.6, 2.7-21.3, and 2.8-17.9 days, respectively. The categorization of CDI attributable costs allows budget holders to anticipate the cost per CDI case, a perspective that should enrich the design of appropriate incentives for the various budget holders to invest in prevention so that CDI prevention is optimized globally. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical significance of detection of serum markers of several viral infections in hospitalized patients before blood exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Kai; Chen Linxing; Chen Yichang; Ding Yingshu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the desirability of setting a routine of test for detection of the serum markers of several viral infections hospitalized patients before anticipated blood exposure. Methods: Serum levels of five HBV markers, anti-HCV, anti-HIV (with ELISA) and ALT were determined in 214 hospitalized patients before forthcoming blood exposure as well as in 2468 controls. Results: The positive rate of each of the above-mentioned markers in the patients was: HBsAg 15.2% (397/2614), HBcAb- IgG 72.5% (1895/2614), anti-HCV 3.91% (102/2614), anti- HIV 0.08% (2/2614) and ALT level was above 40 u in 8.7% of the patients (227/2614). Each of the positive rate was significantly higher than that in the controls. Conclusion: There is a substantial portion of subjects harboring viral infections in the hospitalized patients. It is imperative to have these patients identified before blood exposure so that proper cautions can be taken and preventive measures implemented to minimize possible nosocomial as well as patients-to-staff infections. Moreover, any potential legal problems can also be appropriately dealt with. (authors)

  13. Increased Hospitalizations for Neuropathies as Indicators of Zika Virus Infection, according to Health Information System Data, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Christovam; Xavier, Diego Ricardo; Pavão, Ana Luiza; Boccolini, Cristiano Siqueira; Pina, Maria Fatima; Pedroso, Marcel; Romero, Dalia; Romão, Anselmo Rocha

    2016-11-01

    Evidence is increasing that Zika virus can cause extensive damage to the central nervous system, affecting both fetuses and adults. We sought to identify traces of possible clinical manifestations of nervous system diseases among the registers of hospital admissions recorded in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Time series of several diagnoses from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, were analyzed by using control diagrams, during January 2008-February 2016. Beginning in mid-2014, we observed an unprecedented and significant rise in the hospitalization rate for congenital malformations of the nervous system, Guillain-Barré syndrome, encephalitis, myelitis, and encephalomyelitis. These conditions are compatible with viral infection and inflammation-associated manifestations and may have been due to the entrance of Zika virus into Brazil. These findings show the necessity of adequately diagnosing and treating suspected cases of Zika virus infection and also that health surveillance systems can be improved by using routine data.

  14. [Study of Staphylococcus aureus infections in a general acute care hospital (2002-2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togneri, Ana M; Podestá, Laura B; Pérez, Marcela P; Santiso, Gabriela M

    A twelve-year retrospective review of Staphylococcus aureus infections in adult and pediatric patients (AP and PP respectively) assisted in the Hospital Interzonal General de Agudos Evita in Lanús was performed to determine the incidence, foci of infection, the source of infection and to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance. An amount of 2125 cases of infection in AP and 361 in PP were documented. The incidence in AP decreased significantly in the last three years (χ i 2 ; p<0.05); in PP it increased significantly during the last five years (χ 2 ; p<0.0001). In both populations was detected a notable increase in skin infections and associated structures (PEA) in bacteremia to the starting point of a focus on PEA, and in total S. aureus infections of hospital-onset (χ 2 ; p < 0.005). Methicillin-resistance (MRSA) increased from 28 to 78% in PP; in AP it remained around 50%, with significant reduction in accompanying antimicrobial resistance to non-β-lactams in both groups of MRSA. In S. aureus documented from community onset infections (CO-MRSA) in the last three years, the percentage of methicillin-resistance was 57% in PP and 37% in AP; in hospital-onset infections it was 43% and 63% respectively. Although data showed that S. aureus remains a pathogen associated with the hospital-onset, there was an increase of CO-MRSA infections with predominance in PEA in both populations. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Device-associated infection rates in intensive care units of Brazilian hospitals: datos de la Comunidad Científica Internacional de Control de Infecciones Nosocomiales Tasa de infecciones asociadas a aparatos en unidades de cuidados intensivos de hospitales brasileños

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Salomao

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To measure device-associated infection (DAI rates, microbiological profiles, bacterial resistance, extra length of stay, and attributable mortality in intensive care units (ICUs in three Brazilian hospitals that are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC. METHODS: Prospective cohort surveillance of DAIs was conducted in five ICUs in three city hospitals in Brazil by applying the definitions of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (CDC-NNIS. RESULTS: Between April 2003 and February 2006, 1 031 patients hospitalized in five ICUs for an aggregate 10 293 days acquired 307 DAIs, a rate of 29.8% or 29.8 DAIs per 1 000 ICU-days. The ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP rate was 20.9 per 1 000 ventilator-days; the rate for central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI was 9.1 per 1 000 catheter-days; and the rate for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI was 9.6 per 1 000 catheter-days. Ninety-five percent of all Staphylococcus aureus DAIs were caused by methicillin-resistant strains. Infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae were resistant to ceftriaxone in 96.7% of cases, resistant to ceftazidime in 79.3% of cases, and resistant to piperacillin-tazobactam in 85.7% of cases. Pseudomonas aeruginosa DAIs were resistant to ciprofloxacin in 71.3% of cases, resistant to ceftazidime in 75.5% of cases, and resistant to imipenem in 27.7% of cases. Patients with DAIs in the ICUs of the hospitals included in this study presented extra mortality rates of 15.3% (RR 1.79, P = 0.0149 for VAP, 27.8% (RR 2.44, P = 0.0004 for CVC-BSI, and 10.7% (RR 1.56, P = 0.2875 for CAUTI. CONCLUSION: The DAI rates were high in the ICUs of the Brazilian hospitals included in this study. Patient safety can be improved through the implementation of an active infection control program comprising surveillance of DAIs and infection prevention

  16. Molecular Characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae Causing Community- and Hospital-acquired Infections in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoqin Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae, a colonizing agent in pregnant women and the main cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, has been increasingly associated with invasive disease in nonpregnant adults. We collected a total of 87 non-repetitive S. agalactiae isolates causing community-acquired (CA and hospital-acquired (HA infections in nonpregnant adults from a teaching hospital in Shanghai between 2009 and 2013. We identified and characterized their antibiotic resistance, sequence type (ST, serotype, virulence, and biofilm formation. The most frequent STs were ST19 (29.9%, ST23 (16.1%, ST12 (13.8%, and ST1 (12.6%. ST19 had significantly different distributions between CA- and HA-group B Streptococci (GBS isolates. The most frequent serotypes were III (32.2%, Ia (26.4%, V (14.9%, Ib (13.8%, and II (5.7%. Serotype III/ST19 was significantly associated with levofloxacin resistance in all isoates. The HA-GBS multidrug resistant rate was much higher than that of CA-GBS. Virulence genes pavA, cfb were found in all isolates. Strong correlations exist between serotype Ib (CA and HA and surface protein genes spb1 and bac, serotype III (HA and surface protein gene cps and GBS pilus cluster. The serotype, epidemic clone, PFGE-based genotype, and virulence gene are closely related between CA-GBS and HA-GBS, and certain serotypes and clone types were significantly associated with antibiotic resistance. However, CA-GBS and HA-GBS still had significant differences in their distribution of clone types, antibiotic resistance, and specific virulence genes, which may provide a basis for infection control.

  17. Hospital Textiles, Are They a Possible Vehicle for Healthcare-Associated Infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Fijan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Textiles are a common material in healthcare facilities; therefore it is important that they do not pose as a vehicle for the transfer of pathogens to patients or hospital workers. During the course of use hospital textiles become contaminated and laundering is necessary. Laundering of healthcare textiles is most commonly adequate, but in some instances, due to inappropriate disinfection or subsequent recontamination, the textiles may become a contaminated inanimate surface with the possibility to transfer pathogens. In this review we searched the published literature in order to answer four review questions: (1 Are there any reports on the survival of microorganisms on hospital textiles after laundering? (2 Are there any reports that indicate the presence of microorganisms on hospital textiles during use? (3 Are there any reports that microorganisms on textiles are a possible source infection of patients? (4 Are there any reports that microorganisms on textiles are a possible source infection for healthcare workers?

  18. Underdiagnosis of Influenza Virus Infection in Hospitalized Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Lauren; Zhu, Yuwei; Edwards, Kathryn M; Griffin, Marie R; Talbot, H Keipp

    2018-03-01

    To describe factors associated with provider-ordered influenza testing in hospitalized older adults. Information on participant demographics, symptoms, and provider-ordered influenza testing were collected by questionnaire and chart review. We conducted prospective laboratory-based surveillance using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the criterion standard for diagnosis of influenza, to determine how participant characteristics and provider-ordered testing affected accurate influenza diagnosis. One academic and three community hospitals in Davidson County, Tennessee. Adults aged 18 and older with acute respiratory illness or nonlocalizing fever (N=1,422). We compared characteristics of participants with and without provider-ordered testing for influenza using the Wilcoxon test and Pearson chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify factors predictive of provider-ordered influenza testing. Twenty-eight percent (399/1,422) of participants had provider-ordered influenza testing. Participants who were tested were younger than those not tested (58 ± 18 vs 66 ± 15, p<.001) and more likely to have influenza-like illness (ILI) (71% vs 49%, p<.001). ILI decreased with increasing age (aged 18-49, 63%; aged 50-64, 60%; aged ≥65, 48%). ILI and younger age were independent predictors of provider-ordered testing. Of the 136 participants with influenza confirmed using RT-PCR, ILI was the only significant predictor of provider-ordered testing (adjusted odds ratio=3.43, 95% confidence interval=1.22-9.70). Adults aged 65 and older hospitalized with fever or respiratory symptoms during influenza season are less likely to undergo a provider-ordered influenza test than younger adults. Some, but not all, of this disparity is due to a lower likelihood of ILI. Further strategies are needed to increase clinician awareness and testing in this vulnerable group. © 2018, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2018

  19. Infection control practice in countries with limited resources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alp, E.; Leblebicioglu, H.; Doganay, M.; Voss, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial infections and their control are a world-wide challenge. The prevalence of nosocomial infections is generally higher in developing countries with limited resources than industrialized countries. In this paper we aimed to further explain the differences with regard to infection control

  20. Neonatal bloodstream infections in a Ghanaian Tertiary Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labi, Appiah-Korang; Obeng-Nkrumah, Noah; Bjerrrum, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    submitted to the microbiology department of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital was conducted from January 2010 through December 2013. We assessed the prevalence of bacteria and fungi involved in BSI and the susceptibility coverage of recommended empiric antibiotics by Ghana Standard Treatment guidelines...... and the WHO recommendations for managing neonatal sepsis. The national and WHO treatment guidelines recommend either ampicillin plus gentamicin or ampicillin plus cefotaxime for empiric treatment of neonatal BSI. The WHO recommendations also include cloxacillin plus gentamicin. We described the resistance...

  1. Hand hygiene noncompliance and the cost of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Keith L; Anderson, Deverick J; Kaye, Keith S

    2010-04-01

    Hand hygiene noncompliance is a major cause of nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infection cost data exist, but the effect of hand hygiene noncompliance is unknown. To estimate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-related cost of an incident of hand hygiene noncompliance by a healthcare worker during patient care. Two models were created to simulate sequential patient contacts by a hand hygiene-noncompliant healthcare worker. Model 1 involved encounters with patients of unknown MRSA status. Model 2 involved an encounter with an MRSA-colonized patient followed by an encounter with a patient of unknown MRSA status. The probability of new MRSA infection for the second patient was calculated using published data. A simulation of 1 million noncompliant events was performed. Total costs of resulting infections were aggregated and amortized over all events. Duke University Medical Center, a 750-bed tertiary medical center in Durham, North Carolina. Model 1 was associated with 42 MRSA infections (infection rate, 0.0042%). Mean infection cost was $47,092 (95% confidence interval [CI], $26,040-$68,146); mean cost per noncompliant event was $1.98 (95% CI, $0.91-$3.04). Model 2 was associated with 980 MRSA infections (0.098%). Mean infection cost was $53,598 (95% CI, $50,098-$57,097); mean cost per noncompliant event was $52.53 (95% CI, $47.73-$57.32). A 200-bed hospital incurs $1,779,283 in annual MRSA infection-related expenses attributable to hand hygiene noncompliance. A 1.0% increase in hand hygiene compliance resulted in annual savings of $39,650 to a 200-bed hospital. Hand hygiene noncompliance is associated with significant attributable hospital costs. Minimal improvements in compliance lead to substantial savings.

  2. A Cost Analysis of Hospitalizations for Infections Related to Injection Drug Use at a County Safety-Net Hospital in Miami, Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansel Tookes

    Full Text Available Infections related to injection drug use are common. Harm reduction strategies such as syringe exchange programs and skin care clinics aim to prevent these infections in injection drug users (IDUs. Syringe exchange programs are currently prohibited by law in Florida. The goal of this study was to estimate the mortality and cost of injection drug use-related bacterial infections over a 12-month period to the county safety-net hospital in Miami, Florida. Additionally, the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus among this cohort of hospitalized IDUs was estimated.IDUs discharged from Jackson Memorial Hospital were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for illicit drug abuse and endocarditis, bacteremia or sepsis, osteomyelitis and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs. 349 IDUs were identified for chart abstraction and 92% were either uninsured or had publicly funded insurance. SSTIs, the most common infection, were reported in 64% of IDUs. HIV seroprevalence was 17%. Seventeen patients (4.9% died during their hospitalization. The total cost for treatment for injection drug use-related infections to Jackson Memorial Hospital over the 12-month period was $11.4 million.Injection drug use-related bacterial infections represent a significant morbidity for IDUs in Miami-Dade County and a substantial financial cost to the county hospital. Strategies aimed at reducing risk of infections associated with injection drug use could decrease morbidity and the cost associated with these common, yet preventable infections.

  3. Hospital-Diagnosed Pertussis Infection in Children and Long-term Risk of Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Morten; Thygesen, Sandra K; Østergaard, John R

    2015-01-01

    , maternal history of epilepsy, presence of congenital malformations, and gestational age. Unique personal identifiers permitted unambiguous data linkage and complete follow-up for death, emigration, and hospital contacts. RESULTS: We identified 4700 patients with pertussis (48% male), of whom 90 developed......: In Denmark, risk of epilepsy was increased in children with hospital-diagnosed pertussis infections compared with the general population; however, the absolute risk was low....

  4. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%).

  5. Innovative Training for Occupational Health and Infection Control Workplace Assessment in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lyndsay; Bryce, Elizabeth Ann; Scharf, Sydney; Yassi, Annalee

    2012-01-01

    A user-friendly, high quality workplace assessment field guide and an accompanying worksheet are invaluable tools for recognizing hazards in the hospital environment. These tools ensure that both front line workers as well as health and safety and infection control professionals can systematically evaluate hazards and formulate recommendations.…

  6. Perioperative hyperoxygenation and wound site infection following surgery for acute appendicitis: a randomized, prospective, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Amitai; Gurevits, Michael; Vamos, Ronny; Ivry, Simon; Eitan, Arieh

    2011-04-01

    To assess the influence of hyperoxygenation on surgical site infection by using the most homogeneous study population. A randomized, prospective, controlled trial. Department of surgery in a government hospital. A total of 210 patients who underwent open surgery for acute appendicitis. In the study group, patients received 80% oxygen during anesthesia, followed by high-flow oxygen for 2 hours in the recovery room. The control group received 30% oxygen, as usual. Open appendectomy via incision in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. Surgical site infection, mainly assessed by the ASEPSIS (additional treatment, serous discharge, erythema, purulent discharge, separation of deep tissues, isolation of bacteria, and stay in hospital prolonged >14 days) system score. Surgical site infections were recorded in 6 of 107 patients (5.6%) in the study group vs 14 of 103 patients (13.6%) in the control group (P = .04). Significant differences in the ASEPSIS score were also found. The mean hospital stay was longer in the control group (2.92 days) compared with the study group (2.51 days) (P = .01). The use of supplemental oxygen is advantageous in operations for acute appendicitis by reducing surgical site infection rate and hospital stay. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01002365.

  7. Invasive Aspergillus niger complex infections in a Belgian tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, E; Maertens, J; Meersseman, P; Saegeman, V; Dupont, L; Lagrou, K

    2014-05-01

    The incidence of invasive infections caused by the Aspergillus niger species complex was 0.043 cases/10 000 patient-days in a Belgian university hospital (2005-2011). Molecular typing was performed on six available A. niger complex isolates involved in invasive disease from 2010 to 2011, revealing A. tubingensis, which has higher triazole minimal inhibitory concentrations, in five out of six cases. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  8. Etiologic Agents of Central Nervous System Infections among Febrile Hospitalized Patients in the Country of Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Akhvlediani, Tamar; Bautista, Christian T.; Shakarishvili, Roman; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Imnadze, Paata; Tatishvili, Nana; Davitashvili, Tamar; Samkharadze, Tamar; Chlikadze, Rusudan; Dvali, Natia; Dzigua, Lela; Karchava, Mariam; Gatserelia, Lana; Macharashvili, Nino; Kvirkvelia, Nana

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is a large spectrum of viral, bacterial, fungal, and prion pathogens that cause central nervous system (CNS) infections. As such, identification of the etiological agent requires multiple laboratory tests and accurate diagnosis requires clinical and epidemiological information. This hospital-based study aimed to determine the main causes of acute meningitis and encephalitis and enhance laboratory capacity for CNS infection diagnosis. METHODS: Children and adults patients cli...

  9. Healthcare-Associated Infective Endocarditis: a Case Series in a Referral Hospital from 2006 to 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Francischetto, Oslan; Silva, Luciana Almenara Pereira da; Senna, Katia Marie Simões e; Vasques, Marcia Regina; Barbosa, Giovanna Ferraiuoli; Weksler, Clara; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Golebiovski, Wilma Felix; Lamas, Cristiane da Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare-associated infective endocarditis (HCA-IE), a severe complication of medical care, shows a growing incidence in literature. Objective: To evaluate epidemiology, etiology, risk factors for acquisition, complications, surgical treatment, and outcome of HCA-IE. Methods: Observational prospective case series study (2006-2011) in a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Results: Fifty-three patients with HCA-IE from a total of 151 cases of infective endocarditis (IE) were ...

  10. Preventing device-associated infections in US hospitals: national surveys from 2005 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Sarah L; Fowler, Karen E; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Saint, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Numerous initiatives have focused on reducing device-associated infections, contributing to an overall decrease in infections nationwide. To better understand factors associated with this decline, we assessed the use of key practices to prevent device-associated infections by US acute care hospitals from 2005 to 2013. We mailed surveys to infection preventionists at a national random sample of ∼600 US acute care hospitals in 2005, 2009 and 2013. Our survey asked about the use of practices to prevent the 3 most common device-associated infections: central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). Using sample weights, we estimated the per cent of hospitals reporting regular use (a score of 4 or 5 on a scale from 1 (never use) to 5 (always use)) of prevention practices from 2005 to 2013. The response rate was about 70% in all 3 periods. Use of most recommended prevention practices increased significantly over time. Among those showing the greatest increase were use of an antimicrobial dressing for preventing CLABSI (25-78%, ppreventing VAP (41-79%, ppreventing CAUTI (9-53%, pinfections. Practices for which little change was observed included use of antimicrobial catheters to prevent either CLABSI or CAUTI. US hospitals have responded to the call to reduce infection by increasing use of key recommended practices. Vigilance is needed to ensure sustained improvement and additional strategies may still be required, given an apparent continuing lag in CAUTI prevention efforts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Infections at a Provincial Reference Hospital, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Maryline; San, Kim Chamroeun; Pho, Yati; Sok, Chandara; Dousset, Jean-Philippe; Brant, William; Hurtado, Northan; Eam, Khun Kim; Ardizzoni, Elisa; Heng, Seiha; Godreuil, Sylvain; Yew, Wing-Wai; Hewison, Cathy

    2017-07-01

    Prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease is poorly documented in countries with high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB). We describe prevalence, risk factors, and TB program implications for NTM isolates and disease in Cambodia. A prospective cohort of 1,183 patients with presumptive TB underwent epidemiologic, clinical, radiologic, and microbiologic evaluation, including >12-months of follow-up for patients with NTM isolates. Prevalence of NTM isolates was 10.8% and of disease was 0.9%; 217 (18.3%) patients had TB. Of 197 smear-positive patients, 171 (86.8%) had TB confirmed (167 by culture and 4 by Xpert MTB/RIF assay only) and 11 (5.6%) had NTM isolates. HIV infection and past TB were independently associated with having NTM isolates. Improved detection of NTM isolates in Cambodia might require more systematic use of mycobacterial culture and the use of Xpert MTB/RIF to confirm smear-positive TB cases, especially in patients with HIV infection or a history of TB.

  12. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare... Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection... infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in settings where healthcare is provided; and (3...

  13. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare... Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection... infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in settings where healthcare is provided; and (3...

  14. 75 FR 29772 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare... Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection... infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in settings where healthcare is provided; and (3...

  15. Nosocomial infection control in healthcare settings: Protection against emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanxi; Wang, Shengyong

    2016-04-12

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea in 2015 may be attributable to poor nosocomial infection control procedures implemented. Strict infection control measures were taken in the hospital where an imported case with MERS was treated in southern China and 53 health care workers were confirmed to be MERS-CoV negative. Infection control in healthcare settings, in which patients with emerging infectious diseases such as MERS, Ebola virus disease, and the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are diagnosed and treated, are often imperfect. When it comes to emerging or unknown infectious diseases, before the imported case was finally identified or community transmission was reported, cases have often occurred in clusters in healthcare settings. Nosocomial infection control measures should be further strengthened among the workers and inpatients in designated healthcare settings that accommodate suspected cases suffering from emerging or unknown infectious diseases.

  16. Identifying Core Competencies of Infection Control Nurse Specialists in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Fong; Bond, Trevor G; Adamson, Bob; Chow, Meyrick

    2016-01-01

    To confirm a core competency scale for Hong Kong infection control nurses at the advanced nursing practice level from the core competency items proposed in a previous phase of this study. This would serve as the foundation of competency assurance in Hong Kong hospitals. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All public and private hospitals in Hong Kong. All infection control nurses in hospitals of Hong Kong. The 83-item proposed core competency list established in an earlier study was transformed into a questionnaire and sent to 112 infection control nurses in 48 hospitals in Hong Kong. They were asked to rate the importance of each infection prevention and control item using Likert-style response categories. Data were analyzed using the Rasch model. The response rate of 81.25% was achieved. Seven items were removed from the proposed core competency list, leaving a scale of 76 items that fit the measurement requirements of the unidimensional Rasch model. Essential core competency items of advanced practice for infection control nurses in Hong Kong were identified based on the measurement criteria of the Rasch model. Several items of the scale that reflect local Hong Kong contextual characteristics are distinguished from the overseas standards. This local-specific competency list could serve as the foundation for education and for certification of infection control nurse specialists in Hong Kong. Rasch measurement is an appropriate analytical tool for identifying core competencies of advanced practice nurses in other specialties and in other locations in a manner that incorporates practitioner judgment and expertise.

  17. High prevalence of diarrhoegenic intestinal parasite infections among non-ART HIV patients in Fitche Hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamu, Haileeyesus; Wegayehu, Teklu; Petros, Beyene

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection has been modifying both the epidemiology and outcome of parasite infections. Hence, this study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and other intestinal parasite infections among HIV positives with and without Antiretroviral Treatment(ART) and its association with CD4+ T-cell count. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Fitche hospital focusing on HIV positives who came to hospital for follow-ups. A total of 378 HIV positive persons with and without ART participated in the study. Data on socio-demographic factors and diarrhoea status were obtained by interviewing all 214 with ART and 164 without ART. Stool samples were collected from all patients and examined for intestinal parasites using direct, formol-ether and modified acid-fast staining techniques. The prevalence of intestinal parasite infections in this study was significantly higher among HIV positive persons not on ART. Specifically, the rate of infection with Cryptosporidium species, Blastocystis spp., Giardia lamblia, and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar were higher, particularly in those with CD4+ T-cell counts less than 200 cells/µL. Fifty seven percent of the study participants were on ART. Out of these 164/378 (43%) of the non-ART study participants were infected with at least one intestinal parasite species. Significant association was observed between lower CD4+ T-cell count (parasites were significantly more prevalent in HIV positive non-ART patients. HIV infection increased the risk of having Cryptosporidium and other intestinal parasites and diarrhoea. Therefore, raising HIV positive's immune status and screening for intestinal parasites is important. This study showed that patients who are taking ART had a lower prevalence of diarrhoea causing parasites and Cryptosporidium suggesting that ART through improvement of immune status of the patients may have contributed to controlling diarrhoea-causing parasites in HIV positive patients.

  18. Enterovirus infections in hospitals of Ile de France region over 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molet, Lucie; Saloum, Kenda; Marque-Juillet, Stéphanie; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Henquell, Cécile; Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène; Rozenberg, Flore; Mirand, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring and genotyping of Enterovirus (EV) infections can help to associate particular or severe clinical manifestations with specific EV types and to identify the aetiology of infectious outbreaks. To describe the epidemiological features of EV infections diagnosed during the year 2013 in the Greater Paris area (Ile de France). During 2013, 2497 samples taken from 470 patients in 33 hospitals of Ile-de France were tested for EV genome by RT-PCR. EV genotyping was performed by the National Reference Centre (NRC) laboratories. EV infections were retrospectively reviewed by retrieving clinical and genotyping data from the NRC database. Of the 2497 samples, 490 (19.6%) was positive for EV genome detection. These EV infections represented 88.7% and 24.1%, respectively, of all reported regional and national infections. Twenty-seven different genotypes were identified. Echovirus 30 (E-30) accounted for 54.1% of all characterized strains and caused a large outbreak. Four severe neonatal infections were reported, of which two were caused by EV-A71. Respiratory infections involving EV-D68 were observed in two adults. One fatal case of Coxsackievirus A2-associated myocarditis was reported. Monitoring EV infections in combination with EV genotyping via the French EV network characterized the epidemiology of EV infections in the Ile de France region in 2013 and documented severe EV infections associated with EV-A71 or CV-A2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Suboptimal Addiction Interventions for Patients Hospitalized with Injection Drug Use-Associated Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Elana S; Karchmer, Adolf W; Theisen-Toupal, Jesse; Castillo, Roger Araujo; Rowley, Chris F

    2016-05-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious infection, often resulting from injection drug use. Inpatient treatment regularly focuses on management of infection without attention to the underlying addiction. We aimed to determine the addiction interventions done in patients hospitalized with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis. This is a retrospective review of patients hospitalized with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis from January, 2004 through August, 2014 at a large academic tertiary care center in Boston, Massachusetts. For the initial and subsequent admissions, data were collected regarding addiction interventions, including consultation by social work, addiction clinical nurse and psychiatry, documentation of addiction in the discharge summary plan, plan for medication-assisted treatment and naloxone provision. There were 102 patients admitted with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis, 50 patients (49.0%) were readmitted and 28 (27.5%) patients had ongoing injection drug use at readmission. At initial admission, 86.4% of patients had social work consultation, 23.7% had addiction consultation, and 24.0% had psychiatry consultation. Addiction was mentioned in 55.9% of discharge summary plans, 7.8% of patients had a plan for medication-assisted treatment, and naloxone was never prescribed. Of 102 patients, 26 (25.5%) are deceased. The median age at death was 40.9 years (interquartile range 28.7-48.7). We found that patients hospitalized with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis had high rates of readmission, recurrent infective endocarditis and death. Despite this, addiction interventions were suboptimal. Improved addiction interventions are imperative in the treatment of injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Risk factors of development of nosocomial pyogenic and septic infections in maternity hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Iu A; Nikolaeva, A M; Fel'dblium, I V

    2007-01-01

    During prospective epidemiological surveillance cases of pyogenic and septic infections (PSI) in mothers and newborns in two maternity hospitals were studied using standard case definition and leading risk factors of their development were revealed. These factors differed in two hospitals and were connected mainly with high level of patients colonization, contamination of the environment by nosocomial strains of microorganisms, and degree of participation of mother's relatives in delivery. It was shown that permission to relatives for presence on delivery did not influence on the rate of PSI. Specificity of risk factors of PSI in mothers and newborns dictates necessity to determine them in each maternity hospital.

  1. Hospitalization for community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection: validation and impact assessment of a clinical prediction rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalenhoef, Janneke E; van der Starre, Willize E; Vollaard, Albert M; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Delfos, Nathalie M; Leyten, Eliane M S; Koster, Ted; Ablij, Hans C; Van't Wout, Jan W; van Dissel, Jaap T; van Nieuwkoop, Cees

    2017-06-06

    There is a lack of severity assessment tools to identify adults presenting with febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) at risk for complicated outcome and guide admission policy. We aimed to validate the Prediction Rule for Admission policy in Complicated urinary Tract InfeCtion LEiden (PRACTICE), a modified form of the pneumonia severity index, and to subsequentially assess its use in clinical practice. A prospective observational multicenter study for model validation (2004-2009), followed by a multicenter controlled clinical trial with stepped wedge cluster-randomization for impact assessment (2010-2014), with a follow up of 3 months. Paricipants were 1157 consecutive patients with a presumptive diagnosis of acute febrile UTI (787 in validation cohort and 370 in the randomized trial), enrolled at emergency departments of 7 hospitals and 35 primary care centers in the Netherlands. The clinical prediction rule contained 12 predictors of complicated course. In the randomized trial the PRACTICE included guidance on hospitalization for high risk (>100 points) and home discharge for low risk patients (urinary tract infection, futher improvement is necessary to reduce the occurrence of secondary hospital admissions. NTR4480 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4480 , registered retrospectively 25 mrt 2014 (during enrollment of subjects).

  2. Healthcare-associated vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium infections in the Mansoura University Hospitals intensive care units, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Moemen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF ia an emerging and challenging nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to determine the prevalence, risk factors and clonal relationships between different VREF isolates in the intensive care units (ICUs of the university hospitals in our geographic location. This prospective study was conducted from July, 2012 until September, 2013 on 781 patients who were admitted to the ICUs of the Mansoura University Hospitals (MUHs, and fulfilled the healthcare-associated infection (HAI criteria. Susceptibility testing was determined using the disk diffusion method. The clonal relationships were evaluated with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Out of 52 E. faecium isolates, 12 (23.1% were vancomycin resistant. The significant risk factors for the VREF infections were: transfer to the ICU from a ward, renal failure, an extended ICU stay and use of third-generation cephalosporins, gentamicin, or ciprofloxacin. PFGE with the 12 isolates showed 9 different patterns; 3 belonged to the same pulsotype and another 2 carried a second pulsotypes. The similar pulsotypes isolates were isolated from ICUs of one hospital (EICUs; however, all of the isolates from the other ICUs had different patterns. Infection control policy, in conjunction with antibiotic stewardship, is important to combat VREF transmission in these high-risk patients.

  3. The Economic Burden of Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection: A Population-Based Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanwa, Natasha; Kwong, Jeffrey C; Krahn, Murray; Daneman, Nick; Lu, Hong; Austin, Peter C; Govindarajan, Anand; Rosella, Laura C; Cadarette, Suzanne M; Sander, Beate

    2016-09-01

    BACKGROUND High-quality cost estimates for hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are vital evidence for healthcare policy and decision-making. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the costs attributable to hospital-acquired CDI from the healthcare payer perspective. METHODS We conducted a population-based propensity-score matched cohort study of incident hospitalized subjects diagnosed with CDI (those with the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, Canada code A04.7) from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2010, in Ontario, Canada. Infected subjects were matched to uninfected subjects (those without the code A04.7) on age, sex, comorbidities, geography, and other variables, and followed up through December 31, 2011. We stratified results by elective and nonelective admissions. The main study outcomes were up-to-3-year costs, which were evaluated in 2014 Canadian dollars. RESULTS We identified 28,308 infected subjects (mean annual incidence, 27.9 per 100,000 population, 3.3 per 1,000 admissions), with a mean age of 71.5 years (range, 0-107 years), 54.0% female, and 8.0% elective admissions. For elective admission subjects, cumulative mean attributable 1-, 2-, and 3-year costs adjusted for survival (undiscounted) were $32,151 (95% CI, $28,192-$36,005), $34,843 ($29,298-$40,027), and $37,171 ($30,364-$43,415), respectively. For nonelective admission subjects, the corresponding costs were $21,909 ($21,221-$22,609), $26,074 ($25,180-$27,014), and $29,944 ($28,873-$31,086), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Hospital-acquired CDI is associated with substantial healthcare costs. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first CDI costing study to present longitudinal costs. New strategies may be warranted to mitigate this costly infectious disease. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1068-1078.

  4. Effectiveness and efficiency of the two trolley system as an infection control mechanism in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuisawana, Viliame

    2009-11-01

    A good infection control manager understands the need to prevent a complete cycle of infection. The Infection Control Working Group Manual of Fiji, emphasised that the Cycle of Infection is the series of stage in which infection is spread. Operating theatres have infection control protocols. Most equipments and instruments used in operating theatre circulate within the theatre. The theatre trolleys are a main component in managing an operating theatre but the least recognised. This paper reviews the effectiveness and efficiency of the current two-trolley system as an infection control mechanism in theatre. The paper will discuss infection control using the current trolley system in relation to the layout of Labasa Hospital operating theatre, human resource, equipment standard and random swab results. The following are random swab results of theatre equipments taken by the Infection Control Nurse from 2006 to 2008. The Labasa Hospital Infection Committee have discouraged random swab sample from mid 2008 based on new guidelines on infection control. The two trolley system, in which an allocated outside trolley transports patients from the ward to a semi-sterile area in theatre. The inside trolley which transports the patient to the operating table. The two trolley system means more trolleys, extra staffs for lifting, additional handling of very sick patients, congestion and delay in taking patients to operating table in theatres should be considered. The one-trolley system in theatre greatly reduces the chances of manually lifting patients, thus reducing the risk of patient injury from fall and risk of back injuries to nurses. There are other evident based practices which can compliment the one trolley system for an effective infection control mechanism in theatres. The Fiji Infection Control Manual (2002) emphases the importance of regularly cleaning the environment and equipments in theatre but there is never a mention about using a two trolley system as an

  5. Spectrum Of Opportunistic Infections In Aids Cases In A Tertiary Care Hospital In Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Shanker Joshi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study was carried out, 404 clinically suspected cases attending AIDS clinic at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal to assess an occurance of opportunistic infections in AIDS cases. Study reveals that Tuberculosis (60%, Cryptospridiosis (13.33% and candidasis (11.11% are the predominant opportunistic infection in HIV/AIDS patients in the Pokharo village. Next common pathogen was found an ubiquitous yeast. Candida obtained from skin, oral cavity, oesophagus, sputum and stool. The least common documented documented infection was pneumocystis carini pneumonia (2.22%.

  6. Reduction in nosocomial infection with improved hand hygiene in intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Guzman, Sandra; Safdar, Nasia

    2005-09-01

    Hand hygiene is a fundamental measure for the control of nosocomial infection. However, sustained compliance with hand hygiene in health care workers is poor. We attempted to enhance compliance with hand hygiene by implementing education, training, and performance feedback. We measured nosocomial infections in parallel. We monitored the overall compliance with hand hygiene during routine patient care in intensive care units (ICUs); 1 medical surgical ICU and 1 coronary ICU, of 1 hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina, before and during implementation of a hand hygiene education, training, and performance feedback program. Observational surveys were done twice a week from September 2000 to May 2002. Nosocomial infections in the ICUs were identified using the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) criteria, with prospective surveillance. We observed 4347 opportunities for hand hygiene in both ICUs. Compliance improved progressively (handwashing adherence, 23.1% (268/1160) to 64.5% (2056/3187) (RR, 2.79; 95% CI: 2.46-3.17; P nosocomial infection in both ICUs decreased from 47.55 per 1000 patient-days (104/2187) to 27.93 per 1000 patient days (207/7409) RR, 0.59; 95% CI: 0.46-0.74, P hand hygiene, coinciding with a reduction in nosocomial infection rates in the ICUs.

  7. Hospital-acquired influenza: a synthesis using the Outbreak Reports and Intervention Studies of Nosocomial Infection (ORION) statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voirin, N; Barret, B; Metzger, M-H; Vanhems, P

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial influenza outbreaks occur in almost all types of hospital wards, and their consequences for patients and hospitals in terms of morbidity, mortality and costs are considerable. The source of infection is often unknown, since any patient, healthcare worker (HCW) or visitor is capable of transmitting it to susceptible persons within hospitals. Nosocomial influenza outbreak investigations should help to identify the source of infection, prevent additional cases, and increase our knowledge of disease control to face future outbreaks. However, such outbreaks are probably underdetected and underreported, making routes of transmission difficult to track and describe with precision. In addition, the absence of standardised information in the literature limits comparison between studies and better understanding of disease dynamics. In this study, reports of nosocomial influenza outbreaks are synthesised according to the ORION guidelines to highlight existing knowledge in relation to the detection of influenza cases, evidence of transmission between patients and HCWs and measures of disease incidence. Although a body of evidence has confirmed that influenza spreads within hospitals, we should improve clinical and virological confirmation and initiate active surveillance and quantitative studies to determine incidence rates in order to assess the risk to patients.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus eye infections in two Indian hospitals: emergence of ST772 as a major clone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadig S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Savitha Nadig1, Nithya Velusamy2, Prajna Lalitha2, Sarita Kar3, Savitri Sharma3, Gayathri Arakere11Society for Innovation and Development, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, Karnataka, 2Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, 3LV Prasad Eye Institute, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, IndiaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to perform molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing a variety of eye infections from two major eye care hospitals in India.Methods: Twenty-four isolates from Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai, India, and nine isolates from LV Prasad Eye Institute, Bhubaneswar, India, representing severe to nonsevere eye infections like microbial keratitis to lacrimal sac abscess, were characterized. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing, multilocus sequence typing, accessory gene regulator typing, staphylococcal protein A typing, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis were used, along with determination of the presence of Panton–Valentine leucocidin toxin and endotoxin gene cluster among each sequence type.Results: The majority of eye infections, both severe and nonsevere, were caused by sequence type (ST772, positive for the Panton–Valentine leucocidin gene, and carrying methicillin-resistant staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type V cassette (22/33, 67%. Some of the other sequence types that caused severe eye infections were ST1 (9%, 5 (3%, 72 (6%, 88 (3%, 121 (3%, and 672 (3%. This is the first report of the presence of ST1 and 88 in India.Conclusion: Although the number of isolates included in this study was small, most of the eye infections were caused by community-associated S. aureus where patients had no history of hospitalization or treatment in the past year. In the case of six severe infections, patients were admitted for surgeries and there is probability of hospital infection. In addition, only methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates carrying staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type V were

  9. Epidemiology of human coronavirus NL63 infection among hospitalized patients with pneumonia in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Su, Mei-Chi; Tien, Ni; Huang, Chien-Jhen; Lan, Yu-Ching; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Chen, Chao-Hsien; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2017-12-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 is recognized in association with upper or lower respiratory tract illnesses in children. This study surveyed the prevalence of HCoV-NL63 and influenza viruses in patients with influenza-like illness in Taiwan during 2010-2011. Throat samples from 107 hospitalized patients with pneumonia and 175 outpatients with influenza-like illness were examined using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays with virus-specific primers, and then virus-positive specimens were confirmed by sequencing the polymerase chain reaction products. HCoV-NL63 infection was identified in 8.4% (9/107) of hospitalized patients with pneumonia, but not found in outpatients with influenza-like illness. Age distribution of HCoV-NL63 infection in hospitalized patients with pneumonia indicated that the group aged 16-25 years (20%) had the highest positive rate compared with the other groups, and exhibited a similar age-specific pattern to influenza A/H1N1 infection, but not influenza A/H3N2 and B infections in hospitalized patients. Seasonal prevalence of HCoV-NL63 infection was late winter, overlapping the highest peak of the influenza A/H1N1 epidemic during December 2010 to March 2011 in Taiwan. Co-infection of HCoV-NL63 and influenza A/H1N1 was detected in three hospitalized patients. Clinical manifestation analysis indicated that the main symptoms for HCoV-NL63 infection included fever (88.9%), cough (77.8%), and pneumonia (100%). Co-infection caused significantly higher rates of breathing difficulties, cough, and sore throat than those of single infection with HCoV-NL63 and influenza A/H1N1. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a low level of heterogeneity between Taiwan and global HCoV-NL63 strains. Understanding epidemiology of HCoV-NL63 in Taiwan provides an insight for worldwide surveillance of HCoV-NL63 infection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Incidence and predictors of hospitalization for bacterial infection in community-based patients with type 2 diabetes: the fremantle diabetes study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Hamilton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The few studies that have examined the relationship between diabetes and bacterial infections have utilized administrative databases and/or have had limited/incomplete data including recognized infection risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and associates of bacterial infection severe enough to require hospitalization in well-characterized community-based patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We studied a cohort of 1,294 patients (mean±SD age 64.1±11.3 years from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1 and 5,156 age-, gender- and zip-code-matched non-diabetic controls. The main outcome measure was incident hospitalization for bacterial infection as principal diagnosis between 1993 and 2010. We also examined differences in statin use in 52 FDS1 pairs hospitalized with pneumonia (cases or a contemporaneous non-infection-related cause (controls. During 12.0±5.4 years of follow-up, 251 (19.4% patients were hospitalized on 368 occasions for infection (23.7/1,000 patient-years. This was more than double the rate in matched controls (incident rate ratio (IRR (95% CI, 2.13 (1.88-2.42, P<0.001. IRRs for pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia were 1.86 (1.55-2.21, 2.45 (1.92-3.12, and 2.08 (1.41-3.04, respectively (P<0.001. Among the diabetic patients, older age, male sex, prior recent infection-related hospitalization, obesity, albuminuria, retinopathy and Aboriginal ethnicity were baseline variables independently associated with risk of first hospitalization with any infection (P≤0.005. After adjustment for these variables, baseline statin treatment was not significant (hazard ratio (95% CI, 0.70 (0.39-1.25, P = 0.22. Statin use at hospitalization for pneumonia among the case-control pairs was similar (23.1% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.27. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of severe infection is increased among type 2 diabetic patients and is not reduced by statin

  11. Surveillance of surgical site infections at a tertiary care hospital in Greece: incidence, risk factors, microbiology, and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumbelaki, Maria; Kritsotakis, Evangelos I; Tsioutis, Constantinos; Tzilepi, Penelope; Gikas, Achilleas

    2008-12-01

    In this first attempt to implement a standardized surveillance system of surgical site infections (SSI) in a Greek hospital, our objective was to identify areas for improvement by comparing main epidemiologic and microbiologic features of SSI with international data. The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system protocols were employed to prospectively collect data for patients in 8 surgical wards who underwent surgery during a 9-month period. SSI rates were benchmarked with international data using standardized infection ratios. Risk factors were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. A total of 129 SSI was identified in 2420 operations (5.3%), of which 47.3% developed after discharge. SSI rates were higher for 2 of 20 operation categories compared with Spanish and Italian data and for 12 of 20 categories compared with NNIS data. Gram-positive microorganisms accounted for 52.1% of SSI isolates, and Enterococci were predominant. Alarming resistance patterns for Enterococcus faecium and Acinetobacter baumannii were recorded. Potentially modifiable risk factors for SSI included multiple procedures, extended duration of operation, and antibiotic prophylaxis. SSI was associated with prolongation of postoperative stay but not with mortality. Comparisons of surveillance data in our hospital with international benchmarks provided useful information for infection control interventions to reduce the incidence of SSI.

  12. Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection: A Hospital Based Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Bhat, Javaid Ahmed; Parry, Nazir Ahmed; Shaheen, Lubna; Bhat, Sartaj Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is one of the commonly encountered entities by paediatricians. Studies have shown easy vulnerability of paediatric urinary tract in any acute febrile illness and a miss in diagnosis could have long term consequences like renal scaring with its adverse effects. Bearing these evidence based preludes in view we designed our study to know the prevalence of UTI in Kashmir province. Aim Aim of the present study was to know the prevalence of UTI in febrile children and to know the sensitivity of different imaging modalities like Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS), Voiding Cystourethrography (VCUG) and Dimercaptosuccinic Acid (DMSA) scan in diagnosing UTI. Materials and Methods A total of 304 patients, between 2 months to 10 years, with axillary temperature of ≥ 100.4oF (38oC), who did not have a definite source for their fever and who were not on antibiotics were included in the study. Detailed history and through clinical examination was done to rule out any potential or definite focus of infection as per the predesigned proforma. Routine urine examination with culture and sensitivity, followed by RUS and VCUG was done in all patients where routine urine examination was suggestive of UTI. DMSA was done in only culture proven cases after 6 months to document the renal scarring. Results Out of 304 children, 140 were males and 164 were females, UTI was present in 40 patients who had fever without any apparent cause giving a prevalence of 13.2%. Escherichia coli (E. coli) were the commonest isolated organism, followed by Klebsiella and Citrobacter species. Renal and Urinary Bladder Ultrasonography (RUS) detected Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) in 25% (10/40) while VCUG showed VUR in 55% (22/40) giving a RUS sensitivity of 45% for detecting VUR. DMSA done only after 6 months in UTI diagnosed patients showed a renal scarring in 25% (10/40) patients. Conclusion Missing a febrile paediatric UTI, can prove a future

  13. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p infected children required respiratory support. hMPV is present in young.......6%) ARTI episodes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting the hMPV N gene and the RSV L gene. Two children were co-infected with hMPV and RSV. They were excluded from statistical analysis. Hospitalization for ARTI caused by hMPV was restricted to very young...

  14. Analysis of used disinfectants in correlation with the occurrence and causes of hospital infections - a comparison of data for general hospital in Ohrid in the period 2009 to 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Petkovska, Sofija; Gjorgjeska, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    Intra-hospital or nosocomial hospital infections mean infections that develop in hospitals or are caused by microorganisms acquired during the hospitalization of the patient, and clinically are manifested from 48 to 72 hours after admission at earliest. To achieve the goal in reducing and prevention of these infections, within the hospital hygiene, many processes and procedures that should be routinely carried out in the hospital are included.

  15. Infection control in neonatal intensive care unit : from a certified nurse in infection control's point of view

    OpenAIRE

    坂木, 晴世

    2007-01-01

    Neonates, especially those in neonatal intensive care units (NICU), are at high risk for infection. And nosocomial infections are responsible for almost 50% of the deaths that occur beyond 2 weeks of age. Advances in neonatal intensive care have resulted in survival of more low birth weight and sick infants. On the other hand, infection control measures in NICU are hard to say that we established. Therefore it is often that infection control measure in NICU of our country is taken in original...

  16. The Recent Emergence of Clostridium difficile Infection in Romanian Hospitals is Associated with a High Prevalence of Polymerase Chain Reaction Ribotype 027

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Adrian Popescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To investigate the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Romanian hospitals. Methods: A survey was conducted at nine hospitals throughout Romania between November 2013 and February 2014. Results: The survey identified 393 patients with Clostridium difficile infection. The median age was 67 years (range: 2-94 years; 56% of patients were aged >65 years. The mean prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection was 5.2 cases per 10.000 patient-days. The highest prevalences were 24.9 and 20 per 10.000 patient-days in hospitals specializing in gastroenterology and infectious diseases, respectively. Clostridium difficile infections were health care-associated in 70.5% patients and community-acquired in 10.2%. The origin was not determined in 19.3%. Clostridium difficile infection was severe in 12.3% of patients, and the in-hospital all-cause mortality was 8.8%. Polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 had the highest prevalence in all participating hospitals and represented 82.6% of the total ribotyped isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration of moxifloxacin was >4 μg/mL for 59 of 80 tested isolates (73.8%. Of 59 isolates, 54 were highly resistant to moxifloxacin (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥32 μg/mL, and the majority were polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 (p<0.0001. Conclusion: The ribotype 027 was the predominant cause of Clostridium difficile infections in Romania. In some specialized hospitals, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection was higher than the European mean prevalence, and this demonstrates the need for strict adherence to infection control programs.

  17. The Recent Emergence of Clostridium difficile Infection in Romanian Hospitals is Associated with a High Prevalence of Polymerase Chain Reaction Ribotype 027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Gabriel Adrian; Serban, Roxana; Pistol, Adriana; Niculcea, Andreea; Preda, Andreea; Lemeni, Daniela; Macovei, Ioana Sabina; Tălăpan, Daniela; Rafila, Alexandru; Florea, Dragoş

    2018-03-15

    To investigate the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Romanian hospitals. A survey was conducted at nine hospitals throughout Romania between November 2013 and February 2014. The survey identified 393 patients with Clostridium difficile infection. The median age was 67 years (range: 2-94 years); 56% of patients were aged >65 years. The mean prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection was 5.2 cases per 10.000 patient-days. The highest prevalences were 24.9 and 20 per 10.000 patient-days in hospitals specializing in gastroenterology and infectious diseases, respectively. Clostridium difficile infections were health care-associated in 70.5% patients and community-acquired in 10.2%. The origin was not determined in 19.3%. Clostridium difficile infection was severe in 12.3% of patients, and the in-hospital all-cause mortality was 8.8%. Polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 had the highest prevalence in all participating hospitals and represented 82.6% of the total ribotyped isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration of moxifloxacin was >4 μg/mL for 59 of 80 tested isolates (73.8%). Of 59 isolates, 54 were highly resistant to moxifloxacin (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥32 μg/mL), and the majority were polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027 (pClostridium difficile infections in Romania. In some specialized hospitals, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection was higher than the European mean prevalence, and this demonstrates the need for strict adherence to infection control programs.

  18. [Role of medium-sized independent laboratories in control of healthcare-associated infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Eiko; Fukui, Toru

    2009-05-01

    In 2006, the Ministry of Health and Welfare revised the regulations regarding the Medical Service Law. The amendments stipulate that all healthcare institutions are required to implement infection control programs. However, small hospitals and clinics have no clinical microbiology laboratories, whereas medium-sized hospitals have few medical technologists and the outsourcing of microbiology tests to independent laboratories is common. The decreasing number of laboratories and recent outsourcing tendency reflect the increasing commercialization, and, with it, the escalating number of commercially operating chains. Each independent laboratory is responsible for supporting activities related to the surveillance, control, and prevention of healthcare-associated infections in the associated small and medium-sized hospitals. The people responsible for infection control in these hospitals usually do not have a background in microbiology. The evaluation of communication between independent laboratory staff and hospital personnel, and rapid turnaround time of microbiology laboratory test reports are important elements ensuring the quality of independent laboratory work. With the pressures of financial constraints in the Japanese medical insurance system, the development of a cost-effective and practical protocol for quality assurance is a real dilemma.

  19. Use of a patient hand hygiene protocol to reduce hospital-acquired infections and improve nurses' hand washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cherie; Wavra, Teresa; Drake, Diane Ash; Mulligan, Debbie; Bennett, Yvonne Pacheco; Nelson, Carla; Kirkwood, Peggy; Jones, Louise; Bader, Mary Kay

    2015-05-01

    Critically ill patients are at marked risk of hospital-acquired infections, which increase patients' morbidity and mortality. Registered nurses are the main health care providers of physical care, including hygiene to reduce and prevent hospital-acquired infections, for hospitalized critically ill patients. To investigate a new patient hand hygiene protocol designed to reduce hospital-acquired infection rates and improve nurses' hand-washing compliance in an intensive care unit. A preexperimental study design was used to compare 12-month rates of 2 common hospital-acquired infections, central catheter-associated bloodstream infection and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and nurses' hand-washing compliance measured before and during use of the protocol. Reductions in 12-month infection rates were reported for both types of infections, but neither reduction was statistically significant. Mean 12-month nurse hand-washing compliance also improved, but not significantly. A hand hygiene protocol for patients in the intensive care unit was associated with reductions in hospital-acquired infections and improvements in nurses' hand-washing compliance. Prevention of such infections requires continuous quality improvement efforts to monitor lasting effectiveness as well as investigation of strategies to eliminate these infections. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.