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Sample records for hormone replacement treatment

  1. HORMONE REPLACEMENT TREATMENT IN UROGYNAECOLOGIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Barbič

    2008-12-01

    Different studies on influence of the estrogen on urinary incontinence reveal only subjective improvement, but not objective one. There is even less studies, considering local estrogene treatment as pre-operative adjuvant therapy in treating urinary incontinence, however, evidently improved local vascularisation under estrogene influence support thesis,that local estrogene treatment might improve and accelerate post-operative wound healing.The role of systemic and local estrogene treatment is not defined yet precisely. However, itis confirmed that estrogene improve local vascularisation of vaginal and para-vaginaltissues, what gives us impression that pre- and postoperative estrogene local treatmentmight be useful

  2. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement has been used for more than 100 years in the treatment of hypothyroidism, and there is no doubt about its overall efficacy. Desiccated thyroid contains both thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)); serum T(3) frequently rises to supranormal values in the absorption

  3. Comments to guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism prepared by the American thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Viktorovich Fadeev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the discussion about to guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism prepared by the American thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement.

  4. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy....... This review is based on the English-language literature on the effect of estrogen therapy and estrogen plus progestin therapy on postmenopausal women. The advantages of hormone replacement therapy are regulation of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, relief of hot flushes, and prevention of atrophic changes...... in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin...

  5. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy and your heart Are you taking — or considering — hormone therapy to treat bothersome menopausal symptoms? Understand ... you. By Mayo Clinic Staff Long-term hormone replacement therapy used to be routinely prescribed for postmenopausal ...

  6. Controversies in hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baziad

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of estrogen hormone will result in either long-term or short-term health problems which may reduce the quality of life. There are numerous methods by which the quality of female life can be achieved. Since the problems occuring are due to the deficiency of estrogen hormone, the appropriate method to tackle the problem is by administration of estrogen hormone. The administration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with estrogen may eliminate climacteric complaints, prevent osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia, and colon cancer. Although HRT has a great deal of advantage, its use is still low and may result in controversies. These controversies are due to fact that both doctor and patient still hold on to the old, outmoded views which are not supported by numerous studies. Currently, the use of HRT is not only based on experience, or temporary observation, but more on evidence based medicine. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 182-6Keywords: controversies, HRT

  7. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  8. Guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism: prepared by the american thyroid association task force on thyroid hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Bianco, Antonio C; Bauer, Andrew J; Burman, Kenneth D; Cappola, Anne R; Celi, Francesco S; Cooper, David S; Kim, Brian W; Peeters, Robin P; Rosenthal, M Sara; Sawka, Anna M

    2014-12-01

    A number of recent advances in our understanding of thyroid physiology may shed light on why some patients feel unwell while taking levothyroxine monotherapy. The purpose of this task force was to review the goals of levothyroxine therapy, the optimal prescription of conventional levothyroxine therapy, the sources of dissatisfaction with levothyroxine therapy, the evidence on treatment alternatives, and the relevant knowledge gaps. We wished to determine whether there are sufficient new data generated by well-designed studies to provide reason to pursue such therapies and change the current standard of care. This document is intended to inform clinical decision-making on thyroid hormone replacement therapy; it is not a replacement for individualized clinical judgment. Task force members identified 24 questions relevant to the treatment of hypothyroidism. The clinical literature relating to each question was then reviewed. Clinical reviews were supplemented, when relevant, with related mechanistic and bench research literature reviews, performed by our team of translational scientists. Ethics reviews were provided, when relevant, by a bioethicist. The responses to questions were formatted, when possible, in the form of a formal clinical recommendation statement. When responses were not suitable for a formal clinical recommendation, a summary response statement without a formal clinical recommendation was developed. For clinical recommendations, the supporting evidence was appraised, and the strength of each clinical recommendation was assessed, using the American College of Physicians system. The final document was organized so that each topic is introduced with a question, followed by a formal clinical recommendation. Stakeholder input was received at a national meeting, with some subsequent refinement of the clinical questions addressed in the document. Consensus was achieved for all recommendations by the task force. We reviewed the following therapeutic

  9. Guidelines for the Treatment of Hypothyroidism: Prepared by the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Thyroid Hormone Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Antonio C.; Bauer, Andrew J.; Burman, Kenneth D.; Cappola, Anne R.; Celi, Francesco S.; Cooper, David S.; Kim, Brian W.; Peeters, Robin P.; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sawka, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A number of recent advances in our understanding of thyroid physiology may shed light on why some patients feel unwell while taking levothyroxine monotherapy. The purpose of this task force was to review the goals of levothyroxine therapy, the optimal prescription of conventional levothyroxine therapy, the sources of dissatisfaction with levothyroxine therapy, the evidence on treatment alternatives, and the relevant knowledge gaps. We wished to determine whether there are sufficient new data generated by well-designed studies to provide reason to pursue such therapies and change the current standard of care. This document is intended to inform clinical decision-making on thyroid hormone replacement therapy; it is not a replacement for individualized clinical judgment. Methods: Task force members identified 24 questions relevant to the treatment of hypothyroidism. The clinical literature relating to each question was then reviewed. Clinical reviews were supplemented, when relevant, with related mechanistic and bench research literature reviews, performed by our team of translational scientists. Ethics reviews were provided, when relevant, by a bioethicist. The responses to questions were formatted, when possible, in the form of a formal clinical recommendation statement. When responses were not suitable for a formal clinical recommendation, a summary response statement without a formal clinical recommendation was developed. For clinical recommendations, the supporting evidence was appraised, and the strength of each clinical recommendation was assessed, using the American College of Physicians system. The final document was organized so that each topic is introduced with a question, followed by a formal clinical recommendation. Stakeholder input was received at a national meeting, with some subsequent refinement of the clinical questions addressed in the document. Consensus was achieved for all recommendations by the task force. Results: We reviewed the

  10. Improving compliance with hormonal replacement therapy in primary osteoporosis prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P; Gram, J

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule.......To evaluate whether introduction of treatment alternatives would improve compliance with hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) as primary osteoporosis prevention in women not tolerating the first line osteoporosis prevention schedule....

  11. Hormone replacement for osteoporosis in women with primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudic, Jelena S; Poropat, Goran; Krstic, Miodrag N

    2011-01-01

    Women with primary biliary cirrhosis often suffer from postmenopausal osteoporosis due to their age, or osteoporosis secondary to their liver disease, or treatments provided for their liver disease. Hormone replacement increases bone mineral density and reduces fractures in postmenopausal women...

  12. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone

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    Lars Rejnmark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH. Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84 as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34 have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy.

  13. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on pituitary hormone secretion and hormone replacement therapies in GHD adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubina, Erika; Mersebach, Henriette; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2004-01-01

    We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes.......We tested the impact of commencement of GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient (GHD) adults on the circulating levels of other anterior pituitary and peripheral hormones and the need for re-evaluation of other hormone replacement therapies, especially the need for dose changes....

  14. HORMONAL TREATMENT IN UROGYNECOLOGY

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    Adolf Lukanović

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hormonal treatment in urogynecology is based on the knowledge, that urinary and reproductive tracts have common embriologic origin and are also linked anatomically and functionally. Both systems are functioning and changing due to sex steroids influence. Decreased estrogen concentrations are connected to metabolic and trophic changes in all organs with estrogen receptors, i.e. also in urogenital tract. Atrophy of urogenital system in postmenopause is a common causative factor for stress urinary incontinence (SUI and urge incontinence (UUI. In both estrogen replacement treatment have been introduced, but meta-analyses of the available literature indicate that estrogen therapy is effective only if given vaginaly. Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI occur in postmenopause often as a consequence of structural changes in urinary and reproductive tract to lowered immune protection and colonization with eneterobacteria. In RUTI too, estrogen replacement treatment have been used with the results similar to those with SUI and UUI. Effectiveness of estrogen treatment was evident only in topically applied vaginaly, while oral administration has the same effectiveness as placebo. Conclusions. Structural changes in urogenital tract in postmenopause are the results of estrogen depletion. Estrogen replacement is effective in cases of SUI, UUI and RUTI if it is applied topicaly, the efffect being influenced by the type of estrogen used and duration of treatment.

  15. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  16. Hormone replacement therapy and hypercoagulability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Jespersen, Jørgen; Andersen, Lars F.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of a variety of HRT regimens on the haemostatic balance using markers of fibrin turnover and inhibitors of coagulation. DESIGN: An open randomised study allocating women to either a control group or five different HRT treatment groups. SETTING: Gentofte Hospital...

  17. [Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) as well as insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are essential hormones to maintain homeostasis of bone turnover by activating osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Results from GH replacement therapy for primary osteoporosis and adult-onset GH deficiency (AGHD) suggest that one year or more treatment period by this agent is required to gain bone mineral density (BMD) over the basal level after compensating BMD loss caused by dominant increase in bone resorption which was observed at early phase of GH treatment. A recent meta-analysis demonstrates the efficacy of GH replacement therapy on increases in BMD in male patients with AGHD. Additional analyses are needed to draw firm conclusions in female patients with AGHD, because insufficient amounts of GH might be administrated to them without considerations of influence of estrogen replacement therapy on IGF-1 production. Further observational studies are needed to clarify whether GH replacement therapy prevent fracture risk in these patients.

  18. Sex hormone replacement in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Hjerrild, Britta; Cleemann, Line Hartvig

    2012-01-01

    The cardinal features of Turner syndrome (TS) are short stature, congenital abnormalities, infertility due to gonadal dysgenesis, with sex hormone insufficiency ensuing from premature ovarian failure, which is involved in lack of proper development of secondary sex characteristics and the frequent...... osteoporosis seen in Turner syndrome. But sex hormone insufficiency is also involved in the increased cardiovascular risk, state of physical fitness, insulin resistance, body composition, and may play a role in the increased incidence of autoimmunity. Severe morbidity and mortality affects females with Turner...... syndrome. Recent research emphasizes the need for proper sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during the entire lifespan of females with TS and new hypotheses concerning estrogen receptors, genetics and the timing of HRT offers valuable new information. In this review, we will discuss the effects...

  19. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  20. Hormone Replacement Therapy: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hormone therapy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Hormone Replacement Therapy ... Estrogen overdose Types of hormone therapy Related Health Topics Menopause National Institutes of Health The primary NIH ...

  1. Hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors: Utopia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioli, Roberto; Luvero, Daniela; Armento, Grazia; Capriglione, Stella; Plotti, Francesco; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Lopez, Salvatore; Montera, Roberto; Gatti, Alessandra; Serra, Giovan Battista; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Terranova, Corrado

    2018-04-01

    As growing of old women population, menopausal women will also increase: an accurate estimation of postmenopausal population is an essential information for health care providers considering that with aging, the incidence of all cancers is expected to increase. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has proven to be highly effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, dyspareunia, sexual disorders, and insomnia and in preventing osteoporosis. According to preclinical data, estrogen and progesterone are supposed to be involved in the induction and progression of breast and endometrial cancers. Similarly, in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the pathogenesis seems to be at least partly hormonally influenced. Is HRT in gynecological cancer survivors possible? The literature data are controversial. Many clinicians remain reluctant to prescribe HRT for these patients due to the fear of relapse and the risk to develop coronary heart disease or breast cancer. Before the decision to use HRT an accurate counselling should be mandatory in order to individualizing on the basis of potential risks and benefits, including a close follow-up. Nevertheless, we do believe that with strong informed consent doctors may individually consider to prescribe some course of HRT in order to minimize menopausal symptoms and disease related to hormonal reduction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Polymorphisms of the GR and HSD11B1 genes influence body mass index and weight gain during hormone replacement treatment in patients with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Ágnes; Kövesdi, Annamária; Szücs, Nikolette; Tóth, Miklós; Igaz, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoid substitution is essential in patients with chronic primary adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease) and both over-treatment and inadequate dosage have deleterious effects. Individual sensitivity to glucocorticoids is partly genetically determined. To test the hypothesis whether the well-characterized SNPs of the GR and HSD11B1 genes may modulate the individual sensitivity to exogenous glucocorticoids and may influence clinical and/or laboratory parameters and the glucocorticoid substitution dosage in patients with Addison's disease. 68 patients with primary adrenocortical insufficiency were involved. Clinical and laboratory data, as well as the dosage of the hormone replacement therapy were collected. Peripheral blood DNA was isolated, and the GR and HSD11B1 SNPs were examined using allele-specific PCR or Taqman assay on Real Time PCR. The allele frequency of the GR N363S polymorphism was higher in patients compared to the control group and the disease appeared significantly earlier in patients harbouring the GR A3669G compared to noncarriers. These patients had higher ACTH level measured at the time of diagnosis. Homozygous BclI carriers had higher body mass index (BMI) and lower total hydrocortisone equivalent supplementation dose needed than heterozygous or noncarriers. The BMI and weight gain during hormone replacement therapy were also higher in carriers of the HSD11B1 rs4844880 treated with glucocorticoids other than dexamethasone. The BclI polymorphism of the GR gene and the rs4844880 of the HSD11B1 gene may contribute to weight gain and may affect the individual need of glucocorticoid substitution dose in these patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Therapy of Hypoparathyroidism by Replacement with Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is a state of hypocalcemia due to inappropriate low levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH. HypoPT is normally treated by calcium supplements and activated vitamin D analogues. Although plasma calcium is normalized in response to conventional therapy, quality of life (QoL seems impaired and patients are at increased risk of renal complications. A number of studies have suggested subcutaneous injections with PTH as an alternative therapy. By replacement with the missing hormone, urinary calcium may be lowered and QoL may improve. PTH replacement therapy (PTH-RT possesses, nevertheless, a number of challenges. If PTH is injected only once a day, fluctuations in calcium levels may occur resulting in hypercalcemia in the hours following an injection. Twice-a-day injections seem to cause less fluctuation in plasma calcium but do stimulate bone turnover to above normal. Most recently, continuous delivery of PTH by pump has appeared as a feasible alternative to injections. Plasma calcium levels do not fluctuate, urinary calcium is lowered, and bone turnover is only stimulated modestly (into the normal range. Further studies are needed to assess the long-term effects. If beneficial, it seems likely that standard treatment of HypoPT in the future will change into replacement therapy with the missing hormone.

  4. The optimal hormonal replacement modality selection for multiple organ procurement from brain-dead organ donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zhibao; Novitzky, Dimitri; Collins, Joseph F; Cooper, David Kc

    2015-01-01

    The management of brain-dead organ donors is complex. The use of inotropic agents and replacement of depleted hormones (hormonal replacement therapy) is crucial for successful multiple organ procurement, yet the optimal hormonal replacement has not been identified, and the statistical adjustment to determine the best selection is not trivial. Traditional pair-wise comparisons between every pair of treatments, and multiple comparisons to all (MCA), are statistically conservative. Hsu's multiple comparisons with the best (MCB) - adapted from the Dunnett's multiple comparisons with control (MCC) - has been used for selecting the best treatment based on continuous variables. We selected the best hormonal replacement modality for successful multiple organ procurement using a two-step approach. First, we estimated the predicted margins by constructing generalized linear models (GLM) or generalized linear mixed models (GLMM), and then we applied the multiple comparison methods to identify the best hormonal replacement modality given that the testing of hormonal replacement modalities is independent. Based on 10-year data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), among 16 hormonal replacement modalities, and using the 95% simultaneous confidence intervals, we found that the combination of thyroid hormone, a corticosteroid, antidiuretic hormone, and insulin was the best modality for multiple organ procurement for transplantation.

  5. Hormone replacement therapy increases the risk of cranial meningioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting.......We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting....

  6. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were undertaken to identify studies in humans of the association between growth hormone treatment and bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Random effects model was used for this meta-analysis. Results. A total of 20 studies (including one outlier study with 936 subjects were included in our research. We detected significant overall association of growth hormone treatment with increased bone mineral density of spine, femoral neck, and total body, but some results of subgroup analyses were not consistent with the overall analyses. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggested that growth hormone replacement therapy could have beneficial influence on bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults, but, in some subject populations, the influence was not evident.

  7. The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, G; Hayashi, I

    1976-12-01

    The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media. (Reemplazo del suero por hormonas en el medio de cultivo de células). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 120-121, 1976. The serum used in cell culture media can be replaced by a mixture of hormones and some accesory blood factors. The pituitary cell line GH3 can be grown in a medium in which serum is replaced by triiodothyronine, transferrin, parathormone, tyrotrophin releasing hormone and somatomedins. Hela and BHK cell strains can also be grown in serum free medium supplemented with hormones. Each cell type appears to have different hormonal requirements yet it may found that some hormones are required for most cell types.

  8. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, L

    2015-01-01

    Many peri- and postmenopausal women suffer from a reduced quality of life due to menopausal symptoms and preventable diseases. The importance of cardiovascular disease in women must be emphasized, as it is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in women. It is well known that female hormones...... contribute to the later onset of cardiovascular disease in women. The effect of estrogens has for decades been understood from observational studies of postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Later, treatment with HRT was disregarded due to the fear of side......-effects and an ambiguity of the cardiovascular advantages. Accumulating knowledge from the large number of trials and studies has elucidated the cause for the disparity in results. In this paper, the beneficial effects of HRT, with emphasis on cardiovascular disease are explained, and the relative and absolute risks...

  9. Quantitative liver functions in Turner syndrome with and without hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Poulsen, H.E.; Ott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes.......Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes....

  10. The optimal hormonal replacement modality selection for multiple organ procurement from brain-dead organ donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhibao Mi,1 Dimitri Novitzky,2 Joseph F Collins,1 David KC Cooper3 1Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA Maryland Health Care Systems, Perry Point, MD, USA; 2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Thomas E Starzl Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The management of brain-dead organ donors is complex. The use of inotropic agents and replacement of depleted hormones (hormonal replacement therapy is crucial for successful multiple organ procurement, yet the optimal hormonal replacement has not been identified, and the statistical adjustment to determine the best selection is not trivial. Traditional pair-wise comparisons between every pair of treatments, and multiple comparisons to all (MCA, are statistically conservative. Hsu’s multiple comparisons with the best (MCB – adapted from the Dunnett’s multiple comparisons with control (MCC – has been used for selecting the best treatment based on continuous variables. We selected the best hormonal replacement modality for successful multiple organ procurement using a two-step approach. First, we estimated the predicted margins by constructing generalized linear models (GLM or generalized linear mixed models (GLMM, and then we applied the multiple comparison methods to identify the best hormonal replacement modality given that the testing of hormonal replacement modalities is independent. Based on 10-year data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS, among 16 hormonal replacement modalities, and using the 95% simultaneous confidence intervals, we found that the combination of thyroid hormone, a corticosteroid, antidiuretic hormone, and insulin was the best modality for multiple organ procurement for transplantation. Keywords: best treatment selection, brain-dead organ donors, hormonal replacement, multiple binary endpoints, organ procurement, multiple comparisons

  11. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection following Topical Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Pan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare condition, usually presenting as an acute coronary syndrome, and is often seen in states associated with high systemic estrogen levels such as pregnancy or oral contraceptive use. While topical hormonal replacement therapy may result in increased estrogen levels similar to those documented with oral contraceptive use, there are no reported cases of spontaneous coronary dissection with topical hormonal replacement therapy. We describe a 53-year-old female who developed two spontaneous coronary dissections while on topical hormonal replacement therapy. The patient had no other risk factors for coronary dissection. After withdrawal from topical hormonal therapy, our patient has done well and has not had recurrent coronary artery dissections over a one-year follow-up period. The potential contributory role of topical hormonal therapy as a cause of spontaneous coronary dissection should be recognized.

  12. Hormone replacement therapy in Denmark, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Møller, Lisbeth Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Danish National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (NRM) was opened for research purposes, and therefore, on an individual basis, can merge with other national registers. The aim of this study was to analyse the use of hormones based on the individual data of the entire Danish...... female population, with the focus on a detailed evaluation of specific hormone regimens and factors associated with systemic hormone replacement therapy (HRT)....

  13. A cost-effectiveness analysis of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, A P; Wren, B G

    1992-03-02

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause with particular reference to osteoporotic fracture and myocardial infarction. The multiple-decrement form of the life table was the mathematical model used to follow women of age 50 through their lifetime under the "no hormone replacement" and "hormone replacement" assumptions. Standard demographic and health economic techniques were used to calculate the corresponding lifetime differences in direct health care costs (net costs in dollars) and health effects ("net effectiveness" in terms of life expectancy and quality, in "quality-adjusted life-years"). This was then expressed as a cost-effectiveness ratio or the cost ($) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for each of the chosen hormone replacement regimens. All women of age 50 in New South Wales, Australia (n = 27,021). The analysis showed that the lifetime net increments in direct medical care costs were largely contributed by hormone drug and consultation costs. Hormone replacement was associated with increased quality-adjusted life expectancy, a large percentage of which was attributed to a relief of menopausal symptoms. Cost-effectiveness ratios ranged from under 10,000 to over a million dollars per QALY. Factors associated with improved cost-effectiveness were prolonged treatment duration, the presence of menopausal symptoms, minimum progestogen side effects (in the case of oestrogen with progestogen regimens), oestrogen use after hysterectomy and the inclusion of cardiac benefits in addition to fracture prevention. Hormone replacement therapy for symptomatic women is cost-effective when factors that enhance its efficiency are considered. Short-term treatment of asymptomatic women for prevention of osteoporotic fractures and myocardial infarction is an inefficient use of health resources. Cost-effectiveness of hormone replacement in asymptomatic women is dependent on the magnitude of cardiac benefits associated with hormone

  14. [Panhypopituitarism in one identical twin: the effect of hormone replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Canho, Harrij; van Alfen-van der Velden, Janiëlle; del Canho, Riwka; Otten, Barto

    2011-01-01

    Panhypopituitarism in childhood is rare. It is even rarer if the disorder appears in a boy with an identical but healthy twin brother. In such a patient it is useful to study the consequences of the hormone disorder and the effect of hormone replacement. A 6-year-old boy saw a paediatrician because of short stature. He was much shorter than his identical twin brother and he had more abdominal fat mass and a smaller penis. Laboratory tests identified hypothyroidism of central origin, in combination with hypocortisolism and growth hormone deficiency. Hormonal replacement resulted in an improvement in growth rate. At the age of 15 years, testosterone therapy was introduced because puberty had not occurred and his growth rate was low. Finally the patient grew a few centimetres taller than his twin brother. In the first year of life, panhypopituitarism has no negative consequences for growth. After this point, growth is clearly delayed. With sufficient replacement growth can completely catch up.

  15. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuat......The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone...... fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri......-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal variations on the brain....

  16. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... THYROID HORMONES? Desiccated ( dried and powdered ) animal thyroid ( Armour ®), now mainly obtained from pigs, was the most ... hormone can increase the risk or heart rhythm problems and bone loss making the use of thyroxine ...

  17. QUALITY OF LIFE, COUNSELLING AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nena Kopčavar Guček

    2008-12-01

    Quality of life in menopause is a result of many factors and therefore it is very individual.Hormone replacement therapy is one of the possibilities of improvement. Therefore, it isessential that a woman is adequately informed about all the advantages and risks of thehormonal replacement therapy. Only an informed patient can be a partner in shareddecision making about the improvement of quality of life

  18. Systematic review of hormone replacement therapy in the infertile man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr El Meliegy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To highlight alternative treatment options other than exogenous testosterone administration for hypogonadal men with concomitant infertility or who wish to preserve their fertility potential, as testosterone replacement therapy (TRT inhibits spermatogenesis, representing a problem for hypogonadal men of reproductive age. Materials and methods: We performed a comprehensive literature review for the years 1978–2017 via PubMed. Also abstracts from major urological/surgical conferences were reviewed. Review was consistent with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA criteria. We used Medical Subject Heading terms for the search including ‘testosterone replacement therapy’ or ‘TRT’ and ‘male infertility’. Results: In all, 91 manuscripts were screened and the final number used for the review was 56. All studies included were performed in adults, were written in English and had an abstract available. Conclusions: Exogenous testosterone inhibits spermatogenesis. Hypogonadal men wanting to preserve their fertility and at the same time benefiting from TRT effects can be prescribed selective oestrogen receptor modulators or testosterone plus low-dose human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG. Patients treated for infertility with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism can be prescribed hCG alone at first followed by or in combination from the start with follicle-stimulating hormone preparations. Keywords: Gonadotrophins, Hypogonadism, Infertility, Systematic review, Testosterone therapy

  19. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  20. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan; Almeida, Jackson Guedes; Quintans Junior, Lucindo

    2014-01-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  1. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  2. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Bone Mineral Density in Growth Hormone Deficient Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Peng; Wang, Yan; Yang, Jie; Li, Yukun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Growth hormone deficiency patients exhibited reduced bone mineral density compared with healthy controls, but previous researches demonstrated uncertainty about the effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on bone in growth hormone deficient adults. The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth hormone replacement therapy could elevate bone mineral density in growth hormone deficient adults. Methods. In this meta-analysis, searches of Medline, Embase, and The Cochr...

  3. Revisiting the Cutaneous Impact of Oral Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald E. Piérard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a key point moment in the specific aging process of women. It represents a universal evolution in life. Its initiation is defined by a 12-month amenorrhea following the ultimate menstrual period. It encompasses a series of different biologic and physiologic characteristics. This period of life appears to spot a decline in a series of skin functional performances initiating tissue atrophy, withering, and slackness. Any part of the skin is possibly altered, including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and hair follicles. Hormone replacement therapy (oral and nonoral and transdermal estrogen therapy represent possible specific managements for women engaged in the climacteric phase. All the current reports indicate that chronologic aging, climacteric estrogen deficiency, and adequate hormone therapy exert profound effects on various parts of the skin.

  4. Thyroxin hormone suppression treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the important modalities of treatment of thyroid cancer (TC) after surgery is the administration of thyroxin as an adjuvant treatment. The analysis supports the theory that thyroid suppression plays an important role in patient management. 300 μg of thyroxin, as this is an adequate dose for suppression is given. Ideally the dose should be tailored by testing s-TSH levels. However, since a large number of the patients come from out station cities and villages this is impractical. We therefore depend on clinical criteria of hyperthyroid symptoms and adjust the dose. Very few patients need such adjustment

  5. Clinical study on postoperative steroid hormon replacement for preclinical Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Nozomu; Koide, Haruhisa; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miki, Jun; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria for preclinical Cushing's syndrome (PCS) were reported in 1996. However, requirement of postoperative steroid hormone replacement is still controversial issue. In this study, we observed recent surgical cases retrospectively and evaluate the use of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. Eighteen patients with PCS underwent surgery from 1997 to 2007 in Jikei University Hospital. Thirteen of them received postoperative steroid hormone replacement. We investigated preoperative hormone activity by 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy and suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and evaluated the requirement of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. Preoperative serum cortisol was normal range in all patients. Serum ACTH was suppressed in 10 of them (56%). In 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy, accumulation in ipsilateral side was observed in all patients. Accumulation in contralateral side was observed in 13 patients whose serum ACTH had tendency to be suppressed. Mean period of steroid hormone replacement was 19.8 weeks. Patients with lower preoperative ACTH tended to require longer period until withdrawal of steroid hormone replacement. In addition, patients received steroid hormone replacement with higher starting dose significantly required longer period. Three of them had complications during tapering of steroid hormone. Postoperative adrenal insufficiency is important issue as postoperative management of PCS patients whose function of contralateral adrenal or pituitary gland is suppressed. 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy and preoperative serum ACTH were important factors to evaluate the requirement of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. Especially, patients with low preoperative serum ACTH tended to require long duration of postoperative steroid hormone replacement. On the other hand, patients with accumulation of contralateral side in 131 I-adosterol scintigraphy and without suppression of serum ACTH may not require steroid hormone

  6. Hormone replacement therapy in postmenopause - where we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Franić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The findings of most relevant randomized clinical studies such as HERS, WHI and MWS, performed in the last decade have shown that hormonal replacement therapy (HRT users are at increased risk for the development of breast cancer, stroke and pulmonary edema. On the other hand they are at a lower risk for the development of large bowel cancer and for hip and vertebral fractures; the incidences of endometrial cancer and coronary heart disease have not been proved to be significantly affected by HRT. As for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, the findings of these studies differed from those provided by observational studies, it became an imperative to find the causes of these discrepancies. The major criticism of randomized clinical studies was aimed at the inclusion criteria, as the mean women’s age in HERS and in WHI study was 63 years. The women of that age may no longer be healthy, and are particularly exposed to cardiovascular diseases. In all studies the same type of HRT was used, i.e. conjugated equine estrogen alone or in combination with medroxyprogesterone acetate. In Europe, this combination is rarely prescribed; we do not prescribe it in Slovenia either. The same type of HRT used in randomized clinical studies was further criticized, the basic idea of HRT being an individual approach to each woman requiring HRT. For rather sensational and often misinterpreted findings of randomized studies, the largest menopause societies worldwide, the International Menopause Society (IMS, the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS and the North American Menopause Society (NAMS, have revised the guidelines for HRT use in postmenopause. These guidelines have been adopted by the Slovene Menopause Society as well.Conclusions: The indications for HRT remain to be markedly expressed and severe climacteric symptoms, prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, urogenital syndrome and premature menopause. However, the

  7. Growth hormone replacement normalizes impaired fibrinolysis: new insights into endothelial dysfunction in patients with hypopituitarism and growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljic, D; Miljic, P; Doknic, M; Pekic, S; Stojanovic, M; Cvijovic, G; Micic, D; Popovic, V

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypopituitarism is increased. Clustering of cardiovascular risk factors leading to endothelial dysfunction and impaired fibrinolysis has also been reported and may account for progression to overt vascular changes in these patients. However, effect of long lasting GH replacement therapy on fibrinolytic capacity in GH deficient patients has not been investigated so far. To investigate fibrinolysis before and after challenge with venous occlusion in GHD patients with hypopituitarism before and during one year of growth hormone replacement. Hospital based, interventional, prospective study. Twenty one patient with GHD and fourteen healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and body mass index (BMI). Anthropometric, metabolic and fibrinolytic parameters were measured at the start and after three, six and twelve months of treatment with human recombinant GH. At baseline GHD patients had significantly impaired fibrinolysis compared to healthy persons. During treatment with GH, significant changes were observed in insulin like growth factor 1(IGF-1) [from baseline 6.9(2.4-13.5) to 22.0(9.0-33.0) nmol/l after one month of treatment; p<0.01] and fibrinolysis. Improvement in fibrinolysis was mostly attributed to improvement of stimulated endothelial tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) release in response to venous occlusion [from baseline 1.1(0.4-2.6) to 1.9(0.5-8.8) after one year of treatment; p<0.01]. Growth hormone replacement therapy has favorable effects on t-PA release from endothelium and net fibrinolytic capacity in GHD adults, which may contribute to decrease their risk of vascular complications. © 2013.

  8. Temporal changes in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure during cyclic post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rasmussen, Verner; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Post-menopausal hormone replacement (HRT) might protect against cardiovascular disease, possibly by arterial vasodilation and reduced blood pressure. Progestogens are needed to avoid endometrial disease but vascular effects are controversial. The objective was to assess temporal changes...... in blood pressure (BP) by two measurement techniques during a cyclic hormone replacement regimen. DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen healthy and normotensive post-menopausal women (age 55 +/- 3 years) were studied in a placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, and were randomized to 17beta-oestradiol plus...... and in the ninth weeks of treatment in both periods. RESULTS: Clinic systolic and diastolic BP were reduced after 10 days of oestradiol (-5.1 and -3.2 mmHg respectively, P

  9. Use of Ursodeoxycholic Acid on Post-menopausal Obesity, Hepatic steatosis and Plasma Profile as an Alternative Treatment for Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Christiano Franzoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA as an alternative treatment for menopause pathologies. For this, female Swiss-CD-1 mice were ovariectomized (OVX; SHAM operated mice served as controls. Ten weeks after operation, each group of mice was treated during four weeks with either UDCA, or 17(-estradiol+progesterone. The blood and tissues (liver and periuterine adipose tissue - PUAT were harvested. The OVX mice had increase body weight, accompanied by liver lipid accumulation. UDCA and HRT treatments reduced these parameters. PUAT was also increased in OVX group and UDCA and HRT treatments reduced this. Histology confirmed the results in the liver and PUAT. The plasma glucose levels were elevated in the OVX mice, as well as total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and VLDL cholesterol levels and reduced in OVX-UDCA and OVX-HRT. These results suggest that UDCA could reduce weight gain and fat liver deposition caused by ovariectomy, such as HRT, showing a possible alternative treatment for post-menopausal metabolic dysfunctions with UDCA.

  10. The effect of hormonal replacement therapy on breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Mi Gyoung; Oh, Ki Keun; Kim, Mi Hye

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate mammographic and sonographic breast parenchymal changes and the risk of breast cancer in women on hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). The study group consisted of 50 patients examined with serial mammograms and/or ultrasonograms during HRT. The control group consisted of 50 patients examined with serial mammogram for a routine health check. Mammographic parenchymal changes in both the study and control groups and sonographic findings of 27/50 patients in study group were evaluated. Follow-up mammogram of the control group showed no interval change or slight evolution of parenchyma with increasing age, but the study group showed increasing parenchymal densities. Most frequently encountered finding on sonogram in 11 women treated by estrogen alone, was ductal dilatation (7 cases; 64%), whereas in 16 women treated by estrogen and progesteron it was ductal epithelial hyperplasia (8 cases; 50%). Overall, four breast cancers developed; one infiltrating ductal carcinoma and three ductal carcinoma in situ. HRT causes the changes of breast parenchyma on mammogram and sonogram of postmenopausal women, and increases the risk of developing breast cancer. Therefore, careful and regular examination should be followed in those on postmenopausal HRT

  11. The ethics of aggregation and hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, A D; Myers, E R; Faden, R R

    2001-01-01

    The use of aggregated quality of life estimates in the formation of public policy and practice guidelines raises concerns about the moral relevance of variability in values in preferences for health care. This variability may reflect unique and deeply held beliefs that may be lost when averaged with the preferences of other individuals. Feminist moral theories which argue for attention to context and particularity underline the importance of ascertaining the extent to which differences in preferences for health states reveal information which is morally relevant to clinicians and policymakers. To facilitate these considerations, we present an empirical study of preferences for the timing and occurrence of health states associated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Sixteen women between the ages of 45 and 55 were enrolled in this pilot study. Their preferences regarding five health states associated with HRT (menopausal symptoms. side effects of HRT, breast cancer, myocardial infarction, and osteoporosis) were assessed in quantitative terms known as utilities. Two standard methods, the visual analog scale (VAS) and the standard gamble (SG), were used to assess utility and time preference (calculated as a discount rate). The wide variability of responses underlines the importance of tailoring health care to individual women's preferences. Policy guidelines which incorporate utility analysis must recognize the normative limitations of aggregated preferences, and the moral relevance of individual conceptions of health.

  12. Hormone replacement therapy is associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Close Helen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oestrogen and progestogen have the potential to influence gastro-intestinal motility; both are key components of hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Results of observational studies in women taking HRT rely on self-reporting of gastro-oesophageal symptoms and the aetiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD remains unclear. This study investigated the association between HRT and GORD in menopausal women using validated general practice records. Methods 51,182 menopausal women were identified using the UK General Practice Research Database between 1995–2004. Of these, 8,831 were matched with and without hormone use. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated for GORD and proton-pump inhibitor (PPI use in hormone and non-hormone users, adjusting for age, co-morbidities, and co-pharmacy. Results In unadjusted analysis, all forms of hormone use (oestrogen-only, tibolone, combined HRT and progestogen were statistically significantly associated with GORD. In adjusted models, this association remained statistically significant for oestrogen-only treatment (OR 1.49; 1.18–1.89. Unadjusted analysis showed a statistically significant association between PPI use and oestrogen-only and combined HRT treatment. When adjusted for covariates, oestrogen-only treatment was significant (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.03–1.74. Findings from the adjusted model demonstrated the greater use of PPI by progestogen users (OR 1.50; 1.01–2.22. Conclusions This first large cohort study of the association between GORD and HRT found a statistically significant association between oestrogen-only hormone and GORD and PPI use. This should be further investigated using prospective follow-up to validate the strength of association and describe its clinical significance.

  13. Increased risk of breast cancer following different regimens of hormone replacement therapy frequently used in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2004-01-01

    was established in 1993, where all female nurses aged 45 years and above received a mailed questionnaire (n = 23,178). A total of 19,898 women returned the questionnaire (86%). The questionnaire included information on HRT types and regimens, reproductive history and lifestyle-related factors. Breast cancer cases......Epidemiologic studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer following hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The aim of this study was to investigate whether different treatment regimens or the androgenecity of progestins influence the risk of breast cancer differently. The Danish Nurse Cohort...

  14. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly menstrual periods have returned. Is this normal? Answers from ... Advertising and sponsorship opportunities Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial ...

  15. Growth arrest despite growth hormone replacement, post-craniopharyngioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVile, C J; Hayward, R D; Neville, B G; Grant, D B; Stanhope, R

    1995-01-01

    Children with growth failure, whether secondary to an endocrinopathy such as growth hormone deficiency or secondary to neurological handicap with poor nutrient intake, grow at a subnormal rate but it is most unusual for a child to have complete growth arrest. PMID:7745571

  16. Menopause, hormone replacement and RR and QT modulation during sleep

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanfranchi, P. A.; Gosselin, N.; Kára, T.; Jurák, Pavel; Somers, V. K.; Denesle, R.; Petit, D.; Carrier, J.; Nadeau, R.; Montplaisir, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2005), s. 561-566 ISSN 1389-9457 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0402 Keywords : Sleep * Menopause * RR interval * QT interval * Gender * Hormones Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2005

  17. Hormone replacement therapy in Denmark, 1995-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Møller, Lisbeth Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the Danish National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (NRM) was opened for research purposes, and therefore, on an individual basis, can merge with other national registers. The aim of this study was to analyse the use of hormones based on the individual data of the entire Danish...

  18. Prepubertal Gynecomastia Due to Indirect Exposure to Nonformulary Bioidentical Hormonal Replacement Therapy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pinho, Joao Correia; Aghajanova, Lusine; Herndon, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Gynecomastia is a disorder of the endocrine system characterized by an abnormal presence of a palpable unilateral or bilateral enlargement and proliferation of glandular ductal benign breast tissue in male individuals. This case discusses the medical implications of an unregulated, indirect exposure to nonformulary, bioidentical hormone replacement therapy in male children. An 8-year-old boy presented with prepubertal gynecomastia secondary to estrogen exposure from maternal use of bioidentical hormonal replacement therapy (the Wiley protocol). We review the literature on prepubertal gynecomastia secondary to exogenous estrogen exposure, evaluation, clinical surveillance of the pubertal development, and relevant short- and long-term implications. Indirect exposure to nonformulary hormonal replacement in our case report was an etiologic factor in the development of prepubertal gynecomastia. This novel estrogen exposure source has important implications in the differential diagnosis of prepubertal gynecomastia and potential adverse effects secondary to precocious hormonal exposure.

  19. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement on Peripheral Muscle and Exercise Capacity in Severe Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Gonzalez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of growth hormone therapy (rGH on mitochondrial function on peripheral muscle and to correlate with exercise capacity in subjects with severe adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD.DesignSix months, double-blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled trial of subcutaneous rGH in 17 patients with GHD.MeasurementsQuadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months to measure succinate dehydrogenase (SDH to assess mitochondrial activity. Exercise capacity was measured with cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Lipids, glycemic parameters, and body fat levels were also measured.ResultsSerum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 levels reduced fat mass by 3.2% (p < 0.05 and normalized with rGH in the active phase (p < 0.005. Patients showed an increase in SDH (p < 0.01 from base line that differed between placebo and rGH therapy treatment groups (p < 0.05: those treated by rGH followed by placebo showed a significant increase in SDH (p < 0.001 followed by a decrease, with a significant between group difference at the end of 6 months (p < 0.05. No significant improvements or correlation with exercise capacity was found.ConclusionShort-term rGH for 3 months normalized IGF1 levels, reduced fat mass, and had a significant effect on mitochondrial function, but exercise capacity was unchanged.Clinical Trial RegistrationNumber ISRCTN94165486.

  20. Therapy of hypoparathyroidism by replacement with parathyroid hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Underbjerg, Line; Sikjaer, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT) is a state of hypocalcemia due to inappropriate low levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). HypoPT is normally treated by calcium supplements and activated vitamin D analogues. Although plasma calcium is normalized in response to conventional therapy, quality of life (Qo...... recently, continuous delivery of PTH by pump has appeared as a feasible alternative to injections. Plasma calcium levels do not fluctuate, urinary calcium is lowered, and bone turnover is only stimulated modestly (into the normal range). Further studies are needed to assess the long-term effects...

  1. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of non-fatal stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A T; Lidegaard, O; Kreiner, S

    1997-01-01

    haemorrhage, 846 thromboembolic infarction, 321 transient ischaemic attack) and 3171 controls. FINDINGS: After adjustment for confounding variables and correction for the trend in sales of HRT preparations, no significant associations were detected between current use of unopposed oestrogen replacement...... influence on the risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (1.22 [0.79-1.89]), intracerebral haemorrhage (1.17 [0.64-2.13]), or thromboembolic infarction (1.17 [0.92-1.47]). A significantly increased incidence of transient ischaemic attacks among former users of HRT and among current users of unopposed oestrogen may...... to some extent be explained by selection--HRT users being more aware of symptoms than non-users. INTERPRETATION: Unopposed oestrogen and combined oestrogen-progestagen replacement therapy have no influence on the risk of non-fatal thromboembolic or haemorrhagic stroke in women aged 45-64 years....

  2. Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, Lea L; Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1975, estrogen only was found to be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. In November 2015, NICE guidelines on hormone therapy were published that did not take this risk into account. AIM: This systematic literature review assesses the safety of estrogen plus...... progestin therapy according to the risk of endometrial cancer, while considering both regimen and type of progestin. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched, resulting in the identification of 527 published articles on menopausal women with intact uteri treated with estrogen only......, estrogen plus progestin or tibolone for a minimum of one year. Risk of endometrial cancer was compared to placebo or never users and measured as relative risk, hazard or odds ratio. RESULTS: 28 studies were included. The observational literature found an increased risk among users of estrogen alone...

  3. Associations between the number of natural teeth in postmenopausal women and hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Yong-Gyu; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-12-01

    Increasing research suggests that periodontal status is associated with hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. This study was performed to assess the relationship between the number of natural teeth and ever use of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women using nationally representative Korean data. Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2010 and 2012 were used, and the analysis in this study was confined to a total of 4869 respondents over 19 years old who had gone through menopause and who had no missing data for the reproductive factors and outcome variables in that study. The total number of natural teeth was then calculated after excluding third molars. The time of day when tooth brushing was done was recorded as representative oral health behavior. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess association between the number of natural teeth and the use of hormone replacement therapy. Among participants who had ever used hormone replacement therapy, the proportions (percentage and standard error) with no teeth, 1-9 teeth, 10-19 teeth, 20-27 teeth, and 28 teeth were 5.0±2.4%, 6.7±1.4%, 12.5±1.7%, 18.9±1.0%, and 20.7±1.6%, respectively (Preplacement therapy, after adjustments. The analysis revealed that the use of hormone replacement therapy by postmenopausal women showed positive effects for retention of natural teeth. Lack of hormone replacement therapy may be considered to be an independent risk indicator for tooth loss in Korean postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporal changes in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure during cyclic post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rasmussen, Verner; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Post-menopausal hormone replacement (HRT) might protect against cardiovascular disease, possibly by arterial vasodilation and reduced blood pressure. Progestogens are needed to avoid endometrial disease but vascular effects are controversial. The objective was to assess temporal changes...... in blood pressure (BP) by two measurement techniques during a cyclic hormone replacement regimen. DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixteen healthy and normotensive post-menopausal women (age 55 +/- 3 years) were studied in a placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, and were randomized to 17beta-oestradiol plus...

  5. Improved left ventricular function after growth hormone replacement in patients with hypopituitarism: assessment with radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuocolo, A.; Nicolai, E.; Colao, A.; Longobardi, S.; Cardei, S.; Fazio, S.; Merola, B.; Lombardi, G.; Sacca, L.; Salvatore, M.

    1996-01-01

    Prolonged growth hormone deficiency (GHD) leads to marked cardiac dysfunction; however, whether reversal of this abnormality may be achieved after specific replacement therapy has not yet been completely clarified. Fourteen patients with childhood-onset GHD (nine men and five women, mean age 27±4 years) and 12 normal control subjects underwent equilibrium radionuclide angiography under control conditions at rest. Patients with GHD were also studied 6 months after recombinant human (rh) GH treatment (0.05 IU/kg per day). Normal control subjects and patients with GHD did not differ with respect to age, gender and heart rate. In contrast, left ventricular ejection fraction (53%±9% vs 66%±6%, P 2 , P 2 , P 2 , P 2 , P <0.01) was observed in GHD patients. In conclusion, prolonged lack of GH leads to impaired left ventricular function at rest. Reversal of this abnormality may be observed after 6 months of specific replacement therapy in patients with childhood-onset GHD. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Obesity and sarcopenia after menopause are reversed by sex hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M B; Rosenfalck, A M; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Menopause is linked to an increase in fat mass and a decrease in lean mass exceeding age-related changes, possibly related to reduced output of ovarian steroids. In this study we examined the effect of combined postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on the total and regional ......, which in turn, prevents disease in the elderly....

  7. Hormone replacement therapy: short-term versus long-term use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Mary Ellen

    2002-01-01

    Midwives manage health care of women throughout the life cycle including prescribing hormone replacement therapy (HRT). This article presents a history of research on the use of HRT, as well as risks and benefits. Older research on the effects of HRT on heart disease, osteoporosis, and breast cancer is included. The results and recommendations of the Women's Health Initiative are examined.

  8. Effect of long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy on Plasma Homocysteine in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonna S; Kristensen, Søren R; Klitgaard, Niels A

    2002-01-01

    hormone replacement therapy had significantly lower total homocysteine concentrations than women in the control group; median total homocysteine values were 8.6 micromol/L and 9.7 micromol/L, respectively, in a per-protocol analysis (P =.02). The effect was comparable in all methylenetetrahydrofolate...

  9. Raloxifene and hormone replacement therapy increase arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic levels in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, E.J.; Duschek, E.J.J.; Katan, M.B.; Neele, S.J.; Netelenbos, J.C.; Zock, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens may affect the essential n-6 and n-3 fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3). Therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of hormone replacement therapy and raloxifene, a selective estrogen-receptor modulator, in two randomized,

  10. Should we start and continue growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy in adults with GH deficiency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC

    2000-01-01

    During the last decade, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been described as a clinical syndrome. Central features of this entity include increased fat mass, reduced muscle and bone mass, as well as impaired exercise capacity and quality of life. GH replacement therapy has been initiated

  11. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-28

    Jul 28, 2011 ... Although tamoxifen is the established drug for hormonal treatment of breast cancer, cases of .... This is a growth factor protein which is over‑expressed in different types of .... These groups of drugs act as receptor binding competitors of estrogens and ... Mechanism of Action of Selective Estrogen. Receptor ...

  12. Does hormone replacement therapy and use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch-Johansen, Fatima; Jensen, Allan; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women.......We aimed to examine whether use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptives (OC) affect the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in women....

  13. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on serum homocysteine levels in perimenopausal women : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, AE; Bak, AAA; Lindemans, J; Planellas, J; Bennink, HJTC; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2001-01-01

    Serum homocysteine levels may be lowered by hormone replacement therapy, but randomized controlled trial data are scarce. We performed a single center randomized placebo-controlled trial to assess the 6 months effect of hormone replacement therapy compared with placebo on fasting serum homocysteine

  14. Protein metabolism in Turner syndrome and the impact of hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Riis, Anne Lene; Møller, Niels; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2007-09-01

    Studies have documented an altered body composition in Turner syndrome (TS). Body fat is increased and muscle mass is decreased. Ovarian failure necessitates substitution with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and HRT induces favourable changes in body composition. It is unknown how HRT affects protein metabolism. To test whether alterations in body composition before and after HRT in TS are a result of altered protein metabolism. We performed a randomized crossover study with active treatment (HRT in TS and oral contraceptives in controls) or no treatment. We studied eight women (age 29.7 +/- 5.6 (mean +/- SD) years) with TS, verified by karyotype, and eight age-matched controls (age 27.3 +/- 4.9 years). All subjects underwent a 3-h study in the postabsorptive state. Protein dynamics of the whole body and of the forearm muscles were measured by an amino acid tracer dilution technique using [(15)N]phenylalanine and [(2)H(4)]tyrosine. Substrate metabolism was examined by indirect calorimetry. Energy expenditure was comparable among TS and controls, and did not change during active treatment. Whole-body phenylalanine and tyrosine fluxes were similar in the untreated situations, and did not change during active treatment. Amino acid degradation and protein synthesis were similar in all situations. Muscle protein breakdown was similar among groups, and was not affected by treatment. Muscle protein synthesis rate and forearm blood flow did not differ among groups or due to treatment. Protein metabolism in TS is comparable to controls, and is not affected by HRT.

  15. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswal, B.M.; Mallik, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  16. Effect of hormone replacement on exercise cardiopulmonary reserve and recovery performance in subclinical hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R.M. Mainenti

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH patients present cardiopulmonary, vascular and muscle dysfunction, but there is no consensus about the benefits of levothyroxine (L-T4 intervention on cardiopulmonary performance during exercise. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of L-T4 on cardiopulmonary exercise reserve and recovery in SH patients. Twenty-three SH women, 44 (40-50 years old, were submitted to two ergospirometry tests, with an interval of 6 months of normalization of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH levels (L-T4 replacement group or simple observation (TSH = 6.90 μIU/mL; L-T4 = 1.02 ng/dL. Patients with TSH >10 μIU/mL were excluded from the study to assure that they would receive treatment in this later stage of SH. Twenty 30- to 57-year-old women with no thyroid dysfunction (TSH = 1.38 μIU/mL; L-T4 = 1.18 ng/dL were also evaluated. At baseline, lower values of gas exchange ratio reserve (0.24 vs 0.30; P < 0.05 were found for SH patients. The treated group presented greater variation than the untreated group for pulmonary ventilation reserve (20.45 to 21.60 L/min; median variation = 5.2 vs 25.09 to 22.45 L/min; median variation = -4.75, respectively and for gas exchange ratio reserve (0.19 to 0.27; median variation = 0.06 vs 0.28 to 0.18; median variation = -0.08, respectively. There were no relevant differences in cardiopulmonary recovery for either group at baseline or after follow-up. In the sample studied, L-T4 replacement improved exercise cardiopulmonary reserve, but no modification was found in recovery performance after exercise during this period of analysis.

  17. The effects of progesterone selection on psychological symptoms in hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Emel Kiyak; Kara, Mustafa; Etiz, Sema; Kumru, Pinar; Aka, Nurettin; Kose, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of hormone replacement therapy using dienogest and medroxyprogesterone acetate on psychological symptoms in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. A total of 73 patients who sought treatment at the menopause units of the authors' gynecology and obstetrics clinics between of November 2003 and October 2004 complaining of vasomotor symptoms were included in the study prospectively. The cases were divided into two groups: Group I (37 patients) was given 2 mg estradiol valerate and 2 mg dienogest, and Group II (36 patients) was given 2 mg estradiol valerate and 10 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate. The groups' results in months 0 and 6 were compared through the evaluation of vasomotor and psychological symptom levels. No significant difference was found between the groups when the initial levels of vasomotor and psychological symptom subtypes were compared (p = 0.16). It was observed that all the psychological symptoms decreased in the 6th month in the group using dienogest in comparison with the initial situation, and that psychological symptoms increased in the group using medroxyprogesterone acetate in the evaluation performed in the 6th month compared with the initial levels. It was also found out that there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups when compared in terms of these symptoms (p psychological situation and sleep, it was observed that the use of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) worsens the general psychological situation.

  18. Prevalence of hormone replacement therapy in a sample of middle-aged women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S H; Jeune, B

    1988-01-01

    A survey based on a postal questionnaire sent to a random sample of Danish women aged 40-59 yr living on the island of Fünen (n = 401, response rate = 79%) revealed that the overall prevalence of the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was 16%, the highest rate being in the 50-54 age group (21......%). Among post-menopausal women the rate was 21% and it was highest of all (37%) in those who had undergone an artificial menopause. The median age at the start of treatment was 44.3 yr among the artificial menopause and 48.9 yr among the natural menopause subjects. About half of the women were treated...... with natural oestrogen alone and over a third with cyclic natural oestrogen in combination with progestogens. Almost one-third of the women had consulted their doctor about climacteric complaints and two-thirds of these were current or past users of HRT. The women had ambiguous feelings towards HRT...

  19. Pharmaceutical intervention in menopausal patients with hormone replacement therapy in a community pharmacy from Antofagasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina Alucema

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is the most widely used treatment for controlling the effects of menopause. This type of therapy causes some drug-related problems (DRP, which requires monitoring to control the negative effects and ensure patient adherence to therapy. Aims: Perform a pharmacotherapeutic monitoring and educate to menopausal patients in HRT of a community pharmacy from the city of Antofagasta. Methods: A 98-menopausal patients underwent a pharmaceutical intervention to identify the PRM and its resolution. It was applied to them a survey before and after educational activities about this disease and HRT to determine the knowledge on the subject. Results: During the pharmacotherapeutic monitoring was determined that 55% of patients using combined HRT. 62 DRPs were detected, of which 43 were resolved (69%; the most were Patient-Pharmacist (73%. The better resolution DRP were DRP 4(b “frequency of inadequate administration” and DRP 2(a “no medical indication”. At baseline, 90% had an inadequate level of knowledge about the disease and THR, 8% intermediate, and only 2% adequate. After the implementation of the education strategy, the level of knowledge increased, achieving at the end of the study only intermediate (10% and adequate (90% levels. Conclusions: The results confirm the importance of pharmaceutical intervention for the identification and resolution of DRP and the requirement to establish educational strategies to increase the knowledge about menopause and HRT in menopausal patients.

  20. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities in growth hormone-deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Beentjes; A. van Tol (Arie); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), factors involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, are

  1. Menopausia, hipertensión arterial y terapia de reemplazo hormonal Menopause, blood hypertension and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Navarro Despaigne

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Para evaluar la influencia de la terapia de reemplazo hormonal (THR sobre el síndrome climatérico (SC y los niveles de tensión arterial en mujeres posmenopáusicas con hipertensión arterial (HTA, se realizó un ensayo terapéutico abierto, el cual incluyó 45 mujeres no obesas con HTA ligera/moderada. En cada mujer se evaluó la evolución de los síntomas climatéricos y de los niveles de tensión arterial, así como los efectos indeseables a la THR. Como medicamento las pacientes recibieron Estradiol 2mg + Levonorgestrel 1 mg por día durante 12 meses. Durante la THR disminuyeron los síntomas climatéricos, en particular los vasomotores (de 86,6 a 10 % y los genitourinarios (de 56,7 a 15 %. En la totalidad de las mujeres existió estabilidad en los niveles de tensión arterial. En 5 mujeres hubo necesidad de incrementar la dosis de medicamentos antihipertensivos. En el resto esta se mantuvo o disminuyó. Como efectos indeseables se reportó sangramiento vaginal, mastodinia, cefalea, vasculitis e isquemia del quinto dedo del pie. Las dos últimas pacientes debieron suspender el tratamiento y se presentaron al sexto mes de haber iniciado la THR. En conclusión, en mujeres de edad mediana con hipertensión arterial la THR mejora el síndrome climatérico sin empeorar los niveles de tensión arterial.To evaluate the influence of hormone replacement therapy on the climateric syndrome (CS and the blood pressure values in postmenopausal women with hypertension, an open therapeutic assay was carried out, which included 45 non-obese women with slight/moderate hypertension. The course of the climateric symptoms and the blood pressure levels as well as the adverse effects of HRT were evaluated in every woman. The patients took Estradiol 2mg plus Levonorgestrel 1 mg per day for 12 months as drug therapy. During the application of the HRT, the climateric symptoms, particularly vasomotor (from 86,6 to 10% and genitourinary (from 56,7 to 15% decreased

  2. Combination treatment with T4 and T3: toward personalized replacement therapy in hypothyroidism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2012-07-01

    Levothyroxine therapy is the traditional lifelong replacement therapy for hypothyroid patients. Over the last several years, new evidence has led clinicians to evaluate the option of combined T(3) and T(4) treatment to improve the quality of life, cognition, and peripheral parameters of thyroid hormone action in hypothyroidism. The aim of this review is to assess the physiological basis and the results of current studies on this topic. We searched Medline for reports published with the following search terms: hypothyroidism, levothyroxine, triiodothyronine, thyroid, guidelines, treatment, deiodinases, clinical symptoms, quality of life, cognition, mood, depression, body weight, heart rate, cholesterol, bone markers, SHBG, and patient preference for combined therapy. The search was restricted to reports published in English since 1970, but some reports published before 1970 were also incorporated. We supplemented the search with records from personal files and references of relevant articles and textbooks. Parameters analyzed included the rationale for combination treatment, the type of patients to be selected, the optimal T(4)/T(3) ratio, and the potential benefits of this therapy on symptoms of hypothyroidism, quality of life, mood, cognition, and peripheral parameters of thyroid hormone action. The outcome of our analysis suggests that it may be time to consider a personalized regimen of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. Further prospective randomized controlled studies are needed to clarify this important issue. Innovative formulations of the thyroid hormones will be required to mimic a more perfect thyroid hormone replacement therapy than is currently available.

  3. Change in the use of hormone replacement therapy and the incidence of fracture in Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H E; Lofthus, C M; Søgaard, A J; Falch, J A

    2009-05-01

    Fracture incidence in Oslo decreased from the 1970s to the 1990s in younger postmenopausal women, but not in older women or in men. Concurrently, hormone replacement therapy increased considerably. Using data from the Oslo Health Study, we estimated that roughly half the decline might be attributed hormone replacement therapy. Between the late 1970s and the late 1990s, the incidence of hip fracture and distal forearm fracture decreased in younger postmenopausal women in Oslo, but not in elderly women or in men. The purpose of this report is to evaluate whether the decreased incidence was coherent with trends in use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Data on estrogens were collected from official drug statistics, data on fractures from published studies and data on bone mineral density (BMD) from the Oslo Health Study. The sale of all estrogens increased 22 times from 1979 to 1999, and the sub-category estradiol combined with progestin increased 35 times. In the corresponding period the incidence of distal forearm fracture in women aged 50-64 years decreased by 33% and hip fracture by 39%. Based on differences in BMD between users and non-users of HRT, we estimated that up to half of this decline might be due to HRT. The reduction in fracture incidence in postmenopausal women in Oslo occurred in a period with a substantial increase in the use of HRT. Future surveillance will reveal whether the last years' decline in use of HRT will be translated into increasing fracture rates.

  4. EFFECT OF GROWTH HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY WHO HAVE A HISTORY OF ACROMEGALY VERSUS OTHER DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, Elena; Brick, Danielle J.; Johnson, Jessica C.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the response in quality of life (QoL) to growth hormone (GH) replacement in women with GH deficiency (GHD) and a history of acromegaly with that in women with GHD of other causes. Methods Fifty-five women with GHD were studied: 17 with prior acromegaly and 38 with other causes of GHD. We compared two 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of GH therapy in women with hypopituitarism conducted with use of the same design—one in women with a history of acromegaly and one in women with no prior acromegaly. QoL was assessed with the following questionnaires: the QoL-Assessment of Growth Hormone deficiency in Adults (AGHDA), the Symptom Questionnaire, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results The 2 groups had comparable mean pretreatment age, body mass index, and QoL scores and comparable mean GH dose at 6 months (0.61 ± 0.30 versus 0.67 ± 0.27 mg daily). After 6 months of GH replacement therapy, women with GHD and prior acromegaly demonstrated a greater improvement in AGHDA score, four SF-36 subscales (Role Limitations due to Physical Health, Energy or Fatigue, Emotional Well-Being, and Social Functioning), and the Somatic Symptoms subscale of the Symptom Questionnaire than did women with GHD of other causes. Poorer pretreatment QoL was associated with a greater improvement in QoL after administration of GH. Conclusion In this study, GH replacement therapy improved QoL in women with GHD and a history of acromegaly but not in women with GHD due to other hypothalamic and pituitary disorders. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term risks versus benefits of GH replacement in patients who develop GHD after definitive treatment for acromegaly. PMID:22440981

  5. 45 CFR 201.70 - Treatment of replacement checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of replacement checks. 201.70 Section... STATES FOR PUBLIC ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Review and Audits § 201.70 Treatment of replacement checks. (a... (FFP) for replacement checks under titles I, VI-A, X, XIV, XVI (AABD) except under the circumstances...

  6. Mammographic changes in postmenopausal women : comparative effects between continuous combined hormone and single estrogen replacement therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sug; Choi, Jong Tae; Jung, Kyoon Soon; Jung, Seung Hye [Jeil Women' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    As the use of hormone replacement therapy for the menopausal women increases, some caution is advised, since there is an increased risk of breast cancer. Accordingly, the importance of regular mammography has been addressed. This cross-setional study analyzed the effects of different hormone therapies on mammographic density. Sixty-seven postemenopausal women who had completed one year of hormone therapy and had undergone follow-up mammography, were divided into two groups : Group I : continuous conjugated equine estrogen, 0.625mg, plus continuous medroxyprogesterone acetate, 2.5mg (n=48), Group II : continuous conjugated equine estrogen 0.625mg (n=19). The mammograms were read by two radiologists. With regard to the radiologists involved, interobserver reliabillity (kappa) was 0.70 and intraobserver reliability (kappa) was 0.51 and 0.67. Before hormone therapy, factors related to decreased mammographic density were age and number of full term pregnancies (p<0.05). After one year of hormone therapy, body fat showed a significant increase (p<0.05), but in spite of this, increased mammographic density induced by hormone therapy remained significantly high (p<0.05). Compared with Group II, Group I showed a significant increase in mammographic density (p<0.05). In Group I, mammographic density increased from P2 to DY pattern in two cases, but there was no such change in Group II. The increase of mammographic density seen in Group II was much more significant statistically than that seen in Group I. The mammograms of women who have undergone continuous combined hormone therapy should therefore be interpreted very cautiously.

  7. Mammographic changes in postmenopausal women : comparative effects between continuous combined hormone and single estrogen replacement therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sug; Choi, Jong Tae; Jung, Kyoon Soon; Jung, Seung Hye

    1997-01-01

    As the use of hormone replacement therapy for the menopausal women increases, some caution is advised, since there is an increased risk of breast cancer. Accordingly, the importance of regular mammography has been addressed. This cross-setional study analyzed the effects of different hormone therapies on mammographic density. Sixty-seven postemenopausal women who had completed one year of hormone therapy and had undergone follow-up mammography, were divided into two groups : Group I : continuous conjugated equine estrogen, 0.625mg, plus continuous medroxyprogesterone acetate, 2.5mg (n=48), Group II : continuous conjugated equine estrogen 0.625mg (n=19). The mammograms were read by two radiologists. With regard to the radiologists involved, interobserver reliabillity (kappa) was 0.70 and intraobserver reliability (kappa) was 0.51 and 0.67. Before hormone therapy, factors related to decreased mammographic density were age and number of full term pregnancies (p<0.05). After one year of hormone therapy, body fat showed a significant increase (p<0.05), but in spite of this, increased mammographic density induced by hormone therapy remained significantly high (p<0.05). Compared with Group II, Group I showed a significant increase in mammographic density (p<0.05). In Group I, mammographic density increased from P2 to DY pattern in two cases, but there was no such change in Group II. The increase of mammographic density seen in Group II was much more significant statistically than that seen in Group I. The mammograms of women who have undergone continuous combined hormone therapy should therefore be interpreted very cautiously

  8. Lipoproteína a, aterosclerosis y terapia hormonal de reemplazo Lipoprotein a, atherosclerosis and replacement hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Lugones Botell

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión sobre la lipoproteína plasmática, Lp(a, cuyo papel fisiológico es poco conocido. Se ha descrito una asociación entre las concentraciones aumentadas de Lp(a y el proceso aterosclerótico. Además, su exceso podría inducir una disminución de la actividad fibrinolítica y, por tanto, favorecer la trombosis. También analizamos la terapia hormonal de reemplazo. En relación con los efectos positivos, mejora los síntomas climatéricos y previene la osteoporosis, aunque entre los efectos adversos en las mujeres que la siguen, se ha descrito un ligero aumento del riesgo del tromboembolismo venoso, y más recientemente, en estudios realizados en EE.UU. en los años 2002 y 2004, en el ya conocido estudio (Women´s Health Initiative Study, se reportó mayor incidencia de eventos cardiovasculares para la terapia combinada con estrógenos conjugados equinos y medroxiprogesterona, y de stroke para la terapia estrogénica. Estos estudios pusieron en su lugar los efectos de esta terapia, que no es totalmente inocua. Se precisan estudios más amplios para definir el papel de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo y otras medidas terapéuticas sobre el sistema hemostático, el metabolismo lipídico y la enfermedad cardiovascular.A review of plasmatic lipoprotein, Lp(a, whose physiological role is little known, was made. An association between the augmented concentrations of Lp(a and the atherosclerotic proccess has been described. Besides, its excess may lead to a reduction of the fibrinolytic activity and, therefore, favor thrombosis. The replacement hormone therapy was also analyzed. In relation to its positive effects, it improves the climacteric symptoms and prevents osteoporosis. Among its adverse effects, it has been observed a mild increase of the risk for venous thromboembolism and, more recently, in the aleady known Women's Health Initiative Study, it was reported a higher incidence of cardiovascular events for the combined

  9. Influence of growth hormone replacement on neurological and psychomotor development. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Felipe; Eisencraft, Adriana Pasmanik; Crisostomo, Lindiane Gomes

    2018-05-14

    The height response to the use of growth hormone in short height cases has already been confirmed in the literature. The influence of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH-IGF1) axis components on development, function, regeneration, neuroprotection, cognition, and motor functions has been evaluated in experimental studies and in adults with central nervous system lesions. However, there is still little research on the clinical impact of hormone replacement on neurological and psychomotor development. This report presents the case of a patient with excellent weight-height recovery and, even more surprisingly, neurological and psychomotor development in response to use of growth hormone. The result strengthens the correlation between experimental and clinical findings related to cerebral plasticity response to growth hormone in children. A preterm male patient with multiple health problems during the neonatal and young infancy period, who for six years presented with a relevant deficit in growth, bone maturation, and neurological and psychomotor development. At six years of age, he had low stature (z-score -6.89), low growth rate, and low weight (z-score -7.91). He was incapable of sustaining his axial weight, had not developed fine motor skills or sphincter control, and presented with dysfunctional swallowing and language. Supplementary tests showed low IGF-11 levels, with no changes on the image of the hypothalamus-pituitary region, and bone age consistent with three-year-old children - for a chronological age of six years and one month. Growth hormone replacement therapy had a strong impact on the weight-height recovery as well as on the neurological and psychomotor development of this child.

  10. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on the bone mass and urinary excretion of pyridinium cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, D P; Sabino, A T; Meneses, A M; Kasamatsu, T; Vieira, J G

    2000-01-06

    The menopause accelerates bone loss and is associated with an increased bone turnover. Bone formation may be evaluated by several biochemical markers. However, the establishment of an accurate marker for bone resorption has been more difficult to achieve. To study the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on bone mass and on the markers of bone resorption: urinary excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. Cohort correlational study. Academic referral center. 53 post-menopausal women, aged 48-58 years. Urinary pyr and d-pyr were measured in fasting urine samples by spectrofluorometry after high performance liquid chromatography and corrected for creatinine excretion measured before treatment and after 1, 2, 4 and 12 months. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) before treatment and after 12 months of HRT. The BMD after HRT was about 4.7% (P < 0.0004); 2% (P < 0.002); and 3% (P < 0. 01) higher than the basal values in lumbar spine, neck and trochanter respectively. There were no significant correlations between pyridinium cross-links and age, weight, menopause duration and BMD. The decrease in pyr and d-pyr was progressive after HRT, reaching 28.9% (P < 0.0002), and 42% (P < 0.0002) respectively after 1 year. Urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion decreases early in hormone replacement therapy, reflecting a decrease in the bone resorption rate, and no correlation was observed with the bone mass evaluated by densitometry.

  11. Book review of "The estrogen elixir: A history of hormone replacement therapy in America" by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    "The Estrogen elixir: A history of hormone replacement therapy in America" by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins is a thoroughly documented cautionary tale of the information and advice offered to women in the perimenopausal period of their life, and the consequences of exposure to sexual hormones on their health and wellbeing.

  12. Book review of The Estrogen Elixir: A History of Hormone Replacement Therapy in America by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnenschein Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Estrogen Elixir: A History of Hormone Replacement Therapy in America by Elizabeth Siegel Watkins is a thoroughly documented cautionary tale of the information and advice offered to women in the perimenopausal period of their life, and the consequences of exposure to sexual hormones on their health and wellbeing.

  13. Doubling in the use of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in Denmark: association to iodization of salt?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, Charlotte; Knudsen, Nils; Ovesen, Lars; Laurberg, Peter; Perrild, Hans; Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Jørgensen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Iodization of salt is an effective strategy to prevent iodine deficiency disorders. Recent studies, however, indicate that increasing the iodine intake in a population may give rise to an increased incidence of hypothyroidism, but the association has not been fully clarified. In Denmark, iodization of salt was initiated in 1998 because of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the raised iodine intake on the nationwide incident use of thyroid hormone replacement therapy (levothyroxine) to treat hypothyroidism. Data on all use of levothyroxine was extracted from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics during the period 1995–2009 and linked to other nationwide registers by use of the Danish identification number. Persons with previous thyroid surgery were excluded. In the studied period 71,565 incident users were identified. The incidence rate increased 75% in the moderately iodine deficient region (72.2 incident users/100,000 person-years in 1997 to 126.6 in 2008) and 87% in the mildly deficient region (86.9–162.9). When stratified by sex and age-group (00–39, 40–64, 65+) the largest relative increase was seen among women in the youngest age-group, where more than a doubling was seen. The mechanisms behind the increase may be a result of iodine-induced hypothyroidism, although a higher diagnostic activity with regard to thyroid dysfunction and intensified treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism may also play a role. Our findings stress the need for caution when initiating iodine fortification programs to keep the intake within the optimal range, and the need for continuous monitoring.

  14. Hormonal Replacement in Hypopituitarism in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleseriu, Maria; Hashim, Ibrahim A; Karavitaki, Niki; Melmed, Shlomo; Murad, M Hassan; Salvatori, Roberto; Samuels, Mary H

    2016-11-01

    To formulate clinical practice guidelines for hormonal replacement in hypopituitarism in adults. The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of six experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the Pituitary Society, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline. The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned two systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the Pituitary Society, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Using an evidence-based approach, this guideline addresses important clinical issues regarding the evaluation and management of hypopituitarism in adults, including appropriate biochemical assessments, specific therapeutic decisions to decrease the risk of co-morbidities due to hormonal over-replacement or under-replacement, and managing hypopituitarism during pregnancy, pituitary surgery, and other types of surgeries.

  15. A boy with Prader-Willi syndrome: unmasking precocious puberty during growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Natasha G; Radaeli, Rafael F; Silva, Mariana M X; Romero, Camila M; Carrilho, Alexandre J F; Bessa, Danielle; Macedo, Delanie B; Oliveira, Maria L; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Mazzuco, Tânia L

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder frequently characterized by obesity, growth hormone deficiency, genital abnormalities, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Incomplete or delayed pubertal development as well as premature adrenarche are usually found in PWS, whereas central precocious puberty (CPP) is very rare. This study aimed to report the clinical and biochemical follow-up of a PWS boy with CPP and to discuss the management of pubertal growth. By the age of 6, he had obesity, short stature, and many clinical criteria of PWS diagnosis, which was confirmed by DNA methylation test. Therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement (0.15 IU/kg/day) was started. Later, he presented psychomotor agitation, aggressive behavior, and increased testicular volume. Laboratory analyses were consistent with the diagnosis of CPP (gonadorelin-stimulated LH peak 15.8 IU/L, testosterone 54.7 ng/dL). The patient was then treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa). Hypothalamic dysfunctions have been implicated in hormonal disturbances related to pubertal development, but no morphologic abnormalities were detected in the present case. Additional methylation analysis (MS-MLPA) of the chromosome 15q11 locus confirmed PWS diagnosis. We presented the fifth case of CPP in a genetically-confirmed PWS male. Combined therapy with GnRHa and rhGH may be beneficial in this rare condition of precocious pubertal development in PWS.

  16. Electrodiagnostic studies in presumptive primary hypothyroidism and polyneuropathy in dogs with reevaluation during hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Elżbieta Gabriela; Płonek, Marta; Nicpoń, Józef Marian; Wrzosek, Marcin Adam

    2016-05-21

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological manifestation of canine hypothyroidism. Data concerning electrodiagnostic studies in hypothyroid associated polyneuropathy in dogs are very limited and usually lack a reevaluation after hormone replacement therapy. The objective of this study was to perform a detailed, retrospective analysis of electromyographic (EMG), motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), F-wave and brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) findings in 24 dogs with presumptive primary hypothyroidism and polyneuropathy with a comparison of the results before and after initiation of levothyroxine treatment with the assessment of the clinical outcome. The results obtained from hypothyroid dogs showed a significant reduction in MNCV at a proximal-distal and middle-distal stimulation, decreased amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), an increased CMAP duration and a prolonged distal latency prior to treatment. Fifty percent of the dogs had an increased F-wave latency. A normal BAER recording was found in 78 % of the hypothyroid patients without vestibular impairment. Bilaterally increased peak V latencies and increased interpeak I-V latencies were found in the remaining individuals. Dogs with concurrent vestibular impairment had ipsilaterally increased peak latencies with normal interpeak latencies and decreased amplitudes of wave I and II. A comparison of the findings before and after 2 months of treatment revealed a decrease in the pathological activity on EMG, an improvement of proximal, middle and distal CMAP amplitudes and an increase in the proximal-distal conduction velocity in all dogs. F-wave latency improved in 38 % of dogs. The BAER reexamination revealed a persistent prolongation of peak I, II, III and V latencies and decreased wave I amplitude on the affected side in all dogs manifesting vestibular signs. Conversely, in dogs without vestibular signs, the peak V and interpeak I-V latencies decreased to normal values

  17. Breast cancer with different prognostic characteristics developing in Danish women using hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia; Pedersen, A T; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic

    2004-01-01

    of receptor-negative breast cancer, relative risk (RR) 3.29 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.77) and RR 0.99 (95% CI: 0.42-2.36), respectively (P for difference=0.013). The risk of being diagnosed with low histological malignancy grade was higher than high malignancy grade with RR 4.13 (95% CI: 2......The aim of this study is to investigate the risk of developing prognostic different types of breast cancer in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A total of 10 874 postmenopausal Danish Nurses were followed since 1993. Incident breast cancer cases and histopathological information were...... retrieved through the National Danish registries. The follow-up ended on 31 December 1999. Breast cancer developed in 244 women, of whom 172 were invasive ductal carcinomas. Compared to never users, current users of HRT had an increased risk of a hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, but a neutral risk...

  18. Reversal learning in gonadectomized marmosets with and without hormone replacement: are males more sensitive to punishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaClair, Matthew; Lacreuse, Agnès

    2016-05-01

    This study examined sex differences in executive function in middle-aged gonadectomized marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with or without hormonal replacement. We tested ten castrated male (mean age 5.5 years) marmosets treated with testosterone cypionate (T, n = 5) or vehicle (n = 5) on Reversal Learning, which contributes to cognitive flexibility, and the Delayed Response task, measuring working memory. Their performance was compared to that of 11 ovariectomized females (mean age = 3.7 years) treated with Silastic capsules filled with 17-β estradiol (E2, n = 6) or empty capsules (n = 5), previously tested on the same tasks (Lacreuse et al. in J Neuroendocrinol 26:296-309, 2014. doi: 10.1111/jne.12147). Behavioral observations were conducted daily. Females exhibited more locomotor behaviors than males. Males and females did not differ in the number of trials taken to reach criterion on the reversals, but males had significantly longer response latencies, regardless of hormone replacement. They also had a greater number of refusals than females. Additionally, both control and T-treated males, but not females, had slower responses on incorrect trials, suggesting that males were making errors due to distraction, lack of motivation or uncertainty. Furthermore, although both males and females had slower responding following an incorrect compared to a correct trial, the sex difference in response latencies was disproportionally large following an incorrect trial. No sex difference was found in the Delayed Response task. Overall, slower response latencies in males than females during Reversal Learning, especially during and following an incorrect trial, may reflect greater sensitivity to punishment (omission of reward) and greater performance monitoring in males, compared to females. Because these differences occurred in gonadectomized animals and regardless of hormone replacement, they may be organized early in life.

  19. Description of women's personality traits and psychological vulnerability prior to choosing hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loekkegaard, E; Eplov, L F; Køster, A

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Data suggest that women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) represent a special subgroup of the general population regarding, for instance, cardiovascular risk factors and education. OBJECTIVE: To analyse if women who choose HRT are characterised a priori by high neuroticism sco...... confounders. The study suggests that selection bias among women choosing HRT may also include personality traits....... included Eysencks personality questionnaire concerning intro/extroversion and neuroticism. At the age of 45, the re-examination of the women included a test for psychological vulnerability. The participants reported whether or not they used HRT at the age of 40, 45, 51 and 60 years. The analyses comprised...

  20. Growing up with short stature : Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-van Balen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Growing up with short stature. Psychosocial consequences of hormone treatment To enhance height in children with short stature, growth hormone (GH) can be used. In short children without a detectable pathology underlying their short stature, there is no medical rationale for growth hormone

  1. Endogenous hormones in postmenopausal females with breast cancer--before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Aniljeet S; Arora, Megha K; Seth, Shashi; Chauhan, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is usually present for many years (as long as 5-10 years) before it can be clinically diagnosed (theory of the 'dormant malignant cell'). This implies that breast cancer cells, during their subclinical period, are likely to have been exposed for a considerable time to endogenous sex hormones and endogenous hormonal milieu predicts the chances of breast cancer in females. So, we planned this study to evaluate the role of endogenous hormones in postmenopausal females excluding the patients on hormone replacement therapy as the relationship between breast cancer and hormone replacement therapy is well known. Hormone therapy is known to affect these hormone levels but whether treatment of breast cancer per se also decreases the hormone levels is not known. We planned the present study to determine hormone levels in patients before and after 4 months of treatment (chemotherapy/surgery and radiotherapy). Circulating hormone levels were measured using a chemiluminescence method. Their results were compared with a group of 25 age matched healthy controls. We found that serum prolactin, testosterone and estrogen levels were very significantly higher in patients before treatment (Group I) as compared to controls (Group III). Serum prolactin and serum estrogen levels were significantly higher and serum testosterone was very significantly higher in patients before treatment (Group I) when compared after 4 months of treatment (Group II). Only serum estrogen levels were significantly high in patients after treatment (Group II) as compared to controls (Group III). Serum progesterone levels showed no significant difference to any of the groups. We concluded that postmenopausal females with breast cancer have abnormalities in hormone levels. These abnormalities may be considered in the pathogenesis of the disease and should be taken into account in the treatment of patients of breast cancer. It might also be helpful to delay the onset of cancer by normalizing the

  2. The effects of growth hormone deficiency and growth hormone replacement therapy on intellectual ability, personality and adjustment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga González, B; Ferrández Longás, A; Oyarzábal, M; Nosas, R

    2010-06-01

    Traditionally, it has been assumed that intellectual development in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is distributed between ranges of a normal population based on the observation that it does not differ substantially from that of children of the same age. Nevertheless, few studies have investigated this assumption. This Spanish Collaborative study was prospectively planned with two main purposes: to study a possible influence of GHD on intelligence quotient (IQ), personality traits and adaptative capacity and to study the evolution of these parameters during substitution therapy with growth hormone (GH). Although the overall intellectual ability of children with GHD is comparable to that of a normal reference population, some areas such the motor-component scale (evaluated by McCarthy test) and performance IQ (evaluated by WISC-R) were below the mean at the beginning of the study, showing significant improvement during therapy. Emotional adjustment (normal at study start) also improved significantly during treatment. Females showed better adjustment capacity before and during GH therapy. Longer studies with an increased number of cases are needed to confirm these effects of GHD and its treatment in children.

  3. Resolution of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis after growth hormone replacement in a pediatric liver transplant patient with panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Thomas; Dufour, Sylvie; Shulman, Gerald I; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Emre, Sukru H

    2016-12-01

    NAFLD is a common condition linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Simple hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for inflammatory reactions in the liver (NASH), which may lead to cirrhosis. While the mechanism is unclear, NAFLD and NASH are associated with panhypopituitarism, which in the pediatric population often results from craniopharyngioma or pituitary adenoma and the sequelae of treatment, causing hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and GH deficiency. Refractory NAFLD in panhypopituitarism may be amenable to GH replacement. Here, we report a pediatric case of NASH secondary to panhypopituitarism from craniopharyngioma, which recurred by 11 months after LDLT. Despite low-dose GH replacement, the patient remained GH deficient. Pubertal dosed GH therapy led to rapid and complete resolution of hepatic steatosis, which we tracked using serial 1 H MRS. Pediatric patients with NASH cirrhosis secondary to panhypopituitarism can be good candidates for liver transplantation, but hormone deficiencies predispose to recurrence after transplant. High-dose GH replacement should be considered in pediatric patients with GH deficiency and recurrent disease. A multidisciplinary team approach is essential for successful outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of different progestin regimens in hormone replacement therapy on blood coagulation factor VII and tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Skouby, S O.; Andersen, L F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces cardiovascular risk, but an early increased risk was reported in women with coronary heart disease. In such women the arterial intima can express tissue factor, and changes in coagulation factor VII (factor VII) and tissue factor...... pathway inhibitor (TFPI) may be deleterious. METHODS: We measured factor VII clotting activity, activated factor VII, and concentrations of factor VII and TFPI during 12 months in healthy post-menopausal women randomized to: (i). cyclic oral estrogen/progestin (n = 25); (ii). long-cycle oral estrogen......: No variations were observed in the reference group. There was a substantial decrease in TFPI concentrations in the HRT groups irrespective of the type of progestin. In women receiving long-cycle treatment, all factor VII measures increased during the unopposed estrogen periods, and the increase was reversed...

  5. Hormonal treatment for endometriosis associated pelvic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shun Felix Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Endometriosis is a common gynecological problem associated with chronic pelvic pain. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of current hormonal treatments of endometriosis associated pain.Materials and Methods: Randomized Controlled studies identified from databases of Medline and Cochrane Systemic Review groups were pooled. 7 RCTs were recruited for evaluation in this review. Data from these studies were pooled and meta-analysis was performed in three comparison groups: 1 Progestogen versus GnRHa; 2 Implanon versus Progestogen (injection; 3 Combined oral contraceptive pills versus placebo and progestogen. Response to treatment was measured as a reduction in pain score. Pain improvement was defined as improvement ≥1 at the end of treatment. Results: There was no significant difference between treatment groups of progestogen and GnRHa (RR: 0.036; CI:-0.030-0.102 for relieving endometriosis associated pelvic pain. Long acting progestogen (Implanon and Mirena are not inferior to GnRHa and depot medroxy progesterone acetate (DMPA (RR: 0.006; CI:-0.142-0.162. Combined oral contraceptive pills demonstrated effective treatment of relieving endometriosis associated pelvic pain when compared with placebo groups (RR:0.321CI-0.066-0.707. Progestogen was more effective than combined oral contraceptive pills in controlling dysmenorrhea (RR:-0.160; CI:-0.386-0.066, however, progestogen is associated with more side effects like spotting and bloating than the combined contraceptive pills. Conclusion: Combined oral contraceptive pills (COCP, GnRHa and progestogens are equally effective in relieving endometriosis associated pelvic pain. COCP and progestogens are relatively cheap and more suitable for long-term use as compared to GnRHa. Long-term RCT of medicated contraceptive devices like Mirena and Implanon are required to evaluate their long-term effects on relieving the endometriosis associated pelvic pain

  6. Circadian hormone profiles and insulin sensitivity in patients with Addison's disease: a comparison of continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion with conventional glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdottir, Sigridur; Øksnes, Marianne; Isaksson, Magnus; Methlie, Paal; Nilsen, Roy M; Hustad, Steinar; Kämpe, Olle; Hulting, Anna-Lena; Husebye, Eystein S; Løvås, Kristian; Nyström, Thomas; Bensing, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    Conventional glucocorticoid replacement therapy in patients with Addison's disease (AD) is unphysiological with possible adverse effects on mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The diurnal cortisol profile can likely be restored by continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion (CSHI). The aim of this study was to compare circadian hormone rhythms and insulin sensitivity in conventional thrice-daily regimen of glucocorticoid replacement therapy with CSHI treatment in patients with AD. An open, randomized, two-period, 12-week crossover multicentre trial in Norway and Sweden. Ten Norwegian patients were admitted for 24-h sampling of hormone profiles. Fifteen Swedish patients underwent euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Thrice-daily regimen of oral hydrocortisone (OHC) and CSHI treatment. We measured the circadian rhythm of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1, (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), glucose, insulin and triglycerides during OHC and CSHI treatment. Euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp was used to assess insulin sensitivity. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion provided a more physiological circadian cortisol curve including a late-night cortisol surge. ACTH levels showed a near normal circadian variation for CSHI. CSHI prevented a continuous decrease in glucose during the night. No difference in insulin sensitivity was observed between the two treatment arms. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion replacement re-established a circadian cortisol rhythm and normalized the ACTH levels. Patients with CSHI replacement had a more stable night-time glucose level compared with OHC without compromising insulin sensitivity. Thus, restoring night-time cortisol levels might be advantageous for patients with AD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on the bone mass and urinary excretion of pyridinium cross-links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Perovano Pardini

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The menopause accelerates bone loss and is associated with an increased bone turnover. Bone formation may be evaluated by several biochemical markers. However, the establishment of an accurate marker for bone resorption has been more difficult to achieve. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT on bone mass and on the markers of bone resorption: urinary excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. DESIGN: Cohort correlational study. SETTING: Academic referral center. SAMPLE: 53 post-menopausal women, aged 48-58 years. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Urinary pyr and d-pyr were measured in fasting urine samples by spectrofluorometry after high performance liquid chromatography and corrected for creatinine excretion measured before treatment and after 1, 2, 4 and 12 months. Bone mineral density (BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA before treatment and after 12 months of HRT. RESULTS: The BMD after HRT was about 4.7% (P < 0.0004; 2% (P < 0.002; and 3% (P < 0.01 higher than the basal values in lumbar spine, neck and trochanter respectively. There were no significant correlations between pyridinium cross-links and age, weight, menopause duration and BMD. The decrease in pyr and d-pyr was progressive after HRT, reaching 28.9% (P < 0.0002, and 42% (P < 0.0002 respectively after 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion decreases early in hormone replacement therapy, reflecting a decrease in the bone resorption rate, and no correlation was observed with the bone mass evaluated by densitometry.

  8. Effect of growth hormone replacement therapy on plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activities in growth hormone-deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; van Tol, A; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement on plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), factors involved in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, We unknown. We carried out a 6 mouths study in 24

  9. Parity, infertility, oral contraceptives, and hormone replacement therapy and the risk of ovarian serous borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Emma L Kaderly; Hannibal, Charlotte Gerd; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined the risk of an ovarian serous borderline tumor (SBT) associated with parity, infertility, oral contraceptives (OCs), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which was the study aim. METHODS: This nationwide case-control study included all women with an SBT...... diagnosis in Denmark, 1978-2002. SBTs were confirmed by centralized expert pathology review. For each case, 15 age-matched female controls were randomly selected using risk-set sampling. Cases and controls with previous cancer (except for non-melanoma skin cancer) and controls with bilateral oophorectomy...... or salpingo-oophorectomy were excluded. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: We found a strongly decreased risk of SBTs among parous women which decreased with increasing number of children (p

  10. Hormone Replacement and Strength Training Positively Influence Balance During Gait in Post-Menopausal Females: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Stephen D.; Bombardier, Eric; Radtke, Alison; Tiidus, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of hormone replacement combined with strength training on improving dynamic balance control in post-menopausal women. Thirty one participating post-menopausal women were divided into three groups (hormone replacement (HR), non-hormone replacement (NR) and control (CR) group). HR and NR groups were tested for muscle strength and balance control during gait, prior to training and following a six week lower body strength training program. Quadriceps muscle strength was evaluated as isokinetic peak torque (60°·sec-1) using a CYBEX NORM and balance control was evaluated by center of mass - base of support relationships and ground reaction forces during gait perturbations. Only the HR group showed significantly (p < 0.05) improved balance control during the initial phase of unexpected gait termination and single stance periods while walking across uneven terrain following training. The strength gains in the HR group tended to be greater than in the NR group over the six week training program, although neither group showed statistically significant increases. The CR group showed no significant differences between testing times. HR in post-menopausal females may enhance dynamic balance control when combined with a strength training program, even if no statistically significant gains in strength are achieved. Key Points This study provides evidence that even a short modest strength training program can enhance dynamic balance control in older adult females taking hormone replacement. If potential benefits of hormone replacement therapy extend to enhancing muscle strength then this would be important in designing optimal interventions for both strength and balance for this cohort. Future work should explore the influence of hormone replacement therapy on other dynamic balance or functional tasks. PMID:24501551

  11. The effect of growth hormone replacement on the thyroid axis in patients with hypopituitarism: in vivo and ex vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Nigel; Kenny, Helena; Quisenberry, Leah; Halsall, David J; Cook, Paul; Kyaw Tun, Tommy; McDermott, John H; Smith, Diarmuid; Thompson, Christopher J; O'Gorman, Donal J; Boelen, Anita; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin; Agha, Amar

    2017-05-01

    Alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis have been reported following growth hormone (GH) replacement. The aim was to examine the relationship between changes in serum concentration of thyroid hormones and deiodinase activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue, before and after GH replacement. A prospective, observational study of patients receiving GH replacement as part of routine clinical care. Twenty adult hypopituitary men. Serum TSH, thyroid hormones - free and total thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) and reverse T3, thyroglobulin and thyroid-binding globulin (TBG) levels were measured before and after GH substitution. Changes in serum hormone levels were compared to the activity of deiodinase isoenzymes (DIO1, DIO2 and DIO3) in subcutaneous adipose tissue. The mean daily dose of growth hormone (GH) was 0·34 ± 0·11 mg (range 0·15-0·5 mg). Following GH replacement, mean free T4 levels declined (-1·09 ± 1·99 pmol/l, P = 0·02). Reverse T3 levels also fell (-3·44 ± 1·42 ng/dl, P = 0·03) and free T3 levels increased significantly (+0·34 ± 0·15 pmol/l, P = 0·03). In subcutaneous fat, DIO2 enzyme activity declined; DIO1 and DIO3 activities remained unchanged following GH substitution. Serum TSH, thyroglobulin and TBG levels were unaltered by GH therapy. In vitro analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue from hypopituitary human subjects demonstrates that GH replacement is associated with significant changes in deiodinase isoenzyme activity. However, the observed variation in enzyme activity does not explain the changes in the circulating concentration of thyroid hormones induced by GH replacement. It is possible that deiodinase isoenzymes are differentially regulated by GH in other tissues including liver and muscle. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. INFLUENCES OF HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ON OLFACTORY AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN THE MENOPAUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L.; Tourbier, Isabelle; Ng, Victoria; Neff, Jessica; Armstrong, Deborah; Battistini, Michelle; Sammel, Mary D.; Gettes, David; Evans, Dwight L.; Mirza, Natasha; Moberg, Paul J.; Connolly, Tim; Sondheimer, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction can be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may protect against developing AD in postmenopausal women, the question arises as to whether it also protects against olfactory dysfunction in such women. Three olfactory and 12 neurocognitive tests were administered to 432 healthy postmenopausal women with varied HRT histories. Serum levels of reproductive hormones were obtained for all subjects; APOE-ε4 haplotype was determined for 77. National Adult Reading Test and Odor Memory/Discrimination Test (OMT) scores were positively influenced by HRT. Odor identification and OMT test scores were lower for women who scored poorly on a delayed recall test, a surrogate for mild cognitive impairment. WAIS-R NI Spatial Span Backwards Test scores were higher in women receiving estrogen plus progestin HRT and directly correlated with serum testosterone levels, the latter implying a positive effect of testosterone on spatial memory. APOE-ε4 was associated with poorer odor threshold test scores. These data suggest that HRT positively influences a limited number of olfactory and cognitive measures in the menopause. PMID:25850354

  13. Modification of blood pressure in postmenopausal women: role of hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannoletta M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Marianna Cannoletta, Angelo Cagnacci Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences of the Mother, Child and Adult, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena and Reggio Emilia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy Abstract: The rate of hypertension increases after menopause. Whether estrogen and progesterone deficiency associated with menopause play a role in determining a worst blood pressure (BP control is still controversial. Also, studies dealing with the administration of estrogens or hormone therapy (HT have reported conflicting evidence. In general it seems that, despite some negative data on subgroups of later postmenopausal women obtained with oral estrogens, in particular conjugated equine estrogens (CEE, most of the data indicate neutral or beneficial effects of estrogen or HT administration on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive women. Data obtained with ambulatory BP monitoring and with transdermal estrogens are more convincing and concordant in defining positive effect on BP control of both normotensive and hypertensive postmenopausal women. Overall progestin adjunct does not hamper the effect of estrogens. Among progestins, drospirenone, a spironolactone-derived molecule, appears to be the molecule with the best antihypertensive properties. Keywords: hormone replacement therapy, estrogen, progestin, blood pressure, menopause, hypertension 

  14. Breast Cancer Suspicion in a Transgender Male-to-Female Patient on Hormone Replacement Therapy Presenting with Right Breast Mass: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Presentation of a Rare Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystina Tongson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing use of hormonal therapy among male-to-female (MtF transgender individuals. This long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT renders MtF individuals a unique patient subgroup in terms of breast cancer risk. This case describes a MtF transgender who presented with a breast lesion concerning for malignancy following hormonal replacement therapy. The patient additionally had a strong family history of breast cancer. Final pathology revealed lobular hyperplasia in the setting of gynecomastia and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH. Both pathology findings are rare in biological females, let alone in the setting of hormone replacement therapy in a MtF individual. While the number of reported cases of suspicious breast lesions in this population remains scarce, it presents both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to the nature of the treatment course and the lack of research in this recently growing subgroup of patients.

  15. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer | Abdulkareem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This critical review focuses on the role of steroid hormones and their receptors in the development and treatment of breast cancer, with special reference to estrogen receptors, as well as mechanisms of receptor.ligand interactions, response or resistance to hormonal therapy against breast cancer, in conjunction with other ...

  16. Risk of low-energy hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures among current and previous users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundrup, Yrsa Andersen; Høidrup, Susanne; Ekholm, Ola

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effect of oestrogen alone and in combination with progestin on the risk of low-energy, hip, wrist, and upper arm fractures. Additionally, to examine to what extent previous use, duration of use as well as recency of discontinuation of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) influences...

  17. Hormone replacement therapy: changes in frequency and type of prescription by Dutch GPs during the last decade of the millenium.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Velden, K. van der; Foets, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The present study was conducted in order to determine the change of frequency and type of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) regimen newly prescribed by Dutch GPs. Methods: A comparison was made of two data sets (multi-stage random samples) collected in 1987/88 and from 1995 to 1998

  18. Sources of information influencing the state-of-the-science gap in hormone replacement therapy usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Chew

    Full Text Available Medical reviews and research comprise a key information source for news media stories on medical therapies and innovations as well as for physicians in updating their practice. The present study examined medical review journal articles, physician surveys and news media coverage of hormone replacement therapy (HT to assess the relationship between the three information sources and whether/if they contributed to a state-of-the-science gap (a condition when the evaluation of a medical condition or therapy ascertained by the highest standards of investigation is incongruent with the science-in-practice such as physician recommendations and patient actions.We content-analyzed 177 randomly sampled HT medical reviews between 2002 and 2014, and HT news valence in three major TV networks, newspapers and magazines/internet sites in 2002-2003, 2008-2009 and 2012-14. The focus in both analyses was whether HT benefits outweighed risks, risks outweighed benefits or both risks and benefits were presented. We also qualitatively content-analyzed all 19 surveys of US physicians' HT recommendations from 2002 to 2009, and 2012 to 2014.Medical reviews yielded a mixed picture about HT (40.1% benefits, 26.0% risks, and 33.9% both benefits and risks. While a majority of physician surveys were pro-HT 10/19, eight showed varied attitudes and one was negative. Newspaper and television coverage reflected a pro and con balance while magazine stories were more positive in the later reporting period.Medical journal review articles, physicians, and media reports all provide varying view points towards hormone therapy use thus leading to limited knowledge about the actual risks and benefits of HT among peri- and menopausal women and a state-of-the-science gap.

  19. Comparison of piascledine (avocado and soybean oil) and hormone replacement therapy in menopausal-induced hot flashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Kashani, Nafise; Baharie Javan, Nika; Dadjo, Yahya

    2011-01-01

    Different symptoms in Climacteric period, includes hot flash. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is common therapy for relief of menopausal symptoms but has possible contraindications and side effects. Recently Piascledine (combination of Avocado oil with Soybean oil) showed effects in reducing hot flash severity. Present study designed to compare the effects of HRT with Piascledine in treatment of hot flash. The cases of this study were sixty-six women at the age range of 40 to 70 years and complaints of menopause-induced hot flashing, whose last menstruation dated at least 6 months prior to the beginning of the study. The patients in this open label clinical trial, randomized to receive Piascledine capsule 1 mg or HRT (0.625 mg oral daily Conjugated Estrogen tablets, plus 2.5 mg continuous oral daily Medroxyprogesterone Acetate tablets) for 2 month. Hot flash property and severity was assessed via a daily check list and Visual analog scale. Climacteric symptom was measured before and after intervention using Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) and Blatt-kupperman Menopausal Index (BKMI). Thirty-three eligible patients were allocated in each group. From the Piascledine group, one patient and from the HRT group, 16 patients weren›t willing to attend the study; therefore, 32 and 17 woman received treatment in Piascledine and HRT groups. 4 patients were withdrawn for vaginal bleeding and one for breast tenderness from HTR group. Hot flash severity in both groups decreased during the time similarly. With regard to GCS (p = 0.571) and BMKI (p = 0.891), the outcome was similar among the two groups. Due to low HRT compliance and its possible risks in long period of time and considering the same activity of soybean supplement and HRT in relieving the hot flash as menopausal symptoms in women, it seems that soybean supplements can be an alternative therapy to hormone.

  20. Study protocol; Thyroid hormone Replacement for Untreated older adults with Subclinical hypothyroidism - a randomised placebo controlled Trial (TRUST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stott, D.J.; Gussekloo, J.; Kearney, P.M.; Rodondi, N.; Westendorp, R.G.; Mooijaart, S.; Kean, S.; Quinn, T.J.; Sattar, N.; Hendry, K.; Puy, R. Du; Elzen, W.P. den; Poortvliet, R.K.; Smit, J.W.A.; Jukema, J.W.; Dekkers, O.M.; Blum, M.; Collet, T.H.; McCarthy, V.; Hurley, C.; Byrne, S.; Browne, J.; Watt, T.; Bauer, D.; Ford, I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is a common condition in elderly people, defined as elevated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal circulating free thyroxine (fT4). Evidence is lacking about the effect of thyroid hormone treatment. We describe the protocol of a large

  1. The optimal growth hormone replacement dose in adults, derived from bioimpedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H; Blok, G J; Voerman, B; de Vries, P; Popp-Snijders, C; van der Veen, E

    1995-07-01

    The prevalence of clinical signs and symptoms related to fluid retention is high in most studies evaluating the efficacy of GH treatment in GH-deficient (GHD) adults. This may be a consequence of supraphysiological GH replacement. To examine whether fluid retention is a dose-related phenomenon, we evaluated the impact of various GH substitution doses on body fluid status in 46 GHD men participating in a 1-yr, double blind, and placebo-controlled study. The patients were randomized to receive either placebo (n = 13) or GH in a dose of 1 (n = 11), 2 (n = 10), or 3 (n = 12) IU/m2.day, respectively. Treatment was started at one third of the predetermined dose and was subsequently increased by another third every month until the maintenance dose was reached. Tissue hydration was assessed by means of electrical impedance measurements. Normal values were obtained from 128 age- and sex-matched controls. In the untreated GHD state, whole body resistance was abnormally high (observed, 642 +/- 82 omega; predicted, 550 +/- 31 omega; P Regression analysis of the pooled data showed that GH replacement in a dose of 1.10 IU/m2.day (95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.45 IU/m2.day) resulted in a normalization of whole body resistance. In conclusion, GH replacement therapy in adults rapidly corrects the preexisting deficit in ECW. This rehydration process is dose dependent and may result in a substantial weight gain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  2. Effects of up to 15 years of recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement on bone metabolism in adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD): the Leiden Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha M; Claessen, Kim M J A; Hamdy, Neveen A T; Pereira, Alberto M; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adulthood may be associated with a decreased bone mineral density (BMD), a decreased bone mineral content (BMC) and an increased fracture risk. Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement induces a progressive increase in BMD for up to 5-7 years of treatment. Data on longer follow-up are, however, scarce. Two hundred and thirty-adult GHD patients (mean age 47·1 years, 52·6% female), of whom 88% patients had adult-onset (AO) GHD, receiving rhGH replacement for ≥5 years were included in the study. Most patients had multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies. Bone turnover markers, BMC and BMD and T-scores at the lumbar spine and femoral neck were evaluated at baseline, and after 5, 10 and 15 years of rhGH replacement. In addition, clinical fracture incidence was assessed. Mean lumbar spine BMD, lumbar spine BMC and T-scores gradually increased during the first 10 years of rhGH replacement and remained stable thereafter. Largest effects of rhGH supplementation were found in men. In the small subset of patients using bisphosphonates, use of bisphosphonates did not impact additional beneficial effects in the long term. Low baseline BMD positively affected the change in BMD and BMC over time, but there was a negative effect of high GH dose at 1 year on the change in BMD and BMC over time. Clinical fracture incidence during long-term rhGH replacement was 20.1/1000 py. Fifteen years of rhGH replacement in GHD adults resulted in a sustained increase in BMD values at the lumbar spine, particularly in men, and stabilization of BMD values at the femoral neck. Clinical fracture incidence was suggested not to be increased during long-term rhGH replacement. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of Breast Cancer in Korean Women: A Quantitative Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myon Bae

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The epidemiological characteristics of breast cancer incidence by age group in Korean women are unique. This systematic review aimed to investigate the association between hormone replacement therapy (HRT and breast cancer risk in Korean women. Methods: We searched electronic databases such as KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, and RISS4U as well as PubMed for publications on Korean breast cancer patients. We also conducted manual searching based on references and citations in potential papers. All of the analytically epidemiologic studies that obtained individual data on HRT exposure and breast cancer occurrence in Korean women were selected. We restricted the inclusion of case-control studies to those that included age-matched controls. Estimates of summary odds ratio (SOR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using random effect models. Results: One cohort and five case-control studies were finally selected. Based on the heterogeneity that existed among the six studies (I-squared=70.2%, a random effect model was applied. The summary effect size of HRT history from the six articles indicated no statistical significance in breast cancer risk (SOR, 0.983; 95% CI, 0.620 to 1.556. Conclusions: These facts support no significant effect of HRT history in the risk of breast cancer in Korean women. It is necessary to conduct a pooled analysis.

  4. Are women who are taking Hormone Replacement Therapy doing so with informed consent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, E.M

    2003-11-01

    Just over half the population in Britain today are women, and each is likely to spend over one-third of her life in the post menopausal state. The number of post-war 'Baby Boomers' is having a profound effect on interest in the menopause and increasing awareness of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Patients are no longer prepared to passively accept the advice of their doctor, and should make an informed decision over its use, after having been given up-to-date information. Some of the claimed benefits of taking HRT are not fully proven and the risks and disadvantages must be considered, notably the increased risk of breast cancer and the effect on the sensitivity and specificity of the mammographic image. The long-term benefits are still uncertain. Available information needs to be comprehensible, credible, and up to date. Whether to initiate the taking of HRT is one of the most important decisions a woman entering mid-life will make, so she needs to be given information she can understand in order to make an informed decision. HRT and informed consent are topics relevant to mammography, which was the rationale in writing this paper as part of a Post Graduate Certificate in Mammographic Studies.

  5. Association between hormone replacement therapy and dementia: is it time to forget?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Osvaldo P; Flicker, Leon

    2005-06-01

    The results of in vitro and animal studies provide a strong rationale for the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In humans, the results of 16 observational studies are consistent with the hypothesis that estrogen use reduces the risk of AD by 10 to 60%. However, women who are prescribed HRT are less likely to have hypertension, diabetes and history of stroke than nonusers. As all of these factors have been associated with increased risk of dementia (including AD), this "prescription bias" may have a significant impact on the results of observational studies. Randomized trials are designed with the aim of avoiding many of the potential biases and confounding (measured or unmeasured) of observational studies. The results of the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS) indicate that HRT (estrogen plus progestin or estrogen alone) increases the risk of dementia (hazard ratio, HR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.6). Taking into account the results of the WHIMS and the adverse health events associated with the use of estrogen plus progestin or estrogen alone, we conclude that HRT cannot be recommended as a safe and effective strategy to prevent dementia.

  6. Beneficial Effects on Pregnancy Outcomes of Thyroid Hormone Replacement for Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman J. Blumenthal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothyroidism and raised thyroid antibody levels have been associated with adverse obstetrical outcomes. Several studies have investigated causal associations, but results have been inconsistent and few studies have reported the effects of thyroxine replacement therapy on pregnancy outcomes in hypothyroid patients. Objective. The primary study objective was to determine the outcome of pregnancies in women diagnosed with overt and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH (serum TSH > 2.5 mIU/L and those with elevated circulating thyroid autoantibody levels in the first trimester of pregnancy and after the institution of appropriate thyroxine replacement therapy to maintain the serum TSH ≤ 2.5 mIU/L. Study Design. This prospective observational study was undertaken between 2013 and 2016. Blood samples were taken from 1025 women at presentation for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb, and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb. Those with a TSH > 2.5 mIU/L were treated with thyroxine and managed appropriately to ensure that the TSH was maintained ≤2.5 mIU/L. Outcomes in these patients were compared to those in euthyroid patients. Maternal antenatal complications and perinatal outcomes were recorded. Results. There were a total of 1025 patients of whom 382 (37.5% were nulliparous. 10.1% had a TSH level > 2.5 mIU/L and 18.2% had at least one raised thyroid antibody level. No differences in adverse outcomes of pregnancy were evident in women treated for SCH or overt hypothyroidism compared to the euthyroid group. There was also no association between raised thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy outcomes in either group. Conclusion. There were no adverse outcomes of pregnancy found in pregnant women who had been diagnosed and treated with thyroxine for SCH at the time of presentation when compared to euthyroid patients. There was also no relationship with thyroid antibodies and adverse pregnancy

  7. Salivary cortisol and explicit memory in postmenopausal women using hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Elizabeth; Duff-Canning, Sarah J

    2016-02-01

    Circulating cortisol levels are known to influence explicit memory in humans and other primates. The present study investigated salivary cortisol and its association with explicit memory performance in 99 postmenopausal women (64 treated with conjugated equine estrogens or estradiol, and 35 matched controls not using any form of hormone therapy). Controls were compared with treated women taking estrogens alone (n=39), or taking estrogens in combination with a progestin (n=25). Mean time on hormone therapy was approximately 5 years, with initiation of treatment in close proximity to the onset of menopause. Explicit memory was assessed with the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT). Saliva was collected before (basal or resting sample) and after (post-test sample) completing a set of cognitive tasks. Cortisol was measured using a high-sensitivity radioimmunoassay. Treated women were found to have higher resting cortisol concentrations than controls matched for time of day. Basal cortisol was a modest predictor of learning and memory on the CVLT. Higher cortisol was associated with better recall and fewer memory errors, which is consistent with experimental studies examining explicit memory under small increases in circulating cortisol load. Potential cumulative effects on the central nervous system of sustained exposure to mildly increased cortisol in conjunction with the long-term use of oral estrogens are discussed in the context of aging and dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Benign Phyllodes Tumor Mimicking a Malignancy in a Turner Syndrome Woman with Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woong Jae; Chong, Se Min; Pang, Jae Choon; Seo, Jae Seung; Byun, Jun Soo; Seok, Ju Won; Shin, Hee Jung; Gong, Gyung Yub

    2010-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a relatively rare fibroepithelial tumor. Turner syndrome is a condition that affects approximately 50 per 100,000 females and includes total or partial absence of one X chromosome in all or part of the cells, reduced final height, absence of female sex hormone, and infertility. In this case report, we describe the first case of a benign phyllodes tumor mimicking a malignancy at breast US in a 26-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who had been undergoing hormone replacement therapy

  9. Benign Phyllodes Tumor Mimicking a Malignancy in a Turner Syndrome Woman with Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woong Jae; Chong, Se Min; Pang, Jae Choon; Seo, Jae Seung; Byun, Jun Soo; Seok, Ju Won [Chung-Ang University Medical Center, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hee Jung; Gong, Gyung Yub [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Mdeicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a relatively rare fibroepithelial tumor. Turner syndrome is a condition that affects approximately 50 per 100,000 females and includes total or partial absence of one X chromosome in all or part of the cells, reduced final height, absence of female sex hormone, and infertility. In this case report, we describe the first case of a benign phyllodes tumor mimicking a malignancy at breast US in a 26-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who had been undergoing hormone replacement therapy

  10. The effect of growth hormone replacement in patients with hypopituitarism on pituitary tumor recurrence, secondary cancer, and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, Sina; Alahdab, Fares; Ahmed, Ahmed T; Tamhane, Shrikant U; Sharma, Anu; Donegan, Diane; Nippoldt, Todd B; Murad, M Hassan

    2017-05-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy has benefits for patients with hypopituitarism. The safety profile in regard to tumor recurrence or progression, development of secondary malignancies, or cerebrovascular stroke is still an area of debate. A comprehensive search of multiple databases-MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus was conducted through August 2015. Eligible studies that evaluated long-term adverse events in adult patients with hypopituitarism treated with growth hormone replacement therapy and reported development of pituitary tumor recurrence or progression, secondary malignancies, or cerebrovascular stroke were selected following a predefined protocol. Reviewers, independently and in duplicate, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool relative risks and 95 % confidence intervals. We included 15 studies (published 1995-2015) that reported on 46,148 patients. Compared to non-replacement, growth hormone replacement therapy in adults with hypopituitarism was not associated with statistically significant change in pituitary tumor progression or recurrence (relative risk, 0.77; 95 % confidence interval, 0.53-1.13) or development of secondary malignancy (relative risk, 0.99; 95 % confidence interval, 0.70-1.39). In two retrospective studies, there was higher risk of stroke in patients who did not receive replacement (relative risk, 2.07; 95 % confidence interval, 1.51-2.83). The quality of evidence is low due to study limitations and imprecision. This systematic review and meta-analysis supports the overall safety of growth hormone therapeutic use in adults with hypopituitarism with no clear evidence of increased risk of pituitary tumor recurrence, malignancy, or stroke.

  11. Efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo sobre la mamografía: nuestra experiencia Effect of replacement hormone therapy on mammography: our experience in this field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Navarro Despaigne

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, cuyo objetivo fue describir el efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo (THR sobre las mamografías de mujeres de edad mediana que asistieron a la Clínica de Climaterio y Osteoporosis (ClimOs entre enero de 1998 y diciembre de 2003. A cada mujer se le realizó mamografía (Mx inicial y durante el uso de la THR, las cuales fueron informadas como: 1 mamografías sin alteraciones, 2 con cambios menores [densidad irregular y microcalcificaciones] y 3 con cambios mayores [nódulos, quistes u otra alteración]. Como tratamiento recibieron estrógenos solos (E, estrógenos y progestagenos combinados continuos (EP y terapia no estrogénica (fitoestrógenos, tibolona. La muestra estuvo constituida por 112 mujeres, con edades entre 34 y 59 años. La Mx inicial mostró: no alteraciones en el 85,5 %, cambios menores en el 9,1 y cambios mayores en el 5,4. En la posTHR (tiempo promedio entre ambos estudios: 2,5 años, el 66 % continuó con mamografías normales, en el 29,0 hubo cambios menores (pA retrospective study was conducted, with the objective of describing the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT on mammography performed on middle-aged females, who had been seen at climacterics and osteoporosis clinics from January 1998 to December 2003. Mammography had been performed on each woman at the beginning and during the use of the HRT, being the results as follows: 1 mammography showing no changes; 2 mammography with slight changes irregular density and microcalcification and 3 mammography with major changes nodules, cysts or any other change . As a treatment, they received estrogen (E, continuos combined estrogen and progestagen (EP and nonestrogen therapy (phytoestrogen, tibolone. The sample was composed of 112 women aged 34 to 59 years. The initial Mx showed no changes in 85,5 %, slight changes in 9,1 and major changes in 5,4 of females. After the application of HRT (average time between both mammographic

  12. Hormonal treatment of obstructed kidneys in patients with prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1993-01-01

    A review of 1288 patients with previously untreated prostatic cancer revealed 209 patients (16%) with ureteric obstruction; the obstruction was bilateral in 36%. The effect of hormonal treatment was assessed in 88 patients with 120 obstructed kidneys: 77 patients had androgen deprivation...... or hormonal medication alone and 11 patients needed percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteric catheters in addition. Drainage improved in 58% of the kidneys. The diverting catheter was withdrawn in 9 of the 11 patients after a median of 4 weeks. In all, 95% of patients were discharged. The patients with hormonal...

  13. Treatable Bedridden Elderly―Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    2016-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27746435

  14. Treatable Bedridden Elderly -Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency.

  15. [Utilization of hormone replacement therapy in Spain: Trends in the period 2000-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladé Martínez, Laura; Montero Corominas, Dolores; Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego

    2016-10-07

    The objective of the study was to describe the trends of utilization, supply and prevalence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Spain during the period 2000-2014. Annual prevalence of HRT use including the 95% CI was calculated for women aged≥40 using individual data from the national population-based database BIFAP. Annual and total-period consumptions were expressed in defined daily doses (DDD) per 1,000 inhabitants per day and were obtained from the databases of medications dispensed in community pharmacies and charged through official prescriptions to the Spanish National Health System. In the year 2000, overall HRT consumption was 33.12 DDDs/1000 inhabitans/day: 19.81 for oestrogen only, 6.88 for tibolone and 6.44 for combined oestrogen and progestagen. In 2014 overall HRT consumption was 5.32 DDDs/1000 inhabitans/day: 1.08 for oestrogen only, 1.61 for tibolone and 2.62 for combinations of oestrogen and progestagen. The marketed presentations of HRT decreased by 46.9%. Prevalence of HRT use in women aged≥40 in BIFAP was 7.19% (95% CI 6.97-7.40) in 2001 and 0.21% (95% CI 0.20-0.22) in 2014. Women aged 40-45 registered the highest prevalence of use in 2014: 0.71% (95% CI 0.66-0.76). A sharp decline in the consumption and prevalence of HRT has been observed in Spain since the publication of the Women's Health Initiative and Million Women Study and the regulatory measures taken restricting conditions of use, showing a similar trend to that of other western countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Thyroiditis de Quervain. Are there predictive factors for long-term hormone-replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenke, S; Klett, R; Braun, S; Zimny, M

    2013-01-01

    Subacute thyroiditis is a usually self-limiting disease of the thyroid. However, approximately 0.5-15% of the patients require permanent thyroxine substitution. Aim was to determine predictive factors for the necessity of long-term hormone-replacement (LTH). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 72 patients with subacute thyroiditis. Morphological and serological parameters as well as type of therapy were tested as predictive factors of consecutive hypothyroidism. Mean age was 49 ± 11 years, f/m-ratio was 4.5 : 1. Thyroid pain and signs of hyperthyroidism were leading symptoms. Initial subclinical or overt hyperthyroidism was found in 20% and 37%, respectively. Within six months after onset 15% and 1.3% of the patients developed subclinical or overt hypothyroidism, respectively. At latest follow-up 26% were classified as liable to LTH. At onset the thyroid was enlarged in 64%, and at latest follow-up in 8.3%, with a significant reduction of the thyroid volume after three months. At the endpoint the thyroid volume was less in patients in the LTH group compared with the non-LTH group (41.7% vs. 57.2% of sex-adjusted upper norm, p = 0.041). Characteristic ultrasonographic features occurred in 74% of the patients in both lobes. Serological and morphological parameters as well as type of therapy were not related with the need of LTH. In this study the proportion of patients who received LTH was 26%. At the endpoint these patients had a lower thyroid volume compared with euthyroid patients. No predictive factors for LTH were found.

  17. The secondary hypothyroidism after radioiodine therapy and the replacement treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ying; Xu Xiaohui

    2004-01-01

    The secondary hypothyroidism is the most important intercurrent disease after radioiodine therapy. The early hypothyroidism and the late hypothyroidism are incompletely different in pathogenesis. It needs researching further. there has not yet been an affirmable answer to choose the distillates from animal hypothyroid extract or complex preparation of levo-thyroxine in replacement treatment. (authors)

  18. Beyond hormone replacement: quality of life in women with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Dzemaili

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Little is known about how women with isolated GnRH deficiency cope with their condition. This study aimed to examine the health and informational needs of women with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH and evaluate if their experiences differ from women with more common forms of infertility. Design: Cross-sectional, multiple methods study using web-based data collection to reach dispersed rare disease patients. Methods: A community-based participatory research framework was employed to develop an online survey and collect quantitative and qualitative data. Adult women diagnosed with CHH who had received at least one year of hormonal treatment completed the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. Information on health care experiences, treatment outcomes and patient-reported challenges were also collected. Results: Women (n = 55 were often diagnosed late (20.7 ± 7.4, range: 10–48 years and 16/20 patients receiving fertility treatment conceived. Poor adherence was frequently observed (34/55 while more than half (27/49 reported a gap in treatment exceeding a year. Low adherence correlated with depressive symptoms (r = 0.3, P > 0.05. Negative illness perceptions were pervasive and 30/55 exhibited some depressive symptoms – significantly greater than women with common female factor infertility (P < 0.01. Symptoms were underappreciated by providers as only 15 of 55 patients had discussions about psychological services. Women identified isolation, need for information and finding expert care as challenges to living with CHH. Conclusions: Despite being a treatable form of female infertility, the presumable availability of treatment does not necessarily ensure adequate quality of life for women with isolated GnRH deficiency.

  19. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on the bone mass and urinary excretion of pyridinium cross-links

    OpenAIRE

    Pardini,Dolores Perovano; Sabino,Anibal Tagliaferri; Meneses,Ana Maria; Kasamatsu,Teresa; Vieira,José Gilberto Henriques

    2000-01-01

    CONTEXT: The menopause accelerates bone loss and is associated with an increased bone turnover. Bone formation may be evaluated by several biochemical markers. However, the establishment of an accurate marker for bone resorption has been more difficult to achieve. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on bone mass and on the markers of bone resorption: urinary excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. DESIGN: Cohort correlational study. SETTING: Academic...

  20. Resistance training and hormone replacement increase MMP-2 activity, quality and quantity of bone in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus V.C Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract AIMS The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of resistance training (RT and hormone replacement (HR on MMP-2 activity, biomechanical and physical properties bone of ovariectomized (OVX rats. METHODS Sprague-Dawley female rats were grouped into six experimental groups (n = 11 per group: sham-operated sedentary (SHAM Sed, ovariectomized sedentary (OVX Sed, sham-operated resistance training (SHAM RT, ovariectomized resistance training (OVX RT, ovariectomized sedentary hormone replacement (OVX Sed-HR, and ovariectomized resistance training hormone replacement (OVX RT-HR. HR groups received implanted silastic capsules with a 5% solution of 17β-estradiol (50 mg 17β-estradiol/ml of sunflower oil. In a 12-week RT period (27 sessions; 4-9 climbs the animals climbed a 1.1 m vertical ladder with weights attached to their tails. Biomechanical and physical bone analyses were performed using a universal testing machine, and MMP-2 activity analysis was done by zymography. RESULTS Bone density and bone mineral content was higher in the RT and HR groups. The MMP-2 activity was higher in the RT and HR groups. The biomechanical analysis (stiffness, fracture load and maximum load demonstrated better bone tissue quality in the RT associated with HR. CONCLUSION The RT alone as well as when it is associated with HR was efficient in increasing MMP-2 activity, biomechanical and biophysical properties bone of ovariectomized rats.

  1. HORMONE REPLACEMENT AND STRENGTH TRAINING POSITIVELY INFLUENCE BALANCE DURING GAIT IN POST-MENOPAUSAL FEMALES: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Perry

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of hormone replacement combined with strength training on improving dynamic balance control in post-menopausal women. Thirty one participating post-menopausal women were divided into three groups (hormone replacement (HR, non-hormone replacement (NR and control (CR group. HR and NR groups were tested for muscle strength and balance control during gait, prior to training and following a six week lower body strength training program. Quadriceps muscle strength was evaluated as isokinetic peak torque (60°·sec-1 using a CYBEX NORM and balance control was evaluated by center of mass - base of support relationships and ground reaction forces during gait perturbations. Only the HR group showed significantly (p < 0.05 improved balance control during the initial phase of unexpected gait termination and single stance periods while walking across uneven terrain following training. The strength gains in the HR group tended to be greater than in the NR group over the six week training program, although neither group showed statistically significant increases. The CR group showed no significant differences between testing times. HR in post-menopausal females may enhance dynamic balance control when combined with a strength training program, even if no statistically significant gains in strength are achieved

  2. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    Information on the course and outcome of pregnancies in growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients is sparse, and GH treatment during pregnancy in such women has not been described previously. We have studied fetal growth and serum levels of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF binding...

  3. Physiological growth hormone replacement and rate of recurrence of craniopharyngioma: the Genentech National Cooperative Growth Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy R; Cote, David J; Jane, John A; Laws, Edward R

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The object of this study was to establish recurrence rates in patients with craniopharyngioma postoperatively treated with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) as a basis for determining the risk of rhGH therapy in the development of recurrent tumor. METHODS The study included 739 pediatric patients with craniopharyngioma who were naïve to GH upon entering the Genentech National Cooperative Growth Study (NCGS) for treatment. Reoperation for tumor recurrence was documented as an adverse event. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were developed for time to recurrence, using age as the outcome and enrollment date as the predictor. Patients without recurrence were treated as censored. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the incidence of recurrence with adjustment for the amount of time at risk. RESULTS Fifty recurrences in these 739 surgically treated patients were recorded. The overall craniopharyngioma recurrence rate in the NCGS was 6.8%, with a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range 0.7-6.4 years.). Age at the time of study enrollment was statistically significant according to both Cox (p = 0.0032) and logistic (p craniopharyngioma after surgery in children, but long-term follow-up of GH-treated patients is required to establish a true natural history in the GH treatment era.

  4. Timing of growth hormone treatment affects trabecular bone microarchitecture and mineralization in growth hormone deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Erika; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Morck, Douglas W; Boyd, Steven K

    2010-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is essential in the development of bone mass, and a growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in childhood is frequently treated with daily injections of GH. It is not clear what effect GHD and its treatment has on bone. It was hypothesized that GHD would result in impaired microarchitecture, and an early onset of treatment would result in a better recovery than late onset. Growth hormone deficient homozygous (lit/lit) mice of both sexes were divided into two treatment groups receiving daily injections of GH, starting at an early (21 days of age) or a late time point (35 days of age, corresponding to the end of puberty). A group of heterozygous mice with normal levels of growth hormone served as controls. In vivo micro-computed tomography scans of the fourth lumbar vertebra were obtained at five time points between 21 and 60 days of age, and trabecular morphology and volumetric BMD were analyzed to determine the effects of GH on bone microarchitecture. Early GH treatment led to significant improvements in bone volume ratio (p=0.006), tissue mineral density (p=0.005), and structure model index (p=0.004) by the study endpoint (day 60), with no detected change in trabecular thickness. Trabecular number increased and trabecular separation decreased in GHD mice regardless of treatment compared to heterozygous mice. This suggests fundamental differences in the structure of trabecular bone in GHD and GH treated mice, reflected by an increased number of thinner trabeculae in these mice compared to heterozygous controls. There were no significant differences between the late treatment group and GHD mice except for connectivity density. Taken together, these results indicate that bone responds to GH treatment initiated before puberty but not to treatment commencing post-puberty, and that GH treatment does not rescue the structure of trabecular bone to that of heterozygous controls. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Long-term Growth Hormone Replacement in Adults With Growth Hormone Deficiency Following Cure of Acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Korbonits, Márta

    2014-01-01

    on GH. The safety population included 164 adults with acroGHD and 2469 with NFPA, all GH-replaced. Both acroGHD and NFPA were compared with several cohorts from the general population (including the World Health Organization Global Burden of Disease). OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures included quality...

  6. GnRH neurons of young and aged female rhesus monkeys co-express GPER but are unaffected by long-term hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugle, Michelle M; Gore, Andrea C

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is caused by changes in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that controls reproduction. Hypophysiotropic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the hypothalamus orchestrate the activity of this axis and are regulated by hormonal feedback loops. The mechanisms by which GnRH responds to the primary regulatory sex steroid hormone, estradiol (E2), are still poorly understood in the context of menopause. Our goal was to determine whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is co-expressed in adult primate GnRH neurons and whether this changes with aging and/or E2 treatment. We used immunofluorescence double-labeling to characterize the co-expression of GPER in GnRH perikarya and terminals in the hypothalamus. Young and aged rhesus macaques were ovariectomized and given long-term (~2-year) hormone treatments (E2, E2 + progesterone, or vehicle) selected to mimic currently prescribed hormone replacement therapies used for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms in women. We found that about half of GnRH perikarya co-expressed GPER, while only about 12% of GnRH processes and terminals in the median eminence (ME) were double-labeled. Additionally, many GPER-labeled processes were in direct contact with GnRH neurons, often wrapped around the perikarya and processes and in close proximity in the ME. These results extend prior work by showing robust co-localization of GPER in GnRH in a clinically relevant model, and they support the possibility that GPER-mediated E2 regulation of GnRH occurs both in the soma and terminals in nonhuman primates.

  7. Physical activity, hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizot, Cécile; Boniol, Mathieu; Mullie, Patrick; Koechlin, Alice; Boniol, Magali; Boyle, Peter; Autier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Lower risk of breast cancer has been reported among physically active women, but the risk in women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) appears to be higher. We quantified the association between physical activity and breast cancer, and we examined the influence that HRT use and other risk factors had on this association. After a systematic literature search, prospective studies were meta-analysed using random-effect models applied on highest versus lowest level of physical activity. Dose-response analyses were conducted with studies reporting physical activity either in hours per week or in hours of metabolic equivalent per week (MET-h/week). The literature search identified 38 independent prospective studies published between 1987 and 2014 that included 116,304 breast cancer cases. Compared to the lowest level of physical activity, the highest level was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85, 0.90) for all breast cancer, 0.89 (95% CI 0.83, 0.95) for ER+/PR+ breast cancer and 0.80 (95% CI 0.69, 0.92) for ER-/PR- breast cancer. Risk reductions were not influenced by the type of physical activity (occupational or non-occupational), adiposity, and menopausal status. Risk reductions increased with increasing amounts of physical activity without threshold effect. In six studies, the SRR was 0.78 (95% CI 0.70, 0.87) in women who never used HRT and 0.97 (95% CI 0.88, 1.07) in women who ever used HRT, without heterogeneity in results. Findings indicate that a physically inactive women engaging in at least 150 min per week of vigorous physical activity would reduce their lifetime risk of breast cancer by 9%, a reduction that might be two times greater in women who never used HRT. Increasing physical activity is associated with meaningful reductions in the risk of breast cancer, but in women who ever used HRT, the preventative effect of physical activity seems to be cancelled out. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  8. Physiologic Growth Hormone-Replacement Therapy and Craniopharyngioma Recurrence in Pediatric Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Nawaf M; Noormohamed, Nadia; Cote, David J; Alharthi, Salman; Doucette, Joanne; Zaidi, Hasan A; Mekary, Rania A; Smith, Timothy R

    2018-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to examine the effect of growth hormone-replacement therapy (GHRT) on the recurrence of craniopharyngioma in children. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched through April 2017 for studies that evaluated the effect of GHRT on the recurrence of pediatric craniopharyngioma. Pooled effect estimates were calculated with fixed- and random-effects models. Ten studies (n = 3487 patients) met all inclusion criteria, including 2 retrospective cohorts and 8 case series. Overall, 3436 pediatric patients were treated with GHRT after surgery and 51 were not. Using the fixed effect model, we found that the overall craniopharyngioma recurrence rate was lower among children who were treated by GHRT (10.9%; 95% confidence interval 9.80%-12.1%; I 2  = 89.1%; P for heterogeneity <0.01; n = 10 groups) compared with those who were not (35.2%; 95% confidence interval 23.1%-49.6%; I 2  = 61.7%; P for heterogeneity = 0.11; n = 3); the P value comparing the 2 groups was <0.01. Among patients who were treated with GHRT, subgroup analysis revealed that there was a greater prevalence of craniopharyngioma recurrence among studies conducted outside the United States (P < 0.01), single-center studies (P < 0.01), lower impact factor studies (P = 0.03), or studies with a lower quality rating (P = 0.01). Using the random-effects model, we found that the results were not materially different except for when stratifying by GHRT, impact factor, or study quality; this led to nonsignificant differences. Both Begg's rank correlation test (P = 0.7) and Egger's linear regression test (P = 0.06) indicated no publication bias. This meta-analysis demonstrated a lower recurrence rate of craniopharyngioma among children treated with GHRT than those who were not. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Abnormal imaging findings of the breast related to hormone replacement therapy: analysis of surgically excised cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Cha, Joo Hee; Cho, Kyung Soo; Choi, Een Wan; Lee, Yu Jin; Im, Jung Gi [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Seok [Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sun Yang [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    To correlate the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings with the pathologic results in women undergoing hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and to determine the characteristic clinical, mammographic or histologic findings of breast cancer in these patients. Twenty-five breast lesions in 25 patients aged 44-65 (mean, 55.5) years undergoing HRT were surgically removed due to abnormal mammographic findings or the presence of palpable masses. Mammograms in all patients and ultrasonograms in 23 were retrospectively analyzed in terms of the shape and margin of the mass, and microcalcifications, and the imaging findings were correlated with the pathologic results. As a control group, 45 cancer patients not undergoing HRT were selected. Using the student t test, detection methods, tumor size, mammographic findings, and the proportion of intraductal cancers were compared between to two groups. Surgical excision revealed ten benign lesions (four fibroadenomas and six cases of fibrocystic change) and 15 cancers (three intraductal and twelve invasive ductal cancers). Abnormal findings at mammography were a mass in 16 cases, clustered microcalcifications in seven, and a mass with microcalcifications in two. Mammography showed that all four circumscribed masses were benign. Five of seven ill-defined masses (71%) and all six spiculated masses were malignant. Three of seven cases (43%) with microcalcifications, and both with a mass and microcalcification, were malignant. In two cases in which ultrasonography revealed cystic lesions, histologic examination showed that fibrocystic change had occurred. Compared to non-HRT-related cancers, HRT-related cancers were more often detected by mammography (60% vs 16%; p<0.001), smaller (17 mm vs 24 mm, p<0.01), showed microcalcification only (20% vs 13%; p<0.05), and were intraductal (20% vs 7%; p<0.01). In patients with HRT, mammographic findings of an ill-defined or spiculated mass, or one with microcalcifications, were associated with

  10. Abnormal imaging findings of the breast related to hormone replacement therapy: analysis of surgically excised cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Cha, Joo Hee; Cho, Kyung Soo; Choi, Een Wan; Lee, Yu Jin; Im, Jung Gi; Kim, Hyung Seok; Chung, Sun Yang; Cho, Nariya

    2004-01-01

    To correlate the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings with the pathologic results in women undergoing hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and to determine the characteristic clinical, mammographic or histologic findings of breast cancer in these patients. Twenty-five breast lesions in 25 patients aged 44-65 (mean, 55.5) years undergoing HRT were surgically removed due to abnormal mammographic findings or the presence of palpable masses. Mammograms in all patients and ultrasonograms in 23 were retrospectively analyzed in terms of the shape and margin of the mass, and microcalcifications, and the imaging findings were correlated with the pathologic results. As a control group, 45 cancer patients not undergoing HRT were selected. Using the student t test, detection methods, tumor size, mammographic findings, and the proportion of intraductal cancers were compared between to two groups. Surgical excision revealed ten benign lesions (four fibroadenomas and six cases of fibrocystic change) and 15 cancers (three intraductal and twelve invasive ductal cancers). Abnormal findings at mammography were a mass in 16 cases, clustered microcalcifications in seven, and a mass with microcalcifications in two. Mammography showed that all four circumscribed masses were benign. Five of seven ill-defined masses (71%) and all six spiculated masses were malignant. Three of seven cases (43%) with microcalcifications, and both with a mass and microcalcification, were malignant. In two cases in which ultrasonography revealed cystic lesions, histologic examination showed that fibrocystic change had occurred. Compared to non-HRT-related cancers, HRT-related cancers were more often detected by mammography (60% vs 16%; p<0.001), smaller (17 mm vs 24 mm, p<0.01), showed microcalcification only (20% vs 13%; p<0.05), and were intraductal (20% vs 7%; p<0.01). In patients with HRT, mammographic findings of an ill-defined or spiculated mass, or one with microcalcifications, were associated with

  11. Myxedema coma and cardiac ischemia in relation to thyroid hormone replacement therapy in a 38-year-old Japanese woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Asaba, Koichi; Takao, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Kozo

    2007-12-01

    Although thyroid hormone deficiency, either clinical or subclinical, is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, coronary ischemia in a premenopausal woman in her 30s is relatively rare. A 38-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with severe breathlessness and depressed consciousness. Physical examination found facial, abdominal, and pretibial edema; coarse hair, hoarse voice, and dry skin; engorged jugular veins; a distant heart sound; and reduced bilateral entry of air into the chest. Laboratory examinations revealed severe hypothyroidism, hyperlipidemia, and elevated serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125). A computed tomography scan showed massive pleural and pericardial effusions. After 3 months of levothyroxine replacement therapy (initial dose: 12.5 microg/d; maintenance dose: 125 microg/d), all abnormal laboratory values associated with hypothyroidism returned to within normal ranges, with the exception of a transient and paradoxical rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. However, 3 weeks after the initiation of therapy, the patient reported intermittent chest pains during the course of therapy, and a coronary artery angiogram revealed diffuse stenosis of all 3 branches. The patient underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, with subsequent improvement in coronary perfusion. Careful cardiovascular evaluation is recommended before the start of thyroid hormone replacement therapy. In addition, care should be taken in the interpretation of serum biomarkers of malignancy (eg, CEA, CA125) in patients with myxedema, as values may be elevated in a hypothyroid state. Long-standing hypothyroidism may be associated with severe coronary atherosclerosis, even in a relatively young, premenopausal woman. The potential adverse cardiovascular effects of thyroid hormone must be considered during replacement therapy, even in relatively young patients.

  12. Overnight Levels of Luteinizing Hormone, Follicle-Stimulating Hormone and Growth Hormone before and during Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analogue Treatment in Short Boys Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaay, Danielle C. M.; de Jong, Frank H.; Rose, Susan R.; Odink, Roelof J. H.; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M.; Sulkers, Eric J.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate if 3 months of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa) treatment results in sufficient suppression of pubertal luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) profile patterns in short pubertal small for gestational age (SGA) boys. To compare growth hormone

  13. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  14. Growth hormone treatment in 35 prepubertal children with achondroplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Niels Thomas; Eklöf, Ole; Ivarsson, Sten

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia with extreme, disproportionate, short stature. AIM: In a 5-y growth hormone (GH) treatment study including 1 y without treatment, we investigated growth and body proportion response in 35 children with achondroplasia. METHODS: Patients were rando...... treatment of children with achondroplasia improves height during 4 y of therapy without adverse effect on trunk-leg disproportion. The short-term effect is comparable to that reported in Turner and Noonan syndrome and in idiopathic short stature.......BACKGROUND: Achondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia with extreme, disproportionate, short stature. AIM: In a 5-y growth hormone (GH) treatment study including 1 y without treatment, we investigated growth and body proportion response in 35 children with achondroplasia. METHODS: Patients were...

  15. Sleeve gastrectomy leads to easy management of hormone replacement therapy and good weight loss in patients treated for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Manuela; Da Broi, Joël; Salerno, Angelo; Testa, Rosa M; Marinari, Giuseppe M

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of sleeve gastrectomy on hormone replacement therapy and on hypothalamic obesity in patients affected by craniopharyngioma with post-surgical pan-hypopituitarism. A retrospective review of three patients, treated for hypothalamic obesity with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, who have previously undergone surgery for craniopharyngioma in their childhood, was done. Patients' mean age and BMI were 22.3 years (range 21-24) and 49.2 kg/m 2 (range 41.6-58.1), respectively. The mean time of delay between neurosurgery and bariatric surgery was 12.3 years (range 6-16). There were no major complications or deaths. At 24 months follow-up, the mean BMI was 35.3 kg/m 2 (range 31.2-40.6). No hydrocortisone and sex steroids dose changes were observed, while levothyroxine was decreased in two patients. Growth hormone replacement therapy was increased in two patients, whereas it was started in one patient. Desmopressin was significantly decreased in all of them. Patients with surgically induced pan-hypopituitarism after craniopharyngioma who become obese, can expect good results from sleeve gastrectomy: this procedure does not have significant negative effects on hormone substitution and leads to a good stabilization of body weight in a mid-term follow-up.

  16. Single-tooth replacement: factors affecting different prosthetic treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Quran Firas A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice between several treatment options for replacing a single missing tooth is influenced by clinical, dentist- and patient-immanent factors. This study aimed to determine the patient factors that would affect the treatment decision to replace a single missing tooth and to assess the satisfaction with several options. Method 200 volunteers involved (121 females and 79 males divided into four groups, Group A: consisted of patients with conventional fixed partial dentures or patients with resin bonded fixed partial dentures. Group B: consisted of patients who received removable partial dentures while Group C: consisted of patients who received a single implant supported crown, and a control group D: consisted of patients who received no treatment. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Results The highest percentage of males within groups (58% was within the removable prostheses category. The majority of the subjects in the study reported that the main reason for replacing a missing tooth was for esthetic and function. Most important factor affecting the choice between treatment modalities was damaging the neighboring teeth. Pain, post operative sensitivity and dental phobia were important factors in choosing the prosthesis type and affected the control group patients not to have any treatment. The highest satisfaction percentage among groups studied was recorded for dental implants then FPD groups, while the least percentage were in both the control and RPD groups, for all aspects of function, esthetic and speech efficiency. Conclusions The final choice between FPD, RPD and implant depended on several factors which affected the decision making; among these is cost and patients' awareness of the different treatment options.

  17. Effects of 1-year growth hormone replacement therapy on thyroid volume and function of the children and adolescents with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Meliksah; Bayramoglu, Elvan; Aycan, Zehra

    2017-10-26

    There are different opinions about the effects of growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) on thyroid function and volume. This study aimed to assess the effects of GHRT on thyroid volume and function in the children and adolescents with growth hormone (GH) deficiency. A total of 29 patients diagnosed with GH deficiency were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 29 cases matched for age, gender and pubertal period with the patients. Thyroid function tests and insulin-like growth factor levels were measured, simultaneously thyroid volumes were assessed by ultrasonography at the initiation period and at the end of GHRT. Thyroid volumes of the patient group was -0.55±1.1 standard deviations (SDs) initially; whereas at the end of 1 year it was found to be -0.29±1.29 SDs and both SDs of thyroid volumes did not differ significantly. The SDs of thyroid volume of the control group was -0.85±1.03 SDs initially and -0.72±0.85 SDs at the end of 1 year; and they did not differ significantly. On the other hand, after GHRT of 1 year, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) levels decreased. It was observed that SDs of thyroid gland volumes did not change in GH deficient children and adolescents after GHRT.

  18. Regression of the increased common carotid artery-intima media thickness in subclinical hypothyroidism after thyroid hormone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Se-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Sun; Park, Seok-Won; Cho, Yong-Wook

    2009-01-01

    The association between subclinical hypothyroidism and cardiovascular disease and the beneficial effect of levothyroxine replacement in subclinical hypothyroidism are still under debate. The present study was designed to determine whether subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with an increase in the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (C-IMT) and whether thyroid hormone replacement can reverse this change in the C-IMT. Patients with newly-diagnosed subclinical (n=36) and overt (n=40) hypothyroidism and healthy euthyroid individuals (n=32) participated in this study. All the patients were examined for clinical characteristics, and the serum lipid levels and the C-IMT were measured. Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism had a C-IMT measurement after 18 months of levothyroxine replacement. There were meaningful differences in total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels between patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroidism. The subjects with subclinical and overt hypothyroidism had a greater C-IMT compared with euthyroid controls (0.66+/- 0.10 and 0.70+/- 0.11 vs. 0.57+/- 0.08 mm, respectively; P replacement significantly decreased the C-IMT (0.67+/- 0.11 to 0.60+/- 0.10 mm; P = 0.021) and improved the lipid profile. Based on multiple regression analysis, the decrement in LDL-cholesterol was independently associated with the regression of the C-IMT. Subclinical hypothyroidism was closely related to an increased C-IMT. Thyroid hormone replacement resulted in regression of the increased C-IMT, which was attributed to the improvement in the lipid profile.

  19. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  20. Growth hormone treatment in non-growth hormone-deficient children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Loche

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Until 1985 growth hormone (GH was obtained from pituitary extracts, and was available in limited amounts only to treat severe growth hormone deficiency (GHD. With the availability of unlimited quantities of GH obtained from recombinant DNA technology, researchers started to explore new modalities to treat GHD children, as well as to treat a number of other non-GHD conditions. Although with some differences between different countries, GH treatment is indicated in children with Turner syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency, Prader-Willi syndrome, deletions/mutations of the SHOX gene, as well as in short children born small for gestational age and with idiopathic short stature. Available data from controlled trials indicate that GH treatment increases adult height in patients with Turner syndrome, in patients with chronic renal insufficiency, and in short children born small for gestational age. Patients with SHOX deficiency seem to respond to treatment similarly to Turner syndrome. GH treatment in children with idiopathic short stature produces a modest mean increase in adult height but the response in the individual patient is unpredictable. Uncontrolled studies indicate that GH treatment may be beneficial also in children with Noonan syndrome. In patients with Prader-Willi syndrome GH treatment normalizes growth and improves body composition and cognitive function. In any indication the response to GH seems correlated to the dose and the duration of treatment. GH treatment is generally safe with no major adverse effects being recorded in any condition.

  1. Model for Quantitative Evaluation of Enzyme Replacement Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radeva B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal disorder. Its enzyme replacement treatment was the new progress of modern biotechnology, successfully used in the last years. The evaluation of optimal dose of each patient is important due to health and economical reasons. The enzyme replacement is the most expensive treatment. It must be held continuously and without interruption. Since 2001, the enzyme replacement therapy with Cerezyme*Genzyme was formally introduced in Bulgaria, but after some time it was interrupted for 1-2 months. The dose of the patients was not optimal. The aim of our work is to find a mathematical model for quantitative evaluation of ERT of Gaucher disease. The model applies a kind of software called "Statistika 6" via the input of the individual data of 5-year-old children having the Gaucher disease treated with Cerezyme. The output results of the model gave possibilities for quantitative evaluation of the individual trends in the development of the disease of each child and its correlation. On the basis of this results, we might recommend suitable changes in ERT.

  2. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symer, Matthew M; Wong, Natalie Z; Abelson, Jonathan S; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Yeo, Heather L

    2018-06-01

    Hormone replacement therapy has been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence, but its effect on colorectal cancer mortality is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hormone replacement therapy on survival from colorectal cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter randomized trial run from 1993 to 2001, with follow-up data recently becoming mature. Participants were women aged 55 to 74 years, without recent colonoscopy. Data from the trial were analyzed to evaluate colorectal cancer incidence, disease-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality based on subjects' use of hormone replacement therapy at the time of randomization: never, current, or former users. A total of 75,587 women with 912 (1.21%) incident colorectal cancers and 239 associated deaths were analyzed, with median follow-up of 11.9 years. Overall, 88.6% were non-Hispanic white, and colorectal cancer incidence in current users compared to never-users was lower (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.94; P = .005), as was death from colorectal cancer (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.47-0.85; P = .002) and all-cause mortality (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.72-0.80; P colorectal cancer incidence and improved colorectal cancer-specific survival, as well as all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Progestins used in hormonal replacement therapy display different effects in coronary arteries from New Zealand white rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nina G; Pedersen, Susan H; Dalsgaard, Tórur

    2004-01-01

    ) medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), (2) norethisterone acetate (NETA), (3) conjugated equine estrogens (CEE), (4) 17-beta-estradiol (E2), (5) MPA+CEE , (6) NETA+E2 , (7) or placebo (n=8) and given hormonal treatment through the diet for 4 weeks. Ring segments from the left proximal coronary artery and from the distal...

  4. An automatic framework for assessing breast cancer risk due to various hormone replacement therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    It is well known that menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998), J.M. Boone(...

  5. An Automatic Framework for Assessing Breast Cancer Risk Due to Various Hormone Replacement Therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    Background: It is well known that Menopausal Hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998),...

  6. Growth hormone replacement does not elevate albuminuria in GH-deficient adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, JAM; Dullaart, RPF

    2002-01-01

    Minor elevations in urinary albumin excretion rate (Ualb.V) are likely to be associated with renal function loss and increased cardiovascular risk. Since urinary albumin excretion is affected by the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis, we evaluated the effect of 6 months GH

  7. Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Anja; Hein, Rebecca; Lindström, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Women using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are at increased risk of developing breast cancer (BC). To detect genetic modifiers of the association between current use of MHT and BC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide case-only studies followed by replication in 11 case...

  8. Serum estrogen and SHBG levels and breast cancer incidence among users and never users of hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Anne Mette Lund; Tjønneland, Anne; Christensen, Jane

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Levels of endogenous estrogen and SHBG are associated with risk of breast cancer among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We investigated these associations in both never and baseline users of HRT. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted within the ...... and baseline HRT users. More studies are needed to support the findings for HRT users and to further investigate estrogen levels in relation to estrogen receptor-specific breast cancer and other histological and molecular subtypes.......OBJECTIVE: Levels of endogenous estrogen and SHBG are associated with risk of breast cancer among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We investigated these associations in both never and baseline users of HRT. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted within...... logistic regression yielded incidence rate ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for exposures analyzed continuously and categorically in models adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Modest direct associations were identified between estrogen levels and breast cancer incidence among both never...

  9. Infection after total knee replacement: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Honorio de Carvalho Junior

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection after total knee replacement (IATJ is a rare complication. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality increasing the final costs. Gram positive coccus and Staphylococcus coagulase-negative and Staphylococcus aureus are the most common isolated germs (>50% of the cases. Conditions related to the patient, to the surgical procedure and even to the post op have been identified as risk factors to IATJ. Many complementary methods together with clinical symptoms are useful to a proper diagnosis. Treatment for IATJ must be individualized but generally is a combination of systemic antibiotic therapy and surgical treatment. Prosthesis exchange in one or two stages is the first choice procedure. Debridement with prosthesis retention is an option in acute cases with stable implants and antibiotic sensible germs.

  10. BENEFITS AND RISKS OF HORMONE REPLACEMENT ON THE DISTURBANCE ANDROGENIC MALE AGEING: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Simão Rodrigues Filho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aging man is accompanied by a progressive decline in testosterone production. This slow decrease causes a series of signs and symptoms can often interfere with the quality of man life. The purpose of this article is to review the current issues about the possible risks and benefits of androgen replacement therapy, discussing the clinical studies published on the subject. This is a review of scientific articles, and the identification and analysis of the articles were made through a search in the PUBMED database and SCIELO the period July to October 2013 This set of changes from affecting the musculoskeletal system to damage the scope psychobehavioral called Androgen Dysfunction Male Aging, which affects over 20% of men over 60 years worldwide. It was found in this work that replacement with androgens exerts beneficial effects on the ystem and psycho-behavioral, reflecting improved quality of life. In the other hand, the potential risks refer to the cardiovascular effects of metabolism and worsening of prostate cancer. Although knowledge about the potential risks and benefits of hormone replacement in men has evolved, there is still much that needs to be determined.

  11. Hormone Treatment Restores Bone Density for Young Women with Menopause-Like Condition (Primary Ovarian Insufficiency)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS NIMH NIMHD NINDS NINR NLM CC CIT CSR FIC NCATS NCCIH OD About NIH Who We ... valid results as to whether testosterone replacement could benefit women with POI, Dr. Nelson said. “While hormone ...

  12. Metabolic and functional changes in transgender individuals following cross-sex hormone treatment: Design and methods of the GEnder Dysphoria Treatment in Sweden (GETS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wiik

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the divergent male and female differentiation depends on key genes, many biological differences seen in men and women are driven by relative differences in estrogen and testosterone levels. Gender dysphoria denotes the distress that gender incongruence with the assigned sex at birth may cause. Gender-affirming treatment includes medical intervention such as inhibition of endogenous sex hormones and subsequent replacement with cross-sex hormones. The aim of this study is to investigate consequences of an altered sex hormone profile on different tissues and metabolic risk factors. By studying subjects undergoing gender-affirming medical intervention with sex hormones, we have the unique opportunity to distinguish between genetic and hormonal effects. Methods: The study is a single center observational cohort study conducted in Stockholm, Sweden. The subjects are examined at four time points; before initiation of treatment, after endogenous sex hormone inhibition, and three and eleven months following sex hormone treatment. Examinations include blood samples, skeletal muscle-, adipose- and skin tissue biopsies, arteriography, echocardiography, carotid Doppler examination, whole body MRI, CT of muscle and measurements of muscle strength. Results: The primary outcome measure is transcriptomic and epigenomic changes in skeletal muscle. Secondary outcome measures include transcriptomic and epigenomic changes associated with metabolism in adipose and skin, muscle strength, fat cell size and ability to release fatty acids from adipose tissue, cardiovascular function, and body composition. Conclusions: This study will provide novel information on the role of sex hormone treatment in skeletal muscle, adipose and skin, and its relation to cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Keywords: Transgender, Sex hormone, Adipose tissue, Skeletal muscle, Epigenetics, Sex change

  13. Differential effects of raloxifene and estrogen on body composition in growth hormone-replaced hypopituitary women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Birzniece, Vita

    2012-03-01

    GH deficiency causes reduction in muscle and bone mass and an increase in fat mass (FM), the changes reversed by GH replacement. The beneficial effects of GH on fat oxidation and protein anabolism are attenuated more markedly by raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, compared with 17β-estradiol. Whether this translates to a long-term detrimental effect on body composition is unknown.

  14. Hormonal replacement therapy reduces forearm fracture incidence in recent postmenopausal women - results of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Leif; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Sørensen, O.H.

    2000-01-01

    -to-treat analysis (n=2016), overall fracture risk was borderline statistically significantly reduced (RR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.50-1.05), and forearm fracture risk was significantly reduced (RR=0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.90) with HRT. Restricting the analysis to women who had adhered to their initial allocation of either HRT (n......OBJECTIVES: To study the fracture reducing potential of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) in recent postmenopausal women in a primary preventive scenario. METHODS: Prospective controlled comprehensive cohort trial: 2016 healthy women aged 45-58 years, from three to 24 months past last menstrual...... by own choice). First line HRT was oral sequential oestradiol/norethisterone in women with intact uterus and oral continuous oestradiol in hysterectomised women. RESULTS: After five years, a total of 156 fractures were sustained by 140 women. There were 51 forearm fractures in 51 women. By intention...

  15. [Antibiotic treatment for prevention of infectious complications in joint replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, D; Nyc, O; Pokorný, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2006-04-01

    Prophylactic antibiotic treatment is mandatory in every operation involving an orthopedic implant. Carefully selected and correctly administered antibiotics can provide effective protection of the implant from bacterial colonization. The prevention of deep wound infection in joint replacement includes several procedures and measures which constitute three basic groups: 1) Promotion of patient's ability to resist infection (careful pre-operative preparation, elimination of potential infectious loci, good nutritional status, etc). 2) Optimal conditions for the operative wound (surgical technique, prophylactic antibiotics). 3) Reduction of the number of bacteria brought in the wound (control measures, super-sterile operating theatres). Clear rules for the system of prophylactic antibiotic treatment should be adopted. A program in which responsibility for antibiotic administration was shifted from the nursing staff to the anesthesiologist in the operating theatre showed improved outcomes and reduced costs. Poor timing of prophylactic antibiotic administration is one of the basic mistakes. If the wound happened to be contaminated during surgery, the first three post-operative hours would be most decisive for the development of infection. An effective bactericidal concentration of antibiotic should be present in tissues and serum immediately after surgery has begun. Therefore the appropriate time for antibiotic application is before a skin incision is made, and not after the operation has started; the highest serum and bone tissue levels appear 20 to 30 min. after intravenous antibiotic injection. To allow antibiotics to reach target tissues, they should be introduced at least 10 min. before tourniquet application. For long surgical procedures or when blood loss is high, an additional dose of antibiotics is recommended during the operation. If a sample for bacterial cultivation is required, antibiotic administration is postponed until during surgery. However, this is

  16. Hormone replacement therapy improves contractile function and myonuclear organization of single muscle fibres from postmenopausal monozygotic female twin pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Rizwan; Renaud, Guillaume; Hedstrom, Yvette; Pöllänen, Eija; Ronkainen, Paula; Kaprio, Jaakko; Alen, Markku; Sipilä, Sarianna; Artemenko, Konstantin; Bergquist, Jonas; Kovanen, Vuokko; Larsson, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Ageing is associated with a decline in muscle mass and strength leading to increased physical dependency in old age. Postmenopausal women experience a greater decline than men of similar age in parallel with the decrease in female sex steroid hormone production. We recruited six monozygous female twin pairs (55-59 years old) where only one twin pair was on hormone replacement therapy (HRT use = 7.8 ± 4.3 years) to investigate the association of HRT with the cytoplasmic volume supported by individual myonuclei (myonuclear domain (MND) size,) together with specific force at the single fibre level. HRT use was associated with a significantly smaller (∼27%; P muscle fibres expressing the type I but not the IIa myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform. In comparison to non-users, higher specific force was recorded in HRT users both in muscle fibres expressing type I (∼27%; P fibre-type dependent, i.e. the higher specific force in fast-twitch muscle fibres was primarily caused by higher force per cross-bridge while slow-twitch fibres relied on both a higher number and force per cross-bridge. HRT use had no effect on fibre cross-sectional area (CSA), velocity of unloaded shortening (V0) and relative proportion of MyHC isoforms. In conclusion, HRT appears to have significant positive effects on both regulation of muscle contraction and myonuclei organization in postmenopausal women.

  17. Hormone replacement therapy increases levels of antibodies against heat shock protein 65 and certain species of oxidized low density lipoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uint L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT reduces cardiovascular risks, although the initiation of therapy may be associated with transient adverse ischemic and thrombotic events. Antibodies against heat shock protein (Hsp and oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL have been found in atherosclerotic lesions and plasma of patients with coronary artery disease and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of HRT on the immune response by measuring plasma levels of antibodies against Hsp 65 and LDL with a low and high degree of copper-mediated oxidative modification of 20 postmenopausal women before and 90 days after receiving orally 0.625 mg equine conjugate estrogen plus 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate per day. HRT significantly increased antibodies against Hsp 65 (0.316 ± 0.03 vs 0.558 ± 0.11 and against LDL with a low degree of oxidative modification (0.100 ± 0.01 vs 0.217 ± 0.02 (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively, ANOVA. The hormone-mediated immune response may trigger an inflammatory response within the vessel wall and potentially increase plaque burden. Whether or not this immune response is temporary or sustained and deleterious requires further investigation.

  18. Association of perceived tinnitus with duration of hormone replacement therapy in Korean postmenopausal women: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Su; Han, Kyung-do; Joo, Young-Hoon

    2017-07-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and tinnitus in South Korea using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES) (2010-2012). Cross-sectional analysis of a nationwide health survey. KNHANES is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of South Korea population. Only postmenopausal women aged 19-65 years were included in the study (n=2736). Auditory function was evaluated using pure-tone audiometric testing according to established KNHANES protocols. Subjects were questioned about their experience with tinnitus. Exogenous hormone-related factors included the starting age and duration of HRT. The overall prevalence of tinnitus was 22.2% among postmenopausal women. (1) Tinnitus severity was significantly higher in women using HRT (p=0.0024) and (2) significantly lower in women who breast fed their children (p=0.0386). (3) According to logistic regression models, the longer duration of HRT was significantly associated with increasing tinnitus (OR=1.323, 95% CI 1.007 to 1.737, p=0.0441). A longer duration of HRT was associated with developing tinnitus in Korean postmenopausal women. Further experimental and epidemiological researches are needed to elucidate the causal relationship between HRT and tinnitus. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Successful Pregnancies and Deliveries in a Patient With Evolving Hypopituitarism due to Pituitary Stalk Transection Syndrome: Role of Growth Hormone Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Miyako; Ieki, Yasuhiko; Takazakura, Eisuke; Fukuta, Kaori; Hidaka, Takao; Wakasugi, Takanobu; Shimatsu, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a 31-year-old Japanese woman with evolving hypopituitarism due to pituitary stalk transection syndrome. She had a history of short stature treated with growth hormone (GH) in childhood and had hypothyroidism and primary amenorrhea at 20 years old. Levothyroxine replacement and recombinant follicle stimulating hormone-human chorionic gonadotropin (FSH-hCG) therapy for ovulation induction were started. GH replacement therapy (GHRT) was resumed when she was 26 years old. She developed mild adrenocortical insufficiency at 31 years old. She succeeded in becoming pregnant and delivered twice. GHRT was partially continued during pregnancy and stopped at the end of the second trimester without any complications. PMID:28250299

  20. Simulation of Post-Thyroidectomy Treatment Alternatives for Triiodothyronine or Thyroxine Replacement in Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shachar, Rotem; Huang, Stephen A.; DiStefano, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background As in adults, thyroidectomy in pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is often followed by 131I remnant ablation. A standard protocol is to give normalizing oral thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3) after surgery and then withdraw it for 2 to 6 weeks. Thyroid remnants or metastases are treated most effectively when serum thyrotropin (TSH) is high, but prolonged withdrawals should be avoided to minimize hypothyroid morbidity. Methods A published feedback control system model of adult human thyroid hormone regulation was modified for children using pediatric T4 kinetic data. The child model was developed from data for patients ranging from 3 to 9 years old. We simulated a range of T4 and T3 replacement protocols for children, exploring alternative regimens for minimizing the withdrawal period, while maintaining normal or suppressed TSH during replacement. The results are presented with the intent of providing a quantitative basis to guide further studies of pediatric treatment options. Replacement was simulated for up to 3 weeks post-thyroidectomy, followed by various withdrawal periods. T4 vs. T3 replacement, remnant size, dose size, and dose frequency were tested for effects on the time for TSH to reach 25 mU/L (withdrawal period). Results For both T3 and T4 replacement, higher doses were associated with longer withdrawal periods. T3 replacement yielded shorter withdrawal periods than T4 replacement (up to 3.5 days versus 7–10 days). Higher than normal serum T3 concentrations were required to normalize or suppress TSH during T3 monotherapy, but not T4 monotherapy. Larger remnant sizes resulted in longer withdrawal periods if T4 replacement was used, but had little effect for T3 replacement. Conclusions T3 replacement yielded withdrawal periods about half those for T4 replacement. Higher than normal hormone levels under T3 monotherapy can be partially alleviated by more frequent, smaller doses (e.g., twice a day). LT4 may be the

  1. Quality of life in children and adolescents with growth hormone deficiency: association with growth hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Alexandra; Lass, Nina; Reinsch, Nicole; Uysal, Yvonne; Singer, Viola; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Reinehr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) as it is related with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a matter of controversy. We analyzed QoL in 95 children aged 8-18 years with isolated GHD (72% male) treated with growth hormone (GH). These children were compared to 190 age- and gender-matched healthy children with similar height [height children of normal stature (control group 2: CG2). QoL was measured by the KINDL® questionnaire referring to six domains (physical well-being, emotional well-being, self-esteem, family, friends, and school). QoL was significantly reduced in CG1 (effect-size 0.21) compared to CG2, while QoL was not significantly altered in children with GHD. In multiple linear regression analyses adjusted to age, gender, BMI, migration background, and socioeconomic status, decreasing height-SDS was associated with poorer QoL (especially emotional well-being), and treatment with GH was related significantly to better self-esteem. Increase of height-SDS in children treated with GH was associated positively with QoL and all its subscales except family and school. These findings suggest psychological consequences of short stature in children and an improvement of QoL in children treated with GH with the focus on self-esteem and emotional well-being. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Fixed-functional appliance treatment combined with growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the effects of growth hormone (GH) therapy and fixed functional appliance treatment in a 13-year-old Class II malocclusion patient without GH deficiency. GH has been shown to effectively increase endochondral growth and induce a more prognathic skeletal pattern. Although a major concern in Class II retrognathic patients is chin deficiency, long-term studies have shown that the mandibular growth enhancement effects of functional appliances are clinically insignificant. This case report demonstrates that the mandible grew significantly during fixed functional appliance treatment combined with GH therapy, with stable results during 2 years 11 months of retention. More studies are needed to evaluate GH therapy as a supplement in Class II treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement vs surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen HA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hanna A Jensen, Lillian L Tsai, Vinod H Thourani Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Joseph B Whitehead Department of Surgery, Structural Heart and Valve Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Severe aortic stenosis (AS is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and is increasing in prevalence as the global population increases. Since AS primarily affects the elderly, many of these patients have comorbidities that make them poor candidates for the gold standard treatment for AS, surgical aortic valve replacement. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as a novel technology for the management of AS in higher risk patients over the past decade. Randomized trials have established the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and the medical community has rallied to identify the patients who are most suitable for this transformative treatment. This review focuses on outlining the key procedural differences, describing the unique challenges of both operations, and finally assessing and comparing outcomes both on a general level and in challenging patient subgroups. Keywords: aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, surgical aortic valve replacement 

  4. Long-Term Outcomes, Genetics, and Pituitary Morphology in Patients with Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency and Multiple Pituitary Hormone Deficiencies: A Single-Centre Experience of Four Decades of Growth Hormone Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohayem, Julia; Drechsel, Hendrik; Tittel, Bettina; Hahn, Gabriele; Pfaeffle, Roland; Huebner, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been used to treat children with GH deficiency (GHD) since 1966. Using a combined retrospective and cross-sectional approach, we explored the long-term outcomes of patients with GHD, analysed factors influencing therapeutic response, determined persistence into adulthood, investigated pituitary morphology, and screened for mutations in causative genes. The files of 96 GH-deficient children were reviewed. In a subset of 50 patients, re-assessment in adulthood was performed, including GHRH-arginine testing, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mutational screening for the growth hormone-1 gene (GH1) and the GHRH receptor gene (GHRHR) in isolated GHD (IGHD), and HESX1, PROP1, POU1F1, LHX3, LHX4, and GLI2 in multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD) patients. GH was started at a height SDS of -3.2 ± 1.4 in IGHD patients and of -4.1 ± 2.1 in MPHD patients. Relative height gain was 0.3 SDS/year, absolute gain 1.6 SDS, and 1.2/2.6 SDS in IGHD/MPHD, respectively. Mid-parental target height was reached in 77%. Initial height SDS, bone age retardation and duration of GH replacement were correlated with height SDS gain. GHD persisted into adulthood in 19 and 89% of subjects with IGHD and MPHD, respectively. In 1/42 IGHD patients a GH1 mutation was detected; PROP1 mutations were found in 3/7 MPHD subjects. Anterior pituitary hypoplasia, combined with posterior pituitary ectopy and pituitary stalk invisibility on MRI, was an exclusive finding in MPHD patients. GH replacement successfully corrects the growth deficit in children with GHD. While the genetic aetiology remains undefined in most cases of IGHD, PROP1 mutations constitute a major cause for MPHD. Persistence of GHD into adulthood is related to abnormal pituitary morphology. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement on muscle strength in patients with GH-deficiency: a meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Widdowson, W Matthew

    2012-02-01

    CONTEXT\\/OBJECTIVES: GH replacement increases muscle mass and reduces body fat in growth hormone deficiency (GHD) adults. A recent meta-analysis has demonstrated that this improvement in body composition is associated with improved exercise performance. The current meta-analysis was carried out to determine whether high-quality evidence exists to support a beneficial effect of GH replacement on strength. DESIGN\\/METHODS: An extensive Medline search\\/literature review identified eight studies with utilizable, robust data, involving 231 patients in nine cohorts. Previously unpublished data were sought from authors and obtained in two cases. All studies included were randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, of parallel or cross-over design and of an average 6.7 months duration. Information was retrieved in uniform format, with data pertaining to patient numbers, study-design, GH-dose, mean age, IGF-I levels and muscle strength measurements (isometric or isokinetic quadriceps strength) recorded. Data were analysed using a fixed-effects model, utilizing continuous data measured on different scales. A summary effect measure (d(s)) was derived for individual strength variables, whereas an overall summary effect was derived from the sum of all studies incorporating different variables; 95% CIs were calculated from the weighted variances of individual study effects. RESULTS: Analysis revealed no significant improvement, neither when all studies were combined (d(s) = +0.01 +\\/- 0.26) nor when measured individually (isometric quadriceps strength, d(s) = +0.02 +\\/- 0.32 and isokinetic quadriceps strength, d(s) = 0.00 +\\/- 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from short-term controlled studies fails to support a benefit on muscle strength of GH replacement in GHD patients, which is likely to occur over a longer time-course, as seen in open-label studies.

  6. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  7. Continuation rate of hormone replacement therapy in Hong Kong public health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K Y; Ling, M; Tang, G W K

    2004-12-10

    To assess the 1-year continuation rate of HRT prescribed in Hong Kong public health sector and to identify factors affecting this continuation rate. All women who received at least one dispensed prescription of estrogens between January 1998 and December 2000 from 36 specialist outpatient clinics of the Hospital Authority were selected, and observed for at least 2 years and at most 3 years. The duration of use and variables including age, types of hormones, routes of delivery, dose of estrogen, and prescribing specialty were retrieved from the central prescription database of the Hospital Authority. Of 12,711 incident users of HRT, more than half were aged 50-59. Most (78.5%) of the users took conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) 0.625 mg or related products. Only a small proportion (3.0%) of women used CEE 0.3 mg. Initial estrogen prescriptions were written by gynaecologists in 86.7%. The overall 1-year continuation rate was 68.3%. The highest and lowest continuation rates were observed in women aged 40-49 and the two extreme age groups (35-39 and 70-79), respectively. Better continuation rate was observed in women taking estrogen-only therapy such as CEE or estradiol (overall 76.3%) than in women using continuous combined therapy (58.6%), sequential combined therapy (64.8%), or transdermal estrogen (60.6%). In the age group 60-69, the use of CEE 0.3 mg was associated with better continuation rate than CEE 0.625 mg. Better continuation rate at 1 year was associated with age younger than 60, oral route of HRT and hysterectomy.

  8. Gender influences short-term growth hormone treatment response in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sävendahl, Lars; Blankenstein, Oliver; Oliver, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Gender may affect growth hormone (GH) treatment outcome. This study assessed gender-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation scores (ΔHSDS) after 2 years' GH treatment.......Gender may affect growth hormone (GH) treatment outcome. This study assessed gender-related differences in change from baseline height standard deviation scores (ΔHSDS) after 2 years' GH treatment....

  9. Non‑Hormonal treatment of BPH/BOO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir I Osman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review the use of non-hormonal pharmacotherapies in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS due to presumed benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Materials and Methods: A search of the PUBMED database was conducted for the terms BPH, LUTS, bladder outlet obstruction, alpha-adrenoceptor blockers, anti-muscarinics, and phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Results: Medical therapy has long been established as the accepted standard of care in the treatment of male LUTS. The aim of treatment is improvement in symptoms and quality of life whilst minimizing adverse effects. The agents most widely used as 1 st line therapy are alpha-blockers (AB, as a standalone or in combination with 2 other classes of drug; 5-α reductase inhibitors and anti-muscarinics. AB have rapid efficacy, improving symptoms and flow rate in a matter of days, these effects are then maintained over time. AB do not impact on prostate size and do not prevent acute urinary retention or the need for surgery. Anti-mucarinics, alone or in combination with an AB are safe and efficacious in the treatment of bothersome storage symptoms associated with LUTS/BPH. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors are an emerging treatment option that improve LUTS without improving flow rates. Conclusions: AB are the most well-established pharmacotherapy in the management of men with LUTS/BPH. The emergence of different classes of agent offers the opportunity to target underlying pathophysiologies driving symptoms and better individualize treatment.

  10. Study protocol; Thyroid hormone Replacement for Untreated older adults with Subclinical hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, David J.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Kearney, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    randomised controlled trial (RCT) of Levothyroxine treatment for SCH. METHODS: Participants are community-dwelling subjects aged ≥65 years with SCH, diagnosed by elevated TSH levels (≥4.6 and ≤19.9 mU/L) on a minimum of two measures ≥ three months apart, with fT4 levels within laboratory reference range...... treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism is powered to detect clinically relevant change in symptoms / quality of life and is likely to be highly influential in guiding treatment of this common condition. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01660126 ; registered 8th June 2012........ The study is a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled parallel group trial, starting with levothyroxine 50 micrograms daily (25 micrograms in subjects

  11. Remarkable change in age-specific breast cancer incidence in the Swiss canton of Geneva and its possible relation with the use of hormone replacement therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Morabia, Alfredo; Verkooijen, Helena M; Fioretta, Gérald; Wespi, Yves; Schäfer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to explain the reasons for the remarkable change in age of breast cancer occurrence in the Swiss canton of Geneva. We used population-based data from the Geneva cancer registry, which collects information on method of detection, stage and tumour characteristics since 1975. For patients diagnosed between 1997–2003, we obtained additional information on use of hormone replacement therapy from a large prospective study on breast cancer. Using generalized log linear regression analysis, we compared age-specific incidence rates with respect to period, stage, oestrogen receptor status, method of detection and use of hormone replacement therapy. In the periods 1975–1979 and 1985–1989, breast cancer risk increased with age, showing the highest incidence rates among women aged ≥ 85 years. From 1997, the age-specific incidence curve changed completely (p < 0.0001), showing an incidence peak at 60–64 years and a reduced incidence among elderly women. This incidence peak concerned mainly early stage and oestrogen positive cancers and was exclusively observed among women who ever used hormone replacement therapy, regardless whether the tumour was screen-detected or not. The increasing prevalence of hormone replacement therapy use during the 1990s could explain the important change in age-specific breast cancer incidence, not only by increasing breast cancer risk, but also by revealing breast cancer at an earlier age

  12. The influence of hormone replacement therapy on the aging-related change in cognitive performance. Analysis based on a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Pedersen, A T; Laursen, P

    2002-01-01

    A maintenance and/or improvement of cognitive performance with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is biological plausible. The objectives of this study were to analyze the impact of HRT on aging-related changes in cognitive performances, and to assess whether women who choose HRT have...... better cognitive performance prior to HRT....

  13. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  14. Serum Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Levels and Body Mass Index Percentiles in Children with Primary Hypothyroidism on Levothyroxine Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoba, Asma; Basu, Sanjib; Mantis, Stelios; Minutti, Carla

    2017-12-15

    To determine the association, if any, between thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels and body mass index (BMI) percentiles in children with primary hypothyroidism who are chemically euthyroid and on treatment with levothyroxine. This retrospective cross-sectional study consisted of a review of medical records from RUSH Medical Center and Stroger Hospital, Chicago, USA of children with primary hypothyroidism who were seen in the clinic from 2008 to 2014 and who were chemically euthyroid and on treatment with levothyroxine for at least 6 months. The patients were divided into two groups based on their TSH levels (0.34-hypothyroidism who are chemically euthyroid on treatment with levothyroxine, there is a positive association between higher TSH levels and higher BMI percentiles. However, it is difficult to establish if the higher TSH levels are a direct cause or a consequence of the obesity. Further studies are needed to establish causation beyond significant association.

  15. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of breast cancer: the role of progestins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlberg, Claudia Irene; Pederson, Anette Tønnes; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2003-01-01

    estrogen-progestin treatment regime is now prescribed worldwide. In the USA the predominant compounds are conjugated estrogens and medroxyprogesterone-acetate, whereas oestradiol combined with testosterone-like progestins is commonly used in Europe. These differences are largely the result of traditions...

  16. Long-term safety of growth hormone replacement therapy after childhood medulloblastoma and PNET: it is time to set aside old concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indini, Alice; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Biassoni, Veronica; Bergamaschi, Luca; Magni, Maria Chiara; Puma, Nadia; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Pallotti, Federica; Seregni, Ettore; Diletto, Barbara; Pecori, Emilia; Gandola, Lorenza; Poggi, Geraldina; Massimino, Maura

    2017-01-01

    To assess the long-term safety of administering growth hormone (GH) in patients with GH deficiency due to treatment for childhood medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Data were retrospectively retrieved on children receiving GH supplementation, assessing their disease-free and overall survival outcomes and risk of secondary malignancies using Kaplan-Meier and Cox models. Overall 65 children were consecutively collected from May 1981 to April 2013. All patients had undergone craniospinal irradiation (total dose 18-39 Gy), and subsequently received GH for a median (interquartile range, IQR) of 81 (50.6-114.9) months. At a median (IQR) of 122.4 months (74.4-149.5) after the end of their adjuvant cancer treatment, two patients (3 %) experienced recurrent disease and 8 (12.3 %) developed secondary malignancies, all but one of them (an osteosarcoma) related to radiation exposure and occurring within the radiation fields. There was no apparent correlation between the administration of GH replacement therapy (or its duration) and primary tumor relapse or the onset of secondary malignancies [HR: 1.01 (95 % CI: 0.98, 1.03) for every additional 12 months of GH supplementation; p = 0.36). At univariate analysis, the large cell or anaplastic medulloblastoma subtype, metastases and myeloablative chemotherapy correlated with a higher risk of secondary malignancies (p < 0.1), but multivariate analysis failed to identify any factors independently associated with this risk. Our data supports once more the safety of long-term GH replacement therapy in children treated for medulloblastoma/PNET, previously reported in larger data sets. The neurooncology community now need to warrant large-scale meta-analyses or international prospective trials in order to consolidate our knowledge of factors other than GH, such as genetic predisposition, high-grade/metastatic disease, high-dose chemotherapy and era of treatment, in promoting the occurrence of

  17. Prevalence of right atrial non-pulmonary vein triggers in atrial fibrillation patients treated with thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hun; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Mohanty, Prasant; Trivedi, Chintan; Morris, Eli Hamilton; Santangeli, Pasquale; Bai, Rong; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Burkhardt, John David; Gallinghouse, Joseph G; Horton, Rodney; Sanchez, Javier E; Bailey, Shane; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Zagrodzky, Jason; Kim, Soo G; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is known to enhance arrhythmogenicity, and high-normal thyroid function is related with an increased recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation. However, the impact of thyroid hormone replacement (THR) on AF ablation is not well known. This study evaluated 1163 consecutive paroxysmal AF patients [160 (14%) on THR and 1003 (86%) without THR] undergoing their first catheter ablation. A total of 146 patients on THR and 146 controls were generated by propensity matching, based on calculated risk factor scores, using a logistic model (age, sex, body mass index, and left atrium size). The presence of non-pulmonary vein (PV) triggers was disclosed by a high-dose isoproterenol challenge (up to 30 μg/min) after PV isolation. Clinical characteristics were not different between the groups. When compared to the control, non-PV triggers were significantly greater in the THR patients [112 (77%) vs. 47 (32%), P atrial appendage (47 vs. 34%, P = 0.03), crista terminalis/superior vena cava (11 vs. 8%, P = 0.43), and mitral valve annulus (7 vs. 5%, P = 0.45) (THR vs. control), respectively. After mean follow-up of 14.7 ± 5.2 months, success rate was lower in patients on THR therapy [94 (64.4%)] compared to patients not receiving THR therapy [110 (75.3%), log-rank test value = 0.04]. Right atrial non-PV triggers were more prevalent in AF patients treated with THR. Elimination of non-PV triggers provided better arrhythmia-free survival in the non-THR group.

  18. Resumption of menstruation and pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in functional hypothalamic amenorrhea subjects undertaking estrogen replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z Q; Xu, J J; Lin, J F

    2013-11-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) refers to a functional menstrual disorder with various causes and presentations. Recovery of menstrual cyclicity is common in long-term follow-up but the affecting factors remain unknown. To explore factors affecting the menstrual resumption and to evaluate the pituitary response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in FHA. Thirty cases with FHA were recruited. All subjects were put on continuous 1 mg/day estradiol valerate orally and followed up monthly. Recovery was defined as the occurrence of at least three consecutive regular cycles. Responder referred to those who recovered within two years of therapy. Gonadotropin response to the 50 μg GnRH challenge was tested every three months. Nineteen (63.3%) subjects recovered with a mean time to recovery of 26.8 months. Time to recovery was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) before and by amenorrhea. Twentyone cases had undertaken therapy for more than two years and 10 of them recovered. BMI before and by amenorrhea were negatively correlated with the recovery. Significant increase of serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and LH response to GnRH were noted after recovery. Menstrual resumption was common in FHA undertaking estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The likelihood of recovery was affected by their BMI before and by amenorrhea but not by the weight gain during therapy. Low serum LH and attenuated LH response to GnRH were the main features of pituitary deficiency in FHA. The menstrual resumption in FHA was accompanied by the recovery of serum LH and the LH response to GnRH.

  19. Hormonal homeostasis in lung cancer patients under combined and radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotova, I.A.; Firsova, P.P.; Matveenko, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of hormonal homeostasis was performed in 200 lung cancer patients before and after combined and radiation treatment and in 25 healthy subjects (controls). The study showed an increase in the basal level of hormones of pituitary - adrenal system matched by a decline in thyroid function. Adequate combined and radiation treatment brought hormone levels to normal. Hormonal disorders accompanying recurrence were identical to those registered at disease onset. In some cases, changes in hormonal homeostasis developed as early as 3-6 months prior to clinically manifest recurrences or dissemination

  20. Bone Mass in Young Adulthood Following Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog Treatment and Cross-Sex Hormone Treatment in Adolescents With Gender Dysphoria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, D.T.; Caris, M.G.; Heijboer, A.C.; van Trotsenburg, M.; Rotteveel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Sex steroids are important for bone mass accrual. Adolescents with gender dysphoria (GD) treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) therapy are temporarily sex-steroid deprived until the addition of cross-sex hormones (CSH). The effect of this treatment on bone mineral

  1. Study protocol; Thyroid hormone Replacement for Untreated older adults with Subclinical hypothyroidism - a randomised placebo controlled Trial (TRUST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, David J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Kearney, Patricia M; Rodondi, Nicolas; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Mooijaart, Simon; Kean, Sharon; Quinn, Terence J; Sattar, Naveed; Hendry, Kirsty; Du Puy, Robert; Den Elzen, Wendy P J; Poortvliet, Rosalinde K E; Smit, Jan W A; Jukema, J Wouter; Dekkers, Olaf M; Blum, Manuel; Collet, Tinh-Hai; McCarthy, Vera; Hurley, Caroline; Byrne, Stephen; Browne, John; Watt, Torquil; Bauer, Douglas; Ford, Ian

    2017-02-03

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is a common condition in elderly people, defined as elevated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal circulating free thyroxine (fT4). Evidence is lacking about the effect of thyroid hormone treatment. We describe the protocol of a large randomised controlled trial (RCT) of Levothyroxine treatment for SCH. Participants are community-dwelling subjects aged ≥65 years with SCH, diagnosed by elevated TSH levels (≥4.6 and ≤19.9 mU/L) on a minimum of two measures ≥ three months apart, with fT4 levels within laboratory reference range. The study is a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled parallel group trial, starting with levothyroxine 50 micrograms daily (25 micrograms in subjects hypothyroid symptoms and fatigue / vitality) on the thyroid-related quality of life questionnaire (ThyPRO) at one year. The study has 80% power (at p = 0.025, 2-tailed) to detect a change with levothyroxine treatment of 3.0% on the hypothyroid scale and 4.1% on the fatigue / vitality scale with a total target sample size of 750 patients. Secondary outcomes include general health-related quality of life (EuroQol), fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, handgrip strength, executive cognitive function (Letter Digit Coding Test), basic and instrumental activities of daily living, haemoglobin, blood pressure, weight, body mass index and waist circumference. Patients are monitored for specific adverse events of interest including incident atrial fibrillation, heart failure and bone fracture. This large multicentre RCT of levothyroxine treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism is powered to detect clinically relevant change in symptoms / quality of life and is likely to be highly influential in guiding treatment of this common condition. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01660126 ; registered 8th June 2012.

  2. Levothyroxine liquid solution versus tablet form for replacement treatment in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Carlo; Negro, Roberto; Pirola, Ilenia; Gandossi, Elena; Agosti, Barbara; Castellano, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the need and the magnitude of levothyroxine (LT4) increase in hypothyroid pregnant women on liquid compared to tablet formulations. Patients were recruited by searching our "thyroid patients" database. The selection criteria were as follows: a) pregnant women on treatment for hypothyroidism (both liquid and tablet LT4) who gave birth at our hospital between February 2012 and January 2014; b) thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) levels obtained at least 3 months before missed menstrual cycle, with a TSH value less than 2.5 mIU/L and c) TSH and FT4 obtained within 12 weeks of pregnancy, and each month subsequently. During pregnancy, 8/31 (25.5%) of the women had to increase the dosage of LT4. Of these, 7/17 (41.2%) were on LT4 replacement therapy with tablets, and 1/14 (7.1%) with liquid formulation (p = 0.038). Daily LT4 was significantly increased in the liquid group only (52.9 ± 19.5 versus 67.5 ± 19.2 mcg/day (p = 0.013). A logistic regression analysis showed that the treatment with LT4 tablets was the only predictor of LT4 increase (OR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.04-0.83; p = 0.031). Pregnant women on optimal replacement therapy before pregnancy require an increase of LT4 dosage more often when on a tablet than liquid formulation.

  3. CARDIAC STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ABNORMALITIES IN FEMALES WITH UNTREATED HYPOPITUITARISM DUE TO SHEEHAN SYNDROME: RESPONSE TO HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Ramzan, Mahroosa; Allai, Mohd Sultan; Wani, Arshad Iqbal; Misgar, Raiz Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Data on cardiac abnormalities in females with untreated hypopituitarism are limited. We investigated echocardiographic abnormalities in females with untreated hypopituitarism and their response to treatment. Twenty-three females with treatment-naïve hypopituitarism and 30 matched healthy controls were evaluated for cardiac structure and function. Echocardiographic evaluation was done at presentation and after achieving a euthyroid and eucortisol state. Fourteen (61%) patients had mitral regurgitation, and 11 (48%) had pericardial effusion as against none among controls. Indices of left ventricular (LV) size like LV end diastolic dimension (LVEDD; 44.5 ± 3.5 mm in cases vs. 47.6 ± 3.8 mm in controls, P = .004), and LV diastolic volume (LVEDV; 91.8 ± 18.0 mL versus 106.5 ± 20.4 mL, P = .009) were significantly lower in the SS group compared with controls. LV mass (LVM) was 70.8 ± 19.2 g in cases and 108.0 ± 33.2 g in controls (P = .02). Similarly, indices of LV systolic function like stroke volume (SV; 59.1 ± 12.0 mL in cases and 74.4 ± 15.8 mL in controls; P = .000), ejection fraction (EF; 64.3 ± 6.2 % in cases against 69.9 ± 9.2 % in controls; P = .03), and fractional shortening (FS; 34.9 ± 4.7% versus 40.1 ± 4.4%, P = .000) were significantly decreased in patients compared with controls. Cardiac abnormalities normalized with restoration of a euthyroid and eucortisol state. Pericardial effusion, mitral regurgitation, and diminished LVM are common in females with untreated hypopituitarism. ACTH = adrenocorticotrophic hormone BMI = body mass index DT = deceleration time EDV = end-diastolic volume EF = ejection fraction FS = fractional shortening GH = growth hormone IGF-1 = insulin growth factor-1 ITT = insulin tolerance test IVSd = interventricular septal diameter LH = luteinizing hormone LV = left ventricular LVEDD = LV end diastolic dimension LVEDV = LV end diastolic volume LVM = LV mass MRI = magnetic resonance imaging MVP = mitral value prolapse PPH

  4. Clinical and hormonal effects of chronic gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment in polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingold, K; De Ziegler, D; Cedars, M; Meldrum, D R; Lu, J K; Judd, H L; Chang, R J

    1987-10-01

    Previously, we reported that short term administration of a highly potent GnRH agonist (GnRHa) for 1 month to patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) resulted in complete suppression of ovarian steroidogenesis without measurable effects on adrenal steroid production. This new study was designed to evaluate the effects of long term GnRHa administration in PCO patients with respect to their hormone secretion patterns and clinical responses. Eight PCO patients and 10 ovulatory women with endometriosis were treated daily with sc injections of [D-His6-(imBzl]),Pro9-NEt]GnRH (GnRHa; 100 micrograms) for 6 months. Their results were compared to hormone values in 8 women who had undergone bilateral oophorectomies. In response to GnRHa, PCO and ovulatory women had rises of serum LH at 1 month, after which it gradually declined to baseline. In both groups FSH secretion was suppressed throughout treatment. Serum estradiol, estrone, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone levels markedly decreased to values found in oophorectomized women by 1 month and remained low thereafter. In contrast, serum pregnenolone and 17-hydroxypregnenolone were partially suppressed, and dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and cortisol levels did not change. Clinically, hyperplastic endometrial histology in three PCO patients reverted to an inactive pattern, and proliferative endometrium in two other PCO patients became inactive in one and did not change in the other. Regression of proliferative endometrial histology occurred in all ovulatory women. Vaginal bleeding occurred in all women studied during the first month of GnRHa administration, after which all but one PCO patient became amenorrheic. Hot flashes were noted by all ovulatory women and by four of eight PCO patients. All PCO patients noted subjective reduction of skin oiliness, and five had decreased hair growth. We conclude that in premenopausal women: 1) chronic Gn

  5. Hormone-replacement therapy influences gene expression profiles and is associated with breast-cancer prognosis: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoog Lambert

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postmenopausal hormone-replacement therapy (HRT increases breast-cancer risk. The influence of HRT on the biology of the primary tumor, however, is not well understood. Methods We obtained breast-cancer gene expression profiles using Affymetrix human genome U133A arrays. We examined the relationship between HRT-regulated gene profiles, tumor characteristics, and recurrence-free survival in 72 postmenopausal women. Results HRT use in patients with estrogen receptor (ER protein positive tumors (n = 72 was associated with an altered regulation of 276 genes. Expression profiles based on these genes clustered ER-positive tumors into two molecular subclasses, one of which was associated with HRT use and had significantly better recurrence free survival despite lower ER levels. A comparison with external data suggested that gene regulation in tumors associated with HRT was negatively correlated with gene regulation induced by short-term estrogen exposure, but positively correlated with the effect of tamoxifen. Conclusion Our findings suggest that post-menopausal HRT use is associated with a distinct gene expression profile related to better recurrence-free survival and lower ER protein levels. Tentatively, HRT-associated gene expression in tumors resembles the effect of tamoxifen exposure on MCF-7 cells.

  6. Influence of timing and dose of thyroid hormone replacement on mental, psychomotor, and behavioral development in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers-Schokking, Jacoba J; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M P F

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of initial and postinitial treatment factors on cognitive, psychomotor, and psychological outcome in schoolchildren with congenital hypothyroidism (CH). We studied 45 patients (19 with severe CH and 26 with mild CH) and 37 control children by correlating initial and postinitial treatment factors (free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] concentrations, and the percentage of overtreatment and undertreatment periods) with the results of neuropsychological tests and behavior (as reported on the Teacher Report Form [TRF]). The global IQ of the children with CH was comparable to that of the controls; visuomotor and verbal scores were lower, and total TRF scores were higher. Ethnic group, previous development, and overtreatment predicted IQ and verbal scores, with higher scores seen for the overtreated patients than for the control children and those patients who had not been overtreated. As initial treatment was less satisfactory, total TRF scores were higher. Our study suggests that initial and postinitial suboptimal treatment of CH leads to abnormalities in IQ and specific fields. Overtreatment may advance cognitive development in 5-1/2- to 7-year-olds. Suboptimal initial treatment may lead to behavioral problems. We recommend that TSH concentrations be maintained within the normal range in patients with CH.

  7. Effect of hypophysectomy and hormonal replacement on the uptake of Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate in the metaphysis and shaft of the rat femur: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trow, R.S.; Klingensmith, G.J.; Klingensmith, W.C.; Huffer, W.E.; Schalch, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    We have investigated the uptake of Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) in the metaphysis and shaft of the rat femur as affected by hypophysectomy and hormonal replacement with growth hormone and thyroxine. Two hours following injection of Tc-MDP, the metaphysis and a specimen of shaft were obtained and the metaphysis-to-shaft radioactivity ratio was measured. By five days after hypophysectomy the metaphysis-to-shaft ratio fell from a control value of 3.8 +/- 0.2 (mean +/- s.e.) to 2.4 +/- 0.2 (p less than 0.05) and remained significantly decreased throughout the 30-day study. When daily hormonal replacement with 0.5 mg of bovine growth hormone and 10 micrograms of thyroxine (both administered intraperitoneally) was given, beginning on the eighth day after hypophysectomy, the metaphysis-to-shaft ratio of Tc-MDP returned to control levels in twelve days. This model demonstrates the effect of growth hormone and thyroxine on the distribution of Tc-MDP, and may be useful as a radiobioassay of net circulating skeletal growth-promoting activity

  8. European audit of current practice in diagnosis and treatment of childhood growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Bernasconi, Sergio; Clayton, Peter E

    2002-01-01

    The present survey among members of the ESPE on current practice in diagnosis and treatment of growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) is of great clinical relevance and importance in the light of the recently published guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD by the Growth Hormone Research...... Society. We have found much conformity but also numerous discrepancies between the recommendations of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the current practice in Europe....

  9. Enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease, towards individualized treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is a very heterogeneous disorder for which expensive enzyme replacement therapy is available since more than 15 years. Because of the variety of symptoms and disease course, individual choices need to be made to improve the appropriate use of therapy. Supported by ZONWM, we have been

  10. Effect of growth hormone treatment on the adult height of children with chronic renal failure. German Study Group for Growth Hormone Treatment in Chronic Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, D; Schaefer, F; Nissel, R; Wühl, E; Tönshoff, B; Mehls, O

    2000-09-28

    Growth hormone treatment stimulates growth in short children with chronic renal failure. However, the extent to which this therapy increases final adult height is not known. We followed 38 initially prepubertal children with chronic renal failure treated with growth hormone for a mean of 5.3 years until they reached their final adult height. The mean (+/-SD) age at the start of treatment was 10.4+/-2.2 years, the mean bone age was 7.1+/-2.3 years, and the mean height was 3.1+/-1.2 SD below normal. Fifty matched children with chronic renal failure who were not treated with growth hormone served as controls. The children treated with growth hormone had sustained catch-up growth, whereas the control children had progressive growth failure. The mean final height of the growth hormone-treated children was 165 cm for boys and 156 cm for girls. The mean final adult height of the growth hormone-treated children was 1.6+/-1.2 SD below normal, which was 1.4 SD above their standardized height at base line (Pgrowth hormone-treated children, treatment was not associated with a shortening of the pubertal growth spurt. The total height gain was positively associated with the initial target-height deficit and the duration of growth hormone therapy and was negatively associated with the percentage of the observation period spent receiving dialysis treatment. Long-term growth hormone treatment of children with chronic renal failure induces persistent catch-up growth, and the majority of patients achieve normal adult height.

  11. The role of hormonal treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam SK

    2015-02-01

    agents, active and frequent participation of diabetes educator, and involvement of multidisciplinary team. The objective of this review is to highlight recent trends in hormonal treatment and to explore new and innovative therapeutic modalities in the management of T2DM.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, hormonal treatment, early insulinization, glycosylated hemoglobin, ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia, hypoglycaemia

  12. Pre-operative ultrasound identification of thyroiditis helps predict the need for thyroid hormone replacement after thyroid lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lilah F; Iupe, Isabella M; Edeiken-Monroe, Beth S; Warneke, Carla L; Hansen, Mandy O; Evans, Douglas B; Lee, Jeffrey E; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Perrier, Nancy D

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether pre-operative thyroiditis identified by ultrasound (US) could help predict the need for thyroid hormone replacement (THR) following thyroid lobectomy. Data from patients who underwent thyroid lobectomy in 2006-2011, were not taking THR pre-operatively, and had ≥1 month of follow-up were reviewed retrospectively. THR was prescribed for relatively elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and hypothyroid symptoms. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the percentage of patients who required THR at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively, and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate prognostic factors for requiring post-thyroid lobectomy THR. During follow-up, 45 of 98 patients required THR. Median follow-up among patients not requiring THR was 11.6 months (range, 1.2 to 51.3 months). Six months after thyroid lobectomy, 22% of patients were taking THR (95% confidence interval [CI], 15-32%); the proportion increased to 46% at 12 months (95% CI, 36-57%) and 55% at 18 months (95% CI, 43-67%). On univariate analysis, significant prognostic factors for postoperative THR included a pre-operative TSH level >2.5 μ international units [IU]/mL (hazard ratio [HR], 2.8; 95% CI, 1.4-5.5; P = .004) and pathology-identified thyroiditis (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.3; P = .005). Patients with both pre-operative TSH >2.5 μIU/mL and US-identified thyroiditis had a 5.8-fold increased risk of requiring postoperative THR (95% CI, 2.4-13.9; P2.5 μIU/mL significantly increases the risk of requiring THR after thyroid lobectomy. Thyroiditis can add to that prediction and guide pre-operative patient counseling and surgical decision making. US-identified thyroiditis should be reported and post-thyroid lobectomy patients followed long-term (≥18 months).

  13. Achondroplastic Dwarfism—Effects of Treatment with Human Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Roberto F.; Hutchings, John J.; Li, Choh Hao; Forsham, Peter

    1966-01-01

    Two male patients with achondroplastic dwarfism aged 7-5/12 and 14½ years were treated with human growth hormone 5 mg daily. Both showed nitrogen retention on balance studies, the older second patient to a marked degree. In the younger patient, height increased from 95.4 to 106.3 cm on hgh 5 mg daily alone for 14 out of 24 months. The rate of growth approximately doubled during the first two treatment periods as compared with the pre-treatment rate. In the second older patient hgh was administered 5 mg daily intramuscularly for 21 out of 33 months. Growth from 129.6 cm to 137.8 cm occurred with the rate increasing following the addition of Na-1-thyroxine to the routine. This increased growth rate occurred during the post-puberty deceleration phase. Bone ages, interpreted from changes in the phalanges and metacarpals, increased from 4½ to 6 years during 16 months in Case 1, and from 13½ to 18 years in 33 months in Case 2. Transient adolescent gynecomastia appeared in Case 2. No local or general toxic effects were noted. These results are suggestive, but whether or not the eventual height of an achondroplastic dwarf can be significantly altered must await further studies. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:5946547

  14. Should we give up hormone treatment in menopause?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Aral Atalay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The first paper entitled intrauterine insemination (IUI was published in 1962. By time, several methods involving the technique and the ovulation induction schedules have evolved in order to improve the success rates. Although gonadotrophin releasing hormone antagonists (GnRHa is a crucial part of assisted reproductive treatments now, concerns also arouse regarding the need for the use of it in IUI cycles. These drugs may be considered in IUI programs basically in order to prevent premature LH surges and related cycle cancellations. Although administration of a GnRH antagonist almost completely abolishes premature luteinization, it does not substantially improve the pregnancy rate. The decision of using GnRH antagonists in IUI cycles should be based primarily on the local cost/benefit analysis of individual centers. It will be prudent to limit the involvement of the antagonists in ovulation induction protocols to: patients who frequently exhibit premature LH discharges and therefore either fail to complete treatment or result in unsuccessful outcome; initiated cycles intented for IUI but converted to ART; if it is not possible for logistic reasons (weekend to perform the insemination or for medical centers in which a gynecologist on call is not available and in order to decrease clinical task burden resulting from strict cycle monitoring such as serial transvaginal sonography and/or frequent urine tests.

  15. Growth hormone treatment in Turner's syndrome: A real world experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Sheker Reddy Danda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Short stature is a universal clinical feature of Turner's syndrome (TS. Growth failure begins in fetal life, and adults with TS are on an average 20 cm shorter than the normal female population. Since there is a paucity of data from India regarding the effect of growth hormone (GH on TS patients, we retrospectively analyzed the data of TS patients who are on GH treatment. Methods: This hospital-based observational retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Hyderabad. The data such as height, weight, and bone age of 16 patients who are diagnosed with TS on GH therapy for at least 6 months were included in the study. All the patients were treated with human recombinant GH at the dose of 0.3 mg/kg/week administered as daily subcutaneous injections. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 12.7 years. The mean height at the start of GH therapy was 1.26 m, and mean height standard deviation score (HSDS was-0.61 when compared to Turner's specific reference data. With a mean duration of GH therapy of 25 months, the mean height at the end of therapy was 1.37 m and the mean height as per HSDS was + 0.37 resulting in a mean height gain of + 0.99 HSDS. Conclusion: Our observation shows that girls with TS benefit from early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with GH.

  16. Hormone treatment of gender identity disorder in a cohort of children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Jacqueline K; Paul, Campbell; Kasiannan, Porpavai; Grover, Sonia R; Newman, Louise K; Warne, Garry L

    2012-05-21

    To describe the experience of hormone treatment of gender identity disorder (GID) in children and adolescents within a specialist clinic. Cohort study by medical record review of children aged 0-17 years referred during 2003-2011 for management at the GID clinic in a tertiary paediatric referral centre - the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria. Clinical characteristics of the patient population, hormone treatment provided, frequency of referrals with time. Thirty-nine children and adolescents were referred for gender dysphoria. Seventeen individuals were pubertal with persistent GID, and were considered eligible for hormone treatment. Seven patients, comprising three biological males and four biological females, had legally endorsed hormone treatment. In this group, gender dysphoria was first noted at 3-6 years of age. Hormone treatment with GnRH analogue to suppress pubertal progression (phase 1) was given at 10-16 years of age. Treatment with cross-sex hormones (phase 2) was given at 15.6-16 years. One patient purchased cross-sex hormone treatment overseas. One patient received oestrogen and progesterone for menstrual suppression before phase 1. The annual frequency of new referrals increased continuously over the study period. Hormone treatment for pubertal suppression and subsequent gender transition needs to be individualised within stringent protocols in multidisciplinary specialist units.

  17. Treatment of idiopathic FSGS with adrenocorticotropic hormone gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Jonathan; Bomback, Andrew S; Mehta, Kshama; Canetta, Pietro A; Rao, Maya K; Appel, Gerald B; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Lafayette, Richard A

    2013-12-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) has shown efficacy as primary and secondary therapy for nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy. The data on using ACTH to treat idiopathic FSGS are limited. This report describes our experience using ACTH for nephrotic syndrome due to idiopathic FSGS in the United States. Twenty-four patients with nephrotic syndrome from idiopathic FSGS were treated with ACTH gel at two academic medical centers between 2009 and 2012, either as part of investigator-initiated pilot studies (n=16) or by prescription for treatment-resistant FSGS (n=8). The primary outcome was remission of proteinuria. The median dose of ACTH was 80 units injected subcutaneously twice weekly. Treatment durations were not uniform. Twenty-two patients had received immunosuppression (mean, 2.2 medications) before ACTH therapy. Six patients had steroid-dependent and 15 had steroid-resistant FSGS. At the time of ACTH initiation, the median serum creatinine (interquartile range) was 2.0 (1.1-2.7) mg/dl, estimated GFR was 36 (28-78) ml/min per 1.73 m(2), and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio was 4595 (2200-8020) mg/g. At the end of ACTH therapy, 7 of 24 patients (29%) experienced remission (n=2 complete remissions, n=5 partial remissions). All remitters had steroid-resistant (n=5) or steroid-dependent (n=2) FSGS. Two responders relapsed during the follow-up period (mean ± SD, 70±31 weeks). Adverse events occurred in 21 of 24 patients, including one episode of new-onset diabetes that resolved after stopping ACTH and two episodes of AKI. Response to ACTH treatment among steroid-resistant or steroid-dependent patients with FSGS is low, but ACTH gel may be a viable treatment option for some patients with resistant nephrotic syndrome due to idiopathic FSGS. Further research is necessary to determine which patients will respond to therapy.

  18. Effect of long-term growth hormone treatment on bone mass and bone metabolism in growth hormone-deficient men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravenboer, N; Holzmann, PJ; ter Maaten, JC; Stuurman, LM; Roos, JC; Lips, P

    2005-01-01

    Long-term GH treatment in GH-deficient men resulted in a continuous increase in bone turnover as shown by histomorphometry. BMD continuously increased in all regions of interest, but more in the regions with predominantly cortical bone. Introduction: Adults with growth hormone (GH) deficiency have

  19. Effect of hormone treatments on deformed fruit development in pear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    erica

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... of plant growth regulators applications and endogenous hormones on deformed pear fruit to clarify the relation- ship between shape and hormones in the fruit. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The experiments were conducted in 2008 using pear trees growing fruit demonstration farm in Jianning County.

  20. Interactive effect of genetic susceptibility with height, body mass index, and hormone replacement therapy on the risk of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harlid Sophia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer today has many established risk factors, both genetic and environmental, but these risk factors by themselves explain only part of the total cancer incidence. We have investigated potential interactions between certain known genetic and phenotypic risk factors, specifically nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and height, body mass index (BMI and hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Methods We analyzed samples from three different study populations: two prospectively followed Swedish cohorts and one Icelandic case–control study. Totally 2884 invasive breast cancer cases and 4508 controls were analysed in the study. Genotypes were determined using Mass spectrometry-Maldi-TOF and phenotypic variables were derived from measurements and/or questionnaires. Odds Ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using unconditional logistic regression with the inclusion of an interaction term in the logistic regression model. Results One SNP (rs851987 in ESR1 tended to interact with height, with an increasingly protective effect of the major allele in taller women (p = 0.007 and rs13281615 (on 8q24 tended to confer risk only in non users of HRT (p-for interaction = 0.03. There were no significant interactions after correction for multiple testing. Conclusions We conclude that much larger sample sets would be necessary to demonstrate interactions between low-risk genetic polymorphisms and the phenotypic variables height, BMI and HRT on the risk for breast cancer. However the present hypothesis-generating study has identified tendencies that would be of interest to evaluate for gene-environment interactions in independent materials.

  1. Polymorphisms in Th1/Th2 Cytokine Genes, Hormone Replacement Therapy, and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Gongjian; Pan, Dongsheng; Zheng, Tongzhang; Lan, Qing; Chen, Xuezhong; Chen, Yingtai; Kim, Christopher; Bi, Xiaofeng; Holford, Theodore; Boyle, Peter; Leaderer, Brian; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Yawei

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a population-based case–control study in Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in Th1 and Th2 cytokine genes modify the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Compared to women without a history of HRT use, women with a history of HRT use had a significantly decreased risk of NHL if they carried IFNGR2 (rs1059293) CT/TT genotypes (OR = 0.5, 95%CI: 0.3–0.9), IL13 (rs20541) GG genotype (OR = 0.6, 95%CI: 0.4–0.9), and IL13 (rs1295686) CC genotype (OR = 0.6, 95%CI: 0.4–0.8), but not among women who carried IFNGR2 CC, IL13 AG/AA, and IL13CT/TT genotypes. A similar pattern was also observed for B-cell lymphoma but not for T-cell lymphoma. A statistically significant interaction was observed for IFNGR2 (rs1059293 P for interaction = 0.024), IL13(rs20541 P for interaction = 0.005), IL13 (rs1295686 P for interaction = 0.008), and IL15RA (rs2296135 P for interaction = 0.049) for NHL overall; IL13 (rs20541 P for interaction = 0.0009), IL13(rs1295686 P for interaction = 0.0002), and IL15RA (rs2296135 P for interaction = 0.041) for B-cell lymphoma. The results suggest that common genetic variation in Th1/Th pathway genes may modify the association between HRT and NHL risk.

  2. Polymorphisms in Th1/Th2 Cytokine Genes, Hormone Replacement Therapy, and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Gongjian; Pan, Dongsheng [Gansu Provincial Academy of Medical Sciences, Gansu Provincial Tumor Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Zheng, Tongzhang [Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Lan, Qing [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Chen, Xuezhong [Gansu Provincial Academy of Medical Sciences, Gansu Provincial Tumor Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Chen, Yingtai [Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Institute/Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, P.R. (China); Kim, Christopher [Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Bi, Xiaofeng [Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Institute/Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, P.R. (China); Holford, Theodore [Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Boyle, Peter [International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon (France); Leaderer, Brian [Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Chanock, Stephen J. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Core Genotyping Facility, Department of Health and Human Services, Advanced Technology Center, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Rothman, Nathaniel [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Zhang, Yawei, E-mail: yawei.zhang@yale.edu [Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-07-28

    We conducted a population-based case–control study in Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in Th1 and Th2 cytokine genes modify the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Compared to women without a history of HRT use, women with a history of HRT use had a significantly decreased risk of NHL if they carried IFNGR2 (rs1059293) CT/TT genotypes (OR = 0.5, 95%CI: 0.3–0.9), IL13 (rs20541) GG genotype (OR = 0.6, 95%CI: 0.4–0.9), and IL13 (rs1295686) CC genotype (OR = 0.6, 95%CI: 0.4–0.8), but not among women who carried IFNGR2 CC, IL13 AG/AA, and IL13CT/TT genotypes. A similar pattern was also observed for B-cell lymphoma but not for T-cell lymphoma. A statistically significant interaction was observed for IFNGR2 (rs1059293 P{sub for} {sub interaction} = 0.024), IL13(rs20541 P{sub for} {sub interaction} = 0.005), IL13 (rs1295686 P{sub for} {sub interaction} = 0.008), and IL15RA (rs2296135 P{sub for} {sub interaction} = 0.049) for NHL overall; IL13 (rs20541 P{sub for} {sub interaction} = 0.0009), IL13(rs1295686 P{sub for} {sub interaction} = 0.0002), and IL15RA (rs2296135 P{sub for} {sub interaction} = 0.041) for B-cell lymphoma. The results suggest that common genetic variation in Th1/Th pathway genes may modify the association between HRT and NHL risk.

  3. Use of hormone replacement therapy in the Hong Kong public health sector after the Women's Health Initiative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K Y; Ling, Matina; Tang, G W K

    2005-01-01

    To determine the impact of Women Health Initiative (WHI) trial on the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the Hong Kong public health sector. The central prescription database of the Hospital Authority was used to describe the half-yearly trend in the use of HRT between July 2000 and December 2003. The data of hysterectomy was retrieved from another clinical database. Before the publication of the WHI trial in July 2002, conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) and its related products dominated HRT prescribing. Relative to the first half of 2002, there was an immediate and substantial decline by 43.5% in the prescriptions of combined CEE/progestogen products and a modest decline by 22.4% in the prescriptions of CEE-alone therapy in the second half of 2002. In the first half of 2003, a decline in the prescriptions of all HRT preparations except raloxifene was observed. However, in the second half of 2003, there were no more declines in overall HRT users. Relative to the first half of 2002, the decline in the overall HRT users in the first half of 2003 was more than 46% in women aged 50-69. The decline was greater in women with a history of hysterectomy (60.3%) than women without (38.6%), but was similar between gynaecology specialty (41.7%) and non-gynaecology specialty (43.9%). Similar to the U.S., an immediate and substantial decline in the use of CEE and its related products was observed in Hong Kong after the publication of the WHI trial.

  4. Volumetric quantification of the effect of aging and hormone replacement therapy on breast composition from digital mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammann-Kloss, J.S.; Bick, U.; Fallenberg, E.; Engelken, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the physiological changes in breast composition with aging using volumetric breast composition measurement from digital mammograms and to assess the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Methods: A total of 764 consecutive mammograms of 208 non-HRT using women and 508 mammograms of 134 HRT-using women were analyzed using a volumetric breast composition assessment software (Quantra™, Hologic Inc.). Fibroglandular tissue volume (FTV), breast volume (BV), and percent density (PD) were measured. For statistical analysis, women were divided into a premenopausal (<46 years), a perimenopausal (46–55 years), and a postmenopausal (>55 years) age group. More detailed graphical analysis was performed using smaller age brackets. Women using HRT were compared to age-matched controls not using HRT. Results: Women in the postmenopausal age group had a significantly lower FTV and PD and a significantly higher BV than women in the premenopausal age group (FTV: 77 vs. 120 cm 3 , respectively; PD: 16% vs. 28%, respectively; BV 478 vs. 406 cm 3 , respectively; p < 0.01 for all). Median FTV was nearly stable in consecutive mammograms in the premenopausal and postmenopausal age groups, but declined at a rate of 3.9% per year in the perimenopausal period. Median PD was constant in the premenopausal and postmenopausal age groups and declined at a rate of 0.57% per year in the perimenopausal age group. BV continuously increased with age. Women using HRT throughout the study had a 5% higher PD than women not using HRT (22% vs. 17%, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Accurate knowledge of normal changes in breast composition are of particular interest nowadays due to the importance of breast density for breast cancer risk evaluation. FTV and PD change significantly during the perimenopausal period but remain relatively constant before and thereafter. Median total breast volume consistently increases with age and further contributes to changes in breast

  5. The rationale and design of TransCon Growth Hormone for the treatment of growth hormone deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennett Sprogøe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental challenge of developing a long-acting growth hormone (LAGH is to create a more convenient growth hormone (GH dosing profile while retaining the excellent safety, efficacy and tolerability of daily GH. With GH receptors on virtually all cells, replacement therapy should achieve the same tissue distribution and effects of daily (and endogenous GH while maintaining levels of GH and resulting IGF-1 within the physiologic range. To date, only two LAGHs have gained the approval of either the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the European Medicines Agency (EMA; both released unmodified GH, thus presumably replicating distribution and pharmacological actions of daily GH. Other technologies have been applied to create LAGHs, including modifying GH (for example, protein enlargement or albumin binding such that the resulting analogues possess a longer half-life. Based on these approaches, nearly 20 LAGHs have reached various stages of clinical development. Although most have failed, lessons learned have guided the development of a novel LAGH. TransCon GH is a LAGH prodrug in which GH is transiently bound to an inert methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG carrier. It was designed to achieve the same safety, efficacy and tolerability as daily GH but with more convenient weekly dosing. In phase 2 trials of children and adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD, similar safety, efficacy and tolerability to daily GH was shown as well as GH and IGF-1 levels within the physiologic range. These promising results support further development of TransCon GH.

  6. Association between the clinical classification of hypothyroidism and reduced TSH in LT4 supplemental replacement treatment for pregnancy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lyu; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Ye, Hongying; Zhu, Xiaoming; Li, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the effects of levothyroxine (LT4) supplemental replacement treatment for pregnancy and analyze the associations between the clinical classification of hypothyroidism and reduced thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in LT4 therapy. Totally, 195 pregnant women with hypothyroidism receiving routine prenatal care were enrolled. They were categorized into three groups: overt hypothyroidism (OH), subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) with negative thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOAb), and SCH with positive TPOAb. The association between the clinical classification and reduced TSH in LT4 supplemental replacement treatment was assessed. The results indicated that reduced TSH was significantly different among the groups according to the clinical classifications (p = 0.043). The result was also significantly different between patients with OH and patients with SCH and negative TPOAb (p = 0.036). Similar result was reported for the comparison between patients with OH and patients with SCH and positive TPOAb (p = 0.016). Multiple variable analyses showed that LT4 supplementation, gestational age and the variable of clinical classifications were associated with reduced TSH independently. Our data suggested that the therapeutic effect of substitutive treatment with LT4 was significantly associated with different clinical classifications of hypothyroidism in pregnancy and the treatment should begin as soon as possible after diagnosis.

  7. Growth hormone treatment during pregnancy in a growth hormone-deficient woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, J; Starup, J; Christiansen, J S

    1995-01-01

    protein 3 (IGFBP-3) during pregnancy, as well as birth weight and hormone levels after delivery in a 25-year-old woman with idiopathic, isolated GH deficiency diagnosed at the age of 7 years. As part of a clinical trial, the patient was treated with 2 IU/M2 GH for a period of 5 years. At this time she...

  8. The estrogen myth: potential use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadesus, Gemma; Garrett, Matthew R; Webber, Kate M; Hartzler, Anthony W; Atwood, Craig S; Perry, George; Bowen, Richard L; Smith, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Estrogen and other sex hormones have received a great deal of attention for their speculative role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but at present a direct connection between estrogen and the pathogenesis of AD remains elusive and somewhat contradictory. For example, on one hand there is a large body of evidence suggesting that estrogen is neuroprotective and improves cognition, and that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at the onset of menopause reduces the risk of developing AD decades later. However, on the other hand, studies such as the Women's Health Initiative demonstrate that HRT initiated in elderly women increases the risk of dementia. While estrogen continues to be investigated, the disparity of findings involving HRT has led many researchers to examine other hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis such as luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone. In this review, we propose that LH, rather than estrogen, is the paramount player in the pathogenesis of AD. Notably, both men and women experience a 3- to 4-fold increase in LH with aging, and LH receptors are found throughout the brain following a regional pattern remarkably similar to those neuron populations affected in AD. With respect to disease, serum LH level is increased in women with AD relative to non-diseased controls, and levels of LH in the brain are also elevated in AD. Mechanistically, we propose that elevated levels of LH may be a fundamental instigator responsible for the aberrant reactivation of the cell cycle that is seen in AD. Based on these aforementioned aspects, clinical trials underway with leuprolide acetate, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist that ablates serum LH levels, hold great promise as a ready means of treatment in individuals afflicted with AD.

  9. Effects of methimazole treatment on growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing hormone in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustina, A; Ferrari, C; Bodini, C; Buffoli, M G; Legati, F; Schettino, M; Zuccato, F; Wehrenberg, W B

    1990-12-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that thyroid hormones can enhance basal and stimulated growth hormone secretion by cultured pituitary cells. However, both in man and in the rat the effects of high thyroid hormone levels on GH secretion are unclear. The aim of our study was to test the GH response to human GHRH in hyperthyroid patients and to evaluate the effects on GH secretion of short- and long-term pharmacological decrease of circulating thyroid hormones. We examined 10 hyperthyroid patients with recent diagnosis of Graves' disease. Twelve healthy volunteers served as controls. All subjects received a bolus iv injection of GHRH(1-29)NH2, 100 micrograms. Hyperthyroid patients underwent a GHRH test one and three months after starting antithyroid therapy with methimazole, 10 mg/day po. GH levels at 15, 30, 45, 60 min and GH peak after stimulus were significantly lower in hyperthyroid patients than in normal subjects. The GH peak was also delayed in hyperthyroid patients. After one month of methimazole therapy, most of the hyperthyroid patients had thyroid hormone levels in the normal range, but they did not show significant changes in GH levels after GHRH, and the GH peak was again delayed. After three months of therapy with methimazole, the hyperthyroid patients did not show a further significant decrease in serum thyroid hormone levels. However, mean GH levels from 15 to 60 min were significantly increased compared with the control study. The GH peak after GHRH was also earlier than in the pre-treatment study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement in men with childhood-onset GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; De Boer, H; Kamp, O; Stuurman, L; Van der Veen, EA

    Short term GH replacement therapy has been shown to improve body composition and exercise capacity. It is not yet known whether GH replacement remains beneficial over the long term. We assessed the effects of long term GH replacement on body composition, bone mineral density, and cardiac function.

  11. The effects of genetic polymorphism on treatment response of recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; You, Hanxiao; Pan, Hui; Zhu, Huijuan; Yang, Hongbo; Gong, Fengying; Wang, Linjie; Jiang, Yu; Yan, Chengsheng

    2017-12-06

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) has been widely used in clinical treatment of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) or non GHD since 1985 and technology have achieved a great development in different long-acting formulations. Although the mathematical models for predicting the growth hormone response could help clinicians get to an individual personalized growth dose, many patients just can't reach the target height and the growth hormone responses differed.Genetic polymorphisms may play a role in the varies of individual responses in this treatment process.This article gives an overview of the genetic polymorphisms research of growth hormone in recent years, in order to give some potential suggestion and guide for the dose titration during treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Efficacy of biorhythmic transdermal combined hormone treatment in relieving climacteric symptoms: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Formby

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available B Formby, F SchmidtThe Rasmus Institute for Medical Research, Program in Reproductive Endocrinology, Santa Barbara, CA, USAObjective: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of bioidentical combined 17β-estradiol and progesterone transdermal delivery system (lipophilic emulsion-type base to relieve climacteric symptoms. The hormonal replacement was given during a period of 6 months at four different cyclic doses to mimic the normal ovary secretory pattern.Design: An open, randomized, comparative, between-patient trial conducted over 6 months in 29 menopausal women with climacteric symptoms assessed with the Kupperman index at baseline and during treatments. Saliva and serum values of 17β-estradiol and progesterone were quantitated before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Pharmacokinetic data following transdermal administration of 17β-estradiol (0.3 mg, daily and progesterone (100 mg, daily were calculated from saliva levels using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis.Results: Improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 93% of women evaluated before and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Values of saliva 17β-estradiol increased after 6 months from 0.6 ± 0.3 pg/mL to 14.1 ± 3.3 pg/mL, and the values of serum 17β-estradiol increased from 3.3 ± 2.8 pg/mL to 80.6 ± 21.9 pg/mL. Of responders, 88% characterized symptom relief as complete. No adverse health-related events were attributed to the bioidentical hormone therapy. Time to maximum saliva concentrations (Tmax, in all experimental cases, was observed after 6 hours. Baseline values were reached within 24 hours, indicating a diurnal rhythm of 17β-estradiol seen in normally cyclic women over the 24-hour period, ie, its daily biological rhythm.Conclusion: Percutaneous absorption of 17β-estradiol, as well as the absorption of progesterone, was associated with relief of climacteric symptoms. The cyclical transdermal delivery of combined bioidentical hormones may be

  13. Issues concerning the use of hormone replacement therapy and risk of fracture: a population-based, nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Giovanni; Zambon, Antonella; Nicotra, Federica; Conti, Valentino; Nappi, Rossella E; Merlino, Luca

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of duration, how recently it has been used, and age at start of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the risk of bone fracture. A population-based, nested case-control study was conducted in Lombardia, Northern Italy. The 78,294 women aged 45-75 years who received at least one HRT prescription during 1998-2000 were followed until 2005. Cases were women who experienced bone fracture during follow-up. Up to six controls were randomly selected for each case from the cohort after matching for age and date of cohort entry. The odds ratio of fracture associated with the use of HRT was estimated by conditional logistic regression. One thousand one hundred and seventy-four cases and 6760 controls were included. Compared with women who took HRT for less than 2 months, those who were treated for more than 20 months had an odds ratio (OR) of 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.65, 0.99). This risk reduction was still significant among current HRT users (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55, 0.90) and in women who began therapy at the age of 55-65 years (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42, 0.94) or 65-75 years (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32, 0.99). There was no statistical evidence of a protective effect for women who had stopped treatment more than 6 months previously or those who began HRT at the age of 45-55 years. HRT should be continued for long periods to achieve an optimal protection from fracture. The fracture reducing potential of HRT seems to disappear after a few months without treatment and might mainly act in women who begin therapy at older age.

  14. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue (Buserelin) treatment for central precocious puberty: a multi-centre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, G A; Warne, G L; Ennis, G; Gold, H; Silink, M; Cowell, C T; Quigley, C; Howard, N; Antony, G; Byrne, G C

    1990-02-01

    A multi-centre open trial of Buserelin, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue, was conducted in 13 children with central precocious puberty. Eleven children (eight girls and three boys), aged 3.4-10.2 years at commencement, completed the required 12 month period of treatment. Initially all patients received the drug by intranasal spray in a dose of 1200 micrograms/day, but by the end of the 12 month period two were having daily subcutaneous injections and three were receiving an increased dose intranasally. The first month of treatment was associated in one boy with increased aggression and masturbation, and in the girls with an increase in the prevalence of vaginal bleeding. Thereafter, however, both behavioural abnormalities and menstruation were suppressed. Median bone age increased significantly during the study, but without any significant change in the ratio of height age to bone age. The median predicted adult height for the group therefore did not alter significantly over the twelve months of the study. Buserelin treatment caused a reduction in the peak luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) responses to LHRH, mostly to prepubertal levels, and also suppressed basal FSH. In the first weeks of treatment, the girls' serum oestradiol levels rose significantly and then fell to prepubertal or early pubertal levels. A similar pattern was seen for serum testosterone levels. Serum somatomedin-C levels, however, showed little fluctuation over the course of the study. Buserelin treatment was safe and well accepted, and offers the promise of improved linear growth potential in precocious puberty.

  15. Cognitive and Adaptive Advantages of Growth Hormone Treatment in Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Roof, Elizabeth; Hunt-Hawkins, Hailee

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) typically have mild to moderate intellectual deficits, compulsivity, hyperphagia, obesity, and growth hormone deficiencies. Growth hormone treatment (GHT) in PWS has well-established salutatory effects on linear growth and body composition, yet cognitive benefits of GHT, seen in other patient…

  16. What Are the Treatments for Prader-Willi Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These treatments are used to treat small genitals (penis, scrotum, clitoris). Replacement of sex hormones. Replacement of sex hormones during puberty may result in development of adequate secondary sex ...

  17. Hormone Replacement Therapy advertising: sense and nonsense on the web pages of the best-selling pharmaceuticals in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantero María

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The balance of the benefits and risks of long term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT have been a matter of debate for decades. In Europe, HRT requires medical prescription and its advertising is only permitted when aimed at health professionals (direct to consumer advertising is allowed in some non European countries. The objective of this study is to analyse the appropriateness and quality of Internet advertising about HRT in Spain. Methods A search was carried out on the Internet (January 2009 using the eight best-selling HRT drugs in Spain. The brand name of each drug was entered into Google's search engine. The web sites appearing on the first page of results and the corresponding companies were analysed using the European Code of Good Practice as the reference point. Results Five corporate web pages: none of them included bibliographic references or measures to ensure that the advertising was only accessible by health professionals. Regarding non-corporate web pages (n = 27: 41% did not include the company name or address, 44% made no distinction between patient and health professional information, 7% contained bibliographic references, 26% provided unspecific information for the use of HRT for osteoporosis and 19% included menstrual cycle regulation or boosting feminity as an indication. Two online pharmacies sold HRT drugs which could be bought online in Spain, did not include the name or contact details of the registered company, nor did they stipulate the need for a medical prescription or differentiate between patient and health professional information. Conclusions Even though pharmaceutical companies have committed themselves to compliance with codes of good practice, deficiencies were observed regarding the identification, information and promotion of HRT medications on their web pages. Unaffected by legislation, non-corporate web pages are an ideal place for indirect HRT advertising, but they often contain

  18. Hormone replacement therapy advertising: sense and nonsense on the web pages of the best-selling pharmaceuticals in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilet-Rosell, Elisa; Martín Llaguno, Marta; Ruiz Cantero, María Teresa; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2010-03-16

    The balance of the benefits and risks of long term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have been a matter of debate for decades. In Europe, HRT requires medical prescription and its advertising is only permitted when aimed at health professionals (direct to consumer advertising is allowed in some non European countries). The objective of this study is to analyse the appropriateness and quality of Internet advertising about HRT in Spain. A search was carried out on the Internet (January 2009) using the eight best-selling HRT drugs in Spain. The brand name of each drug was entered into Google's search engine. The web sites appearing on the first page of results and the corresponding companies were analysed using the European Code of Good Practice as the reference point. Five corporate web pages: none of them included bibliographic references or measures to ensure that the advertising was only accessible by health professionals. Regarding non-corporate web pages (n = 27): 41% did not include the company name or address, 44% made no distinction between patient and health professional information, 7% contained bibliographic references, 26% provided unspecific information for the use of HRT for osteoporosis and 19% included menstrual cycle regulation or boosting feminity as an indication. Two online pharmacies sold HRT drugs which could be bought online in Spain, did not include the name or contact details of the registered company, nor did they stipulate the need for a medical prescription or differentiate between patient and health professional information. Even though pharmaceutical companies have committed themselves to compliance with codes of good practice, deficiencies were observed regarding the identification, information and promotion of HRT medications on their web pages. Unaffected by legislation, non-corporate web pages are an ideal place for indirect HRT advertising, but they often contain misleading information. HRT can be bought online from Spain

  19. Justified and unjustified use of growth hormone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGrowth hormone (GH) replacement therapy for children and adults with proven GH deficiency due to a pituitary disorder has become an accepted therapy with proven efficacy. GH is increasingly suggested, however, as a potential treatment for frailty, osteoporosis,

  20. Comparison of low-normal and high-normal IGF-1 target levels during growth hormone replacement therapy : A randomized clinical trial in adult growth hormone deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bunderen, Christa C; Lips, Paul; Kramer, Mark H H; Drent, Madeleine L

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines state that the goals of growth hormone (GH) therapy in adults should be an appropriate clinical response, avoidance of side effects, and an IGF-1 value within the age-adjusted reference range. There are no published studies on the target level for IGF-1 that offer

  1. Microarchitecture, but Not Bone Mechanical Properties, Is Rescued with Growth Hormone Treatment in a Mouse Model of Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Erika; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Morck, Douglas W.; Boyd, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is related to an increased fracture risk although it is not clear if this is due to compromised bone quality or a small bone size. We investigated the relationship between bone macrostructure, microarchitecture and mechanical properties in a GH-deficient (GHD) mouse model undergoing GH treatment commencing at an early (prepubertal) or late (postpubertal) time point. Microcomputed tomography images of the femur and L4 vertebra were obtained to quantify macrostruc...

  2. [The influence of hormonal replacement therapy on bone density in postmenopausal women depending on polymorphism of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and estrogen receptor (ER) genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodowska, Agnieszka

    2003-01-01

    genes? 3. What estrogen concentration is necessary to protect bone tissue depending on the polymorphism of VDR and ER genes? The study group included 44 postmenopausal women aged 44-75 years with primary osteoporosis on cyclic HRT (hormonal replacement therapy). Two hormonal preparations were administered: Systen 50 (Jansen Cilag) transdermal system twice per week between day 1 and 21 of the cycle; Provera (Upjohn) 5 mg tablets daily between day 16 and 27 of the cycle. This therapy was supplemented with vitamin D analogue (Alphacalcidolum, Glaxo-Poznan) orally at 0.25 microg per day, calcium-enriched (1200 mg daily) diet and regular physical exercise. Patients were qualified to the study on the basis of a questionnaire. Women with secondary osteoporosis were excluded. TSH, FT3, and FT4 concentrations, as well as fasting glucose were measured. 24 h glycemia was established in women with elevated glucose levels. Polymorphism of the ER gene was studied with Xba I and Pvu II restrictases. Polymorphism of the VDR gene was studied with Bsm I restrictase. Age and BMI were recorded. Spine BMD was determined with DEXA (Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (Lunar instrument) before treatment and after 12 months of HRT. Serum estradiol concentrations were measured before treatment and after 2 months of HTR. The following conclusions were drawn: 1. There is no connection between VDR and ER gene polymorphism and degree of osteoporosis before treatment. 2. XX, PP and Bb markers or X, P, B alleles are associated with a significant decrease in therapeutic efficacy. Nevertheless, satisfactory results were achieved in each woman with primary osteoporosis. 3. Estradiol concentration in serum before and during HRT does not depend on the polymorphism of VDR and ER genes.

  3. Effects of growth hormone treatment on growth in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, D; Bechtold, S

    2009-11-01

    Several therapeutic trials have been conducted over the past decade to evaluate the role of exogenous growth hormone (GH) as a means of correcting the growth deficiency seen in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early studies showed the benefit of GH treatment with respect to final height in patients with JIA. Of 13 patients receiving GH, 84% (11 patients) achieved a final height within their target range compared with only 22% (4 of 18 patients) of untreated patients. There are, however, factors that may limit the statural gains achieved with GH therapy including severe inflammation, severe statural deficiency at GH therapy initiation, long disease duration and delayed puberty. Data on the efficacy of GH replacement therapy in children with JIA and factors that influence the statural growth response will be reviewed. Results from therapeutic trials show that treatment with GH can decrease the statural deficit that occurs during the active phase of JIA, producing an adult height that is close to the genetically determined target height. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Effectiveness and safety of growth hormone replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency%生长激素替代治疗成人生长激素缺乏症的有效性与安全性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林晨红; 宋筱筱; 徐小红

    2015-01-01

    成人生长激素缺乏症可致机体组分改变、糖、脂代谢紊乱、骨代谢异常、心血管疾病风险增加及生活质量下降等,生长激素替代治疗可有效改善以上情况.但生长激素广泛的生理作用使其安全性备受争议,近几年大部分文献提示生长激素替代治疗不增加糖尿病的发生、肿瘤复发、新发恶性肿瘤及心血管事件等,但仍缺乏大量随机、对照研究,故在生长激素治疗时应严密监测血清胰岛素样生长因子-1水平、血脂、血压、血糖、骨密度、肿瘤标志物及生活质量等指标.%Adult growth hormone deficiency causes a series of abnormities including abnormal body composition,impaired glucose and lipid metabolism,abnormal bone metabolism,as well as increased cardiovascular risk and decreased living quality.Growth hormone replacement therapy can effectively improve those abnormalities.However,the safety of growth hormone is controversial since growth hormone has extensively physiological functions.In recent years,most of the studies revealed that the incidence of diabetes mellitus,tumor recurrence,second neoplasms and cardiovascular events in growth hormone replacement therapy did not increase,although large randomized controlled studies are needed to reach the conclusion.Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 level,serum lipids,blood pressure,plasma glucose,bone mineral density,cancer biomarkers and living quality should be closely monitored during the period of growth hormone replacement therapy.

  5. The Asian Menopause Survey: knowledge, perceptions, hormone treatment and sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ko-En; Xu, Ling; I, Nik Nasri; Jaisamrarn, Unnop

    2010-03-01

    To provide current insights into the opinions, attitudes, and knowledge of menopausal women in Asia regarding menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Cross-sectional. Between January 2006 and February 2006, 1000 postmenopausal women from China, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand and Hong Kong were interviewed to determine postmenopausal symptoms, HRT use and knowledge, breast discomfort and knowledge of breast cancer risks, and sexual function. Almost all women reported experiencing postmenopausal symptoms. Sleeplessness (42%) was reported as the main reason for seeking treatment. On average, 54% of women were aware of HRT, despite the fact that most (38%) were unable to mention any associated benefits. Most women had used natural or herbal treatments (37%) for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms. Only 19% had received HRT. 27% of respondents reported having breast discomfort, while 70% reported performing self-breast examinations. 53% of women had never received a mammogram, despite breast cancer concern (50%). 24% of women described HRT as being a risk factor for breast cancer. Most women and their partners reported no reductions in sexual function (66 and 51%, respectively), while 90% of respondents did not seek treatment for reduced sexual function. In the event of sexual dysfunction, 33% of women replied that they would be willing to seek treatment. Many Asian women experience postmenopausal symptoms that are often left untreated (due to the acceptance of menopause as a natural process) or treated with herbal/natural remedies. There was a general lack of knowledge among these women regarding treatment options, HRT, and possible risks associated with HRT. A more concerted effort should be made to better disseminate information regarding the pathogenesis and risk factors associated with breast cancer, menopause, and menopausal symptoms to Asian women. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy with carotid atherosclerosis and soluble thrombomodulin: the vascular aging (EVA) study. Etude du Vieillissement Artériel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Laure; van Oort, Floor V A; Le Gal, Grégoire; Mennen, Louise I; Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Touboul, Pierre-Jean; Zureik, Mahmoud; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves

    2002-02-15

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may reduce atherosclerosis among postmenopausal women, partly by reducing vascular endothelium damage. We have tested this hypothesis by evaluating the association of HRT with firstly, carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and plaques, and secondly, with endothelial cell damage, indicated by soluble thrombomodulin (sTM). Then, we tested the association between the two markers of atherosclerosis and the levels of sTM. Among 747 postmenopausal women included into the EVA study, we compared 154 HRT users (including 80% transdermal treatment) with 593 never users. Carotid IMT and plaques were measured with B-mode ultrasonography and sTM with ELISA. At least one plaque was detected among 13.6% of HRT users and 27.3% of never users. After adjustment for confounding factors, the odds ratio for the presence of plaque was 0.45 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.78, P=0.005) in HRT users in comparison with nonusers. HRT users had a slightly lower crude mean IMT than nonusers, but the difference was not significant. sTM was positively associated with mean IMT (P for trend=0.001) but not with plaques. Finally, estrogen users had a lower sTM level than nonusers (difference 0.14 ng/ml, P=0.03). As HRT was associated with sTM and plaques, but not with IMT, while sTM was only associated with IMT, our hypothesis was not confirmed. This suggests that the possible beneficial effects of HRT on atherosclerosis may not go through the endothelial cell damage assessed by plasma thrombomodulin.

  7. Advanced scheduling for zygote intrafallopian transfer is possible via the use of a hormone replacement cycle for patients who have experienced repeated implantation failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Koji; Juen, Hiroyasu; Nishi, Yayoi; Sugiyama, Rie; Motoyama, Hiroshi; Kuribayashi, Yasushi; Inoue, Masato; Akira, Shigeo; Sugiyama, Rikikazu

    2014-11-01

    Zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT) is an effective option for patients who have experienced repeated implantation failures (RIF) in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. However, advance planning for the day of the operation can be problematic. Using a hormone replacement cycle (HRC) makes it possible to plan for the day of ZIFT. In the present study, we evaluated whether HRC-ZIFT is useful for RIF patients who have experienced difficulties obtaining morphologically good embryos in vitro. A total of 55 patients with a history of five or more unsuccessful transfers received HRC-ZIFT between June 2008 and June 2013. The oocyte pick-ups were performed and the oocytes showing two pronuclei (2PN) were cryopreserved. After receiving more than five 2PN oocytes, the operation day was scheduled in advance, and as a consequence, a HRC was started and ZIFT was performed. The clinical outcomes were evaluated. The average age of the patients was 39.3 years, and the previous OPU and ET attempts numbered 7.5 and 6.9, respectively. The number of previously transferred embryos was 11.8, and the number of morphologically good embryos (MGEs) was only 1.2. The number of transferred 2PN oocytes was 6.7, and the subsequent pregnancy rate was 23.6 %. No ectopic or multiple pregnancies were observed, but there were 6 cases of miscarriage. Among RIF patients, in particular those who have difficulty obtaining MGEs in vitro, ZIFT might be a useful option. The HRC allows patients and medical staff to plan for the operation day in advance.

  8. Intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of post-irradiation residual/recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Aaron O; Kocherill, Paul G; Wallace, Michelle; Forman, Jeffrey D

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of residual/recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with biochemical evidence of residual/recurrent prostate cancer were initially treated with radiation therapy (RT)(13), neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy and RT (3), or RT following prostatectomy (1). The mean follow-up time was 19.4 months from the initiation of hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy consisted of an LH-RH agonist alone (7), an anti-androgen alone (1) or a combination of both (9). Hormonal therapy was continued until the prostatic specific antigen (PSA) level became undetectable. IHT was reinstituted when the PSA reached a pre-determined level, usually greater than or equal to 10ng/ml. Results: The mean time from completion of primary treatment to the initiation of hormonal therapy was 32.5 months. The mean PSA at the start of the first cycle of hormonal therapy was 43.9ng/ml, the second cycle, 11.9ng/ml and the third cycle, 24ng/ml. The mean PSA levels at the end of the first and second cycle of hormonal therapy were .48 and .42ng/ml, respectively. No patient has yet completed the third cycle of hormonal therapy. The average duration of hormonal therapy was 10 months for the first cycle and 4 months for the second cycle. The mean intermittent time off hormones were 9.3 months between cycles 1 and 2, and 10 months between cycles 2 and 3. No patient has yet become refractory to hormonal therapy. Currently all patients are alive. All patients experienced hot flashes and decreased libido at varying degrees during treatment. Thirty-five percent experienced gynecomastia. During the intervals between hormonal therapy, most patients reported a decrease in hot flashes. Conclusion: This analysis supplies preliminary evidence that intermittent hormonal therapy is a viable option in patients with biochemical evidence of disease following initial therapy. It is associated with less treatment

  9. Gut hormones - Novel tools in the treatment of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parlevliet, Edwin Tijmen

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has now become a global epidemic. The past decade hormones from the gastrointestinal tract have gained much interest as potential new therapeutic drugs in the battle against this disease. Gut peptides play an important role in regulating food intake and energy homeostasis.

  10. Parents' views on growth hormone treatment for their children: psychosocial issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dongen N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nadine van Dongen,1 Ad A Kaptein21Patient Intelligence Panel Health Ltd, London, United Kingdom; 2Section Medical Psychology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The NetherlandsBackground: We evaluated the opinions of parents in The Netherlands concerning treatment of their children with growth hormone, and examined beliefs and perceptions about treatment and quality of health care communication and support.Methods: An Internet survey was completed by 69 parents who had children prescribed growth hormone and were part of the Patient Intelligence Panel. Acceptance of the diagnosis and treatment was investigated with reference to four topics, ie, search and quality of information, involvement in decision-making process, operational aspects, and emotional problems and support.Results: Among the parents surveyed, 48% reported a lack of freedom to choose the type of growth hormone device that best suited their needs, 92% believed that their children (and they themselves would benefit if the children self-administered growth hormone, and 65% believed training to support self-administration would be helpful. According to 79%, the availability of support from another parent with experience of treating their own child with growth hormone, alongside their doctor, would be valuable. Thirty-seven percent of the parents indicated that their children felt anxious about administration of growth hormone, and 83% of parents would appreciate psychological support to overcome their anxiety. An increase in reluctance to receive treatment with growth hormone was observed by 40% of parents after the children reached puberty, and 57% of these parents would appreciate psychological support to overcome this reluctance.Conclusion: Understanding how growth hormone treatments and their implications are perceived by parents is a first step towards addressing quality of growth hormone treatment, which may be instrumental in improving adherence. The data show a need for

  11. Replacing a failed mini-implant with a miniplate to prevent interruption during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hwa; Choo, Hyeran; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Giannuzzi, Lucille A; Ngan, Peter

    2011-06-01

    When mini-implants fail during orthodontic treatment, there is a need to have a backup plan to either replace the failed implant in the adjacent interradicular area or wait for the bone to heal before replacing the mini-implant. We propose a novel way to overcome this problem by replacement with a miniplate so as not to interrupt treatment or prolong treatment time. The indications, advantages, efficacy, and procedures for switching from a mini-implant to a miniplate are discussed. Two patients who required replacement of failed mini-implants are presented. In the first patient, because of the proximity of the buccal vestibule to the mini-implant, it was decided to replace the failed mini-implant by an I-shaped C-tube miniplate. In the second patient, radiolucencies were found around the failed mini-implants, making the adjacent alveolar bone unavailable for immediate placement of another mini-implant. In addition, the maxillary sinus pneumatization was expanded deeply into the interradicular spaces; this further mandated an alternative placement site. One failed mini-implant was examined under a scanning electron microscope for bone attachment. Treatment was completed in both patients after replacement with miniplates without interrupting the treatment mechanics or prolonging the treatments. Examination under the scanning electron microscope showed partial bone growth into the coating pores and titanium substrate interface even after thorough cleaning and sterilization. Replacement with a miniplate is a viable solution for failed mini-implants during orthodontic treatment. The results from microscopic evaluation of the failed mini-implant suggest that stringent guidelines are needed for recycling used mini-implants. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Concentration of serum thyroid hormone binding proteins after 131I treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrop, J.S.; Hopton, M.R.; Lazarus, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Serum concentrations of the thyroid hormone binding proteins, thyroxine binding globulin, prealbumin, and albumin were determined in 30 thyrotoxic patients before and after 131 I treatment. Each patient was placed into one of three groups according to response to treatment. The serum concentration of all three proteins rose significantly in 10 patients who became euthyroid, and a greater increase was seen in 10 patients who developed hypothyroidism. There was no significant change in thyroid hormone binding protein concentrations in 10 subjects who remained hyperthyroid. Changes in the concentration of thyroid hormone binding proteins should be borne in mind when total thyroid hormone concentrations are used to monitor the progress of patients receiving treatment for hyperthyroidism. (author)

  13. Cytokines and Bone Loss in a 5-Year Longitudinal Study—Hormone Replacement Therapy Suppresses Serum Soluble Interleukin-6 Receptor and Increases Interleukin-1-Receptor Antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B.; Bonnevie-Nielsen, V.; Ebbesen, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    ) and the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) potentially modify cytokine bioactivity. We therefore assessed the impact of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on cytokines and activity modifiers in serum within a 5-year longitudinal study. One hundred sixty perimenopausal women (age 50.1 +/- 2.8 years) were.......16; p = 0.17). In conclusion, serum IL-1ra and sIL-6R are influenced by HRT and are associated with the rate of bone loss in perimenopausal women....

  14. The effect of a high-protein, high-sodium diet on calcium and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women stratified by hormone replacement therapy use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, M.; Bennett, T.; Jakobsen, Jette

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of a high-sodium, high-protein diet on bone metabolism in postmenopausal women ( aged 49 - 60 y) stratified by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use. In a crossover trial, 18 women (n = 8 HRT users (+HRT) and n = 10 nonusers (-HRT)) were...... randomly assigned to a diet high in protein ( 90 g/day) and sodium (180 mmol/day) ( calciuric diet) or a diet moderate in protein ( 70 g/day) and low in sodium ( 65 mmol/day) for 4 weeks followed by crossover to alternative dietary regimen for a further 4 weeks. The calciuric diet significantly (P...

  15. Interventions for replacing missing teeth: treatment of peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Worthington, Helen V

    2012-01-18

    One of the key factors for the long-term success of oral implants is the maintenance of healthy tissues around them. Bacterial plaque accumulation induces inflammatory changes in the soft tissues surrounding oral implants and it may lead to their progressive destruction (peri-implantitis) and ultimately to implant failure. Different treatment strategies for peri-implantitis have been suggested, however it is unclear which are the most effective. To identify the most effective interventions for treating peri-implantitis around osseointegrated dental implants. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. Handsearching included several dental journals. We checked the bibliographies of the identified randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and relevant review articles for studies outside the handsearched journals. We wrote to authors of all identified RCTs, to more than 55 dental implant manufacturers and an Internet discussion group to find unpublished or ongoing RCTs. No language restrictions were applied. The last electronic search was conducted on 9 June 2011. All RCTs comparing agents or interventions for treating peri-implantitis around dental implants. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by two review authors. We contacted the authors for missing information. Results were expressed as random-effects models using mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Heterogeneity was to be investigated including both clinical and methodological factors. Fifteen eligible trials were identified, but six were excluded. The following interventions were compared in the nine included studies: different non-surgical interventions (five trials); adjunctive treatments to non-surgical interventions (one trial); different surgical interventions (two trials

  16. Treatment of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: a comparison of treatment with daily injections and with the pulsatile infusion pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargil, A A

    1987-03-01

    Thirty husbands in childless couples, aged 24 to 35 years, were treated with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) for idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) of peripubertal (incomplete) type. They were azoospermic or oligospermic, with less than 1.5 X 10(6)/ml nonmotile spermatozoa. The diagnosis of IHH was based on clinical and laboratory features and testicular biopsy specimen study and was further supported by results of stimulation tests and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) test. Two treatment modalities were used: subcutaneous injections of 500 micrograms LH-RH twice daily; and perpetual subcutaneous injection, via portable infusion pump, of 25 ng/kg LH-RH, at 90-minute intervals. Two patients required a short second period of pulsatile treatment to cause a second pregnancy of their spouses. The pump proved to yield better results, compared with intermittent injections, in respect to endocrine responses, spermatogenesis, and fertility capacity. Normal levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone were reached in 2 to 3 weeks and normal testosterone levels in 8 to 10 weeks from the start of treatment. Sperm counts rose to greater than 60 X 10(6)/ml viable spermatozoa with less than 15% of abnormal forms in 3 to 5 months, and the wives conceived. Of a total of 18 deliveries of healthy infants, 12 offspring were identified genetically with their fathers. Four women were still pregnant at the conclusion of the study. The pump was well tolerated, without special operational problems to the patients. Pulsatile treatment is therefore recommended in the treatment of well-diagnosed and carefully selected cases of incomplete IHH.

  17. Foot length before and during insulin-like growth factor-I treatment of children with laron syndrome compared to human growth hormone treatment of children with isolated growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbergeld, Aviva; Lilos, Pearl; Laron, Zvi

    2007-12-01

    To compare foot length deficits between patients with Laron syndrome (LS) (primary growth hormone [GH] insensitivity) and congenital isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) and their response to replacement therapy with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and hGH, respectively. Data for the study were collected from the records of nine children with LS (3 M, 6 F) 7.8 +/- 4.8 years old (mean +/- SD), and nine children with IGHD (3 M, 6 F), 3.8 +/- 3.3 years old. Fifteen non-treated adult patients with LS were also included in the study. Measurements of foot length were recorded without treatment and monitored during 9 years of treatment in the children and in the untreated adult patients. For statistical analysis the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was used. With almost similar basal values in growth deficit and pre-treatment growth velocities, the achievements towards norms after 9 years of treatment were greater in the patients with IGHD than in the patients with LS: foot length reached -1.4 +/- 0.8 vs. -3.3 +/- 1.0 SDS (mean +/- SD), and body height -2.2 +/- 1.0 vs. -3.9 +/- 0.5 SDS. The difference between the two groups could be due to the initiation of replacement therapy in the patients with IGHD at a younger age. Adult foot size of untreated patients with LS is small but less retarded than the height deficit. Both IGF-I and hGH are potent growth stimulating hormones of linear growth and acrae as exemplified by foot growth.

  18. Pain and senzitisation after total knee replacement or nonsurgical treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study is a secondary analysis of 12-month follow-ups from two parallel, randomised controlled trials (RCT) in painful knee osteoarthritis patients. RCT1: Total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment compared with non-surgical treatment. RCT2: Non...

  19. Conjectures concerning cross-sex hormone treatment of aging transsexual persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooren, Louis; Lips, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Guidelines for cross-sex hormone treatment of transsexual people are now in place. However, little attention has been paid to the issue of treatment suitability for older people. Does existing treatment need to be adapted as subjects age, and does it make a difference if treatment is only started when the subject is already older? To assess the necessity of adapting cross-sex hormone administration for elderly transsexual people. Risks/benefits of continued use of cross-sex hormones with regard to bone health, cardiovascular risks, and malignancies. Due to lack of data on the subject population, sex hormone treatment of other conditions in older non-transsexual people has been taken as the best available analogy to determine the extent to which these might be applicable to comparable transsexual persons. Findings in transsexual people receiving cross-sex hormone treatment sometimes modified the above approach of applying guidelines for the elderly to the aging transsexual population. Testosterone administration to female-to-male transsexual persons (FtoM) carries little risk with regard to cardiovascular disease and cancer. For those with high hematocrit or cardiac insufficiency the dose can be reduced. Administration of estrogens to male-to-female transsexual persons (MtoF), particularly when combined with progestins, does significantly increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (almost a twofold incidence compared with the general population). This may require dose adjustment or changing from oral to safer transdermal estrogens. Tumors of the breasts, prostate and pituitary may occur. In FtoM, breast cancer can occur even after breast ablation. Older subjects can commence cross-sex hormone treatment without disproportionate risks. Cross-sex hormones may be continued into old age but monitoring for cardiovascular disease and malignancies, both of the old and new sex, is recommended. MtoF will have more health complications in old age than Fto

  20. Interventions for replacing missing teeth: treatment of perimplantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Tzanetea, Eleni; Piattelli, Adriano; Worthington, Helen V

    2010-06-16

    One of the key factors for the long-term success of oral implants is the maintenance of healthy tissues around them. Bacterial plaque accumulation induces inflammatory changes in the soft tissues surrounding oral implants and it may lead to their progressive destruction (perimplantitis) and ultimately to implant failure. Different treatment strategies for perimplantitis have been suggested, however it is unclear which are the most effective. To identify the most effective interventions for treating perimplantitis around osseointegrated dental implants. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. Handsearching included several dental journals. We checked the bibliographies of the identified randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and relevant review articles for studies outside the handsearched journals. We wrote to authors of all identified RCTs, to more than 55 dental implant manufacturers and an Internet discussion group to find unpublished or ongoing RCTs. No language restrictions were applied. The last electronic search was conducted on 7th January 2010. All RCTs comparing agents or interventions for treating perimplantitis around dental implants. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by two review authors. We contacted the authors for missing information. Results were expressed as random-effects models using mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Heterogeneity was to be investigated including both clinical and methodological factors. Twelve eligible trials were identified, but five were excluded. The following procedures were tested: (1) use of local antibiotics versus ultrasonic debridement; (2) benefits of adjunctive local antibiotics to debridement; (3) different techniques of subgingival debridement; (4) laser versus manual

  1. Breast cancer with Her-22 hormone receptor-positive neu: primary systemic treatment, sentinel node biopsy and hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez C, Nayara; Sanchez M, Jose Ignacio; De Santiago G, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an interesting option in the therapy of some breast cancer cases. Cases in which the timing for sentinel lymph node biopsy is controversial. Co-expression of estrogen receptors and Her2/neu (cc-erbB-2) in breast cancer may imply hormone resistance, especially to tamoxifen. We present a clinic case with co-expression of estrogen receptors and Her2/neu that was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and previous sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by breast tumorectomy with axillar lympha- denectomy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy with letrozol, geserelina and trastuzumab. A good treatment response as found

  2. The fate of estrogenic hormones in an engineered treatment wetland with dense macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J.L.; Sedlak, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the estrogenic hormones 17??-estradiol (E2) and 17??-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) have been detected in municipal wastewater effluent and surface waters at concentrations sufficient to cause feminization of male fish. To evaluate the fate of steroid hormones in an engineered treatment wetland, lithium chloride, E2, and EE 2 were added to a treatment wetland test cell. Comparison of hormone and tracer data indicated that 36% of the E2 and 41% of the EE 2 were removed during the cell's 84-h hydraulic retention time (HRT). The observed attenuation was most likely the result of sorption to hydrophobic surfaces in the wetland coupled with biotransformation. Sorption was indicated by the retardation of the hormones relative to the conservative tracer. Biotransformation was indicated by elevated concentrations of the E2 metabolite, estrone. It may be possible to improve the removal efficiency by increasing the HRT or the density of plant materials.

  3. Predicting Treatment Response for Oppositional Defiant and Conduct Disorder Using Pre-treatment Adrenal and Gonadal Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Chad E; Dorn, Lorah D; Kolko, David J; Susman, Elizabeth J; Noll, Jennie G; Bukstein, Oscar G

    2012-12-01

    Variations in adrenal and gonadal hormone profiles have been linked to increased rates of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD). These relationships suggest that certain hormone profiles may be related to how well children respond to psychological treatments for ODD and CD. The current study assessed whether pre-treatment profiles of adrenal and gonadal hormones predicted response to psychological treatment of ODD and CD. One hundred five children, 6 - 11 years old, participating in a randomized, clinical trial provided samples for cortisol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione. Diagnostic interviews of ODD and CD were administered up to three years post-treatment to track treatment response. Group-based trajectory modeling identified two trajectories of treatment response: 1) a High-response trajectory where children demonstrated lower rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up, and 2) a Low-response trajectory where children demonstrated higher rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up. Hierarchical logistic regression predicting treatment response demonstrated that children with higher pre-treatment concentrations of testosterone were four times more likely to be in the Low-response trajectory. No other significant relationship existed between pre-treatment hormone profiles and treatment response. These results suggest that higher concentrations of testosterone are related to how well children diagnosed with ODD or CD respond to psychological treatment over the course of three years.

  4. Quality of life in locally advanced prostate cancer patients who underwent hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Hirofumi; Naito, Seiji; Fukui, Iwao; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Matsuoka, Naoki; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the feasibility of quality of life (QOL) research and to evaluate the QOL prospectively in locally advanced prostate cancer patients treated with hormonal treatment combined with radiotherapy. The treatment schedule was that patients with decreasing prostatic specific antigen (PSA) levels below 10 ng/ml after receiving 6 months of neoadjuvant hormonal treatment were randomly divided into two groups; one group was the continuous hormonal treatment group and the other was the intermittent hormonal treatment group. Both groups received a total dose of 72 Gy external beam radiotherapy with concomitant hormonal treatment followed by 6 months of adjuvant hormonal treatment following radiotherapy. At 14 months, patients either underwent continuous or intermittent hormonal treatment according to the random allocation. QOL was assessed at baseline, and at 6, 8, 14, and 20 months after treatment using functional assessment of cancer treatment-general (FACT-G), P with the other 3 items comprising bother of urination, bother of bowel movement, and bother of sexual activity. Between January 2000 and June 2003, a total of 188 patients were enrolled in this study. The rate of collection of baseline QOL sheets was 98.0%. The rate of answer to questions of QOL sheets was 99.0%. At baseline, the average score of FACT-G, P was 120.7 and the maximum score was more than twice the minimum score. Dysfunction of urination and bowel movement was correlated with the bother of urination and bowel movement, respectively. On the other hand, dysfunction of sexual activity was not correlated with the bother of sexual activity. In June 2003, all of the QOL sheets at baseline, and at 6, 8, and 14 months were completely collected from a total of 72 patients. Although QOL at 8 months was significantly affected compared with QOL at baseline and at 6 months, QOL at 14 months was significantly improved compared with that at 8 months and there was no significant

  5. Early versus delayed hormonal treatment in locally advanced or asymptomatic metastatic prostatic cancer patient dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezioso, Domenico; Iacono, Fabrizio; Romeo, Giuseppe; Ruffo, Antonio; Russo, Nicola; Illiano, Ester

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the effectiveness of hormonal treatment (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists and/or antiandrogens) as an early or as a deferred intervention for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) and/or asymptomatic metastasis. Systematic review of trials published in 1950-2007. Sources included MEDLINE and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Eligible trials included adults with a history of LAPC who are not suitable for curative local treatment of prostate cancer. We retrieved 22 articles for detailed review, of which 8 met inclusion criteria. The Veterans Administration Cooperative Urological Research Group suggested that delaying hormonal therapy did not compromise overall survival and that many of the patients died of causes other than prostate cancer. In European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30846 trial, the median survival for delayed endocrine treatment was 6.1 year, and for immediate treatment 7.6 year, the HR for survival on delayed versus immediate treatment was 1.23 (95 % CI 0.88-1.71), indicating a 23 % nonsignificant trend in favour of early treatment. In EORTC 30891, the immediate androgen deprivation resulted in a modest but statistically significant increase in overall survival. The protocol SAKK 08/88 showed the lack of any major advantage of immediate compared with deferred hormonal treatment regarding quality of life or overall survival. The early intervention with hormonal treatment for patients with LAPC provides important reductions in all-cause mortality, prostate cancer-specific mortality, overall progression, and distant progression compared with deferring their use until standard care has failed to halt the disease.

  6. UGT2B17 gene deletion associated with an increase in bone mineral density similar to the effect of hormone replacement in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, S; Bussières, J; Bureau, A; Rousseau, F

    2012-03-01

    UGT2B17 is one of the most important enzymes for androgen metabolism. In addition, the UGT2B17 gene is one of the most commonly deleted regions of the human genome. The deletion was previously found associated with higher femoral bone density in men and women, and we replicated this association in a sample of postmenopausal who never used hormone therapy. Deletion of the UGT2B17 gene was previously shown to be associated with a higher hip bone mineral density (BMD). Using a PCR assay, we tried to replicate the association among a large group of 2,379 women. We examined the effect of the deletion on femoral neck BMD and lumbar spine BMD according to the menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We used a high-throughput PCR assay to identify the gene and the deletion in a population of well-characterized women. Two additional polymorphisms, UGT2B28 deletion and UGT2B15 rs1902023 G > T were also investigated. Only UGT2B17 deletion was associated with LS and FN BMD. Furthermore, the association was seen only among postmenopausal women who had never used hormone replacement as in the first reported association. We confirmed the association between UGT2B17 deletion and a higher LS and FN BMD. In addition, we show that the association is observed among postmenopausal women who never used HRT consistent with the enzymatic function of UGT2B17. The analysis shows that those having one or two UGT2B17 alleles benefit from HRT, which is not the case for null carriers.

  7. Methylphenidate and the Response to Growth Hormone Treatment in Short Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Renes (Judith); M.A.J. de Ridder (Maria); P.E. Breukhoven (Petra); A.J. Lem (Annemieke); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Growth hormone (GH) treatment has become a frequently applied growth promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). Children born SGA have a higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment of ADHD with

  8. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  9. EXPERIENCE OF ADMINISTRATION OF GROWTH HORMONE IN TREATMENT OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF MICROSOMIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Peterkova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunities of receiving of genetically engineered medications, e.g. somatotropic hormone (STG are almost unrestricted, and treatment and monitoring of patients with different types of microsomia can be held on modern, new level with the help of it. STG provides normal stature and valuable quality of life in these patients. Treatment with growth hormone influences on hormonal, metabolic and psychical status of patient. Metabolic effects are: increasing of muscle strength, improving of renal blood flow, increasing of cardiac output, absorbability of calcium in intestines and mineralization of bones. The level of blood cholesterol, lipoproteins is descended; blood alkaline phosphatase, phosphorus, urine and fatty acid are increased. Patients' vitality and quality of life are normalized. Besides somatotropic insufficiency, growth hormone is widely used in growth_stimulating treatment of different types of dwarism in children: microsomia due to pre_natal growth delay, genetic syndromes: Silwer–Russell, Shereshevsky–Turner, Nunan, Prader–Willi, and microsomia in patients with chronic renal disease.Key words: children, microsomia, somatotropic hormone, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(2:86-93

  10. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition to con...

  11. Deficits in latent inhibition induced by estradiol replacement are ameliorated by haloperidol treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eAlmey

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are sex differences in the symptomatology of schizophrenia, and in the response to antipsychotic treatments. One hallmark symptom of schizophrenia is a deficit in selective attention. Selective attention can be measured using a latent inhibition (LI paradigm in humans; LI can be measured in rodents, and is used as an animal model of the selective attention deficits observed in schizophrenia. In the current experiments LI was used to clarify whether selective attention differs between male rats and ovariectomized (OVX female rats receiving different estradiol (E2 replacement regimens. An additional aim was to determine whether haloperidol's facilitation of LI is enhanced by E2. Males and OVX female rats were trained in a conditioned emotional response LI paradigm. Females received no E2 replacement, a chronic low dose of E2 via silastic capsule, or a high phasic dose of E2 via silastic capsule accompanied by E2 (10 ug/kg SC injections every fourth day. Actual plasma levels of E2 were determined using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Rats were also administered a vehicle treatment, a 0.05mg/kg, or a 0.1mg/kg IP injection of haloperidol. Males and OVX females that did not receive E2 replacement both exhibited LI, but LI was not observed in the low and high E2 replacement groups. Haloperidol restored LI at a lower dose in the females receiving high E2 replacement compared to females receiving low E2 replacement, indicating that E2 replacement facilitates haloperidol in restoring LI.

  12. The challenge of growth hormone deficiency (GHD diagnosis and treatment during the transition from puberty into adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eCianfarani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In children with childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency, replacement GH therapy is effective in normalising height during childhood and achieving adult height within the genetic target range. GH has further beneficial effects on body composition and metabolism through adult life. The transition phase, defined as the period from mid to late teens until 6–7 years after the achievement of final height, represents a crucial time for reassessing children’s GH secretion and deciding whether GH therapy should be continued throughout life. Evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of GHD children during transition are lacking. The aim of this review is to critically review the up-to-date evidence on the best management of transition patients in order to ensure the correct definitive diagnosis and establish the appropriate therapeutic regimen.

  13. Can anti-Mullerian hormone replace ultrasonographic evaluation in polycystic ovary syndrome? A review of current progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awadhesh Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies over the past decade have now consistently indicated that the serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH levels are at least 2–3-fold higher in the patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, which also corresponds to the increased number of AMH producing preantral and small antral follicles. Moreover, AMH levels have been found to be associated in direct proportion to the follicle numbers per ovary or antral follicular count, assessed by the transvaginal ultrasound (TVS. Furthermore, AMH correlates directly with the rising serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels in PCOS. Hence, serum AMH in women with oligo-anovulation and/or hyperandrogenemia could indicate the presence of underlying PCOS, when reliable TVS is not feasible, or not acceptable, either due to the virginal status or psycho-social issue. In addition, the imaging quality of abdominal ultrasound is often impaired by obesity, which typically occurs in PCOS women. Indeed, PCOS occurs most commonly in young females who cannot be subjected to invasive TVS for various reasons; therefore, a desirable alternative to TVS is urgently required to diagnose the most prevalent endocrine abnormality of young women. This review will analyze the currently available evidence regarding the role of AMH in the diagnosis of PCOS.

  14. The effect of the deterioration of insulin sensitivity on beta-cell function in growth-hormone-deficient adults following 4-month growth hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Fisker, S; Hilsted, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the combined effect of GH treatment on body composition and glucose metabolism, with special focus on beta-cell function in adult GHD patients. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 24 GHD adults (18M/6F), were randomized to 4 months treatment...... with biosynthetic GH 2 IU/m2s.c. daily (n =13) or placebo (n =11). At inclusion and 4 months later an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scanning were performed. During the study period, body...

  15. Lifestyle influences on the association between pre-diagnostic hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer prognosis - results from The Danish 'Diet, Cancer and Health' prospective cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Olsen, Anja; Kroman, Niels

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The association between pre-diagnostic hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and breast cancer specific mortality as well as potential influences from other lifestyle factors on the association was investigated. STUDY DESIGN: Female participants from the prospective cohort "Diet, Cancer......, and Health" diagnosed with breast cancer (BC) were identified and their pre-diagnostic HRT use evaluated for association with tumour biology and breast cancer outcome in multivariate analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Breast cancer specific mortality. RESULTS: Of the 1212 patients originally considered 1064...... were included. Of these, 105 women died from breast cancer during a median follow-up of 6.3 years (range 0.2-14.3 years). In multivariate analyses women who used HRT at enrolment into the cohort study had 47% lower risk of dying from breast cancer as compared to women who had previously or never used...

  16. Gut hormones in the treatment of short-bowel syndrome and intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle B

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The approval of teduglutide, a recombinant analog of human glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2, by the US Food and Drug Administration (Gattex) and the European Medicines Agency (Revestive) has illustrated the potential of selected gut hormones as treatments in patients with short......-bowel syndrome and intestinal failure. Gut hormones may improve the structural and functional intestinal adaptation following intestinal resection by decreasing a rapid gastric emptying and hypersecretion, by increasing the intestinal blood flow, and by promoting intestinal growth. This review summarizes......-1 may be less potent. Synergistic effects may be seen by co-treatment with GLP-2. SUMMARY: Gut hormones promote intestinal adaptation and absorption, decreasing fecal losses, thereby decreasing or even eliminating the need for parenteral support. This will aid the intestinal rehabilitation...

  17. Resolution of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis after growth hormone replacement in a pediatric liver transplant patient with panhypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilliland, Thomas; Dufour, Sylvie; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    NAFLD is a common condition linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Simple hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for inflammatory reactions in the liver (NASH), which may lead to cirrhosis. While the mechanism is unclear, NAFLD and NASH are associated with panhypopituitarism, which...... case of NASH secondary to panhypopituitarism from craniopharyngioma, which recurred by 11 months after LDLT. Despite low-dose GH replacement, the patient remained GH deficient. Pubertal dosed GH therapy led to rapid and complete resolution of hepatic steatosis, which we tracked using serial (1) H MRS...

  18. [Health economic consequences of the choice of follicle stimulating hormone alternatives in IVF treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Peter Bo; Højgaard, Astrid; Quartarolo, Jens Piero

    2007-04-02

    There is a choice between two types of hormones for stimulation of the follicles in IVF treatment - recombinant FSH and the urine-derived menotrophin. A literature review by NICE (2004) in the United Kingdom documented that the two types of hormones were equally effective and safe, which is why it was recommended to use the cheaper urine-derived hormone. Based on the EISG study (European and Israeli Study Group), the aim was to analyse the health economic consequences of the choice between the two types of hormone in IVF treatment in Denmark. In a prospective cost-effectiveness analysis (health care sector perspective), menotrophin and recombinant FSH (Gonal-F) were compared. Differences in costs were compared with differences in effects of the two alternatives. The total costs for the average patient are lower when using menotrophin compared with recombinant FSH. Furthermore, the cost per clinical pregnancy was lower with menotrophin compared with recombinant FSH hormone. Menotrophin is therefore less expensive both for the patient as well as for the health care sector. The use of menotrophin instead of recombinant FSH can result in savings of up to DKK 16 million on the drug budget--savings that could finance 1,400 additional IVF cycles. The analysis shows that urine-derived menotrophin is a cost-effective alternative to recombinant FSH with a potential for considerable savings for patients as well as the public drug budget.

  19. Possible effects of an early diagnosis and treatment in patients with growth hormone deficiency: the state of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagi, Stefano; Scalini, Perla; Farello, Giovanni; Verrotti, Alberto

    2017-09-16

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a relatively uncommon and heterogeneous endocrine disorder presenting in childhood with short stature. However, during the neonatal period, the metabolic effects of GHD may to require prompt replacement therapy to avoid possible life-threatening complications. An increasing amount of data suggests the importance of an early diagnosis and treatment of GHD because of its auxological, metabolic, and neurodevelopmental features with respect to the patients diagnosed and treated later in life.The available results show favourable auxological outcomes for patients with GHD diagnosed and treated with r-hGH early in life compared with those from patients with GHD who do not receive this early diagnosis and treatment. Because delayed referral for GHD diagnosis and treatment is still frequent, these results highlight the need for more attention in the diagnosis and treatment of GHD.Despite these very encouraging data regarding metabolic and neurodevelopmental features, further studies are needed to better characterize these findings. Overall, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of GHD needs to be addressed.

  20. Growth hormone treatment in cartilage-hair hypoplasia: effects on growth and the immune system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bocca, G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Burgt, C.J.A.M. van der; Otten, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia with severe growth retardation and impaired immunity. We studied the effects of growth hormone treatment on growth parameters and the immune system in four children with CHH. The

  1. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.K. Grote (Floor); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); D. Mul (Dick); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); R. ten Cate (Rebecca); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); W.H.J. van Luijk (Wilma); C.J.A. Jansen-Van Wijngaarden (C. J A); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims:

  2. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, FK; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Mul, D; Hop, WCJ; ten Cate, R; Oostdijk, W; Van Luijk, W; Jansen-van Wijngaarden, CJA; Keizer-Schrama, SMPFD

    Background: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims: To study the

  3. Treatment of intraoperative nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak of patients with hormone active pituitary adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yu Grigoriev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative nasal cerebrospinal fluid leak are common during the transnasal transsphenoidal interven tions. In certain cases, it is a feature of these interventions. However, its amplification needs a mandatory treatment. In this article, we describe the technique for closure dural defects that have developed during the transnasal removal of hormone active pituitary adenomas, using thrombin and fibrinogen containing colla genic sponge.

  4. PSYCHOSOCIAL EFFECTS OF 2 YEARS OF HUMAN GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT IN TURNER SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLIJPER, FME; SINNEMA, G; AKKERHUIS, GW; BRUGMANBOEZEMAN, A; FEENSTRA, J; DENHARTOG, L; HEUVEL, F

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-eight girls with Turner syndrome were treated for 2 years with human growth hormone. Both parents and patients carried out assessments of the effects of treatment on various aspects of psychosocial functioning. The children used the Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale and the Social Anxiety Scale

  5. Effects of previous growth hormone excess and current medical treatment for acromegaly on cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummelman, Pauline; Koerts, Janneke; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; van den Berg, Gerrit; Tucha, Oliver; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; van Beek, Andre P.

    2012-01-01

    Background In untreated acromegaly patients, decreased cognitive functioning is reported to be associated with the degree of growth hormone (GH) and IGF-1 excess. Whether previous GH excess or current medical treatment for acromegaly specifically affects cognition remains unclear. The aim of this

  6. Bone mineral density and body composition in Noonan's syndrome: effects of growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, C.; Span, J.; van Rijn, R. R.; Gomes-Jardin, E.; van Kuijk, C.; Otten, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition in children with Noonan's syndrome (NS) before and during growth hormone (GH) treatment. Sixteen children (12 boys, 4 girls) with NS aged 5.8-14.2 (mean 10.0) years were studied for 2 years. Anthropometry, BMD measurements by radiographic

  7. Bone density and body composition in chronic renal failure: effects of growth hormone treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, I. M.; Boot, A. M.; Nauta, J.; Hop, W. C.; de Jong, M. C.; Lilien, M. R.; Groothoff, J. W.; van Wijk, A. E.; Pols, H. A.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C.; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease and growth retardation are common complications of chronic renal failure (CRF). We evaluated bone mineral density (BMD), bone metabolism, body composition and growth in children with CRF, and the effect of growth hormone treatment (GHRx) on these variables. Thirty-three

  8. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    in relation to two testosterone injections. Mean baseline IGF-I levels were 352 +/- 135 microg/L, and they remained unaltered during the study period (analysis of variance (ANOVA), P = 0.88). Free IGF-I levels did not change either (ANOVA, P = 0.35). Serum IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and acid......-labile subunit decreased (ANOVA, P = 0.04 and P = 0.02 respectively) but post hoc analysis did not reveal a particular difference between days. IGFBP-1 increased following testosterone administration (ANOVA, P = 0.05), whereas GH binding protein levels tended to decrease following testosterone administration...... (ANOVA, P = 0.08). Prostate-specific antigen tended slightly to increase after each testosterone injection (ANOVA, P = 0.08, post hoc, NS). We conclude that major changes in total IGF-I are not induced during conventional intramuscular testosterone replacement in GH-treated hypopituitary males...

  9. Motives for choosing growth-enhancing hormone treatment in adolescents with idiopathic short stature: a questionnaire and structured interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-van Balen, J.; Geenen, R.; Kamp, G.A.; Huisman, J.; Wit, J.M.; Sinnema, G.

    2005-01-01

    Background Growth-enhancing hormone treatment is considered a possible intervention in short but otherwise healthy adolescents. Although height gain is an obvious measure for evaluating hormone treatment, this may not be the ultimate goal for the person, but rather a means to reach other goals such

  10. Effect of hormone treatment on spontaneous and radiation-induced chromosomal breakage in normal and dwarf mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buul, P.P.W. van; Buul-Offers, S. van

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of dwarf mice with growth hormone, insulin and testosterone had no effect on the spontaneous frequencies of micronuclei (MN) in bone-marrow cells, whereas thyroxine decreased these frequencies. The induction of MN by X-rays and mitomycin C was significantly lower in dwarf mice than in normal mice. Treatment with thyroxine plus growth hormone restored normal radiosensitivity in dwarfs. (orig.)

  11. Total knee replacement and non-surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Roos, Ewa M; Laursen, Mogens B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare 2-year outcomes of total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment to that of non-surgical treatment alone and outcomes of the same non-surgical treatment to that of written advice. DESIGN: In two randomized trials, 200 (mean age 66) adults with moderate...... to severe knee osteoarthritis (OA), 100 eligible for TKR and 100 not eligible for TKR, were randomized to TKR followed by non-surgical treatment, non-surgical treatment alone, or written advice. Non-surgical treatment consisted of 12 weeks of supervised exercise, education, dietary advice, use of insoles......, and pain medication. The primary outcome was the mean score of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales, covering pain, symptoms, activities of daily living (ADL), and quality of life (QOL). RESULTS: Patients randomized to TKR had greater improvements than patients randomized...

  12. Thyroid hormone analogs for the treatment of dyslipidemia: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitala, Alessandro P; Delitala, Giuseppe; Sioni, Paolo; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Treatment of dyslipidemia is a major burden for public health. Thyroid hormone regulates lipid metabolism by binding the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), but the use of thyroid hormone to treat dyslipidemia is not indicated due to its deleterious effects on heart, bone, and muscle. Thyroid hormone analogs have been conceived to selectively activate TR in the liver, thus reducing potential side-effects. The authors searched the PubMed database to review TR and the action of thyromimetics in vitro and in animal models. Then, all double-blind, placebo controlled trials that analyzed the use of thyroid hormone analog for the treatment of dyslipidemia in humans were included. Finally, the ongoing research on the use of TR agonists was searched, searching the US National Institutes of Health Registry and the WHO International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP). Thyromimetics were tested in humans for the treatment of dyslipidemia, as a single therapeutic agent or as an add-on therapy to the traditional lipid-lowering drugs. In most trials, thyromimetics lowered total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, but their use has been associated with adverse side-effects, both in pre-clinical studies and in humans. The use of thyromimetics for the treatment of dyslipidemia is not presently recommended. Future possible clinical applications might include their use to promote weight reduction. Thyromimetics might also represent an interesting alternative, both for the treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and type 2 diabetes due to their positive effects on insulin sensitivity. Finally, additional experimental and clinical studies are needed for a better comprehension of the effect(s) of a long-term therapy.

  13. Dual-hormone treatment with insulin and glucagon in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, H K; Schmidt, S; Ranjan, Ajenthen

    2015-01-01

    Intensive insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes reduces the incidence and slows the progression of microvascular and macrovascular complications; however, it is associated with an increased risk of hypoglycaemia and weight gain. In this review, we propose dual-hormone treatment with insulin...... and glucagon as a method for achieving near normalization of blood glucose levels without increasing hypoglycaemia frequency and weight gain. We briefly summarize glucagon pathophysiology in type 1 diabetes as well as the current applications of glucagon for the treatment of hypoglycaemia. Until now, the use...... of glucagon has been limited by the need for reconstitution immediately before use, because of instability of the available compounds; however, stabile compounds are soon to be launched and will render long-term intensive dual-hormone treatment in type 1 diabetes possible....

  14. Effect of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphism on high density lipoprotein levels in response to hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Nogueira-de-Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that estrogen replacement therapy and estrogen plus progestin replacement therapy alter serum levels of total, LDL and HDL cholesterol levels. However, HDL cholesterol levels in women vary considerably in response to hormone replacement therapy (HRT. A significant portion of the variability of these levels has been attributed to genetic factors. Therefore, we investigated the influence of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1 gene polymorphisms on HDL levels in response to postmenopausal HRT. We performed a prospective cohort study on 54 postmenopausal women who had not used HRT before the study and had no significant general medical illness. HRT consisted of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate continuously for 1 year. The lipoprotein levels were measured from blood samples taken before the start of therapy and after 1 year of HRT. ESR1 polymorphism (MspI C>T, HaeIII C>T, PvuII C>T, and XbaI A>G frequencies were assayed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A general linear model was used to describe the relationships between HDL levels and genotypes after adjusting for age. A significant increase in HDL levels was observed after HRT (P = 0.029. Women with the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype showed a statistically significant increase in HDL levels after HRT (P = 0.032. No association was found between other ESR1 polymorphisms and HDL levels. According to our results, the ESR1 PvuII TT genotype was associated with increased levels of HDL after 1 year of HRT.

  15. Effects of growth hormone replacement therapy on IGF-related parameters and on the pituitary-gonadal axis in GH-deficient males. A double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Andersson, A M; Pedersen, S A

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that growth hormone (GH) may play a regulatory role in male reproductive function. To express full anabolic effect in immature boys testosterone apparently requires the presence of GH. In GH-deficient adults, GH replacement therapy exerts a variety of anabolic actions, some...... study in 13 young males with childhood-onset GH deficiency of which 6 had isolated GH deficiency. GH treatment significantly increased serum levels of total IGF-I from 98 (68) to 323 (126) microg/l, free IGF-I from 0.48 (0.47) to 2.24 (1.66) microg/l, IGFBP-3 from 1,874 (1,178) to 3,520 (778) microg...... in hypogonadal patients substituted with androgens, but GH had no effect on inhibin-B levels. In conclusion, GH replacement therapy in 13 GH-deficient young adult males resulted in significant increases in total and free IGF-I as well as in ALS levels in all patients, but had no significant effect on: (1...

  16. Hormonal treatment reduces psychobiological distress in gender identity disorder, independently of the attachment style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizzi, Marco; Costa, Rosalia; Pace, Valeria; Todarello, Orlando

    2013-12-01

    Gender identity disorder may be a stressful situation. Hormonal treatment seemed to improve the general health as it reduces psychological and social distress. The attachment style seemed to regulate distress in insecure individuals as they are more exposed to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system dysregulation and subjective stress. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the presence of psychobiological distress and insecure attachment in transsexuals and to study their stress levels with reference to the hormonal treatment and the attachment pattern. We investigated 70 transsexual patients. We measured the cortisol levels and the perceived stress before starting the hormonal therapy and after about 12 months. We studied the representation of attachment in transsexuals by a backward investigation in the relations between them and their caregivers. We used blood samples for assessing cortisol awakening response (CAR); we used the Perceived Stress Scale for evaluating self-reported perceived stress and the Adult Attachment Interview to determine attachment styles. At enrollment, transsexuals reported elevated CAR; their values were out of normal. They expressed higher perceived stress and more attachment insecurity, with respect to normative sample data. When treated with hormone therapy, transsexuals reported significantly lower CAR (P treatment seemed to have a positive effect in reducing stress levels, whatever the attachment style may be. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. High Risk Aortic Valve Replacement - The Challenges of Multiple Treatment Strategies with an Evolving Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, K; Beattie, R; McBride, M; Manoharan, G; Spence, M; Jones, J M

    2016-01-01

    Deciding on the optimal treatment strategy for high risk aortic valve replacement is challenging. Transcatheter Aortic Valve implantation (TAVI) has been available in our centre as an alternative treatment modality for patients since 2008. We present our early experience of TAVI and SAVR (surgical Aortic Valve Replacement) in high risk patients who required SAVR because TAVI could not be performed. The database for Surgical aortic valve and Transcatheter aortic valve replacement referrals was interrogated to identify relevant patients. Survival to hospital discharge was 95.5% in the forty five patients who had SAVR when TAVI was deemed technically unsuitable. One year survival was 86%. Defining who is appropriate for TAVI or high risk SAVR is challenging and multidisciplinary team discussion has never been more prudent in this field of evolving technology with ever decreasing risks of surgery. The introduction of TAVI at our institution has seen a rise in our surgical caseload by approximately by 25%. Overall, the option of aortic valve intervention is being offered to more patients in general which is a substantial benefit in the treatment of aortic valve disease.

  18. Hormonal receptors and response to treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, D.; Rakowsky, E.; Stein, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Response to several types of endocrine therapy or chemotherapy was evaluated in 60 patients with breast cancer. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were determined by radioimmunoassay. Response to endocrine therapy was significantly higher (P<0.01) among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases than among ER-negative cases. The response to chemotherapy did not differ significantly between the two groups. The results of this small series support the conclusion that determination of ER is valuable in planning endocrine treatment of the breast cancer patient, whereas response to chemotherapy does not correlate with ER levels. (author)

  19. Microarchitecture, but Not Bone Mechanical Properties, Is Rescued with Growth Hormone Treatment in a Mouse Model of Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kristensen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH deficiency is related to an increased fracture risk although it is not clear if this is due to compromised bone quality or a small bone size. We investigated the relationship between bone macrostructure, microarchitecture and mechanical properties in a GH-deficient (GHD mouse model undergoing GH treatment commencing at an early (prepubertal or late (postpubertal time point. Microcomputed tomography images of the femur and L4 vertebra were obtained to quantify macrostructure and vertebral trabecular microarchitecture, and mechanical properties were determined using finite element analyses. In the GHD animals, bone macrostructure was 25 to 43% smaller as compared to the GH-sufficient (GHS controls (P<0.001. GHD animals had 20% and 19% reductions in bone volume ratio (BV/TV and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, respectively. Whole bone mechanical properties of the GHD mice were lower at the femur and vertebra (67% and 45% resp. than the GHS controls (P<0.001. Both early and late GH treatment partially recovered the bone macrostructure (15 to 32 % smaller than GHS controls and the whole bone mechanical properties (24 to 43% larger than GHD animals although there remained a sustained 27–52% net deficit compared to normal mice (P<0.05. Importantly, early treatment with GH led to a recovery of BV/TV and Tb.Th with a concomitant improvement of trabecular mechanical properties. Therefore, the results suggest that GH treatment should start early, and that measurements of microarchitecture should be considered in the management of GHD.

  20. Thickening of the epicardial adipose tissue can be alleviated by thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Irmak; Erkan, Aycan Fahri; Ekici, Berkay; Kutuk, Utku; Corakci, Ahmet; Tore, Hasan Fehmi

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is a common disorder which has adverse cardiovascular effects. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), a novel marker of cardiovascular risk, is increased in SCH. We aimed to investigate whether L-thyroxine treatment can reverse the thickening of EAT in SCH. Forty-four patients with SCH and 42 euthyroid control subjects were included. EAT thickness was measured using transthoracic echocardiography at baseline and after restoration of the euthyroid status with 3 months of L-thyroxine treatment. At baseline, mean EAT thickness was significantly greater in the SCH group when compared to the control group (6.3 ± 1.7 mm vs. 4.1 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, p treatment (6.3 ± 1.7 mm vs. 5.1 ± 1.4 mm, p treatment when compared to baseline (DEAT) significantly correlated to the difference in TSH levels before and after treatment (DTSH; r = 0.323; p = 0.032). Epicardial adipose tissue thickness is increased in patients with SCH. This thickening was alleviated with restoration of the euthyroid status with L-thyroxine treatment in our study population of predominantly male, relatively old subjects with greater baseline EAT thickness.

  1. Thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism: US national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraka, Spyridoula; Mwangi, Raphael; McCoy, Rozalina G; Yao, Xiaoxi; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Singh Ospina, Naykky M; O'Keeffe, Derek T; De Ycaza, Ana E Espinosa; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Coddington, Charles C; Stan, Marius N; Brito, Juan P; Montori, Victor M

    2017-01-25

     To estimate the effectiveness and safety of thyroid hormone treatment among pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism.  Retrospective cohort study.  Large US administrative database between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2014.  5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as untreated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration 2.5-10 mIU/L.  Thyroid hormone therapy.  Pregnancy loss and other pre-specified maternal and fetal pregnancy related adverse outcomes.  Among 5405 pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, 843 with a mean pre-treatment TSH concentration of 4.8 (SD 1.7) mIU/L were treated with thyroid hormone and 4562 with a mean baseline TSH concentration of 3.3 (SD 0.9) mIU/L were not treated (Ptreatment TSH concentration was 4.1-10 mIU/L (odds ratio 0.45, 0.30 to 0.65) but not if it was 2.5-4.0 mIU/L (0.91, 0.65 to 1.23) (Ptreatment was associated with decreased risk of pregnancy loss among women with subclinical hypothyroidism, especially those with pre-treatment TSH concentrations of 4.1-10 mIU/L. However, the increased risk of other pregnancy related adverse outcomes calls for additional studies evaluating the safety of thyroid hormone treatment in this patient population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Combined Treatment with Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Analog and Anabolic Steroid Hormone Increased Pubertal Height Gain and Adult Height in Boys with Early Puberty for Height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Naiki, Yasuhiro; Horikawa, Reiko

    2012-04-01

    Twenty-one boys with a height of 135 cm or less at onset of puberty were treated with a combination of GnRH analog and anabolic steroid hormone, and their pubertal height gain and adult height were compared with those of untreated 29 boys who enter puberty below 135 cm. The mean age at the start of treatment with a GnRH analog, leuprorelin acetate depot (Leuplin(®)) was 12.3 yr, a mean of 1.3 yr after the onset of puberty, and GnRH analog was administered every 3 to 5 wk thereafter for a mean duration of 4.1 yr. The anabolic steroid hormone was started approximately 1 yr after initiation of treatment with the GnRH analog. The mean pubertal height gain from onset of puberty till adult height was significantly greater in the combination treatment group (33.9 cm) than in the untreated group (26.4 cm) (ppenis and pubic hair is promoted by the anabolic steroid hormone, no psychosocial problems arose because of delayed puberty. No clinically significant adverse events appeared. Combined treatment with GnRH analog and anabolic steroid hormone significantly increased height gain during puberty and adult height in boys who entered puberty with a short stature, since the period until epiphyseal closure was extended due to deceleration of the bone age maturation by administration of the GnRH analog and the growth rate at this time was maintained by the anabolic steroid hormone.

  3. Hormonal Aspects of the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Cryptorchidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Holt, Rune; de Knegt, Victoria Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    A normal functioning hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis is required for normal testicular descent. The percentage of cases that result from a disturbance in this axis remains controversial. Much has yet to be learnt about cryptorchidism, but is seems that the existence of A dark spermatogonia...... on testicular histology, gonadotropins, and inhibin B at the time of early surgery: Group 1, patients suspected of prepubertal transient hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular hypofunction and a high risk of later infertility; Group 2, patients with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and a primary testicular dysfunction...... elevated, thereby supporting the suspicion of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular hypofunction. Studies of GnRH-supplementary treatment should include testicular biopsy at surgery and at follow-up in childhood as well as examinations of fertility potential in adulthood....

  4. The morpho-functional parameters of rat pituitary hormone producing cells after genistein treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Trifunović

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are a diverse group of steroid–like compounds that occur naturally in many plants. There are various types of phytoestrogens, including the best-researched isoflavones which are commonly found in soy. The consumption of soy products has many health benefits, including protection against breast cancer, prostate cancer, menopausal symptoms, heart disease and osteoporosis. In contrast, use of hormonally active compounds-isoflavones may unfortunately interfere with the endocrine system and can have far-reaching consequences. Genistein, the most abundant soy-bean derived isoflavone, possesses a ring system similar to estrogens and acts through an estrogen receptor (ER-mediated mechanism, by increasing or decreasing the transcription of ER-dependent target genes. Also, genistein can act on cells through ER non-dependent mechanisms, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The neuroendocrine systems are responsible for the control of homeostatic processes in the body, including reproduction, growth, metabolism and energy balance, and stress responsiveness. It is well known, that estrogen is important for development of the neuroendocrine system in both sexes. At the pituitary level, estrogen is known to affect the regulation of all hormone producing (HP cells, by direct and/or indirect mechanisms. Due to structural and functional resemblance to estrogen, the question may arise of whether and how genistein affects the morphofunctional features of pituitary HP cells. This review deals with the consequences of genistein’s effects on morphological, stereological and hormonal features of HP cells within the anterior pituitary gland. Transparency on this issue is needed because isoflavones are presently highly consumed. Inter alia, genistein as well as other isoflavones, are present in various dietary supplements and generally promoted as an accepted alternative to estrogen replacement therapy. Potential isoflavone biomedical exploitation is not

  5. Boiler feedwater quality improvement by replacing conventional pre-treatment with advanced membrane systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, Bernhard [Process Systems Pall GmbH, Dreieich (Germany). Marketing; Venkatadri, Ramraj [Pall Corporation, Port Washington, NY (United States). Global Marketing Energy

    2013-09-01

    Two case studies in different application fields highlight significant economical and operational improvements that were achieved by replacing conventional water treatment technologies by highly-sophisticated membrane systems. The first case study deals with boiler feedwater in a power plant, focusing on the challenges faced as well as the direct and indirect benefits gained by the new system within a utility station. The second case study deals with the conventional water treatment scheme for groundwater from 13 wells at a major oil sands facility. Operational performance as well as the cost improvements gained in both cases will be presented. (orig.)

  6. Effects of hormone treatment on chromosomal radiosensitivity of somatic and germ cells of Snell's dwarf mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buul, P.P.W. van; Buul-Offers, S.C. van

    1988-01-01

    The X-ray induction of micronuclei and structural chromosomal aberrations was studied in bone-marrow cells of normal and dwarf mice in combination with thyroxin and/or prolactin treatment or otherwise. Hormone treatment clearly increased micronuclei induction but not chromosome breakage, suggesting that indirect effects were involved. Since no clear differences in the timing of the final stage of erythropoiesis could be found, it is likely that the indirect effects are mediated via the formation-differentiation kinetics of erythroblasts. The induction of reciprocal translocations by X-rays in stem cell spermatogonia of dwarf mice was lower than in normals and treatment with prolactin, growth hormone and/or thyroxin, did not influence the chromosomal radiosensitivity of spermatogonial cells. 19 refs.; 1 figure; 4 tabs

  7. Exercise training versus T3 and T4 hormones treatment: The differential benefits of thyroid hormones on the parasympathetic drive of infarcted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Rayane Brinck; Zimmer, Alexsandra; de Castro, Alexandre Luz; Carraro, Cristina Campos; Casali, Karina Rabello; Dias, Ingrid Gonçalves Machuca; Godoy, Alessandra Eifler Guerra; Litvin, Isnard Elman; Belló-Klein, Adriane; da Rosa Araujo, Alex Sander

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether beneficial effects of thyroid hormones are comparable to those provided by the aerobic exercise training, to verify its applicability as a therapeutic alternative to reverse the pathological cardiac remodeling post-infarction. Male rats were divided into SHAM-operated (SHAM), myocardial infarction (MI), MI subjected to exercise training (MIE), and MI who received T3 and T4 treatment (MIH) (n = 8/group). MI, MIE and MIH groups underwent an infarction surgery while SHAM was SHAM-operated. One-week post-surgery, MIE and MIH groups started the exercise training protocol (moderate intensity on treadmill), or the T3 (1.2 μg/100 g/day) and T4 (4.8 μg/100 g/day) hormones treatment by gavage, respectively, meanwhile SHAM and MI had no intervention for 9 weeks. The groups were accompanied until 74 days after surgery, when all animals were anesthetized, left ventricle echocardiography and femoral catheterization were performed, followed by euthanasia and left ventricle collection for morphological, oxidative stress, and intracellular kinases expression analysis. Thyroid hormones treatment was more effective in cardiac dilation and infarction area reduction, while exercise training provided more protection against fibrosis. Thyroid hormones treatment increased the lipoperoxidation and decreased GSHPx activity as compared to MI group, increased the t-Akt2 expression as compared to SHAM group, and increased the vascular parasympathetic drive. Thyroid hormones treatment provided differential benefits on the LV function and autonomic modulation as compared to the exercise training. Nevertheless, the redox unbalance induced by thyroid hormones highlights the importance of more studies targeting the ideal duration of this treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on gender dysphoria individuals' mental health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rosalia; Colizzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sex hormonal treatment represents a main aspect of gender dysphoria health care pathway. However, it is still debated whether this intervention translates into a better mental well-being for the individual and which mechanisms may underlie this association. Although sex reassignment surgery has been the subject of extensive investigation, few studies have specifically focused on hormonal treatment in recent years. Here, we systematically review all studies examining the effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on mental health and well-being in gender dysphoria. Research tends to support the evidence that hormone therapy reduces symptoms of anxiety and dissociation, lowering perceived and social distress and improving quality of life and self-esteem in both male-to-female and female-to-male individuals. Instead, compared to female-to-male individuals, hormone-treated male-to-female individuals seem to benefit more in terms of a reduction in their body uneasiness and personality-related psychopathology and an amelioration of their emotional functioning. Less consistent findings support an association between hormonal treatment and other mental health-related dimensions. In particular, depression, global psychopathology, and psychosocial functioning difficulties appear to reduce only in some studies, while others do not suggest any improvement in these domains. Results from longitudinal studies support more consistently the association between hormonal treatment and improved mental health. On the contrary, a number of cross-sectional studies do not support this evidence. This review provides possible biological explanation vs psychological explanation (direct effect vs indirect effect) for the hormonal treatment-induced better mental well-being. In conclusion, this review indicates that gender dysphoria-related mental distress may benefit from hormonal treatment intervention, suggesting a transient reaction to the nonsatisfaction connected to the incongruent body

  9. The effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on gender dysphoria individuals’ mental health: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rosalia; Colizzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sex hormonal treatment represents a main aspect of gender dysphoria health care pathway. However, it is still debated whether this intervention translates into a better mental well-being for the individual and which mechanisms may underlie this association. Although sex reassignment surgery has been the subject of extensive investigation, few studies have specifically focused on hormonal treatment in recent years. Here, we systematically review all studies examining the effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on mental health and well-being in gender dysphoria. Research tends to support the evidence that hormone therapy reduces symptoms of anxiety and dissociation, lowering perceived and social distress and improving quality of life and self-esteem in both male-to-female and female-to-male individuals. Instead, compared to female-to-male individuals, hormone-treated male-to-female individuals seem to benefit more in terms of a reduction in their body uneasiness and personality-related psychopathology and an amelioration of their emotional functioning. Less consistent findings support an association between hormonal treatment and other mental health-related dimensions. In particular, depression, global psychopathology, and psychosocial functioning difficulties appear to reduce only in some studies, while others do not suggest any improvement in these domains. Results from longitudinal studies support more consistently the association between hormonal treatment and improved mental health. On the contrary, a number of cross-sectional studies do not support this evidence. This review provides possible biological explanation vs psychological explanation (direct effect vs indirect effect) for the hormonal treatment-induced better mental well-being. In conclusion, this review indicates that gender dysphoria-related mental distress may benefit from hormonal treatment intervention, suggesting a transient reaction to the nonsatisfaction connected to the incongruent body

  10. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian; Baum, Linda G.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  11. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. © 2013 FEBS.

  12. Effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on cortical thickness in transsexual individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Junque, Carme; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Guillamon, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Untreated transsexuals have a brain cortical phenotype. Cross-sex hormone treatments are used to masculinize or feminize the bodies of female-to-male (FtMs) or male-to-female (MtFs) transsexuals, respectively. A longitudinal design was conducted to investigate the effects of treatments on brain cortical thickness (CTh) of FtMs and MtFs. This study investigated 15 female-to-male (FtMs) and 14 male-to-female (MtFs) transsexuals prior and during at least six months of cross-sex hormone therapy treatment. Brain MRI imaging was performed in a 3-Tesla TIM-TRIO Siemens scanner. T1-weighted images were analyzed with FreeSurfer software to obtain CTh as well as subcortical volumetric values. Changes in brain CTh thickness and volumetry associated to changes in hormonal levels due to cross-sex hormone therapy. After testosterone treatment, FtMs showed increases of CTh bilaterally in the postcentral gyrus and unilaterally in the inferior parietal, lingual, pericalcarine, and supramarginal areas of the left hemisphere and the rostral middle frontal and the cuneus region of the right hemisphere. There was a significant positive correlation between the serum testosterone and free testosterone index changes and CTh changes in parieto-temporo-occipital regions. In contrast, MtFs, after estrogens and antiandrogens treatment, showed a general decrease in CTh and subcortical volumetric measures and an increase in the volume of the ventricles. Testosterone therapy increases CTh in FtMs. Thickening in cortical regions is associated to changes in testosterone levels. Estrogens and antiandrogens therapy in MtFs is associated to a decrease in the CTh that consequently induces an enlargement of the ventricular system. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. GROWTH HORMONE TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH SHORT STATURE LIVED IN SAMARA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Mikhailova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth inhibition in children is heterogeneous state, and it may accompany many endocrine, somatic, genetic and chromosome diseases. Generally recognized medications for treatment of somatotropic insufficiency in present times are biosynthetic analogs of human growth hormone (hGH, obtained with DNA-recombinant technology. This article presents the results of estimation of effectiveness of hGH in treatment of children with short stature (n=77 with isolated deficiency of growth hormone, panhypopituitarism, Turner's syndrome, treated with hGH during 3 years. All patients had significant positive dynamics of clinical status, the velocity of grouth increased from 1.9 cm (initial per year to 11.0 cm (the end of first year, with following decrease to 5.3 cm per year. SDS index of growth had stable tendency to increase: medium SDS index of growth initially was -3.9 SD, on the end of third year – -2.0 SD. It was shown, that treatment with hGH is effective in any types of short stature.Key words: children, short stature, treatment, human growth hormone.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(1:108-113

  14. Effects of short-term hormonal replacement on learning and on basal forebrain ChAT and TrkA content in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Raya, Judith; Plata-Cruz, Noemí; Neri-Gómez, Teresa; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Picazo, Ofir

    2011-02-23

    It has been proposed that sex steroid hormones improve performance in some cognitive tasks by regulating the basal forebrain cholinergic function. However, the molecular basis of such influence still remains unknown. Current study analyzed the performance of ovariectomized rats in an autoshaping learning task after a short-term treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2: 4 and 40μg/kg) and/or progesterone (P4: 4mg/kg). These results were correlated with basal forebrain choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and TrkA protein content. The high dose of E2 enhanced both acquisition in the autoshaping task and the content of ChAT and TrkA. P4 treatment increased ChAT and TrkA content without affecting performance of rats in the autoshaping learning task. Interestingly, the continuous and simultaneous administration of E2 plus P4 did not significantly modify behavioral and biochemical evaluated parameters. These results address the influence of both E2 and P4 on cholinergic and TrkA activity and suggest that the effects of ovarian hormones on cognitive performance involve basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Efeitos da terapia de reposição hormonal na cicatrização de anastomoses de cólon Effects of hormonal replacement therapy on colon anastomosis healing in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Pessole Biondo-Simões

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Existe coincidência entre os sintomas do climatério e o aparecimento acentuado dos sinais de envelhecimento da pele. Estudos, em modelos animais, mostraram que o estrógeno é uma espécie de mediador crítico na cicatrização de feridas. Os autores apresentam um estudo da influência da terapia de reposição hormonal (TRH em anastomoses de cólon, feitas em ratas. MÉTODOS: Utilizam 3 grupos de ratas Wistar, um grupo de ooforectomizadas com TRH feita com 50mg de estrógeno e 2 mg de acetato de medroxiprogesterona, um de ooforectomizadas e sem TRH e um de ratas laparotomizadas e não ooforectomizadas. Realizaram a ooforectomia e a confirmação da condição hormonal após 28 dias. Em seguida instituíram a TRH ou de solução fisiológica, diariamente. Após 2 meses fizeram uma colotomia esquerda com anastomose término-terminal e estudaram a resistência e a densidade de colágeno com 7 e 14 dias. RESULTADOS: As anastomoses dos cólons das ratas sem TRH eram menos resistentes do que as do grupo controle tanto no 7.º dia (p=0,0488 como no 14.º dia (p=0,0115. A densidade de colágeno foi menor no 7.º dia (p=0,0210 com menor presença de colágeno I (p=0,0023 e de colágeno III (p=0,0470. No 14.º dia estas diferenças permaneceram significantes. Nas anastomoses dos cólons das ratas com TRH as diferenças, em relação ao grupo controle, não foram significantes. CONCLUSÃO: A falta dos hormônios ovarianos leva à menor resistência e atrasa a maturação de anastomoses do cólon, em ratas e estas deficiências são compensadas pela TRH.PURPOSE: The symptoms of the climacteric coincide with the marked appearance of signs of skin aging. Studies on animal models have shown that estrogen is a critical mediator in wound healing. The authors report a study of the influence of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT on colon anastomoses performed in female rats. METHODS: Three groups of Wistar rats were used: one submitted to oophorectomy

  16. Hormonal changes after localized prostate cancer treatment. Comparison between external beam radiation therapy and radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, J; Celma, A; Placer, J; Maldonado, X; Trilla, E; Salvador, C; Lorente, D; Regis, L; Cuadras, M; Carles, J; Morote, J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on the hypothalamic pituitary axis of 120 men with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with RP or EBRT exclusively. 120 patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. Ninety two patients underwent RP and 28 patients EBRT exclusively. We measured serum levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (T), free testosterone, and estradiol at baseline and at 3 and 12 months after treatment completion. Patients undergoing RP were younger and presented a higher prostate volume (64.3 vs. 71.1 years, p<0.0001 and 55.1 vs. 36.5 g, p<0.0001; respectively). No differences regarding serum hormonal levels were found at baseline. Luteinizing hormone and FSH levels were significantly higher in those patients treated with EBRT at three months (luteinizing hormone 8,54 vs. 4,76 U/l, FSH 22,96 vs. 8,18 U/l, p<0,0001) while T and free testosterone levels were significantly lower (T 360,3 vs. 414,83ng/dl, p 0,039; free testosterone 5,94 vs. 7,5pg/ml, p 0,018). At 12 months FSH levels remained significantly higher in patients treated with EBRT compared to patients treated with RP (21,01 vs. 8,51 U/l, p<0,001) while T levels remained significantly lower (339,89 vs. 402,39ng/dl, p 0,03). Prostate cancer treatment influences the hypothalamic pituitary axis. This influence seems to be more important when patients with prostate cancer are treated with EBRT rather than RP. More studies are needed to elucidate the role that prostate may play as an endocrine organ. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Urea for long-term treatment of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, G; Genette, F

    1981-10-24

    The efficacy of oral urea in producing a sufficiently high osmotic diuresis was tested in seven patients with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. In all patients urea corrected the hyponatraemia despite a normal fluid intake. Five patients were controlled (serum sodium concentration greater than 128 mmol(mEq)/1) with a dose of 30 g urea daily, and two with 60 g daily. The patients who needed 30 g drank 1-2 1 of fluid daily, while those who needed 60 g drank up to 3.1 per day. No major side effects were noted, even after treatment periods of up to 270 days. These findings suggest that urea is a safe and efficacious treatment of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone.

  18. Effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT on the body weight, blood pressure and vaginal bleeding in menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was a descriptive, retrospective trial conducted in 29 menopausal women. Each patient received treatment with conjugated equine estrogen (CEE 0.625 mg/day + medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA 5 mg/hari continuously for the period of 6 months. The average age of menopause was 53.7 years with duration of menopause of 5.5 years. The education level of patients was Senior High School and higher. During the period of 6 months of continuous combined HRT, a significant increase of body weight and systolic blood pressure was found, while diastolic blood pressure did not have any significant change. Vaginal bleeding in the form of spotting occurred in 69% of the patients during the use of continuous combined HRT. (Med J Indones 2002; 11:11-4Keywords: continuous HRT, menopause, body weight, blood pressure, bleeding

  19. Cross-sex hormonal treatment and body uneasiness in individuals with gender dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Alessandra D; Castellini, Giovanni; Bandini, Elisa; Casale, Helen; Fanni, Egidia; Benni, Laura; Ferruccio, Naika; Meriggiola, Maria Cristina; Manieri, Chiara; Gualerzi, Anna; Jannini, Emmanuele; Oppo, Alessandro; Ricca, Valdo; Maggi, Mario; Rellini, Alessandra H

    2014-03-01

    Cross-sex hormonal treatment (CHT) used for gender dysphoria (GD) could by itself affect well-being without the use of genital surgery; however, to date, there is a paucity of studies investigating the effects of CHT alone. This study aimed to assess differences in body uneasiness and psychiatric symptoms between GD clients taking CHT and those not taking hormones (no CHT). A second aim was to assess whether length of CHT treatment and daily dose provided an explanation for levels of body uneasiness and psychiatric symptoms. A consecutive series of 125 subjects meeting the criteria for GD who not had genital reassignment surgery were considered. Subjects were asked to complete the Body Uneasiness Test (BUT) to explore different areas of body-related psychopathology and the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R) to measure psychological state. In addition, data on daily hormone dose and length of hormonal treatment (androgens, estrogens, and/or antiandrogens) were collected through an analysis of medical records. Among the male-to-female (MtF) individuals, those using CHT reported less body uneasiness compared with individuals in the no-CHT group. No significant differences were observed between CHT and no-CHT groups in the female-to-male (FtM) sample. Also, no significant differences in SCL score were observed with regard to gender (MtF vs. FtM), hormone treatment (CHT vs. no-CHT), or the interaction of these two variables. Moreover, a two-step hierarchical regression showed that cumulative dose of estradiol (daily dose of estradiol times days of treatment) and cumulative dose of androgen blockers (daily dose of androgen blockers times days of treatment) predicted BUT score even after controlling for age, gender role, cosmetic surgery, and BMI. The differences observed between MtF and FtM individuals suggest that body-related uneasiness associated with GD may be effectively diminished with the administration of CHT even without the use of genital surgery for Mt

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy evidence of efficacy for adrenal and gonadal hormone replacement therapy in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Ecklund, Kirsten; Mulkern, Robert V; Feldman, Henry A; O'Donnell, Jennifer M; DiVasta, Amy D; Rosen, Clifford J; Gordon, Catherine M

    2018-05-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)+estrogen/progestin therapy for adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa (AN) has the potential to arrest bone loss. The primary aim of this study was to test the effects of DHEA+estrogen/progestin therapy in adolescent girls with AN on bone marrow in the distal femur using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. Seventy adolescent girls with AN were enrolled in a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial at two urban hospital-based programs. Seventy-six girls were randomly assigned to receive 12months of either oral micronized DHEA or placebo. DHEA was administered with conjugated equine estrogens (0.3mg daily) for 3months, then an oral contraceptive (20μg ethinyl estradiol/ 0.1mg levonorgestrel) for 9months. The primary outcome measure was bone marrow fat by MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). T2 of the water resonance dropped significantly less in the active vs. placebo group over 12months at both the medial and lateral distal femur (p=0.02). Body mass index (BMI) was a significant effect modifier for T1 and for T2 of unsaturated (T2 unsat ) and saturated fat (T2 sat ) in the lateral distal femur. Positive effects of the treatment of DHEA+estrogen/progestin were seen primarily for girls above a BMI of about 18kg/m 2 . These findings suggest treatment with oral DHEA+estrogen/progestin arrests the age- and disease-related changes in marrow fat composition in the lateral distal femur reported previously in this population. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Hormone replacement therapy dependent changes in breast cancer-related gene expression in breast tissue of healthy postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieuwerts, Anieta M; De Napoli, Giuseppina; van Galen, Anne; Kloosterboer, Helenius J; de Weerd, Vanja; Zhang, Hong; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; De Geyter, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Risk assessment of future breast cancer risk through exposure to sex steroids currently relies on clinical scorings such as mammographic density. Knowledge about the gene expression patterns in existing breast cancer tumors may be used to identify risk factors in the breast tissue of women still free of cancer. The differential effects of estradiol, estradiol together with gestagens, or tibolone on breast cancer-related gene expression in normal breast tissue samples taken from postmenopausal women may be used to identify gene expression profiles associated with a higher breast cancer risk. Breast tissue samples were taken from 33 healthy postmenopausal women both before and after a six month treatment with either 2mg micronized estradiol [E2], 2mg micronized estradiol and 1mg norethisterone acetate [E2+NETA], 2.5mg tibolone [T] or [no HRT]. Except for [E2], which was only given to women after hysterectomy, the allocation to each of the three groups was randomized. The expression of 102 mRNAs and 46 microRNAs putatively involved in breast cancer was prospectively determined in the biopsies of 6 women receiving [no HRT], 5 women receiving [E2], 5 women receiving [E2+NETA], and 6 receiving [T]. Using epithelial and endothelial markers genes, non-representative biopsies from 11 women were eliminated. Treatment of postmenopausal women with [E2+NETA] resulted in the highest number of differentially (pbreast tissue with a change in the expression of genes putatively involved in breast cancer. Our data suggest that normal mammary cells triggered by [E2+NETA] adjust for steroidogenic up-regulation through down-regulation of the estrogen-receptor pathway. This feasibility study provides the basis for whole genome analyses to identify novel markers involved in increased breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Turner syndrome in Albania and the efficacy of its treatment with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Petrit; Babameto-Laku, Anila; Vyshka, Gentian; Gjoka, Klodiana; Minxuri, Dorina; Myrtaj, Elira; Çakërri, Luljeta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of Turner syndrome inside the Albanian population, its clinical, cytological and genetic characteristics, the accompanying pathologies, and the efficacy of the treatment with the growth hormone. We performed a retrospective analysis of 59 patients suffering from this syndrome (aging from 5 to 23 years old). The diagnosis of female patients suffering from Turner syndrome is delayed, with a mean age at the moment of diagnosis of 13.74 years (5-23 years). The main reason for seeking medical advice was the growth retardation or a delayed puberty. Available data for 52 patients showed that the most frequent accompanying pathologies were the following: thyroid autoimmune disorders (59%), cardiovascular anomalies (43%), renal pathologies (41%), hearing impairment (4.3%) and hypertension (3.3%). Follow-up for the growth rate was possible for 52 patients out of the total of 59 patients. Twenty-five of the female patients suffering Turner syndrome and forming part of our study sample were treated with growth hormone for a period averaging 3 years and 4 months. A variety of reasons was identified as responsible for the missed treatment in 27 patients. We saw an enhanced growth (in terms of body height) within the treated subgroup, when compared with the untreated subgroup (27 patients), especially during the first 3 years of the follow-up. No side effects of this treatment were reported. Both groups of patients initiated as well a sexual hormone therapy (estrogens and progesterone) for inducing puberty at the age of 12 years. Further work is needed for an early diagnosis of this syndrome, the prompt treatment with growth hormone and the monitoring of accompanying disorders. This will ensure a better quality of life and an improvement of the longevity of patients suffering from the Turner syndrome.

  3. Hormonal therapy in the treatment of mandibular metastasis of breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlinger, P.; Peeters, L.C.; Fossion, E.; Servais, J.

    1993-01-01

    We present the clinical history of a 39-year-old woman, who has survived for over 10 years with metastatic breast cancer. After combined surgery and radiotherapy of the primary tumor and the regional lymph nodes, all bone metastases gradually disappeared under chemotherapy and continuing hormonal treatment. This complete remission included a large mandibular metastasis, which had received additional radiotherapy of 21 Gy. Spontaneous reossification was observed in this location. (au) (7 refs.)

  4. Double insemination and gonadotropin-releasing hormone treatment of repeat-breeding dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J S; Call, E P; Scoby, R K; Phatak, A P

    1990-07-01

    Our objective was to determine if double inseminations during the same estrous period of dairy cattle eligible for their third or fourth service (repeat breeders) would improve pregnancy rates equivalent to injections of GnRH given at the time of AI. Repeat-breeding, lactating cows from six herds (five herds in the San Joaquin Valley of central California and one herd in northeast Kansas) were assigned randomly to four treatment groups when detected in estrus: 1) single AI plus no injection, 2) single AI plus 100 micrograms GnRH at AI, 3) double AI plus no injection, or 4) double AI plus 100 micrograms of GnRH at AI. Inseminations were performed according to the a.m.-p.m. rule. The second AI for the double AI treatment was given 12 to 16 h after the first AI. Injections of GnRH were given intramuscularly immediately following the single AI or the first AI of the double AI. Pregnancy rates of cows given a single AI and hormone injection were numerically higher in all six herds than those of their herdmates given only a single AI. In five of six herds, the pregnancy rates of cows given a double AI and hormone injection were numerically higher than pregnancy rates of their herdmates given only a double AI. Overall pregnancy rates for the four treatments were 1) 112/353 (32.1%), 2) 165/406 (41.6%), 3) 119/364 (33.5%), and 4) 135/359 (37.5%). Gonadotropin-releasing hormone increased pregnancy rates of repeat breeders compared with controls given only a single AI. No further benefit beyond the single AI was accrued from the double AI treatment, with or without concurrent hormone administration.

  5. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone in the treatment of dwarfism and relationship between IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shanxiang; Nie, Yuxiang; Wang, Aihong

    2016-12-01

    The effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in the treatment of dwarfism and the relationship between insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and thyroid hormone were examined in the present study. For this purpose, 66 patients diagnosed with dwarfism were selected retrospectively, with 36 cases of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and 30 cases of idiopathic short stature (ISS). The therapeutic dose of GHD 0.10 IU/kg·day and ISS 0.15 IU/kg·day were injected subcutaneously every night before sleep until adulthood. The average follow-up was 5 years, and the results were evaluated and measured every 3 months, including height, BA, secondary test of growth hormone (GH peak), IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and thyroid hormone (FT3, FT4 and TSH). After treatment, the height, BA, GH peak, IGF-A and IGFBP-3 of the GHD group were all increased, and the differences were statistically significant (P0.05). The results of the Pearson-related analysis suggested that GH peak of the GHD group, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were positively associated with height (P0.05). rhGH was effective for GHD and ISS, with the GHD effect being positively associated with the GH peak, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. ISS had no obvious relationship with GH peak, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 although other influencing factors may be involved.

  6. The timing hypothesis and hormone replacement therapy: a paradigm shift in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease in women. Part 2: comparative risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Howard N; Mack, Wendy J

    2013-06-01

    A major misperception concerning postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is that the associated risks are large in magnitude and unique to HRT, but over the past 10 years, sufficient data have accumulated so that the magnitude and perspective of risks associated with the primary coronary heart disease prevention therapies of statins, aspirin, and postmenopausal HRT have become more fully defined. Review of randomized controlled trials indicates that the risks of primary prevention therapies and other medications commonly used in women's health are of similar type and magnitude, with the majority of these risks categorized as rare to infrequent (risks of postmenopausal HRT are predominantly rare (risks, including breast cancer, stroke, and venous thromboembolism are common across medications and are rare, and even rarer when HRT is initiated in women younger than 60 or who are less than 10 years since menopause. In Part 1 of this series, the sex-specificity of statins and aspirin and timing of initiation of HRT as modifiers of efficacy in women were reviewed. Herein, the comparative risks of primary prevention therapies in women are discussed. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Future long-term trials of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy - what is possible and what is the optimal protocol and regimen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purbrick, B; Stranks, K; Sum, C; MacLennan, A H

    2012-06-01

    The ideal long-term, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) from near menopause for up to 30 years to assess major morbidity and mortality is impractical because of high cost, participant retention, therapy compliance, and continuity of research staff and funding. Also the trial regimen may become outdated. It is nihilistic to demand such a long-term trial before endorsing HRT. However, medium-term trials using surrogate measures for long-term morbidity and mortality are possible and two are near completion. If these studies have been able to maintain reasonable participant retention, therapy compliance and minimal breach of protocol, they will set standards for trials of new HRT regimens. This paper discusses lessons learnt from past attempts at long-term trials and suggests the currently optimal protocol and cost of assessing new HRT regimens to optimize potential benefits and minimize adverse effects. A 5-7-year randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a flexible transdermal estrogen regimen ± either a selective estrogen receptor modulator, e.g. bazedoxifene, or micronized progesterone is discussed. Mild to moderately symptomatic women, 1-4 years post menopause, can be recruited via general practice and group meetings. Future trials should be funded by independent agencies and are high priority in women's health.

  8. Increased body mass index is a predisposition for treatment by total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the radiological and epidemiological data of 4,151 subjects followed up from 1976 to 2003 to determine individual risk factors for hip osteoarthritis (OA), hip pain and/or treatment by total hip replacement (THR). Pelvic radiographs recorded in 1992 were assessed for evidence of hip......-joint degeneration and dysplasia. Sequential body mass index (BMI) measurements from 1976 to 1992, age, exposure to daily lifting and hip dysplasia were entered into logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of hip dysplasia ranged from 5.4% to 12.8% depending on the radiographical index used. Radiological hip OA...

  9. Is Total Femur Replacement a Reliable Treatment Option for Patients With Metastatic Carcinoma of the Femur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevelda, Florian; Waldstein, Wenzel; Panotopoulos, Joannis; Kaider, Alexandra; Funovics, Philipp Theodor; Windhager, Reinhard

    2018-05-01

    The majority of metastatic bone lesions to the femoral bone can be treated without surgery or with minimally invasive intramedullary nailing. In rare patients with extensive metastatic disease to the femur, total femur replacement may be the only surgical alternative to amputation; however, little is known about this approach. In a highly selected small group of patients with metastatic carcinoma of the femur, we asked: (1) What was the patient survivorship after this treatment? (2) What was the implant survivorship free from all-cause revision and amputation, and what complications were associated with this treatment? (3) What functional outcomes were achieved by patients after total femur replacement for this indication? Eleven patients (three men, eight women) with a mean age of 64 years (range, 41-78 years) received total femur replacements between 1986 and 2016; none were lost to followup. The most common primary disease was breast cancer. In general, during this period, our indications for this procedure were extensive metastatic disease precluding internal fixation or isolated proximal or distal femur replacement, and an anticipated lifespan exceeding 6 months. Our contraindication for this procedure during this time was expected lifespan less than 6 months. Patient survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis; implant survival free from revision surgery and amputation were assessed by competing risk analysis. Function was determined preoperatively and 6 to 12 weeks postoperatively with the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score normalized to a 100-point scale, with higher scores representing better function from a longitudinally maintained institutional database. Eleven patients died at a median of 5 months (range, 1-31 months) after surgery. One-year revision-free and limb survival were 82% (95% CI, 51%-98%) and 91% (95% CI, 61%-99%), respectively. Reasons for reoperation were hip dislocation, infection and local recurrence in one patient each. The

  10. Can field-in-field technique replace wedge filter in radiotherapy treatment planning: a comparative analysis in various treatment sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, R.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to show whether field-in-field (FIF) technique can be used to replace wedge filter in radiation treatment planning. The study was performed in cases where wedges are commonly used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Thirty patients with different malignancies who received radiotherapy were studied. This includes patients with malignancies of brain, head and neck, breast, upper and lower abdomen. All the patients underwent computed tomography scanning and the datasets were transferred to the treatment planning system. Initially, wedge based planning was performed to achieve the best possible dose distribution inside the target volume with multileaf collimators (Plan1). Wedges were removed from a copy of the same plan and FIF plan was generated (Plan2). The two plans were then evaluated and compared for mean dose, maximum dose, median dose, doses to 2% (D 2 ) and 98% (D 9 8) of the target volume, volume receiving greater than 107% of the prescribed dose (V>107%), volume receiving less than 95% of the prescribed dose (V 2 , V>107% and CI for more of the sites with statistically significant reduction in monitor units. FIF results in better dose distribution in terms of homogeneity in most of the sites. It is feasible to replace wedge filter with FIF in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  11. Ovarian ultrasound and ovarian and adrenal hormones before and after treatment for hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjöldebrand Sparre, L; Kollind, M; Carlström, K

    2002-01-01

    To relate thyroid, steroid and pituitary hormones to ovarian ultrasonographic findings in hyperthyroid patients before and during treatment. Ultrasonography of the ovaries and serum hormone determination by immunoassay were performed before and during thiamazole therapy in 18 women of fertile age treated for hyperthyroidism at the Danderyd Hospital from 1996 to 1998. When hyperthyreotic, the patients had elevated serum levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and subnormal values of cortisol, free testosterone (fT) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). In the euthyreotic state following treatment, endocrine variables were normalized. Patients with a short duration of the disease had higher pretreatment levels of free thyroxine (fT4), SHBG and testosterone and lower corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) and cortisol levels compared to patients with a long duration of the disease. The pretreatment ultrasonographic picture was abnormal in 16 of 18 patients. Of the 8 patients who were examined by ultrasonography after 3 months of treatment, all but 1 showed a normal picture. Samples from patients showing an abnormal ultrasonographic picture had significantly higher fT4 and lower free testosterone (fT) values than samples from patients with a normal ultrasonographic picture. Ultrasonographic findings showing a multicystic/multifollicular picture, resembling polycystic ovaries (PCO), in hyperthyroidism may be related to direct effects of thyroid hormones on the ovaries and/or altered intraovarian androgen environment due to elevated SHBG levels. It is highly recommended to assess the thyroid status in patients with multicystic/multifollicular ovaries/PCO. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Recent Advances in Thyroid Hormone Regulation: Toward a New Paradigm for Optimal Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Rudolf; Midgley, John E. M.; Larisch, Rolf; Dietrich, Johannes W.

    2017-01-01

    In thyroid health, the pituitary hormone thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) raises glandular thyroid hormone production to a physiological level and enhances formation and conversion of T4 to the biologically more active T3. Overstimulation is limited by negative feedback control. In equilibrium defining the euthyroid state, the relationship between TSH and FT4 expresses clusters of genetically determined, interlocked TSH–FT4 pairs, which invalidates their statistical correlation within the euthyroid range. Appropriate reactions to internal or external challenges are defined by unique solutions and homeostatic equilibria. Permissible variations in an individual are much more closely constrained than over a population. Current diagnostic definitions of subclinical thyroid dysfunction are laboratory based, and do not concur with treatment recommendations. An appropriate TSH level is a homeostatic concept that cannot be reduced to a fixed range consideration. The control mode may shift from feedback to tracking where TSH becomes positively, rather than inversely related with FT4. This is obvious in pituitary disease and severe non-thyroid illness, but extends to other prevalent conditions including aging, obesity, and levothyroxine (LT4) treatment. Treatment targets must both be individualized and respect altered equilibria on LT4. To avoid amalgamation bias, clinically meaningful stratification is required in epidemiological studies. In conclusion, pituitary TSH cannot be readily interpreted as a sensitive mirror image of thyroid function because the negative TSH–FT4 correlation is frequently broken, even inverted, by common conditions. The interrelationships between TSH and thyroid hormones and the interlocking elements of the control system are individual, dynamic, and adaptive. This demands a paradigm shift of its diagnostic use. PMID:29375474

  13. Recent Advances in Thyroid Hormone Regulation: Toward a New Paradigm for Optimal Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Hoermann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In thyroid health, the pituitary hormone thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH raises glandular thyroid hormone production to a physiological level and enhances formation and conversion of T4 to the biologically more active T3. Overstimulation is limited by negative feedback control. In equilibrium defining the euthyroid state, the relationship between TSH and FT4 expresses clusters of genetically determined, interlocked TSH–FT4 pairs, which invalidates their statistical correlation within the euthyroid range. Appropriate reactions to internal or external challenges are defined by unique solutions and homeostatic equilibria. Permissible variations in an individual are much more closely constrained than over a population. Current diagnostic definitions of subclinical thyroid dysfunction are laboratory based, and do not concur with treatment recommendations. An appropriate TSH level is a homeostatic concept that cannot be reduced to a fixed range consideration. The control mode may shift from feedback to tracking where TSH becomes positively, rather than inversely related with FT4. This is obvious in pituitary disease and severe non-thyroid illness, but extends to other prevalent conditions including aging, obesity, and levothyroxine (LT4 treatment. Treatment targets must both be individualized and respect altered equilibria on LT4. To avoid amalgamation bias, clinically meaningful stratification is required in epidemiological studies. In conclusion, pituitary TSH cannot be readily interpreted as a sensitive mirror image of thyroid function because the negative TSH–FT4 correlation is frequently broken, even inverted, by common conditions. The interrelationships between TSH and thyroid hormones and the interlocking elements of the control system are individual, dynamic, and adaptive. This demands a paradigm shift of its diagnostic use.

  14. What Are the Treatments for Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Cushing Syndrome Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a Study ... stop the excess production of hormones Hormone replacement Cushing's Syndrome The treatment for Cushing's syndrome depends on the ...

  15. [Early effectiveness of discover cervical artificial disc replacement in treatment of cervical spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yufeng; Xue, Feng; Sheng, Xiaowen; Lu, Jianmin; Chen, Bingqian

    2012-03-01

    difference between left bending and right bending in upper segment was 2 times higher than that in the replaced segment; a marked linear correlation (P < 0.05) existed between the ROM difference and prosthesis eccentricity, and prosthesis bias had bigger ROM in lateral bending. Discover cervical artificial disc replacement for treatment of cervical spondylosis can provide a good effectiveness and cervical postoperative movement function. As a new prosthesis, it has some merits such as simple operative steps and less complications.

  16. Measuring persistence to hormonal therapy in patients with breast cancer: accounting for temporary treatment discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiart, Laetitia; Ferdynus, Cyril; Dell'Aniello, Sophie; Bakiri, Naciba; Giorgi, Roch; Suissa, Samy

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have been conducted to estimate persistence to hormonal therapy among women with breast cancer (BC). Most studies focus on first treatment discontinuation. Patients, however, can have numerous periods of treatment discontinuation or treatment exposure. Our objective is to estimate persistence to tamoxifen in patients with BC while accounting for temporary treatment discontinuations and this by using multi-state (MS) models. A cohort of 10,806 women with BC having received at least one prescription of tamoxifen between 1998 and 2008 was constituted from the UK General Practice Research Database. We fitted a semi-Markov model with three states to estimate the probability of being off treatment over a 5-year period while accounting for temporary treatment discontinuations (transition between on treatment and off treatment) and competing risks (recurrence of BC or death). Non-persistence, as estimated from the MS model, ranged from 12.1% (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 9.2-15.1) at 1 year to 14.9% (95%CI: 11.7-18.1) at 5 years. Estimations of non-persistence based on the Kaplan-Meier model were higher, i.e., 29.3% (95%CI: 28.1-30.6) at 5 years, as well as those obtained from a competing risk model, i.e., 24.0% (95%CI: 22.9-25.1). Most temporary discontinuations (94.7%) lasted less than 6 months. Temporary treatment discontinuations are frequent and should be accounted for when measuring adherence to treatment. MS models can provide a useful framework for this sort of analysis insofar as they help describe patients' complex behavior. This may help tailor interventions that improve persistence to hormonal therapy among women with BC. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The use of hormonal treatments to improve reproductive performance of anestrous beef cattle in tropical climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruselli, P S; Reis, E L; Marques, M O; Nasser, L F; Bó, G A

    2004-07-01

    Most of the world's bovine herd is found in tropical regions. Bos indicus predominates, due to their adaptation to the climate and management conditions. Anestrous is the main factor that negatively affects reproductive performance of animals bred in these regions of the globe. Several factors affect postpartum anestrous, including suckling and maternal-offspring bond, and pre- and postpartum nutritional status. The short duration of estrus and the tendency to show estrus during the night, greatly affect the efficiency of artificial insemination (AI) programs in B. indicus cattle managed in tropical areas. Several restricted suckling or weaning procedures (temporary or permanent), and hormonal treatments have been used to induce ovulation and cyclicity in postpartum cows. Most hormonal treatments are based on progesterone/progestogen (P4) releasing devices associated with estradiol benzoate (EB), or a combination of GnRH/PGF(2alpha)/GnRH (Ovsynch). Treatments with GnRH/PGF(2alpha)/GnRH has presented inconsistent results, probably due to the variable number of cows in anestrous. Treatments using P4 devices and EB have resulted in apparently more consistent results than Ovsynch programs in B. indicus cattle; however, pregnancy rates are low in herds presenting high anestrous rates and moderate to low body condition. The addition of an eCG treatment at the time of device removal, which increased plasma progesterone concentrations and pregnancy rates in anestrous postpartum suckled B. indicus cows, may be useful to improve reproductive performance of beef cattle in tropical climates.

  18. Treatment of TBI with Hormonal and Pharmacological Support, Preclinical Validation Using Diffuse and Mechanical TBI Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Award Number: PT075653 (grant) W81XWH-08-2-0153 (contract) TITLE: Treatment of TBI with Hormonal and Pharmacological Support, Preclinical...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-08-2-0153 Treatment of TBI with Hormonal and Pharmacological Support, Preclinical Validation Using...rats. Our in vivo tests also included MRI imaging, focusing on edema resolution and reduction of diffuse axonal damage (fractional anisotropy

  19. Effect of long-term treatment with steroid hormones or tamoxifen on the progesterone receptor and androgen receptor in the endometrium of ovariectomized cynomolgus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline J Mark

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progesterone receptor (PR and androgen receptor (AR belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. Two isoforms of PR (A and B have been identified with different functions. The expression of AR, each isoform of PR and their involvement in long-term effects on the endometrium after hormonal replacement therapy (HRT or tamoxifen (TAM treatment is not known. The aims of this study were to determine PR(A+B, PRB and AR distribution by immunohistochemistry in the macaque (Macaca fascicularis endometrium. Ovariectomized (OVX animals were orally treated continuously for 35 months with either conjugated equine estrogens (CEE; medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; the combination of CEE/MPA; or TAM. Treatment with CEE/MPA tended to down-regulate PR in the superficial glands, but increased it in the stroma. TAM treatment increased both the PR and PRB levels in the stroma. Overall, less than 20% of the cells were positive for the PRB isoform and less variation was observed after steroid treatment. AR was found in the stroma, mainly distributed in the basal layer of the endometrium in the OVX and steroid treated groups, but was absent in the TAM treated group. No AR was found in the glandular epithelium. The present data show that long-term hormone treatment affects the PR level, and also the ratio between PRA and PRB in the endometrium.

  20. PTH(1-84) Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT): a Randomized Controlled Trial on Pharmacokinetics and Dynamic effects Following 24 Weeks of treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikjær, Tanja Tvistholm; Amstrup, Anne Kristine; Rolighed, Lars

    In HypoPT, lack of PTH necessitates treatment with calcium and vitamin D analogues in order to avoid hypocalcemia. To study if replacement with the missing hormone possesses advantages, we randomized 62 patients with HypoPT to 24-wks with a daily SC injection in the thigh of PTH(1-84) 100 μg...... or similar placebo, as add to conventional therapy. At end of study, we performed a 24h biochemical monitoring on 39 patients (22 on PTH) in order to assess effects on diurnal variations in calcium-phosphate homeostasis. Following injection, blood samples were obtained at 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6...

  1. Application of hormonal treatment in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: more than ten years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luo; Zhang, Si Xiao; Dong, Qiang; Xiong, Zi Bing; Li, Xiang

    2012-04-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of hormone treatment on the patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), we summarized our more than 10 years experience. A total of 242 male patients (age range 15-52 years old) with HH including two Kallmann syndrome treated at the andrology outpatient clinics of university hospital in the past 10 years were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into three groups based on the different treatment strategy. There were 84 patients treated with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (group 1, hCG treatment group), 74 patients treated with hCG plus human menopause gonadotropin (hMG) (group 2, hCG + hMG treatment group), and 84 patients treated with testosterone (group 3, T treatment group). Sex characteristics, testicular volume, and sperm production were determined before and after the treatments. The therapeutic effects in the three groups were analyzed statistically. In total, 42 patients of group 1 (50.0%) and 56 of group 2 (75.7%) had their testicular volumes increased after 6-18 months treatment, from 2.0 ± 1.1 to 6.8 ± 3.2 mL and 2.1 ± 1.1 to 8.8 ± 3.9 mL, respectively. Only six patients of group 3 had their testicular volumes increased but no statistically significant. Among the patients with testes growth, 34 patients of group 1 and 48 patients of group 2 achieved spermatogenesis, and three of them made their wives pregnant naturally. During the follow-up after treatment, there were 36 patients finally defined as delayed puberty, and 204 patients defined as idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. For the hormonal treatment of HH, testosterone therapy could not stimulate testes growth and spermatogenesis, but HCG therapy and hCG/hMG combination therapy both are effective, while hCG/hMG combination therapy could achieve better therapeutic effects.

  2. Hormones and tumour therapy: current clinical status and future developments in endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szepesi, T.; Schratter-Sehn, A.U.

    1982-01-01

    Postoperative adjuvant hormone therapy and hormone therapy in disseminated breast cancer will be discussed systematically. The classical ablative and additive endocrine therapeutic measures - with the exception of ovarectomy and gestagen therapy - are increasinlgy being replaced by antagonists. Individual chapters discuss recent experience with combined hormone-radiotherapy or hormone-chemotherapy. In addition, a successful therapy scheme for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer will be presented. (Author)

  3. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of postoperative medical treatment on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, Meghana R K; Ugur, Murat; Bavaria, Joseph E; Kshettry, Vibhu R; Groh, Mark A; Petracek, Michael R; Jones, Kent W; Suri, Rakesh M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2015-03-01

    The study objective was to analyze factors associated with left ventricular mass regression in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with a newer bioprosthesis, the Trifecta valve pericardial bioprosthesis (St Jude Medical Inc, St Paul, Minn). A total of 444 patients underwent aortic valve replacement with the Trifecta bioprosthesis from 2007 to 2009 at 6 US institutions. The clinical and echocardiographic data of 200 of these patients who had left ventricular hypertrophy and follow-up studies 1 year postoperatively were reviewed and compared to analyze factors affecting left ventricular mass regression. Mean (standard deviation) age of the 200 study patients was 73 (9) years, 66% were men, and 92% had pure or predominant aortic valve stenosis. Complete left ventricular mass regression was observed in 102 patients (51%) by 1 year postoperatively. In univariate analysis, male sex, implantation of larger valves, larger left ventricular end-diastolic volume, and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal were significantly associated with complete mass regression. In the multivariate model, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) indicated that male sex (3.38 [1.39-8.26]) and beta-blocker or calcium-channel blocker treatment at dismissal (3.41 [1.40-8.34]) were associated with increased probability of complete left ventricular mass regression. Patients with higher preoperative systolic blood pressure were less likely to have complete left ventricular mass regression (0.98 [0.97-0.99]). Among patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, postoperative treatment with beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers may enhance mass regression. This highlights the need for close medical follow-up after operation. Labeled valve size was not predictive of left ventricular mass regression. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of the Joint Effect of Menopause and Hormone Replacement Therapy and Cancer in African American Women: The Jackson Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sarpong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the US and in Mississippi. Breast cancer (BC is the most common cancer among women, and the underlying pathophysiology remains unknown, especially among African American (AA women. The study purpose was to examine the joint effect of menopause status (MS and hormone replacement therapy (HRT on the association with cancers, particularly BC using data from the Jackson Heart Study. The analytic sample consisted of 3202 women between 35 and 84 years of which 73.7% and 22.6% were postmenopausal and on HRT, respectively. There were a total of 190 prevalent cancer cases (5.9% in the sample with 22.6% breast cancer cases. Menopause (p < 0.0001, but not HRT (p = 0.6402, was independently associated with cancer. Similar results were obtained for BC. BC, cancer, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, prevalent cardiovascular disease, physical activity and certain dietary practices were all significantly associated with the joint effect of menopause and HRT in the unadjusted analyses. The family history of cancer was the only covariate that was significantly associated with cancer in the age-adjusted models. In examining the association of cancer and the joint effect of menopause and HRT, AA women who were menopausal and were not on HRT had a 1.97 (95% CI: 1.15, 3.38 times odds of having cancer compared to pre-menopausal women after adjusting for age; which was attenuated after further adjusting for family history of cancer. Given that the cancer and BC cases were small and key significant associations were attenuated after adjusting for the above mentioned covariates, these findings warrant further investigation in studies with larger sample sizes of cancer (and BC cases.

  6. Cross-sectional analyses of participation in cancer screening and use of hormone replacement therapy and medications in meat eaters and vegetarians: the EPIC-Oxford study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Paul N; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Key, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine differences in health-related behaviours such as screening or testing for cancer, use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and use of other medications in different diet groups. Design We studied 31 260 participants across four diet groups (18 155 meat eaters, 5012 fish eaters, 7179 vegetarians, 914 vegans) in the UK EPIC-Oxford cohort. Information was collected in 5-year (around 2000–2003) or 10-year (around 2007) follow-up questionnaires regarding participation in breast screening, cervical screening, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, use of HRT and use of medications for the past 4 weeks. Using Poisson regression, we estimated the prevalence ratios (PR) for each behaviour across people of different diet groups, using meat eaters as the reference group. Results Compared with meat eaters, vegetarian (PR: 0.94, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98) and vegan (PR: 0.82, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.95) women reported lower participation in breast screening, and vegetarian men were less likely to report PSA testing (PR: 0.82, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.96). No differences were observed among women for cervical screening. In women, all non-meat-eating groups reported lower use of HRT compared with meat eaters (P heterogeneity diet groups for the reported use of specific medication for high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, asthma, diabetes and thyroid disease. Conclusions Differences in self-reported breast screening, PSA testing, HRT use and overall medication use were observed across the diet groups. Whether such differences contribute to differential long-term disease risks requires further study. PMID:29284719

  7. KRAS rs61764370 is associated with HER2-overexpressed and poorly-differentiated breast cancer in hormone replacement therapy users: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerne Jasmina-Ziva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single nucleotide polymorphism located in the 3'-untranslated region of the KRAS oncogene (KRAS variant; rs61764370 disrupts a let-7 miRNA binding and was recently reported to act as a genetic marker for increased risk of developing human cancers. We aimed to investigate an association of the KRAS variant with sporadic and familial breast cancer and breast tumor characteristics. Methods Genotyping was accomplished in 530 sporadic postmenopausal breast cancer cases, 165 familial breast cancer cases (including N = 29, who test positive for BRCA1/2 mutations and 270 postmenopausal control women using the flurogenic 5' nuclease assay. Information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT use and tumor characteristics in sporadic breast cancer cases was ascertained from a postal questionnaire and pathology reports, respectively. Associations between the KRAS genotype and breast cancer or breast tumor characteristics were assessed using chi-square test and logistic regression models. Results No evidence of association was observed between the KRAS variant and risk of sporadic and familial breast cancer - either among BRCA carriers or non-BRCA carriers. The KRAS variant was statistically significantly more often associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 - positive tumors and tumors of higher histopathologic grade. However, both associations were detected only in HRT users. Conclusion Our data do not support the hypothesis that the KRAS variant rs61764370 is implicated in the aetiology of sporadic or of familial breast cancer. In postmenopausal women using HRT, the KRAS variant might lead to HER2 overexpressed and poorly-differentiated breast tumors, both indicators of a worse prognosis.

  8. KRAS rs61764370 is associated with HER2-overexpressed and poorly-differentiated breast cancer in hormone replacement therapy users: a case control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerne, Jasmina-Ziva; Stegel, Vida; Gersak, Ksenija; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2012-01-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism located in the 3'-untranslated region of the KRAS oncogene (KRAS variant; rs61764370) disrupts a let-7 miRNA binding and was recently reported to act as a genetic marker for increased risk of developing human cancers. We aimed to investigate an association of the KRAS variant with sporadic and familial breast cancer and breast tumor characteristics. Genotyping was accomplished in 530 sporadic postmenopausal breast cancer cases, 165 familial breast cancer cases (including N = 29, who test positive for BRCA1/2 mutations) and 270 postmenopausal control women using the flurogenic 5' nuclease assay. Information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use and tumor characteristics in sporadic breast cancer cases was ascertained from a postal questionnaire and pathology reports, respectively. Associations between the KRAS genotype and breast cancer or breast tumor characteristics were assessed using chi-square test and logistic regression models. No evidence of association was observed between the KRAS variant and risk of sporadic and familial breast cancer - either among BRCA carriers or non-BRCA carriers. The KRAS variant was statistically significantly more often associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) - positive tumors and tumors of higher histopathologic grade. However, both associations were detected only in HRT users. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the KRAS variant rs61764370 is implicated in the aetiology of sporadic or of familial breast cancer. In postmenopausal women using HRT, the KRAS variant might lead to HER2 overexpressed and poorly-differentiated breast tumors, both indicators of a worse prognosis

  9. Suicidal ideation among postmenopausal women on hormone replacement therapy: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V) from 2010 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Yoon; Park, Yong-Kyu; Cho, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Seon-Mee; Choi, Youn-Seon; Kim, Do-Hoon; Nam, Ga-Eun; Han, Kyung-Do; Kim, Yang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health problem around the world. Some studies have found that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with depression in postmenopausal women. Depression is a well-known risk factor for suicide; therefore, we investigated the relationship between HRT and suicidal ideation in postmenopausal Korean women. We included 2286 postmenopausal women with or without HRT from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2012. The use and duration of HRT and mental health status, including stress, depressive mood, and suicidal ideation and attempts, were assessed by self-report questionnaires. The proportion of participants with depressive mood and suicidal ideation was higher in the HRT group than the non-HRT group (all p valuessuicidal ideation increased (p for trend=0.006). After adjusting for all covariates, the odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for suicidal ideation was 1.742 (1.223-2.482) in the women with HRT, compared to women without HRT. HRT duration longer than 10 years was associated with suicidal ideation (odds ratio=2.089 and 95% confidence intervals=1.069-4.084). The cross-sectional design, a possibility of incorrect answer about menopausal status, and no assessment of the type of HRT are the main limitations of this study. Postmenopausal women receiving HRT, especially for more than 10 years, showed increased suicidal ideation compared with postmenopausal women without HRT. Physicians should pay attention to mood symptoms and suicidal ideation in postmenopausal women with HRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A cross-sectional study of hormone treatment and hippocampal volume in postmenopausal women: evidence for a limited window of opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Kirk I; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika S; Chaddock, Laura; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-01-01

    The influence of hormone treatment on brain and cognition in postmenopausal women has been a controversial topic. Contradictory patterns of results have prompted speculation that a critical period, or limited window of opportunity, exists for hormone treatment to protect against neurocognitive. In this cross-sectional study of 102 postmenopausal women, we examined whether hippocampal, amygdala, or caudate nucleus volumes and spatial memory performance were related to the interval between menopause and the initiation of hormone treatment. Consistent with a critical period hypothesis, we found that shorter intervals between menopause and the initiation of hormone treatment were associated with larger hippocampal volumes compared with longer intervals between menopause and treatment initiation. Initiation of hormone treatment at the time of menopause was also associated with larger hippocampal volumes when compared with peers who had never used hormone treatment. Furthermore, these effects were independent from potentially confounding factors such as age, years of education, the duration of hormone treatment, current or past use of hormone therapy, the type of therapy, and age at menopause. Larger hippocampal volumes in women who initiated hormone treatment at the time of menopause failed to translate to improved spatial memory performance. There was no relationship between timing of hormone initiation, spatial memory performance, and amygdala or caudate nucleus volume. Our results provide support for a limited window of opportunity for hormone treatment to influence hippocampal volume, yet the degree to which these effects translate to improved memory performance is uncertain. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Hypoxic encephalopathy after heart valve replacement: etiology and pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Г. Постнов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed in this paper are modern approaches in the intensive therapy of acute hypoxic encephalopathy developing in a number of occasions after the heart valve replacement surgery. The study is based on the results of neurological, neuropsychological and neurophysiological (EEG examinations of 240 patients who underwent heart valve replacement surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass conditions complicated later by the development of hypoxic encephalopathies of varying severity and who received complex intensive care. Relying on many years of experience in the treatment of heart surgery patients in whom manifestations of encephalopathy developed in the early postoperative period, or were delayed, we have formulated the following algorithms of therapy. (1 Maintenance of normal blood gas: Hb>100 g/L, pH 7.45, PaCO2 35 mmHg. (2 Maintenance of hemodynamics: ABPsystolic>90 mmHg. (3 Supplying fluids and electrolytes: isoosmolar infusion solutions, adding of KCl and MgSO4 to the infusion. (4 Antiedemic therapy: 15% mannitol or 40% glycerol solution. (5 If necessary (in case of psychomotor agitation, seizures, short-acting barbiturates (sodium thiopental, neuroleptics (haloperidol, propofol. No benzodiazepines in case of psychoses (6 Cerebral metabolism stimulation (not earlier than 48 hours after surgery with cholinomimetics, nootropics, cerebral blood flow protectors. Cholinomimetics are allowed on the first day after surgery. This algorithm and the above-mentioned groups of drugs, especially central cholinomimetics, allow for correcting the neurocognitive impairment in the discussed group of patients quickly and effectively.

  12. Headache And Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reasons to suggest a link between headache and hormones. Migraine is three times common in women as compared to men after puberty, cyclic as well as non-cyclic fluctuations in sex hormone levels during the entire reproductive life span of a women are associated with changes in frequency or severity of migraine attack, abnormalities in the hypothalamus and pineal gland have been observed in cluster headache, oestrogens are useful in the treatment of menstrual migraine and the use of melatonin has been reported in various types of primary headaches. Headache associated with various endocrinological disorders may help us in a better understanding of the nociceptive mechanisms involved in headache disorders. Prospective studies using headache diaries to record the attacks of headache and menstrual cycle have clarified some of the myths associated with menstrual migraine. Although no change in the absolute levels of sex hormones have been reported, oestrogen withdrawal is the most likely trigger of the attacks. Prostaglandins, melatonin, opioid and serotonergic mechanisms may also have a role in the pathogenesis of menstrual migraine. Guidelines have been published by the IHS recently regarding the use of oral contraceptives by women with migraine and the risk of ischaemic strokes in migraineurs on hormone replacement therapy. The present review includes menstrual migraine, pregnancy and migraine, oral contraceptives and migraine, menopause and migraine as well as the hormonal changes in chronic migraine.

  13. Penile growth in response to hormone treatment in children with micropenis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra B Nerli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Micropenis is defined as a stretched penile length 2.5 standard deviations less than the mean for age without the presence of any other penile anomalies, such as hypospadias. The term refers to a specific disorder that has a known set of causative factors and defined treatment modalities. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hormonal therapy on the gonadal response and penile growth in children who presented with micropenis. Materials and Methods: Children (<18 years who met the criteria for micropenis were included in this study. Children more than 11 years old were treated using a standard protocol of 1,500 to 2,000 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin administrated intramuscularly, once per week, for 6 weeks. Children less than 11 years old were treated with parenteral testosterone enanthate 25 mg once a month for 3 months. Response was evaluated in terms of change in testosterone levels and size of penis. Results: Serum testosterone levels at baseline and after 8 weeks of hormonal treatment were <20 and 449.4 ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.0001 in all children more than 11 years old. Stretched penile length after hormonal treatment increased from 15.54 to 37.18 mm in children less than 11 years old and from 26.42 to 64.28 mm in children more than 11 years old (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Management of isolated micropenis revolves around testosterone (direct administration or encouraging the patient′s body to make its own, and results with respect to increase in penile length are promising.

  14. The theory of modulated hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Teresa S.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2012-03-01

    We present a theory that questions the standard of care for pre- and post-menopausal women with breast cancer. Through the use of modulated hormones to mimic the natural multiphasic fluctuations of estrogen and progesterone cycles of healthy young women, it can be expected that patients will not only exhibit increased quality of life such as better sleep, well-being, and libido, but also memory improvement and less joint pain. Additionally, this regimen may engage genetic pathways that protect women in youth from breast cancers. We present a mathematical basis for the coupling of the hormone cycles through the use of Gaussian curves that provides the foundation of a new format of hormone replacement in women.

  15. The theory of modulated hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa S. Wiley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a theory that questions the standard of care for pre- and post-menopausal women with breast cancer. Through the use of modulated hormones to mimic the natural multiphasic fluctuations of estrogen and progesterone cycles of healthy young women, it can be expected that patients will not only exhibit increased quality of life such as better sleep, well-being, and libido, but also memory improvement and less joint pain. Additionally, this regimen may engage genetic pathways that protect women in youth from breast cancers. We present a mathematical basis for the coupling of the hormone cycles through the use of Gaussian curves that provides the foundation of a new format of hormone replacement in women.

  16. Increased body mass index is a predisposition for treatment by total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    -joint degeneration and dysplasia. Sequential body mass index (BMI) measurements from 1976 to 1992, age, exposure to daily lifting and hip dysplasia were entered into logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of hip dysplasia ranged from 5.4% to 12.8% depending on the radiographical index used. Radiological hip OA...... prevalence was 1.0--2.5% in subjects or=60 years of age. While radiological OA was significantly influenced by hip dysplasia in men and hip dysplasia and age in women, the risk of THR being performed was only influenced by BMI assessed in 1976. Hip......We investigated the radiological and epidemiological data of 4,151 subjects followed up from 1976 to 2003 to determine individual risk factors for hip osteoarthritis (OA), hip pain and/or treatment by total hip replacement (THR). Pelvic radiographs recorded in 1992 were assessed for evidence of hip...

  17. [Plastic surgery for the treatment of gynaecomastia following hormone therapy in prostate carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryssel, H; Germann, G; Köllensperger, E; Riedel, K

    2008-04-01

    Gynecomastia is a potential side effect of hormone therapy for prostate cancer. In large, randomized, placebo controlled studies approximately 50% or more of patients with prostate cancer experienced gynecomastia attributable to various mechanisms. Although it is mostly reported as mild to moderate, gynecomastia is one of the reasons most frequently cited for premature discontinuation of such treatment. Prophylactic radiotherapy and prophylactic tamoxifen have been shown to decrease the incidence of hormone-induced gynecomastia; nevertheless, there are still cases of refractory gynecomastia, and in these plastic surgery is needed for correction. Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, requiring no treatment unless it is a source of embarrassment and/or distress for the adolescent or man affected. The indications for surgical treatment of gynecomastia are founded on two main objectives: restoration of the male chest shape and diagnostic evaluation of suspected breast lesions. The authors believe that the complete circumareolar technique with no further scarring creates the best aesthetic results with fewer complications. When this is used in combination with liposuction very pleasing aesthetic results can be achieved.

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  19. Effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment on body fluid distribution in patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Jensen, Martin Bach; Frandsen, E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible beneficial effects of growth hormone (GH) in catabolic patients we examined the impact of GH on body fluid distribution in patients with ulcerative colitis undergoing elective abdominal surgery. DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: Twenty-four patients (14 female, 10 male...... at day -2 and at day 7, and body composition was estimated by dual X-ray absorptiometry and bioimpedance. Changes in body weight and fluid balance were recorded and hence intracellular volume was assessed. RESULTS: During placebo treatment body weight decreased 4.3 +/- 0.6 kg; during GH treatment body.......05). Plasma renin and aldosterone remained unchanged in both study groups. CONCLUSION: Body weight, plasma volume and intracellular volume is preserved during GH treatment in catabolic patients and ECV is increased. From a therapeutic point of view these effects may be desirable under conditions of surgical...

  20. Growth hormone treatment improves body fluid distribution in patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J; Jensen, M B; Frandsen, E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible beneficial effects of growth hormone (GH) in catabolic patients we examined the impact of GH on body fluid distribution in patients with ulcerative colitis undergoing elective abdominal surgery. DESIGN AND MEASUREMENTS: Twenty-four patients (14 female, 10 male...... at day -2 and at day 7, and body composition was estimated by dual X-ray absorptiometry and bioimpedance. Changes in body weight and fluid balance were recorded and hence intracellular volume was assessed. RESULTS: During placebo treatment body weight decreased 4.3 +/- 0.6 kg; during GH treatment body.......05). Plasma renin and aldosterone remained unchanged in both study groups. CONCLUSION: Body weight, plasma volume and intracellular volume is preserved during GH treatment in catabolic patients and ECV is increased. From a therapeutic point of view these effects may be desirable under conditions of surgical...

  1. Growth Hormone Receptor Antagonist Treatment Reduces Exercise Performance in Young Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goto, K.; Doessing, S.; Nielsen, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    between the groups in terms of changes in serum free fatty acids, glycerol, (V) over dotO(2), or relative fat oxidation. Conclusion: GH might be an important determinant of exercise capacity during prolonged exercise, but GHR antagonist did not alter fat metabolism during exercise. (J Clin Endocrinol......Context: The effects of GH on exercise performance remain unclear. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of GH receptor (GHR) antagonist treatment on exercise performance. Design: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist pegvisomant or placebo for 16 d. After the treatment...... period, they exercised to determine exercise performance and hormonal and metabolic responses. Participants: Twenty healthy males participated in the study. Intervention: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist (n = 10; 10 mg/d) or placebo (n = 10). After the treatment period, they performed...

  2. Clomiphene citrate and testosterone gel replacement therapy for male hypogonadism: efficacy and treatment cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick; Levine, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of oral clomiphene citrate (CC) in the treatment of male hypogonadism and male infertility (MI) with low serum testosterone and normal gonadotropin levels has been reported. The aim of this article is to evaluate CC and testosterone gel replacement therapy (TGRT) with regard to biochemical and clinical efficacy and cost. The main outcome measures were change in serum testosterone with CC and TGRT therapy, and change in the androgen deficiency in aging male (ADAM) questionnaire scores with CC therapy. Men receiving CC or TGRT with either Androgel 1% or Testim 1% for hypogonadism (defined as testosterone treatment initiation and semi-annually thereafter. Retrospective data collection was performed via chart review. Subjective follow up of patients receiving CC was performed via telephone interview using the ADAM questionnaire. A hundred and four men (65 CC and 39 TGRT) were identified who began CC (50 mg every other day) or TGRT (5 g). Average age (years) was 42(CC) vs. 57 (TGRT). Average follow up was 23 months (CC, range 8-40 months) vs. 46 months (TGRT, range 6-149 months). Average posttreatment testosterone was 573 ng/dL in the CC group and 553 ng/dL in the TGRT group (P value treatment option for men with hypogonadism, demonstrating biochemical and clinical efficacy with few side effects and lower cost as compared with TGRT.

  3. The effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on gender dysphoria individuals' mental health: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosalia Costa,1 Marco Colizzi2 1Gender Identity Development Service, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, Tavistock Centre, 2Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK Abstract: Cross-sex hormonal treatment represents a main aspect of gender dysphoria health care pathway. However, it is still debated whether this intervention translates into a better mental well-being for the individual and which mechanisms may underlie this association. Although sex reassignment surgery has been the subject of extensive investigation, few studies have specifically focused on hormonal treatment in recent years. Here, we systematically review all studies examining the effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on mental health and well-being in gender dysphoria. Research tends to support the evidence that hormone therapy reduces symptoms of anxiety and dissociation, lowering perceived and social distress and improving quality of life and self-esteem in both male-to-female and female-to-male individuals. Instead, compared to female-to-male individuals, hormone-treated male-to-female individuals seem to benefit more in terms of a reduction in their body uneasiness and personality-related psychopathology and an amelioration of their emotional functioning. Less consistent findings support an association between hormonal treatment and other mental health-related dimensions. In particular, depression, global psychopathology, and psychosocial functioning difficulties appear to reduce only in some studies, while others do not suggest any improvement in these domains. Results from longitudinal studies support more consistently the association between hormonal treatment and improved mental health. On the contrary, a number of cross-sectional studies do not support this evidence. This review provides possible biological explanation vs psychological explanation (direct effect vs indirect effect

  4. Acute gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment enhances extinction memory in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, L Y; Taha, M B; Cover, K K; Glynn, S S; Murillo, M; Lebron-Milad, K; Milad, M R

    2017-08-01

    Leuprolide acetate (LEU), also known as Lupron, is commonly used to treat prostate cancer in men. As a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor agonist, it initially stimulates the release of gonadal hormones, testosterone (T) and estradiol. This surge eventually suppresses these hormones, preventing the further growth and spread of cancer cells. Individuals receiving this treatment often report anxiety and cognitive changes, but LEU's effects on the neural mechanisms that are involved in anxiety during the trajectory of treatment are not well known. In this study, we examined the acute effects of LEU on fear extinction, hypothesizing that increased T levels following a single administration of LEU will facilitate extinction recall by altering neuronal activity within the fear extinction circuitry. Two groups of naïve adult male rats underwent a 3-day fear conditioning, extinction, and recall experiment. The delayed group (n=15) received a single injection of vehicle or LEU (1.2mg/kg) 3weeks before behavioral testing. The acute group (n=25) received an injection one day after fear conditioning, 30min prior to extinction training. Following recall, the brains for all animals were collected for c-fos immunohistochemistry. Blood samples were also collected and assayed for T levels. Acute administration of LEU increased serum T levels during extinction training and enhanced extinction recall 24h later. This enhanced extinction memory was correlated with increased c-fos activity within the infralimbic cortex and amygdala, which was not observed in the delayed group. These results suggest that the elevation in T induced by acute administration of LEU can influence extinction memory consolidation, perhaps through modification of neuronal activity within the infralimbic cortex and amygdala. This may be an important consideration in clinical applications of LEU and its effects on anxiety and cognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Favorable Growth Hormone Treatment Response in a Young Boy with Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstevska-Konstantinova, Marina; Stamatova, Ana; Gucev, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    Achondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia, the most common cause of rhizomelic dwarfism. This is a ten year old boy who was first diagnosed prenatally. He had a mutation c1138G>A in the gene FGFR3 in a heterozygotic constellation. His IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were normal. Two stimulation tests for growth hormone were performed with values within the reference range. His psychomotor development was adequate for his age except for speech difficulty. He started with recombinant hGH (r-hGH) at the age of 3.4 years in a dose of 0.06 mg/kg. His mean Height SDS (HtSDS) was -2.2. The growth increased to 10 cm/year in the first year of therapy (HtSDS -1.1). It decreased during the second year to 4 cm (HtSDS -1.7) and again increased during the third year to 8 cm/year (HtSDS-1.3). In the next years the growth was constant (6.5, 2.3, 3.5 cm / year). He is still growing in the 3(rd) percentile of the growth curve (HtSDS - 1.2) under GH treatment. The body disproportion remained the same. The growth response on GH treatment was satisfactory in the first 4 years of treatment, and the boy still continued to grow. The young age at the start of treatment was also of importance. Our other patients with achondroplasia who started treatment older had a poor response to growth hormone.

  6. Growth and growth hormone secretion in children following treatment of brain tumours with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darendeliler, F.; Livesey, E.A.; Hindmarsh, P.C.; Brook, C.G.D. (Endocrine Unit, The Middlesex Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the growth of 144 children after treatment of brain tumours distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. All had cranial irradiation and 87 spinal irradiation. In 56 patients observed without intervention for 3 years, height SDS in the cranial (CR) group (n=20) declined from 0.02 to -0.44 and in the craniospinal (CS) group (n=36) from -0.28 to -1.11. Failure of spinal growth had a marked effect in the CS group. The onset of puberty was slightly but not significantly advanced; median ages at onset of puberty were 10.3 years in girls and 12.1 years in boys. Of the total group 86.4% had clinical and biochemical evidence of growth hormone insufficiency. Fifty-two children, 33 (28 CS; 5 CR) of whome were prepubertal, received biosynthetic human growth hormone, in a dose of 15 mU/m{sup 2}/week by daily injection for a period of one year. Height velocity SDS increased significantly in both groups from -2.74 to +1.90 (CS) and from -1.0 to +4.26 (CR). Spinal response to GH treatment was restricted in the craniospinal group. (authors).

  7. Growth and growth hormone secretion in children following treatment of brain tumours with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darendeliler, F.; Livesey, E.A.; Hindmarsh, P.C.; Brook, C.G.D.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the growth of 144 children after treatment of brain tumours distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. All had cranial irradiation and 87 spinal irradiation. In 56 patients observed without intervention for 3 years, height SDS in the cranial (CR) group (n=20) declined from 0.02 to -0.44 and in the craniospinal (CS) group (n=36) from -0.28 to -1.11. Failure of spinal growth had a marked effect in the CS group. The onset of puberty was slightly but not significantly advanced; median ages at onset of puberty were 10.3 years in girls and 12.1 years in boys. Of the total group 86.4% had clinical and biochemical evidence of growth hormone insufficiency. Fifty-two children, 33 (28 CS; 5 CR) of whome were prepubertal, received biosynthetic human growth hormone, in a dose of 15 mU/m 2 /week by daily injection for a period of one year. Height velocity SDS increased significantly in both groups from -2.74 to +1.90 (CS) and from -1.0 to +4.26 (CR). Spinal response to GH treatment was restricted in the craniospinal group. (authors)

  8. Growth hormone treatment and risk of recurrence or progression of brain tumors in children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogarin, Roberto; Steinbok, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Brain tumors are one of the most common types of solid neoplasm in children. As life expectancy of these patients has increased with new and improved therapies, the morbidities associated with the treatments and the tumor itself have become more important. One of the most common morbidities is growth hormone deficiency, and since recombinant growth hormone (GH) became available, its use has increased exponentially. There is concern that in the population of children with brain tumors, GH treatment might increase the risk of tumor recurrence or progression or the appearance of a second neoplasm. In the light of this ongoing concern, the current literature has been reviewed to provide an update on the risk of tumor recurrence, tumor progression, or new intracranial tumor formation when GH is used to treat GH deficiency in children, who have had or have intracranial tumors. On the basis of this review, the authors conclude that the use of GH in patients with brain tumor is safe. GH therapy is not associated with an increased risk of central nervous system tumor progression or recurrence, leukemia (de novo or relapse), or extracranial non-leukemic neoplasms.

  9. Hormone and Microorganism Treatments in the Cultivation of Saffron (Crocus Sativus L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Ozkul Acikgoz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The difficult cultivation of the saffron plant (Crocus Sativus L. make the spice of the same name made from its dried stigmas very valuable. It is estimated that some 75,000 blossoms or 225,000 hand-picked stigmas are required to make a single pound of saffron, which explains why it is the world’s most expensive spice. The aim of this study was to identify ways of increasing the fertility and production of saffron. For this purpose, the treatment of saffron bulbs with a synthetic growth hormone – a mixture of Polystimulins A6 and K – and two different microorganism based materials – biohumus or vermicompost and Effective Microorganisms™ (EM – in four different ways (hormone alone, biohumus alone, EM alone and EM+biohumus was investigated to determine whether these treatments have any statistically meaningful effects on corms and stigmas. It has been shown that EM + biohumus was the most effective choice for improved saffron cultivation.

  10. Cambios en el uso de la terapia hormonal sustitutiva tras una intervención informativa dirigida a mujeres y prescriptores Changes in the use of hormone replacement therapy after an educational intervention aimed at women and prescribers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mosquera Tenreiro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Describir las acciones desarrolladas en Asturias en 2004 y 2005 a partir de las recomendaciones de la Agencia Española del Medicamento (AEM sobre el uso de la terapia hormonal sustitutiva (THS después de la publicación del Women's Health Initiative y del Million Women Study. Métodos: Estudio casi experimental sin grupo control. Los datos utilizados fueron las ventas de THS entre 1996 y 2003, previamente a la intervención. En 2004-2005 se analizaron las ventas anuales de THS y el porcentaje estimado de mujeres que usaban este tratamiento respecto a la población de 50-59 años de edad. Para el análisis de la evolución de los costes se tomaron los precios de cada especialidad en pesetas hasta el año 2001 y en euros a partir de entonces. Resultados: Hubo un incremento de las ventas hasta el año 2001. A partir de entonces cambió la tendencia, con un descenso hasta 2005 del 73,6%. El descenso observado en el período 2004-2005 (49,1% fue el doble del producido durante 2002-2003 (24,5%. El porcentaje estimado de mujeres usuarias de THS entre 50 y 59 años habría sido de un 17,2% en 2001 y de un 4,1% en 2005. El gasto total de la THS experimentó un descenso similar, aunque Boltin® (tibolona duplicó sus ventas. Conclusiones: Las acciones para proporcionar una información sistemática e independiente a los profesionales y la población general son necesarias y eficaces. Es preciso investigar en el ámbito nacional la «epidemia» de la THS y sus costes en la salud, así como el uso de tibolona y sus efectos adversos.Objective: To describe changes in prescription of hormone replacement therapy (HRT in Asturias (Spain after the publication of the results of the Women's Health Initiative and the Million Women Study and following the recommendations of the Spanish Drugs Agency to women and prescribers (2004-2005. Methods: We performed a quasiexperimental study with no control group. The data used consisted of sales of HRT products

  11. [Prevention and treatment of perioperative period complication of total ankle replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiang; Gao, Zhizeng; Huang, Shanhu; Yang, Shuhua

    2008-01-01

    To explore the cause of the perioprative period complication of scandinavian total ankle replacement (STAR) and to summarize the experience in the treatment and prevention. From March 1999 to November 2006, 35 patients were given total ankle replacement (TAR) with STAR system. There were 19 males and 16 females with an average age of 50.5 years (27 to 68 years), including 12 cases of posttraumatic arthritis, 8 cases of osteoarthritis and 15 cases of rheumatoid arthritis. All patients had pain of ankle joint, swelling and limitation of joint motion. The disease course was 9-64 months. The curative effect was estimated by Kofoed total ankle scoring system. The mean preoperative ankle score was 29 (6-48); the mean pain score was 18.3 (0-35); the mean function score was 11.7 (6-18); and the mean activity score was 9.2 (3-12). The type of all complications were record, and its cause, prevetion and treatment were analyszed. Thirty-three patients achieved healing by first intention, 2 achieved delayed union because of infection. Twenty-eight patients were followed up 3-80 months (mean 43.5 months). Medial malleolus fracture occurred in 2 cases, unstable ankle joint introversion in 2 cases, limitation of ankle dorsiextension in 1 case and 1 case had hypoesthesia at intermediate dorsal skin of foot and 3rd-5th metatarsal skin without obvious dysfunction; all were treated with symptomatic medication. The postoperative mean ankle score was 85.5 (58-95); the mean pain score was 48.3 (35-50); the mean function score was 20.7 (18-30); the mean activity score was 17.2 (16-20). There were statistically significant differences when compared with preoperative score (P<0.01). The clinical results were excellent in 16 patients, good in 9 patients and fair in 3 patients. The X-ray films showed no loosening and subsidence of prosthesis. Although STAR can retain the functions of the operated joint, it has its special complications. It is important to obey operation principle with

  12. Gaucher disease: MR evaluation of bone marrow features during treatment with enzyme replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Boerner, D.; Cohnen, M.; Jung, G.; Scherer, A.; Moedder, U.; Niederau, C.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) arrests and reverses the hematological and visceral symptoms of adult Gaucher disease, the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder. There are only a few studies available evaluating bone disease during ERT. The aim of this study was to investigate the features of bone marrow (bm) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients during ERT. Materials and Methods: MRI was performed prospectively in thirty adult type I Gaucher patients before and during ERT with a mean follow-up of 3 years. Spin-echo sequences (T 1 /T 2 ) of the lower extremities were obtained and the reconversion (response) or lack of reconversion (non-response) to fatty marrow during treatment was analyzed. The morphological features of bm involvement, a homogeneous or non-homogeneous distribution of bm changes and focal bone lesions surrounded by a rim of reduced signal intensity (SI), were analyzed. Results: Infiltration of bm by Gaucher cells is characterized by a reduction of Sl on both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted sequences. Bone marrow responses were seen in 19 patients (63%) during treatment. Focal bone lesions, surrounded by a rim of reduced Sl, did not respond to ERT and correlated with a non-homogenous distribution of bone involvement and splenectomy. (orig.) [de

  13. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I deficiency and replacement therapy on the hematopoietic system in patients with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Bezalel; Lilos, Pearl; Laron, Zvi

    2003-01-01

    Primary insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiencies, such as in Laron syndrome (LS), are a unique model in man to study the consequences resulting from defects in growth hormone (GH) signal transmission. To assess retrospectively the effect of IGF-I deficiency and its therapy on the various cells of the hematopoietic system as reflected by peripheral blood counts. Two groups of patients were studied. The first group consisted of 11 untreated patients with LS, seven males and four females, who were followed from childhood into adult age. Average age at the time of data analysis was 45.4 +/- 9.6 years. The second group included ten children with LS, six males and four females, who received IGF-I replacement therapy for an average period of 6 years, ranging in age from 0.9-11 years. The mean age at initiation of therapy was 6.9 +/- 4.28 years. Only the seven children treated for 5 years or more were included in the analysis. Data on blood counts were collected from the patients' charts. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, weekly during the first month, once a month during the first year, and once every 3 months thereafter. Statistical analysis of the change over time was performed using repeated measures ANOVA. Children with LS had red cell indices in the lower normal range and an elevated monocyte count. A statistically significant rise in red blood cell (RBC) indices was seen in children during IGF-I therapy: RBC rose from 4.66 x 10(6)/ml to 4.93 x 10(6)/ml (p = 0.011); hemoglobin from 11.55 g/dl to 13.01 g/dl (p syndrome, confirms that IGF-I has a strong stimulatory effect on erythropoiesis. In addition, IGF-I therapy had a reducing effect on monocytes and platelets, an effect not previously described. The mechanism by which IGF-I mediates these effects needs further elucidation.

  14. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in a case of panhypopituitarism: a possible role of growth hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, H; Kato, A; Fujimoto, T; Suzuki, H; Fujigaki, Y; Yamamoto, T; Endoh, A; Yonemura, K; Hishida, A

    2002-10-01

    Panhypopituitarism manifests various symptoms including growth failure, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. Dwarfism is an important problem in children with this condition, and long-term treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (GH) is usually required. We report a 24-year-old man with panhypopituitarism complicated by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The patient had been treated with GH for hypopituitary dwarfism from 3 years of age. Proteinuria was initially noticed at 15 years of age and persisted despite cessation of GH supplementation at 18 years of age. A renal biopsy specimen showed glomerular hypertrophy and limited glomerulosclerosis, compatible with FSGS. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of panhypopituitarism complicated by FSGS. Our case suggests that GH treatment for dwarfism may induce irreversible glomerular disease.

  15. [Application of continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of myonephropathic metabolic syndrome caused by acute lower extremity ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianping; Wang, Tengke; Zhang, Jinglan

    2014-09-16

    To summarize the experiences of using continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of myonephropathic metabolic syndrome caused by acute lower limb ischemia. Retrospective study of patients diagnosed acute lower limb ischemia with surgical treatment between January 2008 and December 2013, among which 22 patients with myonephropathic metabolic syndrome received continuous renal replacement therapy. Summarize the change tendency of myoglobin, urine volume and serum creatinine levels during treatment and analysis the condition changes and prognosis of the patients. Among them, 2 patients were amputated and two died after surgery. The major causes of death were acute renal failure, metabolic acidosis, circulation failure and liver failure, etc. Myoglobin was significantly higher at Day 1 after surgery than that was before surgery (P metabolic syndrome, early targeted continuous renal replacement therapy may decrease the serum concentrations of myoglobin and CK, improve urine volume, maintain homeostasis, prevent renal function deterioration and improve the prognosis of patients. And it is highly recommended.

  16. Predicting intention to use nicotine replacement therapy in people attending residential treatment for substance dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter J; Townsend, Camilla J; Osborne, Briony A; Baker, Amanda L; Deane, Frank P; Keane, Carol; Ingram, Isabella; Lunn, Joanne

    2018-02-28

    Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is recommended as a frontline smoking cessation tool for people attending mental health and substance dependence treatment services. Previous research suggests that NRT is underutilized in these settings. To improve the use of NRT amongst people attending residential treatment for substance use disorders (SUDs) it is important that the factors influencing smokers' decisions to use NRT are understood. The study aimed to examine: (1) smoking cessation strategies used by participants in previous quit attempts, (2) participants' attitudes towards NRT (i.e. safety concerns and perceived efficacy), and (3) the predictors of participants' intention to use NRT to support future quit attempts. Participants completed a cross-sectional survey that examined their smoking behaviours, previous experiences using smoking cessation strategies, attitudes and beliefs regarding NRT, and intention to use NRT as part of future quit attempts (N = 218). All participants were attending residential treatment for substance use disorders provided by We Help Ourselves (WHOS), a large provider of specialist alcohol and other drug treatment in Australia. The majority of respondents (98%) reported that they had smoked regularly in their lifetime, and 89% were current smokers. Forty-five percent of the current smokers reported that they had previously used NRT to support a quit attempt, with 54% reporting that they intended to use NRT to support a future quit attempt. Intentions to use NRT were not related to the participants' mental health status or the participants' perceptions regarding the safety or potential drawbacks associated with using NRT. However, participants were more likely to report that they would use NRT to support future quit attempts if they were female, had previously used NRT and perceived NRT to be effective. Improving the use of evidence based smoking cessation strategies within substance use treatment continues to be a priority. To enhance

  17. Estramustine phosphate in the treatment of hormone escape prostatic carcinoma - a 3 year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf H Syed

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A recent literature review has shown rekin-dled interest in the use of estramustine phosphate (EMP inpatients with advanced prostatic cancer. This led us to assess prostate specific antigen (PSA response and drug tolerability following EMP therapy inpatients with hor-mone refractory prostate cancer Patients and Methods: Twenty-five patients with a mean age of 73.5 years (range 49 to 85 years received EMP for hormone insensitive prostate cancer from January 1996 onwards. They were received at 6 weeks initially followed by 3 monthly intervals to monitor further progression of disease. At each visit clinical examination and blood chem-istry (PSA, etc was done and further investigations, i.e., bone scan, CT scan, etc. were requested if thought neces-sary. Results: According to the WHO score of pain 71 %found immediate symptomatic relief following EMP treatment but only 29% were pain free after one year PSA level showed a persistent decline of> 50% of pre-treatment value in 16 patients (64% at 6 weeks. However, at 1 year 22% had either a still declining PSA or had reached a stable nadir PSA level while the rest showed rising PSA suggesting in-sensitivity to EMP. Three out of 5 patients (excluding I patient with intolerance at 2 months with> 80% decrease in PSA at 6 weeks had longer period of progression free interval (1 year in 2 and 2 years in 1 patient. The treat-ment was generally well tolerated (72% as only 7 patients had to discontinue EMP because of severe side ef-fects. Conclusions: EMP treatment in patients with hormone escaped prostatic cancer does produce immediate PSA response which is reflected simultaneously in pain improve-ment in the majority of cases but overall the benefit is shortlived. Patients who have> 80% reduction in pre-treat-ment PSA value at 6 weeks may have longer period of pro-gressionfree intervals. However EMP was generally well tolerated.

  18. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response

  19. Review of hormone-based treatments in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer focusing on aromatase inhibitors and fulvestrant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Knoop, Ann S; Jessing, Christina A R

    2016-01-01

    . However, overall survival was not significantly increased. CONCLUSION: Conventional treatment with an aromatase inhibitor or fulvestrant may be an adequate treatment option for most patients with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition and cyclin...

  20. Non-invasive treatments of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for inducing spermiation in American (Bufo americanus) and Gulf Coast (Bufo valliceps) toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, Angela D.; Obringer, Amy R.; Roth, Terri L.

    2001-01-01

    As many as 20% of all assessed amphibian species are threatened with extinction, and captive breeding programs are becoming important components of conservation strategies for this taxon. For some species, exogenous hormone administration has been integrated into breeding protocols to improve propagation. However, most treatments are administered by an intraperitoneal injection that can be associated with some risks. The general goal of this study was to identify a non-invasive method of applying luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), which reliably induces sperm release in toads. Specific objectives were to 1) test the spermiation response after topical application of different LHRH doses to the abdominal seat region, 2) evaluate the effects of adding the absorption enhancers dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), acetone, and glyceryl monocaprylate (GMC) to the LHRH, 3) assess the spermiation response after oral delivery of LHRH in a mealworm vehicle, and 4) compare sperm characteristics and spermiation responses to treatments in two different toad species. Male American (n = 9) and Gulf Coast (n = 7) toads were rotated systematically through a series of treatments. Urine was collected and evaluated for the presence of sperm at 0, 3, 7, 12, and 24 hours post-treatment. There were no statistical differences in spermiation induction or sperm characteristics between American and Gulf Coast toads after the treatments. Oral administration of 100 &mgr;g LHRH was occasionally successful in inducing spermiation, but results appeared largely unreliable. Ventral dermal application of 100 or 10 &mgr;g LHRH in 40% DMSO were more effective (P Zoo Biol 20:63-74, 2001. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Does Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Agonists plus add-back therapy bring an aurora to orthodontic treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lingyong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obviously, long therapy time of orthodontic treatment and a number of its adverse effects, such as pain, root resorption, enamel demineralization, periodontal disease, are the main reasons of complaints from patients. It is the first thing for an orthodontist to shorten the period of treatment and decrease the complications of orthodontic treatment as much as possible. The Hypothesis: We hypothesis Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Agonists (GnRHa and add-back therapy can create the "therapeutic window", namely, the appropriate estrogen level and assuage the adverse effects of estrogen deficiency which should be avoided as much as possible. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: It is generally acknowledged that estrogen has direct regulating role in bone metabolism by acting on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Estrogen deficiency can increase the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and also bring about some adverse effects. The appropriate estrogen level, which we call the "therapeutic window" in orthodontic treatment, can speed up the orthodontic tooth movement and eliminate the adverse effects as far as possible. GnRHa can be the maker of estrogen deficiency; meanwhile, add-back therapy can remove the adverse effects by estrogen deficiency. So, we believe that GnRHa plus add-back therapy could be a new adjuvant method of orthodontic treatment and be good for orthodontists and patients.

  2. Thyroid hormonal disturbances related to treatment of hepatitis C with interferon-alpha and ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Lucia Seguro Danilovic

    2011-01-01

    hormonal evaluation, including the analysis of the free T4, TSH, and antithyroid antibody levels, should be mandatory before therapy, and an early re-evaluation within three months of treatment is necessary as an appropriate follow-up.

  3. Growth hormone treatment for childhood short stature and risk of stroke in early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poidvin, Amélie; Touzé, Emmanuel; Ecosse, Emmanuel; Landier, Fabienne; Béjot, Yannick; Giroud, Maurice; Rothwell, Peter M; Carel, Jean-Claude; Coste, Joël

    2014-08-26

    We investigated the incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes in a population-based cohort of patients in France treated with growth hormone (GH) for short stature in childhood. Adult morbidity data were obtained in 2008-2010 for 6,874 children with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency or short stature who started GH treatment between 1985 and 1996. Cerebrovascular events were validated using medical reports and imaging data and classified according to standard definitions of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. Case ascertainment completeness was estimated with capture-recapture methods. The incidence of stroke and of stroke subtypes was calculated and compared with population values extracted from registries in Dijon and Oxford, between 2000 and 2012. Using both Dijon and Oxford population-based registries as references, there was a significantly higher risk of stroke among patients treated with GH in childhood. The excess risk of stroke was mainly attributable to a very substantially and significantly higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke (standardized incidence ratio from 3.5 to 7.0 according to the registry rates considered, and accounting or not accounting for missed cases), and particularly subarachnoid hemorrhage (standardized incidence ratio from 5.7 to 9.3). We report a strong relationship between hemorrhagic stroke and GH treatment in childhood for isolated growth hormone deficiency or childhood short stature. Patients treated with GH worldwide should be advised about this association and further studies should evaluate the potentially causal role of GH treatment in these findings. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Evaluation of Replacement Grafts and Punch Grafts in the Treatment of Vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ajit Kumar

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirtycasesof vitiligo eachwithminimum of two lesions undent replacement graft and multiple punch grafts in one lesion each. Complications observed at the recipient site like infection and raised nigosed surface were significantly more in replacement grafts. Hypopigmentation of the graft was significantly more when the disease was progressive.

  5. Avaliação tomográfica e tensiométrica de fêmures de ratas ooforectomizadas submetidas à terapia de reposição hormonal Tomografic and tensiometric assessment of femurs of oophorectomized rats submitted to hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Alexandre Martynetz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os efeitos da TRH na avaliação biomecânica e tomográfica dos fêmures de ratas submetidas à menopausa induzida. MÉTODOS: Foram divididas igualmente em três grupos 45 ratas Wistar adultas. O primeiro e o segundo constituíram-se de ratas ooforectomizadas e o terceiro, o grupo controle, de ratas não ooforectomizadas. Após a constatação da falência hormonal (citologia esfoliativa. somente o primeiro grupo recebeu TRH, durante dois meses. Após esse período, os fêmures foram desarticulados e submetidos a testes biomecânicos através de máquina universal de ensaios para avaliação da resistência e submetidos a tomografia para determinação da densidade óssea. RESULTADOS: A citologia esfoliativa demonstrou indução de falência hormonal em todos os animais ooforectomizados. Notou-se diferença significante (p = 0,030 entre os grupos ao se mensurar a força máxima de resistência, maior no grupo que recebeu TRH. Observou-se maior fragilidade óssea nos animais ooforectomizados sem TRH quando comparados com os com TRH (p = 0,010 em relação ao grupo controle (p = 0,0107. Houve aumento da resistência óssea nas ratas ooforectomizadas com TRH em relação às sem TRH e valores semelhantes aos do grupo controle (p = 0,179. Na avaliação tomográfica, não se encontraram diferenças significantes entre os grupos (p = 0,625. CONCLUSÃO: Observou-se aumento significativo da resistência óssea com a utilização de TRH. No entanto, o tratamento com TRH não apresentou alteração significante da densidade mineral óssea.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy on the biomechanical and tomographic evaluation of femurs of rats submitted to induced menopause. METHODS: Forty-five adult Wistar rats were divided equally into three groups. The first and second groups consisted of rats submitted to oophorectomy, and the third was the control group, consisting of non-oophorectomized rates. After

  6. Psychomotor retardation in a girl with complete growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Devi; Malhi, Prabhjot; Kumar Bhalla, Anil; Sachdeva, Naresh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Infants with complete growth hormone deficiency may suffer from psychomotor retardation in addition to severe growth failure. Without replacement therapy, they may have a compromised intellectual potential manifesting as learning disabilities and attention-deficit disorders in later life. In this communication, we discuss an infant who showed improvement in physical growth after growth hormone therapy but her psychomotor skills did not improve probably due to late start of treatment. There is a need to start growth hormone therapy as early as possible in infants with complete growth hormone deficiency to avoid adverse effects on psychomotor and brain development.

  7. Orthodontic treatment for a mandibular prognathic girl of short stature under growth hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yun Pan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of a 12-year-old girl with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism, and facial asymmetry, undergoing growth hormone (GH therapy due to idiopathic short stature. Children of short stature with or without GH deficiency have a deviating craniofacial morphology with overall smaller dimensions; facial retrognathism, especially mandibular retrognathism; and increased facial convexity. However, a complete opposite craniofacial pattern was presented in our case of a skeletal Class III girl with idiopathic short stature. The orthodontic treatment goal was to inhibit or change the direction of mandibular growth and stimulate the maxillary growth of the girl during a course of GH therapy. Maxillary protraction and mandibular retraction were achieved using occipitomental anchorage (OMA orthopedic appliance in the first stage of treatment. In the second stage, the patient was treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance using a modified multiple-loop edgewise archwire technique of asymmetric mechanics and an active retainer of vertical chin-cup. The treatment led to an acceptable facial profile and obvious facial asymmetry improvement. Class I dental occlusion and coincident dental midline were also achieved. A 3½-year follow-up of the girl at age 18 showed a stable result of the orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic treatment. Our case shows that the OMA orthopedic appliance of maxillary protraction combined with mandibular retraction is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with midface deficiency and mandibular prognathism in growing children with idiopathic short stature undergoing GH therapy.

  8. Pegvisomant treatment in gigantism caused by a growth hormone-secreting giant pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssig, K; Gallwitz, B; Honegger, J; Strasburger, C J; Bidlingmaier, M; Machicao, F; Bornemann, A; Ranke, M B; Häring, H-U; Petersenn, S

    2007-03-01

    Gigantism is rare with the majority of cases caused by a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. Treatment options for GH-secreting pituitary adenomas have been widened with the availability of long-acting dopamine agonists, depot preparations of somatostatin analogues, and recently the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. A 23-year-old male patient presented with continuous increase in height during the past 6 years due to a GH-secreting giant pituitary adenoma. Because of major intracranial extension and failure of octreotide treatment to shrink the tumour, the tumour was partially resected by a trans-frontal surgical approach. At immunohistochemistry, the tumour showed a marked expression of GH and a sparsely focal expression of prolactin. Somatostatin receptors (sst) 1-5 were not detected. Tumour tissue weakly expressed dopamine receptor type 2. The Gs alpha subunit was intact. Conversion from somatostatin analogue to pegvisomant normalized insulin-like-growth-factor-I (IGF-I) levels and markedly improved glucose tolerance. Pegvisomant is a potent treatment option in patients with pituitary gigantism. In patients who do not respond to somatostatin analogues, knowledge of the SST receptor status may shorten the time to initiation of pegvisomant treatment.

  9. Relation of estrogen receptor-alpha gene polymorphism and hormone replacement therapy to fall risk and muscle strength in early postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmén, Timo; Heikkinen, Anna-Mari; Mahonen, Anitta; Kröger, Heikki; Komulainen, Marja; Saarikoski, Seppo; Honkanen, Risto; Partanen, Juhani; Mäenpää, Pekka H

    2002-01-01

    Several factors may increase fracture risk, among them reduced bone mineral density (BMD), increased bone resorption, microarchitectural deterioration of bone, increased fall risk, and decreased muscle strength. We have previously reported that PvuII polymorphism of the estrogen receptor-alpha (ER alpha) gene is associated with bone loss rate, fracture risk, and response to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in early postmenopausal Finnish women. We studied the influence of the ER alpha genotype on fall risk and muscle strength in a 5-year randomized HRT trial of 331 early postmenopausal women (subgroup of the population-based OSTPRE study, Kuopio, Finland). A 5-year postal inquiry in May 1994 included questions on falls during the previous 12 months. Grip strength was measured with dynamometer. The ER alpha gene polymorphism was analysed using PCR and PvuII restriction enzyme digestion. RESULTS. In all, 97 out of the 331 women reported falls. Half of those (56%) were slip falls, mostly during the winter season. In the HRT group, the ER alpha genotype was associated with fall risk (P = 0.002, logistic regression). The risk of falls (RR) was higher in women with the PP genotype than in those with the Pp (RR = 5.26, 95% CI 1.98-13.94, P = 0.001) or the pp (RR = 3.84, 95% CI 1.46-10.12, P = 0.007) genotype. When the falls were divided into slip (environment-related) and non-slip (endogenous) falls, the non-slip falls were associated with the genotype (P = 0.004), but the slip falls were not so clearly (P = 0.061). When all falls and non-slip falls were adjusted to the number of chronic health disorders and the variable time-since-menopause, the difference between the genotypes persisted (P = 0.003 and P = 0.010, respectively). In the non-HRT group, the ER alpha genotype was not associated with fall risk. The baseline or the 5-year grip strength values were not influenced by the ER alpha genotype. In conclusion, ER alpha polymorphism is associated with fall risk

  10. Effect of estrogen-progestin hormonal replacement therapy on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in postmenopausal women Efeitos da terapia de reposição hormonal estroprogestativa sobre o sistema de coagulação e de fibrinólise em mulheres na pós-menopausa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio E Bonduki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate antithrombin III (AT, thrombin (Fragment 1+2 [F1+2] and thrombin-antithrombin [TAT] generation markers, as well as other coagulation parameters, such as prothrombin time, partial activated thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, euglobulin lysis time, and platelet count, in postmenopausal women after hormonal therapy. STUDY DESIGN: Forty-five patients who received either 0.625 mg/day unopposed oral conjugated equine estrogen (CEE, 0.625 mg/day oral CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MP, or 50 µg/day transdermal 17beta-estradiol plus MP, were included. Tests were performed before (T0 and after 3 (T3, 6 (T6 and 12 (T12 months of treatment. AT was determined by an amidolytic method, whereas F1+2 and TAT complex were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the AT level of patients who received oral CEE plus MP at T3. There was no AT reduction in patients taking either oral CEE alone or transdermal 17beta-estradiol plus MP. F1+2 increased in all patients, but it reached statistical significance only in patients receiving transdermal 17beta-estradiol MP at T3. CONCLUSIONS: The CEE associated with MP treatment may reduce AT levels, whereas unopposed CEE or transdermal 17beta-estradiol plus MP does not change AT. These changes might not be clinically relevant in the general population; however, hormonal replacement therapy may increase the risk of thrombosis in women with congenital or acquired thrombophilia.OBJETIVO: Avaliar os marcadores antitrombina III (AT, fragmento 1 + 2 da trombina (F1+2 e complexo trombina-antitrombina (TAT, bem como outros parâmetros da coagulação, como tempo de pró-trombina, tempo parcial de tromboplastina ativado, tempo de trombina, fibrinogênio e tempo de lise da euglobulina em mulheres na pós-menopausa após terapia hormonal. DESENHO DO ESTUDO: Foram incluídas 45 voluntárias que receberam estrogênios conjugados eqüinos (ECE 0,625 mg/dia, isoladamente ou

  11. Combined Treatment with Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Analog and Anabolic Steroid Hormone Increased Pubertal Height Gain and Adult Height in Boys with Early Puberty for Height

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Naiki, Yasuhiro; Horikawa, Reiko

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-one boys with a height of 135 cm or less at onset of puberty were treated with a combination of GnRH analog and anabolic steroid hormone, and their pubertal height gain and adult height were compared with those of untreated 29 boys who enter puberty below 135 cm. The mean age at the start of treatment with a GnRH analog, leuprorelin acetate depot (Leuplin?) was 12.3 yr, a mean of 1.3 yr after the onset of puberty, and GnRH analog was administered every 3 to 5 wk thereafter for a mean d...

  12. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  13. [Surgical treatment of ishemic mitral regurgitation: repair, replacement or revascularization alone?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrenes, Mile; Velinović, Milos; Kocica, Mladen; Mikić, Aleksandar; Putnik, Svetozar; Djukić, Petar; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of ischemic mitral regurgitation in patients that require revascularization of myocardium is still debatable. The aim of this study was to compare three surgical approaches: valve repair and revascularization; valve replacement and revascularization, and revascularization alone. In 2006 and 2007 at the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, 1,040 patients with coronary disease underwent surgery. Forty-three patients (4.3%) had also mitral insufficiency 3-4+. The patients were examined clinically, echocardiographically and haemodynamically. In group I there were 14 (32.3%) patients, in group II 16 (37.2%) patients and in group III 3 (30.5%) patients. Ninety-three per cent of patients were classified as New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III and IV, and three (7%) patients had congestive heart weakness with ejection fraction < or =30%. The decision as to surgical procedure was made by the surgeon. Postoperatively, patients were checked clinically and echocardiographically after 3, 6 and 12 months. The follow-up period was approximately 15 months (8-20). Hospital mortality for the whole group was 6.9% (3 patients). In group I mortality was 14.2% (2 patients), in group II 6.25% and in group III there was no mortality. Long term results, up to 15 months, showed 100% survival in groups I and II, and in group III one patient died (7.7%). Short term results upto 30 days were best in group III, but longer term results were better in groups I and II.

  14. Effect of Testosterone Treatment on Adipokines and Gut Hormones in Obese Men on a Hypocaloric Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng Tang Fui, Mark; Hoermann, Rudolf; Grossmann, Mathis

    2017-04-01

    In obese men with lowered testosterone levels, testosterone treatment augments diet-associated loss of body fat. We hypothesized that testosterone treatment modulates circulating concentrations of hormonal mediators of fat mass and energy homeostasis in obese men undergoing a weight loss program. Prespecified secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Tertiary referral center. Obese men (body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 ) with a repeated total testosterone level ≤12 nmol/L. One hundred participants mean age 53 years (interquartile range 47 to 60 years) receiving 10 weeks of a very low-energy diet followed by 46 weeks of weight maintenance were randomly assigned at baseline to 56 weeks of intramuscular testosterone undecanoate (cases, n = 49) or matching placebo (controls, n = 51). Eighty-two men completed the study. Between-group differences in leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin, glucagon like peptide-1, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, and amylin levels. At study end, compared with controls, cases had greater reductions in leptin [mean adjusted difference (MAD), -3.6 ng/mL (95% CI, -5.3 to -1.9); P diet-associated weight loss. Testosterone treatment may reduce leptin resistance in obese men.

  15. The fate of pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, UV-filters and pesticides during MBR treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Nghiem, Long D

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between molecular properties and the fate of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) in the aqueous and solid phases during wastewater treatment by MBR. A set of 29 TrOCs was selected to represent pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, UV-filters and pesticides that occur ubiquitously in municipal wastewater. Both adsorption and biodegradation/transformation were found responsible for the removal of TrOCs by MBR treatment. A connection between biodegradation and molecular structure could be observed while adsorption was the dominant removal mechanism for the hydrophobic (logD>3.2) compounds. Highly hydrophobic (logD>3.2) but readily biodegradable compounds did not accumulate in sludge. In contrast, recalcitrant compounds with a moderate hydrophobicity, such as carbamazepine, accumulated significantly in the solid phase. The results provide a framework to predict the removal and fate of TrOCs by MBR treatment. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of a growth hormone treatment on bone orthotropic elasticity in dwarf rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohles, S. S.; Martinez, D. A.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1997-01-01

    A refinement of the current ultrasonic elasticity technique was used to measure the orthotropic elastic properties of rat cortical bone as well as to quantify changes in elastic properties, density, and porosity of the dwarf rat cortex after a treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). The ultrasonic elasticity technique was refined via optimized signal management of high-frequency wave propagation through cubic cortical specimens. Twenty dwarf rats (37 days old) were randomly assigned to two groups (10 rats each). The dwarf rat model (5-10% of normal GH) was given subcutaneous injections of either rhGH or saline over a 14-day treatment period. Density was measured using Archimedes technique. Porosity and other microstructural characteristics were also explored via scanning electron microscopy and image analysis. Statistical tests verified significant decreases in cortical orthotropic Young's (-26.7%) and shear (-16.7%) moduli and density (-2.42%) concomitant with an increase in porosity (+125%) after rhGH treatments to the dwarf model (p bone properties at this time interval. Structural implications of these changes throughout physiological loading regimens should be explored.

  17. Case Study of a physiotherapy treatment of a patient after total hip replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Havlíčková, Barbora

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis consists of two parts. The general part includes anatomy and kinesiology of the hip joint and also the topic of coxarthrosis as the most common reason for the total hip replacement surgery. An integral part of this part is the elaboration of a rehabilitation plan for patients undergoing such procedure. The practical part of the thesis is conceived a case study of a patient after total hip replacement because of coxarthrosis. Finally, the thesis includes the therapeutic o...

  18. Recombinant human growth hormone treatment in short children with renal disease: Our first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević-Dimitrijeva Brankica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Growth retardation is a hallmark of chronic illnesses such as chronic kidney disease in children, and it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The growth hormone (GH resistance observed in uraemia can be overcome by supraphysiological doses of exogenous GH. Objective. We would like to present our first results of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH treatment, mainly in children on haemodialysis. Methods. Sixteen children, aged 4.5-17.1 years (mean age 11.25±3.57 with height below -2.0 standard deviation score (SDS for age or height velocity below -2.0 SDS for age, were selected to receive rhGH therapy at our Nephrology and Haemodialysis Department. Most of them were on haemodialysis (14 children with mean spent time 2.88±2.68 years (0-9 years before the initiation of rhGH therapy. One half of patients were prepubertal (8 children and the second half were in early puberty (testicular volume between 4 and 8 ml for boys and breast development B2 or B3 in girls. All patients received 28-30IU/m² rhGH per week by daily subcutaneous injection. The year before rhGH therapy served as a control period. Results. During the first year of treatment, mean height velocity in haemodialysis patients increased from 2.25 cm/year to 6.59 cm/year (p<0.0001 and in the second year it was 5.25 cm/ year (p=0.004. The mean height SDS in haemodialysis children did not improve significantly during the first year of rhGH treatment (from -3.01 SDS to -2.77 SDS, p=0.063. Neither weight nor the body mass index varied compared with the pretreatment period. Two patients developed worsened secondary hyperparathyroidism and were excluded from the study, but the relationship with rhGH remains uncertain. Conclusion. Mean height velocity significantly improved during rhGH therapy in haemodialysis patients. No significant side-effects were observed in children during three-year treatment with GH.

  19. A prospective study of hormonal treatment and anxiety disorders in community-dwelling elderly women (the Esprit Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scali, Jacqueline; Ryan, Joanne; Carrière, Isabelle; Ritchie, Karen; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2009-05-01

    The impact of hormone therapy use on late-life anxiety disorder in elderly women has not been evaluated. Anxiety disorders were evaluated in 838 community-dwelling postmenopausal women aged 65 years and over, randomly recruited from electoral rolls. Anxiety disorders were assessed using a standardized psychiatric examination based on DSM-IV criteria, at baseline and as part of the 2- and 4-year follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for socio-demographic variables, measures of physical health and cognitive impairment, as well as current depressive symptomatology indicated no significant association between hormone therapy and anxiety disorders at baseline or after the 4-year follow-up period, regardless of type of treatment. Compared to women who have never taken hormonal therapy, no significant difference was observed for women taking continuously hormone therapy over the follow-up or those who stopped their treatment. The use of hormone therapy was not associated with improved anxiety symptomatology in elderly postmenopausal women.

  20. Efficacy of a non-hormonal treatment, BRN-01, on menopausal hot flashes: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colau, Jean-Claude; Vincent, Stéphane; Marijnen, Philippe; Allaert, François-André

    2012-09-01

    -01. BRN-01 seemed to have a significant effect on the HFS, compared with placebo. According to the results of this clinical trial, BRN-01 may be considered a new therapeutic option with a safe profile for hot flashes in menopausal women who do not want or are not able to take hormone replacement therapy or other recognized treatments for this indication. Trial registration number (EudraCT): 2009-016959-21.

  1. Cortical activation during mental rotation in male-to-female and female-to-male transsexuals under hormonal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Beatriz; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Rametti, Giuseppina; Junque, Carme; Gomez, Angel; Karadi, Kazmer; Segovia, Santiago; Guillamon, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    There is strong evidence of sex differences in mental rotation tasks. Transsexualism is an extreme gender identity disorder in which individuals seek cross-gender treatment to change their sex. The aim of our study was to investigate if male-to-female (MF) and female-to-male (FM) transsexuals receiving cross-sex hormonal treatment have different patterns of cortical activation during a three-dimensional (3D) mental rotation task. An fMRI study was performed using a 3-T scan in a sample of 18 MF and 19 FM under chronic cross-sex hormonal treatment. Twenty-three males and 19 females served as controls. The general pattern of cerebral activation seen while visualizing the rotated and non-rotated figures was similar for all four groups showing strong occipito-parieto-frontal brain activation. However, compared to control males, the activation of MF transsexuals during the task was lower in the superior parietal lobe. Compared to control females, MF transsexuals showed higher activation in orbital and right dorsolateral prefrontal regions and lower activation in the left prefrontal gyrus. FM transsexuals did not differ from either the MF transsexual or control groups. Regression analyses between cerebral activation and the number of months of hormonal treatment showed a significant negative correlation in parietal, occipital and temporal regions in the MF transsexuals. No significant correlations with time were seen in the FM transsexuals. In conclusion, although we did not find a specific pattern of cerebral activation in the FM transsexuals, we have identified a specific pattern of cerebral activation during a mental 3D rotation task in MF transsexuals under cross-sex hormonal treatment that differed from control males in the parietal region and from control females in the orbital prefrontal region. The hypoactivation in MF transsexuals in the parietal region could be due to the hormonal treatment or could reflect a priori cerebral differences between MF transsexual

  2. Effect of Growth Hormone on Endometrial Thickness and Fertility Outcome in the Treatment of Women with Panhypopituitarism: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Pluchino, Nicola; Bischof, Paul; Cantero, Pablo; Meyer, Patrick; Chardonnens, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The role of growth hormone (GH) in female reproduction has become a topic of increasing interest over the last decade. The replacement of GH for ovulation induction in women with hypopituitarism remains controversial. The role of GH in the human endometrium is still largely unknown. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first case report showing evidence that GH might play a role not only for ovulation induction, but also for the development of endometrial thickness in women with hypopituitarism. A 32-year-old hypophysectomized. woman, known for primary infertility, experienced multiple IVF/embryo transfer failures with inadequate endometrial development. The use of GH replacement therapy followed by conventional controlled ovarian hyperstimulation enabled endometrial development and better ovarian response to gonadotropins, leading to a successful ongoing pregnancy. The substitution with GH resulted in fewer days of ovarian stimulation, an acceptable endometrium, and a twin pregnancy delivered at 38 weeks' gestation.

  3. Recent Advances in Thyroid Hormone Regulation: Toward a New Paradigm for Optimal Diagnosis and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf Hoermann; John E. M. Midgley; Rolf Larisch; Johannes W. Dietrich; Johannes W. Dietrich; Johannes W. Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    In thyroid health, the pituitary hormone thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) raises glandular thyroid hormone production to a physiological level and enhances formation and conversion of T4 to the biologically more active T3. Overstimulation is limited by negative feedback control. In equilibrium defining the euthyroid state, the relationship between TSH and FT4 expresses clusters of genetically determined, interlocked TSH–FT4 pairs, which invalidates their statistical correlation within the eu...

  4. Methylphenidate and the response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renes, Judith S; de Ridder, Maria A J; Breukhoven, Petra E; Lem, Annemieke J; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment has become a frequently applied growth promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). Children born SGA have a higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment of ADHD with methylphenidate (MP) has greatly increased in recent years, therefore more children are being treated with GH and MP simultaneously. Some studies have found an association between MP treatment and growth deceleration, but data are contradictory. To explore the effects of MP treatment on growth in GH-treated short SGA children Anthropometric measurements were performed in 78 GH-treated short SGA children (mean age 10.6 yr), 39 of whom were also treated with MP (SGA-GH/MP). The SGA-GH/MP group was compared to 39 SGA-GH treated subjects. They were matched for sex, age and height at start of GH, height SDS at start of MP treatment and target height SDS. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels were yearly determined. Growth, serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels during the first three years of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures regression analysis. The SGA-GH/MP group had a lower height gain during the first 3 years than the SGA-GH subjects, only significant between 6 and 12 months of MP treatment. After 3 years of MP treatment, the height gain was 0.2 SDS (± 0.1 SD) lower in the SGA-GH/MP group (P = 0.17). Adult height was not significantly different between the SGA-GH/MP and SGA-GH group (-1.9 SDS and -1.9 SDS respectively, P = 0.46). Moreover, during the first 3 years of MP treatment IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements were similar in both groups. MP has some negative effect on growth during the first years in short SGA children treated with GH, but adult height is not affected.

  5. Methylphenidate and the response to growth hormone treatment in short children born small for gestational age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith S Renes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth hormone (GH treatment has become a frequently applied growth promoting therapy in short children born small for gestational age (SGA. Children born SGA have a higher risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Treatment of ADHD with methylphenidate (MP has greatly increased in recent years, therefore more children are being treated with GH and MP simultaneously. Some studies have found an association between MP treatment and growth deceleration, but data are contradictory. OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of MP treatment on growth in GH-treated short SGA children METHODS: Anthropometric measurements were performed in 78 GH-treated short SGA children (mean age 10.6 yr, 39 of whom were also treated with MP (SGA-GH/MP. The SGA-GH/MP group was compared to 39 SGA-GH treated subjects. They were matched for sex, age and height at start of GH, height SDS at start of MP treatment and target height SDS. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 levels were yearly determined. Growth, serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels during the first three years of treatment were analyzed using repeated measures regression analysis. RESULTS: The SGA-GH/MP group had a lower height gain during the first 3 years than the SGA-GH subjects, only significant between 6 and 12 months of MP treatment. After 3 years of MP treatment, the height gain was 0.2 SDS (± 0.1 SD lower in the SGA-GH/MP group (P = 0.17. Adult height was not significantly different between the SGA-GH/MP and SGA-GH group (-1.9 SDS and -1.9 SDS respectively, P = 0.46. Moreover, during the first 3 years of MP treatment IGF-I and IGFBP-3 measurements were similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: MP has some negative effect on growth during the first years in short SGA children treated with GH, but adult height is not affected.

  6. Motives for choosing growth-enhancing hormone treatment in adolescents with idiopathic short stature: a questionnaire and structured interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-van Balen, Hanneke; Geenen, Rinie; Kamp, Gerdine A; Huisman, Jaap; Wit, Jan M; Sinnema, Gerben

    2005-06-08

    Growth-enhancing hormone treatment is considered a possible intervention in short but otherwise healthy adolescents. Although height gain is an obvious measure for evaluating hormone treatment, this may not be the ultimate goal for the person, but rather a means to reach other goals such as the amelioration of current height-related psychosocial problems or the enhancement of future prospects in life and society. The aim of our study was to clarify the motives of adolescents and their parents when choosing to participate in a growth-enhancing trial combining growth hormone and puberty-delaying hormone treatment. Participants were early pubertal adolescents (25 girls, 13 boys) aged from 11 to 13 years (mean age 11.5 years) with a height standard deviation score (SDS) ranging from -1.03 to -3.43. All had been classified as idiopathic short stature or persistent short stature born small for the gestational age (intrauterine growth retardation) on the basis of a height SDS below -2, or had a height SDS between -1 and -2 and a predicted adult height SDS below -2. The adolescents and their parents completed questionnaires and a structured interview on the presence of height-related stressors, parental worries about their child's behavior and future prospects, problems in psychosocial functioning, and treatment expectations. Questionnaire scores were compared to norms of the general Dutch population. The adolescents reported normal psychosocial functioning and highly positive expectations of the treatment in terms of height gain, whereas the parents reported that their children encountered some behavioral problems (being anxious/depressed, and social and attention problems) and height-related stressors (being teased and juvenilized). About 40% of the parents were worried about their children's future prospects for finding a spouse or job. The motives of the adolescents and their parents exhibited rather different profiles. The most prevalent parental worries related to

  7. Atherogenic Lipoproteins in Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Their Relationship with Hepatic Lipase Activity: Response to Replacement Treatment with Levothyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenta, Gabriela; Berg, Gabriela; Miksztowicz, Veronica; Lopez, Graciela; Lucero, Diego; Faingold, Cristina; Murakami, Masami; Machima, Tetsudo; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Schreier, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Qualitative lipoprotein changes, such as an increase in fasting remnants, are reported in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). It was hypothesized that such changes are due to reduced hepatic lipase (HL) activity in SCH: HL is an enzyme regulated by thyroid hormones, and is involved in the degradation of triglyceride (TG)-rich remnants. This study aimed to quantify remnant-like lipoproteins (RLP), small dense LDL (sdLDL), and HL activity in women with SCH, and to assess these parameters after levothyroxine replacement therapy. This was an observational cross-sectional study with a subsequent longitudinal follow-up. Findings in women with thyrotropin levels >4.5 mIU/L (SH group) were compared with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched euthyroid women (control group). In addition, a subgroup analysis was undertaken in SCH women who chose to receive levothyroxine treatment (0.9 μg/kg/day) for 6 months. RLP was quantified by measuring cholesterol (RLP-C) and triglycerides (RLP-TG) after immunoaffinity chromatography, and sdLDL by automated standardized methods; HL activity was measured in post-heparin plasma. The SCH group included 37 women; 29 women were included in the control group. In addition, 22 women with SCH were included in the subgroup analysis (levothyroxine treatment). Significantly higher RLP values were observed in the SCH group than in the control group: RLP-C (median [range], mg/dL): 20.3 (5.8-66.8) versus 10.2 (2.7-36.3), p = 0.005; RLP-TG (mg/dL): 26.3 (3.2-123.3) versus 12.1 (2.5-61.6), p = 0.033. HL activity (mean ± standard deviation [SD], μmol free fatty acid/mL post-heparin plasma.h)-9.83 ± 4.25 versus 9.92 ± 5.20, p = 0.707-and sdLDL levels (mg/dL)-23.1 ± 10.7 versus 22.6 ± 8.4, p = 0.83-were similar. After levothyroxine, RLP-C decreased-21.5 (5.8-66.8) versus 17.2 (4.1-45.6), p = 0.023-and HL increased-9.75 ± 4.04 versus 11.86 ± 4.58, p = 0.012-in the subgroup of SCH women. No changes

  8. Height Outcome of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment in Achondroplasia Children: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, Mario; Bertelloni, Silvano; Massart, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Although recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) is not approved to treat short stature of achondroplasia (ACH), some studies suggested growth improvement during short-term rhGH treatment. A meta-analysis of rhGH therapy efficacy in ACH children was performed. From 12 English-language studies, 558 (54.0% males) rhGH-treated ACH children were enrolled. Administration of rhGH (median dosage 0.21 mg/kg/ week; range 0.16-0.42 mg/kg/week) improved height (Ht) from baseline [-5.069 standard deviation score (SDS; 95% CI -5.109 to -5.029); p < 0.0001] to 12 [-4.325 SDS (95% CI -4.363 to -4.287); p < 0.0001] and 24 months [-4.073 SDS (95% CI -4.128 to -4.019); p < 0.0001]. Then, Ht remained approximately constant up to 5 years [-3.941 SDS (95% CI -4.671 to -3.212); p < 0.0001]. In ACH children, rhGH treatment increased Ht from -5.0 to -4.0 SDS during 5 years, but insufficient data are available on both the adult Ht and the changes of body proportions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Treatment of resistant glomerular diseases with adrenocorticotropic hormone gel: a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomback, Andrew S; Canetta, Pietro A; Beck, Laurence H; Ayalon, Rivka; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) has shown promising results in glomerular diseases resistant to conventional therapies, but the reported data have solely been from retrospective, observational studies. In this prospective, open-label study (NCT01129284), 15 subjects with resistant glomerular diseases were treated with ACTH gel (80 units subcutaneously twice weekly) for 6 months. Resistant membranous nephropathy (MN), minimal change disease (MCD), and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) were defined as failure to achieve sustained remission of proteinuria off immunosuppressive therapy with at least 2 treatment regimens; resistant IgA nephropathy was defined as >1 g/g urine protein:creatinine ratio despite maximally tolerated RAAS blockade. Remission was defined as stable or improved renal function with ≥50% reduction in proteinuria to 50% reductions in proteinuria while on ACTH, with proteinuria consistently <1 g/g by 6 months. Three of 15 subjects reported significant steroid-like adverse effects with ACTH, including weight gain and hyperglycemia, prompting early termination of therapy without any clinical response. ACTH gel is a promising treatment for resistant glomerular diseases and should be studied further in controlled trials against currently available therapies for resistant disease. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Early change of thyroid hormone concentration after 131I treatment in patients with solitary toxic adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirnat, E.; Fidler, V.; Zaletel, K.; Gaberscek, S.; Hojker, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: In spite of extensive use of 131 I for treatment of hyperthyroidism, the results of early outcome are variable. In our prospective clinical study we tested whether 131 I induced necrosis causing clinical aggravation of hyperthyroidism and increasing the free thyroid hormone concentration in the serum of patients with solitary toxic adenoma not pretreated with antithyroid drugs. Patients and methods: 30 consecutive patients were treated with 925 MBq 131 I. Serum concentration of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (fT 4 ), free triiodothyronine (fT 3 ), thyroglobulin (Tg), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured before and after application of 131 I. Results: After application of 131 I no clinical worsening was observed. FT 4 and fT 3 concentration did not change significantly within the first five days, whereas both of them significantly decreased after 12 days (p 131 I induced necrosis of thyroid cells was found. Therefore, the application of 131 I may be considered as a safe and effective treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism due to toxic adenoma. (orig.)

  11. Growth hormone and somatomedin effects on calcification following X-irradiation, glucocorticoid treatment or fasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearden, L.C.; Mosier, H.D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is thought to activate the liver to produce a peptide called somatomedin (SM) and this substance putatively stimulates linear growth in long bones by its action on cartilagenous epiphyseal plates. These actions include stimulating chondrocytes to synthesize the carbohydrate and protein components of proteoglycan and of collagen, enhancing the synthesis of ribo and desoxyribonucleic acids, and possibly to increase cell division. In GH deficiencies there is a narrowing of the epiphyseal growth plate and cartilage calcification is enhanced concurrent with proteoglycan and collagen alterations in the extracellular matrix. Calcium and phosphate ions accumulate in mitochondria followed by their release as the calcification zone is approached, and matrix vesicles, which possess the chemical machinery necessary to induce the format0344of apatite crystals within them, increase. Therefore, if GH and/or SM levels are altered, there should be corresponding alterations in growth or in cartilage calcification. In the present study we have investigated rats after head X-irradiation, fasting, and corticosteroid treatment, and all of these treatments reduce GH and SM. (Auth.)

  12. Transient Increased Calcium and Calcitriol Requirements After Discontinuation of Human Synthetic Parathyroid Hormone 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Rachel I; Guthrie, Lori C; Kelly, Marilyn H; Brillante, Beth A; Christie, C Michele; Reynolds, James C; Yovetich, Nancy A; James, Robert; Collins, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic human PTH 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism maintains eucalcemia and converts quiescent bone to high-turnover bone. However, the skeletal and metabolic effects of drug discontinuation have not been reported. Nine subjects with hypoparathyroidism received subcutaneous injections of hPTH 1-34 two to three times daily for 19.8 to 61.3 months and then transitioned back to calcium and calcitriol. Biochemistries and bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were assessed at baseline, while on treatment, and at follow-up 3 to 12 months after drug discontinuation. Two subjects developed hypocalcemia when hPTH 1-34 was abruptly discontinued. Thus, to avoid hypocalcemia, subjects were slowly weaned from hPTH 1-34 over several weeks. When hPTH 1-34 was stopped, subjects were requiring two to three times pretreatment doses of calcitriol and calcium to maintain blood calcium levels. Doses were gradually reduced over many weeks until calcium levels were stable on doses similar to baseline. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP), N-telopeptide (NTX), and osteocalcin (OC) increased significantly with hPTH 1-34; at follow-up, BSAP and NTX had returned to baseline while OC was still slightly elevated. During treatment, BMD was unchanged at the hip and lateral spine but declined at the anterior-posterior (AP) spine, radius, and total body. During weaning, BMD increased, with the hip and lateral spine exceeding pre-hPTH 1-34 values and the whole body returning to baseline. AP spine was increased non-significantly compared to baseline at follow-up. hPTH 1-34 must be gradually weaned in hypoparathyroid patients with high doses of oral medications given to avoid hypocalcemia. The transient increased requirements accompanied by increased BMD after long-term hPTH 1-34 therapy suggest a reversal of the expanded remodeling space favoring bone formation as the skeleton returns to a low-turnover state, reminiscent of the hungry

  13. A review of the physical and metabolic effects of cross-sex hormonal therapy in the treatment of gender dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Leighton J

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the effect that cross-gender sex steroid therapy has on metabolic and hormonal parameters. There is an emphasis on those changes that result in significant clinical effects such as the positive effects of the development of secondary sexual characteristics and negative effects such as haemostatic effects and thromboembolism in transwomen or dyslipidaemia in transmen. There is also a description of the current hormonal regimens used at the largest UK gender identity clinic. The overall safety of these treatments in the context of long-term outcome data is reviewed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Interactive effects of dietary composition and hormonal treatment on reproductive development of cultured female European eel, Anguilla anguilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva, Filipa; Støttrup, Josianne Gatt; Kjørsvik, Elin

    2016-01-01

    Farmed female eels were fed two experimental diets with similar proximate composition but different n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels. Both diets had similar levels of arachidonic acid (ARA), while levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in one diet were...... approximately 4.5 and 2.6 times higher compared to the other diet, respectively. After the feeding period, each diet group was divided into two and each half received one of two hormonal treatments using salmon pituitary extract (SPE) for 13 weeks: i) a constant hormone dose of 18.75mg SPE/kg initial body...

  15. Treatment of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone by urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, G; Brimioulle, S; Genette, F; Mockel, J

    1980-07-01

    Recent data have shown the role of urea in the urinary concentrating mechanism. We studied the effects of exogenous urea administration in hyponatremia associated with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). In 20 patients with SIADH, we observed a positive correlation between serum sodium and blood urea levels (r = 0.65; p less than 0.01). In one patient with an oat cell carcinoma and SIADH-induced hyponatremia, we observed the same positive correlation (r = 0.80; p less than 0.01) but also a negative one between the excreted fraction of filtered sodium and urinary urea (r = -0.67; p less than 0.001). The short-term administration of low doses of urea (4 to 10 g) resulted in correcting the "salt-losing" tendency of this patient. Longer term administration of high doses of urea (30 g/day) was attempted with the same patient as well as with a healthy volunteer subject with Pitressin-induced SIADH. in both patients, urea treatment lowered urinary sodium excretion as long as hyponatremia was significant (less than 130 meq/liter). Urea treatment also induced a persistent osmotic diuresis, allowing a normal daily intake of water despite SIADH. This was clearly shown during the long-term treatment of a third patient with SIADH who was taking 30 g urea/day during 11 weeks. It is concluded that urea is a good alternative in the treatment of patients with SIADH who presented with persistent hyponatremia despite the restriction of water intake.

  16. Non-compliance with growth hormone treatment in children is common and impairs linear growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne S Cutfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GH therapy requires daily injections over many years and compliance can be difficult to sustain. As growth hormone (GH is expensive, non-compliance is likely to lead to suboptimal growth, at considerable cost. Thus, we aimed to assess the compliance rate of children and adolescents with GH treatment in New Zealand. METHODS: This was a national survey of GH compliance, in which all children receiving government-funded GH for a four-month interval were included. Compliance was defined as ≥ 85% adherence (no more than one missed dose a week on average to prescribed treatment. Compliance was determined based on two parameters: either the number of GH vials requested (GHreq by the family or the number of empty GH vials returned (GHret. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. FINDINGS: 177 patients were receiving GH in the study period, aged 12.1 ± 0.6 years. The rate of returned vials, but not number of vials requested, was positively associated with HVSDS (p < 0.05, such that patients with good compliance had significantly greater linear growth over the study period (p<0.05. GHret was therefore used for subsequent analyses. 66% of patients were non-compliant, and this outcome was not affected by sex, age or clinical diagnosis. However, Maori ethnicity was associated with a lower rate of compliance. INTERPRETATION: An objective assessment of compliance such as returned vials is much more reliable than compliance based on parental or patient based information. Non-compliance with GH treatment is common, and associated with reduced linear growth. Non-compliance should be considered in all patients with apparently suboptimal response to GH treatment.

  17. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF DIFFERENT HORMONE TREATMENTS IN THE ARTIFICIAL PROPAGATION OF PIKEPERCH (Sander luciopreca REGARDING THE ASPECTS OF ANIMAL WELFARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. NÉMETH

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The pikeperch (Sander lucioperca is very important and valuable freshwater fish in Hungary. The quality of lash is very high (white, tasty and boneless thus the gastronomically demand grows year by year. Besides the pikeperch is an attractive game fish and as a top predator, plays an important role in the maintenance of ecological balance in freshwater ecosystems. The success of pond culture of pikeperch depends on the propagation and nursing methods. Recently the technological development of artificial reproduction ensures the production of more fry and fingerlings. Present study investigates the different reproduction methods in consideration of the spawning behaviour of the pikeperch breeders. Between the hormone treatment and spawning there were observed six stagers in the behaviour of pike-perch couples- In addition to the observations on behaviour of spawning, various hormone products were examined in order to stimulate and synchronise the ovulation of pike perch breeders. Best results were recorded in case of using dried carp pituitary as a hormone treatment (170g eggs/stripped females, while the treatment with GnRH analogs resulted 145 g respectively. Moreover the price and biological advances of GnRH analogs require more research in their use in the field of artificial propagation of pikeperch. These hormones do not interfere violently the neuro-humoral regulation of the ovulation, thus contributes to maintain better conditions of animal welfare during the propagation procedure.

  18. A reversible albumin-binding growth hormone derivative is well tolerated and possesses a potential once-weekly treatment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Olsen, Minna W Brændholt; Alifrangis, Lene; Klim, Søren; Suntum, Mette

    2014-10-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) replacement therapy currently requires daily sc injections for years/lifetime, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC0195-0092 is a novel hGH derivative intended for once-weekly treatment of GH deficiency. A noncovalent albumin binding moiety is attached to the hGH backbone. Clearance is reduced as a consequence of a reversible binding to circulating serum albumin, which prolongs the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect. To evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a single dose (SD) and multiple doses (MD) of NNC0195-0092. Randomized, single-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind, SD/MD, dose-escalation trial of 105 healthy male subjects. NNC0195-0092 sc administration: Five cohorts of eight subjects received one dose of NNC0195-0092 (0.01-0.32 mg/kg) (n = 6) or placebo (n = 2). Sixteen subjects (equal numbers of Japanese and non-Asian) received once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (0.02-0.24 mg/kg; n=12) or placebo (n=4) for 4 weeks. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, PK, IGF-1, and IGF binding protein 3 profiles and anti-drug antibodies. SD and MD of NNC0195-0092 were well tolerated at all dose levels. No safety concerns or local tolerability issues were identified. A dose-dependent IGF-1 response was observed. IGF-1 profiles suggest that NNC0195-0092 may be suitable for once-weekly dosing, with a clinically relevant dose ≤0.08 mg/kg/week. No differences in PK and PD were observed between Japanese and non-Asian subjects. SD and MD of NNC0195-0092 administered to healthy Japanese and non-Asian male subjects were well tolerated at all doses. The present trial suggests that NNC0195-0092 has the potential for an efficacious, well-tolerated, once-weekly GH treatment.

  19. Radioimmunoassay of thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartalena, L.; Mariotti, S.; Pinchera, A.

    1987-01-01

    For many years, methods based on iodine content determination have represented the only techniques available for the estimation of total thyroid hormone concentrations in serum. Subsequently, simple, sensitive, and specific radioligand assays for thyroid hormones have replaced these chemical methods. For the purpose of this chapter, iodometric techniques are only briefly summarized for their historical importance, whereas attention is focused on radioligand assays

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a chronic endocrine illness that caused by varied etiologies. Clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism are variable, often insidious in onset and dependent on the degree and severity of hormone deficiency. However, it is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Therefore, early diagnosis and prompt treatment is necessary. Hypopituitarism can be easily diagnosed by measuring basal pituitary and target hormone levels except growth hormone (GH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency. Dynamic stimulation tests are indicated in equivocal basal hormone levels and GH/ACTH deficiency. Knowledge of the use and limitations of these stimulation tests is mandatory for proper interpretation. It is necessary for physicians to inform their patients that they may require lifetime treatment. Hormone replacement therapy should be individualized according to the specific needs of each patient, taking into account possible interactions. Long-term endocrinological follow-up of hypopituitary patients is important to monitor hormonal replacement regimes and avoid under- or overtreatment. PMID:26790380

  1. Severe acute malnutrition in childhood: hormonal and metabolic status at presentation, response to treatment, and predictors of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Sarah; Mody, Aaloke; Hornik, Christoph; Bain, James; Muehlbauer, Michael; Kiyimba, Tonny; Kiboneka, Elizabeth; Stevens, Robert; Bartlett, John; St Peter, John V; Newgard, Christopher B; Freemark, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. To identify and target those at highest risk, there is a critical need to characterize biomarkers that predict complications prior to and during treatment. We used targeted and nontargeted metabolomic analysis to characterize changes in a broad array of hormones, cytokines, growth factors, and metabolites during treatment of severe childhood malnutrition. Children aged 6 months to 5 years were studied at presentation to Mulago Hospital and during inpatient therapy with milk-based formulas and outpatient supplementation with ready-to-use food. We assessed the relationship between baseline hormone and metabolite levels and subsequent mortality. Seventy-seven patients were enrolled in the study; a subset was followed up from inpatient treatment to the outpatient clinic. Inpatient and outpatient therapies increased weight/height z scores and induced striking changes in the levels of fatty acids, amino acids, acylcarnitines, inflammatory cytokines, and various hormones including leptin, insulin, GH, ghrelin, cortisol, IGF-I, glucagon-like peptide-1, and peptide YY. A total of 12.2% of the patients died during hospitalization; the major biochemical factor predicting mortality was a low level of leptin (P = .0002), a marker of adipose tissue reserve and a critical modulator of immune function. We have used metabolomic analysis to provide a comprehensive hormonal and metabolic profile of severely malnourished children at presentation and during nutritional rehabilitation. Our findings suggest that fatty acid metabolism plays a central role in the adaptation to acute malnutrition and that low levels of the adipose tissue hormone leptin associate with, and may predict, mortality prior to and during treatment.

  2. Efficiency of different hormonal treatments for estrus synchronization in tropical Santa Inês sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texeira, Tarcísio Alves; da Fonseca, Jeferson Ferreira; de Souza-Fabjan, Joanna Maria Gonçalves; de Rezende Carvalheira, Luciano; de Moura Fernandes, Daniel Andrews; Brandão, Felipe Zandonadi

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of (i) the duration of hormone treatment with progestogen sponges during the seasonal anestrus and (ii) the administration of two doses of prostaglandin at 7 days apart during the breeding season on reproductive parameters of Santa Inês ewes. In experiment 1, 32 ewes received intravaginal MAP sponges for 6 (G6 days), 9 (G9 days), or 12 (G12days) days and 75 μg D-cloprostenol i.m. and 300 IU eCG i.m. 1 day before sponge removal. In experiment 2, 23 ewes received two doses of 0.48-mg sodium cloprostenol i.m. 7 days apart. Ovarian follicular dynamic was assessed through transrectal ultrasonography. Blood samples were collected daily to determine progesterone concentrations. In experiment 1, estrus and ovulation rates did not differ (P > 0.05) among protocols and between cyclic and acyclic ewes at the beginning of the experiment. The G9 days treatment showed a lower dispersion of ovulations in relation to onset of estrus when compared to G6 days and G12 days. In experiment 2, all ewes exhibit estrus and ovulated after the second dose of prostaglandin, although ewes that were in diestrus at D0 showed subluteal concentrations of progesterone during the follicle development stage of the treatment. In conclusion, the use of progestogen device during 9 days promotes lower dispersion of ovulation when compared to its use for 6 or 12 days, and the protocol of two doses of prostaglandin 7 days apart synchronizes estrus efficiently but results in follicular development under low progesterone concentrations.

  3. Effect of two virus inactivation methods. Electron beam irradiation and binary ethylenimine treatment on determination of reproductive hormones in equine plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyvsgaard, N.C.; Nansen, P. [The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural Univ., Danish Centre for Experimental Parasitology, Frederiksberg (Denmark); Hoeier, R.; Brueck, I. [The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural Univ., Dept. of Clinical Studies, Section of Reproduction, Frederiksberg (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    Ionizing irradiation and binary ethylenimine treatment have previously been shown to be effective for in-vitro inactivation of virus in biological material. In the present study the 2 methods were tested for possible effects on measurable concentrations of reproductive hormones in equine plasma (luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), progesterone (P{sub 4}), and oestradiol-17 {beta} (E{sub 2})). The inactivation methods were electron beam irradiation with a dose from 11 to 44 kGy or treatment with binary ethylenimine (BEI) in concentrations of 1 and 5 mmol/L. Generally, there was a close correlation (r>0.8, p<0.001) between pre- and post-treatment hormone levels. Thus, the different phases of the oestrous cycle could be distinguished on the basis of measured hormone concentrations of treated samples. However, both treatments significantly changed hormone concentrations of the plasma samples. For LH, FSH, and E{sub 2} the effect of irradiation and BEI treatment was depressive and dose-dependant. For P{sub 4} the effect of irradiation was also depressive and dose-dependant. However, the highest dose of BEI resulted in an increase of measured P{sub 4} concentration, which may be attributed to changes in the plasma matrix due to the treatment. Although the treatments affected measured hormone concentrations, the close correlation between pre-treatment and post-treatment measurements means that the diagnostic value will remain unchanged. (au). 17 refs.

  4. Do immunotherapy and beta cell replacement play a synergistic role in the treatment of type 1 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Sheng; Warnock, Garth L; Tu, Han-Jun; Ao, Ziliang; He, Zehua; Lu, Hong; Dai, Long-Jun

    2009-10-07

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the result of the autoimmune response against pancreatic insulin-producing ss-cells. Its ultimate consequence is beta-cell insufficiency-mediated dysregulation of blood glucose control. In terms of T1D treatment, immunotherapy addresses the cause of T1D, mainly through re-setting the balance between autoimmunity and regulatory mechanisms. Regulatory T cells play an important role in this immune intervention. An alternative T1D treatment is beta-cell replacement, which can reverse the consequence of the disease by replacing destroyed beta-cells in the diabetic pancreas. The applicable insulin-producing cells can be directly obtained from islet transplantation or generated from other cell sources such as autologous adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we summarize the recent research progress and analyze the possible advantages and disadvantages of these two therapeutic options especially focusing on the potential synergistic effect on T1D treatment. Exploring the optimal combination of immunotherapy and beta-cell replacement will pave the way to the most effective cure for this devastating disease.

  5. Cross-sex hormone treatment does not change sex-sensitive cognitive performance in gender identity disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsen, Ira R; Egeland, Thore; Haug, Egil; Finset, Arnstein; Opjordsmoen, Stein

    2005-12-15

    Cognitive performance in untreated early onset gender identity disorder (GID) patients might correspond to their born sex and not to their perceived gender. As a current mode of intervention, cross-sex hormone treatment causes considerable physical changes in GID patients. We asked, as has been suggested, whether this treatment skews cognitive performance towards that of the acquired sex. Somatically healthy male and female early onset GID patients were neuropsychologically tested before, 3 and 12 months after initiating cross-sex hormone treatment, whereas untreated healthy subjects without GID served as controls (C). Performance was assessed by testing six cognitive abilities (perception, arithmetic, rotation, visualization, logic, and verbalization), and controlled for age, education, born sex, endocrine differences and treatment by means of repeated measures analysis of variance. GID patients and controls showed an identical time-dependent improvement in cognitive performance. The slopes were essentially parallel for males and females. There was no significant three-way interaction of born sex by group by time for the six investigated cognitive abilities. Only education and age significantly influenced this improvement. Despite the substantial somatic cross-sex changes in GID patients, no differential effect on cognition over time was found between C and GID participants. The cognitive performance of cross-sex hormone-treated GID patients was virtually identical to that of the control group. The documented test-retest effect should be taken into consideration when evaluating treatment effects generally in psychiatry.

  6. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  7. Growth rates and the prevalence and progression of scoliosis in short-statured children on Australian growth hormone treatment programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPhee Ian

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design and aim This was a longitudinal chart review of a diverse group (cohort of patients undergoing HGH (Human Growth Hormone treatment. Clinical and radiological examinations were performed with the aim to identify the presence and progression of scoliosis. Methods and cohort 185 patients were recruited and a database incorporating the age at commencement, dose and frequency of growth hormone treatment and growth charts was compiled from their Medical Records. The presence of any known syndrome and the clinical presence of scoliosis were included for analysis. Subsequently, skeletally immature patients identified with scoliosis were followed up over a period of a minimum four years and the radiologic type, progression and severity (Cobb angle of scoliosis were recorded. Results Four (3.6% of the 109 with idiopathic short stature or hormone deficiency had idiopathic scoliosis (within normal limits for a control population and scoliosis progression was not prospectively observed. 13 (28.8% of 45 with Turner syndrome had scoliosis radiologically similar to idiopathic scoliosis. 11 (48% of 23 with varying syndromes, had scoliosis. In the entire cohort, the growth rates of those with and without scoliosis were not statistically different and HGH treatment was not ceased because of progression of scoliosis. Conclusion In this study, there was no evidence of HGH treatment being responsible for progression of scoliosis in a small number of non-syndromic patients (four. An incidental finding was that scoliosis, similar to the idiopathic type, appears to be more prevalent in Turner syndrome than previously believed.

  8. A Review on the Importance of Hormones Monitoring and Their Removal in Conventional Wastewater Treatment Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Ghaneian

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: According to the current study, further studies are needed to determine the entry routes of steroid hormones into aquatic environment, the detection techniques and measurements, as well as the best removal method in Iran.

  9. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...

  10. Artificial Disc Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Artificial Disc Replacement (ADR) Patient Education Committee Jamie Baisden The disc ... Disc An artificial disc (also called a disc replacement, disc prosthesis or spine arthroplasty device) is a ...

  11. Analyzing Cell Wall Elasticity After Hormone Treatment: An Example Using Tobacco BY-2 Cells and Auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy, and related nano-indentation techniques, is a valuable tool for analyzing the elastic properties of plant cell walls as they relate to changes in cell wall chemistry, changes in development, and response to hormones. Within this chapter I will describe a method for analyzing the effect of the phytohormone auxin on the cell wall elasticity of tobacco BY-2 cells. This general method may be easily altered for different experimental systems and hormones of interest.

  12. Metacarpal index in short stature before and during growth hormone treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Bettendorf, M.; Graf, K.; Nelle, M.; Heinrich, U.; Troger, J.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To assess the usefulness of the metacarpal index (MCI) as a radiographic measure of the proportions of the metacarpals in the differential diagnosis of short stature. To investigate the significance of the MCI in following the longitudinal growth and proportions of individual long bones during growth hormone stimulated catch up growth in children with short stature with and without growth hormone deficiency.
SUBJECTS—124 children, including 65 children with short sta...

  13. Triggering of final oocyte maturation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or human chorionic gonadotropin. Live birth after frozen-thawed embryo replacement cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griesinger, Georg; Kolibianakis, E M; Papanikolaou, E G

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the outcome of frozen-thawed embryo replacement cycles after GnRH-agonist triggering of final oocyte maturation in the collecting cycle with GnRH-antagonist. DESIGN: Prospective, observational, multicentric clinical study. SETTING: Tertiary university-affiliated IVF centers...... a total of 228 participants. Surplus embryos or oocytes at the pronuclear stage were cryopreserved in 53 patients after hCG administration and 32 patients after GnRH-agonist administration on the basis of patient choice, pronuclear/embryo availability, and local laws. INTERVENTION(S): Transfer of frozen......-thawed embryos. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Live birth rate. RESULT(S): Thirty-one and 23 patients after administration of hCG and GnRH-agonist, respectively, started a frozen-embryo replacement cycle by September 2005, with 25 and 16 patients eventually undergoing at least one frozen-thawed ET. Live birth rate per...

  14. Childhood Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood thyroid cancer treatment usually includes surgery and may include radioactive iodine therapy, targeted therapy, and hormone replacement therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of childhood thyroid cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  15. Diurnal variations in the occurrence and the fate of hormones and antibiotics in activated sludge wastewater treatment in Oslo, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plosz, Benedek Gy.; Leknes, Henriette; Liltved, Helge; Thomas, Kevin V.

    2010-01-01

    We present an assessment of the dynamics in the influent concentration of hormones (estrone, estriol) and antibiotics (trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin) in the liquid phase including the efficiency of biological municipal wastewater treatment. The concentration of estradiol, 17-α-ethinylestradiol, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, demeclocycline, chlortetracycline, cefuroxime, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide were below the limit of detection in all of the sewage samples collected within this study. Two different types of diurnal variation pattern were identified in the influent mass loads of selected antibiotics and hormones that effectively correlate with daily drug administration patterns and with the expected maximum human hormone release, respectively. The occurrence of natural hormones and antimicrobials, administered every 12 hours, shows a daily trend of decreasing contaminant mass load, having the maximum values in the morning hours. The occurrence of antibiotics, typically administered every 8 hours, indicates a daily peak value in samples collected under the highest hydraulic loading. The efficiency of biological removal of both hormones and antibiotics is shown to be limited. Compared to the values obtained in the influent samples, increased concentrations are observed in the biologically treated effluent for trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin, mainly as a result of deconjugation processes. Ciprofloxacin is shown as the predominant antimicrobial compound in the effluent, and it is present at quantities approximately 10 fold greater than the total mass of the other of the compounds due to poor removal efficiency and alternating solid-liquid partitioning behaviour. Our results suggest that, to increase the micro-pollutant removal and the chemical dosing efficiency in enhanced tertiary treatment, significant benefits can be derived from the optimisation of reactor design and the development of control schemes that

  16. Diurnal variations in the occurrence and the fate of hormones and antibiotics in activated sludge wastewater treatment in Oslo, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plosz, Benedek Gy., E-mail: benedek.plosz@niva.no [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, NIVA, Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349, Oslo (Norway); Leknes, Henriette [Norwegian Institute for Air Research NILU, 2027 Kjeller (Norway); Liltved, Helge; Thomas, Kevin V. [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, NIVA, Gaustadalleen 21, NO-0349, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-03-15

    We present an assessment of the dynamics in the influent concentration of hormones (estrone, estriol) and antibiotics (trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin) in the liquid phase including the efficiency of biological municipal wastewater treatment. The concentration of estradiol, 17-{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, demeclocycline, chlortetracycline, cefuroxime, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide were below the limit of detection in all of the sewage samples collected within this study. Two different types of diurnal variation pattern were identified in the influent mass loads of selected antibiotics and hormones that effectively correlate with daily drug administration patterns and with the expected maximum human hormone release, respectively. The occurrence of natural hormones and antimicrobials, administered every 12 hours, shows a daily trend of decreasing contaminant mass load, having the maximum values in the morning hours. The occurrence of antibiotics, typically administered every 8 hours, indicates a daily peak value in samples collected under the highest hydraulic loading. The efficiency of biological removal of both hormones and antibiotics is shown to be limited. Compared to the values obtained in the influent samples, increased concentrations are observed in the biologically treated effluent for trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin, mainly as a result of deconjugation processes. Ciprofloxacin is shown as the predominant antimicrobial compound in the effluent, and it is present at quantities approximately 10 fold greater than the total mass of the other of the compounds due to poor removal efficiency and alternating solid-liquid partitioning behaviour. Our results suggest that, to increase the micro-pollutant removal and the chemical dosing efficiency in enhanced tertiary treatment, significant benefits can be derived from the optimisation of reactor design and the development of control schemes that

  17. [Complete hormonal and metabolic response after iodine-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine treatment in a patient diagnosed of malignant pheochromocytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Alonso, M P; Balsa Bretón, M A; Paniagua Correa, C; Castillejos Rodríguez, L; Rodríguez Pelayo, E; Mendoza Paulini, A; Ortega Valle, A; Penín González, J

    2013-01-01

    Radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine is an analogue of norepinephrine used to localize tumors that express the neurohormone transporters, specifically those derived from the neural crest having a neuroendocrine origin. It is also used to treat non-surgical metastases derived from them. A review of the literature revealed symptomatic improvements associated to a decrease in hormone levels in a significant percentage of patients after (131)I-MIBG treatment. However, complete tumor remission has been described only in very few cases and hardly ever when bone metastases exist. We present a case of a patient diagnosed of malignant pheochromocytoma who achieved complete hormonal and metabolic response after (131)I-MIBG treatment (600 mCi) in spite of the presence of bone metastases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of cross-sex hormonal treatment on gender dysphoria individuals' mental health: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Rosalia; Colizzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Rosalia Costa,1 Marco Colizzi2 1Gender Identity Development Service, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, Tavistock Centre, 2Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK Abstract: Cross-sex hormonal treatment represents a main aspect of gender dysphoria health care pathway. However, it is still debated whether this intervention translates into a better mental well-being for the individual and ...

  19. Seasonal heat stress: Clinical implications and hormone treatments for the fertility of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rensis, F; Garcia-Ispierto, I; López-Gatius, F

    2015-09-15

    Heat stress has consequences on both the physiology and reproductive performance of cows, but the most dramatic effect for dairy producers is the decrease produced in fertility. The effects of heat stress on fertility include an increased number of days open, reduced conception rate, and larger number of cows suffering different types of anestrus. Once becomes pregnant, heat stress affects also the reproductive success of the cow through its direct effects on the ovary, uterus, gametes, embryo, and early fetus. This article reviews current knowledge of the effects of heat stress on fertility in dairy cows and the hormonal strategies used to mitigate these effects at the farm level. Administration of GnRH at the moment of artificial insemination can improve the conception rate. Breeding synchronization protocols for fixed-time insemination may reduce the calving conception interval and the number of services per conception. Progesterone-based protocols seem resolve better the reproductive disorders related to a hot environment (anestrus) than GnRH-based protocols. The use of combinations of GnRH, eCG, and hCG in progesterone-based protocols can improve results. Progesterone supplementation during the late embryonic and/or early fetal period would be useful in curtailing pregnancy losses, mainly in single pregnancies, whereas a more positive effect of treatment with GnRH than progesterone has been found in twin pregnancies. Melatonin therapy is emerging as a promising strategy to improve the natural reproductive performance of cows suffering conditions of heat stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of size at birth, childhood growth patterns and growth hormone treatment on leukocyte telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C J Smeets

    Full Text Available Small size at birth and rapid growth in early life are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. Short children born small for gestational age (SGA are treated with growth hormone (GH, inducing catch-up in length. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL is a marker of biological age and shorter LTL is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease.To investigate whether LTL is influenced by birth size, childhood growth and long-term GH treatment.We analyzed LTL in 545 young adults with differences in birth size and childhood growth patterns. Previously GH-treated young adults born SGA (SGA-GH were compared to untreated short SGA (SGA-S, SGA with spontaneous catch-up to a normal body size (SGA-CU, and appropriate for gestational age with a normal body size (AGA-NS. LTL was measured using a quantitative PCR assay.We found a positive association between birth length and LTL (p = 0.04, and a trend towards a positive association between birth weight and LTL (p = 0.08, after adjustments for gender, age, gestational age and adult body size. Weight gain during infancy and childhood and fat mass percentage were not associated with LTL. Female gender and gestational age were positively associated with LTL, and smoking negatively. After adjustments for gender, age and gestational age, SGA-GH had a similar LTL as SGA-S (p = 0.11, SGA-CU (p = 0.80, and AGA-NS (p = 0.30.Larger size at birth is positively associated with LTL in young adulthood. Growth patterns during infancy and childhood are not associated with LTL. Previously GH-treated young adults born SGA have similar LTL as untreated short SGA, SGA with spontaneous catch-up and AGA born controls, indicating no adverse effects of GH-induced catch-up in height on LTL.

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy with associated growth hormone deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, T.; Mahmood, A.; Shams, S.

    2003-01-01

    A patient with duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and growth hormone (GH) deficiency is described who had no clinical evidence of muscular weakness before initiation of GH replacement therapy. Treatment with human GH resulted in appearance of symptoms of easy fatigability and muscle weakness. Thorough investigations including serum creating phosphokinase (CK) levels in recommended in every patient with GH deficiency before starting GH replacement therapy. (author)

  2. Effect of biochar amendment on soil's retention capacity for estrogenic hormones from poultry manure treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sukhjot MANN; Zhiming QI; Shiv O.PRASHER; Lanhai LI; Dongwei GUI; Qianjing JIANG

    2017-01-01

    Most animals,including humans,produce natural sex hormones such as estrogens:17β-estradiol (E2) and estrone (El).These compounds are able to disrupt the reproductive systems of living organisms at trace concentrations (ng.L-1).This experiment tests the hypothesis that 1% slow pyrolysis biochar-amended sandy soil could retain significant amount of estrogens (El,E2) from poultry manure in its second year of application.The experiment was conducted over 46 days and consisted of a series of lysimeters containing sandy soil with biocharamended topsoil.The application rate of poultry manure was kept at 2.47 kg.m-2.The biochar held a significant concentration of hormone during the first year of its application.However,in the following year (current study),there was no significant retention of hormones in the biochar-amended soil.During the first year after application,the biochar was fresh,so its pores were available for hydrophobic interactions and held significant concentration of hormones.As time passed there were several biotic and abiotic changes on the surface of the biochar so that after some physical fragmentation,pores on the surface were no longer available for hydrophobic interactions.The biochar started releasing dissolved organic carbon,which facilitated greater mobility of hormones from poultry manure down the soil profile.

  3. Height outcome of the recombinant human growth hormone treatment in Turner syndrome: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study sought to determine the effect of the recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH treatment of Turner syndrome (TS on height outcome. Methods: We searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. A literature search identified 640 records. After screening and full-text assessment, 11 records were included in the systematic review. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. RevMan 5.3 software was used for meta-analysis. We also assessed the quality of evidence with the GRADE system. Results: Compared with controls, rhGH therapy led to increased final height (MD = 7.22 cm, 95% CI 5.27–9.18, P < 0.001, I2 = 4%; P = 0.18, height standard deviation (HtSDS (SMD = 1.22, 95% CI 0.88–1.56, P < 0.001, I2 = 49%; P = 0.14 and height velocity (HV (MD 2.68 cm/year; 95% CI 2.34, 3.02; P < 0.001, I2 = 0%; P = 0.72. There was a small increase in bone age (SMD 0.32 years; 95% CI 0.1, 0.54; P = 0.004, I2 = 73%; P = 0.02 after rhGH therapy for 12 months. What is more, the rhGH/oxandrolone combination therapy suggested greater final height (MD 2.46 cm; 95% CI 0.73, 4.18; P = 0.005, I2 = 32%; P = 0.22, increase and faster HV (SMD 1.67 cm/year; 95% CI 1.03, 2.31; P < 0.03, I2 = 80%; P < 0.001, with no significant increase in HtSDS and bone maturation compared with rhGH therapy alone. Conclusions: For TS patients, rhGH alone or with concomitant use of oxandrolone treatment had advantages on final height.

  4. Atorvastatin treatment does not affect gonadal and adrenal hormones in type 2 diabetes patients with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Stefano A; Carrozza, Cinzia; Lulli, Paola; Zuppi, Cecilia; CarloTonolo, Gian; Musumeci, Salvatore

    2003-01-01

    Atorvastatin, a second generation synthetic 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, reduces both intracellular cholesterol synthesis and serum cholesterol levels, and this could have a potential negative impact on gonadal and adrenal steroidogenesis. Hypercholesterolemia in type 2 diabetes, even when mild, must be treated in an aggressive way, due to the more strict therapeutic goals than in the non diabetic population. Since the wide use of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statins) in type 2 diabetes, the main aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of "therapeutic" doses of atorvastatin on gonadal and adrenal hormones in 24 type 2 diabetic patients (16 males and 8 postmenopausal females), with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia (LDL-cholesterol = 150.1 +/- 32.0 and 189.9 +/- 32.9 mg/dl, respectively) studied before and after a 3 months treatment with atorvastatin (20 mg/day). In all patients, lipids and serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S), androstendione and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured, with the addition, only in males, of testosterone and free testosterone index. After atorvastatin treatment a significant decrease in total and LDL cholesterol was observed (p < 0.05), while HDL-cholesterol did not significantly change ( p = N.S.), as no significant difference was found between steroid hormones measured before and after atorvastatin either in male and females. In conclusion, our data suggest that, in type 2 diabetic patients, the use of atorvastatin has no clinically important effects on either gonadal or adrenal steroid hormones.

  5. Callous-unemotional traits and early life stress predict treatment effects on stress and sex hormone functioning in incarcerated male adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan; Vitacco, Michael J; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-01

    The stress response system is highly plastic, and hormone rhythms may "adaptively calibrate" in response to treatment. This investigation assessed whether stress and sex hormone diurnal rhythms changed over the course of behavioral treatment, and whether callous-unemotional (CU) traits and history of early adversity affected treatment results on diurnal hormone functioning in a sample of 28 incarcerated adolescent males. It was hypothesized that the treatment would have beneficial effects, such that healthier diurnal rhythms would emerge post-treatment. Diurnal cortisol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were sampled two weeks after admission to the correctional/treatment facility, and again approximately four months later. Positive treatment effects were detected for the whole sample, such that testosterone dampened across treatment. CU traits predicted a non-optimal hormone response to treatment, potentially indicating biological preparedness to respond to acts of social dominance and aggression. The interaction between CU traits and adversity predicted a promising and sensitized response to treatment including increased cortisol and a steeper testosterone drop across treatment. Results suggest that stress and sex hormones are highly receptive to treatment during this window of development.

  6. Replacement of 5% of OPC by fly ash and APC residues from MSWI with electrodialytic pre-treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magro, Cátia; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Guedes, Paula

    2016-01-01

    as pre-treatment prior to incorporation in mortar, aiming to stabilize and remove HM and chlorides. Eight ED experiments were performed for 7 days with a L/S ratio of 3.5. The number of compartments (2 or 3) and current density (0.1 or 1.0 mA cm-2) varied. After ED treatment the heavy metals left...... in the ash were not leached to the same extent as in the original ash. In mortar 5% of Ordinary Portland Cement was replaced by FA and APC residues (raw and ED upgraded). The studied parameters: compressive strength, HM leachability, and Cl content. The ED pre-treatment resulted in a decrease in both...

  7. The efficacy of 12 weeks non-surgical treatment for patients not eligible for total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of a 12-week non-surgical treatment program with usual care in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) not eligible for total knee replacement (TKR). METHOD: This two-arm parallel group assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) included 100 adults from...... secondary care with knee OA, confirmed by radiography (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥1), but not eligible for a TKR. The 12-week non-surgical treatment program consisted of individualized progressed neuromuscular exercise, patient education, insoles, dietary advice and prescription of pain medication...... if indicated, while usual care comprised two leaflets with information and advice on knee OA and recommended treatments. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to 12 months in the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)4 defined as the average score for the KOOS subscales of pain...

  8. Fluid Replacement in Treatment of Hypovolemia and Shock: Crystalloids and Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yildiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shock is a pathologic state with high mortality rate and characterized by a reduction of systemic tissue perfusion and decresead oxygen delivery. Absolute or relative hypovolemia is a common pathology of most shock types. Correction of hypovolemia might reverse the disturbance and increase the tissue perfusion. Fluid resuscitation with crystalloid and colloid solutions can carry the risk of increasing morbidity and mortality if not used properly. Although crystalloid and colloid solutions are considered to have equal efficacy and safety profile, recent studies showed that this assumption may not be correct. Early and effective management of hypovolemia is the cornerstone of shock resuscitation. Initial management of patients with septic shock and hypovolemia should be done with 30ml/kg of crystalloids. Proper fluid replacement and resuscitation algoritms might increase the survival rate. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 347-361

  9. Adrenal steroid hormone concentrations in dogs with hair cycle arrest (Alopecia X) before and during treatment with melatonin and mitotane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Linda A; Hnilica, Keith A; Oliver, Jack W

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate intermediate adrenal steroid hormones (ISH) in neutered dogs with hair cycle arrest (Alopecia X) during treatment with melatonin, and to see if hair re-growth is associated with sex hormone concentrations within the normal ranges. Twenty-nine neutered, euthyroid, and normo-cortisolemic dogs were enrolled in the study (23 Pomeranians, three keeshonds, two miniature poodles, and one Siberian husky). Coat assessment and an ACTH stimulation test were performed pre-treatment and approximately every 4 months for a year post treatment. Melatonin was administered initially at 3-6 mg, every 12 h. Based on clinical progression, each dog was continued on the current dose of melatonin, given an increased dose of melatonin or changed to mitotane. Partial to complete hair re-growth occurred in 14/23 Pomeranians, and partial re-growth in 3/3 keeshond and 1/2 poodle dogs. A Siberian husky dog failed to re-grow hair. Fifteen dogs had partial hair re-growth at the first re-evaluation. Melatonin dosage was increased in eight dogs but only one had improved hair re-growth. On mitotane treatment, partial to complete hair re-growth was seen in 4/6 dogs and no re-growth in 2/6 dogs. No significant decrease in sex hormone concentrations were seen during melatonin or mitotane treatment. Concentrations of ISH in dogs with hair re-growth did not differ significantly from pre-treatment values. At the completion of the study, androstenedione, progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone were still above reference ranges in 21, 64 and 36%, respectively, of dogs with partial to complete hair re-growth. In conclusion, 62% of dogs had partial to complete hair re-growth. However, not all dogs with hair re-growth had concentrations of ISH within the normal range.

  10. Hormonal changes in secondary impotence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, F.M.; El-Shabrawy, N.O.; Nosseir, S.A.; Abo El-Azayem, Naglaa.

    1985-01-01

    Impotence is one of the problems which is still obscure both in its aetiology and treatment. The present study deals with the possible hormonal changes in cases of secondary infertility. The study involved 25 patients diagnosed as secondary impotence. Hormonal assay was performed for the following hormones: 1. Prolaction hormone. 2. Luteinising hormone (L.H.). 3. Testosterone. 4. Follicle stimulating hormone (F.S.H.). The assay was carried out by radioimmunoassay using double antibody technique. Results are discussed

  11. METABOLIC PROFILE OF COW BLOOD UNDER THE TREATMENT OF OVARIES HYPOFUNCTION BY HORMONAL AND PHYTO-PREPARATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornyat S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For the correction of reproductive function of cows with ovarian hypofunction practices use a number of hormones. Recently, to stimulate reproductive function using herbal medicines that have gonadotropic effect or stimulate secretion of steroid hormones who try to use to increase fertility. Therefore, we carried out an attempt to develop a method of regulation of reproductive function of the ovaries of cows using combination therapies that can provide effective treatment by studying the biochemical parameters of animals. The cows were divided depending on the treatment to control and two experimental groups of 5 animals in each group. Groups were formed by the following treatment regimens indicated pathology. Cows control group treated by next scheme: day 1 — intramuscular injection drug in vitro at a dose of 10 ml; day 2 —PMSG intramuscular administration of the drug at a dose of 500 IU; day 3 —intramuscular injection drug Surfahon at a dose of 50 mg. Cows from experimental group 1 was injected intramuscularly liposomal drug based on herbal (Rhodiola rosea, Salvia; Animals from second experimental group were injected intramuscularly liposomal drug based on phyto-substances (Rhodiola rosea, Salvia with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Surfahon. Analysis of biochemical parameters of blood serum of cows with ovarian hypofunction found low concentrations of estradiol-17-β and progesterone. Between the control and experimental groups concentration of progesterone and estradiol-17-β differ within 10%, which indicates the same level of disease in all animals selected. Level carotene, ascorbic acid and cholesterol in all groups was within the physiological norm and differed slightly. It was established that the treatment of cows with hypofunction ovaries in the experimental group 1 progesterone level 7 days after treatment was 11.5, and 2 - on 41,4% (p <0,01 higher than in the control group animals, indicating that the revitalization of the

  12. Risk Factors for Eating Disorder Psychopathology within the Treatment Seeking Transgender Population: The Role of Cross-Sex Hormone Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bethany Alice; Haycraft, Emma; Bouman, Walter Pierre; Brewin, Nicola; Claes, Laurence; Arcelus, Jon

    2018-03-01

    Many transgender people experience high levels of body dissatisfaction, which is one of the numerous factors known to increase vulnerability to eating disorder symptoms in the cisgender (non-trans) population. Cross-sex hormones can alleviate body dissatisfaction so might also alleviate eating disorder symptoms. This study aimed to explore risk factors for eating disorder symptoms in transgender people and the role of cross-sex hormones. Individuals assessed at a national transgender health service were invited to participate (N = 563). Transgender people not on cross-sex hormones reported higher levels of eating disorder psychopathology than people who were. High body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, anxiety symptoms, and low self-esteem were risk factors for eating psychopathology, but, after controlling for these, significant differences in eating psychopathology between people who were and were not on cross-sex hormones disappeared. Cross-sex hormones may alleviate eating disorder psychopathology. Given the high prevalence of transgender identities, clinicians at eating disorder services should assess for gender identity issues. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  13. Motives for choosing growth-enhancing hormone treatment in adolescents with idiopathic short stature: a questionnaire and structured interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huisman Jaap

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth-enhancing hormone treatment is considered a possible intervention in short but otherwise healthy adolescents. Although height gain is an obvious measure for evaluating hormone treatment, this may not be the ultimate goal for the person, but rather a means to reach other goals such as the amelioration of current height-related psychosocial problems or the enhancement of future prospects in life and society. The aim of our study was to clarify the motives of adolescents and their parents when choosing to participate in a growth-enhancing trial combining growth hormone and puberty-delaying hormone treatment. Methods Participants were early pubertal adolescents (25 girls, 13 boys aged from 11 to 13 years (mean age 11.5 years with a height standard deviation score (SDS ranging from -1.03 to -3.43. All had been classified as idiopathic short stature or persistent short stature born small for the gestational age (intrauterine growth retardation on the basis of a height SDS below -2, or had a height SDS between -1 and -2 and a predicted adult height SDS below -2. The adolescents and their parents completed questionnaires and a structured interview on the presence of height-related stressors, parental worries about their child's behavior and future prospects, problems in psychosocial functioning, and treatment expectations. Questionnaire scores were compared to norms of the general Dutch population. Results The adolescents reported normal psychosocial functioning and highly positive expectations of the treatment in terms of height gain, whereas the parents reported that their children encountered some behavioral problems (being anxious/depressed, and social and attention problems and height-related stressors (being teased and juvenilized. About 40% of the parents were worried about their children's future prospects for finding a spouse or job. The motives of the adolescents and their parents exhibited rather different profiles

  14. Early change of thyroid hormone concentration after {sup 131}I treatment in patients with solitary toxic adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirnat, E.; Fidler, V.; Zaletel, K.; Gaberscek, S.; Hojker, S. [Univ. Medical Centre Ljubljana, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine (Slovenia)

    2002-08-01

    Aim: In spite of extensive use of {sup 131}I for treatment of hyperthyroidism, the results of early outcome are variable. In our prospective clinical study we tested whether {sup 131}I induced necrosis causing clinical aggravation of hyperthyroidism and increasing the free thyroid hormone concentration in the serum of patients with solitary toxic adenoma not pretreated with antithyroid drugs. Patients and methods: 30 consecutive patients were treated with 925 MBq {sup 131}I. Serum concentration of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (fT{sub 4}), free triiodothyronine (fT{sub 3}), thyroglobulin (Tg), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured before and after application of {sup 131}I. Results: After application of {sup 131}I no clinical worsening was observed. FT{sub 4} and fT{sub 3} concentration did not change significantly within the first five days, whereas both of them significantly decreased after 12 days (p<0.0001). Slight and clinically irrelevant increase in the level of the two thyroid hormones was observed in 9 patients. Furthermore, we observed a prolonged increase in Tg concentration and a transient increase in IL-6 concentration. Conclusion: Neither evidence of any clinical aggravation of hyperthyroidism nor any significant increase in thyroid hormone concentration by {sup 131}I induced necrosis of thyroid cells was found. Therefore, the application of {sup 131}I may be considered as a safe and effective treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism due to toxic adenoma. (orig.)

  15. Hormonal changes in spring barley after triazine herbicide treatment and its mixtures of regulators of polyamine biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Trebichalský

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants adapt to abiotic stress by undergoing diverse biochemical and physiological changes that involve hormone-dependent signalling pathways. The effects of regulators of polyamine biosynthesis can be mimicked by exogenous chemical regulators such as herbicide safeners, which not only enhance stress tolerance but also confer hormetic benefits such as increased vigor and yield. The phytohormones, abscisic acid (ABA and auxin (IAA play key roles in regulating stress responses in plants. Two years pot trials at Slovak University of agriculture Nitra were carried out with analyses of contents of plant hormones in spring barley grain of variety Kompakt: indolyl-acetic acid (IAA and abscisic acid (ABA, after exposing of tested plants to herbicide stress, as well as the possible decrease of these stress factors with application of regulators of polyamine synthesis was evaluated. At 1st year in spring barley grain after application of solo triazine herbicide treatment in dose 0,5 L.ha-1 an increase of all analyzed plant hormones was observed and contrary, at 2nd year there was the decrease of their contents. From our work there is an obvious influence of herbicide stress induced by application of certain dose of triazine herbicide at 1st year. Expect of the variant with mixture of triazine herbicide (in amount of 0,5 L.ha-1 and 29,6 g.ha-1 DAB, at this year all by us applied regulators of polyamine synthesis reduced the level of both plant hormones. Higher affect of stress caused by enhanced content of soluble macroelements in soil where the plants of barley were grown was observed next year. Soil with increased contents of macronutrients (mg.kg-1: N30.7 + P108.3 + K261.5 + Mg604.2 had reducing effect on contents of plant hormones in barley grain at variant treated with solo triazine herbicide (in dose at 0,5 L.ha-1 in comparison to control variant. The mixtures of regulators of polyamine synthesis reduced the contents of IAA only in comparison to

  16. Dynamic changes of serum thyroid-related hormones levels after 131I treatment in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Feihua; Zhou Runsuo; Tong Guanghuan; Xu Haifeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum thyroid-related hormones (FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH, TGA, TMA) after 131 I therapy in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum levels of thyroid-related hormones were measured with RIA both before and 3, 6, 12 months after 131 I therapy in 92 patients with Graves' disease and once in 80 controls. Results: Se- mm FT 3 and FT 4 levels were significantly higher in the patients before treatment than those in controls. At 3 months after treatment, the levels were still much higher, but were not much different from those on controls by 6 and 12 months (P>0.05). TSH remained slightly lower than those in controls at 3 months but reached a high level at 6 months and dropped again at 12 months. Positive rate of serum TGA and TMA was 38.0% and 32.6% respectively before treatment, it dropped by 3 months, reached a peak by 6 months and dropped again to slightly lower than those before treatment but not significant. Conclusion: If FT 3 and FT 4 levels were not normal by 6 months after mi therapy, a second course of treatment might be necessary. Higher TGA and TMA levels before therapy predisposed to development of hypothyroidism afterwards. (authors)

  17. The effect of hydraulic retention time in onsite wastewater treatment and removal of pharmaceuticals, hormones and phenolic utility substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejhed, H; Fång, J; Hansen, K; Graae, L; Rahmberg, M; Magnér, J; Dorgeloh, E; Plaza, G

    2018-03-15

    Micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, hormones and phenolic utility chemicals in sewage water are considered to be an emerging problem because of increased use and observed adverse effects in the environment. The study provides knowledge on the removal efficiency of micropollutants with a range of physical and chemical properties in three commercially available onsite wastewater treatment facilities (OWTFs), tested on influent wastewater collected from 2500 person equivalents in Bildchen, Germany. A longer hydraulic retention time would in theory be expected to have a positive effect, and this study presents results for three different OWTFs in full-scale comparable tests under natural conditions. A range of 24 different pharmaceuticals, five phenols and three hormones were analyzed. Flow-proportional consecutive sampling was performed in order to determine the removal efficiency. Twenty-eight substances were detected in the effluent wastewater out of 32 substances included. Average effluent concentrations of Simvastatin, Estrone, Estradiol and Ethinylestradiol were above the indicative critical-effect concentration of pharmacological effect on fish in all facilities. Average effluent concentrations of both Diclofenac and Estradiol were higher than the Environmental Quality Standards applied in Sweden (190-240 times and 9-35 times respectively). The removal efficiency of micropollutants was high for substances with high logK ow , which enhance the adsorption and removal with sludge. Low removal was observed for substances with low logK ow and acidic characteristics, and for substances with stabilizing elements of the chemical structure. Facilities that use activated sludge processes removed hormones more efficiently than facilities using trickling filter treatment technique. Moreover, longer hydraulic retention time increased the removal of pharmaceuticals, hormones, turbidity and total nitrogen. Removal of Caffeine, Ibuprofen, Estrone, Naproxen and Estradiol

  18. Elevation of plasma gonadotropin concentration in response to mammalian gonadotropin releasing hormone (GRH) treatment of the male brown trout as determined by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crim, L.W.; Cluett, D.M.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid increase of the plasma gonadotropin concentration as measured by radioimmunoassay has been demonstrated in response to GRH treatment of the sexually mature male brown trout. Peak gonadotropin values were observed within 15 minutes of GRH treatment, however, the return to baseline values was prolonged compared with the mammalian response. These data support the concept that the brain, operating via releasing hormones, plays a role in the control of pituitary hormone secretion in fish

  19. Growth hormone treatment in aarskog syndrome: analysis of the KIGS (Pharmacia International Growth Database) data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darendeliler, F.; Larsson, P.; Neyzi, O.; Price, A.D.; Hagenas, L.; Sipila, I.; Lindgren, A.; Otten, B.J.; Bakker, B.

    2003-01-01

    Aarskog syndrome is an X-linked disorder characterized by faciogenital dysplasia and short stature. The present study set out to determine the effect of growth hormone (GH) therapy in patients with Aarskog syndrome enrolled in KIGS--the Pharmacia International Growth Database. Twenty-one patients

  20. The effect of insecticide treatment on adipokinetic hormone titre in insect body

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Socha, Radomír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 61, - (2005), s. 1077-1082 ISSN 1526-498X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6007202; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/03/0016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insecticide * adipokinetic hormone * stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.175, year: 2005

  1. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  2. Acute treatment of hyperammonemia by continuous renal replacement therapy in a newborn patient with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jeong Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC deficiency is well known as the most common inherited disorder of the urea cycle, and 1 of the most common causes of hyperammonemia in newborns. We experienced a case of a 3-day-old boy with OTC deficiency who appeared healthy in the first 2 days of life but developed lethargy and seizure soon afterwards. His serum ammonia level was measured as &gt;1700 μg/dL (range, 0 to 45 μg/dL. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT in the mode of continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration was immediately applied to correct the raised ammonia level. No seizure occurred after the elevated ammonia level was reduced. Therefore, CRRT should be included as 1 of the treatment modalities for newborns with inborn errors of metabolism, especially hyperammonemia. Here, we report 1 case of successful treatment of hyperammonemia by CRRT in a neonate with OTC deficiency.

  3. Relatives in older patients' fast-track treatment programme during total hip or knee replacement. A grounded theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    and considerate support in concern for the patients; Substituting mode, with practical and cognitive support; and Adapting mode, by trying to fit in with the patients’ and health professionals’ requirements. Study II: 16 patients aged 70 to 94 were included and data was collected through 15 non......The aim of this Ph.D.-dissertation was to generate grounded theories of relatives, patients, and health professionals’ pattern of behaviour, respectively, in relation to the relatives of older patients’ fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. The dissertation includes...... to the older patients’ self-determination of being autonomous and how they adapt and are perceived in the health professionals’ environment. This may be useful to the health professionals in orthopaedic fast-track treatment programmes and their future collaboration with older patients and their relatives....

  4. Preliminary and intermediate follow-up outcomes for cervical disc replacement in the treatment of cervical spondylopathy in 12 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Zhonglai; Yang Huilin; Jiang Weimin; Li Xigong; Li Xuefeng; Tang Tiansi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the short and intermediate-term clinical outcomes of porous coated motion (PCM) cervical prosthesis in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. Methods: The 12 (13 levels) patients who were suffered spondylotic myelopathy with PCM cervical prosthesis were treated. Evaluate the clinical outcome by comparing the JOA scores, the position of prosthesis,rotation of motion, the heterotopic ossification and Odom's scales. Results: After the average 6.5 months(3 ∼ 12 months) follow-up, the JOA scales raised from 8.35 ± 1.10 preoperatively to 15.88 ± 0.73 postoperatively (P 0.05). There was no occurrence of failures of prosthesis such as subsidence, loosening, or excursion. Heterotopic ossification was also absent. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes for cervical disc replacement in the treatment of cervical spondylopathy are satisfied. (authors)

  5. Improvement of chronic corneal opacity in ocular surface disease with prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressey, Anna; Jacobs, Deborah S; Remington, Crystal; Carrasquillo, Karen G

    2018-06-01

    To demonstrate clearing of chronic corneal opacities and improvement of visual acuity with the use of BostonSight prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) treatment in ocular surface disease. We undertook retrospective analysis of the medical records of a series of patients who underwent PROSE treatment from August 2006 to December 2014. Patients were referred for ocular surface disease of various etiologies. Primary inclusion criterion was corneal opacity that improved with PROSE treatment. Patients were excluded if topical steroids or adjuvant therapy used once PROSE treatment was initiated. Underlying disease, prior treatment, clinical presentation, and clinical course were extracted from the medical record. Four patients are included in this series. There were three females and one male; median age at time of treatment initiation was 30 years (range = 0.5-58 years). Median duration of PROSE treatment at time of retrospective analysis was 3.5 years (range = 1-8 years). Two cases had corneal opacification in the context of neurotrophic keratopathy: a unilateral case due to presumed herpes simplex keratitis and a bilateral case due to congenital corneal anesthesia associated with familial dysautonomia. One case had corneal opacity from exposure related to seventh nerve palsy, and one had corneal opacification associated with recurrent surface breakdown, neurotrophic keratopathy, and limbal stem deficiency of uncertain etiology. After consistent wear of prosthetic devices used in PROSE treatment for support of the ocular surface, visual acuity improved and clearing of the opacities was observed, without use of topical steroids or adjuvant therapy. These cases demonstrate clearing of chronic corneal opacity with PROSE treatment for ocular surface disease. This clearing can occur with no adjuvant therapy, suggesting that restoration of ocular surface function and integrity allows for corneal remodeling.

  6. Total knee replacement plus physical and medical therapy or treatment with physical and medical therapy alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Roos, Ewa M.; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a lack of high quality evidence concerning the efficacy of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to international evidence-based guidelines, treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) should include patient education, exercise and weight loss. Insoles....../or NSAIDs. Patients will be randomised to either receiving or not receiving a TKA in addition to the optimised non-surgical treatment. The primary outcome will be the change from baseline to 12 months on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)4 defined as the average score for the subscale...

  7. Transgender women, hormonal therapy and HIV treatment: a comprehensive review of the literature and recommendations for best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radix, Asa; Sevelius, Jae; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that transgender women (TGW) are disproportionately affected by HIV, with an estimated HIV prevalence of 19.1% among TGW worldwide. After receiving a diagnosis, HIV-positive TGW have challenges accessing effective HIV treatment, as demonstrated by lower rates of virologic suppression and higher HIV-related mortality. These adverse HIV outcomes have been attributed to the multiple sociocultural and structural barriers that negatively affect their engagement within the HIV care continuum. Guidelines for feminizing hormonal therapy among TGW recommend combinations of oestrogens and androgen blockers. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that certain antiretroviral therapy (ART) agents, such as protease inhibitors (PIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and cobicistat, interact with ethinyl estradiol, the key oestrogen component of oral contraceptives (OCPs). The goal of this article is to provide an overview of hormonal regimens used by TGW, to summarize the known drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between feminizing hormonal regimens and ART, and to provide clinical care recommendations. The authors identified English language articles examining DDIs between oestrogen therapy, androgen blockers and ART published between 1995 and 2015 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and EBSCOhost. Published articles predominantly addressed interactions between ethinyl estradiol and NNRTIs and PIs. No studies examined interactions between ART and the types and doses of oestrogens found in feminizing regimens. DDIs that may have the potential to result in loss of virologic suppression included ethinyl estradiol and amprenavir, unboosted fosamprenavir and stavudine. No clinically significant DDIs were noted with other anti-retroviral agents or androgen blockers. There are insufficient data to address DDIs between ART and feminizing hormone regimens used by TGW. There is an urgent need for further research in this

  8. Differential gene expression in response to juvenile hormone analog treatment in the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti (Isoptera, Archotermopsidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornette, Richard; Hayashi, Yoshinobu; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Miura, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Termite societies are characterized by a highly organized division of labor among conspicuous castes, groups of individuals with various morphological specializations. Termite caste differentiation is under control of juvenile hormone (JH), but the molecular mechanism underlying the response to JH and early events triggering caste differentiation are still poorly understood. In order to profile candidate gene expression during early soldier caste differentiation of the damp-wood termite, Hodotermopsis sjostedti, we treated pseudergates (workers) with a juvenile hormone analog (JHA) to induce soldier caste differentiation. We then used Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization to create two cDNA libraries enriched for transcripts that were either up- or downregulated at 24h after treatment. Finally, we used quantitative PCR to confirm temporal expression patterns. Hexamerins represent a large proportion of the genes upregulated following JHA treatment and have an expression pattern that shows roughly an inverse correlation to intrinsic JH titers. This data is consistent with the role of a JH "sink", which was demonstrated for hexamerins in another termite, Reticulitermes flavipes. A putative nuclear protein was also upregulated a few hours after JHA treatment, which suggests a role in the early response to JH and subsequent regulation of transcriptional events associated with soldier caste differentiation. Some digestive enzymes, such as endogenous beta-endoglucanase and chymotrypsin, as well as a protein associated to digestion were identified among genes downregulated after JHA treatment. This suggests that JH may directly influence the pseudergate-specific digestive system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment after prosthetic joint replacement: exploring the orthopaedic surgeon's opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. McNally, MPhil(Dent

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Australian orthopaedic surgeons continue to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment. The recording of PJI in relation to dental procedures into clinical registries would enable the development of consistent guidelines between professional groups responsible for the care of this patient group.

  10. The effect of leptin replacement on parathyroid hormone, RANKL-osteoprotegerin axis, and Wnt inhibitors in young women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Joo-Pin; Polyzos, Stergios A; Anastasilakis, Athanasios D; Chou, Sharon; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2014-11-01

    Recombinant leptin (metreleptin) treatment restores bone mineral density in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA), a condition characterized by hypoleptinemia, which has adverse impact on bone health. The objective of the study was to investigate how metreleptin exerts its positive effect on bone metabolism in humans. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. The study was conducted at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, Massachusetts). Women (n = 18) with HA and hypoleptinemia for at least 6 months were randomized to receive either metreleptin or placebo for 36 weeks. Serum samples were obtained at baseline and 12, 24, and 36 weeks of treatment. Circulating levels of leptin, intact PTH (iPTH), receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin, dickkopf-1, and fibroblast growth factor-23. Metreleptin administration significantly increased leptin levels throughout the treatment period (P = .001). iPTH decreased over the 36 weeks of treatment (P = .01). There was a trend toward a decrease in serum RANKL and increase in serum OPG in the metreleptin-treated group. The RANKL to OPG ratio was significantly decreased within the metreleptin (P = .04) but not the placebo group. Metreleptin had no effect on serum sclerostin, dickkopf-1, and fibroblast growth factor-23. Metreleptin treatment over 36 weeks decreases iPTH and RANKL to OPG ratio levels in hypoleptinemic women with HA.

  11. Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Erythrocytosis in a Patient Undergoing Hormonal Treatment for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi Yeruva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase inhibitors (AIs are most commonly used for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor positive disease. Although the side effect profile of aromatase inhibitors is well known, including common side effects like arthralgia, bone pain, arthritis, hot flashes, and more serious problems like osteoporosis, we present a case of an uncommon side effect of these medications. We report the case of a postmenopausal woman on adjuvant hormonal therapy with anastrozole after completing definitive therapy for stage IIIB estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, who was referred to hematology service for evaluation of persistent erythrocytosis. Primary and known secondary causes of polycythemia were ruled out. On further evaluation, we found that her erythrocytosis began after initiation of anastrozole and resolved after it was discontinued. We discuss the pathophysiology of aromatase inhibitor-induced erythrocytosis and reference of similar cases reported in the literature.

  12. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans

  13. Growth hormone treatment in Turner syndrome accelerates growth and skeletal maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rongen-Westerlaken (Ciska); J.M. Wit (Jan); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine); B.J. Otten (Barto); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); H.A. Delemarre-van der Waal (H.); M.H. Gons (M.); A.G. Bot (Alice); J.L. van den Brande (J.)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSixteen girls with Turner syndrome (TS) were treated for 4 years with biosynthetic growth hormone (GH). The dosage was 4IU/m2 body surface s.c. per day over the first 3 years. In the 4th year the dosage was increased to 61 U/m2 per day in the 6 girls with a poor height increment and in 1

  14. "Fito-hormônios": ciência e natureza no tratamento do climatério "Phyto-hormones": Science and nature in the treatment of menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone Manzali de Sá

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Um novo produto chamado "fito-hormônio" foi elaborado para substituir a terapia de reposição hormonal (TRH nos últimos anos. Este desenvolvimento está associado a dois contextos históricos, a saber: o anúncio dos riscos associados à terapia de reposição hormonal (TRH para mulheres no climatério no ano de 2002, e uma mudança de percepção do público consumidor e laboratórios farmacêuticos a respeito das plantas medicinais. Algumas plantas já utilizadas por comunidades tradicionais para sintomas associados ao climatério foram pesquisadas cientificamente nas últimas décadas e, como resultado, uma nova categoria de medicamento foi constituída. A partir das teorias ator-rede e de translação, de Bruno Latour, analisa-se a construção desta categoria de medicamento, e como a ideia de "natural" foi ressignificada pelos atores envolvidos na rede sócio-técnica.A new product called "phyto-hormone" was designed to replace the hormone replacement therapy (HRT in recent years. This development is associated with two historical contexts: the announcement of the risks associated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT for postmenopausal women in 2002, and a change in public perception of consumers and pharmaceutical companies about medicinal plants. Some plants used by traditional communities for symptoms associated with menopause have been scientifically researched in recent decades and, as a result, a new category of medicine was established. From the actor-network theory and translation, Bruno Latour analyzes the construction of this class of drug, and how the idea of "natural" was re-signified by the actors involved in the socio-technical network.

  15. Adrenal gland hypofunction in active polymyalgia rheumatica. effect of glucocorticoid treatment on adrenal hormones and interleukin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Straub, Rainer H; Foppiani, Luca; Prete, Camilla; Pulsatelli, Lia; Sulli, Alberto; Boiardi, Luigi; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Giusti, Massimo; Pizzorni, Carmen; Seriolo, Bruno; Salvarani, Carlo

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in patients with recent onset polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) not previously treated with glucocorticoids; and to detect possible correlations between adrenal hormone levels, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and other acute phase reactants at baseline and during 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. Forty-one PMR patients of both sexes with recent onset disease and healthy sex and age matched controls were enrolled into a longitudinal study. Patients were monitored for serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), androstenedione (ASD), and clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity such as C-reactive protein and IL-6 concentrations at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment. To assess dynamic HPA axis function, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were evaluated in another 8 patients with recent onset PMR not treated with glucocorticoid in comparison to controls after challenge with ovine corticotropin releasing hormone (oCRH) test. In addition, serum cortisol and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) levels were evaluated after stimulation with low dose (1 microg) intravenous ACTH. Serum cortisol and ASD levels of all PMR patients at baseline did not differ from controls. During followup, cortisol levels dipped at one and 3 months. Serum DHEAS levels in all patients were significantly lower than in controls at baseline. In female PMR patients a significant correlation was found at baseline between cortisol levels and duration of disease. Serum concentrations of IL-6 at baseline were significantly higher in PMR patients than in controls. During 12 months of glucocorticoid treatment IL-6 levels dropped significantly at one month; thereafter they remained stable and did not increase again despite tapering of the glucocorticoid dose. After oCRH stimulation, a similar cortisol response was found in patients and controls. After ACTH

  16. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    to be less need for strong fractionation in PDR schedules. If the overall time is at least as long as that of the LDR schedule and if the total physical dose is (slightly) adapted, PDR schedules can be designed using longer pulse intervals of up to 3 h. Schedules with sufficiently long intervals have significant logistic advantages in terms of patient care and treatment tolerance. However, in general, PDR schedules that apply more fractionation have a lower risk of overdosing normal tissues in comparison to fractionated HDR schedules. Applying probable ranges for the values of α/β and T (1(2)) , the model calculations indicate that the differences in effects between the proposed fractionated HDR and PDR schedules could be rather small. To detect the magnitude of these differences, (randomized) clinical studies with rather large patient groups might be needed. Conclusions: Pulsed dose rate treatment schedules with longer intervals of up to 3 h appear adequate to replace LDR treatment schedules. Whether PDR schedules can, indeed, replace LDR treatment schedules and whether they offer detectable advantages over schedules with less fractionation (fractionated HDR) should be tested in clinical studies

  17. Osteoporosis treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazianas, Michael; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The findings of the Women's Health Initiative study in 2002 marginalized the use of hormone replacement therapy and established bisphosphonates as the first line of treatment for osteoporosis. Denosumab could be used in selected patients. Although bisphosphonates only maintain the structure of bone...... to their benefits/harm ratio. Treatment of osteoporosis is a long process, and many patients will require treatment with more than one type of drug over their lifetime....

  18. Fertility desires, choice of hormone replacement and the effect of length of time since menopause on bone density in women with premature ovarian insufficiency: a review of 223 consecutive new referrals to a tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Monica; Kreatsa, Maria; Narvekar, Nitish; Savvas, Michael; Hamoda, Haitham

    2014-09-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency can have significant implications for the affected women. This review assesses the fertility desires, choice of hormone replacement, and the effect of time since menopause on the bone density of these women. This is a retrospective analysis of 223 consecutive new referrals. The average age (mean [± standard deviation]) of the women was 37.35 (± 5.88) years, with 24.1% (n = 19/79) presenting within 12 months of the onset of symptoms, most commonly, vasomotor type symptoms (n = 98/223; 43.9%). Of the women included, 58.7% (n = 131/223) took hormone replacement therapy (HRT), most commonly, an oral (n = 90/131; 68.7%) sequential preparation (n = 91/131; 69.5%), with a significant number of women >40 years of age preferring the transdermal route (n = 26/54; 48.1%; pfertility, more notable in women ≤ 40 years (n = 72/142; 50.7%; p < 0.01). Of these, 41.7% (n = 35/84) took HRT, most commonly, a sequential regimen (n = 26/35; 74.3%) with oral estradiol (n = 30/35; 85.7%); 69.5% (n = 155/223) of the women had had a bone densitometry scan performed, with 66.5% (n = 103/155) showing normal bone mineral density (BMD), but a greater likelihood of having reduced BMD the greater the time delay in presentation. No difference was seen for the three broad categories of BMD when further analysed for the cause of premature ovarian insufficiency, but a significant difference was noted for the spinal Z-scores, whereby women who underwent a surgically induced menopause were noted to have lower BMD compared with the other causes (p < 0.01). These findings can be useful in counselling women and guiding clinicians in their management of women with premature ovarian insufficiency. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Teaching Appropriate Play to Replace Stereotypy Using a Treatment Package with Students Having Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy H. Greenberg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Students with special education needs such as autism tend to have difficulty with appropriate play skills and leisure time skills. A lack of play may lead to inappropriate behaviors such as stereotypy or passivity. When students have a limited community of reinforcers it may be difficult for educators to find motivators that can be used to teach language, social, academics, and other skills. The present study tested a treatment package in a small group format on the on task painting behavior and stereotypy of four boys between 5 and 12 years old having autism. Using a delayed multiple baseline across students experimental design, a functional relationship was demonstrated between an observed increase in on task painting behavior and decrease in stereotypy of all four students as a function of their participation. Limitations of the present study were also discussed.

  20. Case report of unexpected gastrointestinal involvement in type 1 Gaucher disease: comparison of eliglustat tartrate treatment and enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Shin, Dong Hoon; Park, Su Bum; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2017-05-15

    Gastrointestinal involvement in Gaucher disease is very rare, and appears to be unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Here, we describe identical twin, splenectomized, non-neuronopathic Gaucher patients on long-term ERT for 9 years, who complained of epigastric discomfort due to Gaucher cell infiltration of the gastroduodenal mucosa. Rare compound heterozygous mutations (p.Arg48Trp and p.Arg257Gln) of the GBA gene were found in both. Improvement in the gastroduodenal infiltration and reduced chitotriosidase levels were observed in one who switched to eliglustat tartrate for 1 year, whereas the other one who maintained ERT showed no improvement of chitotriosidase level and persistent duodenal lesions. This shows that eliglustat might be an effective treatment for Gaucher disease patients having lesions resistant to ERT.

  1. Efficacy of hormonal and mental treatments with MMPI in FtM individuals: cross-sectional and longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Toshihiko

    2017-07-17

    Cross-sex hormone treatment (CSHT) is an important option for gender dysphoria (GD) individuals to improve the quality of life. However, in Japan, sex reassignment surgery (SRS) and CSHT for GD had been discontinued until 1998 (over 30 years). After resumption, the number of GD individuals wishing treatment rapidly increased. On the other hand, the number of medical institutions available for evaluation was limited. For this reason, hormonal treatment has been administered to GD individuals requiring the prompt start of CSHT in the absence of mental health assessment by specialists. In this study, we examined the efficacy of CSHT and psychotherapy. The participants were 155 female-to-male (FtM) individuals who consulted our gender identity clinic, and were definitively diagnosed. A cross-sectional study was conducted by dividing them into two groups: groups with and without CSHT on the initial consultation (Group CSHT: n = 53, Group no-CSHT: n = 102). In all participants, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and blood hormone tests were performed on the initial consultation. In addition, CSHT was combined with psychotherapy for a specific period in Group no-CSHT, and FtM individuals in whom an additional MMPI test could be conducted (Group combined treatment (CT), n = 14) were enrolled in a longitudinal study. In the cross-sectional study, there was no significant difference on the MMPI test. In the longitudinal study, there were improvements in the clinical scales other than the Mf scale on the MMPI test. In Group CT, the D, Sc, and Si scale scores on the initial consultation were significantly higher than in Group CSHT. However, there was no clinical scale with a significantly higher value after the start of treatment. The Pd scale score was significantly lower. CSHT improved mental health. Psychotherapy-combined CSHT may further improve it. The study was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of Kansai Medical University (A

  2. Hormonal treatment before and after artificial insemination differentially improves fertility in subpopulations of dairy cows during the summer and autumn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E; Voet, H; Reznikov, D; Wolfenson, D; Roth, Z

    2014-12-01

    Reduced conception rate (CR) during the hot summer and subsequent autumn is a well-documented phenomenon. Intensive use of cooling systems can improve summer and autumn reproductive performance, but is unable to increase CR to winter and spring levels. We examined whether combined hormonal treatments--to increase follicular turnover before artificial insemination (AI) and progesterone supplementation post-AI--might improve fertility of cooled cows during the summer and autumn. The experiment was conducted from July to November in 3 commercial herds in Israel and included 707 Holstein cows at 50 to 60 d in milk (DIM). Cows were hormonally treated to induce 2 consecutive 9-d cycles, with GnRH administration followed by PGF2α injection 7 d later, followed by an intravaginal insert containing progesterone on d 5 ± 1 post-AI for 14 d. Both untreated controls (n=376) and treated cows (n=331) were inseminated following estrus, and pregnancy was determined by palpation 42 to 50 d post-AI. First-AI CR data revealed a positive interaction between treatment and cows previously diagnosed with postpartum uterine disease [odds ratio (OR) 2.24]. Interaction between treatment and low body condition score tended to increase the probability of first-AI CR (OR 1.95) and increased pregnancy rate at 90 DIM (OR 2.50) and at 120 DIM (OR 1.77). Low milk production increased the probability of being detected in estrus at the end of synchronization within treated cows (OR 1.67), and interacted with treatment to increase probability of pregnancy at 90 DIM (OR 2.39) relative to control counterparts. It is suggested that when administered with efficient cooling, combined hormonal treatment in specific subgroups of cows, that is, those previously diagnosed with postpartum uterine disease or those with low body condition score or low milk yield might improve fertility during the summer and autumn. Integration of such an approach into reproductive management during the hot seasons might improve

  3. THE RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF TRICUSPID VALVE INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS USING VALVE REPAIR AND VALVE REPLACEMENT OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kovalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate in-hospital and long-term results of surgical treatment of patients with infective endocarditis of the tricuspid valve, to compare the effectiveness of valve repair and valve replacement techniques, and to identify risk factors of mortality and reoperations. Materials and methods. 31 surgical patients with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis were evaluated. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In Group 1 (n = 14 repairs of the tricuspid valve were performed, in Group 2 (n = 17 patients had undergone tricuspid valve replacements. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and echocardiographic data were studied. Methods of comparative analysis, the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox risk models were applied. Results. The most common complication of in-hospital stay was atrioventricular block (17.7% of cases in Group 2. In Group 1, this type of complication was not found. Hospital mortality was 7.14% in Group 1, and 0% in Group 2. Long-term results have shown the significant reduction of heart failure in general cohort and in both groups. In Group 1 the severity of heart failure in the long term was less than in Group 2. No significant differences in the severity of tricuspid regurgitation were found between the groups. In 7-year follow up no cases of death were registered in Group 1. Cumulative survival rate in Group 2 within 60 months was 67.3 ± 16.2%. No reoperations were performed in patients from Group 1. In Group 2, the freedom from reoperation within 60 months was 70.9 ± 15.3%. Combined intervention was found as predictor of postoperative mortality. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was identified as risk factor for reoperation. Conclusion. Valve repair and valve replacement techniques of surgical treatment of tricuspid valve endocarditis can provide satisfactory hospital and long-term results. Tricuspid valve repair techniques allowed reducing the incidence of postoperative atrioventricular block. In the long-term, patients

  4. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs

  5. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R. (Hospital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Pediatric Endocrinology Unit and INSERM U30)

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiat