WorldWideScience

Sample records for homogeneous catalysis reaction

  1. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  2. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  3. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Sarah Z; Standley, Eric A; Jamison, Timothy F

    2014-05-15

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  4. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  5. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  6. Bridging heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis concepts, strategies, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Can

    2014-01-01

    This unique handbook fills the gap in the market for an up-to-date work that links both homogeneous catalysis applied to organic reactions and catalytic reactions on surfaces of heterogeneous catalysts.

  7. Heterogeneous versus homogeneous copper(II) catalysis in enantioselective conjugate-addition reactions of boron in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanosono, Taku; Xu, Pengyu; Kobayashi, Shū

    2014-01-01

    We have developed Cu(II)-catalyzed enantioselective conjugate-addition reactions of boron to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated carbonyl compounds in water. In contrast to the previously reported Cu(I) catalysis that required organic solvents, chiral Cu(II) catalysis was found to proceed efficiently in water. Three catalyst systems have been exploited: cat. 1: Cu(OH)2 with chiral ligand L1; cat. 2: Cu(OH)2 and acetic acid with ligand L1; and cat. 3: Cu(OAc)2 with ligand L1. Whereas cat. 1 is a heterogeneous system, cat. 2 and cat. 3 are homogeneous systems. We tested 27 α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and an α,β-unsaturated nitrile compound, including acyclic and cyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones, acyclic and cyclic β,β-disubstituted enones, acyclic and cyclic α,β-unsaturated esters (including their β,β-disubstituted forms), and acyclic α,β-unsaturated amides (including their β,β-disubstituted forms). We found that cat. 2 and cat. 3 showed high yields and enantioselectivities for almost all substrates. Notably, no catalysts that can tolerate all of these substrates with high yields and high enantioselectivities have been reported for the conjugate addition of boron. Heterogeneous cat. 1 also gave high yields and enantioselectivities with some substrates and also gave the highest TOF (43,200 h(-1) ) for an asymmetric conjugate-addition reaction of boron. In addition, the catalyst systems were also applicable to the conjugate addition of boron to α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, although such reactions have previously been very limited in the literature, even in organic solvents. 1,4-Addition products were obtained in high yields and enantioselectivities in the reactions of acyclic α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with diboron 2 by using cat. 1, cat. 2, or cat. 3. On the other hand, in the reactions of cyclic α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with compound 2, whereas 1,4-addition products

  8. Computational approaches to homogeneous gold catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faza, Olalla Nieto; López, Carlos Silva

    2015-01-01

    Homogenous gold catalysis has been exploding for the last decade at an outstanding pace. The best described reactivity of Au(I) and Au(III) species is based on gold's properties as a soft Lewis acid, but new reactivity patterns have recently emerged which further expand the range of transformations achievable using gold catalysis, with examples of dual gold activation, hydrogenation reactions, or Au(I)/Au(III) catalytic cycles.In this scenario, to develop fully all these new possibilities, the use of computational tools to understand at an atomistic level of detail the complete role of gold as a catalyst is unavoidable. In this work we aim to provide a comprehensive review of the available benchmark works on methodological options to study homogenous gold catalysis in the hope that this effort can help guide the choice of method in future mechanistic studies involving gold complexes. This is relevant because a representative number of current mechanistic studies still use methods which have been reported as inappropriate and dangerously inaccurate for this chemistry.Together with this, we describe a number of recent mechanistic studies where computational chemistry has provided relevant insights into non-conventional reaction paths, unexpected selectivities or novel reactivity, which illustrate the complexity behind gold-mediated organic chemistry.

  9. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  10. Relativistic effects in homogeneous gold catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, David J; Toste, F Dean

    2007-03-22

    Transition-metal catalysts containing gold present new opportunities for chemical synthesis, and it is therefore not surprising that these complexes are beginning to capture the attention of the chemical community. Cationic phosphine-gold(i) complexes are especially versatile and selective catalysts for a growing number of synthetic transformations. The reactivity of these species can be understood in the context of theoretical studies on gold; relativistic effects are especially helpful in rationalizing the reaction manifolds available to gold catalysts. This Review draws on experimental and computational data to present our current understanding of homogeneous gold catalysis, focusing on previously unexplored reactivity and its application to the development of new methodology.

  11. Catalysis at the Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Chemistry Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Howard; Alper

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Significant progress has been made in recent years in developing efficient, atom economical catalytic reactions of potential applicability to the pharmaceutical, petrochemical, and commodity chemical business sectors. In some cases, homogeneous catalytic processes offer advantages, but in others the use of heterogenized homogeneous catalysis provides a competitive advantage concerning recyclability and catalyst recovery. This presentation will consider new approaches to cyclization reactions a...

  12. Pharmaceutical Industry Oriented Homogeneous Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xumu

    2004-01-01

    Chiral therapeutics already makes up over one-third of pharmaceutical drugs currently sold worldwide. This is a growing industry with global chiral drug sales for 2002 increasing by 12%to $160 billion (Technology Catalysts International) of a total drug market of $410bn. The increasing demand to produce enantiomerically pure pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, flavors, and other fine chemicals has advanced the field of asymmetric catalytic technologies.We aim to become a high value technology provider and partner in the chiral therapeutics industry by offering proprietary catalysts, novel building blocks, and collaborative synthetic solutions. In decade, we have developed a set of novel chiral homogeneous phosphorus ligands such as Binaphane, Me-KetalPhos, TangPhos, f-Binaphane, Me-f-KetalPhos, C4TunePhos and Binapine,which we called Chiral Ligand ToolKit. Complementing the ToolKit, (R, S, S, R)-DIOP*, T-Phos,o-BIPHEP, o-BINAPO and FAP were added recently[1].These ligands can be applied to a broad variety of drug structural features by asymmetric hydrogenation of dehydroamino acid derivatives, enamides, unsatisfied acids and esters, ketones,beta ketoesters, imines and cyclic imines. And ligand FAP had been apllied succefully in allylic alkylation and [3+2] cycloaddition.

  13. Hydrogen Production by Homogeneous Catalysis: Alcohol Acceptorless Dehydrogenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    in hydrogen production from biomass using homogeneous catalysis. Homogeneous catalysis has the advance of generally performing transformations at much milder conditions than traditional heterogeneous catalysis, and hence it constitutes a promising tool for future applications for a sustainable energy sector......, and are fundamental for the thrive of almost all business fields. The latter include the industries of agriculture, food additives, pharmaceuticals, electronics, plastic, fragrances, and more. Today, the major source of both energy and bulk chemicals is fossil fuels, being responsible for more than 80 % of the energy...... dehydrogenation. The third chapter, Biorelevant Substrates, concentrates on the use of alcohols such as ethanol, which are biomass related. The topic is alcohol acceptorless dehydrogenation reactions for both H2 production and the concurrent synthetic application. Finally, Chap. 4, Substrates for H2 Storage...

  14. X-Ray absorption in homogeneous catalysis research: the iron-catalyzed Michael addition reaction by XAS, RIXS and multi-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias; Gastl, Christoph

    2010-06-07

    A survey over X-ray absorption methods in homogeneous catalysis research is given with the example of the iron-catalyzed Michael addition reaction. A thorough investigation of the catalytic cycle was possible by combination of conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and multi-dimensional spectroscopy. The catalytically active compound formed in the first step of the Michael reaction of methyl vinyl ketone with 2-oxocyclopentanecarboxylate (1) could be elucidated in situ by RIXS spectroscopy, and the reduced catalytic activity of FeCl(3) x 6 H(2)O (2) compared to Fe(ClO(4))(3) x 9 H(2)O (3) could be further explained by the formation of a [Fe(III)Cl(4)(-)](3)[Fe(III)(1-H)(2)(H(2)O)(2)(+)][H(+)](2) complex. Chloride was identified as catalyst poison with a combined XAS-UV/vis study, which revealed that Cl(-) binds quantitatively to the available iron centers that are deactivated by formation of [FeCl(4)(-)]. Operando studies in the course of the reaction of methyl vinyl ketone with 1 by combined XAS-Raman spectroscopy allowed the exclusion of changes in the oxidation state and the octahedral geometry at the iron site; a reaction order of two with respect to methyl vinyl ketone and a rate constant of k = 1.413 min(-2) were determined by analysis of the C=C and C=O vibration band. Finally, a dedicated experimental set-up for three-dimensional spectroscopic studies (XAS, UV/vis and Raman) of homogeneous catalytic reactions under laboratory conditions, which emerged from the discussed investigations, is presented.

  15. Asymmetric C-C Bond-Formation Reaction with Pd: How to Favor Heterogeneous or Homogeneous Catalysis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, S.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Mallat, T.

    2010-01-01

    The enantioselective allylic alkylation of (E)-1,3-diphenylallyl acetate was studied to clarify the heterogeneous or homogeneous character of the Pd/Al2O3-(R)-BINAP catalyst system. A combined approach was applied: the catalytic tests were completed with in situ XANES measurements to follow...

  16. One- and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic studies of solution-phase homogeneous catalysis and spin-forbidden reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Karma Rae [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Understanding chemical reactions requires the knowledge of the elementary steps of breaking and making bonds, and often a variety of experimental techniques are needed to achieve this goal. The initial steps occur on the femto- through picosecond time-scales, requiring the use of ultrafast spectroscopic methods, while the rate-limiting steps often occur more slowly, requiring alternative techniques. Ultrafast one and two-dimensional infrared and step-scan FTIR spectroscopies are used to investigate the photochemical reactions of four organometallic complexes. The analysis leads to a detailed understanding of mechanisms that are general in nature and may be applicable to a variety of reactions.

  17. Homogeneous Catalysis with Metal Complexes Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duca, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    The book about homogeneous catalysis with metal complexes deals with the description of the reductive-oxidative, metal complexes  in a liquid phase (in polar solvents, mainly in water, and less in nonpolar solvents). The exceptional importance of the redox processes in chemical systems, in the reactions occuring in living organisms, the environmental processes, atmosphere, water, soil, and in industrial technologies (especially in food-processing industries) is discussed. The detailed practical aspects of the established regularities are explained for solving the specific practical tasks in various fields of industrial chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, analytical chemistry and ecological chemistry. The main scope of the book is the survey and systematization of the latest advances in homogeneous catalysis with metal complexes. It gives an overview of the research results and practical experience accumulated by the author during the last decade.

  18. Nanometallic chemistry: deciphering nanoparticle catalysis from the perspective of organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Yuan, Yuan; Dyson, Paul J

    2013-10-07

    Nanoparticle (NP) catalysis is traditionally viewed as a sub-section of heterogeneous catalysis. However, certain properties of NP catalysts, especially NPs dispersed in solvents, indicate that there could be benefits from viewing them from the perspective of homogeneous catalysis. By applying the fundamental approaches and concepts routinely used in homogeneous catalysis to NP catalysts it should be possible to rationally design new nanocatalysts with superior properties to those currently in use.

  19. Mechanisms in homogeneous and heterogeneous epoxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Oyama, S Ted

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic epoxidation of olefins plays an important role in the industrial production of several commodity compounds, as well as in the synthesis of many intermediates, fine chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The scale of production ranges from millions of tons per year to a few grams per year. The diversity of catalysts is large and encompasses all the known categories of catalyst type: homogeneous, heterogeneous, and biological. This book summarizes the current status in these fields concentrating on rates, kinetics, and reaction mechanisms, but also covers broad topics including modeli

  20. Homogeneous asymmetric catalysis in fragrance chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappa, Alessandra; Bovo, Sara; Bertoldini, Matteo; Scrivanti, Alberto; Matteoli, Ugo

    2008-06-01

    Opposite enantiomers of a chiral fragrance may exhibit different olfactory activities making a synthesis in high enantiomeric purity commercially and scientifically interesting. Accordingly, the asymmetric synthesis of four chiral odorants, Fixolide, Phenoxanol, Citralis, and Citralis Nitrile, has been investigated with the aim to develop practically feasible processes. In the devised synthetic schemes, the key step that leads to the formation of the stereogenic center is the homogeneous asymmetric hydrogenation of a prochiral olefin. By an appropriate choice of the catalyst and the reaction conditions, Phenoxanol, Citralis, and Citralis Nitrile were obtained in high enantiomeric purity, and odor profiles of the single enantiomers were determined.

  1. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  2. Converting Homogeneous to Heterogeneous in Electrophilic Catalysis using Monodisperse Metal Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witham, Cole A.; Huang, Wenyu; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Toste, F. Dean

    2009-10-15

    A continuing goal in catalysis is the transformation of processes from homogeneous to heterogeneous. To this end, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in heterogeneous catalysis, where this conversion is supplemented by the ability to obtain new or divergent reactivity and selectivity. We report a novel method for applying heterogeneous catalysts to known homogeneous catalytic reactions through the design and synthesis of electrophilic platinum nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are selectively oxidized by the hypervalent iodine species PhICl{sub 2}, and catalyze a range of {pi}-bond activation reactions previously only homogeneously catalyzed. Multiple experimental methods are utilized to unambiguously verify the heterogeneity of the catalytic process. The discovery of treatments for nanoparticles that induce the desired homogeneous catalytic activity should lead to the further development of reactions previously inaccessible in heterogeneous catalysis. Furthermore, our size and capping agent study revealed that Pt PAMAM dendrimer-capped nanoparticles demonstrate superior activity and recyclability compared to larger, polymer-capped analogues.

  3. π Activation of Alkynes in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Gold Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistoni, Giovanni; Belanzoni, Paola; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2016-07-14

    The activation of alkynes toward nucleophilic attack upon coordination to gold-based catalysts (neutral and positively charged gold clusters and gold complexes commonly used in homogeneous catalysis) is investigated to elucidate the role of the σ donation and π back-donation components of the Au-C bond (where we consider ethyne as prototype substrate). Charge displacement (CD) analysis is used to obtain a well-defined measure of σ donation and π back-donation and to find out how the corresponding charge flows affect the electron density at the electrophilic carbon undergoing the nucleophilic attack. This information is used to rationalize the activity of a series of catalysts in the nucleophilic attack step of a model hydroamination reaction. For the first time, the components of the Dewar-Chatt-Duncanson model, donation and back-donation, are put in quantitative correlation with the kinetic parameters of a chemical reaction.

  4. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  5. In Silico Design in Homogeneous Catalysis Using Descriptor Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi Rothenberg

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarises the state-of-the-art methodologies used for designinghomogeneous catalysts and optimising reaction conditions (e.g. choosing the right solvent.We focus on computational techniques that can complement the current advances in high-throughput experimentation, covering the literature in the period 1996-2006. The reviewassesses the use of molecular modelling tools, from descriptor models based onsemiempirical and molecular mechanics calculations, to 2D topological descriptors andgraph theory methods. Different techniques are compared based on their computational andtime cost, output level, problem relevance and viability. We also review the application ofvarious data mining tools, including artificial neural networks, linear regression, andclassification trees. The future of homogeneous catalysis discovery and optimisation isdiscussed in the light of these developments.

  6. Neutral tridentate PNP ligands and their hybrid analogues: versatile non-innocent scaffolds for homogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Reek, Joost N H

    2009-01-01

    Ligands in coordination chemistry and homogeneous catalysis are traditionally "static" spectators that do not actively participate in the catalytic cycle. However, such classic systems do not provide additional "handles" that could facilitate or trigger alternative productive reaction pathways. Recent advances in the use of novel nitrogen-centered pincer systems have unveiled interesting opportunities for cooperative catalysis. The chemistry of pyridine-derived, neutral ligands is discussed, with a specific focus on their non-innocent behavior and potential as facilitators for metal-mediated organic transformations. This overview should provide inspiration and an incentive to incorporate non-innocent ligands and their metal complexes within old and new homogeneously catalyzed reactions.

  7. A conceptual translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis: homogeneous-like heterogeneous gold nanoparticle catalyst induced by ceria supporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Xue, Wei; Guan, Bing-Tao; Shi, Fu-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-02-07

    Translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis is a promising solution to green and sustainable development in chemical industry. For this purpose, noble metal nanoparticles represent a new frontier in catalytic transformations. Many challenges remain for researchers to transform noble metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalytic active sites into ionic species of homogeneous catalytic active sites. We report here a successful design on translating homogeneous gold catalysis into a heterogeneous system with a clear understanding of the catalytic pathway. This study initiates a novel concept to immobilize a homogeneous catalyst based on electron transfer between supporting base and supported nanoparticles. Meanwhile, on the basis of theoretical calculation, it has deepened the understanding of the interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and the catalyst support.

  8. Catalysis of Protein Disulfide Bond Isomerization in a Homogeneous Substrate†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A.; Barrows, Seth R.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2008-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a _-hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N-and C-terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N_-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E°_ = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys—Gly—His—Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/KM = 1.7 _ 105 M–1M s–1, which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude that

  9. Catalysis of protein disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersteen, Elizabeth A; Barrows, Seth R; Raines, Ronald T

    2005-09-13

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the rearrangement of nonnative disulfide bonds in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, a process that often limits the rate at which polypeptide chains fold into a native protein conformation. The mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by PDI is unclear. In assays involving protein substrates, the reaction appears to involve the complete reduction of some or all of its nonnative disulfide bonds followed by oxidation of the resulting dithiols. The substrates in these assays are, however, heterogeneous, which complicates mechanistic analyses. Here, we report the first analysis of disulfide bond isomerization in a homogeneous substrate. Our substrate is based on tachyplesin I, a 17-mer peptide that folds into a beta hairpin stabilized by two disulfide bonds. We describe the chemical synthesis of a variant of tachyplesin I in which its two disulfide bonds are in a nonnative state and side chains near its N and C terminus contain a fluorescence donor (tryptophan) and acceptor (N(epsilon)-dansyllysine). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from 280 to 465 nm increases by 28-fold upon isomerization of the disulfide bonds into their native state (which has a lower E(o') = -0.313 V than does PDI). We use this continuous assay to analyze catalysis by wild-type human PDI and a variant in which the C-terminal cysteine residue within each Cys-Gly-His-Cys active site is replaced with alanine. We find that wild-type PDI catalyzes the isomerization of the substrate with kcat/K(M) = 1.7 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is the largest value yet reported for catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. The variant, which is a poor catalyst of disulfide bond reduction and dithiol oxidation, retains virtually all of the activity of wild-type PDI in catalysis of disulfide bond isomerization. Thus, the C-terminal cysteine residues play an insignificant role in the isomerization of the disulfide bonds in nonnative tachyplesin I. We conclude

  10. Linking homogeneous and heterogeneous enantioselective catalysis through a self-assembled coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José I; López-Sánchez, Beatriz; Mayoral, José A

    2008-11-01

    Combining the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous enantioselective catalysis is possible through self-supported copper coordination polymers, based on a new kind of ditopic chiral ligand bearing two azabis(oxazoline) moieties. When the coordination polymer is used to catalyze a cyclopropanation reaction, it becomes soluble in reaction conditions but precipitates after reaction completion, allowing easy recovery and efficient reuse in the same reaction up to 14 times.

  11. Parahydrogen Induced polarization by homogeneous catalysis: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljubasich, Lisandro; Franzoni, María Belén; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The alignment of the nuclear spins in parahydrogen can be transferred to other molecules by a homogeneously catalyzed hydrogenation reaction resulting in dramatically enhanced NMR signals. In this chapter we introduce the involved theoretical concepts by two different approaches: the well known, intuitive population approach and the more complex but more complete density operator formalism. Furthermore, we present two interesting applications of PHIP employing homogeneous catalysis. The first demonstrates the feasibility of using PHIP hyperpolarized molecules as contrast agents in (1)H MRI. The contrast arises from the J-coupling induced rephasing of the NMR signal of molecules hyperpolarized via PHIP. It allows for the discrimination of a small amount of hyperpolarized molecules from a large background signal and may open up unprecedented opportunities to use the standard MRI nucleus (1)H for, e.g., metabolic imaging in the future. The second application shows the possibility of continuously producing hyperpolarization via PHIP by employing hollow fiber membranes. The continuous generation of hyperpolarization can overcome the problem of fast relaxation times inherent in all hyperpolarization techniques employed in liquid-state NMR. It allows, for instance, the recording of a reliable 2D spectrum much faster than performing the same experiment with thermally polarized protons. The membrane technique can be straightforwardly extended to produce a continuous flow of a hyperpolarized liquid for MRI enabling important applications in natural sciences and medicine.

  12. Synergy between experimental and theoretical methods in the exploration of homogeneous transition metal catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lupp, Daniel; Christensen, Niels Johan; Fristrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    n this Perspective, we will focus on the use of both experimental and theoretical methods in the exploration of reaction mechanisms in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. We briefly introduce the use of Hammett studies and kinetic isotope effects (KIE). Both of these techniques can be complem...

  13. Appreciating Formal Similarities in the Kinetics of Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzyme Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    Because interest in catalysts is widespread, the kinetics of catalytic reactions have been investigated by widely diverse groups of individuals, including chemists, engineers, and biologists. This has lead to redundancy in theories, particularly with regard to the topics of homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzyme catalysis. From a pedagogical…

  14. EPR spectroscopy as a tool in homogeneous catalysis research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goswami, M.; Chirila, A.; Rebreyend, C.; de Bruin, B.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of homogeneous catalysis, open-shell systems are often quite challenging to characterize. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most frequently applied tool to characterize organometallic compounds, but NMR spectra are usually broad, difficult to interpret and often fut

  15. Applying homogeneous catalysis for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, M

    2006-01-01

    This article describes recent achievements of my research group in the Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. in the area of applied homogeneous catalysis for the synthesis of biologically active compounds. Special focus is given on the development of novel and practical palladium and copper catalysts for the functionalization of haloarenes and haloheteroarenes.

  16. Synergy between experimental and computational approaches to homogeneous photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Taye B; Hansen, Jørn H

    2016-07-01

    In this Frontiers article, we highlight how state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations can contribute to the field of homogeneous photoredox catalysis. We discuss challenges in the fields and potential solutions to be found at the interface between theory and experiment. The exciting opportunities and insights that can arise through such an interdisciplinary approach are highlighted.

  17. Micelle Catalysis of an Aromatic Substitution Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Gerald; Smith J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the iodonation of aniline reaction is shown to undergo catalysis in solution of sodium lauryl sulfate which forms micelles with negatively charged pseudo surfaces. (MLH)

  18. Carboxylic acids as substrates in homogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, Lukas J; Rodríguez, Nuria; Goossen, Käthe

    2008-01-01

    In organic molecules carboxylic acid groups are among the most common functionalities. Activated derivatives of carboxylic acids have long served as versatile connection points in derivatizations and in the construction of carbon frameworks. In more recent years numerous catalytic transformations have been discovered which have made it possible for carboxylic acids to be used as building blocks without the need for additional activation steps. A large number of different product classes have become accessible from this single functionality along multifaceted reaction pathways. The frontispiece illustrates an important reason for this: In the catalytic cycles carbon monoxide gas can be released from acyl metal complexes, and gaseous carbon dioxide from carboxylate complexes, with different organometallic species being formed in each case. Thus, carboxylic acids can be used as synthetic equivalents of acyl, aryl, or alkyl halides, as well as organometallic reagents. This review provides an overview of interesting catalytic transformations of carboxylic acids and a number of derivatives accessible from them in situ. It serves to provide an invitation to complement, refine, and use these new methods in organic synthesis.

  19. Converting homogeneous to heterogeneous in electrophilic catalysis using monodisperse metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Cole A; Huang, Wenyu; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N; Somorjai, Gabor A; Toste, F Dean

    2010-01-01

    A continuing goal in catalysis is to unite the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic processes. To this end, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in heterogeneous catalysis, where this unification can also be supplemented by the ability to obtain new or divergent reactivity and selectivity. We report a novel method for applying heterogeneous catalysts to known homogeneous catalytic reactions through the design and synthesis of electrophilic platinum nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are selectively oxidized by the hypervalent iodine species PhICl(2), and catalyse a range of π-bond activation reactions previously only catalysed through homogeneous processes. Multiple experimental methods are used to unambiguously verify the heterogeneity of the catalytic process. The discovery of treatments for nanoparticles that induce the desired homogeneous catalytic activity should lead to the further development of reactions previously inaccessible in heterogeneous catalysis. Furthermore, a size and capping agent study revealed that Pt PAMAM dendrimer-capped nanoparticles demonstrate superior activity and recyclability compared with larger, polymer-capped analogues.

  20. Nanoporous oxidic solids: the confluence of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Raja, Robert; Bell, Robert G

    2009-04-28

    The several factors that render certain kinds of nanoporous oxidic solids valuable for the design of a wide range of new heterogeneous catalysts are outlined and exemplified. These factors include: (i), their relative ease of preparation, when both mesoporous siliceous frameworks (ca. 20 to 250 A diameter pores) and microporous framework-substituted aluminophosphates (ca. 4 to 14 A diameter pores) can be tailored to suit particular catalytic needs according to whether regiospecific or enantio- or shape-selective conversions are the goal; (ii), the enormous internal (three-dimensional) areas that these nanoporous solids possess (typically 10(3) m(2) g(-1)) and the consequential ease of access of reactants through the internal pores of the solids; (iii), the ability, by judicious solid-state preparative methods to assemble spatially isolated, single-site active centres at the internal surfaces of these open-structure solids, thereby making the heterogeneous catalyst simulate the characteristic features of homogenous and enzymatic catalysts; (iv), the wide variety of in situ, time-resolved and ex situ experimental techniques, coupled with computational methods, that can pin-point the precise structure of the active site under operating conditions and facilitate the formulation of reaction intermediates and mechanisms. Varieties of catalysts are described for the synthesis (often under environmentally benign and solvent-free conditions) of a wide range of organic materials including commodity chemicals (such as adipic and terephthalic acid), fine and pharmaceutical chemicals (e.g. vitamin B(3)), alkenes, epoxides, and for the photocatalytic preferential destruction of carbon monoxide in the presence of hydrogen. Nanoporous oxidic solids are ideal materials to investigate the phenomenology of catalysis because, in many of them, little distinction exists between a model and a real catalyst.

  1. ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations betweenHomogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai (Ed.), G.A.

    2007-06-11

    The International Symposium on Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis (ISHHC) has a long and distinguished history. Since 1974, in Brussels, this event has been held in Lyon, France (1977), Groeningen, The Netherlands (1981); Asilomar, California (1983); Novosibirsk, Russia (1986); Pisa, Italy (1989); Tokyo, Japan (1992); Balatonfuered, Hungary (1995); Southampton, United Kingdom (1999); Lyon, France (2001); Evanston, Illinois (2001) and Florence, Italy (2005). The aim of this international conference in Berkeley is to bring together practitioners in the three fields of catalysis, heterogeneous, homogeneous and enzyme, which utilize mostly nanosize particles. Recent advances in instrumentation, synthesis and reaction studies permit the nanoscale characterization of the catalyst systems, often for the same reaction, under similar experimental conditions. It is hoped that this circumstance will permit the development of correlations of these three different fields of catalysis on the molecular level. To further this goal we aim to uncover and focus on common concepts that emerge from nanoscale studies of structures and dynamics of the three types of catalysts. Another area of focus that will be addressed is the impact on and correlation of nanosciences with catalysis. There is information on the electronic and atomic structures of nanoparticles and their dynamics that should have importance in catalyst design and catalytic activity and selectivity.

  2. Combining the Benefits of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis with Tunable Solvents and Nearcritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Eckert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The greatest advantage of heterogeneous catalysis is the ease of separation, while the disadvantages are often limited activity and selectivity.  We report solvents that use tunable phase behavior to achieve homogeneous catalysis with ease of separation.  Tunable solvents are homogeneous mixtures of water or polyethylene glycol with organics such as acetonitrile, dioxane, and THF that can be used for homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Modest pressures of a soluble gas, generally CO2, achieve facile post-reaction heterogeneous separation of products from the catalyst. Examples shown here are rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of 1-octene and p-methylstyrene and palladium catalyzed C-O coupling to produce o-tolyl-3,5-xylyl ether and 3,5-di-tert-butylphenol. Both were successfully carried out in homogeneous tunable solvents followed by separation efficiencies of up to 99% with CO2 pressures of 3 MPa. Further examples in tunable solvents are enzyme catalyzed reactions such as kinetic resolution of rac-1-phenylethyl acetate and hydrolysis of 2-phenylethyl acetate (2PEA to 2-phenylethanol (2PE. Another tunable solvent is nearcritical water (NCW, whose unique properties offer advantages for developing sustainable alternatives to traditional processes. Some examples discussed are Friedel-Crafts alkylation and acylation, hydrolysis of benzoate esters, and water-catalyzed deprotection of N-Boc-protected amine compounds.

  3. Combining the benefits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis with tunable solvents and nearcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhel, Ali Z; Pollet, Pamela; Liotta, Charles L; Eckert, Charles A

    2010-11-16

    The greatest advantage of heterogeneous catalysis is the ease of separation, while the disadvantages are often limited activity and selectivity. We report solvents that use tunable phase behavior to achieve homogeneous catalysis with ease of separation. Tunable solvents are homogeneous mixtures of water or polyethylene glycol with organics such as acetonitrile, dioxane, and THF that can be used for homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Modest pressures of a soluble gas, generally CO₂, achieve facile post-reaction heterogeneous separation of products from the catalyst. Examples shown here are rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of 1-octene and p-methylstyrene and palladium catalyzed C-O coupling to produce o-tolyl-3,5-xylyl ether and 3,5-di-tert-butylphenol. Both were successfully carried out in homogeneous tunable solvents followed by separation efficiencies of up to 99% with CO₂ pressures of 3 MPa. Further examples in tunable solvents are enzyme catalyzed reactions such as kinetic resolution of rac-1-phenylethyl acetate and hydrolysis of 2-phenylethyl acetate (2PEA) to 2-phenylethanol (2PE). Another tunable solvent is nearcritical water (NCW), whose unique properties offer advantages for developing sustainable alternatives to traditional processes. Some examples discussed are Friedel-Crafts alkylation and acylation, hydrolysis of benzoate esters, and water-catalyzed deprotection of N-Boc-protected amine compounds.

  4. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-01

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value.

  5. Biodiesel forming reactions using heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yijun

    Biodiesel synthesis from biomass provides a means for utilizing effectively renewable resources, a way to convert waste vegetable oils and animal fats to a useful product, a way to recycle carbon dioxide for a combustion fuel, and production of a fuel that is biodegradable, non-toxic, and has a lower emission profile than petroleum-diesel. Free fatty acid (FFA) esterification and triglyceride (TG) transesterification with low molecular weight alcohols constitute the synthetic routes to prepare biodiesel from lipid feedstocks. This project was aimed at developing a better understanding of important fundamental issues involved in heterogeneous catalyzed biodiesel forming reactions using mainly model compounds, representing part of on-going efforts to build up a rational base for assay, design, and performance optimization of solid acids/bases in biodiesel synthesis. As FFA esterification proceeds, water is continuously formed as a byproduct and affects reaction rates in a negative manner. Using sulfuric acid (as a catalyst) and acetic acid (as a model compound for FFA), the impact of increasing concentrations of water on acid catalysis was investigated. The order of the water effect on reaction rate was determined to be -0.83. Sulfuric acid lost up to 90% activity as the amount of water present increased. The nature of the negative effect of water on esterification was found to go beyond the scope of reverse hydrolysis and was associated with the diminished acid strength of sulfuric acid as a result of the preferential solvation by water molecules of its catalytic protons. The results indicate that as esterification progresses and byproduct water is produced, deactivation of a Bronsted acid catalyst like H2SO4 occurs. Using a solid composite acid (SAC-13) as an example of heterogeneous catalysts and sulfuric acid as a homogeneous reference, similar reaction inhibition by water was demonstrated for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. This similarity together with

  6. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  7. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  8. Nanoparticles as recyclable catalysts: the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astruc, Didier; Lu, Feng; Aranzaes, Jaime Ruiz

    2005-12-01

    Interest in catalysis by metal nanoparticles (NPs) is increasing dramatically, as reflected by the large number of publications in the last five years. This field, "semi-heterogeneous catalysis", is at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and progress has been made in the efficiency and selectivity of reactions and recovery and recyclability of the catalytic materials. Usually NP catalysts are prepared from a metal salt, a reducing agent, and a stabilizer and are supported on an oxide, charcoal, or a zeolite. Besides the polymers and oxides that used to be employed as standard, innovative stabilizers, media, and supports have appeared, such as dendrimers, specific ligands, ionic liquids, surfactants, membranes, carbon nanotubes, and a variety of oxides. Ligand-free procedures have provided remarkable results with extremely low metal loading. The Review presents the recent developments and the use of NP catalysis in organic synthesis, for example, in hydrogenation and C--C coupling reactions, and the heterogeneous oxidation of CO on gold NPs.

  9. Immobilization of Homogeneous Catalysis on Phosphinated MCM-41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Homogeneous catalysis Rh(PPh3)3Cl immobilized on MCM-41 modified with (OEt)3Si(CH2)3PPh2 results in a stable hydrogenation catalyst with turn over frequency (TOF) three times higher than that of Rh(PPh3)3C1 in the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. Leaching of the catalyst is only a minor factor with leaching rate 0.04 % for each cycle. However, immobilization of Rh(PPh3)2(CO)C1 on similar support can only have catalytic hydroformylation properties for the first few cycles. Decay of the catalyst is due to largh leaching rate with totally 22.4 % of Rh leached for the first three cycles.

  10. Immobilization of Homogeneous Catalysis on Phosphinated MCM-41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHYU; Shin-Guang

    2001-01-01

    Homogeneous catalysis Rh(PPh3)3Cl immobilized on MCM-41 modified with (OEt)3Si(CH2)3PPh2 results in a stable hydrogenation catalyst with turn over frequency (TOF) three times higher than that of Rh(PPh3)3C1 in the hydrogenation of cyclohexene. Leaching of the catalyst is only a minor factor with leaching rate 0.04 % for each cycle. However, immobilization of Rh(PPh3)2(CO)C1 on similar support can only have catalytic hydroformylation properties for the first few cycles. Decay of the catalyst is due to largh leaching rate with totally 22.4 % of Rh leached for the first three cycles.  ……

  11. UV LASER INITIATED STEREOSELECTIVE HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS POLYMERIZATION OF PHENYLACETYLENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie; SHE Yongbo; FU Kejian; ZHOU Yihua

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the stereoselective homogeneous catalysis polymerization of phenylacetylene by using two kinds of catalysts W(CO)5CH3I and W(CO)4I2 produced from UV laser photolysis of W (CO)6 in CH3I, I2 -C6H6 and CHI3 -C6H6 respectively was studied . The effects of laser energy,laser irradiation time and lifetime of catalyst on the polymerization of phenylacetylene were discussed . The photoproducts of W (CO)6 in CH3I, I2 - C6H6 and CHI3 - C6H6 were determined by IR spectra. The structures of polyphenylacetylene obtained by W (CO)5CH3I and W (CO)4I2 catalysts were characterized by IR spectra and 1H NMR spectra.

  12. Homogeneous vs heterogeneous polymerization catalysis revealed by single-particle fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N Melody; Blum, Suzanne A

    2011-11-16

    A high-sensitivity and high-resolution single-particle fluorescence microscopy technique differentiated between homogeneous and heterogeneous metathesis polymerization catalysis by imaging the location of the early stages of polymerization. By imaging single polymers and single crystals of Grubbs II, polymerization catalysis was revealed to be solely homogeneous rather than heterogeneous or both.

  13. Solar fuels generation and molecular systems: is it homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc

    2013-03-21

    Catalysis is a key enabling technology for solar fuel generation. A number of catalytic systems, either molecular/homogeneous or solid/heterogeneous, have been developed during the last few decades for both the reductive and oxidative multi-electron reactions required for fuel production from water or CO(2) as renewable raw materials. While allowing for a fine tuning of the catalytic properties through ligand design, molecular approaches are frequently criticized because of the inherent fragility of the resulting catalysts, when exposed to extreme redox potentials. In a number of cases, it has been clearly established that the true catalytic species is heterogeneous in nature, arising from the transformation of the initial molecular species, which should rather be considered as a pre-catalyst. Whether such a situation is general or not is a matter of debate in the community. In this review, covering water oxidation and reduction catalysts, involving noble and non-noble metal ions, we limit our discussion to the cases in which this issue has been directly and properly addressed as well as those requiring more confirmation. The methodologies proposed for discriminating homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis are inspired in part by those previously discussed by Finke in the case of homogeneous hydrogenation reaction in organometallic chemistry [J. A. Widegren and R. G. Finke, J. Mol. Catal. A, 2003, 198, 317-341].

  14. Metal Catalysts Recycling and Heterogeneous/Homogeneous Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Arai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous metal catalysts rather than homogeneous ones are recommended for industrial applications after considering their performance in activity, separation, and recycling [1]. The recycling of metal catalysts is important from economic and environmental points of view. When supported and bulk metal catalysts are used in liquid-phase organic reactions, there is a possibility that active metal species are leaching away into the liquid phases [2,3]. The metal leaching would make it difficult for the catalysts to maintain their desired initial performance for repeated batch reactions and during continuous ones. The metal leaching would also cause some undesired contamination of products by the metal species dissolved in the reaction mixture, and the separation of the metal contaminants would be required to purify the products. Therefore, various novel methods have been proposed so far to immobilize/stabilize the active metal species and to separate/collect/reuse the dissolved metal species [4]. In addition, knowledge on the heterogeneous and homogeneous natures of organic reactions using heterogeneous catalysts is important to discuss their reaction mechanisms and catalytically working active species. [...

  15. Combination of sunlight irradiated oxidative processes for landfill leachate: heterogeneous catalysis (TiO2 versus homogeneous catalysis (H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Cobra Guimarães

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the treatment of landfill leachate liquid in nature, after the use of a combination of advanced oxidation processes. More specifically, it compared heterogeneous catalysis with TiO2 to homogeneous catalysis with H2O2, both under photo-irradiated sunlight. The liquid used for the study was the leachate from the landfill of the city of Cachoeira Paulista, São Paulo State, Brazil. The experiments were conducted in a semi-batch reactor open to the absorption of solar UV radiation, with 120 min reaction time. The factors and their respective levels (-1, 0 and 1 were distributed in a experimental design 24-1 with duplicate and triplicate in the central point, resulting in an array with 19 treatment trials. The studied factors in comparing the two catalytic processes were: liquid leachate dilution, TiO2 concentration on the reactor plate, the H2O2 amount and pH level. The leachate had low photo-catalytic degradability, with NOPC reductions ranging from 1% to a maximum of 24.9%. When considering each factor alone, neither homogeneous catalysis with H2O2, nor heterogeneous catalysis with TiO2, could degrade the percolated liquid without significant reductions (5% level in total NOPC. On the other hand, the combined use of homogenous catalysis with H2O2 and heterogeneous catalysis H2O2 resulted in the greatest reductions in NOPC. The optimum condition for the NOPC reduction was obtained at pH 7, dilution of percolated:water at 1:1 (v v-1 rate; excess of 12.5% H2O2 and coating plate reactor with 0.025 g cm-2 TiO2.

  16. Comparison of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for synthesis of biodiesel from Madhuca indica oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. SINGH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel was developed by transesterification of Madhuca indica oil by homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. KOH and CaO were taken as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, respectively. It was found that the homogeneous catalyst (KOH took 1.0 h of reaction time, 6:1 methanol to oil molar ratio, 0.75 mass% of catalyst amount, 55±0.5 C reaction temperature for completion of the reaction. The heterogeneous catalyst (CaO was found to give optimum yield in 2.5 h of reaction time at 8:1 methanol to oil molar ratio, 2.5 mass% of catalyst amount, at 65±0.5 C. A high yield (95-97% and conversion (>96.5% was obtained from both the catalysts. CaO was found to leach to some extent in the reactants and a biodiesel conversion of 27-28% was observed as a result of leaching.

  17. Molecular Catalysis of O2 Reduction by Iron Porphyrins in Water: Heterogeneous versus Homogeneous Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Dridi, Hachem; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-28

    Despite decades of active attention, important problems remain pending in the catalysis of dioxygen reduction by iron porphyrins in water in terms of selectivity and mechanisms. This is what happens, for example, for the distinction between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis for soluble porphyrins, for the estimation of H2O2/H2O product selectivity, and for the determination of the reaction mechanism in the two situations. With water-soluble iron tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin as an example, procedures are described that allow one to operate this distinction and determine the H2O2/H2O product ratio in each case separately. It is noteworthy that, despite the weak adsorption of the iron(II) porphyrin on the glassy carbon electrode, the contribution of the adsorbed complex to catalysis rivals that of its solution counterpart. Depending on the electrode potential, two successive catalytic pathways have been identified and characterized in terms of current-potential responses and H2O2/H2O selectivity. These observations are interpreted in the framework of the commonly accepted mechanism for catalytic reduction of dioxygen by iron porphyrins, after checking its compatibility with a change of oxygen concentration and pH. The difference in intrinsic catalytic reactivity between the catalyst in the adsorbed state and in solution is also discussed. The role of heterogeneous catalysis with iron tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin has been overlooked in previous studies because of its water solubility. The main objective of the present contribution is therefore to call attention, by means of this emblematic example, to such possibilities to reach a correct identification of the catalyst, its performances, and reaction mechanism. This is a question of general interest, so that reduction of dioxygen remains a topic of high importance in the context of contemporary energy challenges.

  18. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, Egid B.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas

  19. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, E.B.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diells-Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas

  20. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, E.B.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diells-Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas hy

  1. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, Egid B.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas hyd

  2. Mechanistic Insights into Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Asymmetric Iron Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Jessica

    Our group has been focused on replacing toxic and expensive precious metal catalysts with iron for the synthesis of enantiopure compounds for industrial applications. During an investigation into the mechanism of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation with our first generation iron-(P-N-N-P) catalysts we found substantial evidence for zero-valent iron nanoparticles coated in chiral ligand acting as the active site. Extensive experimental and computational experiments were undertaken which included NMR, DFT, reaction profile analysis, substoichiometric poisoning, electron microscope imaging, XPS and multiphasic analysis, all of which supported the fact that NPs were the active species in catalysis. Reversibility of this asymmetric reaction on the nanoparticle surface was then probed using oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols, yielding modest enantiopurity and high turnover frequencies (TOF) for a range of aromatic alcohols. Efficient dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane for hydrogen evolution and the formation of B-N oligomers was also shown using the NP system, yielding highly active systems, with a maximum TOF of 3.66 H2/s-1 . We have also begun to focus on the development of iron catalysts for asymmetric direct hydrogenation of ketones using hydrogen gas. New chiral iron-(P-N-P) catalysts were developed and shown to be quite active and selective for a wide range of substrates. Mechanistic investigations primarily using NMR and DFT indicated that a highly active trans-dihydride species was being formed during catalyst activation. Lastly, a new library of chiral P-N-P and P-NH-P ligands were developed, as well as their corresponding iron complexes, some of which show promise for the development of future generations of active asymmetric direct hydrogenation catalysts.

  3. Rh(I)-catalyzed transformation of propargyl vinyl ethers into (E,Z)-dienals: stereoelectronic role of trans effect in a metal-mediated pericyclic process and a shift from homogeneous to heterogeneous catalysis during a one-pot reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidhani, Dinesh V; Krafft, Marie E; Alabugin, Igor V

    2014-01-01

    The combination of experiments and computations reveals unusual features of stereoselective Rh(I)-catalyzed transformation of propargyl vinyl ethers into (E,Z)-dienals. The first step, the conversion of propargyl vinyl ethers into allene aldehydes, proceeds under homogeneous conditions via a "cyclization-mediated" mechanism initiated by Rh(I) coordination at the alkyne. This path agrees well with the small experimental effects of substituents on the carbinol carbon. The key feature revealed by the computational study is the stereoelectronic effect of the ligand arrangement at the catalytic center. The rearrangement barriers significantly decrease due to the greater transfer of electron density from the catalytic metal center to the CO ligand oriented trans to the alkyne. This effect increases electrophilicity of the metal and lowers the calculated barriers by 9.0 kcal/mol. Subsequent evolution of the catalyst leads to the in situ formation of Rh(I) nanoclusters that catalyze stereoselective tautomerization. The intermediacy of heterogeneous catalysis by nanoclusters was confirmed by mercury poisoning, temperature-dependent sigmoidal kinetic curves, and dynamic light scattering. The combination of experiments and computations suggests that the initially formed allene-aldehyde product assists in the transformation of a homogeneous catalyst (or "a cocktail of catalysts") into nanoclusters, which in turn catalyze and control the stereochemistry of subsequent transformations.

  4. Nonseparable exchange-correlation functional for molecules, including homogeneous catalysis involving transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haoyu S; Zhang, Wenjing; Verma, Pragya; He, Xiao; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-05-14

    The goal of this work is to develop a gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional of Kohn-Sham density functional theory for treating molecular problems with a special emphasis on the prediction of quantities important for homogeneous catalysis and other molecular energetics. Our training and validation of exchange-correlation functionals is organized in terms of databases and subdatabases. The key properties required for homogeneous catalysis are main group bond energies (database MGBE137), transition metal bond energies (database TMBE32), reaction barrier heights (database BH76), and molecular structures (database MS10). We also consider 26 other databases, most of which are subdatabases of a newly extended broad database called Database 2015, which is presented in the present article and in its ESI. Based on the mathematical form of a nonseparable gradient approximation (NGA), as first employed in the N12 functional, we design a new functional by using Database 2015 and by adding smoothness constraints to the optimization of the functional. The resulting functional is called the gradient approximation for molecules, or GAM. The GAM functional gives better results for MGBE137, TMBE32, and BH76 than any available generalized gradient approximation (GGA) or than N12. The GAM functional also gives reasonable results for MS10 with an MUE of 0.018 Å. The GAM functional provides good results both within the training sets and outside the training sets. The convergence tests and the smooth curves of exchange-correlation enhancement factor as a function of the reduced density gradient show that the GAM functional is a smooth functional that should not lead to extra expense or instability in optimizations. NGAs, like GGAs, have the advantage over meta-GGAs and hybrid GGAs of respectively smaller grid-size requirements for integrations and lower costs for extended systems. These computational advantages combined with the relatively high accuracy for all

  5. Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Routes in Water Oxidation Catalysis Starting from Cu(II) Complexes with Tetraaza Macrocyclic Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedello, Andrea; Bazzan, Irene; Dalle Carbonare, Nicola; Giuliani, Angela; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Africh, Cristina; Cepek, Cinzia; Argazzi, Roberto; Bonchio, Marcella; Caramori, Stefano; Robert, Marc; Sartorel, Andrea

    2016-04-20

    Since the first report in 2012, molecular copper complexes have been proposed as efficient electrocatalysts for water oxidation reactions, carried out in alkaline/neutral aqueous media. However, in some cases the copper species have been recognized as precursors of an active copper oxide layer, electrodeposited onto the working electrode. Therefore, the question whether copper catalysis is molecular or not is particularly relevant in the field of water oxidation. In this study, we investigate the electrochemical activity of copper(II) complexes with two tetraaza macrocyclic ligands, distinguishing heterogeneous or homogeneous processes depending on the reaction media. In an alkaline aqueous solution, and upon application of an anodic bias to working electrodes, an active copper oxide layer is observed to electrodeposit at the electrode surface. Conversely, water oxidation in neutral aqueous buffers is not associated to formation of the copper oxide layer, and could be exploited to evaluate and optimize a molecular, homogeneous catalysis.

  6. Cascade catalysis for the homogeneous hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Chelsea A; Sanford, Melanie S

    2011-11-16

    This communication demonstrates the homogeneous hydrogenation of CO(2) to CH(3)OH via cascade catalysis. Three different homogeneous catalysts, (PMe(3))(4)Ru(Cl)(OAc), Sc(OTf)(3), and (PNN)Ru(CO)(H), operate in sequence to promote this transformation.

  7. Synergy between experimental and theoretical methods in the exploration of homogeneous transition metal catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupp, D; Christensen, N J; Fristrup, P

    2014-08-01

    In this Perspective, we will focus on the use of both experimental and theoretical methods in the exploration of reaction mechanisms in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. We briefly introduce the use of Hammett studies and kinetic isotope effects (KIE). Both of these techniques can be complemented by computational chemistry - in particular in cases where interpretation of the experimental results is not straightforward. The good correspondence between experiment and theory is only possible due to recent advances within the applied theoretical framework. We therefore also highlight the innovations made in the last decades with emphasis on dispersion-corrected DFT and solvation models. The current state-of-the-art is highlighted using examples from the literature with particular focus on the synergy between experiment and theory.

  8. Heterogeneous Molecular Catalysis of Electrochemical Reactions: Volcano Plots and Catalytic Tafel Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-14

    We analyze here, in the framework of heterogeneous molecular catalysis, the reasons for the occurrence or nonoccurrence of volcanoes upon plotting the kinetics of the catalytic reaction versus the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate of the catalytic process. As in the case of homogeneous molecular catalysis or catalysis by surface-active metallic sites, a strong motivation of such studies relates to modern energy challenges, particularly those involving small molecules, such as water, hydrogen, oxygen, proton, and carbon dioxide. This motivation is particularly pertinent for what concerns heterogeneous molecular catalysis, since it is commonly preferred to homogeneous molecular catalysis by the same molecules if only for chemical separation purposes and electrolytic cell architecture. As with the two other catalysis modes, the main drawback of the volcano plot approach is the basic assumption that the kinetic responses depend on a single descriptor, viz., the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate. More comprehensive approaches, investigating the responses to the maximal number of experimental factors, and conveniently expressed as catalytic Tafel plots, should clearly be preferred. This is more so in the case of heterogeneous molecular catalysis in that additional transport factors in the supporting film may additionally affect the current-potential responses. This is attested by the noteworthy presence of maxima in catalytic Tafel plots as well as their dependence upon the cyclic voltammetric scan rate.

  9. Molecular weight enlargement--a molecular approach to continuous homogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Michèle; Müller, Christian; Vogt, Dieter

    2010-09-28

    Molecular weight enlargement (MWE) is an attractive method for homogeneous catalyst recycling. Applications of MWE in combination with either catalyst precipitation or nanofiltration have demonstrated their great potential as a method for process intensification in homogeneous catalysis. Selected, recent advances in MWE in combination with catalyst recovery are discussed, together with their implication for future developments. These examples demonstrate that this strategy is applicable in many different homogeneously catalyzed transformations.

  10. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-04

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples.

  11. Chemistry of Platinum and Palladium Metal Complexes in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrban Ashiq

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal complexes of platinum and palladium are most widely used in catalysis. Many synthetic reactions have been carried out with such complexes (used as a catalyst which have specifically polymer ligands, through hydrosilylation, acetoxylation, hydrogenation, hydro-formylation, oligo-merisation and polymerization. Almost many platinum and palladium catalysts are heterogeneous in nature i.e. the reaction taking place on a solid surface. Now from few years homogeneous catalysts which are completely soluble in the liquid phase reactant, has acknowledged too much attention, yet having small industrial applications, mainly due to the striving of platinum and palladium complexes separation from the catalytic products. More recently a transitional type of platinum and palladium catalysts have been synthesized through attachment of the activated transition metal complexes on the surface of polymer support particularly insoluble which has been establish to offer encouraging new collection of catalysts for effective research on synthesis. Many of such complexes will be based on the palladium and platinum metals group. The major objective of this review is to inaugurate the relationship among the reactivity’s of homogeneous platinum and palladium complexes and heterogeneous complexes of these metals (those bonded to the surface of metals.

  12. Nickel N-heterocyclic carbene complexes in homogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berding, Joris

    2009-01-01

    Described in this thesis are the investigations into the chemistry of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands and transition-metal complexes thereof. Specifically, a variety of N-heterocyclic carbene complexes of nickel were prepared, characterized and used as catalysts in three types of homogeneous ca

  13. Molecular recognition in homogeneous transition metal catalysis: a biomimetic strategy for high selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddartha; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2008-01-28

    Traditional methods for selectivity control in homogeneous transition metal catalysis either employ steric effects in a binding pocket or chelate control. In a supramolecular strategy, encapsulation of the substrate can provide useful shape and size selectivity. A fully developed molecular recognition strategy involving hydrogen bonding or solvophobic forces has given almost completely regioselective functionalization of remote, unactivated C-H bonds.

  14. Flows and chemical reactions in homogeneous mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Flows with chemical reactions can occur in various fields such as combustion, process engineering, aeronautics, the atmospheric environment and aquatics. The examples of application chosen in this book mainly concern homogeneous reactive mixtures that can occur in propellers within the fields of process engineering and combustion: - propagation of sound and monodimensional flows in nozzles, which may include disequilibria of the internal modes of the energy of molecules; - ideal chemical reactors, stabilization of their steady operation points in the homogeneous case of a perfect mixture and c

  15. Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Charles P

    2012-11-14

    Mechanistic Studies at the Interface Between Organometallic Chemistry and Homogeneous Catalysis Charles P. Casey, Principal Investigator Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 Phone 608-262-0584 FAX: 608-262-7144 Email: casey@chem.wisc.edu http://www.chem.wisc.edu/main/people/faculty/casey.html Executive Summary. Our goal was to learn the intimate mechanistic details of reactions involved in homogeneous catalysis and to use the insight we gain to develop new and improved catalysts. Our work centered on the hydrogenation of polar functional groups such as aldehydes and ketones and on hydroformylation. Specifically, we concentrated on catalysts capable of simultaneously transferring hydride from a metal center and a proton from an acidic oxygen or nitrogen center to an aldehyde or ketone. An economical iron based catalyst was developed and patented. Better understanding of fundamental organometallic reactions and catalytic processes enabled design of energy and material efficient chemical processes. Our work contributed to the development of catalysts for the selective and mild hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes; this will provide a modern green alternative to reductions by LiAlH4 and NaBH4, which require extensive work-up procedures and produce waste streams. (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H Hydrogenation Catalysts. Youval Shvo described a remarkable catalytic system in which the key intermediate (C5R4OH)Ru(CO)2H (1) has an electronically coupled acidic OH unit and a hydridic RuH unit. Our efforts centered on understanding and improving upon this important catalyst for reduction of aldehydes and ketones. Our mechanistic studies established that the reduction of aldehydes by 1 to produce alcohols and a diruthenium bridging hydride species occurs much more rapidly than regeneration of the ruthenium hydride from the diruthenium bridging hydride species. Our mechanistic studies require simultaneous transfer of hydride from ruthenium to

  16. Magnetically Separable Base Catalysts: Heterogeneous Catalysis vs. Quasi-Homogeneous Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Abu-Reziq

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of magnetically separable quasi-homogeneous base catalyst and heterogeneous base catalyst is described. The quasi-homogeneous catalyst is achieved by supporting silane monomers functionalized with different amine groups directly on the surface of magnetite nanoparticles. The heterogeneous catalyst is prepared via a sol-gel process in which silane monomers containing different amine groups are copolymerized with tetraethoxysilane in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles functionalized with ionic liquid moieties. The reactivity of the quasi-homogeneous and the heterogeneous base catalysts is compared in the nitroaldol condensation.

  17. Homogeneous catalysis of valeronitrile hydrolysis under supercritical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlea, Michael; Kohl, Sabine; Blickhan, Nina; Vogel, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical nitrile hydrolysis can be used for both, amide and acid production as well as waste water treatment, as the hydrolysis products show good biodegradability. The conventional process at ambient conditions requires large amounts of mineral acid or base. Approaches that use supercritical water as a green solvent without a catalyst have been investigated over recent years. Findings for valeronitrile hydrolysis presented recently showed promising reaction rates and valeric acid yields. In an attempt to further maximize product yield and to better understand the impact of the pH, reactions in dilute sulfuric acid (0.01 mol L(-1)) were performed in a continuous high-pressure laboratory-scale apparatus at 400-500 °C, 30 MPa, and a maximum residence time of 100 s. Results from both reaction media were compared with regard to productivity and sustainability.

  18. Periphery-Functionalized Organometallic Dendrimers for Homogeneous Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Jastrzebski, J.T.B.H.

    1999-01-01

    The use of carbosilane based dendrimers as molecular scaffolds for the attachment of organomettallic Ni 'pincer' complexes that are active as a catalyst in the Kharasch addition reaction is described. It is shown that increasing steric crowding at the dendrimer periphery results in decreased catalys

  19. Homogeneous rhodium(i)-catalysis in de novo heterocycle syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, James D; Willis, Michael C

    2016-06-14

    Recent research has led to the development of mild, efficient and selective catalytic systems based on Rh(i) complexes. This review summarises the applications of these catalysts to the synthesis of heterocycles from simple building blocks. Included herein are approaches based on cycloisomerisation, cycloaddition, hydroacylation and hydroarylation reactions, as well as various tandem and domino procedures and carbonylation processes.

  20. Surface plasmon resonance promotion of homogeneous catalysis using a gold nanoparticle platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D. Andrew; Nita, Rafaela; Moore, Martin; Zabetakis, Dan; Khandelwal, Manish; Martin, Brett D.; Fontana, Jake; Goldberg, Efram; Funk, Aaron R.; Chang, Eddie L.; Trammell, Scott A.

    2014-06-01

    Reaction of 10 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a thiol-functionalized bipyridine copper(II) complex, Cu[( N-(6-mercaptohexyl)-2,2'-bipyridinyl-5-carboxamide)]Cl2 ( 3), and (1-mercaptohex-6-yl)tri(ethylene glycol) ( 5) in different ratios resulted in mixed monolayer modified NPs with varying surface coverage of capping agent. The copper complex modified NPs were used for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) promoted homogeneous catalysis applied to the hydrolysis of the nerve agent methyl parathion (MeP) at pH 8.0. Low power green laser (532 nm) irradiation of solutions of modified AuNPs with MeP resulted in significant increase in the rate of phosphate ester hydrolysis which could not be attributed to a thermal process. Ratios of initial rates (laser/dark) at high substrate concentrations of MeP as a function of copper catalyst coverage were determined. A possible mechanism for catalytic enhancement involving dissociation of catalytically inactive hydroxy-bridged Cu(II) dimer is discussed.

  1. Gold coordination during homogeneous alkyne and allene cyclisation catalysis: Coordination to substrates, to ancillary ligands and in intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Schmidbaur

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing role of homogeneous gold catalysis in organic synthesis and the consequent need to be able to rationally control the rate and outcome of such reactions has emphasised the importance of each successive metal–carbon coordination step. Concentrating on alkyne and allene cyclisation and upon reaction mechanisms postulated on the basis of empirical and theoretical results, we have examined the coordination of gold fragments to triple bonds, the modification of gold(I precatalysts to effect specific reaction pathways or enantioselectivity and the isolation of coordinated intermediates or model compounds thereof. Some of the recent advances that have been made in various laboratories are described in this compact review.

  2. Modern multiphase catalysis: new developments in the separation of homogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Mark J

    2010-01-14

    Homogeneous catalysts are powerful tools for the synthesis of fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals and materials, however their exploitation on an industrial scale is often held back due to the challenges of separating and recycling the catalyst. This perspective focuses on approaches to multiphase catalysis that have emerged in the last decade, highlighting methods that can address the separation issues and in some cases result in superior catalyst performance and environmental benefits.

  3. Heterogeneous and homogeneous chiral Cu(II) catalysis in water: enantioselective boron conjugate additions to dienones and dienoesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanosono, Taku; Xu, Pengyu; Kobayashi, Shū

    2013-09-25

    It was proved that a judicious choice of counteranion played a prominent role in Cu(II) catalysis for enantioselective boron conjugate additions in water; the use of Cu(OH)2 renders heterogeneous catalysis, whereas Cu(OAc)2 renders homogeneous catalysis; cyclic dienones underwent a remarkable switch of regioselectivity between 1,4- and 1,6-modes of the additions through these catalyses.

  4. Combining Zn Ion Catalysis with Homogeneous Gold Catalysis: An Efficient Annulation Approach to N-Protected Indoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhao; Liu, Lianzhu; Zhang, Liming

    2013-02-01

    The Fischer indole synthesis is perhaps the most powerful method for indole preparation, but it often suffers from low regioselectivities with unsymmetric aliphatic ketone substrates and strong acidic conditions and is not suitable for α,β-unsaturated ketones. In this article, we disclose an efficient synthesis of N-protected indoles from N-arylhydroxamic acids/N-aryl-N-hydroxycarbamates and a variety of alkynes via a cooperative gold and zinc catalysis. The zinc catalysis is similar to the related zinc ion catalysis in metalloenzymes such as human carbonic anhydrase II and substantially enhances the O-nucleophilicity of N-acylated hydroxamines by forming the corresponding Zn chelates. The Zn chelates can attack gold-activated alkynes to form O-alkenyl-N-arylhydroxamates, which can undergo facile 3,3-sigmatropic rearrangements and subsequent cyclodehydrations to yield N-protected indole products. This new chemistry offers several important improvements over the Fischer indole synthesis: a) the reaction conditions are mildly acidic and can tolerate sensitive groups such as Boc; b) broader substrate scopes including substrates with pendant carbonyl groups (reactive in the Fischer chemistry) and alkyl chlorides (e.g., 3f); c) better regioselectivities for the formation of 2-substituted indoles under much milder conditions; d) 2-alkenylindoles can be prepared readily in good to excellent yields, but the Fischer chemistry could not; e) with internal alkynes both steric and electronic controls are available for achieving good regioselectivities, while the Fischer chemistry is in general problematic.

  5. Catalysis in the alkylation reaction of 1-naphthol with epichlorohydrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLOBODANKA JOVANOVIC

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new and improved procedures were developed for the synthesis of 1-(1-naphthyloxy-2,3-epoxypropane as an important intermediate in the production of the beta-blocker and antioxidant, 1-[(1-methylethylamino]-3-(1-naphthyloxy-2-propanol (propranolol. Both base homogeneous and heterogeneous PTC catalysis were employed. High yields and remarkable selectivity were achieved. The improved purity is particularly important, in view of the quality requirements for propranolol hydrochloride as an active pharmaceutical ingredient.

  6. Development of time-resolved XAFS spectroscopy techniques : applications in homogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2004-01-01

    Catalysis is one of the most important methods to obtain products in a selective and sustainable manner, i.e. in an environmental responsible manner. To be able to modify and optimize these catalytic production pathways, it is important to obtain knowledge on the reaction mechanisms occurring. X-ray

  7. Development of time-resolved XAFS spectroscopy techniques : applications in homogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2004-01-01

    Catalysis is one of the most important methods to obtain products in a selective and sustainable manner, i.e. in an environmental responsible manner. To be able to modify and optimize these catalytic production pathways, it is important to obtain knowledge on the reaction mechanisms occurring. X-ray

  8. Alkaline earth organometallic compounds in homogeneous catalysis : Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of calcium and magnesium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penafiel, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Homogeneous catalysis has been developed mainly through the use of transition metal complexes. However, transition-metal catalysts, often highly toxic, are becoming increasingly rare and consequently more expensive. Therefore, the search for sustainable alternatives is nowadays of great importance.

  9. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Heinz

    1979-06-01

    This history covers: catalytic cracking and other acid catalysed reactions; zeolite catalysis; dual functional catalysis; hydrogenation catalysis and hydrogen production; catalytic hydrocarbon dehydrogenation; catalytic alkylation and dealkylation; catalytic coal liquefaction and gasification; heterogeneous oxidation, arnmoxidation, chlorination, and oxychlorination catalysis; olefin disproportionation catalysis; industrial homogeneous catalysis; catalytic polymerization; catalysis for motor vehicle emission control; fuel cell catalysis; and the profession of the catalytic chemist or engineer. The discussion is mostly limited to the rapid growth of industrial catalysis between the second World War and 1978.

  10. Supramolecular catalysis. Part 1: non-covalent interactions as a tool for building and modifying homogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Matthieu; Ballester, Pablo; Vidal-Ferran, Anton; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2014-03-01

    Supramolecular catalysis is a rapidly expanding discipline which has benefited from the development of both homogeneous catalysis and supramolecular chemistry. The properties of classical metal and organic catalysts can now be carefully tailored by means of several suitable approaches and the choice of reversible interactions such as hydrogen bond, metal-ligand, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The first part of these two subsequent reviews will be dedicated to catalytic systems for which non-covalent interactions between the partners of the reaction have been designed although mimicking enzyme properties has not been intended. Ligand, metal, organocatalyst, substrate, additive, and metal counterion are reaction partners that can be held together by non-covalent interactions. The resulting catalysts possess unique properties compared to analogues lacking the assembling properties. Depending on the nature of the reaction partners involved in the interactions, distinct applications have been accomplished, mainly (i) the building of bidentate ligand libraries (intra ligand-ligand), (ii) the building of di- or oligonuclear complexes (inter ligand-ligand), (iii) the alteration of the coordination spheres of a metal catalyst (ligand-ligand additive), and (iv) the control of the substrate reactivity (catalyst-substrate). More complex systems that involve the cooperative action of three reaction partners have also been disclosed. In this review, special attention will be given to supramolecular catalysts for which the observed catalytic activity and/or selectivity have been imputed to non-covalent interaction between the reaction partners. Additional features of these catalysts are the easy modulation of the catalytic performance by modifying one of their building blocks and the development of new catalytic pathways/reactions not achievable with classical covalent catalysts.

  11. Conversion of CO2 via Visible Light Promoted Homogeneous Redox Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Rieger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This review gives an overview on the principles of light-promoted homogeneous redox catalysis in terms of applications in CO2 conversion. Various chromophores and the advantages of different structures and metal centers as well as optimization strategies are discussed. All aspects of the reduction catalyst site are restricted to CO2 conversion. An important focus of this review is the question of a replacement of the sacrificial donor which is found in most of the current publications. Furthermore, electronic parameters of supramolecular systems are reviewed with reference to the requisite of chromophores, oxidation and reduction sites.

  12. Heterogeneous catalysis in complex, condensed reaction media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantu, David C.; Wang, Yang-Gang; Yoon, Yeohoon; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger; Weber, Robert S.

    2017-07-01

    Many reactions required for the upgrading of biomass into fuels and chemicals—hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation, hydrocracking—are ostensibly similar to those practiced in the upgrading of petroleum into fuels. But, repurposing hydroprocessing catalysts from refinery operations to treat bio-oil has proved to be unsatisfactory. New catalysts are needed because the composition of the biogenic reactants differs from that of petroleum-derived feedstocks (e.g. the low concentration of sulfur in cellulose-derived biomass precludes use of metal sulfide catalysts unless sulfur is added to the reaction stream). New processes are needed because bio-oils oligomerize rapidly, forming intractable coke and “gunk”, at temperatures so low that the desired upgrading reactions are impractically slow, and so low that the bio-oil upgrading must be handled as a condensed fluid. Ideally, the new catalysts and processes would exploit the properties of the multiple phases present in condensed bio-oil, notably the polarizability and structure of the fluid near a catalyst’s surface in the cybotactic region. The results of preliminary modeling of the cybotactic region of different catalyst surfaces in the hydrogenation of phenol suggest that Pd catalysts supported on hydrophilic surfaces are more active than catalysts based on lipophilic supports because the former serve to enhance the concentration of the phenol in the vicinity of the Pd. The effect stems from thermodynamics, not the rate of mass transport. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  13. Innovative Catalysis in Organic Synthesis Oxidation, Hydrogenation, and C-X Bond Forming Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Pher G

    2012-01-01

    Authored by a European team of leaders in the field, this book compiles innovative approaches for C-X bond forming processes frequently applied in organic synthesis. It covers all key types of catalysis, including homogeneous, heterogeneous, and organocatalysis, as well as mechanistic and computational studies. Special attention is focused on the improvement of efficiency and sustainability of important catalytic processes, such as selective oxidations, hydrogenation and cross-coupling reactions.The result is a valuable resource for both advanced researchers in academia and industry, as well a

  14. Catalyse homogène supportée Supported Homogeneous Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Commereuc D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les catalyseurs complexes de coordination en phase homogène offrent des performances d'activité et de sélectivité en général meilleures que celles des catalyseurs hétérogènes obtenus par les méthodes plus classiques de dépôt par voie thermique. Ils posent cependant, en raison de leur valeur plus élevée, des problèmes de récupération ou de recyclage. Le coût de la voie homogène entraîne alors bien souvent le choix de la méthode hétérogène classique, au détriment de performances plus séduisantes. On envisage ici les solutions offertes par la catalyse homogène supportée, ainsi que les difficultés rencontrées lors de la synthèse et de l'utilisation de ce type nouveau de catalyseur. Complex homogeneous-phase coordination catalysts generally have better activity and selectivity performances than those of heterogeneous catalysts produced by more conventional methods of thermal depositing. However, because of their higher value they raise problems of recovery or recycling. The cost of homogeneous catalysis thus often leads to the choice of the conventional heterogeneous method, to the detriment of more attractive performances. This article takes up the solutions offered by supported homogeneous catalysis as well as the difficulties encountered during the synthesis and use of this new type of catalyst.

  15. Heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acid derivatives: history, advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, James; Filonenko, Georgy A; van Putten, Robbert; Hensen, Emiel J M; Pidko, Evgeny A

    2015-06-01

    The catalytic reduction of carboxylic acid derivatives has witnessed a rapid development in recent years. These reactions, involving molecular hydrogen as the reducing agent, can be promoted by heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts. The milestone achievements and recent results by both approaches are discussed in this Review. In particular, we focus on the mechanistic aspects of the catalytic hydrogenation and highlight the bifunctional nature of the mechanism that is preferred for supported metal catalysts as well as homogeneous transition metal complexes.

  16. Half-sandwich iridium complexes for homogeneous water-oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Balcells, David; Hull, Jonathan F; Olack, Gerard W; Incarvito, Christopher D; Eisenstein, Odile; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2010-11-17

    Iridium half-sandwich complexes of the types Cp*Ir(N-C)X, [Cp*Ir(N-N)X]X, and [CpIr(N-N)X]X are catalyst precursors for the homogeneous oxidation of water to dioxygen. Kinetic studies with cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as primary oxidant show that oxygen evolution is rapid and continues over many hours. In addition, [Cp*Ir(H(2)O)(3)]SO(4) and [(Cp*Ir)(2)(μ-OH)(3)]OH can show even higher turnover frequencies (up to 20 min(-1) at pH 0.89). Aqueous electrochemical studies on the cationic complexes having chelate ligands show catalytic oxidation at pH > 7; conversely, at low pH, there are no oxidation waves up to 1.5 V vs NHE for the complexes. H(2)(18)O isotope incorporation studies demonstrate that water is the source of oxygen atoms during cerium(IV)-driven catalysis. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments, including kinetic-isotope-effect studies, suggest a mechanism for homogeneous iridium-catalyzed water oxidation and contribute to the determination of the rate-determining step. The kinetic experiments also help distinguish the active homogeneous catalyst from heterogeneous nanoparticulate iridium dioxide.

  17. Production of glycerol-free biofuel from canola oil and dimethyl carbonate using triazabicyclodecene in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul

    Due to the increasing awareness of the dwindling fossil fuel resources and environmental issues, biofuel became an alternative renewable fuel to meet the steady increase of energy consumption and environmental demands. This work was designed to produce biofuel free from glycerol, soap, catalyst and wastes from canola oil and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) using an organocatalyst, triazabicyclodecene (TBD). To achieve these goals, several interconnected research activities were undertaken. First, a flow sheet was developed for the process and operating criteria were identified by laboratory experimentation verified with Aspen Plus. Mass and energy integration studies were performed to minimize the consumption of materials and energy utilities. Next, kinetics of canola oil transesterification using TBD as homogeneous catalyst in dimethyl carbonate has been investigated and a model was developed. Kinetics data were vital in process assessment and kinetics model was essential in the study of chemical reaction and catalyst development. Finally, a heterogeneous catalyst was developed for use as a biofuel catalyst through the immobilization of TBD into MgAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs) which can combine the advantages of homogeneous catalysis with the best properties of heterogeneous materials.

  18. At the frontier between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis : hydrogenation of olefins and alkynes with soluble iron nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangheard, Claudine; Julián Fernández, César de; Phua, Pim-Huat; Hoorn, Johan; Lefort, Laurent; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-supported Fe nanoparticles in the hydrogenation of unsaturated C–C bonds is a green catalytic concept at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. Iron nanoparticles can be obtained by reducing Fe salts with strong reductants in various solvents. FeCl3 reduced by 3

  19. Continuous-flow homogeneous catalysis using the temperature-controlled solvent properties of supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwardt, Thomas; Franciò, Giancarlo; Leitner, Walter

    2010-09-28

    A fully integrated continuous process for homogeneous catalysed reactions in scCO(2) has been developed exploiting the tunable solvent properties of scCO(2). A heated condenser situated above the reaction zone leads to a phase split under isobaric conditions resulting in efficient catalyst retention and recirculation. Continuous isomerisation of allylic alcohols was carried out for over 200 hours time-on-stream demonstrating the viability of this approach.

  20. Surface functionalization of metal-organic polyhedron for homogeneous cyclopropanation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Yakovenko, Andrey; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2011-05-01

    A super-paddlewheel (comprised of two paddlewheels) metal-organic polyhedron (MOP) containing surface hydroxyl groups was synthesized and characterized. Condensation reactions with linear alkyl anhydrides lead to new MOPs with enhanced solubility. As a result, the surface-modified MOP 4 was demonstrated as a homogeneous Lewis-acid catalyst.

  1. Water oxidation with molecularly defined iridium complexes: insights into homogeneous versus heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, Henrik; Marquet, Nicolas; Kammer, Anja; Denurra, Stefania; Bauer, Matthias; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Gärtner, Felix; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Spannenberg, Anke; Gladiali, Serafino; Beller, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Molecularly defined Ir complexes and different samples of supported IrO(2) nanoparticles have been tested and compared in the catalytic water oxidation with cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) as the oxidant. By comparing the activity of nano-scaled supported IrO(2) particles to the one of organometallic complexes it is shown that the overall activity of the homogeneous Ir precursors is defined by both the formation of the homogeneous active species and its conversion to Ir(IV)-oxo nanoparticles. In the first phase of the reaction the activity is dominated by the homogeneous active species. With increasing reaction time, the influence of nano-sized Ir-oxo particles becomes more evident. Notably, the different conversion rates of the homogeneous precursor into the active species as well as the conversion into Ir-oxo nanoparticles and the different particle sizes have a significant influence on the overall activity. In addition to the homogeneous systems, IrO(2)@MCM-41 has also been synthesized, which contains stabilized nanoparticles of between 1 and 3 nm in size. This latter system shows a similar activity to IrCl(3)⋅xH(2)O and complexes 4 and 5. Mechanistic insights were obtained by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Controlled Fluoroalkylation Reactions by Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tanmay; Iqbal, Naeem; You, Youngmin; Cho, Eun Jin

    2016-10-18

    Owing to their unique biological, physical, and chemical properties, fluoroalkylated organic substances have attracted significant attention from researchers in a variety of disciplines. Fluoroalkylated compounds are considered particularly important in pharmaceutical chemistry because of their superior lipophilicity, binding selectivity, metabolic stability, and bioavailability to those of their nonfluoroalkylated analogues. We have developed various methods for the synthesis of fluoroalkylated substances that rely on the use of visible-light photoredox catalysis, a powerful preparative tool owing to its environmental benignity and mechanistic versatility in promoting a large number of synthetically important reactions with high levels of selectivity. In this Account, we describe the results of our efforts, which have led to the development of visible-light photocatalytic methods for the introduction of a variety of fluoroalkyl groups (such as, -CF3, -CF2R, -CH2CF3, -C3F7, and -C4F9) and arylthiofluoroalkyl groups (such as, -CF2SPh, -C2F4SAr, and -C4F8SAr) to organic substances. In these studies, electron-deficient carbon-centered fluoroalkyl radicals were successfully generated by the appropriate choice of fluoroalkyl source, photocatalyst, additives, and solvent. The redox potentials of the photocatalysts and the fluoroalkyl sources and the choice of sacrificial electron donor or acceptor as the additive affected the photocatalytic pathway, determining whether an oxidative or reductive quenching pathway was operative for the generation of key fluoroalkyl radicals. Notably, we have observed that additives significantly affect the efficiencies and selectivities of these reactions and can even change the outcome of the reaction by playing additional roles during its course. For instance, a tertiary amine as an additive in the reaction medium can act not only as a sacrificial electron donor in photoredox catalysis but also as a hydrogen atom source, an elimination

  3. Hot biological catalysis: isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2014-04-04

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a well-described technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction, using it as an intrinsic probe to characterize virtually every chemical process. Nowadays, this technique is extensively applied to determine thermodynamic parameters of biomolecular binding equilibria. In addition, ITC has been demonstrated to be able of directly measuring kinetics and thermodynamic parameters (kcat, KM, ΔH) of enzymatic reactions, even though this application is still underexploited. As heat changes spontaneously occur during enzymatic catalysis, ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis and can be performed in solution. Moreover, the method needs little amount of material. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful and unique tool to study enzyme kinetics in several applications, such as, for example, drug discovery. In this work an experimental ITC-based method to quantify kinetics and thermodynamics of enzymatic reactions is thoroughly described. This method is applied to determine kcat and KM of the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea by Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean) urease. Calculation of intrinsic molar enthalpy (ΔHint) of the reaction is performed. The values thus obtained are consistent with previous data reported in literature, demonstrating the reliability of the methodology.

  4. Hot Biological Catalysis: Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Characterize Enzymatic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a well-described technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction, using it as an intrinsic probe to characterize virtually every chemical process. Nowadays, this technique is extensively applied to determine thermodynamic parameters of biomolecular binding equilibria. In addition, ITC has been demonstrated to be able of directly measuring kinetics and thermodynamic parameters (kcat, KM, ΔH) of enzymatic reactions, even though this application is still underexploited. As heat changes spontaneously occur during enzymatic catalysis, ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis and can be performed in solution. Moreover, the method needs little amount of material. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful and unique tool to study enzyme kinetics in several applications, such as, for example, drug discovery. In this work an experimental ITC-based method to quantify kinetics and thermodynamics of enzymatic reactions is thoroughly described. This method is applied to determine kcat and KM of the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea by Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean) urease. Calculation of intrinsic molar enthalpy (ΔHint) of the reaction is performed. The values thus obtained are consistent with previous data reported in literature, demonstrating the reliability of the methodology. PMID:24747990

  5. Metal Carbonyl-Hydrosilane Reactions and Hydrosilation Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, A. R.

    2001-04-14

    Manganese carbonyl complexes serve as hydrosilation precatalysts for selectively transforming a carbonyl group into a siloxy methylene or a fully reduced methylene group. Substrates of interest include (1) aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, silyl esters, and esters, and (2) their organometallic acyl counterparts. Three relevant catalytic reactions are shown. Two types of manganese precatalysts have been reported: (a) alkyl and acyl complexes (L)(C0){sub 4}MnR [L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = COCH{sub 3}, COPh, CH{sub 3}] and (b) halides (CO){sub 5}MnX and [(CO){sub 4}MnX]{sub 2} (X = Br, I). The former promote hydrosilation and deoxygenation catalysis; the latter promote dehydrogenative silation of alcohols and carboxylic acids as well as hydrosilation and deoxygenation of some metallocarboxylic acid derivatives. In every case studied, these Mn precatalysts are far more reactive or selective than traditional Rh(I) precatalysts.

  6. Homogeneous photocatalytic reactions with organometallic and coordination compounds--perspectives for sustainable chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Norbert

    2012-02-13

    Since the time of Giacomo Ciamician at the beginning of the 20th century, photochemical transformations have been recognized as contributing to sustainable chemistry. Electronic excitation significantly changes the reactivity of chemical compounds. Thus, the application of activation reagents is frequently avoided and transformations can be performed under mild conditions. Catalysis plays a central role in sustainable chemistry. Stoichiometric amounts of activation reagents are often avoided. This fact and the milder catalytic reaction conditions diminish the formation of byproducts. In the case of homogeneous catalysis, organometallic compounds are often applied. The combination of both techniques develops synergistic effects in the sense of "Green Chemistry". Herein, metal carbonyl-mediated reactions are reported. These transformations are of considerable interest for the synthesis of complex polyfunctionalized compounds. Copper(I)-catalyzed [2+2] photocycloaddition gives access to a large variety of cyclobutane derivatives. Currently, a large number of publications deal with photochemical electron-transfer-induced reactions with organometallic and coordination compounds, particularly with ruthenium complexes. Several photochemically induced oxidations can easily be performed with air or molecular oxygen when they are catalyzed with organometallic complexes. Photochemical reaction conditions also play a certain role in C-H activation with organometallic catalysts, for instance, with alkanes, although such transformations are conveniently performed with a variety of other photochemical reactions.

  7. Is it homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysis derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In operando XAFS, kinetic, and crucial kinetic poisoning evidence for subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based benzene hydrogenation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C; Fulton, John L; Roberts, John A S; Szymczak, Nathaniel K; Smurthwaite, Tricia D; Özkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G

    2011-11-23

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl(2)](2) (Cp* = [η(5)-C(5)(CH(3))(5)]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based "homogeneous" from polymetallic, "heterogeneous" catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of: (i) in operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, and then crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a "wholly kinetic phenomenon" as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in the present case subnanometer Rh(4) cluster-based catalysis, from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)(n) nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined in operando X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and kinetic evidence provide a compelling case for Rh(4)-based, with average stoichiometry "Rh(4)Cp*(2.4)Cl(4)H(c)", benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et(3)N and at 100 °C and 50 atm initial H(2) pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)(n) had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)(n) nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)(n) nanoparticles as a model system). The results--especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed--are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions

  8. Mixing and chemical reaction in sheared and nonsheared homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations were made to examine the local structure of the reaction zone for a moderately fast reaction between unmixed species in decaying, homogeneous turbulence and in a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Pseudospectral techniques were used in domains of 64 exp 3 and higher wavenumbers. A finite-rate, single step reaction between non-premixed reactants was considered, and in one case temperature-dependent Arrhenius kinetics was assumed. Locally intense reaction rates that tend to persist throughout the simulations occur in locations where the reactant concentration gradients are large and are amplified by the local rate of strain. The reaction zones are more organized in the case of a uniform mean shear than in isotropic turbulence, and regions of intense reaction rate appear to be associated with vortex structures such as horseshoe vortices and fingers seen in mixing layers. Concentration gradients tend to align with the direction of the most compressive principal strain rate, more so in the isotropic case.

  9. Lewis-acid catalysis of carbon carbon bond forming reactions in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, JBFN; Feringa, BL; Keller, E; Otto, S

    1996-01-01

    In this article, we review the recent progress that has been made in the field of Lewis-acid catalysis of carbon carbon-bond-forming reactions in aqueous solution. Since water hampers the hard hard interactions between the catalyst and the reactant, it often complicates catalysis. However, once

  10. Heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of pyrolysis vapors from pine wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, E.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Windt, M.

    2012-01-01

    To maximize oil yields in the fast pyrolysis of biomass it is generally accepted that vapors need to be rapidly quenched. The influence of the heterogeneous and homogeneous vapor-phase reactions on yields and oil composition were studied using a fluidized-bed reactor. Even high concentrations of min

  11. A carbon nanotube confinement strategy to implement homogeneous asymmetric catalysis in the solid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kazuki; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-03-09

    A readily recyclable asymmetric catalyst has been developed based on the self-assembly of a homogeneous catalyst in a fibrous network of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Dimerization of an amide-based chiral ligand with a suitable spacer allows for the efficient formation of a heterogeneous catalyst by self-assembly on addition of Er(OiPr)3. The self-assembly proceeds in the MWNT fibrous network and small clusters of assembled catalyst are confined in the MWNTs, producing an easily handled solid-phase catalyst. The resulting MWNT-confined catalyst exhibits a good catalytic performance in a catalytic asymmetric Mannich-type reaction, which can be conducted in a repeated batch system and in a continuous-flow platform.

  12. CO extrusion in homogeneous gold catalysis: reactivity of gold acyl species generated through water addition to gold vinylidenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Janina; Stößer, Tim; Rudolph, Matthias; Rominger, Frank; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2015-01-26

    Herein, we describe a new gold-catalyzed decarbonylative indene synthesis. Synergistic σ,π-activation of diyne substrates leads to gold vinylidene intermediates, which upon addition of water are transformed into gold acyl species, a type of organogold compound hitherto only scarcely reported. The latter are shown to undergo extrusion of CO, an elementary step completely unknown for homogeneous gold catalysis. By tuning the electronic and steric properties of the starting diyne systems, this new reactivity could be exploited for the synthesis of indene derivatives in high yields.

  13. Pop-It Beads to Introduce Catalysis of Reaction Rate and Substrate Depletion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehret, Austin U.

    2017-01-01

    A kinesthetic classroom activity was designed to help students understand enzyme activity and catalysis of reaction rate. Students served the role of enzymes by manipulating Pop-It Beads as the catalytic event. This activity illuminates the relationship between reaction rate and reaction progress by allowing students to experience first-hand the…

  14. Water oxidation catalysis with nonheme iron complexes under acidic and basic conditions: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dachao; Mandal, Sukanta; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Llobet, Antoni; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-08-19

    Thermal water oxidation by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) was catalyzed by nonheme iron complexes, such as Fe(BQEN)(OTf)2 (1) and Fe(BQCN)(OTf)2 (2) (BQEN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, BQCN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)cyclohexanediamine, OTf = CF3SO3(-)) in a nonbuffered aqueous solution; turnover numbers of 80 ± 10 and 20 ± 5 were obtained in the O2 evolution reaction by 1 and 2, respectively. The ligand dissociation of the iron complexes was observed under acidic conditions, and the dissociated ligands were oxidized by CAN to yield CO2. We also observed that 1 was converted to an iron(IV)-oxo complex during the water oxidation in competition with the ligand oxidation. In addition, oxygen exchange between the iron(IV)-oxo complex and H2(18)O was found to occur at a much faster rate than the oxygen evolution. These results indicate that the iron complexes act as the true homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation by CAN at low pHs. In contrast, light-driven water oxidation using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and S2O8(2-) as a sacrificial electron acceptor was catalyzed by iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from the iron complexes under basic conditions as the result of the ligand dissociation. In a buffer solution (initial pH 9.0) formation of the iron hydroxide nanoparticles with a size of around 100 nm at the end of the reaction was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in situ and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. We thus conclude that the water oxidation by CAN was catalyzed by short-lived homogeneous iron complexes under acidic conditions, whereas iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from iron complexes act as a heterogeneous catalyst in the light-driven water oxidation reaction under basic conditions.

  15. Computational studies of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis by late transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kua, Jeremy Soo Pin

    -temperature highly selective homogeneous catalysts have been the Hg and PtCl2 catalysts from Catalytica. Chapter 5 reports our studies on the stability, thermodynamics, and reaction mechanism of the PtCl 2 catalysts, with suggestions of possible modifications necessary to make this process economic.

  16. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of anthracene with selected atmospheric oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Shu, Jinian; Zhang, Yuanxun; Yang, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The reactions of gas-phase anthracene and suspended anthracene particles with O3 and O3-NO were conducted in a 200-L reaction chamber, respectively. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formations from gas-phase reactions of anthracene with O3 and O3-NO were observed. Meanwhile, the size distributions and mass concentrations of SOA were monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) during the formation processes. The rapid exponential growths of SOA reveal that the atmospheric lifetimes of gas-phase anthracene towards O3 and O3-NO are less than 20.5 and 4.34 hr, respectively. The particulate oxidation products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were analyzed with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS). Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of oxidation products of anthracene were carried out for assigning the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra of products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Anthrone, anthraquinone, 9,10-dihydroxyanthracene, and 1,9,10-trihydroxyanthracene were the ozonation products of anthracene, while anthrone, anthraquinone, 9-nitroanthracene, and 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone were the main products of anthracene with O3-NO.

  17. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions of anthracene with selected atmospheric oxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhang; Jinian Shu; Yuanxun Zhang; Bo Yang

    2013-01-01

    The reactions of gas-phase anthracene and suspended anthracene particles with O3 and O3-NO were conducted in a 200-L reaction chamber,respectively.The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formations from gas-phase reactions of anthracene with O3 and O3-NO were observed.Meanwhile,the size distributions and mass concentrations of SOA were monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) during the formation processes.The rapid exponential growths of SOA reveal that the atmospheric lifetimes of gas-phase anthracene towards O3 and O3-NO are less than 20.5 and 4.34 hr,respectively.The particulate oxidation products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions were analyzed with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUVATOFMS).Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of oxidation products of anthracene were carried out for assigning the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra of products from homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions.Anthrone,anthraquinone,9,10-dihydroxyanthracene,and 1,9,10-trihydroxyanthracene were the ozonation products of anthracene,while anthrone,anthraquinone,9-nitroanthracene,and 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone were the main products of anthracene with O3-NO.

  18. Nano-catalysts: Bridging the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functionalized nanoparticles have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. We envisioned a catalyst system, which can bridge the homogenous and heterogeneous system. Postsynthetic surface modifica...

  19. Crossing the divide between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis in water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Aaron K; Alibabaei, Leila; Losego, Mark D; Concepcion, Javier J; Kalanyan, Berç; Parsons, Gregory N; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-12-24

    Enhancing the surface binding stability of chromophores, catalysts, and chromophore-catalyst assemblies attached to metal oxide surfaces is an important element in furthering the development of dye sensitized solar cells, photoelectrosynthesis cells, and interfacial molecular catalysis. Phosphonate-derivatized catalysts and molecular assemblies provide a basis for sustained water oxidation on these surfaces in acidic solution but are unstable toward hydrolysis and loss from surfaces as the pH is increased. Here, we report enhanced surface binding stability of a phosphonate-derivatized water oxidation catalyst over a wide pH range (1-12) by atomic layer deposition of an overlayer of TiO2. Increased stability of surface binding, and the reactivity of the bound catalyst, provides a hybrid approach to heterogeneous catalysis combining the advantages of systematic modifications possible by chemical synthesis with heterogeneous reactivity. For the surface-stabilized catalyst, greatly enhanced rates of water oxidation are observed upon addition of buffer bases -H2PO(-)(4)/HPO(2-)(4), B(OH)3/B(OH)2 O-, HPO(2-)4 /PO(3-)(4) - and with a pathway identified in which O-atom transfer to OH(-) occurs with a rate constant increase of 10(6) compared to water oxidation in acid.

  20. DOE Laboratory Catalysis Research Symposium - Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, T.

    1999-02-01

    The conference consisted of two sessions with the following subtopics: (1) Heterogeneous Session: Novel Catalytic Materials; Photocatalysis; Novel Processing Conditions; Metals and Sulfides; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Metal Oxides and Partial Oxidation; Electrocatalysis; and Automotive Catalysis. (2) Homogeneous Catalysis: H-Transfer and Alkane Functionalization; Biocatalysis; Oxidation and Photocatalysis; and Novel Medical, Methods, and Catalyzed Reactions.

  1. At the frontier between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis: hydrogenation of olefins and alkynes with soluble iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangheard, Claudine; de Julián Fernández, César; Phua, Pim-Huat; Hoorn, Johan; Lefort, Laurent; de Vries, Johannes G

    2010-09-28

    The use of non-supported Fe nanoparticles in the hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C bonds is a green catalytic concept at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. Iron nanoparticles can be obtained by reducing Fe salts with strong reductants in various solvents. FeCl(3) reduced by 3 equivalents of EtMgCl forms an active catalyst for the hydrogenation of a range of olefins and alkynes. Olefin hydrogenation is relatively fast at 5 bar using 5 mol% of catalyst. The catalyst is also active for terminal olefins and 1,1' and 1,2-cis disubstituted olefins while trans-olefins react much slower. 1-Octyne is hydrogenated to mixtures of 1-octene and octane. Kinetic studies led us to propose a mechanism for this latter transformation where octane is obtained by two different pathways. Characterization of the nanoparticles via TEM, magnetic measurements and poisoning experiments were undertaken to understand the true nature of our catalyst.

  2. New Tools for CO2 Fixation by Homogeneous Catalysis - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessop, Phillip G.

    2006-01-20

    The overall goal is the development of new or more efficient methods for the conversion of CO{sub 2} into useful organic products, via the design or discovery of new catalysts, ligands, solvents, and methods. Specific objectives for this funded period: (1) To develop a high-throughput screening technique and use it to develop an efficient catalyst/reagent/solvent system for the synthesis of ureas or carboxylic acids. (2) To use in-situ spectroscopic and kinetic methods to study the mechanism of the synthesis of ureas or carboxylic acids. (3) To develop bifunctional ligands capable of secondary interactions with CO{sub 2}, to detect the interactions, and to demonstrate applications to catalysis.

  3. Atomic-Scale Observations of Catalyst Structures under Reaction Conditions and during Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Crozier, Peter A

    2016-03-23

    Heterogeneous catalysis is a chemical process performed at a solid-gas or solid-liquid interface. Direct participation of catalyst atoms in this chemical process determines the significance of the surface structure of a catalyst in a fundamental understanding of such a chemical process at a molecular level. High-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) have been used to observe catalyst structure in the last few decades. In this review, instrumentation for the two in situ/operando techniques and scientific findings on catalyst structures under reaction conditions and during catalysis are discussed with the following objectives: (1) to present the fundamental aspects of in situ/operando studies of catalysts; (2) to interpret the observed restructurings of catalyst and evolution of catalyst structures; (3) to explore how HP-STM and ETEM can be synergistically used to reveal structural details under reaction conditions and during catalysis; and (4) to discuss the future challenges and prospects of atomic-scale observation of catalysts in understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. This Review focuses on the development of HP-STM and ETEM, the in situ/operando characterizations of catalyst structures with them, and the integration of the two structural analytical techniques for fundamentally understanding catalysis.

  4. Surfactant-assisted specific-acid catalysis of Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, Egid B.; Engberts, Jan B. F. N.

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant-assisted specific-acid catalysis (SASAC) for Diets-Alder reactions of dienophiles 1 and 4 with cyclopentadiene 2 in aqueous media at 32 C was studied. This study showed that acidified anionic surfactants (pH 2) such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkylbenzene sulfonic acid (LA

  5. A Molecular Reaction Cycle with a Solvatochromic Merocyanine Dye: An Experiment in Photochemistry, Kinetics, and Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kader, M. H.; Steiner, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experiments using merocyanine M suitable as an integrated laboratory experience for undergraduates are described. Experiments demonstrate: complete molecular cycle composed of photochemical, thermal, and protolytic reaction steps; kinetics of cis-trans isomerization of the dye; and mechanism of base catalysis for thermal isomerization of the…

  6. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberico, E; Nielsen, M

    2015-04-21

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous catalytic systems have been reported which are able to promote either one or the other of the two reactions under mild conditions. Here, we review and discuss these developments.

  7. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberico, E.; Nielsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous...

  8. Probing Cu(I) in homogeneous catalysis using high-energy-resolution fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walroth, Richard C; Uebler, Jacob W H; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2015-06-18

    Metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitations in Cu(I) X-ray absorption spectra are introduced as spectroscopic handles for the characterization of species in homogeneous catalytic reaction mixtures. Analysis is supported by correlation of a spectral library to calculations and to complementary spectroscopic parameters.

  9. Marcus Electron Transfer Reactions with Bulk Metallic Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer organic reaction rates are considered employing the classic physical picture of Marcus wherein the heats of reaction are deposited as the energy of low frequency mechanical oscillations of reconfigured molecular positions. If such electron transfer chemical reaction events occur in the neighborhood of metallic plates, then electrodynamic interface fields must also be considered in addition to mechanical oscillations. Such electrodynamic interfacial electric fields in principle strongly effect the chemical reaction rates. The thermodynamic states of the metal are unchanged by the reaction which implies that metallic plates are purely catalytic chemical agents.

  10. Development of homogeneous luminescence assays for histone demethylase catalysis and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Akane; Tumber, Anthony; Rose, Nathan R; King, Oliver N F; Daniel, Michelle; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D; Schofield, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Covalent modifications to histones play important roles in chromatin dynamics and the regulation of gene expression. The JumonjiC (JmjC)-containing histone demethylases (HDMs) catalyze the demethylation of methylated lysine residues on histone tails. Here we report the development of homogeneous luminescence-based assay methods for measuring the catalytic activity and the binding affinities of peptides to HDMs. The assays use amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (ALPHA) technology, are sensitive and robust, and can be used for small molecule inhibitor screening of HDMs. We have profiled known inhibitors of JMJD2E and demonstrate a correlation between the inhibitor potencies determined by the ALPHA and other types of assays. Although this study focuses on the JMJD2E isoform, the catalytic turnover and binding assays described here can be used in studies on other HDMs. The assays should be useful for the development of small molecule inhibitors selective for HDM isoforms.

  11. Soybean epoxide production with in situ peracetic acid using homogeneous catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alejandro Boyacá Mendivelso

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Using vegetable oils has become an excellent option for petrochemical product substitution. The epoxides obtained from such oils have wide applications as plastifiers and PVC stabilisers and as raw material in polyol synthesis for the polyurethane industry. This paper presents soybean oil epoxidation using a homogeneous catalyst in a well-mixed, stirred reactor being operated in iso- thermal conditions. The best result achieved was a 6.4% oxyrane oxygen content using hydrogen peroxide (25% molar excess, a- cetic acid (5% p/p and sulphuric acid (2% p/p concentrations at 80°C.

  12. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  13. Micellar Effects on Nucleophilic Addition Reaction and Applicability of Enzyme Catalysis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. London Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the effect of anionic and cationic micelles on nucleophilic addition reaction of rosaniline hydrochloride (RH with hydroxide under pseudo-first order condition. Strong inhibitory effect is observed due to SDS micelle, whereas CTAB catalysed the reaction. This is explained on the basis of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions which are simultaneously operating in the reaction system. The kinetic data obtained is quantitatively analysed by applying the positive cooperativity model of enzyme catalysis. Binding constants and influence of counterions on the reaction have also been investigated.

  14. Reaction Mechanism and Control of Selectivity in Catalysis by Oxides: Some Challenges and Open Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siglinda Perathoner

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Some aspects of the reaction mechanisms in multistep selective (ammoxidation reactions over oxide surfaces are discussed evidencing some of the challenges for surface science and theory in describing these reactions, and for applied catalysis in order to have a more in deep identification of the key factors governing surface reactivity and which may be used to improve catalytic performances. In particular, the role of chemisorbed species in the modification of the surface reactivity and the presence of multiple pathways of reaction are evidenced by comparing the behavior of V-based catalysts in C3-C4 alkanes and alkene oxidation.

  15. Role of the direct reaction H2S + SO2 in the homogeneous Claus reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendt, Karina; Haynes, Brian S

    2005-09-15

    Quantum chemical methods at the Gaussian-2 and -3 levels of theory have been used to investigate the reactions between H(2)S, SO(2), and S(2)O such as might occur in the front-end furnace of the Claus process. The direct reaction between H(2)S and SO(2) occurs via a 5-centered transition state with an initial barrier of approximately 135 kJ mol(-1) and an overall barrier of approximately 153 kJ mol(-1) to produce S(2)O and H(2)O. We indicate approximate values here because there are a number of isomers in the reaction pathway that have barriers slightly different from those quoted. The presence of a water molecule lowers this by approximately 60 kJ mol(-1), but the van der Waals complex required for catalysis by water is thermodynamically unfavorable under the conditions in the Claus reactor. The direct reaction between H(2)S and S(2)O can occur via two possible pathways; the analogous reaction to H(2)S + SO(2) has an initial barrier of approximately 117 kJ mol(-1) and an overall barrier of approximately 126 kJ mol(-1) producing S(3) and H(2)O, and a pathway with a 6-centred transition state has a barrier of approximately 111 kJ mol(-1), producing HSSSOH. Rate constants, including a QRRK analysis of intermediate stabilization, are reported for the kinetic scheme proposed here.

  16. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Chelliah V.; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S.; Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06752a

  17. Glutathione transferase mimics : Micellar catalysis of an enzymic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindkvist, Björn; Weinander, Rolf; Engman, Lars; Koetse, Marc; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Morgenstern, Ralf

    1997-01-01

    Substances that mimic the enzyme action of glutathione transferases (which serve in detoxification) are described. These micellar catalysts enhance the reaction rate between thiols and activated halogenated nitroarenes as well as alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls. The nucleophilic aromatic substituti

  18. Ammoniation-dehydration of fatty acids into nitriles: heterogeneous or homogeneous catalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekki-Berrada, Adrien; Bennici, Simona; Gillet, Jean-Philippe; Couturier, Jean-Luc; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Auroux, Aline

    2013-08-01

    Fatty nitriles have lately become of interest in the framework of biofuels and for the valorization of the oil part of biomass to form fine chemicals or polymers. The production of long-chain fatty nitriles by the direct reaction of acids with NH3 has not been extensively studied, although several catalysts have been developed and published as patents. The characterization of this reaction with and without catalyst is, to the best of our knowledge, performed for the first time in this study. Several catalysts with various acid-base features were tested, and the best catalysts at 250 °C (Zn- and In-based catalysts) were further studied. Catalytically active forms and models are proposed for the Zn- and In-based catalysts, and the kinetic parameters for the amide to nitrile reaction are evaluated.

  19. Transition state structure of arginine kinase: implications for catalysis of bimolecular reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G; Somasundaram, T; Blanc, E; Parthasarathy, G; Ellington, W R; Chapman, M S

    1998-07-21

    Arginine kinase belongs to the family of enzymes, including creatine kinase, that catalyze the buffering of ATP in cells with fluctuating energy requirements and that has been a paradigm for classical enzymological studies. The 1.86-A resolution structure of its transition-state analog complex, reported here, reveals its active site and offers direct evidence for the importance of precise substrate alignment in the catalysis of bimolecular reactions, in contrast to the unimolecular reactions studied previously. In the transition-state analog complex studied here, a nitrate mimics the planar gamma-phosphoryl during associative in-line transfer between ATP and arginine. The active site is unperturbed, and the reactants are not constrained covalently as in a bisubstrate complex, so it is possible to measure how precisely they are pre-aligned by the enzyme. Alignment is exquisite. Entropic effects may contribute to catalysis, but the lone-pair orbitals are also aligned close enough to their optimal trajectories for orbital steering to be a factor during nucleophilic attack. The structure suggests that polarization, strain toward the transition state, and acid-base catalysis also contribute, but, in contrast to unimolecular enzyme reactions, their role appears to be secondary to substrate alignment in this bimolecular reaction.

  20. catalysis of the michael reactions by n,n'-dimethylaminopropyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    In each case the templates were recovered and reused in ... reaction mixture that had pH similar to that of the catalyst-water suspension, the pH of the mixture was ... The shoulders are likely to be due to residual -OEt groups which have been.

  1. Nanomaterials in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Serp, Philippe; Somorjai, Gabor A; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Nanocatalysis has emerged as a field at the interface between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and offers unique solutions to the demanding requirements for catalyst improvement. Heterogeneous catalysis represents one of the oldest commercial applications of nanoscience and nanoparticles of metals, semiconductors, oxides, and other compounds have been widely used for important chemical reactions. The main focus of this fi eld is the development of well-defined catalysts, which may include both metal nanoparticles and a nanomaterial as the support. These nanocatalysts should display the

  2. Challenges in modelling homogeneous catalysis: new answers from ab initio molecular dynamics to the controversy over the Wacker process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, András; Nair, Nisanth N; Lledós, Agustí; Ujaque, Gregori

    2014-07-21

    We present here a review of the mechanistic studies of the Wacker process stressing the long controversy about the key reaction steps. We give an overview of the previous experimental and theoretical studies on the topic. Then we describe the importance of the most recent Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (AIMD) calculations in modelling organometallic reactivity in water. As a prototypical example of homogeneous catalytic reactions, the Wacker process poses serious challenges to modelling. The adequate description of the multiple role of the water solvent is very difficult by using static quantum chemical approaches including cluster and continuum solvent models. In contrast, such reaction systems are suitable for AIMD, and by combining with rare event sampling techniques, the method provides reaction mechanisms and the corresponding free energy profiles. The review also highlights how AIMD has helped to obtain a novel understanding of the mechanism and kinetics of the Wacker process.

  3. Required levels of catalysis for emergence of autocatalytic sets in models of chemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Wim; Kauffman, Stuart A; Steel, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The formation of a self-sustaining autocatalytic chemical network is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the origin of life. The question of whether such a network could form "by chance" within a sufficiently complex suite of molecules and reactions is one that we have investigated for a simple chemical reaction model based on polymer ligation and cleavage. In this paper, we extend this work in several further directions. In particular, we investigate in more detail the levels of catalysis required for a self-sustaining autocatalytic network to form. We study the size of chemical networks within which we might expect to find such an autocatalytic subset, and we extend the theoretical and computational analyses to models in which catalysis requires template matching.

  4. Required Levels of Catalysis for Emergence of Autocatalytic Sets in Models of Chemical Reaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Hordijk

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of a self-sustaining autocatalytic chemical network is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the origin of life. The question of whether such a network could form “by chance” within a sufficiently complex suite of molecules and reactions is one that we have investigated for a simple chemical reaction model based on polymer ligation and cleavage. In this paper, we extend this work in several further directions. In particular, we investigate in more detail the levels of catalysis required for a self-sustaining autocatalytic network to form. We study the size of chemical networks within which we might expect to find such an autocatalytic subset, and we extend the theoretical and computational analyses to models in which catalysis requires template matching.

  5. Catalysis of Heterocyclic Azadiene Cycloaddition Reactions by Solvent Hydrogen Bonding: Concise Total Synthesis of Methoxatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinkerman, Christopher M; Boger, Dale L

    2016-09-28

    Although it has been examined for decades, no general approach to catalysis of the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reactions of heterocyclic azadienes has been introduced. Typically, additives such as Lewis acids lead to nonproductive consumption of the electron-rich dienophiles without productive activation of the electron-deficient heterocyclic azadienes. Herein, we report the first general method for catalysis of such cycloaddition reactions by using solvent hydrogen bonding of non-nucleophilic perfluoroalcohols, including hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and trifluoroethanol (TFE), to activate the electron-deficient heterocyclic azadienes. Its use in promoting the cycloaddition of 1,2,3-triazine 4 with enamine 3 as the key step of a concise total synthesis of methoxatin is described.

  6. Advances in Homogeneous Catalysis Using Secondary Phosphine Oxides (SPOs): Pre-ligands for Metal Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achard, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The secondary phosphine oxides are known to exist in equilibrium between the pentavalent phosphine oxides (SPO) and the trivalent phosphinous acids (PA). This equilibrium can be displaced in favour of the trivalent tautomeric form upon coordination to late transition metals. This tutorial review provides the state of the art of the use of secondary phosphine oxides as pre-ligands in transition metal-catalysed reactions. Using a combination of SPOs and several metals such as Pd, Pt, Ru, Rh and Au, a series of effective and original transformations have been obtained and will be discussed here.

  7. Analysis of Homogeneous Water Oxidation Catalysis with Collector-Generator Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Benjamin D; Sheridan, Matthew V; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Song, Na; Dares, Christopher J; Fang, Zhen; Tamaki, Yusuke; Nayak, Animesh; Meyer, Thomas J

    2016-01-19

    A collector-generator (C-G) technique has been applied to determine the Faradaic efficiencies for electrocatalytic O2 production by the homogeneous water oxidation catalysts Ru(bda)(isoq)2 (1; bda = 2,2'-bipyridine and isoq = isoquinoline) and [Ru(tpy)(bpz)(OH2)](2+) (2; tpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine and bpz = 2,2'-bipyrazine). This technique uses a custom-fabricated cell consisting of two fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) working electrodes separated by 1 mm with the conductive sides facing each other. With a catalyst in solution, water oxidation occurs at one FTO electrode under a sufficient bias to drive O2 formation by the catalyst; the O2 formed then diffuses to the second FTO electrode poised at a potential sufficiently negative to drive O2 reduction. A comparison of the current versus time response at each electrode enables determination of the Faradaic efficiency for O2 production with high concentrations of supporting electrolyte important for avoiding capacitance effects between the electrodes. The C-G technique was applied to electrocatalytic water oxidation by 1 in the presence of the electron-transfer mediator Ru(bpy)3(2+) in both unbuffered aqueous solutions and with the added buffer bases HCO3(-), HPO4(2-), imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, and 4-methoxypyridine. HCO3(-) and HPO4(2-) facilitate water oxidation by atom-proton transfer (APT), which gave Faradaic yields of 100%. With imidazole as the buffer base, coordination to the catalyst inhibited water oxidation. 1-Methylimidazole and 4-methoxypyridine gave O2 yields of 55% and 76%, respectively, with the lower Faradaic efficiencies possibly due to competitive C-H oxidation of the bases. O2 evolution by catalyst 2 was evaluated at pH 12 with 0.1 M PO4(3-) and at pH 7 in a 0.1 M H2PO4(-)/HPO4(2-) buffer. At pH 12, at an applied potential of 0.8 V vs SCE, water oxidation by the Ru(IV)(O)(2+) form of the catalyst gave O2 in 73% yield. In a pH 7 solution, water oxidation at 1.4 V vs SCE, which is dominated

  8. Towards quantum-based modeling of enzymatic reaction pathways: Application to the acetylholinesterase catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Igor V.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Moskovsky, Alexander A.; Pentkovski, Vladimir M.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    We apply computational methods aiming to approach a full quantum mechanical treatment of chemical reactions in proteins. A combination of the quantum mechanical - molecular mechanical methodology for geometry optimization and the fragment molecular orbital approach for energy calculations is examined for an example of acetylcholinesterase catalysis. The codes based on the GAMESS(US) package operational on the 'RSC Tornado' computational cluster are applied to determine that the energy of the reaction intermediate upon hydrolysis of acetylcholine is lower than that of the enzyme-substrate complex. This conclusion is consistent with the experiments and it is free from the empirical force field contributions.

  9. Study on catalysis effect of TEPB on the curing reaction of HTPB binder system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S. J.; Tang, J.; Liu, X.; Yan, W.

    2016-07-01

    The catalysis effect of tri (exhoxyphenyl) bismuthine (TEPB) on the curing reaction of HTPB binder system was studied by using DSC method. The curing peak temperatures of the catalyst systems were measured to calculate kinetic parameters by using Kissinger and Crane methods, respectively. Two curing reaction kinetic equations were established. The results show that TEPB has high catalytic activity and can decrease the curing temperature of HTPB binder system, down to 35 °C, in which the optimum volume of TEPB is 0.5% of HTPB binder system.

  10. Controlled trifluoromethylation reactions of alkynes through visible-light photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naeem; Jung, Jaehun; Park, Sehyun; Cho, Eun Jin

    2014-01-07

    The control of a reaction that can form multiple products is a highly attractive and challenging concept in synthetic chemistry. A set of valuable CF3 -containing molecules, namely trifluoromethylated alkenyl iodides, alkenes, and alkynes, were selectively generated from alkynes and CF3 I by environmentally benign and efficient visible-light photoredox catalysis. Subtle differences in the combination of catalyst, base, and solvent enabled the control of reactivity and selectivity for the reaction between an alkyne and CF3 I. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Special Issue: Coinage Metal (Copper, Silver, and Gold Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Alexandra Correia Carabineiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject of catalysis by coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold comes up increasingly day-by-day. This Special Issue aims to cover the numerous aspects of the use of these metals as catalysts for several reactions. It deals with synthesis and characterization of copper, silver and gold based catalysis, their characterization and use, both for heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, and some of their potential applications.

  12. Catalysis of Dialanine Formation by Glycine in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1998-02-01

    Mutual catalysis of amino acids in the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction is demonstrated for the case of glycine/alanine. The presence of glycine enhances dialanine formation by a factor up to 50 and enables dialanine formation at much lower alanine concentrations. The actual amounts of glycine play an important role for this catalytic effect, the optimal glycine concentration is 1/8 of the alanine concentration. The mechanism appears to be based on the formation of the intermediate Gly-Ala-Ala tripeptide, connected to one coordination site of copper(II) ion, and subsequent hydrolysis to dialanine and glycine.

  13. Controllable Chemoselectivity in Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Four Diverse Aerobic Radical Cascade Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfei; Ye, Xinyi; Bureš, Filip; Liu, Hongjun; Jiang, Zhiyong

    2015-09-21

    Reported is the controllable selectivity syntheses of four distinct products from the same starting materials by visible-light photoredox catalysis. By employing a dicyanopyrazine-derived chromophore (DPZ) as photoredox catalyst, an aerobic radical mechanism has been developed, and allows the reactions of N-tetrahydroisoquinolines (THIQs) with N-itaconimides to through four different pathways, including addition-cyclization, addition-elimination, addition-coupling, and addition-protonation, with satisfactory chemoselectivity. The current strategy provide straightforward access to four different but valuable N-heterocyclic adducts in moderate to excellent yields. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fabrication of Carbon-Platinum Interdigitated Array Electrodes and Their Application for Investigating Homogeneous Hydrogen Evolution Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Divan, Ralu; Parkinson, Bruce A.

    2015-06-29

    Carbon interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes have been applied to study the homogeneous hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst [Ni(PPh2NBn2)2]2+ (where PPh2NBn2 is 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane). The existence of reaction intermediates in the catalytic cycle is inferred from the electrochemical behavior of a glassy carbon disk electrodes and carbon IDA electrodes. The currents on IDA electrodes for an EC’ (electron transfer reaction followed by a catalytic reaction) mechanism are derived from the number of redox cycles and the contribution of non-catalytic currents. The catalytic reaction rate constant was then extracted from the IDA current equations. Applying the IDA current and kinetic equations to the electrochemical response of the [Ni(PPh2NBn2)2]2+ catalyst yielded a rate constant of 0.10 s-1 for the hydrogen evolution reaction that agrees with the literature value. The quantitative analysis of IDA cyclic voltammetry can be used as a simple and straightforward method for determining rate constants in other catalytic systems. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Shock tube propellant reactions: Ignition of M-9 and catalysis of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A.; Decker, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary results of shock tube experiments to study RDX catalysis are presented. It is shown that using N2 as the test gas (P approximately equal to 90 KPa, T bar approximately equal to 650K), the replacement of RDX powder with NaBH4 (20% by weight) leads to a large increase in the amount of RDX reacting and a small decrease in ignition delays T sub i. It is further shown that higher temperatures due to exothermic pyrolysis reactions of NaBH4 are not responsible for these effects. Replacement of N2 by NO2 (10% by volume) in the environment of RDX powders (T bar approximately equal to 650K, P = 90-400 KPa) leads to an increase in T sub i and T sub i is directly proportional to NO2 pressure. Inhibition appears to be initiated by reactions between NO2 and either RDX or the RDX decomposition products.

  16. Shock tube propellant reactions: Ignition of M-9 and catalysis of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A.; Decker, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary results of shock tube experiments to study RDX catalysis are presented. It is shown that using N2 as the test gas (P approximately equal to 90 KPa, T bar approximately equal to 650K), the replacement of RDX powder with NaBH4 (20% by weight) leads to a large increase in the amount of RDX reacting and a small decrease in ignition delays T sub i. It is further shown that higher temperatures due to exothermic pyrolysis reactions of NaBH4 are not responsible for these effects. Replacement of N2 by NO2 (10% by volume) in the environment of RDX powders (T bar approximately equal to 650K, P = 90-400 KPa) leads to an increase in T sub i and T sub i is directly proportional to NO2 pressure. Inhibition appears to be initiated by reactions between NO2 and either RDX or the RDX decomposition products.

  17. Difluoromethanesulfonyl hypervalent iodonium ylides for electrophilic difluoromethylthiolation reactions under copper catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimori, Sadayuki; Matsubara, Okiya; Takada, Masahiro; Shiro, Motoo; Shibata, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Difluoromethanesulfonyl hypervalent iodonium ylides 2 were developed as electrophilic difluoromethylthiolation reagents for a wide range of nucleophiles. Enamines, indoles, β-keto esters, silyl enol ethers and pyrroles were effectively reacted with 2 affording desired difluoromethylthio (SCF2H)-substituted compounds in good to high yields under copper catalysis. The reaction of allyl alcohols with 2 under the same conditions provided difluoromethylsulfinyl (S(O)CF2H) products in good yields. The difluoromethylthiolation of enamines is particularly effective with wide generality, thus the enamine method was nicely extended to the synthesis of a series of difluoromethythiolated cyclic and acyclic β-keto esters, 1,3-diketones, pyrazole and pyrimidine derivatives by a consecutive, two-step one-pot reaction using 2. PMID:27293790

  18. Homogeneous, heterogeneous and enzymatic catalysis for transesterification of high free fatty acid oil (waste cooking oil) to biodiesel: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Man Kee; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years, biodiesel has emerged as one of the most potential renewable energy to replace current petrol-derived diesel. It is a renewable, biodegradable and non-toxic fuel which can be easily produced through transesterification reaction. However, current commercial usage of refined vegetable oils for biodiesel production is impractical and uneconomical due to high feedstock cost and priority as food resources. Low-grade oil, typically waste cooking oil can be a better alternative; however, the high free fatty acids (FFA) content in waste cooking oil has become the main drawback for this potential feedstock. Therefore, this review paper is aimed to give an overview on the current status of biodiesel production and the potential of waste cooking oil as an alternative feedstock. Advantages and limitations of using homogeneous, heterogeneous and enzymatic transesterification on oil with high FFA (mostly waste cooking oil) are discussed in detail. It was found that using heterogeneous acid catalyst and enzyme are the best option to produce biodiesel from oil with high FFA as compared to the current commercial homogeneous base-catalyzed process. However, these heterogeneous acid and enzyme catalyze system still suffers from serious mass transfer limitation problems and therefore are not favorable for industrial application. Nevertheless, towards the end of this review paper, a few latest technological developments that have the potential to overcome the mass transfer limitation problem such as oscillatory flow reactor (OFR), ultrasonication, microwave reactor and co-solvent are reviewed. With proper research focus and development, waste cooking oil can indeed become the next ideal feedstock for biodiesel.

  19. Introduction to Homogenous Catalysis with Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidation of Alcohols: An Experiment for Undergraduate Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecznikowski, John R.; Caradonna, John P.; Foley, Kathleen M.; Kwiecien, Daniel J.; Lisi, George P.; Martinez, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    A three-week laboratory experiment, which introduces students in an advanced inorganic chemistry course to air-sensitive chemistry and catalysis, is described. During the first week, the students synthesize RuCl[subscript 2](PPh[subscript 3])[subscript 3]. During the second and third weeks, the students characterize the formed coordination…

  20. Chlorobenzene degradation by electro-heterogeneous catalysis in aqueous solution: intermediates and reaction mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiade; MEI Yu; LIU Chenliang; CHEN Jianmeng

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the variables that influence chlorobenzene (CB) degradation in aqueous solution by electro-heterogeneous catalysis. The effects of current density, pH, and electrolyte concentration on CB degradation were determined. The degradation efficiency of CB was almost 100% with an initial CB concentration of 50 mg/L, current density 15 mA/cm2, initial pH 10, electrolyte concentration 0.1 mol/L, and temperature 25℃ after 90 min of reaction. Under the same conditions, the degradation efficiency of CB was only 51% by electrochemical (EC) process, which showed that electro-heterogeneous catalysis was more efficient than EC alone. The analysis results of Purge-and-Trap chromatography-mass spectrometry (P&T/GC/MS) and ion chromatography the release of Cl-. Further oxidation of phenol and biphenyl produced p-Vinylbenzoic acid and hydroquinol. Finally, the compounds were oxidized to butenedioic acid and other small-molecule acids.

  1. MHD Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions in a Nanofluid due to a Permeable Shrinking Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahira Mansur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MHD homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction in a nanofluid flow due to a permeable shrinking surface is studied. The bvp4c program in MATLAB is used to obtain the numerical solutions for several values of parameters such as suction parameter, magnetic parameter, nanoparticle volume fraction, heterogeneous reaction and homogeneous reaction rates. The results show that dual solutions exist and the magnetic parameter and the nanoparticle volume fraction widen the range of the solution domain. Suction parameter, magnetic parameter and nanoparticle volume fraction cause the skin friction coefficient to increase and the velocity to decrease. The concentration increases as the nanoparticle volume fraction increases but decrease as the homogeneous reaction rate and heterogeneous reaction rate increase.

  2. Pickering interfacial catalysis for biphasic systems: from emulsion design to green reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera-Titus, Marc; Leclercq, Loïc; Clacens, Jean-Marc; De Campo, Floryan; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2015-02-09

    Pickering emulsions are surfactant-free dispersions of two immiscible fluids that are kinetically stabilized by colloidal particles. For ecological reasons, these systems have undergone a resurgence of interest to mitigate the use of synthetic surfactants and solvents. Moreover, the use of colloidal particles as stabilizers provides emulsions with original properties compared to surfactant-stabilized emulsions, microemulsions, and micellar systems. Despite these specific advantages, the application of Pickering emulsions to catalysis has been rarely explored. This Minireview describes very recent examples of hybrid and composite amphiphilic materials for the design of interfacial catalysts in Pickering emulsions with special emphasis on their assets and challenges for industrially relevant biphasic reactions in fine chemistry, biofuel upgrading, and depollution.

  3. Synergistic chiral iminium and palladium catalysis: Highly regio- and enantioselective [3 + 2] annulation reaction of 2-vinylcyclopropanes with enals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haipan; Du, Peile; Li, Jianjun; Liao, Ziyang; Liu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Summary A cooperative catalytic strategy of chiral iminium catalysis by regioselective activation of the C=C bond in enals and a transition metal promoting to open the 2-vinylcyclopropanes for highly regio- and enantioselective [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of 2-vinylcyclopropanes with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes has been developed. PMID:27559383

  4. Diphenylbutadienes Syntheses by Means of the Wittig Reaction: Experimental Introduction to the Use of Phase Transfer Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillois, J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis of 1,4-diphenylbutadiene by means of the Wittig reaction is presented as suitable for organic chemistry students at the end of a basic laboratory program to apply laboratory skills and display understanding of the use of phase transfer catalysis and its application in syntheses. (CS)

  5. DNA-Accelerated Copper Catalysis of Friedel-Crafts Conjugate Addition/Enantioselective Protonation Reactions in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Fernández, Almudena; Megens, Rik P.; Villarino, Lara; Roelfes, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    DNA-induced rate acceleration has been identified as one of the key elements for the success of the DNA-based catalysis concept. Here we report on a novel DNA-based catalytic Friedel-Crafts conjugate addition/enantioselective protonation reaction in water, which represents the first example of a

  6. Multicatalyst system in asymmetric catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces multi-catalyst systems by describing their mechanism and advantages in asymmetric catalysis.  Helps organic chemists perform more efficient catalysis with step-by-step methods  Overviews new concepts and progress for greener and economic catalytic reactions  Covers topics of interest in asymmetric catalysis including bifunctional catalysis, cooperative catalysis, multimetallic catalysis, and novel tandem reactions   Has applications for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, materials, and flavour and fragrance

  7. Catalysis seen in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation techniques are widely applied in materials research and heterogeneous catalysis. In homogeneous catalysis, its use so far is rather limited despite its high potential. Here, insights in the strengths and limitations of X-ray spectroscopy technique in the field of homogeneous ca

  8. Coupling Solar Energy into Reactions: Materials Design for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ran; Li, Yu; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-08-26

    Enabled by surface plasmons, noble metal nanostructures can interact with and harvest incident light. As such, they may serve as unique media to generate heat, supply energetic electrons, and provide strong local electromagnetic fields for chemical reactions through different mechanisms. This solar-to-chemical pathway provides a new approach to solar energy utilization, alternative to conventional semiconductor-based photocatalysis. To provide readers with a clear picture of this newly recognized process, this review presents coupling solar energy into chemical reactions through plasmonic nanostructures. It starts with a brief introduction of surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures, followed by a demonstration of tuning plasmonic features by tailoring their physical parameters. Owing to their tunable plasmonic properties, metallic materials offer a platform to trigger and drive chemical reactions at the nanoscale, as systematically overviewed in this article. The design rules for plasmonic materials for catalytic applications are further outlined based on existing examples. At the end of this article, the challenges and opportunities for further development of plasmonic-mediated catalysis toward energy and environmental applications are discussed.

  9. The role of acid catalysis in the Baeyer-Villiger reaction. A theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Robert D

    2012-08-17

    Quantum mechanical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level have examined the overall mechanism of the Baeyer-Villiger (BV) reaction with peroxyacetic acid. A series of reactions that include both the addition step and the subsequent alkyl group migration step included ketones, acetone, t-butyl methyl ketone, acetophenone, cyclohexyl methyl ketone, and cyclohexyl phenyl ketone. The combined data suggested that the first step for addition of the peroxyacetic acid oxidation catalyst to the ketone carbonyl to produce the Criegee or tetrahedral intermediate is rate-limiting and has activation barriers that range from 38 to 41 kcal/mol without the aid of a catalyst. The rate of addition is markedly reduced by the catalytic action of a COOH functionality acting as a donor-acceptor group affecting both its proton transfer to the ketone C═O oxygen in concert with transfer of the OOH proton to the carboxylic acid carbonyl. The second or alkyl group migration step has a much reduced activation barrier, and its rate is not markedly influenced by acid catalysis. The rate of both steps in the BV reaction is greatly influenced by the catalytic action of very strong acids.

  10. Effect of Homogenizing Procedures on the Properties of Reaction Sialon Suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xavier; Venceslau; Kexin; Chen; José; M; F; Ferreira

    2002-01-01

    Homogeneous, high concentrated ceramic suspensions wi th low viscosity are the key controlling factors for the production of ceramic c omponents through colloidal processing. A well-dispersed suspension can be obta ined by choosing suitable dispersant, solvent, particle size distribution etc. B esides these factors, the homogenizing procedure is also a key step. In this paper, reaction sialon suspensions were prepared using 3-wt% KD1 as dis persant in organic media composed of 60-vol% methyletheylketone a...

  11. Cyclization of 1,6-enynes catalyzed by gold nanoparticles supported on TiO2: significant changes in selectivity and mechanism, as compared to homogeneous Au-catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryparis, Charis; Efe, Christina; Raptis, Christos; Lykakis, Ioannis N; Stratakis, Manolis

    2012-06-15

    Gold nanoparticles supported on TiO(2) (1.2 mol %) catalyze, for the first time under heterogeneous conditions, the cycloisomerization of a series of 1,6-enynes in high yields. In several cases, the product selectivity differs significantly as compared to homogeneous Au(I)-catalysis. Based on product analysis and stereoisotopic studies it is proposed that the major or exclusive pathway involves a 5-exo cyclization mode to form stereoselectively gold cyclopropyl carbenes that undergo a single cleavage pathway, in contrast to homogeneous Au-catalysis where the double cleavage pathway operates substantially.

  12. Enzyme catalysis-electrophoresis titration for multiplex enzymatic assay via moving reaction boundary chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ran; Xie, Haiyang; Kong, Fanzhi; Zhang, Qiang; Jahan, Sharmin; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liuyin; Cao, Chengxi

    2016-09-21

    In this work, we developed the concept of enzyme catalysis-electrophoresis titration (EC-ET) under ideal conditions, the theory of EC-ET for multiplex enzymatic assay (MEA), and a related method based on a moving reaction boundary (MRB) chip with a collateral channel and cell phone imaging. As a proof of principle, the model enzymes horseradish peroxidase (HRP), laccase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were chosen for the tests of the EC-ET model. The experiments revealed that the EC-ET model could be achieved via coupling EC with ET within a MRB chip; particularly the MEA analyses of catalysis rate, maximum rate, activity, Km and Kcat could be conducted via a single run of the EC-ET chip, systemically demonstrating the validity of the EC-ET theory. Moreover, the developed method had these merits: (i) two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than a fluorescence microplate reader, (ii) simplicity and low cost, and (iii) fairly rapid (30 min incubation, 20 s imaging) analysis, fair stability (<5.0% RSD) and accuracy, thus validating the EC-ET method. Finally, the developed EC-ET method was used for the clinical assay of MPO activity in blood samples; the values of MPO activity detected via the EC-ET chip were in agreement with those obtained by a traditional fluorescence microplate reader, indicating the applicability of the EC-ET method. The work opens a window for the development of enzymatic research, enzyme assay, immunoassay, and point-of-care testing as well as titration, one of the oldest methods of analysis, based on a simple chip.

  13. Complex Reaction Environments and Competing Reaction Mechanisms in Zeolite Catalysis: Insights from Advanced Molecular Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wispelaere, K.; Ensing, B.; Ghysels, A.; Meijer, E.J.; van Van Speybroeck, V.

    2015-01-01

    The methanol-to-olefin process is a showcase example of complex zeolite-catalyzed chemistry. At real operating conditions, many factors affect the reactivity, such as framework flexibility, adsorption of various guest molecules, and competitive reaction pathways. In this study, the strength of first

  14. Polymer-silica hybrids for separation of CO2 and catalysis of organic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Mojica, Ernesto

    Porous materials comprising polymeric and inorganic segments have attracted interest from the scientific community due to their unique properties and functionalities. The physical and chemical characteristics of these materials can be effectively exploited for adsorption applications. This dissertation covers the experimental techniques for fabrication of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica (SiO2) porous supports, and their functionalization with polyamines for developing adsorbents with potential applications in separation of CO2 and catalysis of organic reactions. The supports were synthesized by processes involving (i) covalent cross-linking of PVA, (ii) hydrolysis and poly-condensation of silica precursors (i,e,. sol-gel synthesis), and formation of porous structures via (iii) direct templating and (iv) phase inversion techniques. Their physical structure was controlled by the proper combination of the preparation procedures, which resulted in micro-structured porous materials in the form of micro-particles, membranes, and pellets. Their adsorption characteristics were tailored by functionalization with polyethyleneimine (PEI), and their physicochemical properties were characterized by vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR, UV-vis), microscopy (SEM), calorimetry (TGA, DSC), and adsorption techniques (BET, step-switch adsorption). Spectroscopic investigations of the interfacial cross-linking reactions of PEI and PVA with glutaraldehyde (GA) revealed that PEI catalyzes the cross-linking reactions of PVA in absence of external acid catalysts. In-situ IR spectroscopy coupled with a focal plane array (FPA) image detector allowed the characterization of a gradient interface on a PEI/PVA composite membrane and the investigation of the cross-linking reactions as a function of time and position. The results served as a basis to postulate possible intermediates, and propose the reaction mechanisms. The formulation of amine-functionalized CO2 capture sorbents was based on the

  15. Complex Reaction Environments and Competing Reaction Mechanisms in Zeolite Catalysis: Insights from Advanced Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wispelaere, Kristof; Ensing, Bernd; Ghysels, An; Meijer, Evert Jan; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2015-06-22

    The methanol-to-olefin process is a showcase example of complex zeolite-catalyzed chemistry. At real operating conditions, many factors affect the reactivity, such as framework flexibility, adsorption of various guest molecules, and competitive reaction pathways. In this study, the strength of first principle molecular dynamics techniques to capture this complexity is shown by means of two case studies. Firstly, the adsorption behavior of methanol and water in H-SAPO-34 at 350 °C is investigated. Hereby an important degree of framework flexibility and proton mobility was observed. Secondly, the methylation of benzene by methanol through a competitive direct and stepwise pathway in the AFI topology was studied. Both case studies clearly show that a first-principle molecular dynamics approach enables unprecedented insights into zeolite-catalyzed reactions at the nanometer scale to be obtained.

  16. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  17. Solitary wave solutions of selective nonlinear diffusion-reaction equations using homogeneous balance method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjit Kumar; R S Kaushal; Awadhesh Prasad

    2010-10-01

    An auto-Bäcklund transformation derived in the homogeneous balance method is employed to obtain several new exact solutions of certain kinds of nonlinear diffusion-reaction (D-R) equations. These equations arise in a variety of problems in physical, chemical, biological, social and ecological sciences.

  18. Impact of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux in Jeffrey Fluid Flow with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional stretched flow of Jeffrey fluid in view of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux is addressed. Effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are also considered. Suitable transformations are used to form ordinary differential equations. Convergent series solutions are computed. Impact of significant parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration and skin friction coefficient is addressed. Analysis of thermal relaxation is made. The obtained results show that ratio of relaxation to retardation times and Deborah number have inverse relation for velocity profile. Temperature distribution has decreasing behavior for Prandtl number and thermal relaxation time. Also concentration decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter. PMID:26859675

  19. Homogeneous catalysis for the production of fine chemicals. Palladium- and nickel-catalysed aromatic carbon–carbon bond formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucker, Charles E.; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2002-01-01

    In this article we describe our recent efforts in the area of palladium- and nickel-catalysed aromatic substitution reactions. Main focus is on low cost and low waste production methods. The use of aromatic carboxylic anhydrides in the Heck reaction leads to a waste-free protocol. In addition these

  20. Advances in interactive supported electro-catalysis for hydrogen and oxygen electrode reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljko V Krstajic; Ljiljana M Vracar; Jelena M Jaksic; Milan M Jaksic [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Stelios G Neophytides; Miranda Labou; Jelena M Jaksic; Milan M Jaksic [Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes FORTH, and Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, 26500 Patras, (Greece); Reidar Tunold [University of Trondheim, NTNU, Institute of Industrial Electrochemistry, Trondheim, (Norway); Polycarpos Falaras [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR Demokritos, Attikis, Athens, (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    Magneli phases have been introduced as an unique electron conductive and interactive support for electro-catalysis both in hydrogen (HELR) and oxygen (OELR) electrode reactions in water electrolysis and Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells (LT PEM FC). The Strong Metal-Support Interaction (SMSI) that imposes the former implies: (i) the hypo-hyper-d inter-bonding effect and its catalytic consequences, and (ii) the interactive primary oxide (M-OH) spillover from the hypo-d-oxide support as a dynamic electrocatalytic contribution. The stronger the bonding, the more strained appear d-orbitals, thereby the less strong the intermediate adsorptive strength in the rate determining step (RDS), and consequently, the faster the facilitated catalytic electrode reaction arises. At the same time the primary oxide spillover transferred from the hypo-d-oxide support directly interferes and reacts either individually and directly to contribute to finish the oxygen reduction, or with other interactive species, like CO to contribute to the CO tolerance. In such a respect, the conditions to provide Au to act as the reversible hydrogen electrode have been proved either by its potentiodynamic surface reconstruction in a heavy water solution, or by the nano-structured SMSI Au on anatase titania with characteristic strained d-orbitals in such a hypo-hyper-d-interactive bonding (Au/TiO{sub 2}). In the same context, the monoatomic network dispersion of Pt upon Magneli phases makes it possible to produce an advanced interactive supported electro-catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction (ORR). The strained hypo-hyper-d-inter-electronic and inter-d-orbital metal/hypo-d-oxide support bonding relative to the strength of the latter, has been inferred to be the basis of the synergistic electrocatalytic effect both in the HELR and ORR. (authors)

  1. The structures of pyruvate oxidase from Aerococcus viridans with cofactors and with a reaction intermediate reveal the flexibility of the active-site tunnel for catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Hoque, Md Mominul; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Imamura, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Takénaka, Akio

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of pyruvate oxidase from A. viridans in complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide, thiamine diphosphate and the reaction intermediate 2-acetyl-thiamine diphosphate reveal details of substrate recognition and catalysis.

  2. Catalysis seen in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Moniek

    2015-03-06

    Synchrotron radiation techniques are widely applied in materials research and heterogeneous catalysis. In homogeneous catalysis, its use so far is rather limited despite its high potential. Here, insights in the strengths and limitations of X-ray spectroscopy technique in the field of homogeneous catalysis are given, including new technique developments. A relevant homogeneous catalyst, used in the industrially important selective oligomerization of ethene, is taken as a worked-out example. Emphasis is placed on time-resolved operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy with outlooks to novel high energy resolution and emission techniques. All experiments described have been or can be done at the Diamond Light Source Ltd (Didcot, UK).

  3. Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate via a strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis in a liquid/liquid biphasic system: homogeneous catalysis, facile heterogeneous separation, and recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis (TPSC) is applied to the Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in a p-xylene/PEG-200 biphasic system. Initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP) are used to establish the TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system using water-soluble TPMA as a ligand, EBPA as an initiator, CuBr2 as a catalyst, and AIBN as a reducing agent. By heating to 70 °C, unlimited miscibility of both solvents is achieved and the polymerization can be carried out under homogeneous conditions; then on cooling to 25 °C, the mixture separates into two phases again. As a result, the catalyst complex remains in the PEG-200 phase while the obtained polymers stay in the p-xylene phase. The catalyst can therefore be removed from the resultant polymers by easily separating the two different layers and can be reused again. It is important that well-defined PMMA with a controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution could be obtained using this TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system.

  4. Upgrading light hydrocarbons via tandem catalysis: a dual homogeneous Ta/Ir system for alkane/alkene coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, David C; Lam, Yan Choi; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2013-07-17

    Light alkanes and alkenes are abundant but are underutilized as energy carriers because of their high volatility and low energy density. A tandem catalytic approach for the coupling of alkanes and alkenes has been developed in order to upgrade these light hydrocarbons into heavier fuel molecules. This process involves alkane dehydrogenation by a pincer-ligated iridium complex and alkene dimerization by a Cp*TaCl2(alkene) catalyst. These two homogeneous catalysts operate with up to 60/30 cooperative turnovers (Ir/Ta) in the dimerization of 1-hexene/n-heptane, giving C13/C14 products in 40% yield. This dual system can also effect the catalytic dimerization of n-heptane (neohexene as the H2 acceptor) with cooperative turnover numbers of 22/3 (Ir/Ta).

  5. Synthesis of benzyl chlorides and cycloveratrylene macrocycles using benzylic alcohols under homogeneous catalysis by HCl/dioxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Marina Vargas-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of benzyl chlorides, cyclic derivatives cyclotriveratrylene and cyclotripiperotrylene were carried out in using the HCl/dioxane system as a catalyst. The reaction proceeded with high selectivity and is sensitive to the number of alkyl and methoxy substituent on the aromatic ring.

  6. Solvent Effects on Simple Electron Transfer Reactions. A Comparison of Results for Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Electroanalytical Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California . Davis, CA 95616 \\ JUN2 0 1989 May 1, 1989 C2 E Reproduction in whole or in...0541 Davis, CA 95616 . O 0 Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Arlington, VA 22217-5000 Prepared for Publication in: Journal of Electroanalytical ... Chemistry 1& A (U fm M Solvent effects on the rate constants for both homogeneous and hetero- geneous electron transfer reactions have been analyzed on

  7. KINETIC MODEL FOR DIFFUSION-CONTROLLED INTERMOLECULAR REACTION OF HOMOGENOUS POLYMER UNDER STEADY SHEAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-ge Liu; Wei Yu; Chi-xing Zhou

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic model for diffusion-controlled intermolecular reaction of homogenous polymer under steady shear was theoretically studied. The classic formalism and the concept of conformation ellipsoids were integrated to get a new equation, which directly correlates the rate constant with shear rate. It was found that the rate constant is not monotonic with shear rate. The scale of rate constant is N-1.5 (N is the length of chains), which is in consistent with de Gennes's result.

  8. HRSSA - Efficient hybrid stochastic simulation for spatially homogeneous biochemical reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Luca; Priami, Corrado; Thanh, Vo Hong

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces HRSSA (Hybrid Rejection-based Stochastic Simulation Algorithm), a new efficient hybrid stochastic simulation algorithm for spatially homogeneous biochemical reaction networks. HRSSA is built on top of RSSA, an exact stochastic simulation algorithm which relies on propensity bounds to select next reaction firings and to reduce the average number of reaction propensity updates needed during the simulation. HRSSA exploits the computational advantage of propensity bounds to manage time-varying transition propensities and to apply dynamic partitioning of reactions, which constitute the two most significant bottlenecks of hybrid simulation. A comprehensive set of simulation benchmarks is provided for evaluating performance and accuracy of HRSSA against other state of the art algorithms.

  9. HRSSA – Efficient hybrid stochastic simulation for spatially homogeneous biochemical reaction networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Luca, E-mail: marchetti@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research – University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology (COSBI), Piazza Manifattura, 1, 38068 Rovereto (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research – University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology (COSBI), Piazza Manifattura, 1, 38068 Rovereto (Italy); University of Trento, Department of Mathematics (Italy); Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research – University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology (COSBI), Piazza Manifattura, 1, 38068 Rovereto (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    This paper introduces HRSSA (Hybrid Rejection-based Stochastic Simulation Algorithm), a new efficient hybrid stochastic simulation algorithm for spatially homogeneous biochemical reaction networks. HRSSA is built on top of RSSA, an exact stochastic simulation algorithm which relies on propensity bounds to select next reaction firings and to reduce the average number of reaction propensity updates needed during the simulation. HRSSA exploits the computational advantage of propensity bounds to manage time-varying transition propensities and to apply dynamic partitioning of reactions, which constitute the two most significant bottlenecks of hybrid simulation. A comprehensive set of simulation benchmarks is provided for evaluating performance and accuracy of HRSSA against other state of the art algorithms.

  10. Using soluble polymers to enforce catalyst-phase-selective solubility and as antileaching agents to facilitate homogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yannan; Harrell, Mary L; Bergbreiter, David E

    2014-07-28

    The enforced phase-selective solubility of polyisobutylene (PIB)-bound Rh(II) catalysts in biphasic heptane/acetonitrile mixtures can be used not only to recycle these catalysts but also to minimize bimolecular reactions with ethyl diazoacetate. When cyclopropanation and O-H insertion reactions are carried out with PIB-bound Rh(II) catalysts either with or without addition of an unfunctionalized hydrocarbon polymer cosolvent, dimer by-product formation is suppressed even without slow syringe pump addition of the ethyl diazoacetate. This suppression of by-product formation is shown to be due to increased phase segregation of the soluble polymer-bound catalyst and the ethyl diazoacetate reactant. These studies also reveal that added hydrocarbon polymer cosolvents can function as antileaching agents, decreasing the already small amount of a soluble polymer-bound species that leaches into a polar phase in a biphasic mixture during a liquid/liquid separation step.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A; Farooq, M

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ-perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears.

  12. Allergic reactions to raw, pasteurized, and homogenized/pasteurized cow milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A; Samuelsson, E G

    1988-01-01

    Five children aged 12-40 months with IgE-mediated adverse reactions to cow milk (immediate onset clinical pattern of cow milk allergy) were orally challenged double-blind in random order with three different milk preparations processed from the same batch of milk 1) raw untreated cow milk, 2......) pasteurized cow milk, 3) homogenized and pasteurized cow milk, and 4) Nutramigen (a commercial hypoallergenic infant formula based on hydrolysed casein) as placebo. Skin prick tests with the same preparations were also performed. On oral challenge the three different processed milk types provoked significant...... and similar allergic reactions in each child, and no adverse reactions followed the challenge with placebo (Nutramigen). Skin prick test with the same milk products were positive in all children and comparable to the results with an extract of purified raw cow milk protein (Soluprick), whereas Nutramigen did...

  13. Synthesis of propylene carbonate from urea and propylene glycol over zinc oxide: A homogeneous reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, several metal oxides and zinc salts were used to catalyze propylene carbonate (PC synthesis from urea and propylene glycol (PG. According to the results of catalytic test and characterization, the catalytic pattern of ZnO was different from that of other metal oxides such as CaO, MgO and La2O3, but similar to that of zinc salts. In fact, the leaching of Zn species took place during reaction for ZnO. And ZnO was found to be the precursor of homogenous catalyst for reaction of urea and PG. Thus, the relationship between the amount of dissolved zinc species and the catalytic performance of employed ZnO was revealed. In addition, a possible reaction mechanism over ZnO was discussed based on the catalytic runs and the characterization of XRD, FTIR, and element analysis.

  14. Combining Organocatalysis and Lanthanide Catalysis: A Sequential One-Pot Quadruple Reaction Sequence/Hetero-Diels-Alder Asymmetric Synthesis of Functionalized Tricycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochain, Simon; Vetica, Fabrizio; Puttreddy, Rakesh; Rissanen, Kari; Enders, Dieter

    2016-12-23

    A stereoselective one-pot synthesis of functionalized complex tricyclic polyethers has been achieved using the combination of secondary amine and lanthanide catalysis. This one-pot quadruple reaction/Hetero-Diels-Alder sequence gave good yields (per step) as well as excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Furthermore, the particular combination of lanthanide complexes with organocatalysis is one of the first examples described for sequential catalysis. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  16. The reductive half-reaction of xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus: the role of Glu232 in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James; Reschke, Stefan; Cao, Hongnan; Leimkühler, Silke; Hille, Russ

    2014-11-14

    The kinetic properties of an E232Q variant of the xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus have been examined to ascertain whether Glu(232) in wild-type enzyme is protonated or unprotonated in the course of catalysis at neutral pH. We find that kred, the limiting rate constant for reduction at high [xanthine], is significantly compromised in the variant, a result that is inconsistent with Glu(232) being neutral in the active site of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of the pH dependence of both kred and kred/Kd from reductive half-reaction experiments between wild-type and enzyme and the E232Q variant suggests that the ionized Glu(232) of wild-type enzyme plays an important role in catalysis by discriminating against the monoanionic form of substrate, effectively increasing the pKa of substrate by two pH units and ensuring that at physiological pH the neutral form of substrate predominates in the Michaelis complex. A kinetic isotope study of the wild-type R. capsulatus enzyme indicates that, as previously determined for the bovine and chicken enzymes, product release is principally rate-limiting in catalysis. The disparity in rate constants for the chemical step of the reaction and product release, however, is not as great in the bacterial enzyme as compared with the vertebrate forms. The results indicate that the bacterial and bovine enzymes catalyze the chemical step of the reaction to the same degree and that the faster turnover observed with the bacterial enzyme is due to a faster rate constant for product release than is seen with the vertebrate enzyme.

  17. Reaction Process Phase Transfer Catalysis for Selective Oxidative-Reductive Carbonylation to Monuron%反应过程相转移催化选择性氧化还原羰基化合成灭草隆除草剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ The basic problem of a homogeneous catalytic process is the separation of products from catalytic reaction system. Two main important developments, to immobilize the solid complex catalyst on the solid support and to use the two-phase (aqueous-organic solvent) catalysis, have achieved to solve this problem. However, some difficulties, such as the continuous loss of the catalyst and lower aqueous solubility of the ubstrate, still remain as before[1,2]. Recently, a complex catalyst of nonmetal selenium with triethylamine in the presence of CO, which possesses the reaction process phase transfer property, has been developed[3~7]. This catalytic system provides both advantages from homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis, resulting in simple and complete separation of the product from the catalytic system. It differs from the two-phase catalysis, in our catalytic system no water was used as solvent, and the catalytic system is effective in selective oxidative-reductive carbonylation with nitroaromatic compounds and alkylamine as reagents at the same time[5~7]. Monuron is a kind of herbicide. The methods for its industrial synthesis use mainly the phosgene, but the phosgene has high toxicity and produces a lot of corrosive contaminants[8,9]. Our study is extended to the selective oxidative-reductive carbonylation of p-ClC6H4NO2 and 33%HN(CH3)2-67%H2O in one-pot reaction to give monuron.

  18. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  19. Supported ionic liquids: versatile reaction and separation media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Haumann, Marco;

    2006-01-01

    The latest developments in supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) systems for catalysis and separation technology are surveyed. The SILP concept combines the advantages of homogeneous catalysis with heterogeneous process technology, and a variety of reactions have been studied where supported ionic ...... liquid catalysts proved to be more active and selective than common systems. In separation applications the use of supported ionic liquids can facilitate selective transport of substrates across membranes.......The latest developments in supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) systems for catalysis and separation technology are surveyed. The SILP concept combines the advantages of homogeneous catalysis with heterogeneous process technology, and a variety of reactions have been studied where supported ionic...

  20. Versatile cooperative ligand effects in group 9 transition metal catalysis: Applications in transfer hydrogenation & hydrogen autotransfer reactions, ketene & ketene imine synthesis and hydroformylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative ligand effects of transition metal complexes have a profound impact on the reaction outcome of catalytic reactions, and development of (new) cooperative metal-ligand systems is a hot topic in current catalysis research. Conventional ligands with hydride-accepting/delivering activities ar

  1. Silver-free activation of ligated gold(I) chlorides: the use of [Me3NB12Cl11]- as a weakly coordinating anion in homogeneous gold catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Michael; Huber, Florian; Bolli, Christoph; Jenne, Carsten; Kirsch, Stefan F

    2015-01-12

    Phosphane and N-heterocyclic carbene ligated gold(I) chlorides can be effectively activated by Na[Me3NB12Cl11] (1) under silver-free conditions. This activation method with a weakly coordinating closo-dodecaborate anion was shown to be suitable for a large variety of reactions known to be catalyzed by homogeneous gold species, ranging from carbocyclizations to heterocyclizations. Additionally, the capability of 1 in a previously unknown conversion of 5-silyloxy-1,6-allenynes was demonstrated.

  2. Direct numerical simulation study of statistically stationary propagation of a reaction wave in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rixin; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulation (DNS) study of the propagation of a reaction wave in forced, constant-density, statistically stationary, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is performed by solving Navier-Stokes and reaction-diffusion equations at various (from 0.5 to 10) ratios of the rms turbulent velocity U' to the laminar wave speed, various (from 2.1 to 12.5) ratios of an integral length scale of the turbulence to the laminar wave thickness, and two Zeldovich numbers Ze=6.0 and 17.1. Accordingly, the Damköhler and Karlovitz numbers are varied from 0.2 to 25.1 and from 0.4 to 36.2, respectively. Contrary to an earlier DNS study of self-propagation of an infinitely thin front in statistically the same turbulence, the bending of dependencies of the mean wave speed on U' is simulated in the case of a nonzero thickness of the local reaction wave. The bending effect is argued to be controlled by inefficiency of the smallest scale turbulent eddies in wrinkling the reaction-zone surface, because such small-scale wrinkles are rapidly smoothed out by molecular transport within the local reaction wave.

  3. Activation of Trifluoromethylthio Moiety by Appending Iodonium Ylide under Copper Catalysis for Electrophilic Trifluoromethylation Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrayim Saidalimu; Shugo Suzuki; Etsuko Tokunaga; Norio Shibata

    2016-01-01

    A novel iodonium-ylide compound 2 that appends a trifluoromethylthio (SCF3) group is disclosed as a new,shelf-stable electrophilic trifluoromethylation reagent.Unlike known shelf-stable electrophilic trifluoromethylation reagents,2 has a stable SCF3 group which is activated by appending iodonium ylide under copper catalysis via sulfonium ylide to generate a cationic trifluoromethyl (CF3) species.Reagent 2 was found to be an efficient electrophilic trifluoromethylation reagent for a wide range of silyl enol ethers 3 under copper catalysis.Cyclic and acyclic a-trifluoromethyl ketones 4 were obtained by reagent 2 in moderate to good yields.On the other hand,a difluoromethylthio analogue 5 did not affect intermolecular transfer difluoromethylation to substrates.Instead,intramolecular 1,4-migration proceeded similar to the Stevens rearrangement to provide 6 in 21% yield,independent of the presence of nucleophiles 3.

  4. An improved stochastic algorithm for temperature-dependent homogeneous gas phase reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, M

    2003-01-01

    We propose an improved stochastic algorithm for temperature-dependent homogeneous gas phase reactions. By combining forward and reverse reaction rates, a significant gain in computational efficiency is achieved. Two modifications of modelling the temperature dependence (with and without conservation of enthalpy) are introduced and studied quantitatively. The algorithm is tested for the combustion of n-heptane, which is a reference fuel component for internal combustion engines. The convergence of the algorithm is studied by a series of numerical experiments and the computational cost of the stochastic algorithm is compared with the DAE code DASSL. If less accuracy is needed the stochastic algorithm is faster on short simulation time intervals. The new stochastic algorithm is significantly faster than the original direct simulation algorithm in all cases considered.

  5. Heterogeneous Catalysis on a Disordered Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Frachebourg, L.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a simple model of heterogeneous catalysis on a disordered surface which consists of two types of randomly distributed sites with different adsorption rates. Disorder can create a reactive steady state in situations where the same model on a homogeneous surface exhibits trivial kinetics with no steady state. A rich variety of kinetic behaviors occur for the adsorbate concentrations and catalytic reaction rate as a function of model parameters.

  6. Green chemistry by nano-catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Nano-materials are important in many diverse areas, from basic research to various applications in electronics, biochemical sensors, catalysis and energy. They have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust high surface area heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports. The nano-sized particles increase the exposed surface area of the active component of the catalyst, thereby enhancing the contact between reactants and catalyst dramatically and mimicking the homogeneous catalysts. This review focuses on the use of nano-catalysis for green chemistry development including the strategy of using microwave heating with nano-catalysis in benign aqueous reaction media which offers an extraordinary synergistic effect with greater potential than these three components in isolation. To illustrate the proof-of-concept of this "green and sustainable" approach, representative examples are discussed in this article. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Acid-base bifunctional catalysis of silica-alumina-supported organic amines for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Tomita, Mitsuru; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts were prepared by the reaction of an acidic silica-alumina (SA) surface with silane-coupling reagents possessing amino functional groups. The obtained SA-supported amines (SA-NR2) were characterized by solid-state 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The solid-state NMR spectra revealed that the amines were immobilized by acid-base interactions at the SA surface. The interactions between the surface acidic sites and the immobilized basic amines were weaker than the interactions between the SA and free amines. The catalytic performances of the SA-NR2 catalysts for various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as cyano-ethoxycarbonylation, the Michael reaction, and the nitro-aldol reaction, were investigated and compared with those of homogeneous and other heterogeneous catalysts. The SA-NR2 catalysts showed much higher catalytic activities for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions than heterogeneous amine catalysts using other supports, such as SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, homogeneous amines hardly promoted these reactions under similar reaction conditions, and the catalytic behavior of SA-NR2 was also different from that of MgO, which was employed as a typical heterogeneous base. An acid-base dual-activation mechanism for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions is proposed.

  8. Anion-π Catalysis of Enolate Chemistry: Rigidified Leonard Turns as a General Motif to Run Reactions on Aromatic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotelle, Yoann; Benz, Sebastian; Avestro, Alyssa-Jennifer; Ward, Thomas R; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-03-18

    To integrate anion-π, cation-π, and ion pair-π interactions in catalysis, the fundamental challenge is to run reactions reliably on aromatic surfaces. Addressing a specific question concerning enolate addition to nitroolefins, this study elaborates on Leonard turns to tackle this problem in a general manner. Increasingly refined turns are constructed to position malonate half thioesters as close as possible on π-acidic surfaces. The resulting preorganization of reactive intermediates is shown to support the disfavored addition to enolate acceptors to an absolutely unexpected extent. This decisive impact on anion-π catalysis increases with the rigidity of the turns. The new, rigidified Leonard turns are most effective with weak anion-π interactions, whereas stronger interactions do not require such ideal substrate positioning to operate well. The stunning simplicity of the motif and its surprisingly strong relevance for function should render the introduced approach generally useful. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  10. Greenhouse Gas Conversion by Homogeneous Salen Catalyst Systems under Very Mild Reaction Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyungsock; Song, Sanghoon; Ahn, Sunghyun; Kim, Taesoon; Kim, Beomsik; Chang, Taesun [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Homogeneous salen catalyt systems were investigated for the conversion of greenhouse gas into cyclic carbonate under room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Salen complexes were more active than salophen complexes. Neither electron withdrawing nor donating group showed lower conversion efficiency. Co-catalysts such as moisture or ammonium salt increased the conversion efficiency dramatically. These results have potential to decrease carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel combustions under mild condition. One of the main scientific challenges in the 21st century is the global warming due to the increasing level of carbon dioxide. The consumption of fossil fuels is continue to increase with emitting substantial amount of green house gas. The solution currently considered is capturing and storing of carbon dioxide which compressing carbon dioxide and then storing it into oil wells or under the ocean. The other solution include converting the carbon dioxide into useful chemicals with significant commercial demand, but low chemical reactivity of carbon dioxide restricts the chemical reactions.

  11. Application of a Homogeneous Dodecakis[NCN-Pincer-PdII] Catalyst in a Nanofiltration Membrane Reactor under Continious Reaction Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Dijkstra, H.P.; Ronde, N.; Klink, G.P.M. van; Vogt, D.

    2003-01-01

    A shape-persistent nanosize dodecakis(NCN-PdII-aqua) complex (4b) was applied as a homogeneous catalyst in the double Michael reaction between methyl vinyl ketone and ethyl -cyanoacetate under continuous reaction conditions in a nanofiltration membrane reactor. Due to its macromolecular dimensions,

  12. Metal carbonyl-hydrosilane reactions and hydrosilation catalysis. Final report for period May 1, 1995 - August 14, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, Alan R.

    2001-04-14

    Manganese carbonyl complexes serve as hydrosilation precatalysts for selectively transforming a carbonyl group into a doxy methylene or a fully reduced methylene group. Substrates of interest include (1) aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, silyl esters, and esters, and (2) their organometallic acyl counterparts. Two types of manganese precatalysts have been reported: (a) alkyl and acyl complexes (L)(CO){sub 4}MnR [L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = COCH{sub 3}, COPh, CH{sub 3}] and (b) halides (CO){sub 5}MnX and [(CO){sub 4}MnX]{sub 2} (X = Br, I). The former promote hydrosilation and deoxygenation catalysis; the latter promote dehydrogenative silation of alcohols and carboxylic acids as well as hydrosilation and deoxygenation of some metallocarboxylic acid derivatives. In every case studied, these Mn precatalysts are far more reactive or selective than traditional Rh(l) precatalysts. The reaction chemistry of the above and other Mn alkyl complexes with hydrosilanes was studied in order to probe catalysis mechanism(s). Thus, Mn(CO){sub 5} methyl, benzyl, acetyl, and benzoyl (4 p-substituents) complexes reacted with hydrosilines by four different mechanisms, which were established. A noteworthy development was that the methyl and benzoyl complexes gave moderate yields of a new ({eta}{sup 2}-Si-H) silane adduct (CO){sub 4}Mn(SiMe{sub 2}Ph)(H-SiMe{sub 2}Ph), which is stable in the presence of excess silane. This silane adduct promotes all three catalytic reactions; its extraordinary activity and potential selectivity are under study.

  13. Metal-surface reaction energetics. Theory and application to heterogeneous catalysis, chemisorption, and surface diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shustorovich, E. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    The title is esoteric. The subtitle is specialized. This is an edited book containing five chapters written by eight authors. It is not a book to read from beginning to end, but kept perusing this handsomely printed and well-edited volume, learned so much that he wishes to convey his message to a small but very successful group of chemists and chemical engineers in heterogeneous catalysis: there is a lot to learn in this book, not so much in theory but in the facts that the theorists who wrote the book are trying to explain today with the faint hope that tomorrow they will actually predict new chemistry in as yet unknown catalytic cycles.

  14. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  15. Ground reaction curves for circular excavations in non-homogeneous, axisymmetric strain-softening rock masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. González-Cao; F. Varas; F.G. Bastante; L.R. Alejano

    2013-01-01

    Fast methods to solve the unloading problem of a cylindrical cavity or tunnel excavated in elasto-perfectly plastic, elasto-brittle or strain-softening materials under a hydrostatic stress field can be derived based on the self-similarity of the solution. As a consequence, they only apply when the rock mass is homoge-neous and so exclude many cases of practical interest. We describe a robust and fast numerical technique that solves the tunnel unloading problem and estimates the ground reaction curve for a cylindrical cavity excavated in a rock mass with properties depending on the radial coordinate, where the solution is no longer self-similar. The solution is based on a continuation-like approach (associated with the unloading and with the incremental formulation of the elasto-plastic behavior), finite element spatial discretization and a combination of explicit sub-stepping schemes and implicit techniques to integrate the constitutive law, so as to tackle the difficulties associated with both strong strain-softening and elasto-brittle behav-iors. The developed algorithm is used for two practical ground reaction curve computation applications. The first application refers to a tunnel surrounded by an aureole of material damaged by blasting and the second to a tunnel surrounded by a ring-like zone of reinforced (rock-bolted) material.

  16. Homogenous Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction Rates Correlate with Reaction Overpotential in Acidic Organic Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegis, Michael L.; McKeown, Bradley A.; Kumar, Neeraj; Lang, Kai; Wasylenko, Derek J.; Zhang, X. Peter; Raugei, Simone; Mayer, James M.

    2016-10-28

    Improvement of electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is critical for the advancement of fuel cell technologies. Herein, we report a series of eleven soluble iron porphyrin ORR electrocatalysts that possess turnover frequencies (TOFs) from 3 s-1 to an unprecedented 2.2 x 106 s-1. These TOFs correlate with the ORR overpotential, which can be changed by modulating the ancillary ligand, by varying the reaction conditions or by changing the catalyst’s protonation state. This is the first such correlation for homogeneous ORR electrocatalysis, and it demonstrates that the remarkably fast TOFs are a consequence of the high overpotential. Computational studies indicate that the correlation is analogous to the volcano plot analysis developed for heterogeneous ORR materials. This unique parallel between homo- and heterogeneous ORR electrocatalysts allows a fundamental understanding of intrinsic barriers associated with the ORR, which can aid the design of new catalytic systems that operate at low overpotential. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Additional data is given in the Electronic Supporting Information.

  17. Probing the origin of the compromised catalysis of E. coli alkaline phosphatase in its promiscuous sulfatase reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrina, Irina; O'Brien, Patrick J; Purcell, Jamie; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Zalatan, Jesse G; Hengge, Alvan C; Herschlag, Daniel

    2007-05-02

    The catalytic promiscuity of E. coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) and many other enzymes provides a unique opportunity to dissect the origin of enzymatic rate enhancements via a comparative approach. Here, we use kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) to explore the origin of the 109-fold greater catalytic proficiency by AP for phosphate monoester hydrolysis relative to sulfate monoester hydrolysis. The primary 18O KIEs for the leaving group oxygen atoms in the AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) and p-nitrophenylsulfate (pNPS) decrease relative to the values observed for nonenzymatic hydrolysis reactions. Prior linear free energy relationship results suggest that the transition states for AP-catalyzed reactions of phosphate and sulfate esters are "loose" and indistinguishable from that in solution, suggesting that the decreased primary KIEs do not reflect a change in the nature of the transition state but rather a strong interaction of the leaving group oxygen atom with an active site Zn2+ ion. Furthermore, the primary KIEs for the two reactions are identical within error, suggesting that the differential catalysis of these reactions cannot be attributed to differential stabilization of the leaving group. In contrast, AP perturbs the KIE for the nonbridging oxygen atoms in the reaction of pNPP but not pNPS, suggesting a differential interaction with the transferred group in the transition state. These and prior results are consistent with a strong electrostatic interaction between the active site bimetallo Zn2+ cluster and one of the nonbridging oxygen atoms on the transferred group. We suggest that the lower charge density of this oxygen atom on a transferred sulfuryl group accounts for a large fraction of the decreased stabilization of the transition state for its reaction relative to phosphoryl transfer.

  18. Mechanistic studies on the phosphoramidite coupling reaction in oligonucleotide synthesis. I. Evidence for nudeophilic catalysis by tetrazole and rate variations with the phosphorus substituents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Bjarne H.; Nielsen, John; Dahl, Otto

    1987-01-01

    , and that dialkylammonium tetrazolide salts are inhibitors. These and other facts are evidence that the reactions are subjected to nucleophilic catalysis by tetrazole, in addition to acid catalysis. The rate variations with phosphorus substituents of 1a-h are NEt 2 > NRr12 > N(CH 2CH 2)O > NMePh, and OMe > OCH 2CH 2CN...... > OCHMeCH 2CN > OCMe 2CH 2CN >> OC 6H 4Cl. The inhibitor properties of dialkylammonium tetrazolides have practical consequences for the efficiency of DNA syntheses, when in situ prepared phosphramidites are used; the same would apply for segmented simultaneous syntheses or syntheses where recycling...

  19. Catalytic self-assembled monolayers on Au nanoparticles: the source of catalysis of a transphosphorylation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaupa, Giovanni; Mora, Claudia; Bonomi, Renato; Prins, Leonard J; Scrimin, Paolo

    2011-04-18

    The catalytic activity of a series of Au monolayer protected colloids (Au MPCs) containing different ratios of the catalytic unit triazacyclononane⋅Zn(II) (TACN⋅Zn(II) ) and an inert triethyleneglycol (TEG) unit was measured. The catalytic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are highly efficient in the transphosphorylation of 2-hydroxy propyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNPP), an RNA model substrate, exhibiting maximum values for the Michaelis-Menten parameters k(cat) and K(M) of 6.7×10(-3) s(-1) and 3.1×10(-4) M, respectively, normalized per catalytic unit. Despite the structural simplicity of the catalytic units, this renders these nanoparticles among the most active catalysts known for this substrate. Both k(cat) and K(M) parameters were determined as a function of the mole fraction of catalytic unit (x(1)) in the SAM. Within this nanoparticle (NP) series, k(cat) increases up till x(1) ≈0.4, after which it remains constant and K(M) decreases exponentially over the range studied. A theoretical analysis demonstrated that these trends are an intrinsic property of catalytic SAMs, in which catalysis originates from the cooperative effect between two neighboring catalytic units. The multivalency of the system causes an increase of the number of potential dimeric catalytic sites composed of two catalytic units as a function of the x(1) , which causes an apparent increase in binding affinity (decrease in K(M)). Simultaneously, the k(cat) value is determined by the number of substrate molecules bound at saturation. For values of x(1) >0.4, isolated catalytic units are no longer present and all catalytic units are involved in catalysis at saturation. Importantly, the observed trends are indicative of a random distribution of the thiols in the SAM. As indicated by the theoretical analysis, and confirmed by a control experiment, in case of clustering both k(cat) and K(M) values remain constant over the entire range of x(1) .

  20. An Unexpected Reaction of Allylic Propynoate under Palladium(Ⅱ) Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Zhao-Guo(张兆国); LU,Xi-Yan(陆熙炎); LANG,Shen-Hui(郎深慧)

    2002-01-01

    Palladium (Ⅱ) catalyzed reactions of allyl propynoate in the presence of excess halide ions with or without allyl halide or acrolein were studied, yielding (E)-3-halo-2-allyl-acrylic acid as the sole product. A mechanism involving halopalladation, carbopalladation, ring opening and β-heteroatom elimination was prioposed and was further justified by the reaction with deuterated substrate.keywords palladium, enyne, halopalladation, carbopalladation,β-heteroatom elimination was proposed and was further justified by the reaction with deuterated substrate.

  1. The guanidinium unit in the catalysis of phosphoryl transfer reactions: from molecular spacers to nanostructured supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Riccardo

    2015-07-27

    Examples of guanidinium-based artificial phosphodiesterases are illustrated in this review article. A wide set of collected catalytic systems are presented, from the early examples to the most recent developments of the use of this unit in the design of supramolecular catalysts. Special attention is dedicated to illustrate the operating catalytic mechanism and the role of guanidine/ium units in the catalysis. One or more of these units can act by themselves or in conjunction with other active units. The analogy with the mechanism of enzymatic systems is presented and discussed. In the last part of this overview, recent examples of guanidinophosphodiesterases based on nanostructured supports are reported, namely gold-monolayer-protected clusters and polymer brushes grafted to silica nanoparticles. The issue of the dependence of the catalytic performance on the preorganization of the spacer is tackled and discussed in terms of effective molarity, a parameter that can be taken as a quantitative measurement of this preorganization for both conventional molecular linker and nanosized supports.

  2. Lewis acid catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, S; Bertoncin, F; Engberts, JBFN

    1996-01-01

    Here we report the first detailed study of a Diels-Alder (DA) reaction that is catalyzed by Lewis acids in water. The effect of Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions as Lewis acid catalysts on the rate and endo-exo selectivity of the DA reaction between the bidentate dienophiles 3-phenyl-1-(2-pyridyl)-2-pr

  3. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  4. Catalysis of Cascade and Multicomponent Reactions of Carbonyl Compounds and CH Acids by Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinson, Michail N; Vereshchagin, Anatoly N; Ryzhkov, Fedor V

    2016-08-01

    This review is concerned with modern trends in the use of electrochemically induced chain reactions in cascade and multicomponent electroorganic synthesis. The review summarizes the data on the use of electrochemically induced chain reactions in cascade and multicomponent organic synthesis, which were published mainly in the last decade.

  5. Lewis acid catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, S; Bertoncin, F; Engberts, JBFN

    1996-01-01

    Here we report the first detailed study of a Diels-Alder (DA) reaction that is catalyzed by Lewis acids in water. The effect of Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions as Lewis acid catalysts on the rate and endo-exo selectivity of the DA reaction between the bidentate dienophiles

  6. Tandem Catalysis of an Aldol-'Click' Reaction System within a Molecular Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Marco; Muñoz Capdevila, Iván; Díaz-Oltra, Santiago; Escuder, Beatriu

    2016-06-08

    A heterogeneous supramolecular catalytic system for multicomponent aldol-'click' reactions is reported. The copper(I) metallohydrogel functionalized with a phenyltriazole fragment was able to catalyze the multicomponent reaction between phenylacetylene, p-nitrobenzaldehyde, and an azide containing a ketone moiety, obtaining the corresponding aldol products in good yields. A possible mechanistic pathway responsible for this unexpected catalytic behavior has been proposed.

  7. Surface and nanomolecular catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Using new instrumentation and experimental techniques that allow scientists to observe chemical reactions and molecular properties at the nanoscale, the authors of Surface and Nanomolecular Catalysis reveal new insights into the surface chemistry of catalysts and the reaction mechanisms that actually occur at a molecular level during catalysis. While each chapter contains the necessary background and explanations to stand alone, the diverse collection of chapters shows how developments from various fields each contributed to our current understanding of nanomolecular catalysis as a whole. The

  8. Mutational analysis of a monoterpene synthase reaction: altered catalysis through directed mutagenesis of (-)-pinene synthase from Abies grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David C; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-07-15

    Two monoterpene synthases, (-)-pinene synthase and (-)-camphene synthase, from grand fir (Abies grandis) produce different product mixtures despite having highly homologous amino acid sequences and, presumably, very similar three-dimensional structures. The major product of (-)-camphene synthase, (-)-camphene, and the major products of (-)-pinene synthase, (-)-alpha-pinene, and (-)-beta-pinene, arise through distinct mechanistic variations of the electrophilic reaction cascade that is common to terpenoid synthases. Structural modeling followed by directed mutagenesis in (-)-pinene synthase was used to replace selected amino acid residues with the corresponding residues from (-)-camphene synthase in an effort to identify the amino acids responsible for the catalytic differences. This approach produced an enzyme in which more than half of the product was channeled through an alternative pathway. It was also shown that several (-)-pinene synthase to (-)-camphene synthase amino acid substitutions were necessary before catalysis was significantly altered. The data support a model in which the collective action of many key amino acids, located both in and distant from the active site pocket, regulate the course of the electrophilic reaction cascade.

  9. Chimeric Antibody-Binding Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin (VHb Mediates Redox-Catalysis Reaction: New Insight into the Functional Role of VHb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaneenart Suwanwong, Malin Kvist, Chartchalerm Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Natta Tansila, Leif Bulow, Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimentation was initiated to explore insight into the redox-catalysis reaction derived from the heme prosthetic group of chimeric Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb. Two chimeric genes encoding chimeric VHbs harboring one and two consecutive sequences of Fc-binding motif (Z-domain were successfully constructed and expressed in E. coli strain TG1. The chimeric ZVHb and ZZVHb were purified to a high purity of more than 95% using IgG-Sepharose affinity chromatography. From surface plasmon resonance, binding affinity constants of the chimeric ZVHb and ZZVHb to human IgG were 9.7 x 107 and 49.1 x 107 per molar, respectively. More importantly, the chimeric VHbs exhibited a peroxidase-like activity determined by activity staining on native PAGE and dot blotting. Effects of pH, salt, buffer system, level of peroxidase substrate and chromogen substrate were determined in order to maximize the catalytic reaction. From our findings, the chimeric VHbs displayed their maximum peroxidase-like activity at the neutral pH (~7.0 in the presence of high concentration (20-40 mM of hydrogen peroxide. Under such conditions, the detection limit derived from the calibration curve was at 250 ng for the chimeric VHbs, which was approximately 5-fold higher than that of the horseradish peroxidase. These findings reveal the novel functional role of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin indicating a high trend of feasibility for further biotechnological and medical applications.

  10. Tandem catalysis of ring-closing metathesis/atom transfer radical reactions with homobimetallic ruthenium–arene complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Borguet

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tandem catalysis of ring-closing metathesis/atom transfer radical reactions was investigated with the homobimetallic ruthenium–indenylidene complex [(p-cymeneRu(μ-Cl3RuCl(3-phenyl-1-indenylidene(PCy3] (1 to generate active species in situ. The two catalytic processes were first carried out independently in a case study before the whole sequence was optimized and applied to the synthesis of several polyhalogenated bicyclic γ-lactams and lactones from α,ω-diene substrates bearing trihaloacetamide or trichloroacetate functionalities. The individual steps were carefully monitored by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies in order to understand the intimate details of the catalytic cycles. Polyhalogenated substrates and the ethylene released upon metathesis induced the clean transformation of catalyst precursor 1 into the Ru(II–Ru(III mixed-valence compound [(p-cymeneRu(μ-Cl3RuCl2(PCy3], which was found to be an efficient promoter for atom transfer radical reactions under the adopted experimental conditions.

  11. Effects of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reactions on the Dispersion of a Solute for Immiscible Viscous Fluids between Two Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analytical solution for the dispersion of a solute of two immiscible viscous fluids in the presence of an irreversible first-order chemical reaction. The effects of both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions on the dispersion are studied. The results are presented graphically and in tabular form for various values of viscosity ratio and pressure gradients on the volumetric flow rate and effective Taylor dispersion coefficient. It is found that for homogeneous chemical reaction, the effective Taylor dispersion coefficient decreases as reaction rate parameter increases. The validity of the results obtained from an analytical method for two fluid models is verified by comparison with the available one fluid model results, and good agreement is found.

  12. Methandiide as a non-innocent ligand in carbene complexes: from the electronic structure to bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Julia; Modl, Tanja; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of a ruthenium carbene complex based on a sulfonyl-substituted methandiide and its application in bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis is reported. In the complex, the metal-carbon interaction can be tuned between a Ru-C single bond with additional electrostatic interactions and a Ru=C double bond, thus allowing the control of the stability and reactivity of the complex. Hence, activation of polar and non-polar bonds (O-H, H-H) as well as dehydrogenation reactions become possible. In these reactions the carbene acts as a non-innocent ligand supporting the bond activation as nucleophilic center in the 1,2-addition across the metal-carbon double bond. This metal-ligand cooperativity can be applied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation for the reduction of ketones. This concept opens new ways for the application of carbene complexes in catalysis.

  13. [Recurrent relationship for the characteristic polynom of a system of enzymatic catalysis of nonbranched monomolecular reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omel'ianchuk, L V; Kolchanov, N A

    1982-01-01

    A new mode is proposed to represent the characteristics equation for the system of monomolecular reaction on the basis of directed graphs method. A characteristic equation can be represented as a sum of weights of spanning trees derived from some graph which is connected with the initial graph of reaction. The recurrent relationship for the characteristic polynom of the system of nonbranched monomolecular reaction was obtained on the basis of this representation. A new proof on the matrix theorem about trees formulated by Volkenstein and Goldstein was established.

  14. Understanding organometallic reaction mechanisms and catalysis experimental and computational tools computational and experimental tools

    CERN Document Server

    Ananikov, Valentin P

    2014-01-01

    Exploring and highlighting the new horizons in the studies of reaction mechanisms that open joint application of experimental studies and theoretical calculations is the goal of this book. The latest insights and developments in the mechanistic studies of organometallic reactions and catalytic processes are presented and reviewed. The book adopts a unique approach, exemplifying how to use experiments, spectroscopy measurements, and computational methods to reveal reaction pathways and molecular structures of catalysts, rather than concentrating solely on one discipline. The result is a deeper

  15. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF HEMILABILE COORDINATION AND COUNTERIONS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS: NEW TUNABLE MONOPHOSPHINE LIGANDS FOR HYDROVINYLATION REACTIONS. (R826120)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  16. Catalysis of Reduction and Oxidation Reactions for Application in Gas Particle Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udron, L.; Turek, T.

    2002-09-19

    The present study is a first part of an investigation addressing the simultaneous occurrence of oxidation and reduction reactions in catalytic filters. It has the objectives (a) to assess the state of knowledge regarding suitable (types of) catalysts for reduction and oxidation, (b) to collect and analyze published information about reaction rates of both NOx reduction and VOC oxidation, and (c) to adjust a lab-scale screening method to the requirements of an activity test with various oxidation/reduction catalysts.

  17. Unraveling the reaction mechanisms governing methanol-to-olefins catalysis by theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelsoet, Karen; Van der Mynsbrugge, Jeroen; De Wispelaere, Kristof; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2013-06-03

    The conversion of methanol to olefins (MTO) over a heterogeneous nanoporous catalyst material is a highly complex process involving a cascade of elementary reactions. The elucidation of the reaction mechanisms leading to either the desired production of ethene and/or propene or undesired deactivation has challenged researchers for many decades. Clearly, catalyst choice, in particular topology and acidity, as well as the specific process conditions determine the overall MTO activity and selectivity; however, the subtle balances between these factors remain not fully understood. In this review, an overview of proposed reaction mechanisms for the MTO process is given, focusing on the archetypal MTO catalysts, H-ZSM-5 and H-SAPO-34. The presence of organic species, that is, the so-called hydrocarbon pool, in the inorganic framework forms the starting point for the majority of the mechanistic routes. The combination of theory and experiment enables a detailed description of reaction mechanisms and corresponding reaction intermediates. The identification of such intermediates occurs by different spectroscopic techniques, for which theory and experiment also complement each other. Depending on the catalyst topology, reaction mechanisms proposed thus far involve aromatic or aliphatic intermediates. Ab initio simulations taking into account the zeolitic environment can nowadays be used to obtain reliable reaction barriers and chemical kinetics of individual reactions. As a result, computational chemistry and by extension computational spectroscopy have matured to the level at which reliable theoretical data can be obtained, supplying information that is very hard to acquire experimentally. Special emphasis is given to theoretical developments that open new perspectives and possibilities that aid to unravel a process as complex as methanol conversion over an acidic porous material.

  18. Tandem Catalysis of an Aldol-‘Click’ Reaction System within a Molecular Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Araújo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A heterogeneous supramolecular catalytic system for multicomponent aldol-‘click’ reactions is reported. The copper(I metallohydrogel functionalized with a phenyltriazole fragment was able to catalyze the multicomponent reaction between phenylacetylene, p-nitrobenzaldehyde, and an azide containing a ketone moiety, obtaining the corresponding aldol products in good yields. A possible mechanistic pathway responsible for this unexpected catalytic behavior has been proposed.

  19. Some Numerical Investigations of the Stability of Electrochemical Digital Simulation, Particularly as affected by First-Order Homogeneous Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Dieter; Østerby, Ole

    1994-01-01

    A reported analysis of the stability of some digital simulation methods is investigated by numerical experiments and the results are consistent with the analysis. Traditional stability conditions need to be modified slightly in the presence of homogeneous reactions, though not to a degree that ha...

  20. Exploring water catalysis in the reaction of thioformic acid with hydroxyl radical: a global reaction route mapping perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Vikas

    2014-06-12

    Hydrogen abstraction pathways, in the gas-phase reaction of tautomers of thioformic acid (TFA), TFA(thiol), and TFA(thione), with hydroxyl radical in the presence and absence of single water molecule acting as a catalyst, is investigated with high-level quantum mechanical calculations at CCSD(T)/6-311++G(2d,2p)//MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p), CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)//DFT/BHandHLYP/6-311++G(d,p), and DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p) levels of the theory. A systematic and automated search of the potential energy surface (PES) for the reaction pathways is performed using the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) method that employs an uphill walking technique to search prereaction complexes and transition states. The computations reveal significant lowering of the PES and substantial reduction in the activation energy for the hydrogen abstraction pathway in the presence of water, thereby proving water as an efficient catalyst in the reaction of both the TFA tautomers with OH radical. The hydrogen-bonding interactions are observed to be responsible for the large catalytic effect of water. Notably, in the case of TFA(thiol), formyl hydrogen abstraction is observed to be kinetically more favorable, while acidic hydrogen abstraction is observed to be thermodynamically more feasible. Interestingly, in the case of TFA(thione), reaction pathways involving only formyl hydrogen abstraction were observed to be feasible. The water-catalyzed hydrogen abstraction reaction of TFA with hydroxyl radical, investigated in this work, can provide significant insights into the corresponding reaction in the biological systems.

  1. Insights into the mechanism and catalysis of the native chemical ligation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erik C B; Kent, Stephen B H

    2006-05-24

    Native chemical ligation of unprotected peptide segments involves reaction between a peptide-alpha-thioester and a cysteine-peptide, to yield a product with a native amide bond at the ligation site. Peptide-alpha-thioalkyl esters are commonly used because of their ease of preparation. These thioalkyl esters are rather unreactive so the ligation reaction is catalyzed by in situ transthioesterification with thiol additives. The most common thiol catalysts used to date have been either a mixture of thiophenol/benzyl mercaptan, or the alkanethiol MESNA. Despite the use of these thiol catalysts, ligation reactions typically take 24-48 h. To gain insight into the mechanism of native chemical ligaton and in order to find a better catalyst, we investigated the use of a number of thiol compounds. Substituted thiophenols with pK(a) > 6 were found to best combine the ability to exchange rapidly and completely with thioalkyl esters, and to then act as effective leaving groups in reaction of the peptide-thioester with the thiol side chain of a cysteine-peptide. A highly effective and practical catalyst was (4-carboxylmethyl)thiophenol ('MPAA'), a nonmalodorous, water-soluble thiol. Use of MPAA gave an order of magnitude faster reaction in model studies of native chemical ligation and in the synthesis of a small protein, turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3). MPAA should find broad use in native chemical ligation and in the total synthesis of proteins.

  2. A mini review on the chemistry and catalysis of the water gas shift reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhun

    2014-01-01

    Water gas shift (WGS) reaction is a chemical reaction in which carbon monoxide reacts with water vapor to form carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It is an important reaction industrially used in conjunction with steam reforming of hydrocarbons for the production of high purity hydrogen. Grenoble et al examined the roles of both active metals and metal oxide support on the kinetics of the WGS reaction. They found out that the turn over numbers of various Al2O3 supported transition metals decreased in the trend of Cu, Re, Co, Ru, Ni, Pt, Os, Au, Fe, Pd, Rh, and Ir, which corresponds nicely to the observed volcano shaped correlation between catalytic activities and respective CO adsorption heat. This is a strong indication that CO gets activated on the metal surface during the reaction and different metals have different activation energies. The authors also observed that the turn over number of Pt/Al2O3 was one order of magnitude higher than that of Pt/SiO2, indicating a strong support effect, which the authors ascri...

  3. Influence of structure on reaction efficiency in surface catalysis. 1. Sensitivity to multiplet concentration and configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politowicz, P.A.; Kozak, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical study of the role of configurational/geometrical factors in influencing the efficiency of diffusion-controlled reactions on surfaces has been initiated. The specific problem dealt with in this paper is to assess how different configurations of reaction centers can, by virtue of their disposition in reaction space, influence the efficiency of the process. The mean number (n) of steps taken by a diffusion coreactant before an irreversible reaction takes place at one of the catalytically active sites defining a multiplet has been calculated. This number (n) is related to the lifetime of the species and thence to the turnover number determined experimentally. Calculations are based on a lattice theory of diffusion-controlled processes proposed recently by the authors in which the theory of finite Markov processes is coupled with group theoretical arguments to yield a method for calculating exactly the mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis of the underlying probability distribution function defining the process. Once the numerical results for (n) for different multiplet configurations have been presented, trends in the data are identified, and it is indicated how these can be understood in terms of the interplay of two factors: (1) the number and cluster configuration of the reaction centers and (2) a (discretized) correlation length k which specifies the distribution of singlets/ multiplets relative to a conveniently chosen reference point of the reaction space. In order to provide a concrete illustration of the manner in which these results may be used to interpret experiments, the presentation here focused on the work of Sinfelt and co-workers on the catalytic properties of bimetallic systems (and, in particular, on their studies of the hydrogenolysis of ethane and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane on Ni/Cu alloys.)

  4. Visible-Light-Mediated Thiol-Ene Reactions through Organic Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gaoyuan; Kaur, Sarbjeet; Wang, Ting

    2017-06-16

    Synthetically useful radical thiol-ene reactions can be initiated by visible-light irradiation in the presence of an organic photocatalyst, 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinum tetrafluoroborate. The key thiyl radical intermediates are generated upon quenching of the photoexcited catalyst with a variety of thiols. The success of this method requires only the use of near-stoichiometric levels of alkene coupling partners. Using these highly efficient metal-free conditions, thiol-ene reactions between carbohydrates and peptides can be accomplished in excellent yields.

  5. Catalysis of the interphase reaction of. cap alpha. -methylstyrene with formaldehyde by alkylbenzenesulfonic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharf, V.Z.; Kasymova, K.A.; Litvin, E.F.

    1986-11-10

    Alkylbenzenesulfonic acids accelerate condensation of ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene with formaldehyde (on conversion per acid group) significantly more strongly than sulfuric and oxalic acids. The observed event is due to interphase transfer under conditions of acid catalysts (Prins reaction). Schemes which include transfer of the olefin to the aqueous phase and formaldehyde to the organic phase were proposed. The catalytic cycle includes the formation of an ion pair of the alkylbenzenesulfonic acid with formaldehyde due to the occurrence of the reaction in the organic phase.

  6. Required Levels of Catalysis for Emergence of Autocatalytic Sets in Models of Chemical Reaction Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The formation of a self-sustaining autocatalytic chemical network is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the origin of life. The question of whether such a network could form “by chance” within a sufficiently complex suite of molecules and reactions is one that we have investigated for a simple chemical reaction model based on polymer ligation and cleavage. In this paper, we extend this work in several further directions. In particular, we investigate in more detail the levels of cat...

  7. Bimetallic redox synergy in oxidative palladium catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, David C; Ritter, Tobias

    2012-06-19

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes, which are embedded in the active sites of many metalloenzymes, are responsible for effecting a diverse array of oxidation reactions in nature. The range of chemical transformations remains unparalleled in the laboratory. With few noteworthy exceptions, chemists have primarily focused on mononuclear transition metal complexes in developing homogeneous catalysis. Our group is interested in the development of carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, with a particular focus on identifying reactions that can be applied to the synthesis of complex molecules. In this context, we have hypothesized that bimetallic redox chemistry, in which two metals participate synergistically, may lower the activation barriers to redox transformations relevant to catalysis. In this Account, we discuss redox chemistry of binuclear Pd complexes and examine the role of binuclear intermediates in Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions. Stoichiometric organometallic studies of the oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes to binuclear Pd(III) complexes and subsequent C-X reductive elimination from the resulting binuclear Pd(III) complexes have confirmed the viability of C-X bond-forming reactions mediated by binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Metal-metal bond formation, which proceeds concurrently with oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes, can lower the activation barrier for oxidation. We also discuss experimental and theoretical work that suggests that C-X reductive elimination is also facilitated by redox cooperation of both metals during reductive elimination. The effect of ligand modification on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes will be presented in light of the impact that ligand structure can exert on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Historically, oxidation reactions similar to those discussed here have been proposed to proceed via mononuclear Pd(IV) intermediates, and the hypothesis of mononuclear Pd

  8. Consecutive Reaction to Construct Hierarchical Nanocrystalline CuS “Branch” with Tunable Catalysis Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangdan; Yang, Feifei; Cui, Shizhong; Wei, Wutao; Chen, Weihua; Mi, Liwei

    2016-07-01

    New CuS nanocrystals with a 3D hierarchical branched structure are successfully synthesized through in situ consecutive reaction method with copper foam as template. The formation mechanism of the 3D hierarchical branched structure obtained from the secondary reaction is investigated by adjusting the reaction time. The morphology of CuS nanosheet arrays with the 3D hierarchical branched structure is changed through Cu2+ exchange. In this method, the copper foam reacted completely, and the as-synthesized CuS@Cu9S5 nanocrystals are firmly grown on the surface of the 3D framework. This tunable morphology significantly influence the physical and chemical properties, particularly catalytic performance, of the materials. The as-obtained material of Cu@CuS-2 with the 3D hierarchical branched structure as catalyst for methylene blue degradation exhibits good catalytic performance than that of the material of Cu@CuS with 2D nanosheets in dark environment. Furthermore, the cation exchange between Cu and Cu2+ indicates that Cu2+ in wastewater could be absorbed by Cu@CuS-2 with the 3D hierarchical branched structure. The exchanged resultant of CuS@Cu9S5 retains its capability to degrade organic dyes. This in situ consecutive reaction method may have a significant impact on controlling the crystal growth direction of inorganic material.

  9. A Study on Catalysis and Electrolyte Engineering for H2/O2 Electrochemical Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2016-09-27

    Water electrolysis conjugated with renewable energy sources potentially realizes a sustainable society. Although the current electrolyzers operate at extreme pH to maximize the electrolysis efficiency, near-neutral pH conditions may optimize the overall system operation when conjugated with renewable energy sources. In this context, a study on the electrolysis in the mild conditions is essential. The dissertation investigates the water electrolysis in various conditions, with a particular focus placed on milder conditions, to rationalize and improve its performance. Microkinetic analysis was performed for the cathodic half-reaction in conjugation with mass transport evaluation using various electrode materials. The analysis revealed a significant universal influence of electrolyte properties on the reaction performances at near-neutral pH. Investigation of the associated electrolyte properties (ion size, viscosity and activity/fugacity) rationally optimized the reaction conditions. Together with the separately performed studies on the anodic half-reaction and system configurations, the finding was successfully transferred to electrocatalytic and solar-driven water splitting systems. The presented herein is a fundamental yet crucial aspect of water electrolysis, which can advance the water electrolysis for the future.

  10. Sequence Analysis of Trimer Isomers Formed by Montmorillonite Catalysis in the Reaction of Binary Monomer Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Gözen; Hazen, Robert M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2007-10-01

    Oligonucleotides are structurally similar to short RNA strands. Therefore, their formation via non-enzymatic reactions is highly relevant to Gilbert's RNA world scenario (1986) and the origin of life. In laboratory synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers, it is necessary to remove the water molecules from the reaction medium to shift the equilibrium in favor of oligonucleotide formation, which would have been impossible for reactions that took place in dilute solutions on the early Earth. Model studies designed to address this problem demonstrate that montmorillonite, a phyllosilicate common on Earth and identified on Mars, efficiently catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between activated mononucleotides in dilute solutions and produces RNA-like oligomers. The purpose of this study was to examine the sequences and regiospecificity of trimer isomers formed in the reaction of 5'-phosphorimidazolides of adenosine and uridine. Results demonstrated that regiospecificity and sequence specificity observed in the dimer fractions are conserved in their elongation products. With regard to regiospecificity, 61% of the linkages were found to be RNA-like 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds. With regard to sequence specificity, we found that 88% of the linear trimers were hetero-isomers with 61% A-monomer and 39% U-monomer incorporation. These results lend support to Bernal's hypothesis that minerals may have played a significant role in the chemical processes that led to the origin of life by catalyzing the formation of phosphodiester bonds in RNA-like oligomers.

  11. Consecutive Reaction to Construct Hierarchical Nanocrystalline CuS "Branch" with Tunable Catalysis Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangdan; Yang, Feifei; Cui, Shizhong; Wei, Wutao; Chen, Weihua; Mi, Liwei

    2016-07-28

    New CuS nanocrystals with a 3D hierarchical branched structure are successfully synthesized through in situ consecutive reaction method with copper foam as template. The formation mechanism of the 3D hierarchical branched structure obtained from the secondary reaction is investigated by adjusting the reaction time. The morphology of CuS nanosheet arrays with the 3D hierarchical branched structure is changed through Cu(2+) exchange. In this method, the copper foam reacted completely, and the as-synthesized CuS@Cu9S5 nanocrystals are firmly grown on the surface of the 3D framework. This tunable morphology significantly influence the physical and chemical properties, particularly catalytic performance, of the materials. The as-obtained material of Cu@CuS-2 with the 3D hierarchical branched structure as catalyst for methylene blue degradation exhibits good catalytic performance than that of the material of Cu@CuS with 2D nanosheets in dark environment. Furthermore, the cation exchange between Cu and Cu(2+) indicates that Cu(2+) in wastewater could be absorbed by Cu@CuS-2 with the 3D hierarchical branched structure. The exchanged resultant of CuS@Cu9S5 retains its capability to degrade organic dyes. This in situ consecutive reaction method may have a significant impact on controlling the crystal growth direction of inorganic material.

  12. Some aspects of industrial homogeneous liquid-phase oxidations and emerging oxidation systems; Catalyse homogene d'oxydation. Quelques aspects des reactions industrielles et des nouveaux systemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregeault, J.M.; Launay, F. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-06-01

    This brief account considers recent developments of some catalytic systems in selective liquid-phase oxidations. Radical chain auto-oxidations which lead to some large-scale specialities are presented: i) the two-stage processes to Nylone intermediates (cyclohexane to cyclohexanol-cyclohexanone mixtures and nitric acid oxidation to adipic acid); ii) Amoco oxidation based on MC catalysts to prepare terephthalic acid with p-xylene as the raw material. Homogeneous catalytic processes with hetero-lytic reactions are illustrated first by the Arco-Lyndell method, which uses a molybdenum catalyst that epoxidizes propylene by transferring an oxygen atom from tert-butyl hydroperoxide. All new propylene oxide technologies focus on co product-free routes. Novel results with hydrogen peroxide and titanium, rhenium, tungsten and molybdenum oxo-peroxo species are presented with catalytic oxidations of organic substrates under mild conditions. Significant results appear in the modelling enzyme active sites (bio-mimetic oxidations) and on non-metal catalysts for homogeneous oxidations. These new systems could compete with transition-metal-based systems for fine chemicals. (authors)

  13. Reaction of benzeneselenol with tri- and tetrachloroethylenes under conditions of phase-transfer catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martynov, A.V.; Mirskova, A.N.; Kalikhman, I.D.; Voronkov, M.G.

    1988-08-10

    The reaction of benzeneselenol with trichloroethylene in concentrated sodium hydroxide solution, catalyzed by ammonium salts, leads to Z-phenyl /alpha/,/beta/-dichlorovinyl selenide with an equimolar ratio of the catalyst and the selenol or to a mixture of the Z and E isomers with a ratio of 1:10. In addition to the expected trichlorovinyl selenide PhSeCCl=CCl/sub 2/, the analogous reaction with tetrachloroethylene also gives a mixture of the Z and E isomers of /alpha/-/beta/-dichlorovinyl selenides, and in addition, 1,2-bis(phenylseleno)-1,2-dichloroethylene PhSeCCl = CClSePh. If trialkylbenzylammonium chlorides R/sub 3/PhCH/sub 2/N/sup +/Cl/sup /minus// are used as catalyst, phenyl benzyl selenide PhSeCH/sub 2/Ph is formed as a side product. The results of the reaction in the case of trichloroethylene are explained by the addition of the selenolate ion to the CCl/identical to/CCl, generated from the trichloroethylene in situ, and isomerization of the initially formed Z-phenyl /alpha/,/beta/-dichlorovinyl selenide to the thermodynamically more stable E isomer. In the case of tetrachloroethylene they are explained by the usual addition-elimination mechanism with the formation of trichlorovinyl selenide, accompanied by reductive dechlorination of the CCl/sub 2/-CCl/sub 2/ to CHCl=CCl/sub 2/ by the selenolate and subsequent reaction of the selenolate with CHCl=CCl/sub 2/.

  14. Carbon catalysis of reactions in the lithium SOCl2 and SO2 systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilroy, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    Certain hazards associated with lithium batteries have delayed widespread acceptance of these power sources. The reactivity of ground lithium carbon mixtures was examined. The effect of carbon types on this reactivity was determined. The basic reaction involved mixtures of lithium and carbon with battery electrolyte. The various parameters that influenced this reactivity included: the nature and freshness of the carbon; the freshness, the purity, and the conductive salt of the electrolyte; and the effect of Teflon or moisture.

  15. Dynamics of small autocatalytic reaction network; 2, replication, mutation and catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, P F; Först, C J; Schuster, P; Stadler, Peter F; Schnabl, Wolfgang; Forst, Christian V; Schuster, Peter; Biotechnology, Molecuar

    1994-01-01

    Mutation is introduced into autocatalytic reaction networks. Examples of low dimensional dynamical systems --- n = 2, 3 and 4 --- are discussed and complete qualitative analysis is presented. Error thresholds known from simple replication-mutation kinetics with frequency independent replication rates occur here as well. Instead of cooperative transitions or higher order phase transistions the thresholds appear here as supercritical or subcritical bifurcations being analogous to first order phase transitions.

  16. Influence of structure on reaction efficiency in surface catalysis. 3. Entropic and dynamical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politowicz, P.A. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)); Kozak, J.J. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (USA))

    1990-09-06

    The authors introduce a general method for calculating (and predicting) the rate constant for a kinetic process in which a coreactant, migrating on the surface of a catalyst (or molecular organizate) having clusters of stationary reaction centers, undergoes an irreversible reaction upon first encounter. The authors method is based on the relationship between the first moment of the underlying probability distribution function governing the process (the mean walk length (n) of the diffusing coreactant), the (zero-mode) relaxation time of the system (the reciprocal of the smallest eigenvalue {lambda}{sub 1} of the stochastic mater equation for the problem) and a statistical (also information theoretic) expression for the entropy. Extensive calculations are reported for a wide variety of configurations of active sites (monomers, dimers, triplets, quartets, hexamers, and (binary and ternary) combinations thereof), and the efficiency of the diffusion-controlled reactive process is studied as a function of the concentration C{sub T} of reaction centers and a statistical order parameter {delta}.

  17. Iron(III Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana L. H. Rebelo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(III fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H2TPFPP and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPPCl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPPCl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H2TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPPCl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(IIIporphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide and green solvent (ethanol. Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  18. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-04-12

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed.

  19. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannice, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate course in catalysis offered at Penn State University. A detailed course outline with 30 lecture topics is presented. A list of 42 references on catalysis used in place of a textbook is provided. (BT)

  20. Asymmetric Cooperative Catalysis in a Three-Component Reaction: Mechanism and Origin of Enantio- and Diastereoselectivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisan, Hemanta K; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-08-05

    Mechanistic insights gained through density functional theory (DFT M06 and B3LYP) computations on a three-component cooperative asymmetric catalytic reaction between a diazo ester, a carbamate, and an imine, catalyzed by dirhodium acetate and chiral phosphoric acid (Brønsted acid), are presented. The addition of the dirhodium-bound enol to the imine yielding an α,β-diamino ester is energetically more preferred over a potentially competitive protonation of the same enol leading to an α-amino ester.

  1. Selective molecular recognition, C-H bond activation, and catalysis in nanoscale reaction vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Leung, Dennis H.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2004-11-27

    Supramolecular chemistry represents a way to mimic enzyme reactivity by using specially designed container molecules. We have shown that a chiral self-assembled M{sub 4}L{sub 6} supramolecular tetrahedron can encapsulate a variety of cationic guests, with varying degrees of stereoselectivity. Reactive iridium guests can be encapsulated and the C-H bond activation of aldehydes occurs, with the host cavity controlling the ability of substrates to interact with the metal center based upon size and shape. In addition, the host container can act as a catalyst by itself. By restricting reaction space and preorganizing the substrates into reactive conformations, it accelerates the sigmatropic rearrangement of enammonium cations.

  2. Kinetochromic spectrophotometry-III Determination of fluoride by catalysis of the zirconimn-Methylthymol blue reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hems, R V; Khucbright, G F; West, T S

    1970-05-01

    The determination of 0.5-4.75 mug of fluoride ion by its catalytic action upon the slow reaction between Methylthymol Blue and zirconium(IV) in aqueous solution is described. Calibration curves obtained after 60 min under optimal conditions are smooth, and yield an effective molar absorptivity of 3.23 x 10(4) 1.mole(-1)mm(-1) at 586 nm. There is considerably less cationic interference than in the alizarin complexan-cerium(III) or lanthanum procedure, but more serious anionic interference is encountered when phosphate, arsenate and, to a lesser extent, sulphate ions are present in the sample solution.

  3. First-order reactant in homogeneous turbulence before the final period of decay. [contaminant fluctuations in chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Patel, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for studying theoretically the concentration fluctuations of a dilute contaminate undergoing a first-order chemical reaction. The method is based on Deissler's (1958) theory for homogeneous turbulence for times before the final period, and it follows the approach used by Loeffler and Deissler (1961) to study temperature fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence. Four-point correlation equations are obtained; it is assumed that terms containing fifth-order correlation are very small in comparison with those containing fourth-order correlations, and can therefore be neglected. A spectrum equation is obtained in a form which can be solved numerically, yielding the decay law for the concentration fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence for the period much before the final period of decay.

  4. Final Report for: "Bis-pi-allylpalladium Complexes in Catalysis of Multicomponent Reactions"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinakova, H. C.; Shiota, Atsushi

    2012-06-29

    The research project involved the development of new and functionally improved Pd(II) catalyst for a three-component reaction of boronic acids, allenes and imines to afford homoallylic amines that are useful in synthesis of biologically active heterocycles. Furthermore, insights into the reaction mechanism and the structure and reactivity of the catalytically active intermediates involved in this process were sought. As a result of this work, a new type of Pd-catalysts possessing an auxiliary ligand attached to the Pd center via a C-Pd and N-Pd bonds were identified, and found to be more active than the traditional catalysts derived from Pd(OAc)2. The new catalysts provided an access to a broader range of homoallylic amine products. Although the final unequivocal evidence regarding the structure of the Pd(II) complex involved in the nucleophilic transfer of the allyl fragment from the palladium center to the imine could not be obtained, mechanistic insights into the events that are detrimental to the activity of the originally reported Pd(OAc)2-based catalytic systems were uncovered.

  5. Coupling of the guanosine glycosidic bond conformation and the ribonucleotide cleavage reaction: implications for barnase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Maite; De Maria, Leonardo; Wodak, Shoshana J; Moliner, Vicente; Tuñón, Iñaki; Giraldo, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    To examine the possible relationship of guanine-dependent GpA conformations with ribonucleotide cleavage, two potential of mean force (PMF) calculations were performed in aqueous solution. In the first calculation, the guanosine glycosidic (Gchi) angle was used as the reaction coordinate, and computations were performed on two GpA ionic species: protonated (neutral) or deprotonated (negatively charged) guanosine ribose O2 '. Similar energetic profiles featuring two minima corresponding to the anti and syn Gchi regions were obtained for both ionic forms. For both forms the anti conformation was more stable than the syn, and barriers of approximately 4 kcal/mol were obtained for the anti --> syn transition. Structural analysis showed a remarkable sensitivity of the phosphate moiety to the conformation of the Gchi angle, suggesting a possible connection between this conformation and the mechanism of ribonucleotide cleavage. This hypothesis was confirmed by the second PMF calculations, for which the O2 '--P distance for the deprotonated GpA was used as reaction coordinate. The computations were performed from two selected starting points: the anti and syn minima determined in the first PMF study of the deprotonated guanosine ribose O2'. The simulations revealed that the O2 ' attack along the syn Gchi was more favorable than that along the anti Gchi: energetically, significantly lower barriers were obtained in the syn than in the anti conformation for the O--P bond formation; structurally, a lesser O2 '--P initial distance, and a better suited orientation for an in-line attack was observed in the syn relative to the anti conformation. These results are consistent with the catalytically competent conformation of barnase-ribonucleotide complex, which requires a guanine syn conformation of the substrate to enable abstraction of the ribose H2 ' proton by the general base Glu73, thereby suggesting a coupling between the reactive substrate conformation and enzyme structure

  6. Degradation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by homogeneous and heterogeneous photocatalysis applied to the photochemically enhanced Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, S H; Oliveros, E; Göb, S; Kantor, M; Göppert, A; Lei, L; Yue, P L; Braun, A M

    2001-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of the oxidative degradation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by the photochemically enhanced Fenton reaction was studied using a homogeneous (Fe2+(aq) + H2O2) and a heterogeneous reaction system (iron(III)-exchanged zeolite Y+ H2O2). In the homogeneous Fenton system, efficient degradation was observed in a batch reactor, equipped with a medium pressure mercury arc in a Pyrex envelope and employing 80% of the stoichiometric amount of H2O2 required for the total oxidation of PVA and a concentration ratio as low as I mole of iron(II) sulfate per 20 moles of PVA sub-units (C2H40). Model PVA polymers of three different molecular weights (15,000, 49,000 and 100,000 g mol(-1)) were found to follow identical degradation patterns. Strong experimental evidence supports the formation of supermacromolecules (MW: 1-5 x 10(6) g/mol) consisting of oxidized PVA and trapped iron(III) at an early reaction stage. Low molecular weight intermediates, such as oxalic acid, formic acid or formaldehyde were not found during PVA degradation in the homogeneous Fenton system, and we may deduce that the manifold of degradation reactions is mainly taking place within the super-macromolecules from which CO2 is directly released. However, in the heterogeneous Fenton system, the reaction behavior was found to be distinctly different: a decrease of the molecular weights of all three tested monodisperse PVA samples was observed by the broadening of the GPC-traces during irradiation, and oxalic acid was formed. The results lead to the mechanistic hypothesis that during the heterogeneous Fenton process, the cleavage of the PVA-chains may occur at random positions, the reactive centres being located inside the iron(III)-doped zeolite Y photocatalysts.

  7. General base catalysis in the urate oxidase reaction: evidence for a novel Thr-Lys catalytic diad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Rebecca D; Power, Nicholas P; Borrok, M Jack; Tipton, Peter A

    2003-04-15

    Urate oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of urate without the involvement of any cofactors. The gene encoding urate oxidase from Bacillus subtilis has been cloned and expressed, and the enzyme was purified and characterized. Formation of the urate dianion is believed to be a key step in the oxidative reaction. Rapid-mixing chemical quench studies provide evidence that the dianion is indeed an intermediate; at 15 degrees C the dianion forms within the mixing time of the rapid-quench instrument, and it disappears with a rate constant of 8 s(-)(1). Steady-state kinetic studies indicate that an ionizable group on the enzyme with a pK of 6.4 must be unprotonated for catalysis, and it is presumed that the role of this group is to abstract a proton from the substrate. Surprisingly, examination of the active site provided by the previously reported crystal structure does not reveal any obvious candidates to act as the general base. However, Thr 69 is hydrogen-bonded to the ligand at the active site, and Lys 9, which does not contact the ligand, is hydrogen-bonded to Thr 69. The T69A mutant enzyme has a V(max) that is 3% of wild type, and the K9M mutant enzyme has a V(max) that is 0.4% of wild type. The ionization at pH 6.4 that is observed with wild-type enzyme is absent in both of these mutants. It is proposed that these residues form a catalytic diad in which K9 deprotonates T69 to allow it to abstract the proton from the N9 position of the substrate to generate the dianion.

  8. Real-time electrochemical monitoring of the polymerase chain reaction by mediated redox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deféver, Thibaut; Druet, Michel; Rochelet-Dequaire, Murielle; Joannes, Martine; Grossiord, Céline; Limoges, Benoit; Marchal, Damien

    2009-08-19

    We described the proof-of-principle of a nonoptical real-time PCR that uses cyclic voltammetry for indirectly monitoring the amplified DNA product generated in the PCR reaction solution after each PCR cycle. To enable indirect measurement of the amplicon produced throughout PCR, we monitor electrochemically the progressive consumption (i.e., the decrease of concentration) of free electroactive deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) used for DNA synthesis. This is accomplished by exploiting the fast catalytic oxidation of native deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) or its unnatural analogue 7-deaza-dGTP by the one-electron redox catalysts Ru(bpy)(3)(3+) (with bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) or Os(bpy)(3)(3+) generated at an electrode. To demonstrate the feasibility of the method, a disposable array of eight miniaturized self-contained electrochemical cells (working volume of 50 microL) has been developed and implemented in a classical programmable thermal cycler and then tested with the PCR amplification of two illustrated examples of real-world biological target DNA sequences (i.e., a relatively long 2300-bp sequence from the bacterial genome of multidrug-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans and a shorter 283-bp target from the human cytomegalovirus). Although the method works with both mediator/base couples, the catalytic peak current responses recorded with the Ru(bpy)(3)(3+)/dGTP couple under real-time PCR conditions are significantly affected by a continuous current drift and interference with the background solvent discharge, thus leading to poorly reproducible data. Much more reproducible and reliable results are finally obtained with the Os(bpy)(3)(3+)/7-deaza-dGTP, a result that is attributed to the much lower anodic potential at which the catalytic oxidation of 7-deaza-dGTP by Os(bpy)(3)(3+) is detected. Under these conditions, an exponential decrease of the catalytic signal as a function of the number of PCR cycles is obtained, allowing definition of a cycle

  9. Asymmetric epoxidation of cis/trans-β-methylstyrene catalysed by immobilised Mn(salen) with different linkages: heterogenisation of homogeneous asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haidong; Zou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Meng; Shen, Yu; Zheng, Xuxu

    2014-06-16

    Immobilised Mn(salen) catalysts with two different linkages were studied in the asymmetric epoxidation of cis/trans-β-methylstyrene using NaClO as oxidant. The immobilised Mn(salen) complexes inside nanopores can lead to different catalytic behaviour compared with that of homogeneous Jacobsen catalyst. The rigidity of the linkage was found to be a key factor affecting the catalytic performance of immobilised catalysts. The immobilised catalyst with a rigid linkage exhibited comparable chemical selectivity, enantioselectivity and cis/trans ratio of product formation to that obtained with homogeneous Jacobsen catalysts. In contrast, the immobilised catalyst with a flexible linkage gave remarkably lower chemical selectivity, enantioselectivity and inverted cis/trans ratio compared with the results obtained with the homogeneous Jacobsen catalyst and the immobilised catalyst with rigid linkage. Thus, for immobilised Mn(salen) catalysts, a rigid linkage connecting active centres to the support is essential to obtain activity and enantioselectivity as high as those obtained in homogeneous systems.

  10. A new type of self-supported, polymeric Ru-carbene complex for homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous recovery: synthesis and catalytic activities for ring-closing metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Wei; Kim, Ju Hyun; Shin, Hyunik; Lee, Sang-Gi

    2008-08-01

    A novel 2nd generation Grubbs-type catalyst tethering an isopropoxystyrene has been synthesized and automatically polymerized in solution to form a self-supported polymeric Ru-carbene complex, which catalyzed ring-closing metathesis homogeneously, but was recovered heterogeneously.

  11. An efficient method for synthesis of phenacyl derivatives under homogeneous phase transfer catalyst condition in aqueous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soheil Sayyahi; Jafar Saghanezhad

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, a mild and efficient procedure for synthesis of phenacyl derivatives under homogenous catalysis in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide in aqueous media is described. The nucleophilic substitution reactions were performed under ecofriendly conditions and gave the corresponding products in high yields and short reaction times.

  12. Anion-π catalysis: bicyclic products with four contiguous stereogenic centers from otherwise elusive diastereospecific domino reactions on π-acidic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Le; Cotelle, Yoann; Klehr, Juliane; Sakai, Naomi; Ward, Thomas R; Matile, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Anion-π interactions have been introduced recently to catalysis. The idea of stabilizing anionic intermediates and transition states on π-acidic surfaces is a new fundamental concept. By now, examples exist for asymmetric enolate, enamine, iminium and transamination chemistry, and the first anion-π enzyme has been created. Delocalized over large aromatic planes, anion-π interactions appear particularly attractive to stabilize extensive long-distance charge displacements during domino processes. Moving on from the formation of cyclohexane rings with five stereogenic centers in one step on a π-acidic surface, we here focus on asymmetric anion-π catalysis of domino reactions that afford bicyclic products with quaternary stereogenic centers. Catalyst screening includes a newly synthesized, better performing anion-π version of classical organocatalysts from cinchona alkaloids, and anion-π enzymes. We find stereoselectivities that are clearly better than the best ones reported with conventional catalysts, culminating in unprecedented diastereospecificity. Moreover, we describe achiral salts as supramolecular chirality enhancers and report the first artificial enzyme that operates in neutral water with anion-π interactions, i.e., interactions that are essentially new to enzymes. Evidence in support of contributions of anion-π interactions to asymmetric catalysis include increasing diastereo- and enantioselectivity with increasing rates, i.e., asymmetric transition-state stabilization in the presence of π-acidic surfaces and inhibition with the anion selectivity sequence NO3(-) > Br(-) > BF4(-) > PF6(-).

  13. Latent curing systems stabilized by reaction equilibrium in homogeneous mixtures of benzoxazine and amine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Ya Zhen; Fu, Ya Fei; Liu, Xiang Dong

    2016-12-01

    Latent curing systems are widely used in industrial thermosets in applications such as adhesion, coating, and composites. Despite many attempts to improve the practicality of this dormant reaction system, the majority of commercially available latent products still use particulate hardeners or liquid compounds with blocked active groups. These formulations generally lack fluidity or rapid reaction characteristics and thus are problematic in some industry applications. Here we describe a novel concept that stabilizes highly reactive benzoxazine/amine mixtures by reaction equilibrium. These new latent benzoxazine curing systems have a long storable lifetime but very short gel time at 150 °C. The reversible reaction between benzoxazine and amine is further demonstrated by FT-IR spectral measurements and rheological experiments, and it is shown that the overall characteristics of the latent system are promising for many industrial applications.

  14. DFT study of difference caused by catalyst supports in Pt and Pd catalysis of oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on an experimental phenomenon that catalytic activity of Pt and Pd for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) changes with catalyst supports from C to TiO2, density function theory (DFT) was used to elucidate the cause behind the difference in catalysis caused by catalyst supports. First, factors closely associated with the first electron transfer of the ORR were assessed in the light of quantum chemistry. Then intermediate (atomic oxygen, O) adsorption strength on the catalyst surface was calculated. The results show that, in terms of minimum energy difference, the best orbital symmetry match, and the maximum orbital overlap, TiO2 does bring about a very positive effect on catalysts Pd/TiO2 for the first electron transfer of the ORR. Especially, TiO2 remarkably expands the space size of Pd/TiO2 HOMO orbital and improves orbital overlap of Pd/TiO2 HOMO and O2 LUMO. The analysis of deformation density and partial density of state shows that the strong interaction between Pt and Ti leads to a strong adsorption of intermediate O on Pt/TiO2, but the strong interaction between Pd and surface O causes positive net charge of Pd and a weak adsorption of intermediate O on Pd/TiO2. Thus, the ORR can proceed more smoothly on Pd/TiO2 than Pt/TiO2 in every respect of maximum orbital overlap and rate delay by intermediate O. The research also discloses that several factors lead to less activity of TiO2-supported Pt and Pd catalysts than the C-supported ones for the ORR. These factors include the poor dispersion of Pt and Pd particles on TiO2, poor electric conduction of TiO2 carrier itself, and bigger energy difference between HOMO of TiO2-carried metallic catalysts and LUMO of O2 molecule due to electrons deeply embedded in the semiconductor TiO2 carrier.

  15. DFT study of difference caused by catalyst supports in Pt and Pd catalysis of oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; WEI ZiDong; ZHANG Yi; QI XueQiang; XIA MeiRong; ZHANG Jie; SHAO ZhiGang

    2009-01-01

    Based on an experimental phenomenon that catalytic activity of Pt and Pd for oxygen reduction reac-tion (ORR) changes with catalyst supports from C to TiO2, density function theory (DFT) was used to elucidate the cause behind the difference in catalysis caused by catalyst supports. First, factors closely associated with the first electron transfer of the ORR were assessed in the light of quantum chemistry. Then intermediate (atomic oxygen, O) adsorption strength on the catalyst surface was calculated. The results show that, in terms of minimum energy difference, the best orbital symmetry match, and the maximum orbital overlap, TiO2 does bring about a very positive effect on catalysts Pd/TiO2 for the first electron transfer of the ORR. Especially, TiO2 remarkably expands the space size of Pd/TiO2 HOMO or-bital and improves orbital overlap of Pd/TiO2 HOMO and O2 LUMO. The analysis of deformation density and partial density of state shows that the strong interaction between Pt and Ti leads to a strong ad-sorption of intermediate O on Pt/TiO2, but the strong interaction between Pd and surface O causes positive net charge of Pd and a weak adsorption of intermediate O on Pd/TiO2. Thus, the ORR can proceed more smoothly on Pd/TiO2 than Pt/TiO2 in every respect of maximum orbital overlap and rate delay by intermediate O. The research also discloses that several factors lead to less activity of TiO2-supported Pt and Pd catalysts than the C-supported ones for the ORR. These factors include the poor dispersion of Pt and Pd particles on TiO2, poor electric conduction of TiO2 carrier itself, and bigger energy difference between HOMO of TiO2-carried metallic catalysts and LUMO of O2 molecule due to electrons deeply embedded in the semiconductor TiO2 carrier.

  16. Synthesis of Ni3S2 nanotube arrays on nickel foam by catalysis of thermal reduced graphene for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Miura, Hideo; Meng, Yang; Tongxiang, Liang

    2017-03-01

    The thermal reduced graphene oxide deposition on nickel foam was successfully synthesized by ultrasonic and subsequent thermal reduction process. Ultrathin mesoporous Ni3S2 was formed on the bare nickel foam after hydrothermal process, while Ni3S2 nanotube arrays were formed on the surface of nickel foam with the thermal reduced graphene oxide due to catalysis action of thermal reduced graphene oxide. The resulting Ni3S2 nanotube arrays exhibited higher catalytic activity than ultrathin mesoporous Ni3S2 for hydrogen evolution reaction. In addition, and excellent stability was also obtained in Ni3S2 nanotube arrays.

  17. Characteristics of Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions and Melting Heat Transfer in the Stagnation Point flow of Jeffrey Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on melting heat transfer in the stagnation point flow of Jeffrey fluid past an impermeable stretching cylinder with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. Characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic flow are explored in presence of heat generation/absorption. Diffusion coefficients of species A and B are taken of the same size. Heat released during chemical reaction is negligible. A system of ordinary differential equations is obtained by using suitable transformations. Convergent series solutions are derived. Impacts of various pertinent parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are discussed. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and analyzed. Present results are compared with the previous published data.

  18. Facile "living" radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate in the presence of iniferter agents: homogeneous and highly efficient catalysis from copper(II) acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Lifen; Jiang, Xiaowu; Bao, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-08-01

    A facile homogeneous polymerization system involving the iniferter agent 1-cyano-1-methylethyl diethyldithiocarbamate (MANDC) and copper(II) acetate (Cu(OAc)2 ) is successfully developed in bulk using methyl methacylate (MMA) as a model monomer. The detailed polymerization kinetics with different molar ratios (e.g., [MMA]0 /[MANDC]0 /[Cu(OAc)2 ]0 = 500/1/x (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0)) demonstrate that this system has the typical "living"/controlled features of "living" radical polymerization, even with ppm level catalyst Cu(OAc)2 , first order polymerization kinetics, a linear increase in molecular weight with monomer conversion and narrow molecular weight distributions for the resultant PMMA. (1) H NMR spectra and chain-extension experiments further confirm the "living" characteristics of this process. A plausible mechanism is discussed.

  19. Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated ionic liquid drops: Micro-reactors for homogenous catalytic reactions at designated interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Cai, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    An ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) can assemble on prefabricated carboxylic acid-terminated chemical patterns on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) film. The chemical pattern controls the position, shape and size of the IL on the surface. After the IL assembly - by incubating IL drops assembled on sample surface in an OTS silane vapor - an OTS layer was coated on the IL drop surface which encapsulated the IL drop. The OTS-coated capsule can exist stably under aqueous solution. The OTS coating protected the IL drops from being instantaneously dissolved by other solutions. We found that a homogenous catalyst (FeCl(3)) dissolved in [Bmim]Cl can be assembled together on the chemical patterns and subsequently encapsulated together with [Bmim]Cl by OTS coating. The pinhole defects within the vapor-coated silane layer provide space for the catalyst inside the capsule and reactants outside the capsule to meet and react. When the OTS-coated capsule containing a FeCl(3)/IL mixture was soaked under H(2)O(2) solution, the Fe(3+) ions catalyzed the decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide at the vapor-coated OTS-water interface. Since the shape and position of the interface is defined by the underneath chemical pattern, our findings show that the OTS-coated IL drops assembled on chemical patterns can be used as novel micro-reactors. This allows homogenous catalytic reactions to occur at the designated interfaces.

  20. Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS-coated ionic liquid drops: Micro-reactors for homogenous catalytic reactions at designated interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An ionic liquid (IL, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl can assemble on prefabricated carboxylic acid–terminated chemical patterns on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS film. The chemical pattern controls the position, shape and size of the IL on the surface. After the IL assembly – by incubating IL drops assembled on sample surface in an OTS silane vapor – an OTS layer was coated on the IL drop surface which encapsulated the IL drop. The OTS-coated capsule can exist stably under aqueous solution. The OTS coating protected the IL drops from being instantaneously dissolved by other solutions. We found that a homogenous catalyst (FeCl3 dissolved in [Bmim]Cl can be assembled together on the chemical patterns and subsequently encapsulated together with [Bmim]Cl by OTS coating. The pinhole defects within the vapor-coated silane layer provide space for the catalyst inside the capsule and reactants outside the capsule to meet and react. When the OTS-coated capsule containing a FeCl3/IL mixture was soaked under H2O2 solution, the Fe3+ ions catalyzed the decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide at the vapor-coated OTS-water interface. Since the shape and position of the interface is defined by the underneath chemical pattern, our findings show that the OTS-coated IL drops assembled on chemical patterns can be used as novel micro-reactors. This allows homogenous catalytic reactions to occur at the designated interfaces.

  1. Transition Metal Catalysis Using Functionalized Dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterom, G. Eric; Reek, Joost N. H.; Kamer, Paul C. J.; van Leeuwen, Piet W. N. M.

    2001-05-18

    Dendrimers are well-defined hyperbranched macromolecules with characteristic globular structures for the larger systems. These novel polymers have inspired many chemists to develop new materials and several applications have been explored, catalysis being one of them. The recent impressive strides in synthetic procedures increased the accessibility of functionalized dendrimers, resulting in a rapid development of dendrimer chemistry. The position of the catalytic site(s) as well as the spatial separation of the catalysts appears to be of crucial importance. Dendrimers that are functionalized with transition metals in the core potentially can mimic the properties of enzymes, their efficient natural counterparts, whereas the surface-functionalized systems have been proposed to fill the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. This might yield superior catalysts with novel properties, that is, special reactivity or stability. Both the core and periphery strategies lead to catalysts that are sufficiently larger than most substrates and products, thus separation by modern membrane separation techniques can be applied. These novel homogeneous catalysts can be used in continuous membrane reactors, which will have major advantages particularly for reactions that benefit from low substrate concentrations or suffer from side reactions of the product. Here we review the recent progress and breakthroughs made with these promising novel transition metal functionalized dendrimers that are used as catalysts, and we will discuss the architectural concepts that have been applied.

  2. Solid Base Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The importance of solid base catalysts has come to be recognized for their environmentally benign qualities, and much significant progress has been made over the past two decades in catalytic materials and solid base-catalyzed reactions. The book is focused on the solid base. Because of the advantages over liquid bases, the use of solid base catalysts in organic synthesis is expanding. Solid bases are easier to dispose than liquid bases, separation and recovery of products, catalysts and solvents are less difficult, and they are non-corrosive. Furthermore, base-catalyzed reactions can be performed without using solvents and even in the gas phase, opening up more possibilities for discovering novel reaction systems. Using numerous examples, the present volume describes the remarkable role solid base catalysis can play, given the ever increasing worldwide importance of "green" chemistry. The reader will obtain an overall view of solid base catalysis and gain insight into the versatility of the reactions to whic...

  3. MHD Stagnation Point Flow of Williamson Fluid over a Stretching Cylinder with Variable Thermal Conductivity and Homogeneous/Heterogeneous Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, M.; Sagheer, M.; Hussain, S.; Mehmood, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The present study reveals the effect of homogeneous/hetereogeneous reaction on stagnation point flow of Williamson fluid in the presence of magnetohydrodynamics and heat generation/absorption coefficient over a stretching cylinder. Further the effects of variable thermal conductivity and thermal stratification are also considered. The governing partial differential equations are converted to ordinary differential equations with the help of similarity transformation. The system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations is then solved by shooting technique. MATLAB shooting code is validated by comparison with the previously published work in limiting case. Results are further strengthened when the present results are compared with MATLAB built-in function bvp4c. Effects of prominent parameters are deliberated graphically for the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. Skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number for the different parameters are investigated with the help of tables.

  4. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed.

  5. Homogeneous deuteriodeiodination of iodinated tyrosine in angiotensin-I using synthesized triethyl[H-2]silane and Pd(0)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Holst Friborg; Martiny, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In our efforts to develop new reactions for the efficient labelling of peptides and proteins with tritium, we now report the use of silane hydrides together with homogenous Pd(0) catalysis for the protio- and deuteriodeiodination of an o-iodo-tyrosine containing peptide (angiotensin-I) performed...

  6. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  7. Preparation of detergent-lipase complexes utilizing water-soluble amphiphiles in single aqueous phase and catalysis of transesterifications in homogeneous organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Y; Fukunaga, K; Maruoka, N; Nakao, K; Sugimura, Y

    2000-01-01

    types. The preparation and reaction conditions for these novel gemini-type detergent-modified lipases were optimized using BIG2C12CA (HLB = 9.4) by studying the effect of the detergent/lipase ratio and the nature of organic solvents on the complex formation. The high enzymatic activities of the BIG2C12CA-modified lipases were independent of the solubility of the lipases in organic solvents, unlike in the case of 2CnGE-modified lipases prepared using the conventional suspension system.

  8. Control of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis by tuning nanoparticle properties and reactor residence time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elad; Liu, Jack Hung-Chang; Toste, F. Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2012-11-01

    A combination of the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis could enable the development of sustainable catalysts with novel reactivity and selectivity. Although heterogeneous catalysts are often recycled more easily than their homogeneous counterparts, they can be difficult to apply in traditional organic reactions and modification of their properties towards a desired reactivity is, at best, complex. In contrast, tuning the properties of homogeneous catalysts by, for example, modifying the ligands that coordinate a metal centre is better understood. Here, using olefin cyclopropanation reactions catalysed by dendrimer-encapsulated Au nanoclusters as examples, we demonstrate that changing the dendrimer properties allows the catalytic reactivity to be tuned in a similar fashion to ligand modification in a homogeneous catalyst. Furthermore, we show that these heterogeneous catalysts employed in a fixed-bed flow reactor allow fine control over the residence time of the reactants and thus enables the control over product distribution in a way that is not easily available for homogeneous catalysts.

  9. Process spectroscopy in microemulsions—setup and multi-spectral approach for reaction monitoring of a homogeneous hydroformylation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K.; Ruiken, J.-P.; Illner, M.; Paul, A.; Müller, D.; Esche, E.; Wozny, G.; Maiwald, M.

    2017-03-01

    Reaction monitoring in disperse systems, such as emulsions, is of significant technical importance in various disciplines like biotechnological engineering, chemical industry, food science, and a growing number other technical fields. These systems pose several challenges when it comes to process analytics, such as heterogeneity of mixtures, changes in optical behavior, and low optical activity. Concerning this, online nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for process monitoring in complex reaction mixtures due to its unique direct comparison abilities, while at the same time being non-invasive and independent of optical properties of the sample. In this study the applicability of online-spectroscopic methods on the homogeneously catalyzed hydroformylation system of 1-dodecene to tridecanal is investigated, which is operated in a mini-plant scale at Technische Universität Berlin. The design of a laboratory setup for process-like calibration experiments is presented, including a 500 MHz online NMR spectrometer, a benchtop NMR device with 43 MHz proton frequency as well as two Raman probes and a flow cell assembly for an ultraviolet and visible light (UV/VIS) spectrometer. Results of high-resolution online NMR spectroscopy are shown and technical as well as process-specific problems observed during the measurements are discussed.

  10. Request for Symposia Support: Advances in Olefin Polymerization Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-24

    included, but were not limited to, heterogeneous catalysis , homogeneous catalysis , advances in catalyst activation, methods for polymer topological...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This Advances in Olefin Polymerization Catalysis symposium was held at the 247th ACS National Meeting and Exposition...March 19, 2014 in Dallas, Texas and consisted of twelve (12) invited/contributed talks. The hosting ACS division was the Division of Catalysis Science

  11. Asymmetric trienamine catalysis: new opportunities in amine catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Indresh; Ramaraju, Panduga; Mir, Nisar A

    2013-02-07

    Amine catalysis, through HOMO-activating enamine and LUMO-activating iminium-ion formation, is receiving increasing attention among other organocatalytic strategies, for the activation of unmodified carbonyl compounds. Particularly, the HOMO-raising activation concept has been applied to the greatest number of asymmetric transformations through enamine, dienamine, and SOMO-activation strategies. Recently, trienamine catalysis, an extension of amine catalysis, has emerged as a powerful tool for synthetic chemists with a novel activation strategy for polyenals/polyenones. In this review article, we discuss the initial developments of trienamine catalysis for highly asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with different dienophiles and emerging opportunities for other types of cycloadditions and cascade reactions.

  12. Molecular catalysis of rare-earth elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesky, Peter W. (ed.) [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    This volume reviews the recent developments in the use of molecular rare-earth metal compounds in catalysis. Most of the applications deal with homogenous catalysis but in some cases, heterogeneous systems are also mentioned. The rare-earth elements, which are the lanthanides and their close relatives - scandium and yttrium - have not been in the focus of molecular chemistry for a long time and therefore have also not been considered as homogenous catalysts. Although the first organometallic compounds of the lanthanides, which are tris(cyclopentadienyl) lanthanide complexes, were already prepared in the 1950s, it was only in the late 1970s and early 1980s when a number of research groups began to focus on this class of compounds. One reason for the development was the availability of single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques, which made it possible to characterize these compounds.Moreover, new laboratory techniques to handle highly air and moisture sensitive compounds were developed at the same time. Concomitant with the accessibility of this new class of compounds, the application in homogenous catalysis was investigated. One of the first applications in this field was the use of lanthanide metallocenes for the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in the early 1980s. In the last two or three decades, a huge number of inorganic and organometallic compounds of the rare-earth elements were synthesized and some of them were also used as catalysts. Although early work in homogenous catalysis basically focused only on the hydrogenation and polymerization of olefins, the scope for catalytic application today is much broader. Thus, a large number of catalytic {sigma}-bond metathesis reactions, e.g. hydroamination, have been reported in the recent years. This book contains four chapters in which part of the recent development of the use of molecular rare-earth metal compounds in catalysis is covered. To keep the book within the given page limit, not all aspects could be

  13. Differentiating homogeneous and heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis: confirmation that [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- is a molecular water oxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, James W; Lv, Hongjin; Sumliner, Jordan M; Zhu, Guibo; Luo, Zhen; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Geletii, Yurii V; Hill, Craig L

    2013-09-25

    Distinguishing between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is not straightforward. In the case of the water oxidation catalyst (WOC) [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2](10-) (Co4POM), initial reports of an efficient, molecular catalyst have been challenged by studies suggesting that formation of cobalt oxide (CoOx) or other byproducts are responsible for the catalytic activity. Thus, we describe a series of experiments for thorough examination of active species under catalytic conditions and apply them to Co4POM. These provide strong evidence that under the conditions initially reported for water oxidation using Co4POM (Yin et al. Science, 2010, 328, 342), this POM anion functions as a molecular catalyst, not a precursor for CoOx. Specifically, we quantify the amount of Co(2+)(aq) released from Co4POM by two methods (cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and show that this amount of cobalt, whatever speciation state it may exist in, cannot account for the observed water oxidation. We document that catalytic O2 evolution by Co4POM, Co(2+)(aq), and CoOx have different dependences on buffers, pH, and WOC concentration. Extraction of Co4POM, but not Co(2+)(aq) or CoOx into toluene from water, and other experiments further confirm that Co4POM is the dominant WOC. Recent studies showing that Co4POM decomposes to a CoOx WOC under electrochemical bias (Stracke and Finke, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 14872), or displays an increased ability to reduce [Ru(bpy)3](3+) upon aging (Scandola, et al., Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 8808) help complete the picture of Co4POM behavior under various conditions but do not affect our central conclusions.

  14. Asymmetric catalysis in aqueous media: use of metal-chiral crown ethers as efficient chiral Lewis acid catalysts in asymmetric aldol reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Kobayashi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-chiral crown ether complexes have been developed as efficient chiral Lewis acid catalysts for asymmetric aldol reactions of silyl enol ethers with aldehydes in aqueous media. While many excellent catalytic asymmetric reactions have been developed recently, most of them have to be carried out under strictly anhydrous conditions in organic solvents. This is probably due to the instability of many catalysts and/or intermediates in the presence of even a small amount of water. To address this issue, we searched for metal-crown ether complexes on the basis of our "multi-coordination" hypothesis, and found that lead(II and lanthanide(III catalysts worked well as chiral Lewis acids in aqueous media. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first examples of chiral crown-based Lewis acids that can be successfully used in catalytic asymmetric reactions. The catalysts have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, and their unique structures as chiral catalysts have been revealed. Use of water as a solvent is essential in these asymmetric catalysis, and the role of water on these reactions to explain the high reactivity and selectivity has been suggested. Another important point is that kinetic studies have shown the possibility that these types of crown ether complexes would be suitable as chiral catalysts employed in aqueous media. In addition, although the catalytic asymmetric aldol reactions are one of the most powerful carbon-carbon bond-forming methodologies and several successful examples have been reported, the use of aprotic anhydrous solvents and low reaction temperatures (-78 °C has been needed in almost all successful cases. On the other hand, the present reactions proceeded smoothly at -10-0 °C in water-alcohol solutions while retaining high levels of diastereo- and enantioselectivities.

  15. Alkali metal ion catalysis and inhibition in nucleophilic displacement reactions at phosphorus centers: ethyl and methyl paraoxon and ethyl and methyl parathion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Ik-Hwan; Shin, Young-Hee; Lee, Seung-Eun; Yang, Kiyull; Buncel, Erwin

    2008-02-01

    We report on the ethanolysis of the P=O and P=S compounds ethyl and methyl paraoxon (1a and 1b) and ethyl and methyl parathion (2a and 2b). Plots of spectrophotometrically measured rate constants, kobsd versus [MOEt], the alkali ethoxide concentration, show distinct upward and downward curvatures, pointing to the importance of ion-pairing phenomena and a differential reactivity of free ions and ion pairs. Three types of reactivity and selectivity patterns have been discerned: (1) For the P=O compounds 1a and 1b, LiOEt > NaOEt > KOEt > EtO-; (2) for the P=S compound 2a, KOEt > EtO- > NaOEt > LiOEt; (3) for P=S, 2b, 18C6-crown-complexed KOEt > KOEt = EtO(-) > NaOEt > LiOEt. These selectivity patterns are characteristic of both catalysis and inhibition by alkali-metal cations depending on the nature of the electrophilic center, P=O vs P=S, and the metal cation. Ground-state (GS) vs transition-state (TS) stabilization energies shed light on the catalytic and inhibitory tendencies. The unprecedented catalytic behavior of crowned-K(+) for the reaction of 2b is noteworthy. Modeling reveals an extreme steric interaction for the reaction of 2a with crowned-K(+), which is responsible for the absence of catalysis in this system. Overall, P=O exhibits greater reactivity than P=S, increasing from 50- to 60-fold with free EtO(-) and up to 2000-fold with LiOEt, reflecting an intrinsic P=O vs P=S reactivity difference (thio effect). The origin of reactivity and selectivity differences in these systems is discussed on the basis of competing electrostatic effects and solvational requirements as function of anionic electric field strength and cation size (Eisenman's theory).

  16. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...

  17. Selective Homogeneous Catalysis in Asymmetric Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Peter

    with predictions based on computational modelling of the transition states. Visualization of the determined transition states allowed for the construction of the new mnemonic device for prediction of absolute configuration, which also included a mapping of the important features onto an overlaid transition state....

  18. Enantioconvergent catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin T. Mohr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An enantioconvergent catalytic process has the potential to convert a racemic starting material to a single highly enantioenriched product with a maximum yield of 100%. Three mechanistically distinct approaches to effecting enantioconvergent catalysis are identified, and recent examples of each are highlighted. These processes are compared to related, non-enantioconvergent methods.

  19. A simple fast microwave-assisted synthesis of thermoelectric bismuth telluride nanoparticles from homogeneous reaction-mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Susmita; Das, Rashmita; Bhar, Radhaballabh; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2017-02-01

    A new simple chemical method for synthesis of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) has been developed by microwave assisted reduction of homogeneous tartrate complexes of bismuth and tellurium metal ions with hydrazine. The reaction is performed at pH 10. The nano-crystallites have rhombohedral phase identified by XRD. The size distribution of nanoparticle is narrow and it ranges between 50 to 70 nm. FESEM shows that the fine powders are composed of small crystallites. The TEM micrographs show mostly deformed spherical particles and the lattice fringes are found to be 0.137 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis shows the atomic composition ratio between bismuth and tellurium is 2:3. Thermoelectric properties of the materials are studied after sintering by spark plasma sintering method (SPS). The grain size of the material after sintering is in the nanometer range. The material shows enhanced Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity value at 300 K. The figure of merit is found to be 1.18 at 300 K.

  20. Oxygen switch in visible-light photoredox catalysis: radical additions and cyclizations and unexpected C-C-bond cleavage reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaoqun; Das, Arindam; Bui, Lan; Zhou, Hanjun; Curran, Dennis P; Rueping, Magnus

    2013-02-06

    Visible light photoredox catalyzed inter- and intramolecular C-H functionalization reactions of tertiary amines have been developed. Oxygen was found to act as chemical switch to trigger two different reaction pathways and to obtain two different types of products from the same starting material. In the absence of oxygen, the intermolecular addition of N,N-dimethyl-anilines to electron-deficient alkenes provided γ-amino nitriles in good to high yields. In the presence of oxygen, a radical addition/cyclization reaction occurred which resulted in the formation of tetrahydroquinoline derivatives in good yields under mild reaction conditions. The intramolecular version of the radical addition led to the unexpected formation of indole-3-carboxaldehyde derivatives. Mechanistic investigations of this reaction cascade uncovered a new photoredox catalyzed C-C bond cleavage reaction.

  1. Synthesis of biscoumarin derivatives by the reaction of aldehydes and 4-hydroxycoumarin using ruthenium (III chloride hydrate as a versatile homogeneous catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaeian Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The one-pot domino Knoevenagel-type condensation/Michael reaction of aromatic, heteroaromatic and aliphatic aldehydes with 4-hydroxycoumarin in aqueous media in the presence of ruthenium salt as homogeneous catalyst was investigated. It was found that 5 mol% of RuCl3.nH2O catalyzes biscoumarin synthesis in high yields (70-95% under optimised, mild, green and environmentally benign reaction conditions in short times (25-35min.

  2. Organometallic Catalysis in Diene and Cyclo-olefin Polymerisation Processes. II. The Metathesis Reaction in Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgoplosk, B. A.; Korshak, Yu V.

    1984-01-01

    The development of ideas concerning the mechanism of the metathesis reaction and its employment in polymer chemistry are examined. The possible applications of the metathesis reaction in the synthesis of polymers by the polymerisation of cycloolefins and cyclodienes with ring opening and via the degradation of high-molecular-weight rubbers and their modification are discussed. The bibliography includes 160 references.

  3. Anion-π catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-05

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  4. Bifunctional heterogeneous catalysis of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines with controlled acid-base interactions for efficient 1,4-addition reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Tanaka, Satoka; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-19

    We report the first tunable bifunctional surface of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines (SA-NEt(2)) active for catalytic 1,4-addition reactions of nitroalkanes and thiols to electron-deficient alkenes. The 1,4-addition reaction of nitroalkanes to electron-deficient alkenes is one of the most useful carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions and applicable toward a wide range of organic syntheses. The reaction between nitroethane and methyl vinyl ketone scarcely proceeded with either SA or homogeneous amines, and a mixture of SA and amines showed very low catalytic activity. In addition, undesirable side reactions occurred in the case of a strong base like sodium ethoxide employed as a catalytic reagent. Only the present SA-supported amine (SA-NEt(2)) catalyst enabled selective formation of a double-alkylated product without promotions of side reactions such as an intramolecular cyclization reaction. The heterogeneous SA-NEt(2) catalyst was easily recovered from the reaction mixture by simple filtration and reusable with retention of its catalytic activity and selectivity. Furthermore, the SA-NEt(2) catalyst system was applicable to the addition reaction of other nitroalkanes and thiols to various electron-deficient alkenes. The solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic analyses, including variable-contact-time (13)C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy, revealed that acid-base interactions between surface acid sites and immobilized amines can be controlled by pretreatment of SA at different temperatures. The catalytic activities for these addition reactions were strongly affected by the surface acid-base interactions.

  5. Mechanochemistry, catalysis, and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butyagin, P.Yu.

    1987-07-01

    The physical basis of mechanochemistry and the reasons for the initiation and acceleration of chemical reactions upon the mechanical treatment of solids have been considered. The phenomenon of mechanical catalysis has been described in the example case of the oxidation of CO on oxide surfaces, and the nature of the active sites and the laws governing the mechanically activated chemisorption of gases on cleavage and friction surfaces of solids have been examined. The possibilities of the use of the methods of mechanochemistry in processes used to prepare catalysts have been analyzed in examples of decomposition reactions of inorganic compounds and solid-phase synthesis.

  6. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.

  7. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; LingKang

    2001-01-01

    Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.  ……

  8. Cooperative catalysis designing efficient catalysts for synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, René

    2015-01-01

    Written by experts in the field, this is a much-needed overview of the rapidly emerging field of cooperative catalysis. The authors focus on the design and development of novel high-performance catalysts for applications in organic synthesis (particularly asymmetric synthesis), covering a broad range of topics, from the latest progress in Lewis acid / Br?nsted base catalysis to e.g. metal-assisted organocatalysis, cooperative metal/enzyme catalysis, and cooperative catalysis in polymerization reactions and on solid surfaces. The chapters are classified according to the type of cooperating acti

  9. Asymmetric catalysis : ligand design and microwave acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Bremberg, Ulf

    2000-01-01

    This thesis deals partly with the design and synthesis ofligands for use in asymmetric catalysis, and partly with theapplication of microwave heating on metal-based asymmetriccatalytic reactions. Enantiomerically pure pyridyl alcohols and bipyridylalcohols were synthesized from the chiral pool for future usein asymmetric catalysis. Lithiated pyridines were reacted withseveral chiral electrophiles, yielding diastereomeric mixturesthat could be separated without the use of resolutiontechniques....

  10. Molecular catalysis science: Perspective on unifying the fields of catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong; Hurlburt, Tyler J; Sabyrov, Kairat; Alayoglu, Selim; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-05-10

    Colloidal chemistry is used to control the size, shape, morphology, and composition of metal nanoparticles. Model catalysts as such are applied to catalytic transformations in the three types of catalysts: heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic. Real-time dynamics of oxidation state, coordination, and bonding of nanoparticle catalysts are put under the microscope using surface techniques such as sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under catalytically relevant conditions. It was demonstrated that catalytic behavior and trends are strongly tied to oxidation state, the coordination number and crystallographic orientation of metal sites, and bonding and orientation of surface adsorbates. It was also found that catalytic performance can be tuned by carefully designing and fabricating catalysts from the bottom up. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, and likely enzymes, behave similarly at the molecular level. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis.

  11. Deciphering the origin of cooperative catalysis by dirhodium acetate and chiral spiro phosphoric acid in an asymmetric amination reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisan, Hemanta K; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-12-04

    The mechanism of asymmetric amination of diazo-acetate by tert-butyl carbamate catalyzed by dirhodium tetra(trifluoro)acetate and chiral SPINOL-phosphoric acid is examined using DFT (M06 and B3LYP) computations. A cooperative participation of both catalysts is noticed in the stereo-controlling transition state of the reaction.

  12. Interplay of catalysis, fidelity, threading, and processivity in the exo- and endonucleolytic reactions of human exonuclease I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yuqian; Hellinga, Homme W.; Beese, Lorena S. (Duke-MED)

    2017-05-22

    Human exonuclease 1 (hExo1) is a member of the RAD2/XPG structure-specific 5'-nuclease superfamily. Its dominant, processive 5'–3' exonuclease and secondary 5'-flap endonuclease activities participate in various DNA repair, recombination, and replication processes. A single active site processes both recessed ends and 5'-flap substrates. By initiating enzyme reactions in crystals, we have trapped hExo1 reaction intermediates that reveal structures of these substrates before and after their exo- and endonucleolytic cleavage, as well as structures of uncleaved, unthreaded, and partially threaded 5' flaps. Their distinctive 5' ends are accommodated by a small, mobile arch in the active site that binds recessed ends at its base and threads 5' flaps through a narrow aperture within its interior. A sequence of successive, interlocking conformational changes guides the two substrate types into a shared reaction mechanism that catalyzes their cleavage by an elaborated variant of the two-metal, in-line hydrolysis mechanism. Coupling of substrate-dependent arch motions to transition-state stabilization suppresses inappropriate or premature cleavage, enhancing processing fidelity. The striking reduction in flap conformational entropy is catalyzed, in part, by arch motions and transient binding interactions between the flap and unprocessed DNA strand. At the end of the observed reaction sequence, hExo1 resets without relinquishing DNA binding, suggesting a structural basis for its processivity.

  13. Merging Photoredox with Palladium Catalysis: Decarboxylative ortho-Acylation of Acetanilides with α-Oxocarboxylic Acids under Mild Reaction Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Li, Pinhua; Zhu, Xianjin; Wang, Lei

    2015-12-18

    A room temperature decarboxylative ortho-acylation of acetanilides with α-oxocarboxylic acids has been developed via a novel Eosin Y with Pd dual catalytic system. This dual catalytic reaction shows a broad substrate scope and good functional group tolerance, and an array of ortho-acylacetanilides can be afforded in high yields under mild conditions.

  14. Propensity approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a chemical reaction network: Controlling single E-coli β-galactosidase enzyme catalysis through the elementary reaction steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam, E-mail: gautam@bose.res.in [S. N. Bose National Centre For Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Banerjee, Kinshuk [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2013-12-28

    In this work, we develop an approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an open chemical reaction network in terms of the elementary reaction propensities. The method is akin to the microscopic formulation of the dissipation function in terms of the Kullback-Leibler distance of phase space trajectories in Hamiltonian system. The formalism is applied to a single oligomeric enzyme kinetics at chemiostatic condition that leads the reaction system to a nonequilibrium steady state, characterized by a positive total entropy production rate. Analytical expressions are derived, relating the individual reaction contributions towards the total entropy production rate with experimentally measurable reaction velocity. Taking a real case of Escherichia coli β-galactosidase enzyme obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics, we thoroughly analyze the temporal as well as the steady state behavior of various thermodynamic quantities for each elementary reaction. This gives a useful insight in the relative magnitudes of various energy terms and the dissipated heat to sustain a steady state of the reaction system operating far-from-equilibrium. It is also observed that, the reaction is entropy-driven at low substrate concentration and becomes energy-driven as the substrate concentration rises.

  15. Propensity approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a chemical reaction network: controlling single E-coli β-galactosidase enzyme catalysis through the elementary reaction steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biswajit; Banerjee, Kinshuk; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2013-12-28

    In this work, we develop an approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an open chemical reaction network in terms of the elementary reaction propensities. The method is akin to the microscopic formulation of the dissipation function in terms of the Kullback-Leibler distance of phase space trajectories in Hamiltonian system. The formalism is applied to a single oligomeric enzyme kinetics at chemiostatic condition that leads the reaction system to a nonequilibrium steady state, characterized by a positive total entropy production rate. Analytical expressions are derived, relating the individual reaction contributions towards the total entropy production rate with experimentally measurable reaction velocity. Taking a real case of Escherichia coli β-galactosidase enzyme obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics, we thoroughly analyze the temporal as well as the steady state behavior of various thermodynamic quantities for each elementary reaction. This gives a useful insight in the relative magnitudes of various energy terms and the dissipated heat to sustain a steady state of the reaction system operating far-from-equilibrium. It is also observed that, the reaction is entropy-driven at low substrate concentration and becomes energy-driven as the substrate concentration rises.

  16. A kinetics study of the homogeneous and heterogeneous components of the HCl + ClONO2 reaction. [and its relevance to stratospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Randall R.; Goble, James H.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction HCl + ClONO2 to Cl2 + HNO3 were investigated at 298 K using a flow reactor with FTIR analysis to assess the importance of this reaction for stratospheric chemistry. The observed reaction was characteristic of a heterogeneous process; an upper limit of 5 x 10 to the -18th cu cm/molecule per s was obtained for the homogeneous gas phase rate constant. From calculations of the first order wall rate constant, estimates were made of the reaction rate on stratospheric aerosols. Because both HCl and ClONO2 need to be adsorbed on the particle surface, the reaction will be of negligible importance under most stratospheric conditions.

  17. Kinetic Isotope Effects for Alkaline Phosphatase Reactions: Implications for the Role of Active Site Metal Ions in Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalatan, Jesse G.; Catrina, Irina; Mitchell, Rebecca; Grzyska, Piotr K.; O’Brien, Patrick J.; Herschlag, Daniel; Hengge, Alvan C.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions have frequently been suggested to proceed through transition states that are altered from their solution counterparts, with the alterations presumably arising from interactions with active site functional groups. In particular, the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Recent linear free energy relationship (LFER) studies suggest that AP catalyzes phosphate monoester hydrolysis through a loose transition state, similar to that in solution. To gain further insight into the nature of the transition state and active site interactions, we have determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions with several phosphate monoester substrates. The LFER and KIE data together provide a consistent picture for the nature of the transition state for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis and support previous models suggesting that the enzymatic transition state is similar to that in solution. Moreover, the KIE data provides unique information regarding specific interactions between the transition state and the active site Zn2+ ions. These results provide strong support for a model in which electrostatic interactions between the bimetallo Zn2+ site and a nonbridging phosphate ester oxygen atom make a significant contribution to the large rate enhancement observed for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis. PMID:17630738

  18. Kinetic isotope effects for alkaline phosphatase reactions: implications for the role of active-site metal ions in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalatan, Jesse G; Catrina, Irina; Mitchell, Rebecca; Grzyska, Piotr K; O'brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel; Hengge, Alvan C

    2007-08-08

    Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions have frequently been suggested to proceed through transition states that are altered from their solution counterparts, with the alterations presumably arising from interactions with active-site functional groups. In particular, the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Recent linear free energy relationship (LFER) studies suggest that AP catalyzes phosphate monoester hydrolysis through a loose transition state, similar to that in solution. To gain further insight into the nature of the transition state and active-site interactions, we have determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions with several phosphate monoester substrates. The LFER and KIE data together provide a consistent picture for the nature of the transition state for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis and support previous models suggesting that the enzymatic transition state is similar to that in solution. Moreover, the KIE data provides unique information regarding specific interactions between the transition state and the active-site Zn2+ ions. These results provide strong support for a model in which electrostatic interactions between the bimetallo Zn2+ site and a nonbridging phosphate ester oxygen atom make a significant contribution to the large rate enhancement observed for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis.

  19. Direct sp(3)C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinolines by merging photoredox catalysis with nucleophilic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhu-Jia; Xuan, Jun; Xia, Xu-Dong; Ding, Wei; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zou, You-Quan; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2014-04-07

    Sequence catalysis merging photoredox catalysis (PC) and nucleophilic catalysis (NC) has been realized for the direct sp(3) C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ). The reaction was performed under very mild conditions and afforded products in 50-91% yields. A catalytic asymmetric variant was proved to be successful with moderate enantioselectivities (up to 83 : 17 er).

  20. Catalysis in the Service of Green Chemistry: Nobel Prize-Winning Palladium-Catalysed Cross-Couplings, Run in Water at Room Temperature: Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura and Negishi reactions carried out in the absence of organic solvents, enabled by micellar catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipshutz, Bruce H; Taft, Benjamin R; Abela, Alexander R; Ghorai, Subir; Krasovskiy, Arkady; Duplais, Christophe

    2012-04-01

    Palladium-catalysed cross-couplings, in particular Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura and Negishi reactions developed over three decades ago, are routinely carried out in organic solvents. However, alternative media are currently of considerable interest given an increasing emphasis on making organic processes 'greener'; for example, by minimising organic waste in the form of organic solvents. Water is the obvious leading candidate in this regard. Hence, this review focuses on the application of micellar catalysis, in which a 'designer' surfactant enables these award-winning coupling reactions to be run in water at room temperature.

  1. Utilizing light-triggered plasmon-driven catalysis reactions as a template for molecular delivery and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xin; Wang, Huan; Camden, Jon P

    2017-09-01

    Due to the facile manipulation and non-invasive nature of light-triggered release, it is one of the most potent ways to selectively and remotely deliver a molecular target. Among the various carrier platforms, plasmonic nanoparticles possess advantages such as enhanced cellular uptake and easy loading of "cargo" molecules. Two general strategies are currently utilized to achieve light-induced molecule release from plasmonic nanoparticles. The first uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly break the bond between the nanoparticle and the loaded target. The other requires significant photo-thermal effects to weaken the interaction between the cargo molecules and nanoparticle-attached host molecules. Different from above mechanisms, herein, we introduce a new light-controlled molecular-release method by taking advantage of a plasmon-driven catalytic reaction at the particle surface. In this strategy, we link the target to a plasmon responsive molecule, 4-aminobenzenethiol (4-ABT), through the robust and simple EDC coupling reaction and subsequently load the complex onto the particles via the strong Au-thiol interaction. Upon continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination, the excited surface plasmon catalyzes the formation of 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzenethiol (DMAB) and simultaneously releases the loaded molecules with high efficiency. This method does not require the use of high-power pulsed lasers, nor does it rely on photo-thermal effects. We believe that plasmon-driven release strategies open a new direction for the designing of next-generation light-triggered release processes.

  2. Superoxide reductase from Desulfoarculus baarsii: reaction mechanism and role of glutamate 47 and lysine 48 in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lombard, M; Touati, D; Fontecave, M; Nivière, V

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a small metalloenzyme that catalyzes reduction of O(2)(*)(-) to H(2)O(2) and thus provides an antioxidant mechanism against superoxide radicals. Its active site contains an unusual mononuclear ferrous center, which is very efficient during electron transfer to O(2)(*)(-) [Lombard, M., Fontecave, M., Touati, D., and Nivi{\\`e}re, V. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 115-121]. The reaction of the enzyme from Desulfoarculus baarsii with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bimolecular reaction of superoxide reductase with superoxide, with a rate constant of (1.1 +/- 0.3) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one at a much slower rate constant of 500 +/- 50 s(-1). Decay of the second intermediate occurs with a rate constant of 25 +/- 5 s(-1). These intermediates are suggested to be iron-superoxide and iron-peroxide species. Furthermore, the role of glutamate 47 and lysine 48, which are the closest...

  3. Low-temperature superacid catalysis: Reactions of n - butane and propane catalyzed by iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsz-Keung, Cheung; d`Itri, J.L.; Lange, F.C.; Gates, B.C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate the potential value of solid superacid catalysts of the sulfated zirconia type for light hydrocarbon conversion. The key experiments catalytic testing of the performance of such catalysts in a flow reactor fed with streams containing, for example, n-butane or propane. Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia was used to catalyze the conversion of n-butane at atmospheric pressure, 225-450{degrees}C, and n-butane partial pressures in the range of 0.0025-0.01 atm. At temperatures <225{degrees}C, these reactions were accompanied by cracking; at temperatures >350{degrees}C, cracking and isomerization occurred. Catalyst deactivation, resulting at least in part from coke formation, was rapid. The primary cracking products were methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene. The observation of these products along with an ethane/ethylene molar ratio of nearly 1 at 450{degrees}C is consistent with cracking occurring, at least in part, by the Haag-Dessau mechanism, whereby the strongly acidic catalyst protonates n-butane to give carbonium ions. The rate of methane formation from n-butane cracking catalyzed by Fe- and Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia at 450{degrees}C was about 3 x 10{sup -8} mol/(g of catalyst {center_dot}s). The observation of butanes, pentanes, and methane as products is consistent with Olah superacid chemistry, whereby propane is first protonated by a very strong acid to form a carbonium ion. The carbonium ion then decomposes into methane and an ethyl cation which undergoes oligocondensation reactions with propane to form higher molecular weight alkanes. The results are consistent with the identification of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia as a superacid.

  4. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  5. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  6. Vesicular catalysis of an S(N)2 reaction : Toward understanding the influence of glycolipids on reactions proceeding at the interface of biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the S(N)2 reaction of a series of aromatic alkylsulfonates with water and bromide ions in membrane mimetic media have been investigated. These media include vesicles formed from only synthetic amphiphiles, vesicles composed only of phospholipids and mixtures of these components. Spec

  7. Vesicular catalysis of an S(N)2 reaction: Toward understanding the influence of glycolipids on reactions proceeding at the interface of biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the S(N)2 reaction of a series of aromatic alkylsulfonates with water and bromide ions in membrane mimetic media have been investigated. These media include vesicles formed from only synthetic amphiphiles, vesicles composed only of phospholipids and mixtures of these components. Spec

  8. Zeolites and Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-15

    Handbook of Heterogeneous Catalysis ,Vol. als: State of the Art 1994, Studies in Surface Science and 5, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 1997, p. 2329. Catalysis, Vol...Weitkamp (Eds.), in Zeolite and Microporous Materials, Studies in Surface Handbook of Heterogeneous Catalysis , Vol. 4, Wiley-VCH, Science and Catalysis

  9. Label-Free and Enzyme-Free Homogeneous Electrochemical Biosensing Strategy Based on Hybridization Chain Reaction: A Facile, Sensitive, and Highly Specific MicroRNA Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ting; Li, Wei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Feng

    2015-11-17

    Homogenous electrochemical biosensing strategies have attracted substantial attention, because of their advantages of being immobilization-free and having rapid response and improved recognition efficiency, compared to heterogeneous biosensors; however, the high cost of labeling and the strict reaction conditions of tool enzymes associated with current homogeneous electrochemical methods limit their potential applications. To address these issues, herein we reported, for the first time, a simple label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for sensitive and highly specific detection of microRNA (miRNA). The target miRNA triggers the HCR of two species of metastable DNA hairpin probes, resulting in the formation of multiple G-quadruplex-incorporated long duplex DNA chains. Thus, with the electrochemical indicator Methylene Blue (MB) selectively intercalated into the duplex DNA chain and the multiple G-quadruplexes, a significant electrochemical signal drop is observed, which is dependent on the concentration of the target miRNA. Thus, using this "signal-off" mode, a simple, label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy for sensitive miRNA assay is readily realized. This strategy also exhibits excellent selectivity to distinguish even single-base mismatched miRNA. Furthermore, this method also exhibits additional advantages of simplicity and low cost, since both expensive labeling and sophisticated probe immobilization processes are avoided. Therefore, the as-proposed label-free and enzyme-free homogeneous electrochemical strategy may become an alternative method for simple, sensitive, and selective miRNA detection, and it has great potential to be applied in miRNA-related clinical diagnostics and biochemical research.

  10. Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference brings together all significant issues of practical importance for interested readers in one single volume. While covering homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, the text is unique in focusing on such important aspects as using different reaction media, microwave techniques or catalyst recycling. It also provides a comprehensive treatment of modern-day coupling reactions and emphasizes those topics that show potential for future development, such as continuous flow systems, water as a reaction medium, and catalyst immobilization, among others. With i

  11. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  12. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Megan H; Twilton, Jack; MacMillan, David W C

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Homogeneous Electrocatalytic Reactions at IDA Electrodes: The Example of [Ni(PPh2NBn2)2]2+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Parkinson, B. A.; Divan, Ralu; Roberts, John; Liang, Yanping

    2016-12-01

    Interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes have been applied to study the EC’ (electron transfer reaction followed by a catalytic reaction) reactions and a new method of quantitative analysis of IDA results was developed. In this new method, currents on IDA generator and collector electrodes for an EC’ mechanism are derived from the number of redox cycles and the contribution of non-catalytic current. And the fractions of bipotential recycling species and catalytic-active species are calculated, which helps understanding the catalytic reaction mechanism. The homogeneous hydrogen evolution reaction catalyzed by [Ni(PPh2NBn2)2]2+ (where PPh2NBn2 is 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane) electrocatalyst was examined and analyzed with IDA electrodes. Besides, the existence of reaction intermediates in the catalytic cycle is inferred from the electrochemical behavior of a glassy carbon disk electrodes and carbon IDA electrodes. This quantitative analysis of IDA electrode cyclic voltammetry currents can be used as a simple and straightforward method for determining reaction mechanism in other catalytic systems as well.

  14. Nonlinear effects in asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Abraham, Susan; Kagan, Henri B

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for the preparation of enantiomerically pure compounds for various applications. An efficient approach to achieve this goal is asymmetric catalysis. The chiral catalyst is usually prepared from a chiral auxiliary, which itself is derived from a natural product or by resolution of a racemic precursor. The use of non-enantiopure chiral auxiliaries in asymmetric catalysis seems unattractive to preparative chemists, since the anticipated enantiomeric excess (ee) of the reaction product should be proportional to the ee value of the chiral auxiliary (linearity). In fact, some deviation from linearity may arise. Such nonlinear effects can be rich in mechanistic information and can be synthetically useful (asymmetric amplification). This Review documents the advances made during the last decade in the use of nonlinear effects in the area of organometallic and organic catalysis.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Autoignition and Combustion of n-Butane and Air Mixture in Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition Engine Using Elementary Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yudai; Iida, Norimasa

    The present study focuses on clarifying the combustion mechanism of the homogeneous-charge compression-ignition (HCCI) engine in order to control ignition and combustion as well as to reduce HC and CO emissions and to maintain high combustion efficiency by calculating the chemical kinetics of elementary reactions. For the calculations, n-butane was selected as fuel since it is a fuel with the smallest carbon number in the alkane family that shows two-stage autoignition (heat release with low-temperature reaction (LTR) and with high-temperature reaction (HTR)) similarly to higher hydrocarbons such as gasoline. The CHEMKIN code was used for the calculations assuming zero dimensions in the combustion chamber and adiabatic change. The results reveal the heat release mechanism of the LTR and HTR, the control factor of ignition timing and combustion speed, and the condition need to reduce HC and CO emissions and to maintain high combustion efficiency.

  16. Selective and sensitive quantification of the cytochrome P450 3A4 protein in human liver homogenates through multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślak, Anna; Kelly, Isabelle; Trottier, Jocelyn; Verreault, Mélanie; Wunsch, Ewa; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Poirier, Guy; Droit, Arnaud; Barbier, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at establishing a sensitive multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) method for the quantification of the drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 enzyme in human liver homogenates. Liver samples were subjected to trypsin digestion. MRM-MS analyses were performed using three transitions optimized on one purified synthetic peptide unique to CYP3A4 and the standardizing protein, calnexin. Coefficient of variations for the precision and reproducibility of the MRM-MS measurement were also determined. The method was applied to liver samples from ten non-cholestatic donors and 34 cholestatic patients with primary biliary cholangitis (n = 12; PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (n = 10; PSC) or alcoholic liver disease (n = 12; ALD). The established method presented high sensitivity with limit of detection lower than 5 fmol, and was successfully applied for the absolute and relative quantification of CYP3A4 in both whole liver homogenate and microsomal fractions. When all groups were analyzed together, a significant correlation was observed for the MRM-based CYP3A4 protein quantification in homogenates and microsomes (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was detected between CYP3A4 levels in PSC, PBC, ALD and control samples. Finally, the MRM-MS quantification of CYP3A4 in homogenates also correlated (r = 0.44; p < 0.05) with the level of enzyme activity in the same samples, as determined by measuring the chenodeoxycholic to hyocholic acid conversion. The established method provides a sensitive tool to evaluate the CYP3A4 protein in human liver homogenates from patients with normal or chronic/severe hepatic injury.

  17. Heterogenous and homogenous catalytic oxidation by supported gamma-FeOOH in a fluidized-bed reactor: kinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, S; Huang, C; Huang, Y H

    2001-03-15

    Oxidation of benzoic acid (BA) by H2O2 was performed with a novel supported gamma-FeOOH catalyst in a circulating fluidized-bed reactor (CFBR). This study focused mainly on determining the proportions of homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis in this CFBR. Also studied herein was how pH, H2O2 concentration, and BA concentration affect the oxidation of BA. Experimental results indicate that the decomposition rate of H2O2 was proportional to its concentration and that the oxidation rate of BA depended on both H2O2 and BA concentrations. The change in the rate constant of heterogeneous catalysis by pH was described in terms of ionization fractions of surface hydroxyl group. From the mathematical deduction, we can infer thatthe reaction rate associated with ...Fe(III)OH2+ is markedly higher than that with ...Fe(III)OH. Conclusively, although heterogeneous catalysis contributes primarily to the oxidation of BA at pH 4.4-7.0, the homogeneous catalysis is of increasing importance below pH 4.4 because of the reductive dissolution of gamma-FeOOH.

  18. Supported Ionic Liquid Phase (SILP) catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Haumann, Marco;

    2006-01-01

    Applications of ionic liquids to replace conventional solvents in homogeneous transition-metal catalysis have increased significantly during the last decade. Biphasic ionic liquid/organic liquid systems offer advantages with regard to product separation, catalyst stability, and recycling but util...

  19. Unlocking the potential of supported liquid phase catalysts with supercritical fluids: low temperature continuous flow catalysis with integrated product separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciò, Giancarlo; Hintermair, Ulrich; Leitner, Walter

    2015-12-28

    Solution-phase catalysis using molecular transition metal complexes is an extremely powerful tool for chemical synthesis and a key technology for sustainable manufacturing. However, as the reaction complexity and thermal sensitivity of the catalytic system increase, engineering challenges associated with product separation and catalyst recovery can override the value of the product. This persistent downstream issue often renders industrial exploitation of homogeneous catalysis uneconomical despite impressive batch performance of the catalyst. In this regard, continuous-flow systems that allow steady-state homogeneous turnover in a stationary liquid phase while at the same time effecting integrated product separation at mild process temperatures represent a particularly attractive scenario. While continuous-flow processing is a standard procedure for large volume manufacturing, capitalizing on its potential in the realm of the molecular complexity of organic synthesis is still an emerging area that requires innovative solutions. Here we highlight some recent developments which have succeeded in realizing such systems by the combination of near- and supercritical fluids with homogeneous catalysts in supported liquid phases. The cases discussed exemplify how all three levels of continuous-flow homogeneous catalysis (catalyst system, separation strategy, process scheme) must be matched to locate viable process conditions.

  20. The homogeneously catalysed addition reaction of polyhalogenoalkanes to olefins by divalent arylnickel complexes: comparative reactivity and some important mechanistic leads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Grove, D.M.; Verschuuren, A.H.M.; Beek, J.A.M. van

    1989-01-01

    In comparative studies some bis(ortho-chelated) arylnickel compounds of the type [Ni{C{6}H{3}(CH{2}NRR'){2}-2, 6}X] have been tested for activity in the Kharasch addition reaction of polyhalogenoalkanes to an alkene double bond using methyl methacrylate as substrate and carbon tetrachloride as reage

  1. MERCURY REACTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORINE SPECIES: HOMOGENOUS GAS PHASE AND HETEROGENOUS GAS-SOLID PHASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetics of mercury chlorination (with HC1) were studied using a flow reactor system with an on-line Hg analyzer and spciation sampling using a set of impingers. Kinetic parameters, such as reaction order (a), activation energy (Eu) and the overall rate constant (k') were es...

  2. In Pursuit of an Ideal C-C Bond-Forming Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    RajanBabu, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    Attempts to introduce the highly versatile vinyl group into other organic molecules in a chemo-, regio- and stereoselective fashion via catalytic activation of ethylene provided challenging opportunities to explore new ligand and salt effects in homogeneous catalysis. This review provides a personal account of the development of enantioselective reactions involving ethylene. PMID:19606231

  3. MOF catalysis of Fe(II)-to-Fe(III) reaction for an ultrafast and one-step generation of the Fe2O3@MOF composite and uranium(vi) reduction by iron(ii) under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yang Yang; Li, Jian Qiang; Yan, Chang Sheng; Gao, Heng Ya; Zhou, Jian Ping; Gong, Le Le; Luo, Ming Biao; Zhang, Le; Meng, Pan Pan; Luo, Feng

    2016-08-07

    Herein, we demonstrate that Zn-MOF-74 enables the ultrafast and one-step generation of the Fe2O3@MOF composite once Zn-MOF-74 contacts with FeSO4 solution. This unique reaction can be further applied in catalysis of U(vi) reduction by Fe(ii) under ambient conditions. The results provide a highly renovated strategy for U(vi) reduction by Fe(ii) just under ambient conditions, which completely subvert all established methods about U(vi) reduction by Fe(ii) in which O2- and CO2-free conditions are absolutely required.

  4. Asymmetric catalysis with short-chain peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Bartosz; Wennemers, Helma

    2014-10-01

    Within this review article we describe recent developments in asymmetric catalysis with peptides. Numerous peptides have been established in the past two decades that catalyze a wide variety of transformations with high stereoselectivities and yields, as well as broad substrate scope. We highlight here catalytically active peptides, which have addressed challenges that had thus far remained elusive in asymmetric catalysis: enantioselective synthesis of atropoisomers and quaternary stereogenic centers, regioselective transformations of polyfunctional substrates, chemoselective transformations, catalysis in-flow and reactions in aqueous environments.

  5. Entropy and Enzyme Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åqvist, Johan; Kazemi, Masoud; Isaksen, Geir Villy; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2017-02-21

    The role played by entropy for the enormous rate enhancement achieved by enzymes has been debated for many decades. There are, for example, several confirmed cases where the activation free energy is reduced by around 10 kcal/mol due to entropic effects, corresponding to a rate enhancement of ∼10(7) compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. However, despite substantial efforts from both the experimental and theoretical side, no real consensus has been reached regarding the origin of such large entropic contributions to enzyme catalysis. Another remarkable instance of entropic effects is found in enzymes that are adapted by evolution to work at low temperatures, near the freezing point of water. These cold-adapted enzymes invariably show a more negative entropy and a lower enthalpy of activation than their mesophilic orthologs, which counteracts the exponential damping of reaction rates at lower temperature. The structural origin of this universal phenomenon has, however, remained elusive. The basic problem with connecting macroscopic thermodynamic quantities, such as activation entropy and enthalpy derived from Arrhenius plots, to the 3D protein structure is that the underlying detailed (microscopic) energetics is essentially inaccessible to experiment. Moreover, attempts to calculate entropy contributions by computer simulations have mostly focused only on substrate entropies, which do not provide the full picture. We have recently devised a new approach for accessing thermodynamic activation parameters of both enzyme and solution reactions from computer simulations, which turns out to be very successful. This method is analogous to the experimental Arrhenius plots and directly evaluates the temperature dependence of calculated reaction free energy profiles. Hence, by extensive molecular dynamics simulations and calculations of up to thousands of independent free energy profiles, we are able to extract activation parameters with sufficient precision for making

  6. Les clusters moléculaires. Applications en catalyse homogène et hétérogène Molecular Clusters. Applications in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorbon M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le présent article ne prétend pas être une étude bibliographique complète. II ne s'agit que d'une synthèse dont le but est l'introduction à un secteur de la chimie encore jeune et surtout très vaste et plein d'avenir. Les clusters métalliques sont des composés constitués d'atomes métalliques liés entre eux et généralement entourés de ligands ; ils présentent à la fois certaines des caractéristiques des complexes uninucléaires d'une part et des métaux massiques d'autre part. D'un point de vue fondamental, la chimie des clusters représente un domaine encore neuf et particulièrement vaste. D'un point de vue pratique, leur principal intérêt réside dans le fait que bon nombre d'entre eux ont fait preuve de propriétés catalytiques remarquables tant en mode homogène qu'en mode hétérogène. Ils doivent être pris en considération par les industriels de la chimie car certains peuvent être impliqués dans des réactions aussi importantes que la synthèse de Fischer-Tropsch, l'hydrogénation des oléfines, la réaction de gaz à l'eau et la fixation biologique de l'azote atmosphérique. This article does not pretend to be an exhaustive bibliographic survey. It is merely a synthesis intended as an introduction to a sector of chemistry which is still young and especially is very vast and promising. Metal clusters are compounds made up of metal atours bonded together and generally surrounded by ligands. They have various characteristics of both mono-nuclear complexes and bulk metals. From a fundamental point of view, the chemistry of clusters is still a new and particularly vast field. From a practical point of view, the importance of clusters lies in the fact that a good number of them have shown proof of remarkable catalytic properties, both homogeneous and heterogeneous. They must henceforth be taken into consideration by chemical engineers because some of them may be involved in such important reactions as the Fischer

  7. Ionic Diffusion and Kinetic Homogeneous Chemical Reactions in the Pore Solution of Porous Materials with Moisture Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Results from a systematic continuum mixture theory will be used to establish the governing equations for ionic diffusion and chemical reactions in the pore solution of a porous material subjected to moisture transport. The theory in use is the hybrid mixture theory (HMT), which in its general form...... general description of chemical reactions among constituents is described. The Petrov – Galerkin approach are used in favour of the standard Galerkin weighting in order to improve the solution when the convective part of the problem is dominant. A modified type of Newton – Raphson scheme is derived...... for the non-linear global matrix formulation. The developed model and its numerical solution procedure are checked by running test examples which results demonstrates robustness of the proposed approach....

  8. Phosphine catalysis of allenes with electrophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiming; Xu, Xingzhu; Kwon, Ohyun

    2014-05-07

    Nucleophilic phosphine catalysis of allenes with electrophiles is one of the most powerful and straightforward synthetic strategies for the generation of highly functionalized carbocycle or heterocycle structural motifs, which are present in a wide range of bioactive natural products and medicinally important substances. The reaction topologies can be controlled through a judicious choice of the phosphine catalyst and the structural variations of starting materials. This Tutorial Review presents selected examples of nucleophilic phosphine catalysis using allenes and electrophiles.

  9. Experimental and kinetic study of (trans)esterification reactions on Lewatit K1221

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Steene, Evelien; Clercq, Jeriffa De; Thybaut, Joris

    2013-01-01

    (Trans)esterification reactions play a key role in today’s biorefineries. Conventionally, these reactions are performed using an acid and a base homogeneous catalyst, respectively for esterification and transesterification. Heterogeneous catalysis offers a competitive alternative for these reactions by not requiring dedicated catalyst separation and purification. A single, fixed bed catalytic reactor, comprising a top layer of acid catalyst for esterification of free fatty acids followed by ...

  10. Mechanisms of RNA catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, David M J

    2011-10-27

    Ribozymes are RNA molecules that act as chemical catalysts. In contemporary cells, most known ribozymes carry out phosphoryl transfer reactions. The nucleolytic ribozymes comprise a class of five structurally-distinct species that bring about site-specific cleavage by nucleophilic attack of the 2'-O on the adjacent 3'-P to form a cyclic 2',3'-phosphate. In general, they will also catalyse the reverse reaction. As a class, all these ribozymes appear to use general acid-base catalysis to accelerate these reactions by about a million-fold. In the Varkud satellite ribozyme, we have shown that the cleavage reaction is catalysed by guanine and adenine nucleobases acting as general base and acid, respectively. The hairpin ribozyme most probably uses a closely similar mechanism. Guanine nucleobases appear to be a common choice of general base, but the general acid is more variable. By contrast, the larger ribozymes such as the self-splicing introns and RNase P act as metalloenzymes.

  11. Looking Back on 35 Years of Industrial Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-08-19

    This article is an account of my 35 years in the Basel Chemical Industry, starting in 1976 as a young research chemist in the Central Research Laboratories of Ciba-Geigy until my retirement as Chief Scientific Officer of Solvias in 2011. In the first section, important aspects of industrial research are commented from my personal point of view with particular emphasis on the importance of team work and the situation of catalysis in the (Swiss) fine chemicals industry. In the next sections, the three most important areas of catalytic research are described where my colleagues and I could not only solve specific Ciba-Geigy / Novartis / Solvias problems, but also developed industrially relevant, generally applicable catalytic methodologies and contributed to the understanding of these complex catalytic transformations: i) Catalytic C-C and C-N coupling catalysis where we developed highly efficient catalysts for the Heck, Suzuki, Buchwald-Hartwig reactions; ii) Hydrogenations using modified heterogeneous catalysts, especially the chemoselective reduction of functionalized nitro arenes and the enantioselective hydrogenation of substituted ketones using Pt catalysts modified with chinchona alkaloids where mechanistic studies led to a working understanding of this fascinating reaction; iii) Enantioselective homogeneous hydrogenation and chiral ligands. The process development for the production of (S)-metolachlor, an important herbicide via an iridium-Josiphos catalyzed C=N hydrogenation is described in some detail, followed by a brief description how the Solvias Ligand Portfolio was developed.

  12. Advances in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gates, Bruce C

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Catalysis fills the gap between the journal papers and the textbooks across the diverse areas of catalysis research. For more than 60 years Advances in Catalysis has been dedicated to recording progress in the field of catalysis and providing the scientific community with comprehensive and authoritative reviews. This series in invaluable to chemical engineers, physical chemists, biochemists, researchers and industrial chemists working in the fields of catalysis and materials chemistry. * In-depth, critical, state-of-the-art reviews * Comprehensive, covers of all as

  13. Advances in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Jentoft, Friederike C

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Catalysis fills the gap between the journal papers and the textbooks across the diverse areas of catalysis research. For more than 60 years Advances in Catalysis has been dedicated to recording progress in the field of catalysis and providing the scientific community with comprehensive and authoritative reviews. This series is invaluable to chemical engineers and chemists working in the field of catalysis in academia or industry. Authoritative reviews written by experts in the field. Topics selected to reflect progress of the field. Insightful and critical articles, fully edite

  14. Simulations of chemical catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory K.

    This dissertation contains simulations of chemical catalysis in both biological and heterogeneous contexts. A mixture of classical, quantum, and hybrid techniques are applied to explore the energy profiles and compare possible chemical mechanisms both within the context of human and bacterial enzymes, as well as exploring surface reactions on a metal catalyst. A brief summary of each project follows. Project 1 - Bacterial Enzyme SpvC The newly discovered SpvC effector protein from Salmonella typhimurium interferes with the host immune response by dephosphorylating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) with a beta-elimination mechanism. The dynamics of the enzyme substrate complex of the SpvC effector is investigated with a 3.2 ns molecular dynamics simulation, which reveals that the phosphorylated peptide substrate is tightly held in the active site by a hydrogen bond network and the lysine general base is positioned for the abstraction of the alpha hydrogen. The catalysis is further modeled with density functional theory (DFT) in a truncated active-site model at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level of theory. The truncated model suggested the reaction proceeds via a single transition state. After including the enzyme environment in ab initio QM/MM studies, it was found to proceed via an E1cB-like pathway, in which the carbanion intermediate is stabilized by an enzyme oxyanion hole provided by Lys104 and Tyr158 of SpvC. Project 2 - Human Enzyme CDK2 Phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by kinases and phosphatases play an indispensable role in cellular signaling, and their malfunctioning is implicated in many diseases. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies are reported for the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by a cyclin-dependent kinase, CDK2. Our results suggest that an active-site Asp residue, rather than ATP as previously proposed, serves as the general base to activate the Ser nucleophile. The corresponding transition state features a

  15. A homogeneous quenching resonance energy transfer assay for the kinetic analysis of the GTPase nucleotide exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Kari; Ligabue, Alessio; Wang, Qi; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Veltel, Stefan; van Adrichem, Arjan J; Hänninen, Pekka; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET) assay for small GTPase nucleotide exchange kinetic monitoring is demonstrated using nanomolar protein concentrations. Small GTPases are central signaling proteins in all eukaryotic cells acting as a "molecular switches" that are active in the GTP-state and inactive in the GDP-state. GTP-loading is highly regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In several diseases, most prominently cancer, this process in misregulated. The kinetics of the nucleotide exchange reaction reports on the enzymatic activity of the GEF reaction system and is, therefore, of special interest. We determined the nucleotide exchange kinetics using europium-labeled GTP (Eu-GTP) in the QRET assay for small GTPases. After GEF catalyzed GTP-loading of a GTPase, a high time-resolved luminescence signal was found to be associated with GTPase bound Eu-GTP, whereas the non-bound Eu-GTP fraction was quenched by soluble quencher. The association kinetics of the Eu-GTP was measured after GEF addition, whereas the dissociation kinetics could be determined after addition of unlabeled GTP. The resulting association and dissociation rates were in agreement with previously published values for H-Ras(Wt), H-Ras(Q61G), and K-Ras(Wt), respectively. The broader applicability of the QRET assay for small GTPases was demonstrated by determining the kinetics of the Ect2 catalyzed RhoA(Wt) GTP-loading. The QRET assay allows the use of nanomolar protein concentrations, as more than 3-fold signal-to-background ratio was achieved with 50 nM GTPase and GEF proteins. Thus, small GTPase exchange kinetics can be efficiently determined in a HTS compatible 384-well plate format.

  16. LSENS: A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. Part 1: Theory and numerical solution procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 1 of a series of three reference publications that describe LENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 1 derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved. The accuracy and efficiency of LSENS are examined by means of various test problems, and comparisons with other methods and codes are presented. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  17. Computational Exploration of Rh(III)/Rh(V) and Rh(III)/Rh(I) Catalysis in Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation Reactions of N-Phenoxyacetamides with Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Fang; Houk, K N; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-06-01

    The selective rhodium-catalyzed functionalization of arenes is greatly facilitated by oxidizing directing groups that act both as directing groups and internal oxidants. We report density functional theory (B3LYP and M06) investigations on the mechanism of rhodium(III)-catalyzed redox coupling reaction of N-phenoxyacetamides with alkynes. The results elucidated the role of the internal oxidizing directing group, and the role of Rh(III)/Rh(I) and Rh(III)/Rh(V) catalysis of C-H functionalizations. A novel Rh(III)-Rh(V)-Rh(III) cycle successfully rationalizes recent experimental observations by Liu and Lu et al. ( Liu , G. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013 , 52 , 6033 ) on the reactions of N-phenoxyacetamides with alkynes in different solvents. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the identity of Rh(V) intermediate in the catalytic cycle.

  18. Photon-Ion Catalysis Synergy Material and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The co-operation action mechanism and model of photon-ion catalysis synergy material composed of thallium and valency-variable rare earth elements and semiconductor oxide were proposed. The radiation catalysis reactions of water and oxygen assisted by the synergy material that could largely increase electron, free radical and negative ion products were discussed. The applications of photon-ion catalysis synergy material in areas of air cleaning material, antibacterial material, healthy material and energy resource material were suggested.

  19. Modeling multicomponent ionic transport in groundwater with IPhreeqc coupling: Electrostatic interactions and geochemical reactions in homogeneous and heterogeneous domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    The key role of small-scale processes like molecular diffusion and electrochemical migration has been increasingly recognized in multicomponent reactive transport in saturated porous media. In this study, we propose a two-dimensional multicomponent reactive transport model taking into account the electrostatic interactions during transport of charged ions in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media. The modeling approach is based on the local charge balance and on the description of compound-specific and spatially variable diffusive/dispersive fluxes. The multicomponent ionic transport code is coupled with the geochemical code PHREEQC-3 by utilizing the IPhreeqc module, thus enabling to perform the geochemical calculations included in the PHREEQC's reaction package. The multicomponent reactive transport code is benchmarked with different 1-D and 2-D transport problems. Successively, conservative and reactive transport examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of the proposed model to simulate transport of charged species in heterogeneous porous media with spatially variable physical and chemical properties. The results reveal that the Coulombic cross-coupling between dispersive fluxes can significantly influence conservative as well as reactive transport of charged species both at the laboratory and at the field scale.

  20. In Pursuit of an Ideal C-C Bond-Forming Reaction: Development and Applications of the Hydrovinylation of Olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajanbabu, T V

    2009-01-01

    Attempts to introduce the highly versatile vinyl group into other organic molecules in a chemo-, regio- and stereoselective fashion via catalytic activation of ethylene provided challenging opportunities to explore new ligand and salt effects in homogeneous catalysis. This review provides a personal account of the development of enantioselective reactions involving ethylene.

  1. On the impedance of galvanic cells XXVIII. The frequency-dependence of the electrode admittance for systems with first-order homogeneous chemical reactions and reactant adsorption occurring simultaneously

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyters-Rehbach, M.; Sluyters, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    Equations are derived for the interfacial admittance of an electrode at which the electrode reaction O+neR occurs assuming that the charge transfer is infinitely fast and that either O or R is involved in a first-order homogeneous reaction delivering the substance Y, or that both O and R are involve

  2. Reaction cell for in situ soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of heterogeneous catalysis up to 1 atm and 250 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansen, P. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Abteilung Anorganische Chemie, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Rocha, T. C. R.; Knop-Gericke, A. [Abteilung Anorganische Chemie, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Guo, J. H. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Duda, L. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel in situ reaction cell for heterogeneous catalysis monitored in situ by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The reaction can be carried out at a total pressure up to 1 atm, a regime that has not been accessible to comparable in situ techniques and thus closes the pressure gap to many industrial standard conditions. Two alternate catalyst geometries were tested: (A) a thin film evaporated directly onto an x-ray transparent membrane with a flowing reaction gas mixture behind it or (B) a powder placed behind both the membrane and a gap of flowing reaction gas mixture. To illustrate the working principle and feasibility of our reaction cell setup we have chosen ethylene epoxidation over a silver catalyst as a test case. The evolution of incorporated oxygen species was monitored by total electron/fluorescence yield O K-XAS as well as O K-RIXS, which is a powerful method to separate contributions from inequivalent sites. We find that our method can reliably detect transient species that exist during catalytic reaction conditions that are hardly accessible using other spectroscopic methods.

  3. Comparison of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for glucose-to-fructose isomerization in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Vinit; Pinar, Ana B; Lobo, Raul F; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Sandler, Stanley I

    2013-12-01

    Herein, the first comparison of the mechanisms of glucose-to-fructose isomerization in aqueous media enabled by homogeneous (CrCl3 and AlCl3 ) and heterogeneous catalysts (Sn-beta) by using isotopic-labeling studies is reported. A pronounced kinetic isotope effect (KIE) was observed if the deuterium label was at the C2 position, thus suggesting that a hydrogen shift from the C2 to C1 positions was the rate-limiting step with the three catalysts. (13) C and (1) H NMR spectroscopic investigations confirmed that an intra-hydride-transfer reaction pathway was the predominant reaction channel for all three catalysts in aqueous media. Furthermore, the deuterium atom in the labeled glucose could be mapped onto hydroxymethylfurfural and formic acid through reactions that followed the isomerization step in the presence of Brønsted acids. In all three catalysts, the active site appeared to be a bifunctional Lewis-acidic/Brønsted-basic site, based on a speciation model and first-principles calculations. For the first time, a mechanistic similarities between the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis of aldose-to-ketose isomerization is established and it is suggested that learning from homogeneous catalysis could assist in the development of improved heterogeneous catalysts.

  4. Challenges in polyoxometalate-mediated aerobic oxidation catalysis: catalyst development meets reactor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Manuel; Güttel, Robert; Streb, Carsten

    2016-11-14

    Selective catalytic oxidation is one of the most widely used chemical processes. Ideally, highly active and selective catalysts are used in combination with molecular oxygen as oxidant, leading to clean, environmentally friendly process conditions. For homogeneous oxidation catalysis, molecular metal oxide anions, so-called polyoxometalates (POMs) are ideal prototypes which combine high reactivity and stability with chemical tunability on the molecular level. Typically, POM-mediated aerobic oxidations are biphasic, using gaseous O2 and liquid reaction mixtures. Therefore, the overall efficiency of the reaction is not only dependent on the chemical components, but requires chemical engineering insight to design reactors with optimized productivity. This Perspective shows that POM-mediated aerobic liquid-phase oxidations are ideal reactions to be carried out in microstructured flow reactors as they enable facile mass and energy transfer, provide large gas-liquid interfaces and can be easily upscaled. Recent advances in POM-mediated aerobic catalytic oxidations are therefore summarized with a focus on technological importance and mechanistic insight. The principles of reactor design are discussed from a chemical engineering point of view with a focus on homogeneous oxidation catalysis using O2 in microfluidic systems. Further, current limitations to catalytic activity are identified and future directions based on combined chemistry and chemical engineering approaches are discussed to show that this approach could lead to sustainable production methods in industrial chemistry based on alternative energy sources and chemical feedstocks.

  5. Homogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, John C; Freixa, Zoraida; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2011-01-01

    This first book to illuminate this important aspect of chemical synthesis improves the lifetime of catalysts, thus reducing material and saving energy, costs and waste.The international panel of expert authors describes the studies that have been conducted concerning the way homogeneous catalysts decompose, and the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. The result is a ready reference for organic, catalytic, polymer and complex chemists, as well as those working in industry and with/on organometallics.

  6. Chloromethylation of 2-chloroethylbenzene catalyzed by micellar catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU QiFa; LU Ming; WEI Wei

    2009-01-01

    The chloromethylation reaction of 2-chloroethylbenzene was performed successfully by micellar catalysis in the biphasic oil/water system.The effects of anionic,cationic and non-ionic surfactants on the reaction were compared.The mechanism of chloromethyiation reaction and the mechanism of micellar catalysis were investigated.The results show that the micellar catalysis is an effective way to realize the chloromethylation of 2-chloroethylbenzene,and the cationic surfactant shows the most effectiveness.The longer the hydrophobic chain of the cationic surfactant is,the better the catalysis effect will be,and the addition of inorganic electrolyte into the aqueous phase can markedly promote the catalysis effect.

  7. Extensional flow convecting a reactant undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and diffusional mass transfer from a sphere at low to intermediate Peclet and Damkohler numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N. Y.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Forced convective diffusion-reaction is considered for viscous axisymmetric extensional convecting velocity in the neighborhood of a sphere. For Peclet numbers in the range 0.1 less than or equal to Pe less than or equal to 500 and for Damkohler numbers increasing with increasing Pe but in the overall range 0.02 less than or equal to Da less than or equal to 10, average and local Sherwood numbers have been computed. By introducing the eigenfunction expansion c(r, Theta) = Sum of c(n)(r)P(n)(cos Theta) into the forced convective diffusion equation for the concentration of a chemical species undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and by using properties of the Legendre functions Pn(cos Theta), the variable coefficient PDE can be reduced to a system of N + 1 second order ODEs for the radial functions c(sub n)(r), n = 0, 1, 2,..., N. The adaptive grid algorithm of Pereyra and Lentini can be used to solve the corresponding 2(N + 1) first order differential equations as a two-point boundary value problem on 1 less than or equal to r less than or equal to r(sub infinity). Convergence of the expansion for a specific value of N can thus be established and provides 'spectral' behavior as well as the full concentration field c(r, Theta).

  8. A ''well-known'' advanced oxidation reaction revisited. The photo-Fenton-oxidation of 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichloro-phenol in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Enriquez, M.A.; Bossmann, S.H.; Oliveros, E.; Shahin, N.; Braun, A.M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Umweltmesstechnik, am Engler-Bunte Inst. der Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany); Duran-de-Bazua, C. [Facultad de Quimica, Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The oxidative degradation of 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by the thermal and photochemically enhanced Fenton reactions has served as a model reaction for the comparison of different reaction conditions. The process of dechlorination of the chlorinated phenols is generally monitored by the determination of the chloride anion by ion chromatography. Some authors even proposed the measurement of the released chloride as a convenient measure for the advancement of Fenton reactions of reaction mixtures occurring in the environment. Therefore, we revisited these ''well-known'' reactions and combined mechanistic investigations of the formed chemical intermediates by GC-mass spectroscopy with the determinations of thorough chloride balances. This mechanistic tool was further employed for the comparison of the homogeneous and the heterogeneous photochemically enhanced Fenton degradation of 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol. A mixture of ferric sulphate and hydrogen peroxide was employed for the homogeneous Fenton reactions, whereas the heterogeneous Fenton experiments were performed using an iron(III)-exchanged zeolite Y photocatalyst. Different reaction pathways for the homogenous and heterogeneous (photo)Fenton reactions and especially for the oxidative degradation of 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol were observed. Consequences for the comparison of different operating conditions of (photo)Fenton processes are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  10. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  11. Concepts in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    The group Vill metals have vacant atomic d-orbilals (holes in the d-band) which were ex- peeled to promote celuemiorplion and catalysisA by...Houston, Texas, February 24.26 1971. Mango , F. D., Advances in Catalysis, 19 (1969). Mango , F. D. and i. H. Schachtschnelder, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 89

  12. Development of catalysts and ligands for enantioselective gold catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ming; Lackner, Aaron D; Toste, F Dean

    2014-03-18

    During the past decade, the use of Au(I) complexes for the catalytic activation of C-C π-bonds has been investigated intensely. Over this time period, the development of homogeneous gold catalysis has been extraordinarily rapid and has yielded a host of mild and selective methods for the formation of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. The facile formation of new bonds facilitated by gold naturally led to efforts toward rendering these transformations enantioselective. In this Account, we survey the development of catalysts and ligands for enantioselective gold catalysis by our research group as well as related work by others. We also discuss some of our strategies to address the challenges of enantioselective gold(I) catalysis. Early on, our work with enantioselective gold-catalyzed transformations focused on bis(phosphinegold) complexes derived from axially chiral scaffolds. Although these complexes were highly successful in some reactions like cyclopropanation, the careful choice of the weakly coordinating ligand (or counterion) was necessary to obtain high levels of enantioselectivity for the case of allene hydroamination. These counterion effects led us to use the anion itself as a source of chirality, which was successful in the case of allene hydroalkoxylation. In general, these tactics enhance the steric influence around the reactive gold center beyond the two-coordinate ligand environment. The use of binuclear complexes allowed us to use the second gold center and its associated ligand (or counterion) to exert a further steric influence. In a similar vein, we employed a chiral anion (in place of or in addition to a chiral ligand) to move the chiral information closer to the reactive center. In order to expand the scope of reactions amenable to enantioselective gold catalysis to cycloadditions and other carbocyclization processes, we also developed a new class of mononuclear phosphite and phosphoramidite ligands to supplement the previously widely

  13. Multi-dimensional modeling of the application of catalytic combustion to homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wen; Xie, Maozhao

    2006-12-01

    The detailed surface reaction mechanism of methane on rhodium catalyst was analyzed. Comparisons between numerical simulation and experiments showed a basic agreement. The combustion process of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine whose piston surface has been coated with catalyst (rhodium and platinum) was numerically investigated. A multi-dimensional model with detailed chemical kinetics was built. The effects of catalytic combustion on the ignition timing, the temperature and CO concentration fields, and HC, CO and NOx emissions of the HCCI engine were discussed. The results showed the ignition timing of the HCCI engine was advanced and the emissions of HC and CO were decreased by the catalysis.

  14. A hydrogen-evolving Ni(P2N2)2 electrocatalyst covalently attached to a glassy carbon electrode: preparation, characterization, and catalysis. comparisons with the homogeneous analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Atanu K; Engelhard, Mark H; Bullock, R Morris; Roberts, John A S

    2014-07-01

    A hydrogen-evolving homogeneous Ni(P2N2)2 electrocatalyst with peripheral ester groups has been covalently attached to a 1,2,3-triazolyllithium-terminated planar glassy carbon electrode surface. Coupling proceeds with both the Ni(0) and the Ni(II) complexes. X-ray photoemission spectra show excellent agreement between the Ni(0) coupling product and its parent complex, and voltammetry of the surface-confined system shows that a single species predominates with a surface density of 1.3 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2), approaching the value estimated for a densely packed monolayer. With the Ni(II) system, both photoemission and voltammetric data show speciation to unidentified products on coupling, and the surface density is 6.7 × 10(-11) mol cm(-2). The surface-confined Ni(0) complex is an electroctalyst for hydrogen evolution, showing the onset of catalytic current at the same potential as the soluble parent complex. Decomposition of the surface-confined species is observed in acidic acetonitrile. This is interpreted to reflect the lability of the Ni(II)-phosphine interaction and the basicity of the free phosphine and bears on concurrent efforts to implement surface-confined Ni(P2N2)2 complexes in electrochemical or photoelectrochemical devices.

  15. Supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Wasserscheid, P.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysis has been demonstrated for gas- and liquid-phase continuous fixed-bed reactions using rhodium phosphine catalyzed hydroformylation of propene and 1-octene as examples. The nature of the support had important influence on both the catalytic...

  16. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  17. Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Somorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-05-01

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO(2)-Pt and Pt-SiO(2), can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO(2)-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H(2), which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO(2) interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts.

  18. Nanostructured Membranes for Enzyme Catalysis and Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macroporous membranes functionalized with ionizable macromolecules provide promising applications in toxic metal capture at high capacity, nanoparticle synthesis, and catalysis. Our low-pressure membrane approach is marked by reaction and separation selectivity and their tunabil...

  19. Nanostructured Membranes for Enzyme Catalysis and Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macroporous membranes functionalized with ionizable macromolecules provide promising applications in toxic metal capture at high capacity, nanoparticle synthesis, and catalysis. Our low-pressure membrane approach is marked by reaction and separation selectivity and their tunabil...

  20. Reflector homogenization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R.; Ragusa, J.; Santandrea, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Service d' Etudes de Reacteurs et de Modelisation Avancee, CEA de Saclay, DM2S/SERMA 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)]. e-mail: richard.sanchez@cea.fr

    2004-07-01

    The problem of the determination of a homogeneous reflector that preserves a set of prescribed albedo is considered. Duality is used for a direct estimation of the derivatives needed in the iterative calculation of the optimal homogeneous cross sections. The calculation is based on the preservation of collapsed multigroup albedo obtained from detailed reference calculations and depends on the low-order operator used for core calculations. In this work we analyze diffusion and transport as low-order operators and argue that the P{sub 0} transfers are the best choice for the unknown cross sections to be adjusted. Numerical results illustrate the new approach for SP{sub N} core calculations. (Author)

  1. Electron transfer in acetohydroxy acid synthase as a side reaction of catalysis. Implications for the reactivity and partitioning of the carbanion/enamine form of (alpha-hydroxyethyl)thiamin diphosphate in a "nonredox" flavoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, Kai; Schröder, Kathrin; Golbik, Ralph; McCourt, Jennifer; Kaplun, Alexander; Duggleby, Ronald G; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David M; Hübner, Gerhard

    2004-07-13

    Acetohydroxy acid synthases (AHAS) are thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) and FAD-dependent enzymes that catalyze the first common step of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants, bacteria, and fungi. Although the flavin cofactor is not chemically involved in the physiological reaction of AHAS, it has been shown to be essential for the structural integrity and activity of the enzyme. Here, we report that the enzyme-bound FAD in AHAS is reduced in the course of catalysis in a side reaction. The reduction of the enzyme-bound flavin during turnover of different substrates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics using the intrinsic FAD absorbance. Reduction of enzyme-bound FAD proceeds with a net rate constant of k' = 0.2 s(-1) in the presence of oxygen and approximately 1 s(-1) under anaerobic conditions. No transient flavin radicals are detectable during the reduction process while time-resolved absorbance spectra are recorded. Reconstitution of the binary enzyme-FAD complex with the chemically synthesized intermediate 2-(hydroxyethyl)-ThDP also results in a reduction of the flavin. These data provide evidence for the first time that the key catalytic intermediate 2-(hydroxyethyl)-ThDP in the carbanionic/enamine form is not only subject to covalent addition of 2-keto acids and an oxygenase side reaction but also transfers electrons to the adjacent FAD in an intramolecular redox reaction yielding 2-acetyl-ThDP and reduced FAD. The detection of the electron transfer supports the idea of a common ancestor of acetohydroxy acid synthase and pyruvate oxidase, a homologous ThDP- and FAD-dependent enzyme that, in contrast to AHASs, catalyzes a reaction that relies on intercofactor electron transfer.

  2. RNA catalysis and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of RNA catalysis in the origins of life is considered in connection with the discovery of riboszymes, which are RNA molecules that catalyze sequence-specific hydrolysis and transesterification reactions of RNA substrates. Due to this discovery, theories positing protein-free replication as preceding the appearance of the genetic code are more plausible. The scope of RNA catalysis in biology and chemistry is discussed, and it is noted that the development of methods to select (or predict) RNA sequences with preassigned catalytic functions would be a major contribution to the study of life's origins.

  3. Catalysis by nonmetals rules for catalyst selection

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, Oleg V

    1970-01-01

    Catalysis by Non-metals: Rules of Catalyst Selection presents the development of scientific principles for the collection of catalysts. It discusses the investigation of the mechanism of chemosorption and catalysis. It addresses a series of properties of solid with catalytic activity. Some of the topics covered in the book are the properties of a solid and catalytic activity in oxidation-reduction reactions; the difference of electronegativities and the effective charges of atoms; the role of d-electrons in the catalytic properties of a solid; the color of solids; and proton-acid and proton-ba

  4. Progress of the Application of Mesoporous Silica-Supported Heteropolyacids in Heterogeneous Catalysis and Preparation of Nanostructured Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyong He

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica molecular sieves are a kind of unique catalyst support due to their large pore size and high surface area. Several methods have been developed to immobilize heteropolyacids (HPAs inside the channels of these mesoporous silicas. The mesoporous silica-supported HPA materials have been widely used as recyclable catalysts in heterogeneous systems. They have shown high catalytic activities and shape selectivities in some reactions, compared to the parent HPAs in homogeneous systems. This review summarizes recent progress in the field of mesoporous silica-supported HPAs applied in the heterogeneous catalysis area and preparation of nanostructured metal oxides using HPAs as precursors and mesoporous silicas as hard templates.

  5. Laboratory studies of H2SO4/H2O binary homogeneous nucleation from the SO2+OH reaction: evaluation of the experimental setup and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. Kameel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new laboratory nucleation setup to study binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN of sulphuric acid and water (H2SO4/H2O. Here we provide a detailed evaluation of this new experimental setup and also discuss our preliminary results by comparing with other laboratory studies. H2SO4 is produced from the SO2+OH →HSO3 reaction and OH radicals are produced from water vapor UV absorption. The residual H2SO4 concentrations ([H2SO4] are measured at the end of the fast flow nucleation reactor with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The measured BHN rates (J ranged from 0.02 and 550 cm−3 s−1 at the residual [H2SO4] from 108 to 1010 cm−3, a temperature of 288 K and relative humidity (RH from 6 to 23%; J increased with increasing [H2SO4] and RH. J also showed a power dependence on [H2SO4] with the exponential power of 3 to 8. These results are consistent with other laboratory studies under similar [H2SO4] and RH, but different from atmospheric field observations which showed that particle number concentrations are often linearly dependent on [H2SO4]. Both particle sizes and number concentrations increased with increasing [H2SO4], RH, and nucleation time, consistent with the predictions from nucleation theories. Particle growth rates were estimated between 28 to 127 nm h−1, much higher than those seen from atmospheric field observations, because of the higher [H2SO4] used in our study. While these experimental results demonstrate a validation of our laboratory setup, there are also technical difficulties associated with nucleation studies, including wall loss and H2SO4 measurements.

  6. Research on Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Calvin H.; Hecker, William C.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and philosophy of the Catalysis Laboratory at Brigham Young University are discussed. Also discusses recent and current research activities at the laboratory as well as educational opportunities, research facilities, and sources of research support. (JN)

  7. Co-catalysis effect of different morphological facets of as prepared Ag nanostructures for the photocatalytic oxidation reaction by Ag–TiO{sub 2} aqueous slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Rupinder; Pal, Bonamali, E-mail: bpal@thapar.edu

    2013-12-16

    This paper highlights the comparative co-catalytic efficiency of different shapes of prepared Ag nanoparticles of size much larger as well as smaller than titania for the Ag–TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis. Quantum sized Ag nanospheres (4{sup {sub 8}} nm), nanorod (length 70–75 nm and width 30–38 nm), polygonal nanosphere (80–120 nm) and truncated triangles (side length 70–140 nm) are prepared by solvothermal process. The co-catalytic activities of these Ag nanostructures were investigated by mixing them with TiO{sub 2} for the photocatalytic degradation of aqueous salicylic (0.5 mM) and benzoic acid (0.5 mM) under UV light (125 W-Hg arc, 10.4 mW cm{sup −2}) irradiation. The Ag co-catalysis effect imparted to TiO{sub 2} follows as polygonal nanosphere > nanorod > truncated triangle > small nanosphere due to the formation of many Ag–TiO{sub 2} interfaces by a single large-sized Ag nanoparticle than smaller one. As the surface coverage of Ag particles by TiO{sub 2} decreases, the Ag–TiO{sub 2} photoactivity is decreased accordingly. The efficient adsorption of salicylic acid to TiO{sub 2} surface through –COOH and –OH groups render its higher photodegradation rate (1.8–2.7 × 10{sup −2} μmol min{sup −1}) than benzoic acid (1.5–2.5 × 10{sup −2} μmol min{sup −1}) having one chelating –COOH group. Zeta potential and conductance measurement of photoreaction mixture were carried out to investigate the ionic interaction-adsorption of reactant substrates over Ag–TiO{sub 2} surface. - Graphical abstract: This study demonstrated the co-catalysis effect of relatively larger Ag nanostructures of different shapes than TiO{sub 2} for its improved photocatalytic activity during salicylic acid and benzoic acid degradation under UV light (125 W Hg-arc lamp, 10.4 mW cm{sup −2}) irradiation. The co-catalytic ability of Ag is found to exhibit as polygonal nanosphere > nanorod > truncated triangle > small nanosphere relative to bare TiO{sub 2

  8. Bioorthogonal Catalysis: A General Method To Evaluate Metal-Catalyzed Reactions in Real Time in Living Systems Using a Cellular Luciferase Reporter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Trantow, Brian M; Waymouth, Robert M; Wender, Paul A

    2016-02-17

    The development of abiological catalysts that can function in biological systems is an emerging subject of importance with significant ramifications in synthetic chemistry and the life sciences. Herein we report a biocompatible ruthenium complex [Cp(MQA)Ru(C3H5)](+)PF6(-) 2 (Cp = cyclopentadienyl, MQA = 4-methoxyquinoline-2-carboxylate) and a general analytical method for evaluating its performance in real time based on a luciferase reporter system amenable to high throughput screening in cells and by extension to evaluation in luciferase transgenic animals. Precatalyst 2 activates alloc-protected aminoluciferin 4b, a bioluminescence pro-probe, and releases the active luminophore, aminoluciferin (4a), in the presence of luciferase-transfected cells. The formation and enzymatic turnover of 4a, an overall process selected because it emulates pro-drug activation and drug turnover by an intracellular target, is evaluated in real time by photon counting as 4a is converted by intracellular luciferase to oxyaminoluciferin and light. Interestingly, while the catalytic conversion (activation) of 4b to 4a in water produces multiple products, the presence of biological nucleophiles such as thiols prevents byproduct formation and provides almost exclusively luminophore 4a. Our studies show that precatalyst 2 activates 4b extracellularly, exhibits low toxicity at concentrations relevant to catalysis, and is comparably effective in two different cell lines. This proof of concept study shows that precatalyst 2 is a promising lead for bioorthogonal catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy, similarly activatable pro-drugs. More generally, this study provides an analytical method to measure abiological catalytic activation of pro-probes and, by analogy with our earlier studies on pro-Taxol, similarly activatable pro-drugs in real time using a coupled biological catalyst that mediates a bioluminescent readout, providing tools for the study of imaging signal amplification

  9. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  10. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  11. Heterogenous catalysis mediated by plasmon heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, James R; Boyd, David A; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2009-12-01

    We introduce a new method for performing and miniaturizing many types of heterogeneous catalysis involving nanoparticles. The method makes use of the plasmon resonance present in nanoscale metal catalysts to provide the necessary heat of reaction when illuminated with a low-power laser. We demonstrate our approach by reforming a flowing, liquid mixture of ethanol and water over gold nanoparticle catalysts in a microfluidic channel. Plasmon heating of the nanoparticles provides not only the heat of reaction but the means to generate both water and ethanol vapor locally over the catalysts, which in turn allows the chip and the fluid lines to remain at room temperature. The measured products of the reaction, CO(2), CO, and H(2), are consistent with catalytic steam reforming of ethanol. The approach, which we refer to as plasmon-assisted catalysis, is general and can be used with a variety of endothermic catalytic processes involving nanoparticles.

  12. Scaffolding Catalysis: Expanding the Repertoire of Bifunctional Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kian L; Sun, Xixi; Worthy, Amanda D

    2012-02-01

    Inducing an intramolecular reaction is a powerful means of accelerating reactions. Though this mechanism of catalysis is common in enzymes, it is underutilized in synthetic catalysts. This article outlines our group's recent efforts to use reversible covalent bonding to induce an intramolecular reaction, allowing for rate acceleration as well as control of the selectivity in the desymmetrization of 1,2-diols.

  13. Closed system Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy. [deuterium-carbon monoxide reaction catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooner, D. W.; Gibert, J. M.; Gelpi, E.; Oro, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which meteoritic iron, iron ore and nickel-iron alloy were used to catalyze (in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) the reaction of deuterium and carbon monoxide in a closed vessel. Normal alkanes and alkenes and their monomethyl substituted isomers and aromatic hydrocarbons were synthesized. Iron oxide and oxidized-reduced Canyon Diablo used as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts were found to produce aromatic hydrocarbons in distributions having many of the features of those observed in carbonaceous chondrites, but only at temperatures and reaction times well above 300 C and 6-8 h.

  14. Laboratory studies of H2SO4/H2O binary homogeneous nucleation from the SO2+OH reaction: evaluation of the experimental setup and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN of sulphuric acid and water (H2SO4/H2O is one of the most important atmospheric nucleation processes, but laboratory observations of this nucleation process are very limited and there are also large discrepancies between different laboratory studies. The difficulties associated with these experiments include wall loss of H2SO4 and uncertainties in estimation of H2SO4 concentration ([H2SO4] involved in nucleation. We have developed a new laboratory nucleation setup to study H2SO4/H2O BHN kinetics and provide relatively constrained [H2SO4] needed for nucleation. H2SO4 is produced from the SO2+OH→HSO3 reaction and OH radicals are produced from water vapor UV absorption. The residual [H2SO4] were measured at the end of the nucleation reactor with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS. Wall loss factors (WLFs of H2SO4 were estimated by assuming that wall loss is diffusion limited and these calculated WLFs were in good agreement with simultaneous measurements of the initial and residual [H2SO4] with two CIMSs. The nucleation zone was estimated from numerical simulations based on the measured aerosol sizes (particle diameter, Dp and [H2SO4]. The measured BHN rates (J ranged from 0.01–220 cm−3 s−1 at the initial and residual [H2SO4] from 108−1010 cm−3, a temperature of 288 K and relative humidity (RH from 11–23%; J increased with increasing [H2SO4] and RH. J also showed a power dependence on [H2SO4] with the exponential power of 3–8. These power dependences are consistent with other laboratory studies under similar [H2SO4] and RH, but different from atmospheric field observations which showed that particle number concentrations are often linearly dependent on [H2SO4]. These results, together with a higher [H2SO4] threshold (108–109 cm−3 needed to produce the unit J measured from the laboratory studies compared to the atmospheric conditions (106–107 cm−3, imply that H2SO4/H2O BHN alone is

  15. Rational Design in Catalysis: A Mechanistic Study of β-Hydride Eliminations in Gold(I) and Gold(III) Complexes Based on Features of the Reaction Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiñeira Reis, Marta; López, Carlos Silva; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter; Faza, Olalla Nieto

    2016-09-01

    β-Hydride eliminations for ethylgold(III) dichloride complexes are identified as reactions with an unusually long prechemical stage corresponding to the conformational preparation of the reaction complex and spanning six phases. The prechemical process is characterized by a geared rotation of the L-Au-L group (L = Cl) driving methyl group rotation and causing a repositioning of the ligands. This requires more than 28 kcal/mol of the total barrier of 34.0 kcal/mol, according to the unified reaction valley approach, which also determines that the energy requirements of the actual chemical process leading to the β-elimination product are only about 5.5 kcal/mol. A detailed mechanistic analysis was used as a basis for a rational design of substrates (via substituents on the ethyl group) and/or ligands, which can significantly reduce the reaction barrier. This strategy takes advantage of either a higher trans activity of the ligands or a tuned electronic demand of the ethyl group. The β-hydride elimination of gold(I) was found to suffer from strong Coulomb and exchange repulsion when a positively charged hydrogen atom enforces a coordination position in a d(10)-configured gold atom, thus triggering an unassisted σ-π Au(I)-C conversion.

  16. A Possible Macroscopic-Photo-Catalysis Mechanism in Solar Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tsohsiu; Qing, Cheng-Rui; Chen, Ying-Tian

    2011-05-01

    Based on the experimental results of Chen et al. to use the solar furnace and medium frequency induction furnace to extract boron impurity from metallurgical silicon, we propose a strong radiation catalysis mechanism to explain the difference of reaction rates in these two furnaces. The postulate assuming the photons striking on the material not only increase the thermal energy of the molecules of reactants but also lower down the energy barrier of the reaction to speed up the chemical reaction. It is believed the photon catalysis mechanism is universal in most of high temperature chemical reactions and looking forward to more evidences for the postulate proposed in this article.

  17. A Possible Macroscopic-Photo-Catalysis Mechanism in Solar Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HO Tsohsiu; QING Cheng-Rui; CHEN Ying-Tian

    2011-01-01

    Based on the experimental results of Chen et al.to use the solar furnace and medium frequency induction furnace to extract boron impurity from metallurgical silicon, we propose a strong radiation catalysis mechanism to explain the difference of reaction rates in these two furnaces.The postulate assuming the photons striking on the material not only increase the thermal energy of the molecules of reactants but also lower down the energy barrier of the reaction to speed up the chemical reaction.It is believed the photon catalysis mechanism is universall in most of high temperature chemical reactions and looking forward to more evidences for the postulate proposed in this article.

  18. Adaptação de forno de microondas doméstico para realização de reações de transesterificação sob refluxo e catálise por argilas Adapting a domestic microwave oven transesterification reactions for under reflux and clay catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de C. da Silva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The microwave oven became an important source of heating for many laboratory procedures including accelerating organic reactions. Reactions that require long reflux times can sometimes be carried out in a few hours or minutes in a conventional microwave oven. However, longer reflux times can be troublesome since domestic microwave ovens are not prepared for these harsh conditions. This technical note presents our finding on heterogeneous catalysis transesterification reactions between b-keto-esters and carbohydrate derivatives under heating or microwave irradiation using an adapted domestic microwave oven.

  19. Next-Generation Catalysis for Renewables: Combining Enzymatic with Inorganic Heterogeneous Catalysis for Bulk Chemical Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennestrøm, Peter Nicolai Ravnborg; Christensen, C.H.; Pedersen, S.

    2010-01-01

    of combination involves one-pot cascade catalysis with active sites from bio- and inorganic catalysts. In this article the emphasis is placed specifically on oxidase systems involving the coproduction of hydrogen peroxide, which can be used to create new in situ collaborative oxidation reactions for bulk...

  20. Catalysis for alternative energy generation

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Summarizes recent problems in using catalysts in alternative energy generation and proposes novel solutions  Reconsiders the role of catalysis in alternative energy generation  Contributors include catalysis and alternative energy experts from across the globe

  1. Asymmetric catalysis with helical polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    Inspired by nature, the use of helical biopolymer catalysts has emerged over the last years as a new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In this Concept article the various approaches and designs and their application in asymmetric catalysis will be discussed.

  2. Asymmetric catalysis with helical polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by nature, the use of helical biopolymer catalysts has emerged over the last years as a new approach to asymmetric catalysis. In this Concept article the various approaches and designs and their application in asymmetric catalysis will be discussed.

  3. Preface: Catalysis Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yongdan

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of Catalysis Today with the theme “Sustain-able Energy” results from a great success of the session “Catalytic Technologies Accelerating the Establishment of Sustainable and Clean Energy”, one of the two sessions of the 1st International Symposium on Catalytic Science and Techn......This special issue of Catalysis Today with the theme “Sustain-able Energy” results from a great success of the session “Catalytic Technologies Accelerating the Establishment of Sustainable and Clean Energy”, one of the two sessions of the 1st International Symposium on Catalytic Science...... and Technology in Sustainable Energy and Environment, held in Tianjin, China during October8–10, 2014. This biennial symposium offers an international forum for discussing and sharing the cutting-edge researches and the most recent breakthroughs in energy and environmental technologies based on catalysis...

  4. Mechanistic studies on the phosphoramidite coupling reaction in oligonucleotide synthesis. I. Evidence for nudeophilic catalysis by tetrazole and rate variations with the phosphorus substituents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Bjarne H.; Nielsen, John; Dahl, Otto

    1987-01-01

    Tetrazole catalyzed reactions of a series of phosphoramidites, 5′ -O- DMTdT-3′-O-P(OR 1)NRNR22 (1a-h), with 3′ O-SiBu tPh 2-6-N-benzoyl-dA (2a) in acetonitrite solution have been studied. It is found that the coupling rate depends very much on whether tetrazole is added before or after 2a, and th...

  5. Applications of metal-organic frameworks in heterogeneous supramolecular catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiewei; Chen, Lianfen; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Jianyong; Zhang, Li; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2014-08-21

    This review summarizes the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a versatile supramolecular platform to develop heterogeneous catalysts for a variety of organic reactions, especially for liquid-phase reactions. Following a background introduction about catalytic relevance to various metal-organic materials, crystal engineering of MOFs, characterization and evaluation methods of MOF catalysis, we categorize catalytic MOFs based on the types of active sites, including coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (CUMs), metalloligands, functional organic sites (FOS), as well as metal nanoparticles (MNPs) embedded in the cavities. Throughout the review, we emphasize the incidental or deliberate formation of active sites, the stability, heterogeneity and shape/size selectivity for MOF catalysis. Finally, we briefly introduce their relevance into photo- and biomimetic catalysis, and compare MOFs with other typical porous solids such as zeolites and mesoporous silica with regard to their different attributes, and provide our view on future trends and developments in MOF-based catalysis.

  6. Organosilicon platforms: bridging homogeneous, heterogeneous, and bioinspired catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mayfair C; Riofski, Mark V; Missaghi, Michael N; Kung, Harold H

    2014-03-28

    Organosilicon compounds, in the form of cubic metallasiloxanes, cage-like silsesquioxanes, macromolecular nanocages, and flexible structures such as dendrimers and linear metallsiloxanes, have found useful applications as catalysts, ligands for metal complexes, and catalyst supports. Illustrative examples of these are presented. The well-defined structures of these compounds make them particularly suitable as molecular analogues of zeolites or silica-supported catalysts. A unique feature of many of these compounds is the presence of flexible siloxane bonds, which accommodate large fluctuations in the framework geometry, reminiscent of the adaptability of enzymes to conformational changes, and distinguish siloxane containing materials from carbon based synthetic materials. New preparative pathways and the use of the versatile silyl ester as a protection group have greatly expanded synthetic possibilities, pointing to the possibility of assembling these structures to form multifunctional catalytic structures. Some nanocage structures, with functionalities organized in close proximity, exhibit nanoconfinement effects.

  7. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  8. E factors, green chemistry and catalysis: an odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Roger A

    2008-08-07

    The development of green chemistry is traced from the introduction of the concepts of atom economy (atom utilisation) and E factors in the early 1990s. The important role of catalysis in reducing or eliminating waste is emphasised and illustrated with examples from heterogeneous catalytic oxidations with hydrogen peroxide, homogeneous catalytic oxidations and carbonylations and organocatalytic oxidations with stable N-oxy radicals. Catalytic reactions in non-conventional media, e.g. aqueous biphasic, supercritical carbon dioxide and ionic liquids, are presented. Biotransformations involving non-natural reactions of enzymes, e.g. ester ammoniolysis, and the rational design of semi-synthetic enzymes, such as vanadate phytase, are discussed. The optimisation of enzyme properties using in vitro evolution and improvement of their operational stability by immobilisation as cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEA) are presented. The ultimate in green chemistry is the integration of catalytic steps into a one-pot, catalytic cascade process. An example of a chemoenzymatic synthesis of an enantiomerically pure amino acid in water and a trienzymatic cascade process using a triple-decker oxynitrilase/nitrilase/amidase CLEA are discussed. Finally, catalytic conversions of renewable raw materials are examined and the biocatalytic aerobic oxidation of starch to carboxy starch is presented as an example of green chemistry in optima forma i.e. a biocompatible product from a renewable raw material using a biocatalytic air oxidation.

  9. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  10. Clay catalysis of oligonucleotide formation: kinetics of the reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolides of nucleotides with the non-basic heterocycles uracil and hypoxanthine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.; Ferris, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The montmorillonite clay catalyzed condensation of activated monocleotides to oligomers of RNA is a possible first step in the formation of the proposed RNA world. The rate constants for the condensation of the phosphorimidazolide of adenosine were measured previously and these studies have been extended to the phosphorimidazolides of inosine and uridine in the present work to determine of substitution of neutral heterocycles for the basic adenine ring changes the reaction rate or regioselectivity. The oligomerization reactions of the 5'-phosphoromidazolides of uridine (ImpU) and inosine (ImpI) on montmorillonite yield oligo(U)s and oligo(I)s as long as heptamers. The rate constants for oligonucleotide formation were determined by measuring the rates of formation of the oligomers by HPLC. Both the apparent rate constants in the reaction mixture and the rate constants on the clay surface were calculated using the partition coefficients of the oligomers between the aqueous and clay phases. The rate constants for trimer formation are much greater than those dimer synthesis but there was little difference in the rate constants for the formation of trimers and higher oligomers. The overall rates of oligomerization of the phosphorimidazolides of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides in the presence of montmorillonite clay are the same suggesting that RNA formed on the primitive Earth could have contained a variety of heterocyclic bases. The rate constants for oligomerization of pyrimidine nucleotides on the clay surface are significantly higher than those of purine nucleotides since the pyrimidine nucleotides bind less strongly to the clay than do the purine nucleotides. The differences in the binding is probably due to Van der Waals interactions between the purine bases and the clay surface. Differences in the basicity of the heterocyclic ring in the nucleotide have little effect on the oligomerization process.

  11. Asymmetric reactions in continuous flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yin Mak

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available An overview of asymmetric synthesis in continuous flow and microreactors is presented in this review. Applications of homogeneous and heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis as well as biocatalysis in flow are discussed.

  12. The reaction of the acrylonitrile ion CH 2dbnd CH-C tbnd N rad + with HCN: Proton-transport catalysis vs formation of ionized pyrimidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Henri K.; Jobst, Karl J.; Gerbaux, Pascal; Burgers, Peter C.; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2009-11-01

    The CBS-QB3 model chemistry predicts that the title ion-molecule reaction, of potential interest in astrochemistry, yields a stable head-to-tail dimer, [HC dbnd N-CH 2C(H)C tbnd N] rad + ( D1). Cyclization of D1 into ionized pyrimidine seems possible, but the initiating 1,2-H shift is close in energy to back-dissociation into CH 2dbnd C(H)CN rad + ( AN) + HCN. Less energy demanding is formation of the H-bridged isomers [CH 2dbnd C(CN)H--N tbnd CH] rad + and [HC tbnd N--HC(H) dbnd C(H)CN] rad +, whose HCN component may catalyze isomerization of AN into CH 2dbnd C dbnd C dbnd NH rad + ( AN1) and CH dbnd C(H)C dbnd NH rad + ( AN2) respectively. Tandem mass spectrometry based experiments using 15N/ 13C labelling show that cyclization of D1 does not occur and that AN1 is the predominant reaction product instead.

  13. Exploring the aryl esterase catalysis of paraoxonase-1 through solvent kinetic isotope effects and phosphonate-based isosteric analogues of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavec, Aljoša; Knez, Damijan; Makovec, Tomaž; Stojan, Jure; Gobec, Stanislav; Goličnik, Marko

    2014-11-01

    Although a recent study of Debord et al. in Biochimie (2014; 97:72-77) described the thermodynamics of the catalysed hydrolysis of phenyl acetate by human paraoxonase-1, the mechanistic details along the reaction route of this enzyme remain unclear. Therefore, we briefly present the solvent kinetic isotope effects on the phenyl acetate esterase activity of paraoxonase-1 and its inhibition with the phenyl methylphosphonate anion, which is a stable isosteric analogue that mimics the high-energy tetrahedral intermediate on the hydroxide-promoted hydrolysis pathway. The data show normal isotope effects, while proton inventory analysis indicates that two protons contribute to the kinetic isotope effect. Coherently, moderate competitive inhibition with the phenyl methylphosphonate anion reveals that the rate-limiting transition state suboptimally resembles the tetrahedral intermediate. The implications of these findings can be attributed to two possible reaction mechanisms that might occur during the paraoxonase-1-catalysed hydrolysis of phenyl acetate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. A Partially Fluorinated, Water-Stable Cu(II)-MOF Derived via Transmetalation: Significant Gas Adsorption with High CO2 Selectivity and Catalysis of Biginelli Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tapan K; De, Dinesh; Senthilkumar, S; Neogi, Subhadip; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2016-08-15

    A partially fluorinated, angular tetracarboxylic acid linker (H4L) incorporating a pendant amine moiety forms a three-dimensional Zn(II) framework, 1. The structure consists of paddle-wheel Zn2(CO2)4 secondary building units (SBUs) and Zn12(CO2)24 supramolecular building blocks (SBBs). Thermal stability of 1 is found to be low. However, it undergoes transmetalation reaction with Cu(II) at room temperature without losing crystallinity affording an isostructural framework, 1Cu. Framework 1Cu is thermally robust and allows generation of the solvent-free porous framework 1Cu' upon activation with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers. Framework 1Cu' exhibits water stability and at 77 K, adsorbs 2.56 wt % of H2 up to 1 bar that significantly increases to 4.01 wt % at 13 bar. Also, this framework gives a high adsorption of 164.70 cc/g of CH4 (11.7 wt %) at 303 K and 60 bar. The channel surfaces decorated with -NH2 group and unsaturated metal centers in 1Cu' allow a promising 36.4 wt % of CO2 adsorption at 1 bar and 273 K. Moreover, it exhibits pronounced selectivity of CO2 adsorption over N2 and H2 at 273 K. Finally, the versatility of 1Cu' is shown by its excellent heterogeneous catalytic activity in the Biginelli coupling reactions involving an aldehyde, urea, and ethylacetoacetate to afford dihydroprimidinones.

  15. Pollution Control by Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kim Michael; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    1998-01-01

    The report summarises the results of two years of collaboration supported by INTAS between Department of Chemistry,DTU,DK , IUSTI,Universite de Provence,FR, ICE/HT University 6of Patras,GR, and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis,RU.The project has been concerned with mechanistic studies of deNOx and...

  16. Pollution Control by Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kim Michael; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    1998-01-01

    The report summarises the results of two years of collaboration supported by INTAS between Department of Chemistry,DTU,DK , IUSTI,Universite de Provence,FR, ICE/HT University 6of Patras,GR, and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis,RU.The project has been concerned with mechanistic studies of deNOx and...

  17. Heterogenous Catalysis Mediated by Plasmon Heating

    OpenAIRE

    Adleman, J.R.; Boyd, D. A.; Goodwin, D. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new method for performing and miniaturizing many types of heterogeneous catalysis involving nanoparticles. The method makes use of the plasmon resonance present in nanoscale metal catalysts to provide the necessary heat of reaction when illuminated with a low-power laser. We demonstrate our approach by reforming a flowing, liquid mixture of ethanol and water over gold nanoparticle catalysts in a microfluidic channel. Plasmon heating of the nanoparticles provides not only the he...

  18. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  19. Efficient catalysis of Suzuki–Miyaura C-C coupling reactions with palladium(II) complexes of partially hydrolyzed bisimine ligands: A process important in environment context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Arun; Rao, Gyandshwar Kumar; Saleem, Fariha; Kumar, Rupesh; Singh, Ajai K., E-mail: aksingh@chemistry.iitd.ac.in

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Syntheses of hexadentate chalcogenated (S/Se/Te) bisimine ligands. • Reactions with Pd(II) resulted in their metal promoted partial hydrolysis to 1-[C(CH{sub 3})=N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-EAr]-3-[C(CH{sub 3})=O]-4,6-[OH]{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 2} and ArE-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-NH{sub 2}. • Isolation and characterization of Pd(II) complexes of products of hydrolysis. • Exploration of catalytic potential of Pd(II) complexes for Suzuki coupling. • Highest catalytic efficiency of complex of Se based ligand which shows activity for coupling aryl chlorides. - Abstract: Potentially hexadentante [O{sup −},N,E:E,N,O{sup −}] chalcogenated bisimine ligands L1–L3 have been synthesized by reaction of 1,1′-(4,6-dihydroxy-1,3-phenylene)bisethanone with H{sub 2}N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-S-Ph, H{sub 2}N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-Se-Ph and H{sub 2}N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-Te-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-OMe respectively. The L1–L3 react with Na{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} resulting in their partial hydrolysis, which appears to be metal-promoted. Of the two [-(CH{sub 3})C=N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-EAr] fragments of L1–L3, one is converted to -(CH{sub 3})C=O and H{sub 2}N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-E-Ar eliminated. The hydrolysis products 1-[C(CH{sub 3})=N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-SPh]-3-[C(CH{sub 3})=O]-4,6-[OH]{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 2} (L1′), 1-[C(CH{sub 3})=N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-SePh]-3-[C(CH{sub 3})=O]-4,6-[OH]{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 2} (L2′) and 1-[C(CH{sub 3})=N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-Te-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-OMe]-3-[C(CH{sub 3})=O]-4,6-[OH]{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 2} (L3′) have formed complexes [PdCl(L′–H)] (1, 3 and 5). The other product of hydrolysis H{sub 2}N-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}-E-Ar (L″) reacted with Na{sub 2}PdCl{sub 4} yielding the complexes [PdL”Cl{sub 2}] (2, 4 and 6). All the complexes (1–6) were found thermally and air stable. Complexes 1, 3 and 5 have been investigated as catalysts for Suzuki–Miyaura C-C coupling reactions. The catalytic activities of 1 and 3 which are

  20. Transition metal chemistry under high carbon monoxide pressure: an infrared spectroscopic study of catalysis in the Fischer--Tropsch reaction. [7 refs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Iqbal, M.Z.; Frazier, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    This project involves the design and construction of equipment to investigate the infrared spectra of metal carbonyl derivatives in the 1600 to 2200 cm./sup -1/ nu(CO) region at pressures up to 500 atmospheres and temperatures up to 250/sup 0/ followed by the use of this equipment to study the infrared spectra of a variety of transition metal derivatives at elevated pressures of carbon monoxide. The ultimate objective of this work is the discovery of new chemistry leading to the development of new systems which are catalytically active for the conversion of mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen to hydrocarbons in connection with the conversion of coal to hydrocarbon fuels. During the initial period covered by this first progress report a high pressure infrared cell has been designed, constructed, and used for the preliminary investigations of reactions of about 15 transition metal derivatives under elevated pressure of carbon monoxide and hydrogen.

  1. New and future developments in catalysis activation of carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Suib, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    New and Future Developments in Catalysis is a package of books that compile the latest ideas concerning alternate and renewable energy sources and the role that catalysis plays in converting new renewable feedstock into biofuels and biochemicals. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts and catalytic processes will be discussed in a unified and comprehensive approach. There will be extensive cross-referencing within all volumes. This volume presents a complete picture of all carbon dioxide (CO2) sources, outlines the environmental concerns regarding CO2, and critica

  2. Interactions Between Surface Reactions and Gas-phase Reactions in Catalytic Combustion and Their Influence on Ignition of HCCI Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of methane in a microchannel whose surface was coated with platinum(Pt)catalyst was studied by numerical-simulation. The effects of gas-phase reactions on the whole catalytic combustion process were analyzed at a high inlet pressure. A sensitivity analysis of the detailed mechanisms of the surface reaction of methane on Pt revealed that the most sensitive reactions affecting the heterogeneous ignition are oxygen adsorption/desorption and methane adsorption, and the most sensitive reactions affecting the homogeneous ignition are OH and H2O adsorption/desorption. The combustion process of the homogeneous charge compression ignition(HCCI) engine whose piston face was coated with Pt catalyst was simulated. The effects of catalysis and the most sensitive reactions on the ignition timing and the concentration of the main intermediate species during the HCCI engine combustion are discussed. The results show that the ignition timing of the HCCI engine can be increased by catalysis, and the most sensitive reactions affecting the ignition timing of the HCCI engine are OH and H2O adsorption/desorption.

  3. Structural and optical properties of homogeneous Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films prepared by thermal reaction of InSe/Cu/GaSe alloys with elemental Se vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejene, F. B.; Alberts, V.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, thin films of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 were prepared by the controlled reaction of thermally evaporated InSe/Cu/GaSe precursors with elemental Se vapour in vacuum. We indicate that this classical two-step growth process can be utilized to produce homogeneous single-phase chalcopyrite absorber films with superior structural properties. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that the interplanar spacing d(112) decreases linearly with an increase in the Ga/[In + Ga] atomic ratio due to homogeneous incorporation of gallium into the chalcopyrite lattice. Optical studies revealed the expected systematic increase in the band gap with increasing gallium concentration, once again confirming the monophasic nature of the alloys.

  4. Structural and optical properties of homogeneous Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films prepared by thermal reaction of InSe/Cu/GaSe alloys with elemental Se vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dejene, F B; Alberts, V [Department of Physics, Rand Afrikaans University, PO Box 524, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2005-01-07

    In this study, thin films of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} were prepared by the controlled reaction of thermally evaporated InSe/Cu/GaSe precursors with elemental Se vapour in vacuum. We indicate that this classical two-step growth process can be utilized to produce homogeneous single-phase chalcopyrite absorber films with superior structural properties. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that the interplanar spacing d{sub (112)} decreases linearly with an increase in the Ga/[In + Ga] atomic ratio due to homogeneous incorporation of gallium into the chalcopyrite lattice. Optical studies revealed the expected systematic increase in the band gap with increasing gallium concentration, once again confirming the monophasic nature of the alloys.

  5. Merging Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis with Metal Catalyzed C–H Activations: On the Role of Oxygen and Superoxide Ions as Oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus The development of efficient catalytic systems for direct aromatic C–H bond functionalization is a long-desired goal of chemists, because these protocols provide environmental friendly and waste-reducing alternatives to classical methodologies for C–C and C–heteroatom bond formation. A key challenge for these transformations is the reoxidation of the in situ generated metal hydride or low-valent metal complexes of the primary catalytic bond forming cycle. To complete the catalytic cycle and to regenerate the C–H activation catalyst, (super)stoichiometric amounts of Cu(II) or Ag(I) salts have often been applied. Recently, “greener” approaches have been developed by applying molecular oxygen in combination with Cu(II) salts, internal oxidants that are cleaved during the reaction, or solvents or additives enabling the metal hydride reoxidation. All these approaches improved the environmental friendliness but have not overcome the obstacles associated with the overall limited functional group and substrate tolerance. Hence, catalytic processes that do not feature the unfavorable aspects described above and provide products in a streamlined as well as economically and ecologically advantageous manner would be desirable. In this context, we decided to examine visible light photoredox catalysis as a new alternative to conventionally applied regeneration/oxidation procedures. This Account summarizes our recent advances in this expanding area and will highlight the new concept of merging distinct redox catalytic processes for C–H functionalizations through the application of visible light photoredox catalysis. Photoredox catalysis can be considered as catalytic electron-donating or -accepting processes, making use of visible-light absorbing homogeneous and heterogeneous metal-based catalysts, as well as organic dye sensitizers or polymers. As a consequence, photoredox catalysis is, in principle, an ideal tool for the recycling of any given metal

  6. Magnetic catalysis (and inverse catalysis) at finite temperature in two-color lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgenfritz, E -M; Petersson, B; Schreiber, A

    2013-01-01

    Two-color lattice QCD with N_f=4 staggered fermion degrees of freedom (no rooting trick is applied) with equal electric charge q is studied in a homogeneous magnetic background field B and at non-zero temperature T. In order to circumvent renormalization as a function of the bare coupling we apply a fixed-scale approach. We study the influence of the magnetic field on the critical temperature. At rather small pseudo-scalar meson mass (m_pi \\approx 175 MeV \\approx T_c(B=0)) we confirm magnetic catalysis for sufficiently strong magnetic field strength, while at T=195 MeV and weak magnetic field (qB {\\lesssim} 0.8 GeV^2) we find a rise of the Polyakov loop with qB and thus, indications for an inverse magnetic catalysis.

  7. Solvent Effects on the Reactions of the Nerve Agent VX with KF/Al2O3: Heterogeneous or Homogeneous Decontamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridkin, Gil; Yehezkel, Lea; Columbus, Ishay; Zafrani, Yossi

    2016-03-04

    Solvent effects on the reactions of the extremely toxic nerve agent VX with KF/Al2O3 powder were explored. Small quantities of water or methanol (5-10 wt %), which effectively mobilized all components while maintaining the heterogeneous nature of the reaction, promoted much faster rates than those obtained with larger quantities. Any amount of acetonitrile resulted in extremely slow transformations. Surprisingly, 5-50 wt % of heptane led to fast reactions due to the combination of its ability to mediate fast diffusion of VX and a MAS centrifugation effect.

  8. LDRD final report on new homogeneous and supported oligomerization catalysts (LDRD 42461).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hascall, Anthony G.; Kemp, Richard Alan

    2004-11-01

    The overall purpose of this LDRD is multifold. First, we are interested in preparing new homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the oligomerization of ethylene and in understanding commercially important systems better. Second, we are interested in attempting to support these new homogeneous catalysts in the pores of nano- or mesoporous materials in order to force new and unusual distributions of a-olefins to be formed during the oligomerization. Thus the overall purpose is to try to prepare new catalytic species and to possibly control the active site architecture in order to yield certain desired products during a catalytic reaction, much like nature does with enzymes. In order to rationally synthesize catalysts it is imperative to comprehend the function of the various components of the catalyst. In heterogeneous systems, it is of utmost importance to know how a support interacts with the active site of the catalyst. In fact, in the catalysis world this lack of fundamental understanding of the relationship between active site and support is the single largest reason catalysis is considered an 'empirical' or 'black box' science rather than a well-understood one. In this work we will be preparing novel ethylene oligomerization catalysts, which are normally P-O chelated homogeneous complexes, with new ligands that replace P with a stable carbene. We will also examine a commercially catalyst system and investigate the active site in it via X-ray crystallography. We will also attempt to support these materials inside the pores of nano- and mesoporous materials. Essentially, we will be tailoring the size and scale of the catalyst active site and its surrounding environment to match the size of the molecular product(s) we wish to make. The overall purpose of the study will be to prepare new homogeneous catalysts, and if successful in supporting them to examine the effects that steric constraints and pore structures can have on growing oligomer

  9. Highly Efficient Cooperative Catalysis by Co(III) (Porphyrin) Pairs in Interpenetrating Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zekai; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-10-24

    A series of porous twofold interpenetrated In-Co(III) (porphyrin) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were constructed by in situ metalation of porphyrin bridging ligands and used as efficient cooperative catalysts for the hydration of terminal alkynes. The twofold interpenetrating structure brings adjacent Co(III) (porphyrins) in the two networks parallel to each other with a distance of about 8.8 Å, an ideal distance for the simultaneous activation of both substrates in alkyne hydration reactions. As a result, the In-Co(III) (porphyrin) MOFs exhibit much higher (up to 38 times) catalytic activity than either homogeneous catalysts or MOF controls with isolated Co(III) (porphyrin) centers, thus highlighting the potential application of MOFs in cooperative catalysis. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Gold(I) catalysis at extreme concentrations inside self-assembled nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Hessels, Joeri; Leenders, Stefan H A M; Tröppner, Oliver; Dürr, Maximilian; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-12-01

    Homogeneous transition-metal catalysis is a crucial technology for the sustainable preparation of valuable chemicals. The catalyst concentration is usually kept as low as possible, typically at mM or μM levels, and the effect of high catalyst concentration is hardly exploited because of solubility issues and the inherent unfavorable catalyst/substrate ratio. Herein, a self-assembly strategy is reported which leads to local catalyst concentrations ranging from 0.05 M to 1.1 M, inside well-defined nanospheres, whilst the overall catalyst concentration in solution remains at the conventional mM levels. We disclose that only at this high concentration, the gold(I) chloride is reactive and shows high selectivity in intramolecular CO and CC bond-forming cyclization reactions.

  11. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Winterowd, Christopher; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years has been the discovery and characterization of graphene. A two-dimensional layer of Carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice, graphene exhibits many interesting electronic properties, most notably that the low energy excitations behave as massless Dirac fermions. These excitations interact strongly via the Coulomb interaction and thus non-perturbative methods are necessary. Using methods borrowed from lattice QCD, we study the graphene effective theory in the presence of an external magnetic field. Graphene, along with other $(2+1)$-dimensional field theories, has been predicted to undergo spontaneous breaking of flavor symmetry including the formation of a gap as a result of the external magnetic field. This phenomenon is known as magnetic catalysis. Our study investigates magnetic catalysis using a fully non-perturbative approach.

  12. Catalysis and biocatalysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This final report presents a summary of research activities and accomplishments for the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program, which was renamed the Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program, currently of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD), Office of Industrial Technologies of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Program was formerly under the Division of Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) until the DOE reorganization in April, 1990. The goals of the BCTR Program are consistent with the initial ECUT goals, but represent an increased effort toward advances in chemical and biological technology transfer. In addition, the transition reflects a need for the BCTR Program to assume a greater R&D role in chemical catalysis as well as a need to position itself for a more encompassing involvement in a broader range of biological and chemical technology research. The mission of the AICD is to create a balanced Program of high risk, long-term, directed interdisciplinary research and development that will improve energy efficiency and enhance fuel flexibility in the industrial sector. Under AICD, the DOE Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program sponsors research and development in furthering industrial biotechnology applications and promotes the integrated participation of universities, industrial companies, and government research laboratories.

  13. Catalysis Research of Relevance to Carbon Management: Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hironori; Aresta, Michele; Armor, John; Barteau, Mark; Beckman, Eric J.; Bell, Alexis T.; Bercaw, John E.; Creutz, Carol; Dinjus, Eckhard; Dixon, David A.; Domen, Kazunari; Dubois, Daniel L.; Eckert, Juergen; Fujita, Etsuko; Gibson, Dorothy H.; Goddard, William A.; Goodman, Wayne D.; Keller, Jay; Kubas, Gregory J.; Kung, Harold H.; Lyons, James E.; Manzer, Leo; Marks, Tobin J.; Morokuma, Keiji; Nicholas, Kenneth M.; Periana, Roy; Que, Lawrence; Rostrup-Nielson, Jens; Sachtler, Woflgang M H.; Schmidt, Lanny D.; Sen, Ayusman; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Stair, Peter C.; Stults, Bailey R.; Tumas, William

    2001-04-11

    The goal of the 'Opportunities for Catalysis Research in Carbon Management' workshop was to review within the context of greenhouse gas/carbon issues the current state of knowledge, barriers to further scientific and technological progress, and basic scientific research needs in the areas of H{sub 2} generation and utilization, light hydrocarbon activation and utilization, carbon dioxide activation, utilization, and sequestration, emerging techniques and research directions in relevant catalysis research, and in catalysis for more efficient transportation engines. Several overarching themes emerge from this review. First and foremost, there is a pressing need to better understand in detail the catalytic mechanisms involved in almost every process area mentioned above. This includes the structures, energetics, lifetimes, and reactivities of the species thought to be important in the key catalytic cycles. As much of this type of information as is possible to acquire would also greatly aid in better understanding perplexing, incomplete/inefficient catalytic cycles and in inventing new, efficient ones. The most productive way to attack such problems must include long-term, in-depth fundamental studies of both commercial and model processes, by conventional research techniques and, importantly, by applying various promising new physicochemical and computational approaches which would allow incisive, in situ elucidation of reaction pathways. There is also a consensus that more exploratory experiments, especially high-risk, unconventional catalytic and model studies, should be undertaken. Such an effort will likely require specialized equipment, instrumentation, and computational facilities. The most expeditious and cost-effective means to carry out this research would be by close coupling of academic, industrial, and national laboratory catalysis efforts worldwide. Completely new research approaches should be vigorously explored, ranging from novel compositions

  14. A real time polymerase chain reaction assay for quantification of Edwardsiella ictaluri in catfish pond water and genetic homogeneity of diagnostic case isolates from Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed for the detection and quantification of Edwardsiella ictaluri in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus pond water using modifications to a published E. ictaluri–specific qPCR assay and previously established protocols for the molecula...

  15. The use of digital simulation to improve the cyclic voltammetric determination of rate constants for homogeneous chemical reactions following charge transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozo, J.D.; Carbajo, J. [Applied Electrochemistry Laboratory, Dep. of Chemical Enginery, Physical Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, Experimental Sciences Faculty, University of Huelva, Av. 3 de Marzo, s/n (Campus El Carmen), ES-21071 Huelva (Spain); Sturm, J.C.; Nunez-Vergara, L.J.; Moscoso, R. [Bioelectrochemistry Laboratory, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty, University of Chile, 838492 Santiago (Chile); Squella, J.A., E-mail: asquella@ciq.uchile.cl [Bioelectrochemistry Laboratory, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty, University of Chile, 838492 Santiago (Chile)

    2011-08-05

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is a very useful electrochemical tool used to study reaction systems that include chemical steps that are coupled to electron transfers. This type of system generally involves the chemical reaction of an electrochemically generated free radical. Published methods exist that are used to determine the kinetics of electrochemically initiated chemical reactions from the measurements of the peak current ratio (i{sub pa}/i{sub pc}) of a cyclic voltammogram. The published method requires working curves to relate a kinetic parameter to the peak current ratio. In the presented work, a digital simulation package was used to obtain improved working curves for specific working conditions. The curves were compared with the published results for the first- and second-order chemical reactions following the charge transfer step mechanisms. According to the presented results, the previously published working curve is reliable for a mechanism with a first-order chemical reaction; however, a change in the switching potential requires a recalculation of the curve. In the case of mechanisms with a second-order step (dimerisation and disproportionation), several different views exist on how the second-order chemical term should be expressed so that different values of the constant are obtained. Parameters such as electrode type, electrode area, electroactive species concentration, switching potential, scan rate and method for peak current ratio calculation modify the working curves and must always be specified. We propose a standardised method to obtain the most reliable kinetic constant values. The results of this work will permit researchers who handle simulation software to construct their own working curves. Additionally, those who do not have the simulation software could use the working curves described here. The revelations of the presented experiments may be useful to a broad chemistry audience because this study presents a simple and low-cost procedure

  16. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  17. Organic photoredox catalysis for the oxidation of silicates: applications in radical synthesis and dual catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Christophe; Chenneberg, Ludwig; Corcé, Vincent; Ollivier, Cyril; Fensterbank, Louis

    2016-08-01

    Metal free photooxidation of alkyl bis(catecholato)silicates with the organic dye 1,2,3,5-tetrakis(carbazol-9-yl)-4,6-dicyano-benzene (4CzIPN) allows the smooth formation of alkyl radicals. The latter can be efficiently engaged either with radical acceptors to provide homolytic addition products or in photoredox/nickel dual catalysis reactions to obtain cross-coupling products.

  18. Synthesis of Well-Defined Copper "N"-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes and Their Use as Catalysts for a "Click Reaction": A Multistep Experiment that Emphasizes the Role of Catalysis in Green Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ison, Elon A.; Ison, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A multistep experiment for an advanced synthesis lab course that incorporates topics in organic-inorganic synthesis and catalysis and highlights green chemistry principles was developed. Students synthesized two "N"-heterocyclic carbene ligands, used them to prepare two well-defined copper(I) complexes and subsequently utilized the complexes as…

  19. Synthesis of Well-Defined Copper "N"-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes and Their Use as Catalysts for a "Click Reaction": A Multistep Experiment that Emphasizes the Role of Catalysis in Green Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ison, Elon A.; Ison, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A multistep experiment for an advanced synthesis lab course that incorporates topics in organic-inorganic synthesis and catalysis and highlights green chemistry principles was developed. Students synthesized two "N"-heterocyclic carbene ligands, used them to prepare two well-defined copper(I) complexes and subsequently utilized the complexes as…

  20. Mn(2+)-mediated homogeneous Fenton-like reaction of Fe(III)-NTA complex for efficient degradation of organic contaminants under neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifan; Sun, Jianhui; Sun, Sheng-Peng

    2016-08-05

    In this work, we report a novel Mn(2+)-mediated Fenton-like process based on Fe(III)-NTA complex that is super-efficient at circumneutral pH range. Kinetics experiments showed that the presence of Mn(2+) significantly enhanced the effectiveness of Fe(III)-NTA complex catalyzed Fenton-like reaction. The degradation rate constant of crotamiton (CRMT), a model compound, by the Fe(III)- NTA_Mn(2+) Fenton-like process was at least 1.6 orders of magnitude larger than that in the absence of Mn(2+). Other metal ions such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+) and Cu(2+) had no impacts or little inhibitory effect on the Fe(III)-NTA complex catalyzed Fenton-like reaction. The generation of hydroxyl radical (HO) and superoxide radical anion (O2(-)) in the Fe(III)-NTA_Mn(2+) Fenton-like process were suggested by radicals scavenging experiments. The degradation efficiency of CRMT was inhibited significantly (approximately 92%) by the addition of HO scavenger 2-propanol, while the addition of O2(-) scavenger chloroform resulted in 68% inhibition. Moreover, the results showed that other chelating agents such as EDTA- and s,s-EDDS-Fe(III) catalyzed Fenton-like reactions were also enhanced significantly by the presence of Mn(2+). The mechanism involves an enhanced generation of O2(-) from the reactions of Mn(2+)-chelates with H2O2, indirectly promoting the generation of HO by accelerating the reduction rate of Fe(III)-chelates to Fe(II)- chelates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Relation between Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrodesulfurization Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Šaric, Manuel; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relation between hydrogen evolution and hydrodesulfurization catalysis was found by density functional theory calculations. The hydrogen evolution reaction and the hydrogenation reaction in hydrodesulfurization share hydrogen as a surface intermediate and, thus, have a common elementary step......, which indicates that the same catalyst should perform well for both hydrogen evolution and hydrogenation. If that catalyst also fulfills additional criteria for breaking carbon–sulfur bonds and releasing hydrogen sulfide, it will be a good hydrodesulfurization catalyst. The hydrogen evolution reaction...... is normally performed at room temperature and standard pressure, whereas the hydrodesulfurization reaction is driven by high temperature and pressure. Owing to the very different operating conditions, the adsorption free energy of hydrogen differs between hydrodesulfurization and the hydrogen evolution...

  2. Homogeneous electrochemical detection of ochratoxin A in foodstuff using aptamer-graphene oxide nanosheets and DNase I-based target recycling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Li; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Sun, Guo-Peng; Wang, Xuan-Nian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-03-15

    A simple and feasible homogeneous electrochemical sensing protocol was developed for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in foodstuff on the immobilization-free aptamer-graphene oxide nanosheets coupling with DNase I-based cycling signal amplification. Thionine-labeled OTA aptamers were attached to the surface of nanosheets because of the strong noncovalent binding of graphene oxide nanosheets with nucleobases and aromatic compounds. The electronic signal was acquired via negatively charged screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) toward free thionine molecules. Initially, the formed thionine-aptamer/graphene nanocomposites were suspended in the detection solution and far away from the electrode, thereby resulting in a weak electronic signal. Upon addition of target OTA, the analyte reacted with the aptamer and caused the dissociation of thionine-aptamer from the graphene oxide nanosheets. The newly formed thionine-aptamer/OTA could be readily cleaved by DNase I and released target OTA, which could retrigger thionine-aptamer/graphene nanocomposites with target recycling to generate numerous free thionine molecules. Free thionine molecules were captured by negatively charged SPCE, each of which could produce an electrochemical signal within the applied potentials. Under optimal conditions, graphene-based aptasensing platform could exhibit good electrochemical responses for the detection of OTA at a concentration as low as 5.6pg/mL. The reproducibility, precision and selectivity of the system were acceptable. Importantly, the method accuracy was comparable with commercialized OTA ELISA kit when using for quantitative monitoring of contaminated wheat samples.

  3. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  4. The use of digital simulation to improve the cyclic voltammetric determination of rate constants for homogeneous chemical reactions following charge transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozo, J D; Carbajo, J; Sturm, J C; Núñez-Vergara, L J; Moscoso, R; Squella, J A

    2011-08-05

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is a very useful electrochemical tool used to study reaction systems that include chemical steps that are coupled to electron transfers. This type of system generally involves the chemical reaction of an electrochemically generated free radical. Published methods exist that are used to determine the kinetics of electrochemically initiated chemical reactions from the measurements of the peak current ratio (i(pa)/i(pc)) of a cyclic voltammogram. The published method requires working curves to relate a kinetic parameter to the peak current ratio. In the presented work, a digital simulation package was used to obtain improved working curves for specific working conditions. The curves were compared with the published results for the first- and second-order chemical reactions following the charge transfer step mechanisms. According to the presented results, the previously published working curve is reliable for a mechanism with a first-order chemical reaction; however, a change in the switching potential requires a recalculation of the curve. In the case of mechanisms with a second-order step (dimerisation and disproportionation), several different views exist on how the second-order chemical term should be expressed so that different values of the constant are obtained. Parameters such as electrode type, electrode area, electroactive species concentration, switching potential, scan rate and method for peak current ratio calculation modify the working curves and must always be specified. We propose a standardised method to obtain the most reliable kinetic constant values. The results of this work will permit researchers who handle simulation software to construct their own working curves. Additionally, those who do not have the simulation software could use the working curves described here. The revelations of the presented experiments may be useful to a broad chemistry audience because this study presents a simple and low-cost procedure for the

  5. Shape-controlled nanostructures in heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2013-10-01

    Nanotechnologies have provided new methods for the preparation of nanomaterials with well-defined sizes and shapes, and many of those procedures have been recently implemented for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. The control of nanoparticle shape in particular offers the promise of a better definition of catalytic activity and selectivity through the optimization of the structure of the catalytic active site. This extension of new nanoparticle synthetic procedures to catalysis is in its early stages, but has shown some promising leads already. Here, we survey the major issues associated with this nanotechnology-catalysis synergy. First, we discuss new possibilities associated with distinguishing between the effects originating from nanoparticle size versus those originating from nanoparticle shape. Next, we survey the information available to date on the use of well-shaped metal and non-metal nanoparticles as active phases to control the surface atom ensembles that define the catalytic site in different catalytic applications. We follow with a brief review of the use of well-defined porous materials for the control of the shape of the space around that catalytic site. A specific example is provided to illustrate how new selective catalysts based on shape-defined nanoparticles can be designed from first principles by using fundamental mechanistic information on the reaction of interest obtained from surface-science experiments and quantum-mechanics calculations. Finally, we conclude with some thoughts on the state of the field in terms of the advances already made, the future potentials, and the possible limitations to be overcome.

  6. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  7. Molecular modeling of heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislason, Jason Joseph

    A novel method for modeling heterogeneous catalysis was developed to further facilitate the understanding of catalytic reactor mechanisms. The method employs molecular dynamics simulations, statistical mechanical, and Unity Bond Index - Quadratic Exponential Potential (UBI-QEP) calculations to calculate the rate constants for reactions on metal surfaces. The primary difficulty of molecular dynamics simulations on metal surfaces has been the lack of reliable reactive potential energy surfaces. We have overcome this through the development of the Normalized Bond Index - Reactive Potential Function (NBI-RPF), which can accurately describe the reaction of adsorbates on metal surfaces. The first calculations of rate constants for a reaction on a metal surface using molecular dynamics simulations are presented. This method is applied to the determination of the mechanism for selective hydrogenation of acetylene in an ethylene rich flow. It was determined that the selectivity for acetylene hydrogenation is attributable to the higher reactivity of acetylene versus ethylene with respect to hydrogenation by molecular hydrogen. It was shown that hydrogen transfer from the carbonaceous layer to acetylene or ethylene is insignificant in the hydrogenation process. Molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics calculations were used to determine the diffusion rate constants for dimethylnaphthalene isomers is mordenite. 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene were found to have similar diffusion rate constants. Grand canonical Monte Carlo calculations were performed on the competitive adsorption of 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene in type X zeolites exchanged individually with barium, calcium, potassium, and rubidium ions, calcium exchanged MCM-22, and hydrogen form mordenite (MOR), X zeolite, Y zeolite, hypBEB, ZSM- 12, and MCM-22. These calculations showed that barium exchanged X zeolite was the most selective toward 2

  8. New developments in oxidation catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosowski, F. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The impact of heterogeneous catalysis on the economy can be depicted by the global revenue of the chemical industry in 2006, which accounted for 2200 billion Euros with a share of all chemical products produced applying heterogeneous catalysis of about two thirds. [1] The range of products is enormous and they contribute greatly to the quality of our lifes. The advancement in the development of basic and intermediate chemical products is crucially dependent on either the further development of existing catalyst systems or the development of new catalysts and key to success for the chemical industry. Within the context of oxidation catalysis, the following driving forces are guiding research activities: There is a continuous desire to increase the selectivity of a given process in response to both economic as well as ecological needs and taking advantage of higher efficiencies in terms of cost savings and a better utilization of raw materials. A second motivation focuses on raw material change to all abundant and competitive feedstocks requiring both new developments in catalyst design as well as process technology. A more recent motivation refers to the use of metal oxide redox systems which are key to success for the development of novel technologies allowing for the separation of carbon dioxide and the use of carbon dioxide as a feedstock molecule as well as storing renewable energy in a chemical. To date, general ab initio approaches are known for the design of novel catalytic materials only for a few chemical reactions, whereas most industrial catalytic processes have been developed by empirical methods. [2] The development of catalytic materials are either based on the targeted synthesis of catalytic lead structures as well as high throughput methods that allow for the screening of a large range of parameters. [3 - 5] The successful development of catalysts together with reactor technology has led to both significant savings in raw materials and emissions. The

  9. New perspectives on thiamine catalysis: from enzymic to biomimetic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatis, A; Malandrinos, G; Louloudi, M; Hadjiliadis, N

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a brief review of the detailed mechanism of action of thiamine enzymes, based on metal complexes of bivalent transition and post-transition metals of model compounds, thiamine derivatives, synthesized and characterized with spectroscopic techniques and X-ray crystal structure determinations. It is proposed that the enzymatic reaction is initiated with a V conformation of thiamine pyrophosphate, imposed by the enzymic environment. Thiamine pyrophosphate is linked with the proteinic substrate through its pyrophosphate oxygens. In the course of the reaction, the formation of the "active aldehyde" intermediate imposes the S conformation to thiamine, while a bivalent metal ion may be linked through the N1' site of the molecule, at this stage. Finally, the immobilization of thiamine and derivatives on silica has a dramatic effect on the decarboxylation of pyruvic acid, reducing the time of its conversion to acetaldehyde from 330 minutes for the homogeneous system to less than 5 minutes in the heterogenous system.

  10. Compartmentalized Droplets for Continuous Flow Liquid-Liquid Interface Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Huan; Du, Zhiping; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2016-08-17

    To address the limitations of batch organic-aqueous biphasic catalysis, we develop a conceptually novel method termed Flow Pickering Emulsion, or FPE, to process biphasic reactions in a continuous flow fashion. This method involves the compartmentalization of bulk water into micron-sized droplets based on a water-in-oil Pickering emulsion, which are packed into a column reactor. The compartmentalized water droplets can confine water-soluble catalysts, thus "immobilizing" the catalyst in the column reactor, while the interstices between the droplets allow the organic (oil) phase to flow. Key fundamental principles underpinning this method such as the oil phase flow behavior, the stability of compartmentalized droplets and the confinement capability of these droplets toward water-soluble catalysts are experimentally and theoretically investigated. As a proof of this concept, case studies including a sulfuric acid-catalyzed addition reaction, a heteropolyacid-catalyzed ring opening reaction and an enzyme-catalyzed chiral reaction demonstrate the generality and versatility of the FPE method. Impressively, in addition to the excellent durability, the developed FPE reactions exhibit up to 10-fold reaction efficiency enhancement in comparison to the existing batch reactions, indicating a unique flow interface catalysis effect. This study opens up a new avenue to allow conventional biphasic catalysis reactions to access more sustainable and efficient flow chemistry using an innovative liquid-liquid interface protocol.

  11. Multi-dimensional Modeling of the Application of Catalytic Combustion to Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Zeng; MaoZhao Xie

    2006-01-01

    The detailed surface reaction mechanism of methane on rhodium catalyst was analyzed.Comparisons between numerical simulation and experiments showed a basic agreement.The combustion process of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine whose piston surface has been coated with catalyst (rhodium and platinum) was numerically investigated.A multi-dimensional model with detailed chemical kinetics was built.The effects of catalytic combustion on the ignition timing,the temperature and CO concentration fields,and HC,CO and NOx emissions of the HCCI engine were discussed.The results showed the ignition timing of the HCCI engine was advanced and the emissions of HC and CO were decreased by the catalysis.

  12. Concepts of Modern Catalysis and Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Chorkendorff, I

    2003-01-01

    Until now, the literature has offered a rather limited approach to the use of fundamental kinetics and their application to catalytic reactions. Subsequently, this book spans the full range from fundamentals of kinetics and heterogeneous catalysis via modern experimental and theoretical results of model studies to their equivalent large-scale industrial production processes. The result is key knowledge for students at technical universities and professionals already working in industry. "...such an enterprise will be of great value to the community, to professionals as well as graduate an

  13. Direct acylation of aryl bromides with aldehydes by palladium catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jiwu; Saidi, Ourida; Iggo, Jonathan A; Xiao, Jianliang

    2008-08-13

    A new protocol for the direct acylation of aryl bromides with aldehydes is established. It appears to involve palladium-amine cooperative catalysis, affording synthetically important alkyl aryl ketones in moderate to excellent yields in a straightforward manner, and broadening the scope of metal-catalyzed coupling reactions.

  14. CATALYSIS BY SURFACTANT AGGREGATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ENGBERTS, JBFN

    1992-01-01

    Catalysis of organic reactions by unfunctionalized surfactant aggregates (micelles, vesicles) in aqueous solution is largely determined by medium effects induced at the micellar binding sites and by entropy effects due to compartimentalization. The efficiency of these catalytic effects responds to c

  15. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope...... of the reaction. Particularly, a formation of configurationally labile aminal centers with alkyl substituents has been a formidable challenge due to the enamine/imine equilibrium of electrophilic substrates. Herein, we report enantioselective nucleophilic addition reactions of potassium phthalimides to Boc......-protected alkyl- and aryl-substituted α-amido sulfones. In-situ generated imines smoothly reacted with the nitrogen nucleophiles to corresponding aminals with good to excellent enantioselectivitiy under mild reaction conditions. In addition, transformation of aminal products gave biologically relevant...

  16. Study on the Biodiesel Prepared by Ester Exchange Reaction%酯交换法制备生物柴油的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐玲; 王寅; 王丽辉; 李久明

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the method of preparation biodiesel by ester exchange reaction was systematically described. The method was included homogeneous catalysis, heterogeneous catalysis, lipase catalysis and supereritieal according to the different catalysts. The purpose of the paper was to provide the reference to the use, development and application of biodiesel.%本文主要对酯交换法制备生物柴油进行了系统的阐述.根据所选择催化剂的不同,详细介绍了均相催化、非均相催化、脂肪酶催化以及超临界四种酯交换方法.旨在为酯交换法制备生物柴油的研究开发及应用提供参考.

  17. Spin-modified catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and NCMN, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi 175001, Himachal Pradesh (India); Manchanda, P.; Enders, A.; Balamurugan, B.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Skomski, R., E-mail: rskomski@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and NCMN, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Kashyap, A. [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi 175001, Himachal Pradesh (India); Sykes, E. C. H. [Department of Chemistry, Pearson Chemistry Laboratory, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    First-principle calculations are used to explore the use of magnetic degrees of freedom in catalysis. We use the Vienna Ab-Initio Simulation Package to investigate both L1{sub 0}-ordered FePt and CoPt bulk materials and perform supercell calculations for FePt nanoclusters containing 43 atoms. As the catalytic activity of transition-metal elements and alloys involves individual d levels, magnetic alloying strongly affects the catalytic performance, because it leads to shifts in the local densities of states and to additional peaks due to magnetic-moment formation. The peak shift persists in nanoparticles but is surface-site specific and therefore depends on cluster size. Our research indicates that small modifications in stoichiometry and cluster size are a useful tool in the search for new catalysts.

  18. 离子液体/有机两相催化新进展%Recent Advances in Ionic liquid -organic Biphasic Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦国柱

    2012-01-01

    综述了近年来离子液体/有机两相均相催化的研究进展,重点介绍了基于氟硼酸根(BF4-)或氟磷酸根(PF6-)的咪唑类离子液体在均相催化加氢、氢甲酰化、齐聚、Heck反应中的应用,并对离子液体/有机两相催化工业应用的前景进行了探讨。%The development of ionic liquid - organic two - phasic catalysis was summerized, the applications of imid- azole class ionic liquid based were introduced with emphasis based on the fluoboric acid anion ( BF4- ) or the hexafluoro- phosphoric acid anion (PF6- ) in homogeneous catalysis hydrogenation, hydroformylation, oligomerization, Heek reaction, and the future applications of ionic liquid - organic biphasic catalysis in chemical industry were commented.

  19. Research progress on application of ionic liquid-organic biphasic catalysis%离子液体/有机两相催化应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉成; 王恒生; 程艳婷; 郭振美

    2011-01-01

    作者就近年来离子液体/有机两相催化在加氢、氢甲酰化、齐聚、Heck反应和羰基化反应中的研究进展进行了综述,重点介绍了基于氟硼酸根(BF4-)或氟磷酸根(PF6 -)的咪唑类离子液体在均相催化反应中的应用,并对离子液体/有机两相催化工业应用的前景进行了探讨.%This paper described the development of ionic liquid-organic biphasic catalysis in hydrogena-tion,hydroformylation,oligomerization, Heck reaction and carbonylation,introduced emphatically the applications of imidazole class ionic liquid based on the fluoboric acid anion (BF4- ) or the hexafluoro-phosphoric acid anion (PF6- ) in the homogeneous catalysis,and commented the future applications of ionic liquid-organic biphasic catalysis in chemical industry.

  20. Catalysis on cobalt oxide-based nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiran

    Heterogeneous catalysis, being the focus of attention in the realm of catalysis, plays a vital role in modern chemical and energy industries. A prototype of heterogeneous catalyst consists of metal nanoparticles dispersed and supported on a substrate. Transition metal oxide is one of the key components of heterogeneous catalyst and is frequently used as catalyst support for noble metal nanoparticle catalysts due to low cost. As a result of the high cost of noble metal elements, it is particularly favorable to design and develop transition metal oxide-based nanocatalysts mainly made of earthabundant elements with no or less noble metal with comparable or better catalytic performance than noble metal-based nanocatalysts in a catalytic reaction. In some cases, surface chemistry and structure of nanocatalysts are not invariable during catalysis. They evolve in terms of surface restructuring or phase change, which contributes to the complexity of catalyst surface under different catalytic conditions. Transition metal oxides, especially reducible transition metal oxides, have multiple cationic valence states and crystallographic structures. New catalytic active phases or sites could be formed upon surface restructuring under certain catalytic conditions while they may not be preserved if exposed to ambient conditions. Thus, it is essential to characterize catalyst surface under reaction conditions so that chemistry and structure of catalyst surface could be correlated with the corresponding catalytic performance. It also suggests a new route to design nanocatalysts through restructuring catalyst precursor under certain catalytic conditions tracked with in-situ analytical techniques. Catalysis occurs on catalyst surface. For noble metal nanoparticle catalysts, only atoms exposed on surface participate in catalytic processes, while atoms in bulk do not. In order to make full use of noble metal atoms, it is crucial to maximize the dispersion. A configuration of noble metal

  1. Sequential rhodium/palladium catalysis: enantioselective formation of dihydroquinolinones in the presence of achiral and chiral ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Qureshi, Zafar; Sonaglia, Lorenzo; Lautens, Mark

    2014-12-08

    Compatible combinations of achiral and chiral ligands can be used in rhodium/palladium catalysis to achieve highly enantioselective domino reactions. The difference in rates of catalysis and minimal effects of ligand interference confer control in the domino sequence. The "all-in-one" 1,4-conjugate arylation and C-N cross-coupling through sequential Rh/Pd catalysis provides access to enantioenriched dihydroquinolinone building blocks.

  2. Universality in heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Pedersen, Thomas Bligaard; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2002-01-01

    Based on an extensive set of density functional theory calculations it is shown that for a class of catalytic reactions there is a universal, reactant independent relation between the reaction activation energy and the stability of reaction intermediates. This leads directly to a universal relati...

  3. Atomic-level insights in optimizing reaction paths for hydroformylation reaction over Rh/CoO single-atom catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbing; Zhang, Wenbo; Wang, Shenpeng; Gao, Zehua; Luo, Zhiheng; Wang, Xu; Zeng, Rui; Li, Aowen; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Menglin; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Zhang, Wenhua; Ma, Chao; Si, Rui; Zeng, Jie

    2016-12-22

    Rh-based heterogeneous catalysts generally have limited selectivity relative to their homogeneous counterparts in hydroformylation reactions despite of the convenience of catalyst separation in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we develop CoO-supported Rh single-atom catalysts (Rh/CoO) with remarkable activity and selectivity towards propene hydroformylation. By increasing Rh mass loading, isolated Rh atoms switch to aggregated clusters of different atomicity. During the hydroformylation, Rh/CoO achieves the optimal selectivity of 94.4% for butyraldehyde and the highest turnover frequency number of 2,065 h(-1) among the obtained atomic-scale Rh-based catalysts. Mechanistic studies reveal that a structural reconstruction of Rh single atoms in Rh/CoO occurs during the catalytic process, facilitating the adsorption and activation of reactants. In kinetic view, linear products are determined as the dominating products by analysing reaction paths deriving from the two most stable co-adsorbed configurations. As a bridge of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, single-atom catalysts can be potentially applied in other industrial reactions.

  4. Atomic-level insights in optimizing reaction paths for hydroformylation reaction over Rh/CoO single-atom catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbing; Zhang, Wenbo; Wang, Shenpeng; Gao, Zehua; Luo, Zhiheng; Wang, Xu; Zeng, Rui; Li, Aowen; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Menglin; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Zhang, Wenhua; Ma, Chao; Si, Rui; Zeng, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Rh-based heterogeneous catalysts generally have limited selectivity relative to their homogeneous counterparts in hydroformylation reactions despite of the convenience of catalyst separation in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we develop CoO-supported Rh single-atom catalysts (Rh/CoO) with remarkable activity and selectivity towards propene hydroformylation. By increasing Rh mass loading, isolated Rh atoms switch to aggregated clusters of different atomicity. During the hydroformylation, Rh/CoO achieves the optimal selectivity of 94.4% for butyraldehyde and the highest turnover frequency number of 2,065 h-1 among the obtained atomic-scale Rh-based catalysts. Mechanistic studies reveal that a structural reconstruction of Rh single atoms in Rh/CoO occurs during the catalytic process, facilitating the adsorption and activation of reactants. In kinetic view, linear products are determined as the dominating products by analysing reaction paths deriving from the two most stable co-adsorbed configurations. As a bridge of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, single-atom catalysts can be potentially applied in other industrial reactions.

  5. A Survey Course in Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaates, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a 10-week survey course in catalysis for chemical engineering and chemistry students designed to show how modern chemistry and chemical engineering interact in the ongoing development of industrial catalysts. Includes course outline and instructional strategies. (Author/JN)

  6. THE KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF THE HOMOGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER REACTION BETWEEN FERRIC PORPHYRIN AND ASCORBIC ACID%卟啉铁与抗坏血酸均相电子转移反应的动力学和机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红霞; 任建国

    2001-01-01

    采用电子吸收光谱和光谱-电化学方法研究了中位-四(邻硝基苯基)四苯并卟啉的Fe(Ⅲ)配合物与抗坏血酸在DMF溶液中的均相电子转移反应的动力学和机理。结果表明此电子转移反应来源于抗坏血酸与铁卟啉中心铁离子的轴向配位作用,并将一个电子转移至铁离子。反应速率对铁卟啉和抗坏血酸均为一级,并与抗坏血酸的离解有关。%The kinetics and mechanism of the homogeneous electron transfer reaction between ascorbic acid and Fe(Ⅲ) coordination compound of meso-tetra (o-nitrophenyl) tetrabenzoporphyrin (abbr.Fe(Ⅲ)P) were studied by electron absorption spectrum and electrochemistry-spectrum.The results suggest that the electron transfer reaction between ascorbic acid and Fe(Ⅲ)P is associated with an axial coordination of ascorbic acid to the ionic iron in the Fe(Ⅲ)P,during which one electron transfers from ascorbic ion to ionic iron.The reaction orders with respect to both Fe(Ⅲ)P and ascorbic acid are unit,and the reaction rate is influenced by the ascorbic acid dissociation.

  7. Sustainable nano-catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel nano-catalyst system which bridges the homogenous and heterogeneous system is described that is cheaper, easily accessible (sustainable) and requires no need of catalyst filtration during the work-up. Because of its nano-size, i.e. high surface area, the contact between r...

  8. Gold Nanoparticle-Biological Molecule Interactions and Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Heddle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a brief summary of the field of gold nanoparticle interactions with biological molecules, particularly those with possible catalytic relevance. Gold nanoparticles are well known as catalysts in organic chemistry but much is unknown regarding their potential as catalysts of reactions involving biological molecules such as protein and nucleic acids. Biological molecules may be the substrate for catalysis or, if they are the ligand coating the gold particle, may be the catalyst itself. In other cases biological molecules may form a template upon which gold nanoparticles can be precisely arrayed. As relatively little is currently known about the catalytic capabilities of gold nanoparticles in this area, this review will consider templating in general (including, but not restricted to, those which result in structures having potential as catalysts before going on to consider firstly catalysis by the gold nanoparticle itself followed by catalysis by ligands attached to gold nanoparticles, all considered with a focus on biological molecules.

  9. Editorial: Nanoscience makes catalysis greener

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2012-01-09

    Green chemistry by nanocatalysis: Catalysis is a strategic field of science because it involves new ways of meeting energy and sustainability challenges. The concept of green chemistry, which makes the science of catalysis even more creative, has become an integral part of sustainability. This special issue is at the interface of green chemistry and nanocatalysis, and features excellent background articles as well as the latest research results. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Kinetic evolutionary behavior of catalysis-select migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yuan-Gang; Lin Zhen-Quan; Ke Jian-Hong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a catalysis-select migration driven evolution model of two-species (A- and B-species) aggregates,where one unit of species A migrates to species B under the catalysts of species C,while under the catalysts of species D the reaction will become one unit of species B migrating to species A.Meanwhile the catalyst aggregates of species C perform self-coagulation,as do the species D aggregates.We study this catalysis-select migration driven kinetic aggregation phenomena using the generalized Smoluchowski rate equation approach with C species catalysis-select migration rate kernel K(k;i,j) =Kkij and D species catalysis-select migration rate kernel J(k;i,j) =Jkij.The kinetic evolution behaviour is found to be dominated by the competition between the catalysis-select immigration and emigration,in which the competition is between JD0 and KC0 (D0 and C0 are the initial numbers of the monomers of species D and C,respectively).When JD0 - KC0 > 0,the aggregate size distribution of species A satisfies the conventional scaling form and that of species B satisfies a modified scaling form.And in the case of JDo - KCo < 0,species A and B exchange their aggregate size distributions as in the above JD0 - KC0 > 0 case.

  11. Highly Efficient Cooperative Catalysis by Co III (Porphyrin) Pairs in Interpenetrating Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zekai; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Wenbin (UC); (Xiamen)

    2016-12-02

    A series of porous twofold interpenetrated In-CoIII(porphyrin) metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) were constructed by in situ metalation of porphyrin bridging ligands and used as efficient cooperative catalysts for the hydration of terminal alkynes. The twofold interpenetrating structure brings adjacent CoIII(porphyrins) in the two networks parallel to each other with a distance of about 8.8 Å, an ideal distance for the simultaneous activation of both substrates in alkyne hydration reactions. As a result, the In-CoIII(porphyrin) MOFs exhibit much higher (up to 38 times) catalytic activity than either homogeneous catalysts or MOF controls with isolated CoIII(porphyrin) centers, thus highlighting the potential application of MOFs in cooperative catalysis.

  12. Mechanical catalysis on the centimetre scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Audretsch, Christof; Nagy, Zoltán; Füchslin, Rudolf M; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2015-03-06

    Enzymes play important roles in catalysing biochemical transaction paths, acting as logical machines through the morphology of the processes. A key challenge in elucidating the nature of these systems, and for engineering manufacturing methods inspired by biochemical reactions, is to attain a comprehensive understanding of the stereochemical ground rules of enzymatic reactions. Here, we present a model of catalysis that can be performed magnetically by centimetre-sized passive floating units. The designed system, which is equipped with permanent magnets only, passively obeys the local causalities imposed by magnetic interactions, albeit it shows a spatial behaviour and an energy profile analogous to those of biochemical enzymes. In this process, the enzyme units trigger physical conformation changes of the target by levelling out the magnetic potential barrier (activation potential) to a funnel type and, thus, induce cascading conformation changes of the targeted substrate units reacting in parallel. The inhibitor units, conversely, suppress such changes by increasing the potential. Because the model is purely mechanical and established on a physics basis in the absence of turbulence, each performance can be explained by the morphology of the unit, extending the definition of catalysis to systems of alternative scales.

  13. Switching between Anion-Binding Catalysis and Aminocatalysis with a Rotaxane Dual-Function Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichstaedt, Katarzyna; Jaramillo-Garcia, Javier; Leigh, David A; Marcos, Vanesa; Pisano, Simone; Singleton, Thomas A

    2017-07-12

    The "off" state for aminocatalysis by a switchable [2]rotaxane is shown to correspond to an "on" state for anion-binding catalysis. Conversely, the aminocatalysis "on" state of the dual-function rotaxane is inactive in anion-binding catalysis. Switching between the different states is achieved through the stimuli-induced change of position of the macrocycle on the rotaxane thread. The anion-binding catalysis results from a pair of triazolium groups that act together to CH-hydrogen-bond to halide anions when the macrocycle is located on an alternative (ammonium) binding site, stabilizing the in situ generation of benzhydryl cation and oxonium ion intermediates from activated alkyl halides. The aminocatalysis and anion-binding catalysis sites of the dual-function rotaxane catalyst can be sequentially concealed or revealed, enabling catalysis of both steps of a tandem reaction process.

  14. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and

  15. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  16. CATALYSIS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. ABRAMS; R. BAKER; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objectives were to develop a multidisciplinary team and capabilities to develop a fundamental understanding of homogeneous, heterogeneous, and heterogenized catalysts. With the aid of theoretical chemistry approaches we explored and characterized the chemical reactivity and physical properties of a large number of catalytic systems.

  17. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesotas Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  18. Effects of coupled homogeneous chemical reactions on the response of large-amplitude AC voltammetry: extraction of kinetic and mechanistic information by Fourier transform analysis of higher harmonic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Bullock, John P; Kennedy, Gareth F; Bond, Alan M

    2010-09-23

    Large-amplitude ac voltammograms contain a wealth of kinetic information concerning electrode processes and can provide unique mechanistic insights compared to other techniques. This paper describes the effects homogeneous chemical processes have on ac voltammetry in general and provides experimental examples using two well-known chemical systems: one simple and one complex. Oxidation of [Cp*Fe(CO)(2)](2) (Cp* = η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) in noncoordinating media is a reversible one-electron process; in the presence of nucleophiles, however, the resulting ligand-induced disproportionation changes the process to a multiple step regeneration. The chemical kinetic parameters of the regeneration mechanism were discerned via analysis of the third and higher harmonics of Fourier-transformed ac voltammetry data. Comparison of experimental data to digital simulations provides clear evidence that the reaction proceeds via a rapid pre-equilibrium between the electrogenerated monocation and the coordinating ligand; simultaneous fitting of the first nine harmonics indicates that k(f) = 7500 M(-1) s(-1) and k(r) = 100 s(-1), and that the unimolecular decomposition of the corresponding intermediate occurs with a rate constant of 2.2 s(-1). The rapid cis(+) → trans(+) isomerization of the electrogenerated cis-[W(CO)(2)(dpe)(2)](+), where dpe = 1,2-diphenylphosphinoethane, was examined to illustrate the effects of a simpler EC mechanism on the higher harmonics; a rate constant of 280 s(-1) was determined. These results not only shed new light on the chemistry of these systems, but provide a clear demonstration that the higher harmonics of ac voltammetry provide mechanistic insights into coupled homogeneous processes far more detailed than those that are readily accessible with dc techniques.

  19. The outer-coordination sphere: incorporating amino acids and peptides as ligands for homogeneous catalysts to mimic enzyme function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-09

    Great progress has been achieved in the field of homogeneous transition metal-based catalysis, however, as a general rule these solution based catalysts are still easily outperformed, both in terms of rates and selectivity, by their analogous enzyme counterparts, including structural mimics of the active site. This observation suggests that the features of the enzyme beyond the active site, i.e. the outer-coordination sphere, are important for their exceptional function. Directly mimicking the outer-coordination sphere requires the incorporation of amino acids and peptides as ligands for homogeneous catalysts. This effort has been attempted for many homogeneous catalysts which span the manifold of catalytic reactions and often require careful thought regarding solvent type, pH and characterization to avoid unwanted side reactions or catalyst decomposition. This article reviews the current capability of synthesizing and characterizing this often difficult category of metal-based catalysts. This work was funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Carbon mediated catalysis:A review on oxidative dehydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De Chen; Anders Holmen; Zhijun Sui; Xinggui Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Carbon mediated catalysis has gained an increasing attention in both areas of nanocatalysis and nanomaterials. The progress in carbon nanomaterials provides many new opportunities to manip-ulate the types and properties of active sites of catalysts through manipulating structures, function-alities and properties of carbon surfaces. The present review focuses on progresses in carbon medi-ated oxidative dehydrogenation reactions of ethylbenzene, propane, and butane. The state-of-the-art of the developments of carbon mediated catalysis is discussed in terms of fundamental studies on adsorption of oxygen and hydrocarbons, reaction mechanism as well as effects of carbon nano-material structures and surface functional groups on the catalytic performance. We highlight the importance and challenges in tuning of the electron density of carbon and oxygen on carbon surfac-es for improving selectivity in oxidative dehydrogenation reactions.

  1. Virtual Special Issue on Catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory; Sadow, Aaron D. [Ames Laboratory; Slowing, Igor I. [Ames Laboratory; Marshall, Christopher L. [Argonne National Laboratory; Stair, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Harris, Alex [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Somorjai, Gabor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Biener, Juergen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Matranga, Christopher [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Congjun [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Schaidle, Joshua A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Beckham, Gregg T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Ruddy, Daniel A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Deutsch, Todd [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Alia, Shaun M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Narula, Chaitanya [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Toops, Todd [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Bullock, R. Morris [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Peden, Charles H. F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Wang, Yong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Laboratory; Nørskov, Jens [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Bligaard, Thomas [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    2016-04-18

    Catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE's mission to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. The catalysis research carried out at the DOE National Laboratories ranges from very fundamental catalysis science, funded by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), to applied research and development (R&D) in areas such as biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, fuel cells, and vehicle emission control with primary funding from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  2. Accelerating Strain-Promoted Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Using Micellar Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Grant I; Bangerter, Alyssa S; Davis, Tyson C; Feng, Zhiyuan; Furtak, Aric J; Larsen, Jared O; Scroggin, Triniti L; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2015-08-19

    Bioorthogonal conjugation reactions such as strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) have become increasingly popular in recent years, as they enable site-specific labeling of complex biomolecules. However, despite a number of improvements to cyclooctyne design, reaction rates for SPAAC remain significantly lower than those of the related copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Here we explore micellar catalysis as a means to increase reaction rate between a cyclooctyne and hydrophobic azide. We find that anionic and cationic surfactants provide the most efficient catalysis, with rate enhancements of up to 179-fold for reaction of benzyl azide with DIBAC cyclooctyne. Additionally, we find that the presence of surfactant can provide up to 51-fold selectivity for reaction with a hydrophobic over hydrophilic azide. A more modest, but still substantial, 11-fold rate enhancement is observed for micellar catalysis of the reaction between benzyl azide and a DIBAC-functionalized DNA sequence, demonstrating that micellar catalysis can be successfully applied to hydrophilic biomolecules. Together, these results demonstrate that micellar catalysis can provide higher conjugation yields in reduced time when using hydrophobic SPAAC reagents.

  3. Self-assembly of amphiphilic janus particles into monolayer capsules for enhanced enzyme catalysis in organic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-14

    Encapsulation of enzymes during the creation of an emulsion is a simple and efficient route for enhancing enzyme catalysis in organic media. Herein, we report a capsule with a shell comprising a monolayer of silica Janus particles (JPs) (referred to as a monolayer capsule) and a Pickering emulsion for the encapsulation of enzyme molecules for catalysis purposes in organic media using amphiphilic silica JPs as building blocks. We demonstrate that the JP capsules had a monolayer shell consisting of closely packed silica JPs (270 nm). The capsules were on average 5-50 μm in diameter. The stability of the JP capsules (Pickering emulsion) was investigated with the use of homogeneous silica nanoparticles as a control. The results show that the emulsion stabilized via amphiphilic silica JPs presented no obvious changes in physical appearance after 15 days, indicating the high stability of the emulsions and JP capsules. Furthermore, the lipase from Candida sp. was chosen as a model enzyme for encapsulation within the JP capsules during their formation. The catalytic performance of lipase was evaluated according to the esterification of 1-hexanol with hexanoic acid. It was found that the specific activity of the encapsulated enzymes (28.7 U mL(-1)) was more than 5.6 times higher than that of free enzymes in a biphasic system (5.1 U mL(-1)). The enzyme activity was further increased by varying the volume ratio of water to oil and the JPs loadings. The enzyme-loaded capsule also exhibited high stability during the reaction process and good recyclability. In particular, the jellification of agarose in the JP capsules further enhanced their operating stability. We believe that the monolayer structure of the JP capsules, together with their high stability, rendered the capsules to be ideal enzyme carriers and microreactors for enzyme catalysis in organic media because they created a large interfacial area and had low mass transfer resistance through the monolayer shell.

  4. Selective catalysis utilizing bifunctionalized MCM-41 mesoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strosahl, Kasey Jean [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Selective catalysis is a field that has been under intense investigation for the last 100 years. The most widely used method involves catalysts with stereochemical selectivity. In this type of catalysis, the catalyst controls which reactants will be transformed into the desired product. The secret to employing this type of catalysis, though, is to design the proper catalyst, which can be difficult. One may spend as much time developing the catalyst as spent separating the various products achieved. Another method of selective catalysis is now being explored. The method involves utilizing a multifunctional mesoporous silica catalyst with a gate-keeping capability. Properly functionalized mesoporous materials with well-defined pore morphology and surface properties can provide an ideal three-dimensional environment for anchoring various homogeneous catalysts. These materials can circumvent the multi-sited two-dimensional nature most heterogeneous systems have without adversely impacting the reactant diffusivity. These single-site nanostructured catalysts with ordered geometrical structure are advantageous in achieving high selectivity and reactivity. Mesoporous materials can be prepared to include pores lined homogeneously with tethered catalysts via co-condensation. Additionally, these materials can be reacted with another (RO)3Si~Z group by using the traditional grafting method; this group is anchored predominantly at the entrances to the pores rather than inside the pores. Thus, if these ~Z groups are chosen properly, they can select certain molecules to enter the pores and be converted to products (Scheme 1). In such multifunctional catalysts, the selectivity depends on the discrimination of the gatekeeper. Gate-keeping MCM-41 materials are at the forefront of catalytic substances.

  5. New Perspectives on Thiamine Catalysis: From Enzymic to Biomimetic Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stamatis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief review of the detailed mechanism of action of thiamine enzymes, based on metal complexes of bivalent transition and post-transition metals of model compounds, thiamine derivatives, synthesized and characterized with spectroscopic techniques and X-ray crystal structure determinations. It is proposed that the enzymatic reaction is initiated with a V conformation of thiamine pyrophosphate, imposed by the enzymic environment. Thiamine pyrophosphate is linked with the proteinic substrate through its pyrophosphate oxygens. In the course of the reaction, the formation of the “active aldehyde” intermediate imposes the S conformation to thiamine, while a bivalent metal ion may be linked through the N1' site of the molecule, at this stage. Finally, the immobilization of thiamine and derivatives on silica has a dramatic effect on the decarboxylation of pyruvic acid, reducing the time of its conversion to acetaldehyde from 330 minutes for the homogeneous system to less than 5 minutes in the heterogenous system.

  6. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando-IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd-CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics.

  7. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Patrick L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  8. Recent advances in cooperative bimetallic asymmetric catalysis: dinuclear Schiff base complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2014-02-04

    Cooperative catalysis has proven to be a powerful strategy for realizing high reactivity and selectivity in asymmetric transformations. A variety of cooperative asymmetric catalysts have been developed over the last two decades. In this feature article, recent advances from our research on cooperative asymmetric catalysis, focusing on dinuclear Schiff base catalysis, are described. Design of dinuclear Schiff base catalysts and their applications in several asymmetric C-C and C-N bond-forming reactions under simple proton transfer conditions with perfect atom-economy are discussed in detail.

  9. Operando research in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Groot, Irene

    2017-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging field of techniques for visualizing atomic-scale properties of active catalysts under actual working conditions, i.e. high gas pressures and high temperatures. It explains how to understand these observations in terms of the surface structures and dynamics and their detailed interplay with the gas phase. This provides an important new link between fundamental surface physics and chemistry, and applied catalysis. The book explains the motivation and the necessity of operando studies, and positions these with respect to the more traditional low-pressure investigations on the one hand and the reality of industrial catalysis on the other. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of new experimental and theoretical tools for operando studies of heterogeneous catalysis. The book has a strong emphasis on the new techniques and illustrates how the challenges introduced by the harsh, operando conditions are faced for each of these new tools. Therefore, one can also read th...

  10. 2013 Gordon Research Conference, Inorganic reaction mechanisms, Galveston, TX, March 3-8 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Omar, Mahdi M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-12-08

    The 2013 Gordon Conference on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms will present cutting-edge research on the molecular aspects of inorganic reactions involving elements from throughout the periodic table and state-of-the art techniques that are used in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, metallobiochemistry, electron-transfer in energy reactions, polymerization, nitrogen fixation, green chemistry, oxidation, solar conversion, alkane functionalization, organotransition metal chemistry, and computational chemistry. The talks will cover themes of current interest including energy, materials, and bioinorganic chemistry. Sections cover: Electron-Transfer in Energy Reactions; Catalytic Polymerization and Oxidation Chemistry; Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Catalysts; Metal-Organic Chemistry and its Application in Synthesis; Green Energy Conversion;Organometallic Chemistry and Activation of Small Molecules; Advances in Kinetics Modeling and Green Chemistry; Metals in Biology and Disease; Frontiers in Catalytic Bond Activation and Cleavage.

  11. Porous metal-organic frameworks for heterogeneous biomimetic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Ou, Sha; Wu, Chuan-De

    2014-04-15

    Metalloporphyrins are the active sites in monooxygenases that oxidize a variety of substrates efficiently and under mild conditions. Researchers have developed artificial metalloporphyrins, but these structures have had limited catalytic applications. Homogeneous artificial metalloporphyrins can undergo catalytic deactivation via suicidal self-oxidation, which lowers their catalytic activity and sustainability relative to their counterparts in Nature. Heme molecules in protein scaffolds can maintain high efficiency over numerous catalytic cycles. Therefore, we wondered if immobilizing metalloporphyrin moieties within porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) could stabilize these structures and facilitate the molecular recognition of substrates and produce highly efficient biomimetic catalysis. In this Account, we describe our research to develop multifunctional porphyrinic frameworks as highly efficient heterogeneous biomimetic catalysts. Our studies indicate that porous porphyrinic frameworks provide an excellent platform for mimicking the activity of biocatalysts and developing new heterogeneous catalysts that effect new chemical transformations under mild conditions. The porous structures and framework topologies of the porphyrinic frameworks depend on the configurations, coordination donors, and porphyrin metal ions of the metalloporphyrin moieties. To improve the activity of porous porphyrinic frameworks, we have developed a two-step synthesis that introduces the functional polyoxometalates (POMs) into POM-porphyrin hybrid materials. To tune the pore structures and the catalytic properties of porphyrinic frameworks, we have designed metalloporphyrin M-H8OCPP ligands with four m-benzenedicarboxylate moieties, and introduced the secondary auxiliary ligands. The porphyrin metal ions and the secondary functional moieties that are incorporated into porous metal-organic frameworks greatly influence the catalytic properties and activities of porphyrinic frameworks in

  12. Switching on elusive organometallic mechanisms with photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrett, Jack A; Cuthbertson, James D; Shurtleff, Valerie W; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-08-20

    Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most used carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. Recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C-C bond-forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille, Kumada and Hiyama couplings. Despite the tremendous advances in C-C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C-O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C-O bond-forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. Here we demonstrate that visible-light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon-oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More notably, we have developed a general strategy to 'switch on' important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron-transfer catalysts.

  13. Catalysis and sustainable (green) chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centi, Gabriele; Perathoner, Siglinda [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale ed Ingegneria dei Materiali, University of Messina, Salita Sperone 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2003-01-15

    Catalysis is a key technology to achieve the objectives of sustainable (green) chemistry. After introducing the concepts of sustainable (green) chemistry and a brief assessment of new sustainable chemical technologies, the relationship between catalysis and sustainable (green) chemistry is discussed and illustrated via an analysis of some selected and relevant examples. Emphasis is also given to the concept of catalytic technologies for scaling-down chemical processes, in order to develop sustainable production processes which reduce the impact on the environment to an acceptable level that allows self-depuration processes of the living environment.

  14. Lifting locally homogeneous geometric structures

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We prove that under some purely algebraic conditions every locally homogeneous structure modelled on some homogeneous space is induced by a locally homogeneous structure modelled on a different homogeneous space.

  15. EMSL and Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC) Catalysis Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Charles T.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Lobo, Raul F.; Schneider, William F.; Spicer, Leonard D.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Vohs, John M.; Baer, Donald R.; Hoyt, David W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Mueller, Karl T.; Wang, Chong M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Teller, Raymond G.; Andersen, Amity; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Kabius, Bernd C.; Wang, Hongfei; Campbell, Allison A.; Shelton, William A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; King, David L.; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Mei, Donghai; Garrett, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia; DuBois, Daniel L.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Plata, Charity

    2011-05-24

    Within the context of significantly accelerating scientific progress in research areas that address important societal problems, a workshop was held in November 2010 at EMSL to identify specific and topically important areas of research and capability needs in catalysis-related science.

  16. EMSL and Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC) Catalysis Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Charles T.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Lobo, Raul F.; Schneider, William F.; Spicer, Leonard D.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Vohs, John M.; Baer, Donald R.; Hoyt, David W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Mueller, Karl T.; Wang, Chong M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Teller, Raymond G.; Andersen, Amity; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Kabius, Bernd C.; Wang, Hongfei; Campbell, Allison A.; Shelton, William A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; King, David L.; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Mei, Donghai; Garrett, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia; DuBois, Daniel L.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Plata, Charity

    2011-05-24

    Within the context of significantly accelerating scientific progress in research areas that address important societal problems, a workshop was held in November 2010 at EMSL to identify specific and topically important areas of research and capability needs in catalysis-related science.

  17. Functionality and homogeneity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Functionality and homogeneity are two of the five Sustainable Safety principles. The functionality principle aims for roads to have but one exclusive function and distinguishes between traffic function (flow) and access function (residence). The homogeneity principle aims at differences in mass, spe

  18. Functionality and homogeneity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Functionality and homogeneity are two of the five Sustainable Safety principles. The functionality principle aims for roads to have but one exclusive function and distinguishes between traffic function (flow) and access function (residence). The homogeneity principle aims at differences in mass, spe

  19. Oxime Catalysis by Freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Stijn M; Suylen, Dennis P L; Hackeng, Tilman M

    2016-01-20

    Chemical reaction rates are generally decreased at lower temperatures. Here, we report that an oxime ligation reaction in water at neutral pH is accelerated by freezing. The freezing method and its rate effect on oxime ligation are systematically studied on a peptide model system, and applied to a larger chemokine protein, containing a single acetyl butyrate group, which is conjugated to an aminooxy-labeled ligand. Our improved ligation protocol now makes it possible to efficiently introduce oxime-bond coupled ligands into proteins under aqueous conditions at low concentrations and neutral pH.

  20. Electrified magnetic catalysis in three-dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.; Sukhachov, P. O.

    2016-09-01

    The gap equations for the surface quasiparticle propagators in a slab of three-dimensional topological insulator in external electric and magnetic fields perpendicular to the slab surfaces are analyzed and solved. A different type of magnetic catalysis is revealed with the dynamical generation of both Haldane and Dirac gaps. Its characteristic feature manifests itself in the crucial role that the electric field plays in dynamical symmetry breaking and the generation of a Dirac gap in the slab. It is argued that, for a sufficiently large external electric field, the ground state of the system is a phase with a homogeneous surface charge density.