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Sample records for homodimeric atp-dependent chromatin-remodeling

  1. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

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    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  2. Functional delineation of three groups of the ATP-dependent family of chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyer, L.A.; Logie, C.; Bonte, E; Becker, P.B.; Wade, P.A.; Wolff, A.P.; Wu, C.; Imbalzano, A.N.; Peterson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes antagonize the inhibitory effects of chromatin. We compare six different remodeling complexes: ySWI/SNF, yRSC, hSWI/SNF, xMi-2, dCHRAC, and dNURF. We find that each complex uses similar amounts of ATP to remodel nucleosomal arrays at nearly identical rates.

  3. Phosphorylation of linker histones regulates ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, P.J.; Carruthers, L.M.; Logie, C.; Hill, D.A.; Solomon, M.J.; Wade, P.A.; Imbalzano, A.N.; Hansen, J.; Peterson, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Members of the ATP-dependent family of chromatin remodeling enzymes play key roles in the regulation of transcription, development, DNA repair and cell cycle control. We find that the remodeling activities of the ySWI/SNF, hSWI/SNF, xMi-2 and xACF complexes are nearly abolished by incorporation of

  4. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

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    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  5. De Novo Mutations in CHD4, an ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeler Gene, Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome with Distinctive Dysmorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, Karin; Terhal, Paulien A; Cohen, Lior; Bruccoleri, Michael; Irving, Melita; Martinez, Ariel F; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Machol, Keren; Yang, Yaping; Liu, Pengfei; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Beuten, Joke; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Haude, Katrina; Fong, Chin-To; Enns, Gregory M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Fan, Judith; Gotway, Garrett; Ghorbani, Mohammad; van Gassen, Koen; Monroe, Glen R; van Haaften, Gijs; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Campeau, Philippe M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Also known as Mi2β, CHD4 is an integral subunit of a well-characterized histone deacetylase complex. Here we

  6. De Novo Mutations in CHD4, an ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeler Gene, Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome with Distinctive Dysmorphisms.

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    Weiss, Karin; Terhal, Paulien A; Cohen, Lior; Bruccoleri, Michael; Irving, Melita; Martinez, Ariel F; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Machol, Keren; Yang, Yaping; Liu, Pengfei; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Beuten, Joke; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Haude, Katrina; Fong, Chin-To; Enns, Gregory M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Fan, Judith; Gotway, Garrett; Ghorbani, Mohammad; van Gassen, Koen; Monroe, Glen R; van Haaften, Gijs; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Campeau, Philippe M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-10-06

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Also known as Mi2β, CHD4 is an integral subunit of a well-characterized histone deacetylase complex. Here we report five individuals with de novo missense substitutions in CHD4 identified through whole-exome sequencing and web-based gene matching. These individuals have overlapping phenotypes including developmental delay, intellectual disability, hearing loss, macrocephaly, distinct facial dysmorphisms, palatal abnormalities, ventriculomegaly, and hypogonadism as well as additional findings such as bone fusions. The variants, c.3380G>A (p.Arg1127Gln), c.3443G>T (p.Trp1148Leu), c.3518G>T (p.Arg1173Leu), and c.3008G>A, (p.Gly1003Asp) (GenBank: NM_001273.3), affect evolutionarily highly conserved residues and are predicted to be deleterious. Previous studies in yeast showed the equivalent Arg1127 and Trp1148 residues to be crucial for SNF2 function. Furthermore, mutations in the same positions were reported in malignant tumors, and a de novo missense substitution in an equivalent arginine residue in the C-terminal helicase domain of SMARCA4 is associated with Coffin Siris syndrome. Cell-based studies of the p.Arg1127Gln and p.Arg1173Leu mutants demonstrate normal localization to the nucleus and HDAC1 interaction. Based on these findings, the mutations potentially alter the complex activity but not its formation. This report provides evidence for the role of CHD4 in human development and expands an increasingly recognized group of Mendelian disorders involving chromatin remodeling and modification. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Chromatin Remodeling and Plant Immunity.

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    Chen, W; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y; Zhang, Q

    Chromatin remodeling, an important facet of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, is performed by two major types of multisubunit complexes, covalent histone- or DNA-modifying complexes, and ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes. Snf2 family DNA-dependent ATPases constitute the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes, which accounts for energy supply during chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates a critical role of chromatin remodeling in the establishment of long-lasting, even transgenerational immune memory in plants, which is supported by the findings that DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and histone methylation can prime the promoters of immune-related genes required for disease defense. So what are the links between Snf2-mediated ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling and plant immunity, and what mechanisms might support its involvement in disease resistance? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromatin remodeling, development and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Myunggon; Sohn, Dong H.; Chung, Heekyoung; Seong, Rho H.

    2008-01-01

    Development is a stepwise process in which multi-potent progenitor cells undergo lineage commitment, differentiation, proliferation and maturation to produce mature cells with restricted developmental potentials. This process is directed by spatiotemporally distinct gene expression programs that allow cells to stringently orchestrate intricate transcriptional activation or silencing events. In eukaryotes, chromatin structure contributes to developmental progression as a blueprint for coordinated gene expression by actively participating in the regulation of gene expression. Changes in higher order chromatin structure or covalent modification of its components are considered to be critical events in dictating lineage-specific gene expression during development. Mammalian cells utilize multi-subunit nuclear complexes to alter chromatin structure. Histone-modifying complex catalyzes covalent modifications of histone tails including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex, which disrupts histone-DNA contacts and induces nucleosome mobilization, requires energy from ATP hydrolysis for its catalytic activity. Here, we discuss the diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes during mammalian development. In particular, the roles of these complexes during embryonic and hematopoietic development are reviewed in depth. In addition, pathological conditions such as tumor development that are induced by mutation of several key subunits of the chromatin remodeling complex are discussed, together with possible mechanisms that underlie tumor suppression by the complex

  9. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle

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    Murawska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by “opening” or “closing” chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but also are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts. PMID:22223048

  10. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) promoter targeting through a novel chromatin remodeling complex.

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    Kato, Shigeaki; Fujiki, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Hirochika

    2004-05-01

    We have purified nuclear complexes for Vitamin D receptor (VDR), and identified one of them as a novel ATP-dependent chromatine remodeling containing Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF), that is supposed to be responsible for Williams syndrome. This complex (WSTF including nucleosome assembly complex (WINAC)) exhibited an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity in vitro. Transient expression assays revealed that WINAC potentiates ligand-induced function of VDR in gene activation and repression. Thus, this study describes a molecular basis of the VDR function on chromosomal DNA through chromatine remodeling.

  11. A Functional Switch of NuRD Chromatin Remodeling Complex Subunits Regulates Mouse Cortical Development

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    Justyna Nitarska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications and chromatin remodeling represent universal mechanisms by which cells adapt their transcriptional response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Extensive chromatin remodeling takes place during neuronal development, allowing the transition of pluripotent cells into differentiated neurons. Here, we report that the NuRD complex, which couples ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling with histone deacetylase activity, regulates mouse brain development. Subunit exchange of CHDs, the core ATPase subunits of the NuRD complex, is required for distinct aspects of cortical development. Whereas CHD4 promotes the early proliferation of progenitors, CHD5 facilitates neuronal migration and CHD3 ensures proper layer specification. Inhibition of each CHD leads to defects of neuronal differentiation and migration, which cannot be rescued by expressing heterologous CHDs. Finally, we demonstrate that NuRD complexes containing specific CHDs are recruited to regulatory elements and modulate the expression of genes essential for brain development.

  12. DNA repair goes hip-hop: SMARCA and CHD chromatin remodellers join the break dance.

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    Rother, Magdalena B; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-10-05

    Proper signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical to prevent genome instability and diseases such as cancer. The packaging of DNA into chromatin, however, has evolved as a mere obstacle to these DSB responses. Posttranslational modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling help to overcome this barrier by modulating nucleosome structures and allow signalling and repair machineries access to DSBs in chromatin. Here we recap our current knowledge on how ATP-dependent SMARCA- and CHD-type chromatin remodellers alter chromatin structure during the signalling and repair of DSBs and discuss how their dysfunction impacts genome stability and human disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

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    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  14. The Latest Twists in Chromatin Remodeling.

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    Blossey, Ralf; Schiessel, Helmut

    2018-01-05

    In its most restrictive interpretation, the notion of chromatin remodeling refers to the action of chromatin-remodeling enzymes on nucleosomes with the aim of displacing and removing them from the chromatin fiber (the effective polymer formed by a DNA molecule and proteins). This local modification of the fiber structure can have consequences for the initiation and repression of the transcription process, and when the remodeling process spreads along the fiber, it also results in long-range effects essential for fiber condensation. There are three regulatory levels of relevance that can be distinguished for this process: the intrinsic sequence preference of the histone octamer, which rules the positioning of the nucleosome along the DNA, notably in relation to the genetic information coded in DNA; the recognition or selection of nucleosomal substrates by remodeling complexes; and, finally, the motor action on the nucleosome exerted by the chromatin remodeler. Recent work has been able to provide crucial insights at each of these three levels that add new twists to this exciting and unfinished story, which we highlight in this perspective. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  16. The ISWI chromatin remodeler organizes the hsrω ncRNA-containing omega speckle nuclear compartments.

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    Maria C Onorati

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity in composition and function of the eukaryotic nucleus is achieved through its organization in specialized nuclear compartments. The Drosophila chromatin remodeling ATPase ISWI plays evolutionarily conserved roles in chromatin organization. Interestingly, ISWI genetically interacts with the hsrω gene, encoding multiple non-coding RNAs (ncRNA essential, among other functions, for the assembly and organization of the omega speckles. The nucleoplasmic omega speckles play important functions in RNA metabolism, in normal and stressed cells, by regulating availability of hnRNPs and some other RNA processing proteins. Chromatin remodelers, as well as nuclear speckles and their associated ncRNAs, are emerging as important components of gene regulatory networks, although their functional connections have remained poorly defined. Here we provide multiple lines of evidence showing that the hsrω ncRNA interacts in vivo and in vitro with ISWI, regulating its ATPase activity. Remarkably, we found that the organization of nucleoplasmic omega speckles depends on ISWI function. Our findings highlight a novel role for chromatin remodelers in organization of nucleoplasmic compartments, providing the first example of interaction between an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler and a large ncRNA.

  17. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

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    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  18. The ATRX syndrome protein forms a chromatin-remodeling complex with Daxx and localizes in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies.

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    Xue, Yutong; Gibbons, Richard; Yan, Zhijiang; Yang, Dafeng; McDowell, Tarra L; Sechi, Salvatore; Qin, Jun; Zhou, Sharleen; Higgs, Doug; Wang, Weidong

    2003-09-16

    ATRX syndrome is characterized by X-linked mental retardation associated with alpha-thalassemia. The gene mutated in this disease, ATRX, encodes a plant homeodomain-like finger and a SWI2/SNF2-like ATPase motif, both of which are often found in chromatin-remodeling enzymes, but ATRX has not been characterized biochemically. By immunoprecipitation from HeLa extract, we found that ATRX is in a complex with transcription cofactor Daxx. The following evidence supports that ATRX and Daxx are components of an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex: (i) Daxx and ATRX can be coimmunoisolated by antibodies specific for each protein; (ii) a proportion of Daxx cofractionates with ATRX as a complex of 1 MDa by gel-filtration analysis; (iii) in extract from cells of a patient with ATRX syndrome, the level of the Daxx-ATRX complex is correspondingly reduced; (iv) a proportion of ATRX and Daxx colocalize in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, with which Daxx had previously been located; and (v) the ATRX complex displays ATP-dependent activities that resemble those of other chromatin-remodeling complexes, including triple-helix DNA displacement and alteration of mononucleosome disruption patterns. But unlike the previously described SWI/SNF or NURD complexes, the ATRX complex does not randomize DNA phasing of the mononucleosomes, suggesting that it may remodel chromatin differently. Taken together, the results suggest that ATRX functions in conjunction with Daxx in a novel chromatin-remodeling complex. The defects in ATRX syndrome may result from inappropriate expression of genes controlled by this complex.

  19. Chromatin Remodeling Proteins in Epilepsy: Lessons From CHD2-Associated Epilepsy

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    Kay-Marie J. Lamar

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD family of proteins are ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers that contribute to the reorganization of chromatin structure and deposition of histone variants necessary to regulate gene expression. CHD proteins play an important role in neurodevelopment, as pathogenic variants in CHD1, CHD2, CHD4, CHD7 and CHD8 have been associated with a range of neurological phenotypes, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD, intellectual disability (ID and epilepsy. Pathogenic variants in CHD2 are associated with developmental epileptic encephalopathy (DEE in humans, however little is known about how these variants contribute to this disorder. Of the nine CHD family members, CHD2 is the only one that leads to a brain-restricted phenotype when disrupted in humans. This suggests that despite being expressed ubiquitously, CHD2 has a unique role in human brain development and function. In this review, we will discuss the phenotypic spectrum of patients with pathogenic variants in CHD2, current animal models of CHD2 deficiency, and the role of CHD2 in proliferation, neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation, chromatin remodeling and DNA-repair. We also consider how CHD2 depletion can affect each of these biological mechanisms and how these defects may underpin neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy.

  20. DAF-16 employs the chromatin remodeller SWI/SNF to promote stress resistance and longevity.

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    Riedel, Christian G; Dowen, Robert H; Lourenco, Guinevere F; Kirienko, Natalia V; Heimbucher, Thomas; West, Jason A; Bowman, Sarah K; Kingston, Robert E; Dillin, Andrew; Asara, John M; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-05-01

    Organisms are constantly challenged by stresses and privations and require adaptive responses for their survival. The forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor DAF-16 (hereafter referred to as DAF-16/FOXO) is a central nexus in these responses, but despite its importance little is known about how it regulates its target genes. Proteomic identification of DAF-16/FOXO-binding partners in Caenorhabditis elegans and their subsequent functional evaluation by RNA interference revealed several candidate DAF-16/FOXO cofactors, most notably the chromatin remodeller SWI/SNF. DAF-16/FOXO and SWI/SNF form a complex and globally co-localize at DAF-16/FOXO target promoters. We show that specifically for gene activation, DAF-16/FOXO depends on SWI/SNF, facilitating SWI/SNF recruitment to target promoters, to activate transcription by presumed remodelling of local chromatin. For the animal, this translates into an essential role for SWI/SNF in DAF-16/FOXO-mediated processes, in particular dauer formation, stress resistance and the promotion of longevity. Thus, we give insight into the mechanisms of DAF-16/FOXO-mediated transcriptional regulation and establish a critical link between ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling and lifespan regulation.

  1. DAF-16/FOXO employs the chromatin remodeller SWI/SNF to promote stress resistance and longevity

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    Riedel, Christian G.; Dowen, Robert H.; Lourenco, Guinevere F.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Heimbucher, Thomas; West, Jason A.; Bowman, Sarah K.; Kingston, Robert E.; Dillin, Andrew; Asara, John M.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Organisms are constantly challenged by stresses and privations and require adaptive responses for their survival. The transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO is central nexus in these responses, but despite its importance little is known about how it regulates its target genes. Proteomic identification of DAF-16/FOXO binding partners in Caenorhabditis elegans and their subsequent functional evaluation by RNA interference (RNAi) revealed several candidate DAF-16/FOXO cofactors, most notably the chromatin remodeller SWI/SNF. DAF-16/FOXO and SWI/SNF form a complex and globally colocalize at DAF-16/FOXO target promoters. We show that specifically for gene-activation, DAF-16/FOXO depends on SWI/SNF, facilitating SWI/SNF recruitment to target promoters, in order to activate transcription by presumed remodelling of local chromatin. For the animal, this translates into an essential role of SWI/SNF for DAF-16/FOXO-mediated processes, i.e. dauer formation, stress resistance, and the promotion of longevity. Thus we give insight into the mechanisms of DAF-16/FOXO-mediated transcriptional regulation and establish a critical link between ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling and lifespan regulation. PMID:23604319

  2. Chromatin remodelling: the industrial revolution of DNA around histones.

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    Saha, Anjanabha; Wittmeyer, Jacqueline; Cairns, Bradley R

    2006-06-01

    Chromatin remodellers are specialized multi-protein machines that enable access to nucleosomal DNA by altering the structure, composition and positioning of nucleosomes. All remodellers have a catalytic ATPase subunit that is similar to known DNA-translocating motor proteins, suggesting DNA translocation as a unifying aspect of their mechanism. Here, we explore the diversity and specialization of chromatin remodellers, discuss how nucleosome modifications regulate remodeller activity and consider a model for the exposure of nucleosomal DNA that involves the use of directional DNA translocation to pump 'DNA waves' around the nucleosome.

  3. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling factors BAF60a, b, and c in nutrient signaling and metabolic control

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    Ruo-Ran Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Metabolic syndrome has become a global epidemic that adversely affects human health. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders; however, the mechanisms that integrate these cues to regulate metabolic physiology and the development of metabolic disorders remain incompletely defined. Emerging evidence suggests that SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are critical for directing metabolic reprogramming and adaptation in response to nutritional and other physiological signals. The ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes comprise up to 11 subunits, among which the BAF60 subunit serves as a key link between the core complexes and specific transcriptional factors. The BAF60 subunit has three members, BAF60a, b, and c. The distinct tissue distribution patterns and regulatory mechanisms of BAF60 proteins confer each isoform with specialized functions in different metabolic cell types. In this review, we summarize the emerging roles and mechanisms of BAF60 proteins in the regulation of nutrient sensing and energy metabolism under physiological and disease conditions.

  4. Chromatin Remodeling BAF (SWI/SNF Complexes in Neural Development and Disorders

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    Godwin Sokpor

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-dependent BRG1/BRM associated factor (BAF chromatin remodeling complexes are crucial in regulating gene expression by controlling chromatin dynamics. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that during neural development in mammals, distinct ontogenetic stage-specific BAF complexes derived from combinatorial assembly of their subunits are formed in neural progenitors and post-mitotic neural cells. Proper functioning of the BAF complexes plays critical roles in neural development, including the establishment and maintenance of neural fates and functionality. Indeed, recent human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have revealed that mutations in BAF complex subunits are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, Kleefstra's syndrome spectrum, Hirschsprung's disease, autism spectrum disorder, and schizophrenia. In this review, we focus on the latest insights into the functions of BAF complexes during neural development and the plausible mechanistic basis of how mutations in known BAF subunits are associated with certain neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. Chromatin Remodeling BAF (SWI/SNF) Complexes in Neural Development and Disorders

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    Sokpor, Godwin; Xie, Yuanbin; Rosenbusch, Joachim; Tuoc, Tran

    2017-01-01

    The ATP-dependent BRG1/BRM associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complexes are crucial in regulating gene expression by controlling chromatin dynamics. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that during neural development in mammals, distinct ontogenetic stage-specific BAF complexes derived from combinatorial assembly of their subunits are formed in neural progenitors and post-mitotic neural cells. Proper functioning of the BAF complexes plays critical roles in neural development, including the establishment and maintenance of neural fates and functionality. Indeed, recent human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have revealed that mutations in BAF complex subunits are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, Kleefstra's syndrome spectrum, Hirschsprung's disease, autism spectrum disorder, and schizophrenia. In this review, we focus on the latest insights into the functions of BAF complexes during neural development and the plausible mechanistic basis of how mutations in known BAF subunits are associated with certain neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28824374

  6. Chromatin Remodeling BAF (SWI/SNF) Complexes in Neural Development and Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokpor, Godwin; Xie, Yuanbin; Rosenbusch, Joachim; Tuoc, Tran

    2017-01-01

    The ATP-dependent BRG1/BRM associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complexes are crucial in regulating gene expression by controlling chromatin dynamics. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that during neural development in mammals, distinct ontogenetic stage-specific BAF complexes derived from combinatorial assembly of their subunits are formed in neural progenitors and post-mitotic neural cells. Proper functioning of the BAF complexes plays critical roles in neural development, including the establishment and maintenance of neural fates and functionality. Indeed, recent human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have revealed that mutations in BAF complex subunits are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, Kleefstra's syndrome spectrum, Hirschsprung's disease, autism spectrum disorder, and schizophrenia. In this review, we focus on the latest insights into the functions of BAF complexes during neural development and the plausible mechanistic basis of how mutations in known BAF subunits are associated with certain neurodevelopmental disorders.

  7. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and histone binding by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription coupling factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the

  8. Circadian expression profiles of chromatin remodeling factor genes in Arabidopsis.

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    Lee, Hong Gil; Lee, Kyounghee; Jang, Kiyoung; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a biological time keeper mechanism that regulates biological rhythms to a period of approximately 24 h. The circadian clock enables organisms to anticipate environmental cycles and coordinates internal cellular physiology with external environmental cues. In plants, correct matching of the clock with the environment confers fitness advantages to plant survival and reproduction. Therefore, circadian clock components are regulated at multiple layers to fine-tune the circadian oscillation. Epigenetic regulation provides an additional layer of circadian control. However, little is known about which chromatin remodeling factors are responsible for circadian control. In this work, we analyzed circadian expression of 109 chromatin remodeling factor genes and identified 17 genes that display circadian oscillation. In addition, we also found that a candidate interacts with a core clock component, supporting that clock activity is regulated in part by chromatin modification. As an initial attempt to elucidate the relationship between chromatin modification and circadian oscillation, we identified novel regulatory candidates that provide a platform for future investigations of chromatin regulation of the circadian clock.

  9. Epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodeling in learning and memory.

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    Kim, Somi; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2017-01-13

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of memory formation and maintenance has been a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Memory formation and maintenance are tightly controlled complex processes. Among the various processes occurring at different levels, gene expression regulation is especially crucial for proper memory processing, as some genes need to be activated while some genes must be suppressed. Epigenetic regulation of the genome involves processes such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational modifications. These processes edit genomic properties or the interactions between the genome and histone cores. They then induce structural changes in the chromatin and lead to transcriptional changes of different genes. Recent studies have focused on the concept of chromatin remodeling, which consists of 3D structural changes in chromatin in relation to gene regulation, and is an important process in learning and memory. In this review, we will introduce three major epigenetic processes involved in memory regulation: DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation. We will also discuss general mechanisms of long-term memory storage and relate the epigenetic control of learning and memory to chromatin remodeling. Finally, we will discuss how epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to the pathologies of neurological disorders and cause memory-related symptoms.

  10. INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Coordinates Metabolic Homeostasis with Cell Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme J. Gowans

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive survival requires the coordination of nutrient availability with expenditure of cellular resources. For example, in nutrient-limited environments, 50% of all S. cerevisiae genes synchronize and exhibit periodic bursts of expression in coordination with respiration and cell division in the yeast metabolic cycle (YMC. Despite the importance of metabolic and proliferative synchrony, the majority of YMC regulators are currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex is required to coordinate respiration and cell division with periodic gene expression. Specifically, INO80 mutants have severe defects in oxygen consumption and promiscuous cell division that is no longer coupled with metabolic status. In mutant cells, chromatin accessibility of periodic genes, including TORC1-responsive genes, is relatively static, concomitant with severely attenuated gene expression. Collectively, these results reveal that the INO80 complex mediates metabolic signaling to chromatin to restrict proliferation to metabolically optimal states.

  11. Assembly of the Arp5 (Actin-related Protein) Subunit Involved in Distinct INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Activities*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei; Beckwith, Sean L.; Zheng, Tina; Young, Thomas; Dinh, Van T.; Ranjan, Anand; Morrison, Ashby J.

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, which repositions and restructures nucleosomes, is essential to all DNA-templated processes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is an evolutionarily conserved complex involved in diverse cellular processes, including transcription, DNA repair, and replication. The functional diversity of the INO80 complex can, in part, be attributed to specialized activities of distinct subunits that compose the complex. Furthermore, structural analyses have identified biochemically discrete subunit modules that assemble along the Ino80 ATPase scaffold. Of particular interest is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arp5-Ies6 module located proximal to the Ino80 ATPase and the Rvb1-Rvb2 helicase module needed for INO80-mediated in vitro activity. In this study we demonstrate that the previously uncharacterized Ies2 subunit is required for Arp5-Ies6 association with the catalytic components of the INO80 complex. In addition, Arp5-Ies6 module assembly with the INO80 complex is dependent on distinct conserved domains within Arp5, Ies6, and Ino80, including the spacer region within the Ino80 ATPase domain. Arp5-Ies6 interacts with chromatin via assembly with the INO80 complex, as IES2 and INO80 deletion results in loss of Arp5-Ies6 chromatin association. Interestingly, ectopic addition of the wild-type Arp5-Ies6 module stimulates INO80-mediated ATP hydrolysis and nucleosome sliding in vitro. However, the addition of mutant Arp5 lacking unique insertion domains facilitates ATP hydrolysis in the absence of nucleosome sliding. Collectively, these results define the requirements of Arp5-Ies6 assembly, which are needed to couple ATP hydrolysis to productive nucleosome movement. PMID:26306040

  12. Dysregulation of chromatin remodelling complexes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibshirani, Michael; Zhao, Beibei; Gentil, Benoit J; Minotti, Sandra; Marques, Christine; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rouaux, Caroline; Robertson, Janice; Durham, Heather D

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with paralysis resulting from dysfunction and loss of motor neurons. A common neuropathological finding is attrition of motor neuron dendrites, which make central connections vital to motor control. The chromatin remodelling complex, neuronal Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1)-associated factor complex (nBAF), is critical for neuronal differentiation, dendritic extension and synaptic function. We have identified loss of the crucial nBAF subunits Brg1, Brg1-associated factor 53b and calcium responsive transactivator in cultured motor neurons expressing FUS or TAR-DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) mutants linked to familial ALS. When plasmids encoding wild-type or mutant human FUS or TDP-43 were expressed in motor neurons of dissociated spinal cord cultures prepared from E13 mice, mutant proteins in particular accumulated in the cytoplasm. Immunolabelling of nBAF subunits was reduced in proportion to loss of nuclear FUS or TDP-43 and depletion of Brg1 was associated with nuclear retention of Brg1 mRNA. Dendritic attrition (loss of intermediate and terminal dendritic branches) occurred in motor neurons expressing mutant, but not wild-type, FUS or TDP-43. This attrition was delayed by ectopic over-expression of Brg1 and was reproduced by inhibiting Brg1 activity either through genetic manipulation or treatment with the chemical inhibitor, (E)-1-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-3-((1R, 4R)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2, 5-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one, demonstrating the importance of Brg1 to maintenance of dendritic architecture. Loss of nBAF subunits was also documented in spinal motor neurons in autopsy tissue from familial amyotrophic sclerosis (chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 with G4C2 nucleotide expansion) and from sporadic cases with no identified mutation, pointing to dysfunction of nBAF chromatin remodelling in multiple forms of ALS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  13. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain......-macrodomain interactions, promotes an ungated conformation, and activates the remodeler's ATPase. ALC1 fragments lacking the regulatory macrodomain relax chromatin in vivo without requiring PARP1 activation. Further, the ATPase restricts the macrodomain's interaction with PARP1 under non-DNA damage conditions. Somatic...... cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD+-metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation....

  14. NoRC - a novel member of mammalian ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling machines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strohner, R.; Nemeth, A.; Jansa, Petr; Hofmann-Rohrer, U.; Santoro, R.; Langst, G.; Grummt, I.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 17 (2001), s. 4892-4900 ISSN 0261-4189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : Acf1 * chromatin remodeling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 12.450, year: 2001

  15. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  16. CHD8, A Novel Beta-Catenin Associated Chromatin Remodeling Enzyme, Regulates Androgen Receptor Mediated Gene Transcription

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bochar, Daniel A

    2008-01-01

    .... To better understand the function of beta-catenin in AR mediated transcription, we have identified a novel chromatin remodeling enzyme, CHD8, that can associate with beta-catenin and functions in AR...

  17. Mutation of neuron-specific chromatin remodeling subunit BAF53b : rescue of plasticity and memory by manipulating actin remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel Ciernia, Annie; Kramár, Enikö A; Matheos, Dina P; Havekes, Robbert; Hemstedt, Thekla J; Magnan, Christophe N; Sakata, Keith; Tran, Ashley; Azzawi, Soraya; Lopez, Alberto; Dang, Richard; Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian; Tong, Joyce; Barrett, Ruth M; Post, Rebecca J; Baldi, Pierre; Abel, Ted; Lynch, Gary; Wood, Marcelo A

    Recent human exome-sequencing studies have implicated polymorphic Brg1-associated factor (BAF) complexes (mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes) in several intellectual disabilities and cognitive disorders, including autism. However, it remains unclear how mutations in BAF complexes

  18. Haploinsufficiency of the Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Causes Syndromic Developmental and Speech Delay, Postnatal Microcephaly, and Dysmorphic Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stankiewicz, P.; Khan, T.N.; Szafranski, P.; Slattery, L.; Streff, H.; Vetrini, F.; Bernstein, J.A.; Brown, C.W.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Rednam, S.; Scollon, S.; Bergstrom, K.L.; Parsons, D.W.; Plon, S.E.; Vieira, M.W.; Quaio, C.; Baratela, W.A.R.; Guio, J.C.A.; Armstrong, R.; Mehta, S.G.; Rump, P.; Pfundt, R.P.; Lewandowski, R.; Fernandes, E.M.; Shinde, D.N.; Tang, S.; Hoyer, J.; Zweier, C.; Reis, A.; Bacino, C.A.; Xiao, R.; Breman, A.M.; Smith, J.L.; Katsanis, N.; Bostwick, B.; Popp, B.; Davis, E.E.; Yang, Y

    2017-01-01

    Bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF) is the largest subunit of nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF), a member of the ISWI chromatin-remodeling complex. However, the clinical consequences of disruption of this complex remain largely uncharacterized. BPTF is required for

  19. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R; Knobloch, Gunnar; Kistemaker, Hans A V; Hassler, Markus; Harrer, Nadine; Blessing, Charlotte; Eustermann, Sebastian; Kotthoff, Christiane; Huet, Sébastien; Mueller-Planitz, Felix; Filippov, Dmitri V; Timinszky, Gyula; Rand, Kasper D; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2017-12-07

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain with the ATPase module mediates auto-inhibition. PARP1 activation suppresses this inhibitory interaction. Crucially, release from auto-inhibition requires a poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) binding macrodomain. We identify tri-ADP-ribose as a potent PAR-mimic and synthetic allosteric effector that abrogates ATPase-macrodomain interactions, promotes an ungated conformation, and activates the remodeler's ATPase. ALC1 fragments lacking the regulatory macrodomain relax chromatin in vivo without requiring PARP1 activation. Further, the ATPase restricts the macrodomain's interaction with PARP1 under non-DNA damage conditions. Somatic cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD + -metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Modeling of GR Interactions with the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex and C/EBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muratcioglu, Serena; Presman, Diego M; Pooley, John R

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a steroid-hormone-activated transcription factor that modulates gene expression. Transcriptional regulation by the GR requires dynamic receptor binding to specific target sites located across the genome. This binding remodels the chromatin structure to allow...... interaction with other transcription factors. Thus, chromatin remodeling is an essential component of GR-mediated transcriptional regulation, and understanding the interactions between these molecules at the structural level provides insights into the mechanisms of how GR and chromatin remodeling cooperate...

  1. MRN1 implicates chromatin remodeling complexes and architectural factors in mRNA maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6¿¿ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin....... Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309¿, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing....

  2. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor 'hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam

    2011-01-01

    hypersensitive site analysis to investigate the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that accompany the binding of adipogenic transcription factors. These analyses revealed a dramatic and dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during the first hours of adipocyte differentiation that coincides...... and chromatin remodelling and is required for their establishment. Furthermore, a subset of early remodelled C/EBP-binding sites persists throughout differentiation and is later occupied by PPARγ, indicating that early C/EBP family members, in addition to their well-established role in activation of PPARγ...

  3. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Activates a Stemness Gene-Expression Program Essential for the Maintenance of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells are tightly regulated partly through configuration of chromatin structure by chromatin remodelers. Using knockout mice, we here demonstrate that bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF, a component of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF chromatin-remodeling complex, is essential for maintaining the population size of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, including long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Bptf-deficient HSCs are defective in reconstituted hematopoiesis, and hematopoietic-specific knockout of Bptf caused profound defects including bone marrow failure and anemia. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that BPTF loss caused downregulation of HSC-specific gene-expression programs, which contain several master transcription factors (Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, and Lmo2 required for HSC maintenance and self-renewal. Furthermore, we show that BPTF potentiates the chromatin accessibility of key HSC “stemness” genes. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the chromatin remodeler BPTF and NURF for activation of “stemness” gene-expression programs and proper function of adult HSCs. : Wang and colleagues show that a chromatin remodeler, BPTF, sustains appropriate functions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs. BPTF loss causes bone marrow failure and anemia. The authors further define a BPTF-dependent gene-expression program in HSPCs, which contains key HSC stemness factors. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the BPTF-associated chromatin remodelers for HSC functionality and adult hematopoiesis. Keywords: Bptf, hematopoietic stem cells, chromatin remodeler, Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, DNA accessibility, NURF, AP1 complex

  5. Wongabel Rhabdovirus Accessory Protein U3 Targets the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, D. Albert; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Monaghan, Paul; Cummins, Michelle; McKinstry, William J.; Paradkar, Prasad N.; Moseley, Gregory W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Wongabel virus (WONV) is an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that infects birds. It is one of the growing array of rhabdoviruses with complex genomes that encode multiple accessory proteins of unknown function. In addition to the five canonical rhabdovirus structural protein genes (N, P, M, G, and L), the 13.2-kb negative-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) WONV genome contains five uncharacterized accessory genes, one overlapping the N gene (Nx or U4), three located between the P and M genes (U1 to U3), and a fifth one overlapping the G gene (Gx or U5). Here we show that WONV U3 is expressed during infection in insect and mammalian cells and is required for efficient viral replication. A yeast two-hybrid screen against a mosquito cell cDNA library identified that WONV U3 interacts with the 83-amino-acid (aa) C-terminal domain of SNF5, a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. The interaction was confirmed by affinity chromatography, and nuclear colocalization was established by confocal microscopy. Gene expression studies showed that SNF5 transcripts are upregulated during infection of mosquito cells with WONV, as well as West Nile virus (Flaviviridae) and bovine ephemeral fever virus (Rhabdoviridae), and that SNF5 knockdown results in increased WONV replication. WONV U3 also inhibits SNF5-regulated expression of the cytokine gene CSF1. The data suggest that WONV U3 targets the SWI/SNF complex to block the host response to infection. IMPORTANCE The rhabdoviruses comprise a large family of RNA viruses infecting plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates. In addition to the major structural proteins (N, P, M, G, and L), many rhabdoviruses encode a diverse array of accessory proteins of largely unknown function. Understanding the role of these proteins may reveal much about host-pathogen interactions in infected cells. Here we examine accessory protein U3 of Wongabel virus, an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that infects birds. We show that U3 enters the

  6. The Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Shifts Nucleosomal DNA Bidirectionally as a Monomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Yupeng; Levendosky, Robert F.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D.; Myong, Sua

    2017-10-01

    Chromatin remodelers catalyze dynamic packaging of the genome by carrying out nucleosome assembly/disassembly, histone exchange, and nucleosome repositioning. Remodeling results in evenly spaced nucleosomes, which requires probing both sides of the nucleosome, yet the way remodelers organize sliding activity to achieve this task is not understood. Here, we show that the monomeric Chd1 remodeler shifts DNA back and forth by dynamically alternating between different segments of the nucleosome. During sliding, Chd1 generates unstable remodeling intermediates that spontaneously relax to a pre-remodeled position. We demonstrate that nucleosome sliding is tightly controlled by two regulatory domains: the DNA-binding domain, which interferes with sliding when its range is limited by a truncated linking segment, and the chromodomains, which play a key role in substrate discrimination. We propose that active interplay of the ATPase motor with the regulatory domains may promote dynamic nucleosome structures uniquely suited for histone exchange and chromatin reorganization during transcription.

  7. ATM-dependent pathways of chromatin remodelling and oxidative DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, N Daniel; Stanley, Fintan K T; Moore, Shaun; Goodarzi, Aaron A

    2017-10-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase with a master regulatory function in the DNA damage response. In this role, ATM commands a complex biochemical network that signals the presence of oxidative DNA damage, including the dangerous DNA double-strand break, and facilitates subsequent repair. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding ATM-dependent chromatin remodelling and epigenomic alterations that are required to maintain genomic integrity in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks and/or oxidative stress. We will focus particularly on the roles of ATM in adjusting nucleosome spacing at sites of unresolved DNA double-strand breaks within complex chromatin environments, and the impact of ATM on preserving the health of cells within the mammalian central nervous system.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. In vivo transcriptional profile analysis reveals RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling as prominent processes for adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Daniel A; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Naef, Felix; Hacker, Coleen R; Menn, Benedicte; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Magnasco, Marcelo; Patil, Nila; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2006-01-01

    Neural stem cells and neurogenesis persist in the adult mammalian brain subventricular zone (SVZ). Cells born in the rodent SVZ migrate to the olfactory bulb (Ob) where they differentiate into interneurons. To determine the gene expression and functional profile of SVZ neurogenesis, we performed three complementary sets of transcriptional analysis experiments using Affymetrix GeneChips: (1) comparison of adult mouse SVZ and Ob gene expression profiles with those of the striatum, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus; (2) profiling of SVZ stem cells and ependyma isolated by fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS); and (3) analysis of gene expression changes during in vivo SVZ regeneration after anti-mitotic treatment. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of data from these three separate approaches showed that in adult SVZ neurogenesis, RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling are biological processes as statistically significant as cell proliferation, transcription, and neurogenesis. In non-neurogenic brain regions, RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling were not prominent processes. Fourteen mRNA splicing factors including Sf3b1, Sfrs2, Lsm4, and Khdrbs1/Sam68 were detected along with 9 chromatin remodeling genes including Mll, Bmi1, Smarcad1, Baf53a, and Hat1. We validated the transcriptional profile data with Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. The data greatly expand the catalogue of cell cycle components, transcription factors, and migration genes for adult SVZ neurogenesis and reveal RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling as prominent biological processes for these germinal cells.

  9. Mutation of Neuron-Specific Chromatin Remodeling Subunit BAF53b: Rescue of Plasticity and Memory by Manipulating Actin Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciernia, Annie Vogel; Kramár, Enikö A.; Matheos, Dina P.; Havekes, Robbert; Hemstedt, Thekla J.; Magnan, Christophe N.; Sakata, Keith; Tran, Ashley; Azzawi, Soraya; Lopez, Alberto; Dang, Richard; Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian; Tong, Joyce; Barrett, Ruth M.; Post, Rebecca J.; Baldi, Pierre; Abel, Ted; Lynch, Gary; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent human exome-sequencing studies have implicated polymorphic Brg1-associated factor (BAF) complexes (mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes) in several intellectual disabilities and cognitive disorders, including autism. However, it remains unclear how mutations in BAF complexes result in impaired cognitive function. Post-mitotic…

  10. The selector gene Pax7 dictates alternate pituitary cell fates through its pioneer action on chromatin remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budry, L.; Balsalobre, A.; Gauthier, Y.; Khetchoumian, K.; L'Honore, A.; Vallette-Kasic, S.; Brue, T; Figarella-Branger, D.; Meij, B.P.; Drouin, J.

    2012-01-01

    Genes Dev. 2012 Oct 15;26(20):2299-310. doi: 10.1101/gad.200436.112. The selector gene Pax7 dictates alternate pituitary cell fates through its pioneer action on chromatin remodeling. Budry L, Balsalobre A, Gauthier Y, Khetchoumian K, L'honoré A, Vallette S, Brue T, Figarella-Branger D, Meij B,

  11. dDYRK2 and Minibrain interact with the chromatin remodelling factors SNR1 and TRX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinstrie, Ross; Lochhead, Pamela A; Sibbet, Gary; Morrice, Nick; Cleghon, Vaughn

    2006-08-15

    The DYRKs (dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases) are a conserved family of protein kinases that autophosphorylate a tyrosine residue in their activation loop by an intra-molecular mechanism and phosphorylate exogenous substrates on serine/threonine residues. Little is known about the identity of true substrates for DYRK family members and their binding partners. To address this question, we used full-length dDYRK2 (Drosophila DYRK2) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Drosophila embryo cDNA library. Of 14 independent dDYRK2 interacting clones identified, three were derived from the chromatin remodelling factor, SNR1 (Snf5-related 1), and three from the essential chromatin component, TRX (trithorax). The association of dDYRK2 with SNR1 and TRX was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation studies. Deletion analysis showed that the C-terminus of dDYRK2 modulated the interaction with SNR1 and TRX. DYRK family member MNB (Minibrain) was also found to co-precipitate with SNR1 and TRX, associations that did not require the C-terminus of the molecule. dDYRK2 and MNB were also found to phosphorylate SNR1 at Thr102 in vitro and in vivo. This phosphorylation required the highly conserved DH-box (DYRK homology box) of dDYRK2, whereas the DH-box was not essential for phosphorylation by MNB. This is the first instance of phosphorylation of SNR1 or any of its homologues and implicates the DYRK family of kinases with a role in chromatin remodelling.

  12. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David; Patrick, Steve M.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: ► Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. ► Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. ► Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. ► Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  13. Concerted action of the PHD, chromo and motor domains regulates the human chromatin remodelling ATPase CHD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Rosa; Lee, Benjamin M; Shaw, Heather; Tuma, Roman; Mancini, Erika J

    2012-07-30

    CHD4, the core subunit of the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, is a chromatin remodelling ATPase that, in addition to a helicase domain, harbors tandem plant homeo finger and chromo domains. By using a panel of domain constructs we dissect their roles and demonstrate that DNA binding, histone binding and ATPase activities are allosterically regulated. Molecular shape reconstruction from small-angle X-ray scattering reveals extensive domain-domain interactions, which provide a structural explanation for the regulation of CHD4 activities by intramolecular domain communication. Our results demonstrate functional interdependency between domains within a chromatin remodeller. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  15. Modulation of chromatin remodelling induced by the freshwater cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin in human intestinal caco-2 cells.

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    Antoine Huguet

    Full Text Available Cylindrospermopsin (CYN is a cyanotoxin that has been recognised as an emerging potential public health risk. Although CYN toxicity has been demonstrated, the mechanisms involved have not been fully characterised. To identify some key pathways related to this toxicity, we studied the transcriptomic profile of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to a sub-toxic concentration of CYN (1.6 µM for 24hrs using a non-targeted approach. CYN was shown to modulate different biological functions which were related to growth arrest (with down-regulation of cdkn1a and uhrf1 genes, and DNA recombination and repair (with up-regulation of aptx and pms2 genes. Our main results reported an increased expression of some histone-modifying enzymes (histone acetyl and methyltransferases MYST1, KAT5 and EHMT2 involved in chromatin remodelling, which is essential for initiating transcription. We also detected greater levels of acetylated histone H2A (Lys5 and dimethylated histone H3 (Lys4, two products of these enzymes. In conclusion, CYN overexpressed proteins involved in DNA damage repair and transcription, including modifications of nucleosomal histones. Our results highlighted some new cell processes induced by CYN.

  16. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jé gu, Teddy; Domenichini, Sé verine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Auré lie; Kim, SoonKap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Sté phanie; Mouille, Gré gory; Bourge, Mickaë l; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cé cile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  17. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  18. Genomic and proteomic characterization of ARID1A chromatin remodeller in ampullary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastase, Anca; Teo, Jin Yao; Heng, Hong Lee; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Myint, Swe Swe; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Loh, Jia Liang; Lee, Ser Yee; Ooi, London Lucien; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui; Chow, Pierce Kah Hoe; Cheow, Peng Chung; Wan, Wei Keat; Azhar, Rafy; Khoo, Avery; Xiu, Sam Xin; Alkaff, Syed Muhammad Fahmy; Cutcutache, Ioana; Lim, Jing Quan; Ong, Choon Kiat; Herlea, Vlad; Dima, Simona; Duda, Dan G; Teh, Bin Tean; Popescu, Irinel; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon

    2017-01-01

    AT rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A) is one of the most commonly mutated genes in a broad variety of tumors. The mechanisms that involve ARID1A in ampullary cancer progression remains elusive. Here, we evaluated the frequency of ARID1A and KRAS mutations in ampullary adenomas and adenocarcinomas and in duodenal adenocarcinomas from two cohorts of patients from Singapore and Romania, correlated with clinical and pathological tumor features, and assessed the functional role of ARID1A . In the ampullary adenocarcinomas, the frequency of KRAS and ARID1A mutations was 34.7% and 8.2% respectively, with a loss or reduction of ARID1A protein in 17.2% of the cases. ARID1A mutational status was significantly correlated with ARID1A protein expression level (P=0.023). There was a significant difference in frequency of ARID1A mutation between Romania and Singapore (2.7% versus 25%, P=0.04), suggestive of different etiologies. One somatic mutation was detected in the ampullary adenoma group. In vitro studies indicated the tumor suppressive role of ARID1A . Our results warrant further investigation of this chromatin remodeller as a potential early biomarker of the disease, as well as identification of therapeutic targets in ARID1A mutated ampullary cancers.

  19. Essential role of chromatin remodeling protein Bptf in early mouse embryos and embryonic stem cells.

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    Joseph Landry

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the biological functions of the chromatin remodeling protein Bptf (Bromodomain PHD-finger Transcription Factor, the largest subunit of NURF (Nucleosome Remodeling Factor in a mammal. Bptf mutants manifest growth defects at the post-implantation stage and are reabsorbed by E8.5. Histological analyses of lineage markers show that Bptf(-/- embryos implant but fail to establish a functional distal visceral endoderm. Microarray analysis at early stages of differentiation has identified Bptf-dependent gene targets including homeobox transcriptions factors and genes essential for the development of ectoderm, mesoderm, and both definitive and visceral endoderm. Differentiation of Bptf(-/- embryonic stem cell lines into embryoid bodies revealed its requirement for development of mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm tissue lineages, and uncovered many genes whose activation or repression are Bptf-dependent. We also provide functional and physical links between the Bptf-containing NURF complex and the Smad transcription factors. These results suggest that Bptf may co-regulate some gene targets of this pathway, which is essential for establishment of the visceral endoderm. We conclude that Bptf likely regulates genes and signaling pathways essential for the development of key tissues of the early mouse embryo.

  20. IRAK-M regulates chromatin remodeling in lung macrophages during experimental sepsis.

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    Kenneth Lyn-Kew

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis results in a profound state of immunosuppression, which is temporally associated with impaired leukocyte function. The mechanism of leukocyte reprogramming in sepsis is incompletely understood. In this study, we explored mechanisms contributing to dysregulated inflammatory cytokine expression by pulmonary macrophages during experimental sepsis. Pulmonary macrophages (PM recovered from the lungs of mice undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP display transiently reduced expression of some, but not all innate genes in response to LPS. Impaired expression of TNF-alpha and iNOS was associated with reduced acetylation and methylation of specific histones (AcH4 and H3K4me3 and reduced binding of RNA polymerase II to the promoters of these genes. Transient impairment in LPS-induced cytokine responses in septic PM temporally correlated with induction of IRAK-M mRNA and protein, which occurred in a MyD88-dependent fashion. PM isolated from IRAK-M(-/- mice were largely refractory to CLP-induced impairment in cytokine expression, chromatin remodeling, recruitment of RNA polymerase II, and induction of histone deacetylase-2 observed during sepsis. Our findings indicate that systemic sepsis induces epigenetic silencing of cytokine gene expression in lung macrophages, and IRAK-M appears to be a critical mediator of this response.

  1. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Johanna Sebald

    Full Text Available The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

  2. Novel pedigree analysis implicates DNA repair and chromatin remodeling in multiple myeloma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Rosalie G; Darlington, Todd M; Wei, Xiaomu; Madsen, Michael J; Thomas, Alun; Curtin, Karen; Coon, Hilary; Rajamanickam, Venkatesh; Musinsky, Justin; Jayabalan, David; Atanackovic, Djordje; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Kumar, Shaji; Slager, Susan; Middha, Mridu; Galia, Perrine; Demangel, Delphine; Salama, Mohamed; Joseph, Vijai; McKay, James; Offit, Kenneth; Klein, Robert J; Lipkin, Steven M; Dumontet, Charles; Vachon, Celine M; Camp, Nicola J

    2018-02-01

    The high-risk pedigree (HRP) design is an established strategy to discover rare, highly-penetrant, Mendelian-like causal variants. Its success, however, in complex traits has been modest, largely due to challenges of genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance models. We describe a HRP strategy that addresses intra-familial heterogeneity, and identifies inherited segments important for mapping regulatory risk. We apply this new Shared Genomic Segment (SGS) method in 11 extended, Utah, multiple myeloma (MM) HRPs, and subsequent exome sequencing in SGS regions of interest in 1063 MM / MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance-a precursor to MM) cases and 964 controls from a jointly-called collaborative resource, including cases from the initial 11 HRPs. One genome-wide significant 1.8 Mb shared segment was found at 6q16. Exome sequencing in this region revealed predicted deleterious variants in USP45 (p.Gln691* and p.Gln621Glu), a gene known to influence DNA repair through endonuclease regulation. Additionally, a 1.2 Mb segment at 1p36.11 is inherited in two Utah HRPs, with coding variants identified in ARID1A (p.Ser90Gly and p.Met890Val), a key gene in the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. Our results provide compelling statistical and genetic evidence for segregating risk variants for MM. In addition, we demonstrate a novel strategy to use large HRPs for risk-variant discovery more generally in complex traits.

  3. Novel pedigree analysis implicates DNA repair and chromatin remodeling in multiple myeloma risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie G Waller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The high-risk pedigree (HRP design is an established strategy to discover rare, highly-penetrant, Mendelian-like causal variants. Its success, however, in complex traits has been modest, largely due to challenges of genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance models. We describe a HRP strategy that addresses intra-familial heterogeneity, and identifies inherited segments important for mapping regulatory risk. We apply this new Shared Genomic Segment (SGS method in 11 extended, Utah, multiple myeloma (MM HRPs, and subsequent exome sequencing in SGS regions of interest in 1063 MM / MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance-a precursor to MM cases and 964 controls from a jointly-called collaborative resource, including cases from the initial 11 HRPs. One genome-wide significant 1.8 Mb shared segment was found at 6q16. Exome sequencing in this region revealed predicted deleterious variants in USP45 (p.Gln691* and p.Gln621Glu, a gene known to influence DNA repair through endonuclease regulation. Additionally, a 1.2 Mb segment at 1p36.11 is inherited in two Utah HRPs, with coding variants identified in ARID1A (p.Ser90Gly and p.Met890Val, a key gene in the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. Our results provide compelling statistical and genetic evidence for segregating risk variants for MM. In addition, we demonstrate a novel strategy to use large HRPs for risk-variant discovery more generally in complex traits.

  4. An overproduction of astellolides induced by genetic disruption of chromatin-remodeling factors in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Kawatani, Makoto; Futamura, Yushi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae is an important industrial mold. Recent genomic analysis indicated that A. oryzae has a large number of biosynthetic genes for secondary metabolites (SMs), but many of the SMs they produce have not been identified. For better understanding of SMs production by A. oryzae, we screened a gene-disruption library of transcription factors including chromatin-remodeling factors and found two gene disruptions that show similarly altered SM production profiles. One is a homolog of Aspergillus nidulans cclA, a component of the histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complex of proteins associated with Set1 complex, and the other, sppA, is an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPP1, another component of a complex of proteins associated with Set1 complex. The cclA and sppA disruptions in A. oryzae are deficient in trimethylation of H3K4. Furthermore, one of the SMs that increased in the cclA disruptant was identified as astellolide F (14-deacetyl astellolide B). These data indicate that both cclA and sppA affect production of SMs including astellolides by affecting the methylation status of H3K4 in A. oryzae.

  5. SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor Fun30 supports point centromere function in S. cerevisiae.

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    Mickaël Durand-Dubief

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Budding yeast centromeres are sequence-defined point centromeres and are, unlike in many other organisms, not embedded in heterochromatin. Here we show that Fun30, a poorly understood SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor conserved in humans, promotes point centromere function through the formation of correct chromatin architecture at centromeres. Our determination of the genome-wide binding and nucleosome positioning properties of Fun30 shows that this enzyme is consistently enriched over centromeres and that a majority of CENs show Fun30-dependent changes in flanking nucleosome position and/or CEN core micrococcal nuclease accessibility. Fun30 deletion leads to defects in histone variant Htz1 occupancy genome-wide, including at and around most centromeres. FUN30 genetically interacts with CSE4, coding for the centromere-specific variant of histone H3, and counteracts the detrimental effect of transcription through centromeres on chromosome segregation and suppresses transcriptional noise over centromere CEN3. Previous work has shown a requirement for fission yeast and mammalian homologs of Fun30 in heterochromatin assembly. As centromeres in budding yeast are not embedded in heterochromatin, our findings indicate a direct role of Fun30 in centromere chromatin by promoting correct chromatin architecture.

  6. Concerted action of the PHD, chromo and motor domains regulates the human chromatin remodelling ATPase CHD4

    OpenAIRE

    Morra, Rosa; Lee, Benjamin M; Shaw, Heather; Tuma, Roman; Mancini, Erika J

    2012-01-01

    CHD4, the core subunit of the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, is a chromatin remodelling ATPase that, in addition to a helicase domain, harbors tandem plant homeo finger and chromo domains. By using a panel of domain constructs we dissect their roles and demonstrate that DNA binding, histone binding and ATPase activities are allosterically regulated. Molecular shape reconstruction from small-angle X-ray scattering reveals extensive domain-domain interactions, which prov...

  7. Evf2 lncRNA/BRG1/DLX1 interactions reveal RNA-dependent inhibition of chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajigas, Ivelisse; Leib, David E; Cochrane, Jesse; Luo, Hao; Swyter, Kelsey R; Chen, Sean; Clark, Brian S; Thompson, James; Yates, John R; Kingston, Robert E; Kohtz, Jhumku D

    2015-08-01

    Transcription-regulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have the potential to control the site-specific expression of thousands of target genes. Previously, we showed that Evf2, the first described ultraconserved lncRNA, increases the association of transcriptional activators (DLX homeodomain proteins) with key DNA enhancers but represses gene expression. In this report, mass spectrometry shows that the Evf2-DLX1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) contains the SWI/SNF-related chromatin remodelers Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1, SMARCA4) and Brahma-associated factor (BAF170, SMARCC2) in the developing mouse forebrain. Evf2 RNA colocalizes with BRG1 in nuclear clouds and increases BRG1 association with key DNA regulatory enhancers in the developing forebrain. While BRG1 directly interacts with DLX1 and Evf2 through distinct binding sites, Evf2 directly inhibits BRG1 ATPase and chromatin remodeling activities. In vitro studies show that both RNA-BRG1 binding and RNA inhibition of BRG1 ATPase/remodeling activity are promiscuous, suggesting that context is a crucial factor in RNA-dependent chromatin remodeling inhibition. Together, these experiments support a model in which RNAs convert an active enhancer to a repressed enhancer by directly inhibiting chromatin remodeling activity, and address the apparent paradox of RNA-mediated stabilization of transcriptional activators at enhancers with a repressive outcome. The importance of BRG1/RNA and BRG1/homeodomain interactions in neurodevelopmental disorders is underscored by the finding that mutations in Coffin-Siris syndrome, a human intellectual disability disorder, localize to the BRG1 RNA-binding and DLX1-binding domains. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. The chromatin remodelling factor BRG1 is a novel binding partner of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Graham J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDKN2A/p16INK4a is frequently altered in human cancers and it is the most important melanoma susceptibility gene identified to date. p16INK4a inhibits pRb phosphorylation and induces cell cycle arrest, which is considered its main tumour suppressor function. Nevertheless, additional activities may contribute to the tumour suppressor role of p16INK4a and could help explain its specific association with melanoma predisposition. To identify such functions we conducted a yeast-two-hybrid screen for novel p16INK4a binding partners. Results We now report that p16INK4a interacts with the chromatin remodelling factor BRG1. We investigated the cooperative roles of p16INK4a and BRG1 using a panel of cell lines and a melanoma cell model with inducible p16INK4a expression and BRG1 silencing. We found evidence that BRG1 is not required for p16INK4a-induced cell cycle inhibition and propose that the p16INK4a-BRG1 complex regulates BRG1 chromatin remodelling activity. Importantly, we found frequent loss of BRG1 expression in primary and metastatic melanomas, implicating this novel p16INK4a binding partner as an important tumour suppressor in melanoma. Conclusion This data adds to the increasing evidence implicating the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex in tumour development and the association of p16INK4a with chromatin remodelling highlights potentially new functions that may be important in melanoma predisposition and chemoresistance.

  9. The Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Activates a Stemness Gene-Expression Program Essential for the Maintenance of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bowen; Cai, Ling; Butler, Jason M; Chen, Dongliang; Lu, Xiongdong; Allison, David F; Lu, Rui; Rafii, Shahin; Parker, Joel S; Zheng, Deyou; Wang, Gang Greg

    2018-03-13

    Self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells are tightly regulated partly through configuration of chromatin structure by chromatin remodelers. Using knockout mice, we here demonstrate that bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF), a component of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF) chromatin-remodeling complex, is essential for maintaining the population size of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), including long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Bptf-deficient HSCs are defective in reconstituted hematopoiesis, and hematopoietic-specific knockout of Bptf caused profound defects including bone marrow failure and anemia. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that BPTF loss caused downregulation of HSC-specific gene-expression programs, which contain several master transcription factors (Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, and Lmo2) required for HSC maintenance and self-renewal. Furthermore, we show that BPTF potentiates the chromatin accessibility of key HSC "stemness" genes. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the chromatin remodeler BPTF and NURF for activation of "stemness" gene-expression programs and proper function of adult HSCs. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations and modeling of the chromatin remodeler CHD8 define an emerging autism etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Barnard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong but complex genetic component. Recent family based exome-sequencing strategies have identified recurrent de novo mutations at specific genes, providing strong evidence for ASD risk, but also highlighting the extreme genetic heterogeneity of the disorder. However, disruptions in these genes converge on key molecular pathways early in development. In particular, functional enrichment analyses have found that there is a bias towards genes involved in transcriptional regulation, such as chromatin regulators. Here we review recent genetic, animal model, co-expression network, and functional genomics studies relating to the high confidence ASD risk gene, CHD8. CHD8 a chromatin remodeling factor, may serve as a master regulator of a common ASD etiology. Individuals with a CHD8 mutation show an ASD subtype that includes similar physical characteristics, such as macrocephaly and prolonged GI problems including recurrent constipation. Similarly, animal models of CHD8 disruption exhibit enlarged head circumference and reduced gut motility phenotypes. Systems biology approaches suggest CHD8 and other candidate ASD risk genes are enriched during mid-fetal development, which may represent a critical time window in ASD etiology. Transcription profiles from cell and primary tissue models of early development indicate that CHD8 may also positively regulate other candidate ASD risk genes through both direct and indirect means. However continued study is needed to elucidate the mechanism of regulation as well as identify which CHD8 targets are most relevant to ASD risk. Overall, these initial studies suggest the potential for common ASD etiologies and the development of personalized treatments in the future.

  11. Large-scale chromatin remodeling at the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus: a paradigm for multigene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Daniel J; Wood, Andrew L; Corcoran, Anne E

    2009-01-01

    complementary processes involved in this large-scale locus organisation. We will examine the structure of the Igh locus and the large-scale and higher-order chromatin remodelling processes associated with V(D)J recombination, at the level of the locus itself, its conformational changes and its dynamic localisation within the nucleus.

  12. Selection on a Subunit of the NURF Chromatin Remodeler Modifies Life History Traits in a Domesticated Strain of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E Large

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary life history theory seeks to explain how reproductive and survival traits are shaped by selection through allocations of an individual's resources to competing life functions. Although life-history traits evolve rapidly, little is known about the genetic and cellular mechanisms that control and couple these tradeoffs. Here, we find that two laboratory-adapted strains of C. elegans descended from a single common ancestor that lived in the 1950s have differences in a number of life-history traits, including reproductive timing, lifespan, dauer formation, growth rate, and offspring number. We identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL of large effect that controls 24%-75% of the total trait variance in reproductive timing at various timepoints. Using CRISPR/Cas9-induced genome editing, we show this QTL is due in part to a 60 bp deletion in the 3' end of the nurf-1 gene, which is orthologous to the human gene encoding the BPTF component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex. Besides reproduction, nurf-1 also regulates growth rate, lifespan, and dauer formation. The fitness consequences of this deletion are environment specific-it increases fitness in the growth conditions where it was fixed but decreases fitness in alternative laboratory growth conditions. We propose that chromatin remodeling, acting through nurf-1, is a pleiotropic regulator of life history trade-offs underlying the evolution of multiple traits across different species.

  13. Analysis of MVP and VPARP promoters indicates a role for chromatin remodeling in the regulation of MVP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Nil; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H

    2004-04-16

    Multi-drug-resistant cancer cells frequently express elevated levels of ribonucleoprotein complexes termed vaults. The increased expression of vault proteins and their mRNAs has led to the suggestion that vaults may play a direct role in preventing drug toxicity. To further understand vault component up-regulation, the three proteins that comprise the vault, the major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP), and telomerase-associated protein-1 (TEP1), were examined with respect to gene amplification and drug-induced chromatin remodeling. Gene amplification was not responsible for increased vault component levels in multi-drug-resistant cancer cell lines. The TATA-less murine MVP and human VPARP promoters were identified and functionally characterized. There was no significant activation of either the MVP or VPARP promoters in drug-resistant cell lines in comparison to their parental, drug-sensitive counterparts. Treatment of various cell lines with sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC), led to an increase in vault component protein levels. Furthermore, treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a more specific inhibitor of HDAC, caused an increase in MVP protein, mRNA, and promoter activity. These results suggest that up-regulation of MVP in multi-drug resistance (MDR) may involve chromatin remodeling.

  14. Dynamic Recruitment of Functionally Distinct Swi/Snf Chromatin Remodeling Complexes Modulates Pdx1 Activity in Islet β Cells

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    Brian McKenna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pdx1 is a transcription factor of fundamental importance to pancreas formation and adult islet β cell function. However, little is known about the positive- and negative-acting coregulators recruited to mediate transcriptional control. Here, we isolated numerous Pdx1-interacting factors possessing a wide range of cellular functions linked with this protein, including, but not limited to, coregulators associated with transcriptional activation and repression, DNA damage response, and DNA replication. Because chromatin remodeling activities are essential to developmental lineage decisions and adult cell function, our analysis focused on investigating the influence of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeler on Pdx1 action. The two mutually exclusive and indispensable Swi/Snf core ATPase subunits, Brg1 and Brm, distinctly affected target gene expression in β cells. Furthermore, physiological and pathophysiological conditions dynamically regulated Pdx1 binding to these Swi/Snf complexes in vivo. We discuss how context-dependent recruitment of coregulatory complexes by Pdx1 could impact pancreas cell development and adult islet β cell activity.

  15. The Seed Repair Response during Germination: Disclosing Correlations between DNA Repair, Antioxidant Response, and Chromatin Remodeling in Medicago truncatula

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    Andrea Pagano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work provides novel insights into the effects caused by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA during Medicago truncatula seed germination, with emphasis on the seed repair response. Seeds treated with H2O and TSA (10 and 20 μM were collected during imbibition (8 h and at the radicle protrusion phase. Biometric data showed delayed germination and impaired seedling growth in TSA-treated samples. Comet assay, performed on radicles at the protrusion phase and 4-days old M. truncatula seedlings, revealed accumulation of DNA strand breaks upon exposure to TSA. Activation of DNA repair toward TSA-mediated genotoxic damage was evidenced by the up-regulation of MtOGG1(8-OXOGUANINE GLYCOSYLASE/LYASE gene involved in the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, MtLIGIV(LIGASE IV gene, a key determinant of seed quality, required for the rejoining of DNA double strand breaks and TDP(TYROSYL-DNA PHOSPHODIESTERASE genes encoding the multipurpose DNA repair enzymes tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterases. Since radical scavenging can prevent DNA damage, the specific antioxidant activity (SAA was measured by DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and Folin-Ciocalteu reagent assays. Fluctuations of SAA were observed in TSA-treated seeds/seedlings concomitant with the up-regulation of antioxidant genes MtSOD(SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, MtAPX(ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE and MtMT2(TYPE 2 METALLOTHIONEIN. Chromatin remodeling, required to facilitate the access of DNA repair enzymes at the damaged sites, is also part of the multifaceted seed repair response. To address this aspect, still poorly explored in plants, the MtTRRAP(TRANSFORMATION/TRANSACTIVATION DOMAIN-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN gene was analyzed. TRRAP is a transcriptional adaptor, so far characterized only in human cells where it is needed for the recruitment of histone acetyltransferase complexes to chromatin during DNA repair. The MtTRRAP gene and the predicted interacting partners MtHAM2 (HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE OF

  16. The chromatin remodeling BAP complex limits tumor-promoting activity of the Hippo pathway effector Yki to prevent neoplastic transformation in Drosophila epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Shilin; Herranz, Héctor; Cohen, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complexes are mutated in many human cancers. In this article, we make use of a Drosophila genetic model for epithelial tumor formation to explore the tumor suppressive role of SWI/SNF complex proteins. Members of the BAP complex exhibit...

  17. Noradrenergic Activation of the Basolateral Amygdala Enhances Object Recognition Memory and Induces Chromatin Remodeling in the Insular Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassiba eBeldjoud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that arousal-induced memory enhancement requires noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA and modulatory influences on information storage processes in its many target regions. While this concept is well accepted, the molecular basis of such BLA effects on neural plasticity changes within other brain regions remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether noradrenergic activation of the BLA after object recognition training induces chromatin remodeling through histone post-translational modifications in the insular cortex (IC, a brain region that is importantly involved in object recognition memory. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were trained on an object recognition task, followed immediately by bilateral microinfusions of norepinephrine (1.0 µg or saline administered into the BLA. Saline-treated control rats exhibited poor 24-h retention, whereas norepinephrine treatment induced robust 24-h object recognition memory. Most importantly, this memory-enhancing dose of norepinephrine induced a global reduction in the acetylation levels of histone H3 at lysine 14, H2B and H4 in the IC 1 h later, whereas it had no effect on the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 or tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. Norepinephrine administered into the BLA of non-trained control rats did not induce any changes in the histone marks investigated in this study. These findings indicate that noradrenergic activation of the BLA induces training-specific effects on chromatin remodeling mechanisms, and presumably gene transcription, in its target regions, which may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress and emotional arousal effects on memory consolidation.

  18. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal.

  19. Multiple aspects of ATP-dependent nucleosome translocation by RSC and Mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence.

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    Joke J F A van Vugt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the nucleosome positions can be predicted simply by DNA sequence, especially within promoter regions. This seemingly contrasts with remodeler induced nucleosome mobility. The ability of remodeling enzymes to mobilise nucleosomes over short DNA distances is well documented. However, the nucleosome translocation processivity along DNA remains elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown what determines the initial direction of movement and how new nucleosome positions are adopted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used AFM imaging and high resolution PAGE of mononucleosomes on 600 and 2500 bp DNA molecules to analyze ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by native and recombinant SNF2-type enzymes. We report that the underlying DNA sequence can control the initial direction of translocation, translocation distance, as well as the new positions adopted by nucleosomes upon enzymatic mobilization. Within a strong nucleosomal positioning sequence both recombinant Drosophila Mi-2 (CHD-type and native RSC from yeast (SWI/SNF-type repositioned the nucleosome at 10 bp intervals, which are intrinsic to the positioning sequence. Furthermore, RSC-catalyzed nucleosome translocation was noticeably more efficient when beyond the influence of this sequence. Interestingly, under limiting ATP conditions RSC preferred to position the nucleosome with 20 bp intervals within the positioning sequence, suggesting that native RSC preferentially translocates nucleosomes with 15 to 25 bp DNA steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nucleosome repositioning thus appears to be influenced by both remodeler intrinsic and DNA sequence specific properties that interplay to define ATPase

  20. Involvement of Chromatin Remodeling Genes and the Rho GTPases RhoB and CDC42 in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

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    Nicolai Skovbjerg Arildsen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveOvarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCCs constitute a rare ovarian cancer subtype with distinct clinical features, but may nonetheless be difficult to distinguish morphologically from other subtypes. There is limited knowledge of genetic events driving OCCC tumorigenesis beyond ARID1A, which is reportedly mutated in 30–50% of OCCCs. We aimed to further characterize OCCCs by combined global transcriptional profiling and targeted deep sequencing of a panel of well-established cancer genes. Increased knowledge of OCCC-specific genetic aberrations may help in guiding development of targeted treatments and ultimately improve patient outcome.MethodsGene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue from a cohort of the major ovarian cancer subtypes (cohort 1; n = 67 was performed using whole-genome cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (WG-DASL bead arrays, followed by pathway, gene module score, and gene ontology analyses, respectively. A second FFPE cohort of 10 primary OCCCs was analyzed by targeted DNA sequencing of a panel of 60 cancer-related genes (cohort 2. Non-synonymous and non-sense variants affecting single-nucleotide variations and insertions or deletions were further analyzed. A tissue microarray of 43 OCCCs (cohort 3 was used for validation by immunohistochemistry and chromogenic in situ hybridization.ResultsGene expression analyses revealed a distinct OCCC profile compared to other histological subtypes, with, e.g., ERBB2, TFAP2A, and genes related to cytoskeletal actin regulation being overexpressed in OCCC. ERBB2 was, however, not overexpressed on the protein level and ERBB2 amplification was rare in the validation cohort. Targeted deep sequencing revealed non-synonymous variants or insertions/deletions in 11/60 cancer-related genes. Genes involved in chromatin remodeling, including ARID1A, SPOP, and KMT2D were frequently mutated across OCCC tumors.ConclusionOCCCs appear

  1. Neuron-specific chromatin remodeling: a missing link in epigenetic mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, memory, and intellectual disability disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A

    2014-05-01

    Long-term memory formation requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression. Until recently nucleosome remodeling, one of the major epigenetic mechanisms for controlling gene expression, had been largely unexplored in the field of neuroscience. Nucleosome remodeling is carried out by chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) that interact with DNA and histones to physically alter chromatin structure and ultimately regulate gene expression. Human exome sequencing and gene wide association studies have linked mutations in CRC subunits to intellectual disability disorders, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, how mutations in CRC subunits were related to human cognitive disorders was unknown. There appears to be both developmental and adult specific roles for the neuron specific CRC nBAF (neuronal Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor). nBAF regulates gene expression required for dendritic arborization during development, and in the adult, contributes to long-term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We propose that the nBAF complex is a novel epigenetic mechanism for regulating transcription required for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory processes and that impaired nBAF function may result in human cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional genomics indicates yeast requires Golgi/ER transport, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair for low dose DMSO tolerance

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    Brandon David Gaytán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is frequently utilized as a solvent in toxicological and pharmaceutical investigations. It is therefore important to establish the cellular and molecular targets of DMSO in order to differentiate its intrinsic effects from those elicited by a compound of interest. We performed a genome-wide functional screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify deletion mutants exhibiting sensitivity to 1% DMSO, a concentration standard to yeast chemical profiling studies. We report that mutants defective in Golgi/ER transport are sensitive to DMSO, including those lacking components of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG complex. Moreover, strains deleted for members of the SWR1 histone exchange complex are hypersensitive to DMSO, with additional chromatin remodeling mutants displaying a range of growth defects. We also identify DNA repair genes important for DMSO tolerance. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of histone H2A.Z, which replaces chromatin-associated histone H2A in a SWR1-catalyzed reaction, confers resistance to DMSO. Many yeast genes described in this study have homologs in more complex organisms, and the data provided is applicable to future investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DMSO toxicity.

  3. Chromatin-remodeling SWI/SNF complex regulates coenzyme Q6 synthesis and a metabolic shift to respiration in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Agape M; Venkataramanan, Srivats; Nag, Anish; Galivanche, Anoop Raj; Bradley, Michelle C; Neves, Lauren T; Douglass, Stephen; Clarke, Catherine F; Johnson, Tracy L

    2017-09-08

    Despite its relatively streamlined genome, there are many important examples of regulated RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Here, we report a role for the chromatin remodeler SWI/SNF in respiration, partially via the regulation of splicing. We find that a nutrient-dependent decrease in Snf2 leads to an increase in splicing of the PTC7 transcript. The spliced PTC7 transcript encodes a mitochondrial phosphatase regulator of biosynthesis of coenzyme Q 6 (ubiquinone or CoQ 6 ) and a mitochondrial redox-active lipid essential for electron and proton transport in respiration. Increased splicing of PTC7 increases CoQ 6 levels. The increase in PTC7 splicing occurs at least in part due to down-regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression, leading to the redistribution of spliceosomes from this abundant class of intron-containing RNAs to otherwise poorly spliced transcripts. In contrast, a protein encoded by the nonspliced isoform of PTC7 represses CoQ 6 biosynthesis. Taken together, these findings uncover a link between Snf2 expression and the splicing of PTC7 and establish a previously unknown role for the SWI/SNF complex in the transition of yeast cells from fermentative to respiratory modes of metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. HTLV-1 Tax mediated downregulation of miRNAs associated with chromatin remodeling factors in T cells with stably integrated viral promoter.

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    Saifur Rahman

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a natural cellular mechanism to silence gene expression and is predominantly mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs that target messenger RNA. Viruses can manipulate the cellular processes necessary for their replication by targeting the host RNAi machinery. This study explores the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 transactivating protein Tax on the RNAi pathway in the context of a chromosomally integrated viral long terminal repeat (LTR using a CD4(+ T-cell line, Jurkat. Transcription factor profiling of the HTLV-1 LTR stably integrated T-cell clone transfected with Tax demonstrates increased activation of substrates and factors associated with chromatin remodeling complexes. Using a miRNA microarray and bioinformatics experimental approach, Tax was also shown to downregulate the expression of miRNAs associated with the translational regulation of factors required for chromatin remodeling. These observations were validated with selected miRNAs and an HTLV-1 infected T cells line, MT-2. miR-149 and miR-873 were found to be capable of directly targeting p300 and p/CAF, chromatin remodeling factors known to play critical role in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Overall, these results are first in line establishing HTLV-1/Tax-miRNA-chromatin concept and open new avenues toward understanding retroviral latency and/or replication in a given cell type.

  5. Quantifying transient binding of ISWI chromatin remodelers in living cells by pixel-wise photobleaching profile evolution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdel, Fabian; Rippe, Karsten

    2012-11-20

    Interactions between nuclear proteins and chromatin frequently occur on the time scale of seconds and below. These transient binding events are important for the fast identification of target sites as concluded from our previous analysis of the human chromatin remodelers Snf2H and Snf2L from the imitation switch (ISWI) family. Both ATP-driven molecular motor proteins are able to translocate nucleosomes along the DNA and appear to exert this activity only on a small number of nucleosomes to which they bind more tightly. For mechanistic studies, one needs to distinguish such translocation reactions or other long-lived interactions associated with conformational changes and/or ATP hydrolysis from nonproductive chromatin sampling during target search. These processes can be separated by measuring the duration of nucleosome binding with subsecond time resolution. To reach this goal, we have developed a fluorescence bleaching technique termed pixel-wise photobleaching profile evolution analysis (3PEA). It exploits the inherent time structure of confocal microscopy images and yields millisecond resolution. 3PEA represents a generally applicable approach to quantitate transient chromatin interactions in the 2- to 500-ms time regime within only ∼1 s needed for a measurement. The green autofluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Snf2H and Snf2L and the inactive Snf2L+13 splice variant were studied by 3PEA in comparison to the isolated GFP or red autofluorescent protein and a GFP pentamer. Our results reveal that the residence time for transient chromatin binding of Snf2H and Snf2L is <2 ms, and strongly support the view that ISWI-type remodelers are only rarely active in unperturbed cells during G1 phase.

  6. The two different isoforms of the RSC chromatin remodeling complex play distinct roles in DNA damage responses.

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    Anna L Chambers

    Full Text Available The RSC chromatin remodeling complex has been implicated in contributing to DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in a number of studies. Both survival and levels of H2A phosphorylation in response to damage are reduced in the absence of RSC. Importantly, there is evidence for two isoforms of this complex, defined by the presence of either Rsc1 or Rsc2. Here, we investigated whether the two isoforms of RSC provide distinct contributions to DNA damage responses. First, we established that the two isoforms of RSC differ in the presence of Rsc1 or Rsc2 but otherwise have the same subunit composition. We found that both rsc1 and rsc2 mutant strains have intact DNA damage-induced checkpoint activity and transcriptional induction. In addition, both strains show reduced non-homologous end joining activity and have a similar spectrum of DSB repair junctions, suggesting perhaps that the two complexes provide the same functions. However, the hypersensitivity of a rsc1 strain cannot be complemented with an extra copy of RSC2, and likewise, the hypersensitivity of the rsc2 strain remains unchanged when an additional copy of RSC1 is present, indicating that the two proteins are unable to functionally compensate for one another in DNA damage responses. Rsc1, but not Rsc2, is required for nucleosome sliding flanking a DNA DSB. Interestingly, while swapping the domains from Rsc1 into the Rsc2 protein does not compromise hypersensitivity to DNA damage suggesting they are functionally interchangeable, the BAH domain from Rsc1 confers upon Rsc2 the ability to remodel chromatin at a DNA break. These data demonstrate that, despite the similarity between Rsc1 and Rsc2, the two different isoforms of RSC provide distinct functions in DNA damage responses, and that at least part of the functional specificity is dictated by the BAH domains.

  7. Histone variant H3.3-mediated chromatin remodeling is essential for paternal genome activation in mouse preimplantation embryos.

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    Kong, Qingran; Banaszynski, Laura A; Geng, Fuqiang; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jiaming; Zhang, Heng; O'Neill, Claire L; Yan, Peidong; Liu, Zhonghua; Shido, Koji; Palermo, Gianpiero D; Allis, C David; Rafii, Shahin; Rosenwaks, Zev; Wen, Duancheng

    2018-03-09

    Derepression of chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression of paternal and maternal genomes is considered the first major step that initiates zygotic gene expression after fertilization. The histone variant H3.3 is present in both male and female gametes and is thought to be important for remodeling the paternal and maternal genomes for activation during both fertilization and embryogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using our H3.3B-HA-tagged mouse model, engineered to report H3.3 expression in live animals and to distinguish different sources of H3.3 protein in embryos, we show here that sperm-derived H3.3 (sH3.3) protein is removed from the sperm genome shortly after fertilization and extruded from the zygotes via the second polar bodies (PBII) during embryogenesis. We also found that the maternal H3.3 (mH3.3) protein is incorporated into the paternal genome as early as 2 h postfertilization and is detectable in the paternal genome until the morula stage. Knockdown of maternal H3.3 resulted in compromised embryonic development both of fertilized embryos and of androgenetic haploid embryos. Furthermore, we report that mH3.3 depletion in oocytes impairs both activation of the Oct4 pluripotency marker gene and global de novo transcription from the paternal genome important for early embryonic development. Our results suggest that H3.3-mediated paternal chromatin remodeling is essential for the development of preimplantation embryos and the activation of the paternal genome during embryogenesis. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. A comprehensive molecular study on Coffin-Siris and Nicolaides-Baraitser syndromes identifies a broad molecular and clinical spectrum converging on altered chromatin remodeling.

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    Wieczorek, Dagmar; Bögershausen, Nina; Beleggia, Filippo; Steiner-Haldenstätt, Sabine; Pohl, Esther; Li, Yun; Milz, Esther; Martin, Marcel; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Alanay, Yasemin; Kayserili, Hülya; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Böhringer, Stefan; Wollstein, Andreas; Albrecht, Beate; Boduroglu, Koray; Caliebe, Almuth; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Cogulu, Ozgur; Cristofoli, Francesca; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Elcioglu, Nursel; Gener, Blanca; Goecke, Timm O; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Guillén-Navarro, Encarnación; Hayek, Joussef; Houge, Gunnar; Kilic, Esra; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Özlem; López-González, Vanesa; Kuechler, Alma; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Mari, Francesca; Marozza, Annabella; Mathieu Dramard, Michèle; Mikat, Barbara; Morin, Gilles; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Ozkinay, Ferda; Rauch, Anita; Renieri, Alessandra; Tinschert, Sigrid; Utine, G Eda; Vilain, Catheline; Vivarelli, Rossella; Zweier, Christiane; Nürnberg, Peter; Rahmann, Sven; Vermeesch, Joris; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Zeschnigk, Michael; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-12-20

    Chromatin remodeling complexes are known to modify chemical marks on histones or to induce conformational changes in the chromatin in order to regulate transcription. De novo dominant mutations in different members of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex have recently been described in individuals with Coffin-Siris (CSS) and Nicolaides-Baraitser (NCBRS) syndromes. Using a combination of whole-exome sequencing, NGS-based sequencing of 23 SWI/SNF complex genes, and molecular karyotyping in 46 previously undescribed individuals with CSS and NCBRS, we identified a de novo 1-bp deletion (c.677delG, p.Gly226Glufs*53) and a de novo missense mutation (c.914G>T, p.Cys305Phe) in PHF6 in two individuals diagnosed with CSS. PHF6 interacts with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex implicating dysfunction of a second chromatin remodeling complex in the pathogenesis of CSS-like phenotypes. Altogether, we identified mutations in 60% of the studied individuals (28/46), located in the genes ARID1A, ARID1B, SMARCB1, SMARCE1, SMARCA2, and PHF6. We show that mutations in ARID1B are the main cause of CSS, accounting for 76% of identified mutations. ARID1B and SMARCB1 mutations were also found in individuals with the initial diagnosis of NCBRS. These individuals apparently belong to a small subset who display an intermediate CSS/NCBRS phenotype. Our proposed genotype-phenotype correlations are important for molecular screening strategies.

  9. Analysis of DNA replication associated chromatin decondensation: in vivo assay for understanding chromatin remodeling mechanisms of selected proteins.

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    Borysov, Sergiy; Bryant, Victoria L; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    mechanisms underlying DNA replication associated chromatin accessibility, this unique and powerful experimental system has the propensity to be a valuable tool for understanding chromatin remodeling mechanisms orchestrated by other cellular processes such as DNA repair, recombination, mitotic chromosome condensation, or other chromosome dynamics involving chromatin alterations and accessibility.

  10. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, G.; Wiegant, W.W.; Luijsterburg, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arising in native chromatin elicit an RNF8/RNF168-dependent ubiquitylation response, which triggers the recruitment of various repair factors. Precisely how this response is regulated in the context of chromatin remains largely...... unexplored. Here, we show that SMARCA5/SNF2H, the catalytic subunit of ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes, is recruited to DSBs in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-dependent manner. Remarkably, PARP activity, although dispensable for the efficient spreading of νH2AX into damaged chromatin......, selectively promotes spreading of SMARCA5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168, ubiquitin conjugates and the ubiquitin-binding factors RAD18 and the RAP80-BRCA1 complex throughout DSB-flanking chromatin. This suggests that PARP regulates the spatial organization of the RNF168-driven ubiquitin response to DNA...

  11. Lipid droplet-associated gene expression and chromatin remodelling in LIPASE 5'-upstream region from beginning- to mid-endodormant bud in 'Fuji' apple.

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    Saito, Takanori; Wang, Shanshan; Ohkawa, Katsuya; Ohara, Hitoshi; Ikeura, Hiromi; Ogawa, Yukiharu; Kondo, Satoru

    2017-11-01

    We found that lipid accumulation in the meristem region and the expression of MdLIP2A, which appears to be regulated by chromatin remodeling, coincided with endodormancy induction in the 'Fuji' apple. In deciduous trees, including apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.), lipid accumulation in the meristem region towards endodormancy induction has been thought to be an important process for the acquisition of cold tolerance. In this study, we conducted histological staining of crude lipids in the meristem region of 'Fuji' apples and found that lipid accumulation coincided with endodormancy induction. Since a major component of lipid bodies (triacylglycerol) is esterified fatty acids, we analysed fatty acid-derived volatile compounds and genes encoding fatty acid-modifying enzymes (MdLOX1A and MdHPL2A); the reduction of lipid breakdown also coincided with endodormancy induction. We then characterised the expression patterns of lipid body-regulatory genes MdOLE1 and MdLIP2A during endodormancy induction and found that the expression of MdLIP2A correlated well with lipid accumulation towards endodormancy induction. Based on these results, we conducted chromatin remodelling studies and localized the cis-element in the 5'-upstream region of MdLIP2A to clarify its regulatory mechanism. Finally, we revealed that chromatin was concentrated - 764 to - 862 bp of the 5'-upstream region of MdLIP2A, which harbours the GARE [gibberellin responsive MYB transcription factor binding site] and CArG [MADS-box transcription factor binding site] motifs-meristem development-related protein-binding sites.

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Lakshmi; McDaniel, Ivy E; Engie, Liana; Armstrong, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  13. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

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    Lakshmi Bugga

    Full Text Available CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  14. Genome-wide specificity of DNA binding, gene regulation, and chromatin remodeling by TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polstein, Lauren R; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Kocak, D Dewran; Vockley, Christopher M; Bledsoe, Peggy; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    Genome engineering technologies based on the CRISPR/Cas9 and TALE systems are enabling new approaches in science and biotechnology. However, the specificity of these tools in complex genomes and the role of chromatin structure in determining DNA binding are not well understood. We analyzed the genome-wide effects of TALE- and CRISPR-based transcriptional activators in human cells using ChIP-seq to assess DNA-binding specificity and RNA-seq to measure the specificity of perturbing the transcriptome. Additionally, DNase-seq was used to assess genome-wide chromatin remodeling that occurs as a result of their action. Our results show that these transcription factors are highly specific in both DNA binding and gene regulation and are able to open targeted regions of closed chromatin independent of gene activation. Collectively, these results underscore the potential for these technologies to make precise changes to gene expression for gene and cell therapies or fundamental studies of gene function. © 2015 Polstein et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Mediator binds to boundaries of chromosomal interaction domains and to proteins involved in DNA looping, RNA metabolism, chromatin remodeling, and actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan V; Bharatula, Vasudha; Elfving, Nils; Blomberg, Jeanette; Larsson, Miriam; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R; Björklund, Stefan

    2017-09-06

    Mediator is a multi-unit molecular complex that plays a key role in transferring signals from transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes. We have combined biochemical purification of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediator from chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in order to reveal Mediator occupancy on DNA genome-wide, and to identify proteins interacting specifically with Mediator on the chromatin template. Tandem mass spectrometry of proteins in immunoprecipitates of mediator complexes revealed specific interactions between Mediator and the RSC, Arp2/Arp3, CPF, CF 1A and Lsm complexes in chromatin. These factors are primarily involved in chromatin remodeling, actin assembly, mRNA 3'-end processing, gene looping and mRNA decay, but they have also been shown to enter the nucleus and participate in Pol II transcription. Moreover, we have found that Mediator, in addition to binding Pol II promoters, occupies chromosomal interacting domain (CID) boundaries and that Mediator in chromatin associates with proteins that have been shown to interact with CID boundaries, such as Sth1, Ssu72 and histone H4. This suggests that Mediator plays a significant role in higher-order genome organization. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Cardiac-enriched BAF chromatin-remodeling complex subunit Baf60c regulates gene expression programs essential for heart development and function

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    Xin Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available How chromatin-remodeling complexes modulate gene networks to control organ-specific properties is not well understood. For example, Baf60c (Smarcd3 encodes a cardiac-enriched subunit of the SWI/SNF-like BAF chromatin complex, but its role in heart development is not fully understood. We found that constitutive loss of Baf60c leads to embryonic cardiac hypoplasia and pronounced cardiac dysfunction. Conditional deletion of Baf60c in cardiomyocytes resulted in postnatal dilated cardiomyopathy with impaired contractile function. Baf60c regulates a gene expression program that includes genes encoding contractile proteins, modulators of sarcomere function, and cardiac metabolic genes. Many of the genes deregulated in Baf60c null embryos are targets of the MEF2/SRF co-factor Myocardin (MYOCD. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified MYOCD as a BAF60c interacting factor; we showed that BAF60c and MYOCD directly and functionally interact. We conclude that Baf60c is essential for coordinating a program of gene expression that regulates the fundamental functional properties of cardiomyocytes.

  17. Dietary polyphenols and chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Gian Luigi; Vastolo, Viviana; Ciccarelli, Marco; Albano, Luigi; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Ungaro, Paola

    2017-08-13

    Polyphenols are the most abundant phytochemicals in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages. Recent findings suggest that polyphenols display the ability to reverse adverse epigenetic regulation involved in pathological conditions, such as obesity, metabolic disorder, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and various forms of cancer. Epigenetics, defined as heritable changes to the transcriptome, independent from those occurring in the genome, includes DNA methylation, histone modifications, and posttranscriptional gene regulation by noncoding RNAs. Sinergistically and cooperatively, these processes regulate gene expression by changing chromatin organization and DNA accessibility. Such induced epigenetic changes can be inherited during cell division, resulting in permanent maintenance of the acquired phenotype, but they may also occur throughout an individual life-course and may ultimately influence phenotypic outcomes (health and disease risk). In the last decade, a number of studies have shown that nutrients can affect metabolic traits by altering the structure of chromatin and directly regulate both transcription and translational processes. In this context, dietary polyphenol-targeted epigenetics becomes an attractive approach for disease prevention and intervention. Here, we will review how polyphenols, including flavonoids, curcuminoids, and stilbenes, modulate the establishment and maintenance of key epigenetic marks, thereby influencing gene expression and, hence, disease risk and health.

  18. Impaired chromatin remodelling at STAT1-regulated promoters leads to global unresponsiveness of Toxoplasma gondii-infected macrophages to IFN-γ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Lang

    2012-01-01

    -infected MΦ are unable to respond to IFN-γ due to disturbed chromatin remodelling, but can be rescued using histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  19. Recruitment by the Repressor Freud-1 of Histone Deacetylase-Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes to Strengthen HTR1A Gene Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souslova, Tatiana; Mirédin, Kim; Millar, Anne M; Albert, Paul R

    2017-12-01

    Five-prime repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1)/CC2D1A is genetically linked to intellectual disability and implicated in neuronal development. Freud-1 represses the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene HTR1A by histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent or HDAC-independent mechanisms in 5-HT1A-negative (e.g., HEK-293) or 5-HT1A-expressing cells (SK-N-SH), respectively. To identify the underlying mechanisms, Freud-1-associated proteins were affinity-purified from HEK-293 nuclear extracts and members of the Brg1/SMARCCA chromatin remodeling and Sin3A-HDAC corepressor complexes were identified. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that Freud-1 interacts directly with the Brg1 carboxyl-terminal domain; interaction with Brg1 required the carboxyl-terminal of Freud-1. Freud-1 complexes in HEK-293 and SK-N-SH cells differed, with low levels of BAF170/SMARCC2 and BAF57/SMARCE1 in HEK-293 cells and low-undetectable BAF155/SMARCC1, Sin3A, and HDAC1/2 in SK-N-SH cells. Similarly, by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, Brg1-BAF170/57 and Sin3A-HDAC complexes were observed at the HTR1A promoter in HEK-293 cells, whereas in SK-N-SH cells, Sin3A-HDAC proteins were not detected. Quantifying 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in cells treated with siRNA to Freud-1, Brg1, or both RNAs addressed the functional role of the Freud-1-Brg1 complex. In HEK-293 cells, 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels were increased only when both Freud-1 and Brg1 were depleted, but in SK-N-SH cells, depletion of either protein upregulated 5-HT1A receptor RNA. Thus, recruitment by Freud-1 of Brg1, BAF155, and Sin3A-HDAC complexes appears to strengthen repression of the HTR1A gene to prevent its expression inappropriate cell types, while recruitment of the Brg1-BAF170/57 complex is permissive to 5-HT1A receptor expression. Alterations in Freud-1-Brg1 interactions in mutants associated with intellectual disability could impair gene repression leading to altered neuronal

  20. The homodimeric GBS1074 from Streptococcus agalactiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Anshuman; Pallen, Mark; Anthony, Mark; White, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    The homodimeric nature of the ESAT-6 homologue GBS1074 and the potential for fibre-like assemblies are revealed by the 2 Å resolution crystal structure. ESAT-6 is a well characterized secreted protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and represents the archetype of the WXG100 family of proteins. Genes encoding ESAT-6 homologues have been identified in the genome of the human pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae; one of these genes, esxA, has been cloned and the recombinant protein has been crystallized. In contrast to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6, the crystal structure of GBS1074 reveals a homodimeric structure similar to homologous structures from Staphylococcus aureus and Helicobacter pylori. Intriguingly, GBS1074 forms elongated fibre-like assemblies in the crystal structure

  1. HAB1–SWI3B Interaction Reveals a Link between Abscisic Acid Signaling and Putative SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Angela; Rodrigues, Americo; Santiago, Julia; Rubio, Silvia; Rodriguez, Pedro L.

    2008-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has an important role for plant growth, development, and stress adaptation. HYPERSENSITIVE TO ABA1 (HAB1) is a protein phosphatase type 2C that plays a key role as a negative regulator of ABA signaling; however, the molecular details of HAB1 action in this process are not known. A two-hybrid screen revealed that SWI3B, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the yeast SWI3 subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes, is a prevalent interacting partner of HAB1. The interaction mapped to the N-terminal half of SWI3B and required an intact protein phosphatase catalytic domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction of HAB1 and SWI3B in the nucleus of plant cells. swi3b mutants showed a reduced sensitivity to ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination and growth and reduced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the presence of HAB1 in the vicinity of RD29B and RAB18 promoters was abolished by ABA, which suggests a direct involvement of HAB1 in the regulation of ABA-induced transcription. Additionally, our results uncover SWI3B as a novel positive regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that HAB1 modulates ABA response through the regulation of a putative SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. PMID:19033529

  2. Evidence that two ATP-dependent (Lon proteases in Borrelia burgdorferi serve different functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Coleman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The canonical ATP-dependent protease Lon participates in an assortment of biological processes in bacteria, including the catalysis of damaged or senescent proteins and short-lived regulatory proteins. Borrelia spirochetes are unusual in that they code for two putative ATP-dependent Lon homologs, Lon-1 and Lon-2. Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is transmitted through the blood feeding of Ixodes ticks. Previous work in our laboratory reported that B. burgdorferi lon-1 is upregulated transcriptionally by exposure to blood in vitro, while lon-2 is not. Because blood induction of Lon-1 may be of importance in the regulation of virulence factors critical for spirochete transmission, the clarification of functional roles for these two proteases in B. burgdorferi was the object of this study. On the chromosome, lon-2 is immediately downstream of ATP-dependent proteases clpP and clpX, an arrangement identical to that of lon of Escherichia coli. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Lon-1 and Lon-2 cluster separately due to differences in the NH(2-terminal substrate binding domains that may reflect differences in substrate specificity. Recombinant Lon-1 manifested properties of an ATP-dependent chaperone-protease in vitro but did not complement an E. coli Lon mutant, while Lon-2 corrected two characteristic Lon-mutant phenotypes. We conclude that B. burgdorferi Lons -1 and -2 have distinct functional roles. Lon-2 functions in a manner consistent with canonical Lon, engaged in cellular homeostasis. Lon-1, by virtue of its blood induction, and as a unique feature of the Borreliae, may be important in host adaptation from the arthropod to a warm-blooded host.

  3. ATP-dependent calcium transport across basal plasma membranes of human placental trophoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.J.; Kelley, L.K.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    As a first step in understanding the cellular basis of maternal-fetal calcium transfer, the authors examined the characteristics of calcium uptake by a highly purified preparation of the syncytiotrophoblast basal (fetal facing) plasma membrane. In the presence of nanomolar concentrations of free calcium, basal membranes demonstrated substantial ATP-dependent calcium uptake. This uptake required magnesium, was not significantly affected by Na + or K + (50 mM), or sodium azide (10 mM). Intravesicular calcium was rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium transport was significantly stimulated by the calcium-dependent regulatory protein calmodulin. Placental membrane fractions enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria also demonstrated ATP-dependent calcium uptake. In contrast to basal membrane, mitochondrial calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake by the ER was only 20% of that of basal membranes. They conclude that the placental basal plasma membrane possesses a high-affinity calcium transport system similar to that found in plasma membranes of a variety of cell types. This transporter is situated to permit it to function in vivo in maternal-fetal calcium transfer

  4. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon/sup -/ cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes (/sup 3/H)methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles.

  5. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon - cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes [ 3 H]methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg 2+ . ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles

  6. N terminus of Swr1 binds to histone H2AZ and provides a platform for subunit assembly in the chromatin remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Hua; Wu, Chwen-Huey; Ladurner, Andreas; Mizuguchi, Gaku; Wei, Debbie; Xiao, Hua; Luk, Ed; Ranjan, Anand; Wu, Carl

    2009-03-06

    Variant histone H2AZ-containing nucleosomes are involved in the regulation of gene expression. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromatin deposition of histone H2AZ is mediated by the fourteen-subunit SWR1 complex, which catalyzes ATP-dependent exchange of nucleosomal histone H2A for H2AZ. Previous work defined the role of seven SWR1 subunits (Swr1 ATPase, Swc2, Swc3, Arp6, Swc5, Yaf9, and Swc6) in maintaining complex integrity and H2AZ histone replacement activity. Here we examined the function of three additional SWR1 subunits, bromodomain containing Bdf1, actin-related protein Arp4 and Swc7, by analyzing affinity-purified mutant SWR1 complexes. We observed that depletion of Arp4 (arp4-td) substantially impaired the association of Bdf1, Yaf9, and Swc4. In contrast, loss of either Bdf1 or Swc7 had minimal effects on overall complex integrity. Furthermore, the basic H2AZ histone replacement activity of SWR1 in vitro required Arp4, but not Bdf1 or Swc7. Thus, three out of fourteen SWR1 subunits, Bdf1, Swc7, and previously noted Swc3, appear to have roles auxiliary to the basic histone replacement activity. The N-terminal region of the Swr1 ATPase subunit is necessary and sufficient to direct association of Bdf1 and Swc7, as well as Arp4, Act1, Yaf9 and Swc4. This same region contains an additional H2AZ-H2B specific binding site, distinct from the previously identified Swc2 subunit. These findings suggest that one SWR1 enzyme might be capable of binding two H2AZ-H2B dimers, and provide further insight on the hierarchy and interdependency of molecular interactions within the SWR1 complex.

  7. Antispasmodic activity of Symplocos paniculata is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent K+ channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Symplocos paniculata is a medicinal plant used by native healers to manage gastrointestinal ailments. The crude methanolic extract of S. paniculata was screened pharmacologically both in vitro and in vivo for the validation of its therapeutic potential. It suppressed the spontaneous activity of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations and also caused inhibition of the low K+ (20 mM- induced spastic contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations in a manner comparable to cromakalim. The relaxant effect was found to be blocked following glibenclamide exposure of the isolated tissue preparations similar to cromakalim, suggesting that observed response was likely to be mediated through opening of ATP dependent K+ channels. Following oral administration to mice provided protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in a manner similar to loperamide. The plant material was found safe in toxicity study up to oral dose of 8 g/kg in mice. Hence, present study provides a scientific basis for the vernacular use of S. paniculata in gastro-intestinal system.

  8. ATP-dependent molecular chaperones in plastids--More complex than expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trösch, Raphael; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Willmund, Felix

    2015-09-01

    Plastids are a class of essential plant cell organelles comprising photosynthetic chloroplasts of green tissues, starch-storing amyloplasts of roots and tubers or the colorful pigment-storing chromoplasts of petals and fruits. They express a few genes encoded on their organellar genome, called plastome, but import most of their proteins from the cytosol. The import into plastids, the folding of freshly-translated or imported proteins, the degradation or renaturation of denatured and entangled proteins, and the quality-control of newly folded proteins all require the action of molecular chaperones. Members of all four major families of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones (chaperonin/Cpn60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp100 families) have been identified in plastids from unicellular algae to higher plants. This review aims not only at giving an overview of the most current insights into the general and conserved functions of these plastid chaperones, but also into their specific plastid functions. Given that chloroplasts harbor an extreme environment that cycles between reduced and oxidized states, that has to deal with reactive oxygen species and is highly reactive to environmental and developmental signals, it can be presumed that plastid chaperones have evolved a plethora of specific functions some of which are just about to be discovered. Here, the most urgent questions that remain unsolved are discussed, and guidance for future research on plastid chaperones is given. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A simple and versatile system for the ATP-dependent assembly of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Mai T; Fei, Jia; Cruz-Becerra, Grisel; Kadonaga, James T

    2017-11-24

    Chromatin is the natural form of DNA in the eukaryotic nucleus and is the substrate for diverse biological phenomena. The functional analysis of these processes ideally would be carried out with nucleosomal templates that are assembled with customized core histones, DNA sequences, and chromosomal proteins. Here we report a simple, reliable, and versatile method for the ATP-dependent assembly of evenly spaced nucleosome arrays. This minimal chromatin assembly system comprises the Drosophila nucleoplasmin-like protein (dNLP) histone chaperone, the imitation switch (ISWI) ATP-driven motor protein, core histones, template DNA, and ATP. The dNLP and ISWI components were synthesized in bacteria, and each protein could be purified in a single step by affinity chromatography. We show that the dNLP-ISWI system can be used with different DNA sequences, linear or circular DNA, bulk genomic DNA, recombinant or native Drosophila core histones, native human histones, the linker histone H1, the non-histone chromosomal protein HMGN2, and the core histone variants H3.3 and H2A.V. The dNLP-ISWI system should be accessible to a wide range of researchers and enable the assembly of customized chromatin with specifically desired DNA sequences, core histones, and other chromosomal proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Negative regulation of quorum-sensing systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ATP-dependent Lon protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Akiko; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Tsuchiya, Hiroko; Isogai, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2008-06-01

    Lon protease, a member of the ATP-dependent protease family, regulates numerous cellular systems by degrading specific substrates. Here, we demonstrate that Lon is involved in the regulation of quorum-sensing (QS) signaling systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen. The organism has two acyl-homoserine lactone (HSL)-mediated QS systems, LasR/LasI and RhlR/RhlI. Many reports have demonstrated that these two systems are regulated and interconnected by global regulators. We found that lon-disrupted cells overproduce pyocyanin, the biosynthesis of which depends on the RhlR/RhlI system, and show increased levels of a transcriptional regulator, RhlR. The QS systems are organized hierarchically: the RhlR/RhlI system is subordinate to LasR/LasI. To elucidate the mechanism by which Lon negatively regulates RhlR/RhlI, we examined the effect of lon disruption on the LasR/LasI system. We found that Lon represses the expression of LasR/LasI by degrading LasI, an HSL synthase, leading to negative regulation of the RhlR/RhlI system. RhlR/RhlI was also shown to be regulated by Lon independently of LasR/LasI via regulation of RhlI, an HSL synthase. In view of these findings, it is suggested that Lon protease is a powerful negative regulator of both HSL-mediated QS systems in P. aeruginosa.

  11. An ATP-dependent ligase with substrate flexibility involved in assembly of the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic polyoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyoxin (POL) is an unusual nucleoside antibiotic, in which peptidyl moiety and nucleoside skeleton are linked by an amide bond. However, their biosynthesis remains poorly understood. Here, we report the deciphering of PolG as an ATP-dependent ligase responsible for the assembly of POL. A polG muta...

  12. Inhibition of the cardiac ATP-dependent potassium current by KB-R7943.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramochkin, Denis V; Vornanen, Matti

    2014-09-01

    KB-R7943 (2-[2-[4-(4-nitrobenzyloxy)phenyl]ethyl]isothiourea) was developed as a specific inhibitor of the sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) with potential experimental and therapeutic use. However, in cardiomyocytes KB-R7943 also effectively blocks several K(+) currents including the delayed rectifier, IKr, and background inward rectifier, IK1. In the present study we analyze the effects of KB-R7943 on the ATP-dependent potassium current (IKATP) recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp in ventricular cardiomyocytes from a mammal (mouse) and a fish (crucian carp). IKATP was induced by external application of a mitochondrial uncoupler CCCP (3×10(-7) M) and internal perfusion of the cell with ATP-free pipette solution. A weakly inwardly rectifying current with a large outward component, recorded in the presence of CCCP, was blocked with 10(-5) M glibenclamide by 56.1±4.6% and 56.9±3.6% in crucian carp and mouse ventricular myocytes, respectively. In fish cardiomyocytes IKATP was blocked by KB-R7943 with an IC50 value of 3.14×10(-7) M, while in mammalian cells IC50 was 2.8×10(-6) M (PKB-R7943 inhibited CCCP-induced IKATP by 99.9±0.13% and 97.5±1.2% in crucian carp and mouse ventricular myocytes, respectively. In crucian carp the IKATP is about an order of magnitude more sensitive to KB-R7943 than the background IK1, but in mammals IKATP and IK1 are almost equally sensitive to KB-R7943. Therefore, the ability of KB-R7943 to block IKATP should be taken into account together with INCX inhibition when investigating possible cardioprotective effects of this compound. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Mg2+, ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. I. Structural organization and properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veklich, T O; Mazur, Iu Iu; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    Tight control of cytoplasm Ca2+ concentration is essential in cell functioning. Changing of Ca2+ concentration is thorough in smooth muscle cells, because it determines relaxation/constraint process. One of key proteins which control Ca2+ concentration in cytoplasm is Mg2+, ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump. Thus, it is important to find compoumds which allowed one to change Mg2+, ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump activity, as long as this topic is of current interest in biochemical research which regards energy and pharmacomechanical coupling mechanism of muscle excitation and contraction. In this article we generalized literatute and own data about properties of smooth muscle cell plasma membrane Ca(2+)-pump. Stuctural oganization, kinetical properties and molecular biology are considered.

  14. Asymmetric switching in a homodimeric ABC transporter: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Aittoniemi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are a large family of membrane proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including multidrug and tumor resistance and ion channel regulation. Advances in the structural and functional understanding of ABC transporters have revealed that hydrolysis at the two canonical nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs is co-operative and non-simultaneous. A conserved core architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic ABC exporters has been established, as exemplified by the crystal structure of the homodimeric multidrug exporter Sav1866. Currently, it is unclear how sequential ATP hydrolysis arises in a symmetric homodimeric transporter, since it implies at least transient asymmetry at the NBSs. We show by molecular dynamics simulation that the initially symmetric structure of Sav1866 readily undergoes asymmetric transitions at its NBSs in a pre-hydrolytic nucleotide configuration. MgATP-binding residues and a network of charged residues at the dimer interface are shown to form a sequence of putative molecular switches that allow ATP hydrolysis only at one NBS. We extend our findings to eukaryotic ABC exporters which often consist of two non-identical half-transporters, frequently with degeneracy substitutions at one of their two NBSs. Interestingly, many residues involved in asymmetric conformational switching in Sav1866 are substituted in degenerate eukaryotic NBS. This finding strengthens recent suggestions that the interplay of a consensus and a degenerate NBS in eukaroytic ABC proteins pre-determines the sequence of hydrolysis at the two NBSs.

  15. Activities and specificities of homodimeric TALENs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha; Piatek, Marek J.; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth Kumar; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of highly efficient genome engineering reagents is of paramount importance to launch the next wave of biotechnology. TAL effectors have been developed as an adaptable DNA binding scaffold that can be engineered to bind to any user-defined sequence. Thus, TAL-based DNA binding modules have been used to generate chimeric proteins for a variety of targeted genome modifications across eukaryotic species. For example, TAL effectors fused to the catalytic domain of FokI endonuclease (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs), the repair of which can be harnessed to dictate user-desired, genome-editing outcomes. To cleave DNA, FokI endonuclease must dimerize which can be achieved using a pair of TALENs that bind to the DNA targeted in a tail-to-tail orientation with proper spacing allowing the dimer formation. Because TALENs binding to DNA are dependent on their repeat sequences and nucleotides binding specificities, homodimers and heterodimers binding can be formed. In the present study, we used several TALEN monomers with increased repeats binding degeneracy to allow homodimer formation at increased number of genomic loci. We assessed their binding specificities and genome modification activities. Our results indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to modify the yeast genome in a site-specific manner and their binding to the promoter regions might modulate the expression of target genes. Taken together, our data indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to achieve different engineering possibilities of biotechnological applications and that their transcriptional modulations need to be considered when analyzing their phenotypic effects. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Activities and specificities of homodimeric TALENs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-10-01

    The development of highly efficient genome engineering reagents is of paramount importance to launch the next wave of biotechnology. TAL effectors have been developed as an adaptable DNA binding scaffold that can be engineered to bind to any user-defined sequence. Thus, TAL-based DNA binding modules have been used to generate chimeric proteins for a variety of targeted genome modifications across eukaryotic species. For example, TAL effectors fused to the catalytic domain of FokI endonuclease (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs), the repair of which can be harnessed to dictate user-desired, genome-editing outcomes. To cleave DNA, FokI endonuclease must dimerize which can be achieved using a pair of TALENs that bind to the DNA targeted in a tail-to-tail orientation with proper spacing allowing the dimer formation. Because TALENs binding to DNA are dependent on their repeat sequences and nucleotides binding specificities, homodimers and heterodimers binding can be formed. In the present study, we used several TALEN monomers with increased repeats binding degeneracy to allow homodimer formation at increased number of genomic loci. We assessed their binding specificities and genome modification activities. Our results indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to modify the yeast genome in a site-specific manner and their binding to the promoter regions might modulate the expression of target genes. Taken together, our data indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to achieve different engineering possibilities of biotechnological applications and that their transcriptional modulations need to be considered when analyzing their phenotypic effects. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  17. ATP-Dependent C–F Bond Cleavage Allows the Complete Degradation of 4-Fluoroaromatics without Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Tiedt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Complete biodegradation of the abundant and persistent fluoroaromatics requires enzymatic cleavage of an arylic C–F bond, probably the most stable single bond of a biodegradable organic molecule. While in aerobic microorganisms defluorination of fluoroaromatics is initiated by oxygenases, arylic C–F bond cleavage has never been observed in the absence of oxygen. Here, an oxygen-independent enzymatic aryl fluoride bond cleavage is described during the complete degradation of 4-fluorobenzoate or 4-fluorotoluene to CO2 and HF in the denitrifying Thauera aromatica: the ATP-dependent defluorination of 4-fluorobenzoyl-coenzyme A (4-F-BzCoA to benzoyl-coenzyme A (BzCoA and HF, catalyzed by class I BzCoA reductase (BCR. Adaptation to growth with the fluoroaromatics was accomplished by the downregulation of a promiscuous benzoate-CoA ligase and the concomitant upregulation of 4-F-BzCoA-defluorinating/dearomatizing BCR on the transcriptional level. We propose an unprecedented mechanism for reductive arylic C–F bond cleavage via a Birch reduction-like mechanism resulting in a formal nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In the proposed anionic 4-fluorodienoyl-CoA transition state, fluoride elimination to BzCoA is favored over protonation to a fluorinated cyclic dienoyl-CoA.

  18. ATP-dependent partitioning of the DNA template into supercoiled domains by Escherichia coli UvrAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Hyeon-Sook; Liu, L.F.; Claassen, L.; Grossman, L.

    1991-01-01

    The helicase action of the Escherichia coli UvrAB complex on a covalently closed circular DNA template was monitored using bacterial DNA topoisomerase I, which specifically removes negative supercoils. In the presence of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and ATP, the UvrAB complex gradually introduced positive supercoils into the input relaxed plasmid DNA template. Positive supercoils were not produced when E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was replaced by eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I or when both E. coli and eukaryotic DNA topoisomerases I were added simultaneously. These results suggest that like other DNA helix-tracking processes, the ATP-dependent action of the UvrAM complex on duplex DNA simultaneously generates both positive and negative supercoils, which are not constrained by protein binding but are torsionally strained. The supercoiling activity of UvrAB on UV-damaged DNA was also studied using UV-damaged plasmid DNA and a mutant UvrA protein that lacks the 40 C-terminal amino acids and is defective in preferential binding to UV-damaged DNA. UvrAB was found to preferentially supercoil the UV-damaged DNA template, whereas the mutant protein supercoiled UV-damaged and undamaged DNA with equal efficiency. The authors results therefore suggest that the DNA helix-tracking activity of UvrAB may be involved in searching and/or prepriming the damaged DNA for UvrC incision. A possible role of supercoiled domains in the incision process is discussed

  19. Characterisation of ATP-dependent Mur ligases involved in the biogenesis of cell wall peptidoglycan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Tulika; Gupta, Antima; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Guzman, Juan David; Gibbons, Simon; Keep, Nicholas H; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2013-01-01

    ATP-dependent Mur ligases (Mur synthetases) play essential roles in the biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG) as they catalyze the ligation of key amino acid residues to the stem peptide at the expense of ATP hydrolysis, thus representing potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery. In this study we characterized the division/cell wall (dcw) operon and identified a promoter driving the co-transcription of mur synthetases along with key cell division genes such as ftsQ and ftsW. Furthermore, we have extended our previous investigations of MurE to MurC, MurD and MurF synthetases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Functional analyses of the pure recombinant enzymes revealed that the presence of divalent cations is an absolute requirement for their activities. We also observed that higher concentrations of ATP and UDP-sugar substrates were inhibitory for the activities of all Mur synthetases suggesting stringent control of the cytoplasmic steps of the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. In line with the previous findings on the regulation of mycobacterial MurD and corynebacterial MurC synthetases via phosphorylation, we found that all of the Mur synthetases interacted with the Ser/Thr protein kinases, PknA and PknB. In addition, we critically analyzed the interaction network of all of the Mur synthetases with proteins involved in cell division and cell wall PG biosynthesis to re-evaluate the importance of these key enzymes as novel therapeutic targets in anti-tubercular drug discovery.

  20. Inhibitors of the 5-lipoxygenase arachidonic acid pathway induce ATP release and ATP-dependent organic cation transport in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva-Souza, Hercules Antônio; Lira, Maria Nathalia de; Costa-Junior, Helio Miranda; da Cruz, Cristiane Monteiro; Vasconcellos, Jorge Silvio Silva; Mendes, Anderson Nogueira; Pimenta-Reis, Gabriela; Alvarez, Cora Lilia; Faccioli, Lucia Helena; Serezani, Carlos Henrique; Schachter, Julieta; Persechini, Pedro Muanis

    2014-07-01

    We have previously described that arachidonic acid (AA)-5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism inhibitors such as NDGA and MK886, inhibit cell death by apoptosis, but not by necrosis, induced by extracellular ATP (ATPe) binding to P2X7 receptors in macrophages. ATPe binding to P2X7 also induces large cationic and anionic organic molecules uptake in these cells, a process that involves at least two distinct transport mechanisms: one for cations and another for anions. Here we show that inhibitors of the AA-5-LO pathway do not inhibit P2X7 receptors, as judged by the maintenance of the ATPe-induced uptake of fluorescent anionic dyes. In addition, we describe two new transport phenomena induced by these inhibitors in macrophages: a cation-selective uptake of fluorescent dyes and the release of ATP. The cation uptake requires secreted ATPe, but, differently from the P2X7/ATPe-induced phenomena, it is also present in macrophages derived from mice deficient in the P2X7 gene. Inhibitors of phospholipase A2 and of the AA-cyclooxygenase pathway did not induce the cation uptake. The uptake of non-organic cations was investigated by measuring the free intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) by Fura-2 fluorescence. NDGA, but not MK886, induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. Chelating Ca(2+) ions in the extracellular medium suppressed the intracellular Ca(2+) signal without interfering in the uptake of cationic dyes. We conclude that inhibitors of the AA-5-LO pathway do not block P2X7 receptors, trigger the release of ATP, and induce an ATP-dependent uptake of organic cations by a Ca(2+)- and P2X7-independent transport mechanism in macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterisation of ATP-dependent Mur ligases involved in the biogenesis of cell wall peptidoglycan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Munshi

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent Mur ligases (Mur synthetases play essential roles in the biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG as they catalyze the ligation of key amino acid residues to the stem peptide at the expense of ATP hydrolysis, thus representing potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery. In this study we characterized the division/cell wall (dcw operon and identified a promoter driving the co-transcription of mur synthetases along with key cell division genes such as ftsQ and ftsW. Furthermore, we have extended our previous investigations of MurE to MurC, MurD and MurF synthetases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Functional analyses of the pure recombinant enzymes revealed that the presence of divalent cations is an absolute requirement for their activities. We also observed that higher concentrations of ATP and UDP-sugar substrates were inhibitory for the activities of all Mur synthetases suggesting stringent control of the cytoplasmic steps of the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. In line with the previous findings on the regulation of mycobacterial MurD and corynebacterial MurC synthetases via phosphorylation, we found that all of the Mur synthetases interacted with the Ser/Thr protein kinases, PknA and PknB. In addition, we critically analyzed the interaction network of all of the Mur synthetases with proteins involved in cell division and cell wall PG biosynthesis to re-evaluate the importance of these key enzymes as novel therapeutic targets in anti-tubercular drug discovery.

  2. Engineering an ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase for synthesizing amino acid amides from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yuta; Okazaki, Seiji; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-05-01

    We successfully engineered a new enzyme that catalyzes the formation of D-Ala amide (D-AlaNH 2 ) from D-Ala by modifying ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase (EC 6.3.2.4) from Thermus thermophilus, which catalyzes the formation of D-Ala-D-Ala from two molecules of D-Ala. The new enzyme was created by the replacement of the Ser293 residue with acidic amino acids, as it was speculated to bind to the second D-Ala of D-Ala-D-Ala. In addition, a replacement of the position with Glu performed better than that with Asp with regards to specificity for D-AlaNH 2 production. The S293E variant, which was selected as the best enzyme for D-AlaNH 2 production, exhibited an optimal activity at pH 9.0 and 40 °C for D-AlaNH 2 production. The apparent K m values of this variant for D-Ala and NH 3 were 7.35 mM and 1.58 M, respectively. The S293E variant could catalyze the synthesis of 9.3 and 35.7 mM of D-AlaNH 2 from 10 and 50 mM D-Ala and 3 M NH 4 Cl with conversion yields of 93 and 71.4 %, respectively. This is the first report showing the enzymatic formation of amino acid amides from amino acids.

  3. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca 2+ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting 32 P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated 32 P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor

  4. Acetone and Butanone Metabolism of the Denitrifying Bacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” Demonstrates Novel Biochemical Properties of an ATP-Dependent Aliphatic Ketone Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schühle, Karola

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic and aerobic metabolism of acetone and butanone in the betaproteobacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” is initiated by their ATP-dependent carboxylation to acetoacetate and 3-oxopentanoic acid, respectively. Both reactions are catalyzed by the same enzyme, acetone carboxylase, which was purified and characterized. Acetone carboxylase is highly induced under growth on acetone or butanone and accounts for at least 5.5% of total cell protein. The enzyme consists of three subunits of 85, 75, and 20 kDa, respectively, in a (αβγ)2 composition and contains 1 Zn and 2 Fe per heterohexamer but no organic cofactors. Chromatographic analysis of the ATP hydrolysis products indicated that ATP was exclusively cleaved to AMP and 2 Pi. The stoichiometry was determined to be 2 ATP consumed per acetone carboxylated. Purified acetone carboxylase from A. aromaticum catalyzes the carboxylation of acetone and butanone as the only substrates. However, the enzyme shows induced (uncoupled) ATPase activity with many other substrates that were not carboxylated. Acetone carboxylase is a member of a protein family that also contains acetone carboxylases of various other organisms, acetophenone carboxylase of A. aromaticum, and ATP-dependent hydantoinases/oxoprolinases. While the members of this family share several characteristic features, they differ with respect to the products of ATP hydrolysis, subunit composition, and metal content. PMID:22020645

  5. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R.

    2005-01-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA + protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis

  6. DNA Methylation and Chromatin Remodeling: The Blueprint of Cancer Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Bhattacharjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics deals with the interactions between genes and the immediate cellular environment. These interactions go a long way in shaping up each and every person’s individuality. Further, reversibility of epigenetic interactions may offer a dynamic control over the expression of various critical genes. Thus, tweaking the epigenetic machinery may help cause or cure diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, cancer epigenetics, especially at a molecular level, needs to be scrutinised closely, as it could potentially serve as the future pharmaceutical goldmine against neoplastic diseases. However, in view of its rapidly enlarging scope of application, it has become difficult to keep abreast of scientific information coming out of various epigenetic studies directed against cancer. Using this review, we have attempted to shed light on two of the most important mechanisms implicated in cancer, that is, DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid methylation and histone modifications, and their place in cancer pathogenesis. Further, we have attempted to take stock of the new epigenetic drugs that have emerged onto the market as well as those in the pipeline that offer hope in mankind’s fight against cancer.

  7. Chromatin remodeling in the UV-induced DNA damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ö.Z. Aydin (Özge)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage interferes with transcription and replication, causing cell death, chromosomal aberrations or mutations, eventually leading to aging and tumorigenesis (Hoeijmakers, 2009). The integrity of DNA is protected by a network of DNA repair and associated

  8. The ATP-Dependent Protease ClpP Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Regulating Agr and Cell Wall Hydrolase Sle1 in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Xing; Qin, Juanxiu; Cheng, Sen; Yeo, Won-Sik; He, Lei; Ma, Xiaowei; Liu, Xiaoyun; Li, Min; Bae, Taeok

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm causes hospital-associated infections on indwelling medical devices. In Staphylococcus aureus, Biofilm formation is controlled by intricately coordinated network of regulating systems, of which the ATP-dependent protease ClpP shows an inhibitory effect. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of ClpP on biofilm formation is through Agr and the cell wall hydrolase Sle1. Biofilm formed by clpP mutant consists of proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA). The increase of the protein was, at least in part, due to the reduced protease activity of the mutant, which was caused by the decreased activity of agr. On the other hand, the increase of eDNA was due to increased cell lysis caused by the higher level of Sle1. Indeed, as compared with wild type, the clpP mutant excreted an increased level of eDNA, and showed higher sensitivity to Triton-induced autolysis. The deletion of sle1 in the clpP mutant decreased the biofilm formation, the level of eDNA, and the Triton-induced autolysis to wild-type levels. Despite the increased biofilm formation capability, however, the clpP mutant showed significantly reduced virulence in a murine model of subcutaneous foreign body infection, indicating that the increased biofilm formation capability cannot compensate for the intrinsic functions of ClpP during infection. PMID:28555174

  9. The ATP-Dependent Protease ClpP Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Regulating Agr and Cell Wall Hydrolase Sle1 in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm causes hospital-associated infections on indwelling medical devices. In Staphylococcus aureus, Biofilm formation is controlled by intricately coordinated network of regulating systems, of which the ATP-dependent protease ClpP shows an inhibitory effect. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of ClpP on biofilm formation is through Agr and the cell wall hydrolase Sle1. Biofilm formed by clpP mutant consists of proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA. The increase of the protein was, at least in part, due to the reduced protease activity of the mutant, which was caused by the decreased activity of agr. On the other hand, the increase of eDNA was due to increased cell lysis caused by the higher level of Sle1. Indeed, as compared with wild type, the clpP mutant excreted an increased level of eDNA, and showed higher sensitivity to Triton-induced autolysis. The deletion of sle1 in the clpP mutant decreased the biofilm formation, the level of eDNA, and the Triton-induced autolysis to wild-type levels. Despite the increased biofilm formation capability, however, the clpP mutant showed significantly reduced virulence in a murine model of subcutaneous foreign body infection, indicating that the increased biofilm formation capability cannot compensate for the intrinsic functions of ClpP during infection.

  10. Anticancer ruthenium(III) complex KP1019 interferes with ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocation by sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadafi, Fabrizio-Zagros; Massai, Lara; Bartolommei, Gianluca; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Messori, Luigi; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), a P-type ATPase that sustains Ca2+ transport and plays a major role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, represents a therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Here, we investigated whether ruthenium-based anticancer drugs, namely KP1019 (indazolium [trans-tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)]), NAMI-A (imidazolium [trans-tetrachloro(1H-imidazole)(S-dimethylsulfoxide)ruthenate(III)]) and RAPTA-C ([Ru(η6-p-cymene)dichloro(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)]), and cisplatin (cis-diammineplatinum(II) dichloride) might act as inhibitors of SERCA. Charge displacement by SERCA adsorbed on a solid-supported membrane was measured after ATP or Ca2+ concentration jumps. Our results show that KP1019, in contrast to the other metal compounds, is able to interfere with ATP-dependent translocation of Ca2+ ions. An IC50 value of 1 μM was determined for inhibition of calcium translocation by KP1019. Conversely, it appears that KP1019 does not significantly affect Ca2+ binding to the ATPase from the cytoplasmic side. Inhibition of SERCA at pharmacologically relevant concentrations may represent a crucial aspect in the overall pharmacological and toxicological profile of KP1019. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Degradation of the HilC and HilD regulator proteins by ATP-dependent Lon protease leads to downregulation of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Akiko; Kubota, Yohsuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2005-02-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1) enables infecting Salmonella to cross the small intestinal barrier and to escape phagocytosis by inducing apoptosis. Several environmental signals and transcriptional regulators modulate the expression of hilA, which encodes a protein playing a central role in the regulatory hierarchy of SPI1 gene expression. We have previously shown that Lon, a stress-induced ATP-dependent protease, is a negative regulator of hilA, suggesting that it targets factors required for activating hilA expression. To elucidate the mechanisms by which Lon protease negatively regulates SPI1 transcription, we looked for its substrate proteins. We found that HilC and HilD, which are positive regulators of hilA expression, accumulate in Lon-depleted cells, and that the enhancement of SPI1 expression that occurs in a lon-disrupted mutant is not observed in the lon hilC hilD triple null mutant. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the half-lives of HilC and HilD are, respectively, about 12 times and three times longer in the Lon-depleted mutant, than in the Lon+ cells, suggesting that Lon targets both of HilC and HilD. In view of these findings, we suggest that the regulation of SPI1 expression is negatively controlled through degradation of the HilC and HilD transcriptional regulators by Lon.

  12. A unique set of SH3-SH3 interactions controls IB1 homodimerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Guenat, Sylvie; Dar, Imran

    2006-01-01

    Islet-brain 1 (IB1 or JIP-1) is a scaffold protein that interacts with components of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signal-transduction pathway. IB1 is expressed at high levels in neurons and in pancreatic beta-cells, where it controls expression of several insulin-secretory components...... reduces IB1-dependent basal JNK activity in 293T cells. Impaired dimerization also results in a reduction in glucose transporter type 2 expression and in glucose-dependent insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. Taken together, these results indicate that IB1 homodimerization through its SH3 domain...

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrB Is a Robust DNA-Stimulated ATPase That Also Possesses Structure-Specific ATP-Dependent DNA Helicase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Manoj; Kumar, Mohan B J; Muniyappa, K

    2016-10-18

    Much is known about the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway; however, very little is understood about the proteins involved and the molecular mechanism of NER in mycobacteria. In this study, we show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis UvrB (MtUvrB), which exists in solution as a monomer, binds to DNA in a structure-dependent manner. A systematic examination of MtUvrB substrate specificity reveals that it associates preferentially with single-stranded DNA, duplexes with 3' or 5' overhangs, and linear duplex DNA with splayed arms. Whereas E. coli UvrB (EcUvrB) binds weakly to undamaged DNA and has no ATPase activity, MtUvrB possesses intrinsic ATPase activity that is greatly stimulated by both single- and double-stranded DNA. Strikingly, we found that MtUvrB, but not EcUvrB, possesses the DNA unwinding activity characteristic of an ATP-dependent DNA helicase. The helicase activity of MtUvrB proceeds in the 3' to 5' direction and is strongly modulated by a nontranslocating 5' single-stranded tail, indicating that in addition to the translocating strand it also interacts with the 5' end of the substrate. The fraction of DNA unwound by MtUvrB decreases significantly as the length of the duplex increases: it fails to unwind duplexes longer than 70 bp. These results, on one hand, reveal significant mechanistic differences between MtUvrB and EcUvrB and, on the other, support an alternative role for UvrB in the processing of key DNA replication intermediates. Altogether, our findings provide insights into the catalytic functions of UvrB and lay the foundation for further understanding of the NER pathway in M. tuberculosis.

  14. Identification of critical amino acids in the proximal C-terminal of TREK-2 K+ channel for activation by acidic pHi and ATP-dependent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Joohan; Jun, Young Keul; Zhang, Yin-Hua; Nam, Joo Hyun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Sung Joon

    2018-02-01

    TWIK-related two-pore domain K + channels (TREKs) are regulated by intracellular pH (pH i ) and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ). Previously, Glu 306 in proximal C-terminal (pCt) of mouse TREK-1 was identified as the pH i -sensing residue. The direction of PI(4,5)P 2 sensitivity is controversial, and we have recently shown that TREKs are inhibited by intracellular ATP via endogenous PI(4,5)P 2 formation. Here we investigate the anionic and cationic residues of pCt for the pH i and ATP-sensitivity in human TREK-2 (hTREK-2). In inside-out patch clamp recordings (I TREK-2,i-o ), acidic pH i -induced activation was absent in E332A and was partly attenuated in E335A. Neutralization of cationic Lys (K330A) also eliminated the acidic pH i sensitivity of I TREK-2,i-o . Unlike the inhibition of wild-type (WT) I TREK-2,i-o by intracellular ATP, neither E332A nor K330A was sensitive to ATP. Nevertheless, exogenous PI(4,5)P 2 (10 μM) abolished I TREK-2 i-o in all the above mutants as well as in WT, indicating unspecific inhibition by exogenous PI(4,5)P 2 . In whole-cell recordings of TREK-2 (I TREK-2,w-c ), K330A and E332A showed higher or fully active basal activity, showing attenuated or insignificant activation by 2-APB, arachidonic acid, or acidic pH e 6.9. I TREK-1,w-c of WT is largely suppressed by pH e 6.9, and the inhibition is slightly attenuated in K312A and E315A. The results show concerted roles of the oppositely charged Lys and Glu in pCt for the ATP-dependent low basal activity and pH i sensitivity.

  15. Contribution of Kunitz protease inhibitor and transmembrane domains to amyloid precursor protein homodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khalifa, N; Tyteca, D; Courtoy, P J; Renauld, J C; Constantinescu, S N; Octave, J N; Kienlen-Campard, P

    2012-01-01

    The two major isoforms of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) are APP695 and APP751. They differ by the insertion of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) sequence in the extracellular domain of APP751. APP-KPI isoforms are increased in Alzheimer's disease brains, and they could be associated with disease progression. Recent studies have shown that APP processing to Aβ is regulated by homodimerization, which involves both extracellular and juxtamembrane/transmembrane (JM/TM) regions. Our aim is to understand the mechanisms controlling APP dimerization and the contribution of the ectodomain and JM/TM regions to this process. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation approaches coupled to fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis to measure the dimerization level of different APP isoforms and APP C-terminal fragments (C99) mutated in their JM/TM region. APP751 was found to form significantly more homodimers than APP695. Mutation of dimerization motifs in the TM domain of APP or C99 did not significantly affect fluorescence complementation. These findings indicate that the KPI domain plays a major role in APP dimerization. They set the basis for further investigation of the relation between dimerization, metabolism and function of APP. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Crystal structure of human importin-α1 (Rch1, revealing a potential autoinhibition mode involving homodimerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Miyatake

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the crystal structure of N-terminal importin-β-binding domain (IBB-truncated human importin-α1 (ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 at 2.63 Å resolution. The crystal structure of ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 reveals a novel closed homodimer. The homodimer exists in an autoinhibited state in which both the major and minor nuclear localization signal (NLS binding sites are completely buried in the homodimerization interface, an arrangement that restricts NLS binding. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies revealed that ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 is in equilibrium between monomers and dimers and that NLS peptides shifted the equilibrium toward the monomer side. This finding suggests that the NLS binding sites are also involved in the dimer interface in solution. These results show that when the IBB domain dissociates from the internal NLS binding sites, e.g., by binding to importin-β, homodimerization possibly occurs as an autoinhibition state.

  17. ATP-dependent human RISC assembly pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Mayuko; Kawamata, Tomoko; Paroo, Zain; Ye, Xuecheng; Iwasaki, Shintaro; Liu, Qinghua; Tomari, Yukihide

    2010-01-01

    The assembly of RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is a key process in small RNA-mediated gene silencing. In humans, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are incorporated into RISCs containing the Argonaute (AGO) subfamily proteins Ago1-4. Previous studies have proposed that, unlike Drosophila melanogaster RISC assembly pathways, human RISC assembly is coupled with dicing and is independent of ATP. Here we show by careful reexamination that, in humans, RISC assembly and dicing are uncoupled, and ATP greatly facilitates RISC loading of small-RNA duplexes. Moreover, all four human AGO proteins show remarkably similar structural preferences for small-RNA duplexes: central mismatches promote RISC loading, and seed or 3'-mid (guide position 12-15) mismatches facilitate unwinding. All these features of human AGO proteins are highly reminiscent of fly Ago1 but not fly Ago2.

  18. Self-homodimerization of an actinoporin by disulfide bridging reveals implications for their structure and pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Aisel; Pérez-Socas, Luis Benito; Canet, Liem; Hervis, Yadira de la Patria; de Armas-Guitart, German; Martins-de-Sa, Diogo; Lima, Jônatas Cunha Barbosa; Souza, Adolfo Carlos Barros; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; de Freitas, Sonia Maria; Pazos, Isabel Fabiola

    2018-04-26

    The Trp111 to Cys mutant of sticholysin I, an actinoporin from Stichodactyla helianthus sea anemone, forms a homodimer via a disulfide bridge. The purified dimer is 193 times less hemolytic than the monomer. Ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrate that monomers and dimers are the only independent oligomeric states encountered. Indeed, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies showed that Trp/Tyr residues participate in homodimerization and that the dimer is less thermostable than the monomer. A homodimer three-dimensional model was constructed and indicates that Trp147/Tyr137 are at the homodimer interface. Spectroscopy results validated the 3D-model and assigned 85° to the disulfide bridge dihedral angle responsible for dimerization. The homodimer model suggests that alterations in the membrane/carbohydrate-binding sites in one of the monomers, as result of dimerization, could explain the decrease in the homodimer ability to form pores.

  19. The E. coli monothiol glutaredoxin GrxD forms homodimeric and heterodimeric FeS cluster containing complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, N; Gold, B; Liu, N L; Prathapam, R; Sterling, H J; Willams, E R; Butland, G

    2011-10-18

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (mono-Grx) represent a highly evolutionarily conserved class of proteins present in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. Mono-Grxs have been implicated in iron sulfur (FeS) cluster biosynthesis as potential scaffold proteins and in iron homeostasis via an FeS-containing complex with Fra2p (homologue of E. coli BolA) in yeast and are linked to signal transduction in mammalian systems. However, the function of the mono-Grx in prokaryotes and the nature of an interaction with BolA-like proteins have not been established. Recent genome-wide screens for E. coli genetic interactions reported the synthetic lethality (combination of mutations leading to cell death; mutation of only one of these genes does not) of a grxD mutation when combined with strains defective in FeS cluster biosynthesis (isc operon) functions [Butland, G., et al. (2008) Nature Methods 5, 789-795]. These data connected the only E. coli mono-Grx, GrxD to a potential role in FeS cluster biosynthesis. We investigated GrxD to uncover the molecular basis of this synthetic lethality and observed that GrxD can form FeS-bound homodimeric and BolA containing heterodimeric complexes. These complexes display substantially different spectroscopic and functional properties, including the ability to act as scaffold proteins for intact FeS cluster transfer to the model [2Fe-2S] acceptor protein E. coli apo-ferredoxin (Fdx), with the homodimer being significantly more efficient. In this work, we functionally dissect the potential cellular roles of GrxD as a component of both homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes to ultimately uncover if either of these complexes performs functions linked to FeS cluster biosynthesis. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Structural and functional characterization of a novel homodimeric three-finger neurotoxin from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amrita; Zhou, Xingding; Chong, Ming Zhi; D'hoedt, Dieter; Foo, Chun Shin; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Bertrand, Daniel; Sivaraman, J; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2010-03-12

    Snake venoms are a mixture of pharmacologically active proteins and polypeptides that have led to the development of molecular probes and therapeutic agents. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a novel neurotoxin, haditoxin, from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Haditoxin exhibited novel pharmacology with antagonism toward muscle (alphabetagammadelta) and neuronal (alpha(7), alpha(3)beta(2), and alpha(4)beta(2)) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with highest affinity for alpha(7)-nAChRs. The high resolution (1.5 A) crystal structure revealed haditoxin to be a homodimer, like kappa-neurotoxins, which target neuronal alpha(3)beta(2)- and alpha(4)beta(2)-nAChRs. Interestingly however, the monomeric subunits of haditoxin were composed of a three-finger protein fold typical of curaremimetic short-chain alpha-neurotoxins. Biochemical studies confirmed that it existed as a non-covalent dimer species in solution. Its structural similarity to short-chain alpha-neurotoxins and kappa-neurotoxins notwithstanding, haditoxin exhibited unique blockade of alpha(7)-nAChRs (IC(50) 180 nm), which is recognized by neither short-chain alpha-neurotoxins nor kappa-neurotoxins. This is the first report of a dimeric short-chain alpha-neurotoxin interacting with neuronal alpha(7)-nAChRs as well as the first homodimeric three-finger toxin to interact with muscle nAChRs.

  1. Nuclear Matrix protein SMAR1 represses HIV-1 LTR mediated transcription through chromatin remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenath, Kadreppa; Pavithra, Lakshminarasimhan; Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Surajit; Dash, Prasanta K.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Matrix and MARs have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of host as well as viral genes but their precise role in HIV-1 transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that > 98% of HIV sequences contain consensus MAR element in their promoter. We show that SMAR1 binds to the LTR MAR and reinforces transcriptional silencing by tethering the LTR MAR to nuclear matrix. SMAR1 associated HDAC1-mSin3 corepressor complex is dislodged from the LTR upon cellular activation by PMA/TNFα leading to an increase in the acetylation and a reduction in the trimethylation of histones, associated with the recruitment of RNA Polymerase II on the LTR. Overexpression of SMAR1 lead to reduction in LTR mediated transcription, both in a Tat dependent and independent manner, resulting in a decreased virion production. These results demonstrate the role of SMAR1 in regulating viral transcription by alternative compartmentalization of LTR between the nuclear matrix and chromatin.

  2. DAF-16 employs the chromatin remodeller SWI/SNF to promote stress resistance and longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedel, Christian G; Dowen, Robert H; Lourenco, Guinevere F; Kirienko, Natalia V; Heimbucher, Thomas; West, Jason A; Bowman, Sarah K; Kingston, Robert E; Dillin, Andrew; Asara, John M; Ruvkun, Gary

    Organisms are constantly challenged by stresses and privations and require adaptive responses for their survival. The forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor DAF-16 (hereafter referred to as DAF-16/FOXO) is a central nexus in these responses, but despite its importance little is known about how

  3. Sirtuins: Molecular Traffic Lights in the Crossroad of Oxidative Stress, Chromatin Remodeling, and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Rajendran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription is regulated by acetylation/deacetylation reactions of histone and nonhistone proteins mediated by enzymes called KATs and HDACs, respectively. As a major mechanism of transcriptional regulation, protein acetylation is a key controller of physiological processes such as cell cycle, DNA damage response, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. The deacetylase activity of class III histone deacetylases or sirtuins depends on the presence of NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and therefore, their function is closely linked to cellular energy consumption. This activity of sirtuins connects the modulation of chromatin dynamics and transcriptional regulation under oxidative stress to cellular lifespan, glucose homeostasis, inflammation, and multiple aging-related diseases including cancer. Here we provide an overview of the recent developments in relation to the diverse biological activities associated with sirtuin enzymes and stress responsive transcription factors, DNA damage, and oxidative stress and relate the involvement of sirtuins in the regulation of these processes to oncogenesis. Since the majority of the molecular mechanisms implicated in these pathways have been described for Sirt1, this sirtuin family member is more extensively presented in this paper.

  4. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co...

  5. Endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and Chromatin remodeling in normal and transformed cells and early embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadafora, C.; Sciamanna, I.; Misteli, T.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase (RT) is an enzyme encoded by two classes of genomic retro-elements: retro-transposons and endogenous retroviruses. Basal levels of RT are expressed in all non pathological, differentiated tissues while high RT expression levels characterize tumorigenic cells, germ cells and embryonic tissues. Preliminary studies carried out in our laboratory have shown that RT inhibition using pharmacological inhibitors (nevirapine and efavirenz, two drugs currently used in AIDS therapy) drastically reduces cell proliferation, promotes differentiation of tumorigenic cells in vitro, induces a reprogrammed gene expression and antagonizes tumor progression in nude mice inoculated with tumorigenic human cell lines, including melanoma, prostate and colon carcinoma and microcitoma

  6. Frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gui, Yaoting; Guo, Guangwu; Huang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    frequently in tumors of low stages and grades, highlighting its potential role in the classification and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Our results provide an overview of the genetic basis of TCC and suggest that aberration of chromatin regulation might be a hallmark of bladder cancer.......Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer. Here we sequenced the exomes of nine individuals with TCC and screened all the somatically mutated genes in a prevalence set of 88 additional individuals with TCC with different tumor stages and grades. In our study, we...

  7. Chromatin remodeling: the interface between extrinsic cues and the genetic code?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Shereen

    2008-10-01

    The successful completion of the human genome project ushered a new era of hope and skepticism. However, the promise of finding the fundamental basis of human traits and diseases appears less than fulfilled. The original premise was that the DNA sequence of every gene would allow precise characterization of critical differences responsible for altered cellular functions. The characterization of intragenic mutations in cancers paved the way for early screening and the design of targeted therapies. However, it has also become evident that unmasking genetic codes alone cannot explain the diversity of disease phenotypes within a population. Further, classic genetics has not been able to explain the differences that have been observed among identical twins or even cloned animals. This new reality has re-ignited interest in the field of epigenetics. While traditionally defined as heritable changes that can alter gene expression without affecting the corresponding DNA sequence, this definition has come into question. The extent to which epigenetic change can also be acquired in response to chemical stimuli represents an exciting dimension in the "nature vs nurture" debate. In this review I will describe a series of studies in my laboratory that illustrate the significance of epigenetics and its potential clinical implications.

  8. Function of Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Factor in Sonic Hedgehog-Dependent Medulloblastoma Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    tumor suppressors and REST-targeted neuronal genes. Brg1 deletion led to the inhibition of Shh-type medulloblastoma growth by deregulation of the...China University of Rostock & Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals, Germany University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at...of Rostock & Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals, Germany . Mentor: Prof. Dr. Hans-Martin Seyfert 2010- 2014 Postdoctoral

  9. Dual mechanism of chromatin remodeling in the common shrew sex trivalent (XY 1Y 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Matveevsky

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we focus on the XY1Y2 condition in male common shrew Sorex araneus Linnaeus, 1758, applying electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry for a comprehensive analysis of structure, synapsis and behaviour of the sex trivalent in pachytene spermatocytes. The pachytene sex trivalent consists of three distinct parts: short and long synaptic SC fragments (between the X and Y1 and between the X and Y2, respectively and a long asynaptic region of the X in-between. Chromatin inactivation was revealed in the XY1 synaptic region, the asynaptic region of the X and a very small asynaptic part of the Y2. This inactive part of the sex trivalent, that we named the ‘head’, forms a typical sex body and is located at the periphery of the meiotic nucleus at mid pachytene. The second part or ‘tail’, a long region of synapsis between the X and Y2 chromosomes, is directed from the periphery into the nucleus. Based on the distribution patterns of four proteins involved in chromatin inactivation, we propose a model of meiotic silencing in shrew sex chromosomes. Thus, we conclude that pachytene sex chromosomes are structurally and functionally two different chromatin domains with specific nuclear topology: the peripheral inactivated ‘true’ sex chromosome regions (part of the X and the Y1 and more centrally located transcriptionally active autosomal segments (part of the X and the Y2.

  10. The chromatin-remodeling factor CHD4 coordinates signaling and repair after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Poinsignon, Catherine; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2010-01-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR), cells delay cell cycle progression and activate DNA repair. Both processes are vital for genome integrity, but the mechanisms involved in their coordination are not fully understood. In a mass spectrometry screen, we identified the adenosine triphosphate...

  11. Combinatorial depletion analysis to assemble the network architecture of the SAGA and ADA chromatin remodeling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth K; Sardiu, Mihaela E; Swanson, Selene K; Gilmore, Joshua M; Torok, Michael; Grant, Patrick A; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L; Washburn, Michael P

    2011-07-05

    Despite the availability of several large-scale proteomics studies aiming to identify protein interactions on a global scale, little is known about how proteins interact and are organized within macromolecular complexes. Here, we describe a technique that consists of a combination of biochemistry approaches, quantitative proteomics and computational methods using wild-type and deletion strains to investigate the organization of proteins within macromolecular protein complexes. We applied this technique to determine the organization of two well-studied complexes, Spt-Ada-Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase (SAGA) and ADA, for which no comprehensive high-resolution structures exist. This approach revealed that SAGA/ADA is composed of five distinct functional modules, which can persist separately. Furthermore, we identified a novel subunit of the ADA complex, termed Ahc2, and characterized Sgf29 as an ADA family protein present in all Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase complexes. Finally, we propose a model for the architecture of the SAGA and ADA complexes, which predicts novel functional associations within the SAGA complex and provides mechanistic insights into phenotypical observations in SAGA mutants.

  12. Chromatin remodelling and epigenetic state regulation by non-coding RNAs in the diseased heart

    OpenAIRE

    F. De Majo; M. Calore

    2018-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to all the changes in phenotype and gene expression which are not due to alterations in the DNA sequence. These mechanisms have a pivotal role not only in the development but also in the maintenance during adulthood of a physiological phenotype of the heart. Because of the crucial role of epigenetic modifications, their alteration can lead to the arise of pathological conditions.Heart failure affects an estimated 23 million people worldwide and leads to substantial numbers ...

  13. Changes by short-term hypoxia in the membrane properties of pyramidal cells and the levels of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in slices of rat neocortex; effects of agonists and antagonists of ATP-dependent potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissarek, M; Garcia de Arriba, S; Schäfer, M; Sieler, D; Nieber, K; Illes, P

    1998-10-01

    In a first series of experiments, intracellular recordings were made from pyramidal cells in layers II-III of the rat primary somatosensory cortex. Superfusion of the brain slice preparations with hypoxic medium (replacement of 95%O2-5%CO2 with 95%N2-5%CO2) for up to 30 min led to a time-dependent depolarization (HD) without a major change in input resistance. Short periods of hypoxia (5 min) induced reproducible depolarizations which were concentration-dependently depressed by an agonist of ATP-dependent potassium (K(ATP)) channels, diazoxide (3-300 microM). The effect of 30 but not 300 microM diazoxide was reversed by washout. Tolbutamide (300 microM), an antagonist of K(ATP) channels, did not alter the HD when given alone. It did, however, abolish the inhibitory effect of diazoxide (30 microM) on the HD. Neither diazoxide (3-300 microM) nor tolbutamide (300 microM) influenced the membrane potential or the apparent input resistance of the neocortical pyramidal cells. Current-voltage (I-V) curves constructed at a membrane potential of -90 mV by injecting both de- and hyperpolarizing current pulses were not altered by diazoxide (30 microM) or tolbutamide (300 microM). Moreover, normoxic and hypoxic I-V curves did not cross each other, excluding a reversal of the HD at any membrane potential between -130 and -50 mV. The hypoxia-induced change of the I-V relation was the same both in the absence and presence of tolbutamide (300 microM). In a second series of experiments, nucleoside di- and triphosphates separated with anion exchange HPLC were measured in the neocortical slices. After 5 min of hypoxia, levels of nucleoside triphosphates declined by 29% (GTP), 34% (ATP), 44% (UTP) and 58% (CTP). By contrast, the levels of nucleoside diphosphates either did not change (UDP) or increased by 13% (GDP) and 40% (ADP). In slices subjected to 30 min of hypoxia the triphosphate levels continued to decrease, while the levels of GDP and ADP returned to control values. The tri

  14. Recombinant expression of homodimeric 660 kDa human thyroglobulin in soybean seeds: an alternative source of human thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rebecca; Hudson, Laura C; Lambirth, Kevin C; Luth, Diane; Wang, Kan; Bost, Kenneth L; Piller, Kenneth J

    2011-07-01

    Soybean seeds possess many qualities that make them ideal targets for the production of recombinant proteins. However, one quality often overlooked is their ability to stockpile large amounts of complex storage proteins. Because of this characteristic, we hypothesized that soybean seeds would support recombinant expression of large and complex proteins that are currently difficult or impossible to express using traditional plant and non-plant-based host systems. To test this hypothesis, we transformed soybeans with a synthetic gene encoding human thyroglobulin (hTG)-a 660 kDa homodimeric protein that is widely used in the diagnostic industry for screening and detection of thyroid disease. In the absence of a recombinant system that can produce recombinant hTG, research and diagnostic grade hTG continues to be purified from cadaver and surgically removed thyroid tissue. These less-than-ideal tissue sources lack uniform glycosylation and iodination and therefore introduce variability when purified hTG is used in sensitive ELISA screens. In this study, we report the successful expression of recombinant hTG in soybean seeds. Authenticity of the soy-derived protein was demonstrated using commercial ELISA kits developed specifically for the detection of hTG in patient sera. Western analyses and gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that recombinant hTG and thyroid-purified hTG are biologically similar with respect to size, mass, charge and subunit interaction. The recombinant protein was stable over three generations and accumulated to ~1.5% of total soluble seed protein. These results support our hypothesis that soybeans represent a practical alternative to traditional host systems for the expression of large and complex proteins.

  15. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis reveals the ATP-bound monomeric state of the ATPase domain from the homodimeric MutL endonuclease, a GHKL phosphotransferase superfamily protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Hitoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Nishida, Yuya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Fukui, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    DNA mismatch repair is an excision system that removes mismatched bases chiefly generated by replication errors. In this system, MutL endonucleases direct the excision reaction to the error-containing strand of the duplex by specifically incising the newly synthesized strand. Both bacterial homodimeric and eukaryotic heterodimeric MutL proteins belong to the GHKL ATPase/kinase superfamily that comprises the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal dimerization regions. Generally, the GHKL proteins show large ATPase cycle-dependent conformational changes, including dimerization-coupled ATP binding of the N-terminal domain. Interestingly, the ATPase domain of human PMS2, a subunit of the MutL heterodimer, binds ATP without dimerization. The monomeric ATP-bound state of the domain has been thought to be characteristic of heterodimeric GHKL proteins. In this study, we characterized the ATP-bound state of the ATPase domain from the Aquifex aeolicus MutL endonuclease, which is a homodimeric GHKL protein unlike the eukaryotic MutL. Gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses clearly showed that the domain binds ATP in a monomeric form despite its homodimeric nature. This indicates that the uncoupling of dimerization and ATP binding is a common feature among bacterial and eukaryotic MutL endonucleases, which we suggest is closely related to the molecular mechanisms underlying mismatch repair.

  16. Orientations of Iron-Sulfur Clusters FA and FB in the Homodimeric Type-I Photosynthetic Reaction Center of Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toru; Matsuoka, Masahiro; Azai, Chihiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2016-05-12

    Orientations of the FA and FB iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters in a structure-unknown type-I homodimeric heriobacterial reaction center (hRC) were studied in oriented membranes of the thermophilic anaerobic photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacterium modesticaldum by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and compared with those in heterodimeric photosystem I (PS I). The Rieske-type FeS center in the cytochrome b/c complex showed a well-oriented EPR signal. Illumination at 14 K induced an FB(-) signal with g-axes of gz = 2.066, gy = 1.937, and gx = 1.890, tilted at angles of 60°, 60°, and 45°, respectively, with respect to the membrane normal. Chemical reduction with dithionite produced an additional signal of FA(-), which magnetically interacted with FB(-), with gz = 2.046, gy = 1.942, and gx = 1.911 at 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. The angles and redox properties of FA(-) and FB(-) in hRC resemble those of FB(-) and FA(-), respectively, in PS I. Therefore, FA and FB in hRC, named after their g-value similarities, seem to be located like FB and FA, not like FA and FB, respectively, in PS I. The reducing side of hRC could resemble those in PS I, if the names of FA and FB are interchanged with each other.

  17. Structural differences between glycosylated, disulfide-linked heterodimeric Knob-into-Hole Fc fragment and its homodimeric Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuglstatter, A; Stihle, M; Neumann, C; Müller, C; Schaefer, W; Klein, C; Benz, J

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of bispecific therapeutic antibodies are progressing through clinical development. The Knob-into-Hole (KiH) technology uses complementary mutations in the CH3 region of the antibody Fc fragment to achieve heavy chain heterodimerization. Here we describe the X-ray crystal structures of glycosylated and disulfide-engineered heterodimeric KiH Fc fragment and its homodimeric Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products. The heterodimer structure confirms the KiH design principle and supports the hypothesis that glycosylation stabilizes a closed Fc conformation. Both homodimer structures show parallel Fc fragment architectures, in contrast to recently reported crystal structures of the corresponding aglycosylated Fc fragments which in the absence of disulfide mutations show an unexpected antiparallel arrangement. The glycosylated Knob-Knob Fc fragment is destabilized as indicated by variability in the relative orientation of its CH3 domains. The glycosylated Hole-Hole Fc fragment shows an unexpected intermolecular disulfide bond via the introduced Y349C Hole mutation which results in a large CH3 domain shift and a new CH3-CH3 interface. The crystal structures of glycosylated, disulfide-linked KiH Fc fragment and its Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products reported here will facilitate further design of highly efficient antibody heterodimerization strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Pushing the size limit of de novo structure ensemble prediction guided by sparse SDSL-EPR restraints to 200 residues: The monomeric and homodimeric forms of BAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Axel W.; Bordignon, Enrica; Bleicken, Stephanie; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Jeschke, Gunnar; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination remains a challenge for many biologically important proteins. In particular, proteins that adopt multiple conformations often evade crystallization in all biologically relevant states. Although computational de novo protein folding approaches often sample biologically relevant conformations, the selection of the most accurate model for different functional states remains a formidable challenge, in particular, for proteins with more than about 150 residues. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can obtain limited structural information for proteins in well-defined biological states and thereby assist in selecting biologically relevant conformations. The present study demonstrates that de novo folding methods are able to accurately sample the folds of 192-residue long soluble monomeric Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX). The tertiary structures of the monomeric and homodimeric forms of BAX were predicted using the primary structure as well as 25 and 11 EPR distance restraints, respectively. The predicted models were subsequently compared to respective NMR/X-ray structures of BAX. EPR restraints improve the protein-size normalized root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD100) of the most accurate models with respect to the NMR/crystal structure from 5.9 Å to 3.9 Å and from 5.7 Å to 3.3 Å, respectively. Additionally, the model discrimination is improved, which is demonstrated by an improvement of the enrichment from 5% to 15% and from 13% to 21%, respectively. PMID:27129417

  19. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  20. Structure and mechanism of ATP-dependent phospholipid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura; Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and P4-ATPases are two large and seemingly unrelated families of primary active pumps involved in moving phospholipids from one leaflet of a biological membrane to the other. Scope of review This review aims to identify common mechanistic features...... in the way phospholipid flipping is carried out by two evolutionarily unrelated families of transporters. Major conclusions Both protein families hydrolyze ATP, although they employ different mechanisms to use it, and have a comparable size with twelve transmembrane segments in the functional unit. Further......, despite differences in overall architecture, both appear to operate by an alternating access mechanism and during transport they might allow access of phospholipids to the internal part of the transmembrane domain. The latter feature is obvious for ABC transporters, but phospholipids and other hydrophobic...

  1. Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Nelson, Celeste M.; Muschler, John L.; Veiseh, Mandana; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    Epithelial cells, once dissociated and placed in two-dimensional (2D) cultures, rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. We showed previously that in addition to prolactin, signaling by laminin-111 was necessary to restore functional differentiation of mammary epithelia. Here, we elucidate two additional aspects of laminin-111 action. We show that in 2D cultures, the prolactin receptor is basolaterally localized and physically segregated from its apically placed ligand. Detachment of the cells exposes the receptor to ligation by prolactin leading to signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 5 (STAT5) activation, but only transiently and not sufficiently for induction of milk protein expression. We show that laminin-111 reorganizes mammary cells into polarized acini, allowing both the exposure of the prolactin receptor and sustained activation of STAT5. The use of constitutively active STAT5 constructs showed that the latter is necessary and sufficient for chromatin reorganization and {beta}-casein transcription. These results underscore the crucial role of continuous laminin signaling and polarized tissue architecture in maintenance of transcription factor activation, chromatin organization, and tissue-specific gene expression.

  2. Elucidation of Chromatin Remodeling Machinery Involved in Regulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, Dipali

    2005-01-01

    ... (5-aza-2'deoxycytidine or 5-aza-dC) and HDAC (trichostatin A or TSA). The silencing of ER due to CpG hyperrnethylation correlates with binding of specific methyl-binding proteins, DNA methyltransferases and HDAC proteins...

  3. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Elucidation of Chromatin Remodeling Machinery Involved in Regulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, Dipali

    2005-01-01

    .... Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we examined the chromatin status and repressor complex associated with silenced ER and changes in the key regulatory factors during reactivation by inhibitors of DNMT...

  5. CRTC1 Nuclear Translocation Following Learning Modulates Memory Strength via Exchange of Chromatin Remodeling Complexes on the Fgf1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusaku Uchida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Memory is formed by synapse-to-nucleus communication that leads to regulation of gene transcription, but the identity and organizational logic of signaling pathways involved in this communication remain unclear. Here we find that the transcription cofactor CRTC1 is a critical determinant of sustained gene transcription and memory strength in the hippocampus. Following associative learning, synaptically localized CRTC1 is translocated to the nucleus and regulates Fgf1b transcription in an activity-dependent manner. After both weak and strong training, the HDAC3-N-CoR corepressor complex leaves the Fgf1b promoter and a complex involving the translocated CRTC1, phosphorylated CREB, and histone acetyltransferase CBP induces transient transcription. Strong training later substitutes KAT5 for CBP, a process that is dependent on CRTC1, but not on CREB phosphorylation. This in turn leads to long-lasting Fgf1b transcription and memory enhancement. Thus, memory strength relies on activity-dependent changes in chromatin and temporal regulation of gene transcription on specific CREB/CRTC1 gene targets. : Uchida et al. link CRTC1 synapse-to-nucleus shuttling in memory. Weak and strong training induce CRTC1 nuclear transport and transient Fgf1b transcription by a complex including CRTC1, CREB, and histone acetyltransferase CBP, whereas strong training alone maintains Fgf1b transcription through CRTC1-dependent substitution of KAT5 for CBP, leading to memory enhancement. Keywords: memory enhancement, long-term potentiation, hippocampus, nuclear transport, epigenetics, FGF1, CRTC1, KAT5/Tip60, HDAC3, CREB

  6. CRTC1 Nuclear Translocation Following Learning Modulates Memory Strength via Exchange of Chromatin Remodeling Complexes on the Fgf1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Shusaku; Teubner, Brett J W; Hevi, Charles; Hara, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Dave, Rutu M; Shintaku, Tatsushi; Jaikhan, Pattaporn; Yamagata, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Shumyatsky, Gleb P

    2017-01-10

    Memory is formed by synapse-to-nucleus communication that leads to regulation of gene transcription, but the identity and organizational logic of signaling pathways involved in this communication remain unclear. Here we find that the transcription cofactor CRTC1 is a critical determinant of sustained gene transcription and memory strength in the hippocampus. Following associative learning, synaptically localized CRTC1 is translocated to the nucleus and regulates Fgf1b transcription in an activity-dependent manner. After both weak and strong training, the HDAC3-N-CoR corepressor complex leaves the Fgf1b promoter and a complex involving the translocated CRTC1, phosphorylated CREB, and histone acetyltransferase CBP induces transient transcription. Strong training later substitutes KAT5 for CBP, a process that is dependent on CRTC1, but not on CREB phosphorylation. This in turn leads to long-lasting Fgf1b transcription and memory enhancement. Thus, memory strength relies on activity-dependent changes in chromatin and temporal regulation of gene transcription on specific CREB/CRTC1 gene targets. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-wide overlap in the binding location and function of chromatin-remodeling proteins | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A single strand of DNA can stretch several meters. Yet dozens of these strands, which can be one-tenth as thin as a human hair, need to fit into the cell’s nucleus. To pack those strands into such a small space, DNA tightly winds itself around histone proteins, forming nucleosomes that are strung together into complexes called chromatin. Beyond efficiently packaging DNA,

  8. Mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex gene ARID1B cause Coffin-Siris syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, G.W.; Aten, E.; Sun, Y; Almomani, R.; Gilissen, C.F.; Nielsen, M.; Kant, S.G.; Snoeck, I.N.; Peeters, E.A.; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Y.; Wessels, M.W.; Hollander, N.S. den; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; van Ommen, G.J.; Breuning, M.H.; den Dunnen, J.T.; van Haeringen, A.; Kriek, M.

    2012-01-01

    We identified de novo truncating mutations in ARID1B in three individuals with Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) by exome sequencing. Array-based copy-number variation (CNV) analysis in 2,000 individuals with intellectual disability revealed deletions encompassing ARID1B in 3 subjects with phenotypes

  9. Mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex gene ARID1B cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Gijs W E; Aten, Emmelien; Sun, Yu; Almomani, Rowida; Gilissen, Christian; Nielsen, Maartje; Kant, Sarina G; Snoeck, Irina N; Peeters, Els A J; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Wessels, Marja W; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Breuning, Martijn H; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Haeringen, Arie; Kriek, Marjolein

    2012-03-18

    We identified de novo truncating mutations in ARID1B in three individuals with Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) by exome sequencing. Array-based copy-number variation (CNV) analysis in 2,000 individuals with intellectual disability revealed deletions encompassing ARID1B in 3 subjects with phenotypes partially overlapping that of CSS. Taken together with published data, these results indicate that haploinsufficiency of the ARID1B gene, which encodes an epigenetic modifier of chromatin structure, is an important cause of CSS and is potentially a common cause of intellectual disability and speech impairment.

  10. TIP48/Reptin and H2A.Z requirement for initiating chromatin remodeling in estrogen-activated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone variants, including histone H2A.Z, are incorporated into specific genomic sites and participate in transcription regulation. The role of H2A.Z at these sites remains poorly characterized. Our study investigates changes in the chromatin environment at the Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1 during transcriptional initiation in response to estradiol in estrogen receptor positive mammary tumour cells. We show that H2A.Z is present at the transcription start-site and downstream enhancer sequences of CCND1 when the gene is poorly transcribed. Stimulation of CCND1 expression required release of H2A.Z concomitantly from both these DNA elements. The AAA+ family members TIP48/reptin and the histone variant H2A.Z are required to remodel the chromatin environment at CCND1 as a prerequisite for binding of the estrogen receptor (ERα in the presence of hormone. TIP48 promotes acetylation and exchange of H2A.Z, which triggers a dissociation of the CCND1 3' enhancer from the promoter, thereby releasing a repressive intragenic loop. This release then enables the estrogen receptor to bind to the CCND1 promoter. Our findings provide new insight into the priming of chromatin required for transcription factor access to their target sequence. Dynamic release of gene loops could be a rapid means to remodel chromatin and to stimulate transcription in response to hormones.

  11. The in vitro NADPH-dependent inhibition by CCl4 of the ATP-dependent calcium uptake of hepatic microsomes from male rats. Studies on the mechanism of the inactivation of the hepatic microsomal calcium pump by the CCl3 radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.P.; Chen, N.Q.; Holtzman, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The hepatotoxicity of CCl4 is mediated through its initial reduction by cytochrome P-450 to the CCl3 radical. This radical then damages important metabolic systems such as the ATP-dependent microsomal Ca2+ pump. Previous studies from our laboratory on isolated microsomes have shown that NADPH in the absence of toxic agents inhibits this pump. We have now found in in vitro incubations that CCl4 (0.5-2.5 mM) enhanced the NADPH-dependent inhibition of Ca2+ uptake from 28% without CCl4 to a maximum of 68%. These concentrations are in the range found in the livers and blood of lethally intoxicated animals and are toxic to cultured hepatocytes. The inhibition of Ca2+ uptake was due both to a decrease in the Ca2(+)-dependent ATPase and to an enhanced release of Ca2+ from the microsomes. The NADPH-dependent CCl4 inhibition was greater under N2 and was totally prevented by CO. GSH (1-10 mM) added during the incubation with CCl4 prevented the inhibition. This protection was also seen when the incubations were performed under nitrogen. When samples were preincubated with CCl4, the CCl4 metabolism was stopped, and then the Ca2+ uptake was determined; GSH reversed the CCl4 inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. This reversal showed saturation kinetics for GSH with two Km values of 0.315 and 93 microM when both the preincubation and the Ca2+ uptake were performed under air, and 0.512 and 31 microM when both were performed under nitrogen. Cysteine did not prevent the NADPH-dependent CCl4 inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. CCl4 increased lipid peroxidation in air, but no lipid peroxidation was seen under nitrogen. Lipid peroxidation was only modestly reversed by GSH. GSH did not remove 14C bound to samples preincubated with the 14CCl4

  12. Unifying principles in homodimeric type I photosynthetic reaction centers: properties of PscB and the FA, FB and FX iron-sulfur clusters in green sulfur bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H

    2008-12-01

    The photosynthetic reaction center from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum (CbRC) was solubilized from membranes using Triton X-100 and isolated by sucrose density ultra-centrifugation. The CbRC complexes were subsequently treated with 0.5 M NaCl and ultrafiltered over a 100 kDa cutoff membrane. The resulting CbRC cores did not exhibit the low-temperature EPR resonances from FA- and FB- and were unable to reduce NADP+. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis showed that the PscB subunit, which harbors the FA and FB clusters, had become dissociated, and was now present in the filtrate. Attempts to rebind PscB onto CbRC cores were unsuccessful. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that recombinant PscB contains a heterogeneous mixture of [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and other types of Fe/S clusters tentatively identified as [2Fe-2S]2+,1+ clusters and rubredoxin-like Fe3+,2+ centers, and that the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ clusters which were present were degraded at high ionic strength. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the amount of iron and sulfide in the recombinant protein was sub-stoichiometric. A heme-staining assay indicated that cytochrome c551 remained firmly attached to the CbRC cores. Low-temperature EPR spectroscopy of photoaccumulated CbRC complexes and CbRC cores showed resonances between g=5.4 and 4.4 assigned to a S=3/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster and at g=1.77 assigned to a S=1/2 ground spin state [4Fe-4S]1+ cluster, both from FX-. These results unify the properties of the acceptor side of the Type I homodimeric reaction centers found in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria: in both, the FA and FB iron-sulfur clusters are present on a salt-dissociable subunit, and FX is present as an interpolypeptide [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster with a significant population in a S=3/2 ground spin state.

  13. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Goo Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3 and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI.

  14. A single amino acid substitution in the exoplasmic domain of the human growth hormone (GH) receptor confers familial GH resistance (Laron syndrome) with positive GH-binding activity by abolishing receptor homodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, P; Sobrier, M L; Duriez, B; Dastot, F; Buchanan, C R; Savage, M O; Preece, M A; Craescu, C T; Blouquit, Y; Goossens, M

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) elicits a variety of biological activities mainly mediated by the GH receptor (GHR), a transmembrane protein that, based on in vitro studies, seemed to function as a homodimer. To test this hypothesis directly, we investigated patients displaying the classic features of Laron syndrome (familial GH resistance characterized by severe dwarfism and metabolic dysfunction), except for the presence of normal binding activity of the plasma GH-binding protein, a molecule that derives from the exoplasmic-coding domain of the GHR gene. In two unrelated families, the same GHR mutation was identified, resulting in the substitution of a highly conserved aspartate residue by histidine at position 152 (D152H) of the exoplasmic domain, within the postulated interface sequence involved in homodimerization. The recombinant mutated receptor protein was correctly expressed at the plasma membrane. It displayed subnormal GH-binding activity, a finding in agreement with the X-ray crystal structure data inferring this aspartate residue outside the GH-binding domain. However, mAb-based studies suggested the critical role of aspartate 152 in the proper folding of the interface area. We show that a recombinant soluble form of the mutant receptor is unable to dimerize, the D152H substitution also preventing the formation of heterodimers of wild-type and mutant molecules. These results provide in vivo evidence that monomeric receptors are inactive and that receptor dimerization is involved in the primary signalling of the GH-associated growth-promoting and metabolic actions. Images PMID:8137822

  15. Histone modifications in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, Mohammed; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The packaging of the eukaryotic genome into highly condensed chromatin makes it inaccessible to the factors required for gene transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Eukaryotes have developed intricate mechanisms to overcome this repressive barrier imposed by chromatin. Histone modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play key roles here as they regulate many nuclear processes by altering the chromatin structure. Significantly, these activities are integral to the process of DNA repair where histone modifications act as signals and landing platforms for various repair proteins. This review summarizes the recent developments in our understanding of histone modifications and their role in the maintenance of genome integrity

  16. Chromatin remodeling agent trichostatin A: a key-factor in the hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived of adult bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinken Mathieu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC derived of adult bone marrow to undergo in vitro hepatic differentiation was investigated. Results Exposure of hMSC to a cocktail of hepatogenic factors [(fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, insulin-transferrin-sodium-selenite (ITS and dexamethasone] failed to induce hepatic differentiation. Sequential exposure to these factors (FGF-4, followed by HGF, followed by HGF+ITS+dexamethasone, however, resembling the order of secretion during liver embryogenesis, induced both glycogen-storage and cytokeratin (CK18 expression. Additional exposure of the cells to trichostatin A (TSA considerably improved endodermal differentiation, as evidenced by acquisition of an epithelial morphology, chronological expression of hepatic proteins, including hepatocyte-nuclear factor (HNF-3β, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, CK18, albumin (ALB, HNF1α, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα, and functional maturation, i.e. upregulated ALB secretion, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP-dependent activity. Conclusion hMSC are able to undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. TSA is hereby essential to promote differentiation of hMSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells.

  17. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danna Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi trichostatin A (TSA promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation.

  18. SHH1, a homeodomain protein required for DNA methylation, as well as RDR2, RDM4, and chromatin remodeling factors, associate with RNA polymerase IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Law

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic modification that is critical for gene silencing and the maintenance of genome integrity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the de novo DNA methyltransferase, domains rearranged methyltransferase 2 (DRM2, is targeted to specific genomic loci by 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM. Biogenesis of the targeting siRNAs is thought to be initiated by the activity of the plant-specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol-IV. However, the mechanism through which Pol-IV is targeted to specific genomic loci and whether factors other than the core Pol-IV machinery are required for Pol-IV activity remain unknown. Through the affinity purification of nuclear RNA polymerase D1 (NRPD1, the largest subunit of the Pol-IV polymerase, we found that several previously identified RdDM components co-purify with Pol-IV, namely RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2, CLASSY1 (CLSY1, and RNA-directed DNA methylation 4 (RDM4, suggesting that the upstream siRNA generating portion of the RdDM pathway may be more physically coupled than previously envisioned. A homeodomain protein, SAWADEE homeodomain homolog 1 (SHH1, was also found to co-purify with NRPD1; and we demonstrate that SHH1 is required for de novo and maintenance DNA methylation, as well as for the accumulation of siRNAs at specific loci, confirming it is a bonafide component of the RdDM pathway.

  19. Functional analyses of AtCHR12 and AtCHR23 : plant growth responses upon over-expression of chromatin remodeling ATPase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folta, A.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms have to deal with changing environmental conditions during their whole life cycle. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile organisms. Therefore they have evolved multiple regulatory mechanisms that help them to cope with changing conditions. One of the first responses to

  20. Neurospora crassa female development requires the PACC and other signal transduction pathways, transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, cell-to-cell fusion, and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Chinnici

    Full Text Available Using a screening protocol we have identified 68 genes that are required for female development in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We find that we can divide these genes into five general groups: 1 Genes encoding components of the PACC signal transduction pathway, 2 Other signal transduction pathway genes, including genes from the three N. crassa MAP kinase pathways, 3 Transcriptional factor genes, 4 Autophagy genes, and 5 Other miscellaneous genes. Complementation and RIP studies verified that these genes are needed for the formation of the female mating structure, the protoperithecium, and for the maturation of a fertilized protoperithecium into a perithecium. Perithecia grafting experiments demonstrate that the autophagy genes and the cell-to-cell fusion genes (the MAK-1 and MAK-2 pathway genes are needed for the mobilization and movement of nutrients from an established vegetative hyphal network into the developing protoperithecium. Deletion mutants for the PACC pathway genes palA, palB, palC, palF, palH, and pacC were found to be defective in two aspects of female development. First, they were unable to initiate female development on synthetic crossing medium. However, they could form protoperithecia when grown on cellophane, on corn meal agar, or in response to the presence of nearby perithecia. Second, fertilized perithecia from PACC pathway mutants were unable to produce asci and complete female development. Protein localization experiments with a GFP-tagged PALA construct showed that PALA was localized in a peripheral punctate pattern, consistent with a signaling center associated with the ESCRT complex. The N. crassa PACC signal transduction pathway appears to be similar to the PacC/Rim101 pathway previously characterized in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In N. crassa the pathway plays a key role in regulating female development.

  1. Neurospora crassa female development requires the PACC and other signal transduction pathways, transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, cell-to-cell fusion, and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Jennifer L; Fu, Ci; Caccamise, Lauren M; Arnold, Jason W; Free, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Using a screening protocol we have identified 68 genes that are required for female development in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We find that we can divide these genes into five general groups: 1) Genes encoding components of the PACC signal transduction pathway, 2) Other signal transduction pathway genes, including genes from the three N. crassa MAP kinase pathways, 3) Transcriptional factor genes, 4) Autophagy genes, and 5) Other miscellaneous genes. Complementation and RIP studies verified that these genes are needed for the formation of the female mating structure, the protoperithecium, and for the maturation of a fertilized protoperithecium into a perithecium. Perithecia grafting experiments demonstrate that the autophagy genes and the cell-to-cell fusion genes (the MAK-1 and MAK-2 pathway genes) are needed for the mobilization and movement of nutrients from an established vegetative hyphal network into the developing protoperithecium. Deletion mutants for the PACC pathway genes palA, palB, palC, palF, palH, and pacC were found to be defective in two aspects of female development. First, they were unable to initiate female development on synthetic crossing medium. However, they could form protoperithecia when grown on cellophane, on corn meal agar, or in response to the presence of nearby perithecia. Second, fertilized perithecia from PACC pathway mutants were unable to produce asci and complete female development. Protein localization experiments with a GFP-tagged PALA construct showed that PALA was localized in a peripheral punctate pattern, consistent with a signaling center associated with the ESCRT complex. The N. crassa PACC signal transduction pathway appears to be similar to the PacC/Rim101 pathway previously characterized in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In N. crassa the pathway plays a key role in regulating female development.

  2. Deleting HDAC3 Rescues Long-Term Memory Impairments Induced by Disruption of the Neuron-Specific Chromatin Remodeling Subunit BAF53b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Guanhua; Kramár, Enikö A.; López, Alberto J.; Huynh, Grace; Wood, Marcelo A.; Kwapis, Janine L.

    2018-01-01

    Multiple epigenetic mechanisms, including histone acetylation and nucleosome remodeling, are known to be involved in long-term memory formation. Enhancing histone acetylation by deleting histone deacetylases, like HDAC3, typically enhances long-term memory formation. In contrast, disrupting nucleosome remodeling by blocking the neuron-specific…

  3. Age-associated DNA methylation changes in immune genes, histone modifiers and chromatin remodeling factors within 5 years after birth in human blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E; Vitezic, Morana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related changes in DNA methylation occurring in blood leukocytes during early childhood may reflect epigenetic maturation. We hypothesized that some of these changes involve gene networks of critical relevance in leukocyte biology and conducted a prospective study to elucidate...... factors (for example, HDAC4, KDM2A, KDM2B, JARID2, ARID3A, and SMARCD3) undergo DNA methylation changes in leukocytes during early childhood. These results open new perspectives to understand leukocyte maturation and provide a catalogue of CpG sites that may need to be corrected for age effects when...... the dynamics of DNA methylation. Serial blood samples were collected at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after birth in ten healthy girls born in Finland and participating in the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. DNA methylation was measured using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. RESULTS...

  4. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling gene AtCHR12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynarova, L.; Nap, J.P.H.; Bisseling, T.

    2007-01-01

    One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental stress is establishing a temporary growth arrest that allows adaptation to adverse conditions. The response to abiotic stress requires the modulation of gene expression, which may be mediated by the alteration of chromatin structures. This

  5. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Smeenk (Godelieve); W.W. Wiegant (Wouter); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); M.S. Luijsterburg (Martijn); N. Sroczynski (Nicholas); T. Costelloe (Thomas); R. Romeijn (Ron); A. Pastink (Albert); N. Mailand (Niels); W. Vermeulen (Wim); H. van Attikum (Haico)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIonizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arising in native chromatin elicit an RNF8/RNF168-dependent ubiquitylation response, which triggers the recruitment of various repair factors. Precisely how this response is regulated in the context of chromatin remains

  6. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J., E-mail: Luc_ellis@yahoo.co.uk [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Hawksworth, Gabrielle M. [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Weaver, Richard J. [Biologie Servier, Drug Safety Research Centre, 905 Route de Saran, 45520 Gidy (France)

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  7. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J.; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M.; Weaver, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD 7.0 ) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC 50 values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein

  8. Circadian clock protein KaiC forms ATP-dependent hexameric rings and binds DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tetsuya; Saveliev, Sergei V; Xu, Yao; Stafford, Walter F; Cox, Michael M; Inman, Ross B; Johnson, Carl H

    2002-12-24

    KaiC from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (KaiC) is an essential circadian clock protein in cyanobacteria. Previous sequence analyses suggested its inclusion in the RecADnaB superfamily. A characteristic of the proteins of this superfamily is that they form homohexameric complexes that bind DNA. We show here that KaiC also forms ring complexes with a central pore that can be visualized by electron microscopy. A combination of analytical ultracentrifugation and chromatographic analyses demonstrates that these complexes are hexameric. The association of KaiC molecules into hexamers depends on the presence of ATP. The KaiC sequence does not include the obvious DNA-binding motifs found in RecA or DnaB. Nevertheless, KaiC binds forked DNA substrates. These data support the inclusion of KaiC into the RecADnaB superfamily and have important implications for enzymatic activity of KaiC in the circadian clock mechanism that regulates global changes in gene expression patterns.

  9. Greater ATP dependence than sodium dependence of radiocalcium efflux in bullfrog ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brommundt, G.; Kavaler, F.

    1985-01-01

    45 Ca efflux was studied in intact bullfrog ventricles following a 2-h period of loading with radiocalcium-containing Ringer solution. The cannulated ventricle was placed in a closed air-filled container to which were applied rhythmic, electronically timed, positive- and negative-pressure pulsations, which induced ventricular volume excursions. The mechanical arrangement and timing circuitry made it possible for each period to be as short in duration as 15 s. By use of this technique, penetration of the extracellular space by [ 14 C]inulin was found to be complete within 30 s, and recovery of the inulin proceeded with a time constant of 17-24 s, indicating a completeness of recovery of 98% within 90 s. Washout of added 45 Ca was quantitatively quite close to that of inulin, and in addition the estimated rate of sequestration of the isotope was slow enough to introduce only a small error into the experimental results. 45 Ca efflux was only slightly (15%) sensitive to replacement of extracellular sodium but was profoundly sensitive to the inhibitors of ATP synthesis, cyanide and 2-deoxy-glucose

  10. Resistance of Akt kinases to dephosphorylation through ATP-dependent conformational plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tung O; Zhang, Jin; Rodeck, Ulrich; Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S; Spring, Maureen; Dumitru, Calin D; Myers, Valerie; Li, Xue; Cheung, Joseph Y; Feldman, Arthur M

    2011-11-15

    Phosphorylation of a threonine residue (T308 in Akt1) in the activation loop of Akt kinases is a prerequisite for deregulated Akt activity frequently observed in neoplasia. Akt phosphorylation in vivo is balanced by the opposite activities of kinases and phosphatases. Here we describe that targeting Akt kinase to the cell membrane markedly reduced sensitivity of phosphorylated Akt to dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 2A. This effect was amplified by occupancy of the ATP binding pocket by either ATP or ATP-competitive inhibitors. Mutational analysis revealed that R273 in Akt1 and the corresponding R274 in Akt2 are essential for shielding T308 in the activation loop against dephosphorylation. Thus, occupancy of the nucleotide binding pocket of Akt kinases enables intramolecular interactions that restrict phosphatase access and sustain Akt phosphorylation. This mechanism provides an explanation for the "paradoxical" Akt hyperphosphorylation induced by ATP-competitive inhibitor, A-443654. The lack of phosphatase resistance further contributes insight into the mechanism by which the human Akt2 R274H missense mutation may cause autosomal-dominant diabetes mellitus.

  11. ATP-dependent and NAD-dependent modification of glutamine synthetase from Rhodospirillum rubrum in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehle, D.L.; Lueddecke, B.A.; Ludden, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is the target of both ATP- and NAD-dependent modification. Incubation of R. rubrum cell supernatant with [α- 32 P]NAD results in the labeling of glutamine synthetase and two other unidentified proteins. Dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase does not appear to be responsible for the modification of glutamine synthetase or the unidentified proteins. The [α- 32 P]ATP- and [α- 32 P] NAD-dependent modifications of R. rubrum glutamine synthetase appear to be exclusive and the two forms of modified glutamine synthetase are separable on two-dimensional gels. Loss of enzymatic activity by glutamine synthetase did not correlate with [α- 32 P]NAD labeling. This is in contrast to inactivation by nonphysiological ADP-ribosylation of other glutamine synthetases by an NAD:arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase from turkey erythrocytes. A 32 P-labeled protein spot comigrates with the NAD-treated glutamine synthetase spot when glutamine synthetase purified from H 3 32 PO 4 -grown cells is analyzed on two-dimensional gels. The adenylylation site of R. rubrum glutamine synthetase has been determined to be Leu-(Asp)-Tyr-Leu-Pro-Pro-Glu-Glu-Leu-Met; the tyrosine residue is the site of modification

  12. A label-free electrochemiluminescent sensor for ATP detection based on ATP-dependent ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tingting; Lin, Chunshui; Yao, Qiuhong; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe a new label-free, sensitive and highly selective strategy for the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of ATP at the picomolar level via ATP-induced ligation. The molecular-beacon like DNA probes (P12 complex) are self-assembled on a gold electrode. The presence of ATP leads to the ligation of P12 complex which blocks the digestion by Exonuclease III (Exo III). The protected P12 complex causes the intercalation of numerous ECL indicators (Ru(phen)3(2+)) into the duplex DNA grooves, resulting in significantly amplified ECL signal output. Since the ligating site of T4 DNA ligase and the nicking site of Exo III are the same, it involves no long time of incubation for conformation change. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of enzyme and the inherent high sensitivity of the ECL technique and enables picomolar detection of ATP. The developed strategy also shows high selectivity against ATP analogs, which makes our new label-free and highly sensitive ligation-based method a useful addition to the amplified ATP detection arena. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of ATP-dependent K channels in the effects of erythropoietin in renal ischaemia injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonguç Utku Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the cell proliferative, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects of EPO were associated with KATP channels in the renal tubular cell culture model under hypoxic/normal conditions.

  14. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant γ-glutamyl cycle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cystinosis, an inherited disease caused by a defect in the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS), is characterized by renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion appears to be a key event in the pathophysiology of the disease, even though the manner in which ATP depletion occurs is still a ...

  15. Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery mediates ATP-dependent RISC loading of small RNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shintaro; Kobayashi, Maki; Yoda, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Katsuma, Susumu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Tomari, Yukihide

    2010-07-30

    Small silencing RNAs--small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or microRNAs (miRNAs)--direct posttranscriptional gene silencing of their mRNA targets as guides for the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Both siRNAs and miRNAs are born double stranded. Surprisingly, loading these small RNA duplexes into Argonaute proteins, the core components of RISC, requires ATP, whereas separating the two small RNA strands within Argonaute does not. Here we show that the Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery is required to load small RNA duplexes into Argonaute proteins, but not for subsequent strand separation or target cleavage. We envision that the chaperone machinery uses ATP and mediates a conformational opening of Ago proteins so that they can receive bulky small RNA duplexes. Our data suggest that the chaperone machinery may serve as the driving force for the RISC assembly pathway. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interplay between chromatin modulators and histone acetylation regulates the formation of accessible chromatin in the upstream regulatory region of fission yeast fbp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Akira; Senmatsu, Satoshi; Asada, Ryuta; Abe, Takuya; Hoffman, Charles S; Ohta, Kunihiro; Hirota, Kouji

    2018-05-03

    Numerous noncoding RNA transcripts are detected in eukaryotic cells. Noncoding RNAs transcribed across gene promoters are involved in the regulation of mRNA transcription via chromatin modulation. This function of noncoding RNA transcription was first demonstrated for the fission yeast fbp1 gene, where a cascade of noncoding RNA transcription events induces chromatin remodeling to facilitate transcription factor binding. We recently demonstrated that the noncoding RNAs from the fbp1 upstream region facilitate binding of the transcription activator Atf1 and thereby promote histone acetylation. Histone acetylation by histone acetyl transferases (HATs) and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ADCRs) are implicated in chromatin remodeling, but the interplay between HATs and ADCRs in this process has not been fully elucidated. Here, we examine the roles played by two distinct ADCRs, Snf22 and Hrp3, and by the HAT Gcn5 in the transcriptional activation of fbp1. Snf22 and Hrp3 redundantly promote disassembly of chromatin in the fbp1 upstream region. Gcn5 critically contributes to nucleosome eviction in the absence of either Snf22 or Hrp3, presumably by recruiting Hrp3 in snf22∆ cells and Snf22 in hrp3∆ cells. Conversely, Gcn5-dependent histone H3 acetylation is impaired in snf22∆/hrp3∆ cells, suggesting that both redundant ADCRs induce recruitment of Gcn5 to the chromatin array in the fbp1 upstream region. These results reveal a previously unappreciated interplay between ADCRs and histone acetylation in which histone acetylation facilitates recruitment of ADCRs, while ADCRs are required for histone acetylation.

  17. Regulation of BAZ1A and nucleosome positioning in the nucleus accumbens in response to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, HaoSheng; Damez-Werno, Diane M; Scobie, Kimberly N; Shao, Ning-Yi; Dias, Caroline; Rabkin, Jacqui; Wright, Katherine N; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Kabbaj, Mohamed; Neve, Rachael; Turecki, Gustavo; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J

    2017-06-14

    Chromatin regulation, in particular ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, have previously been shown to be important in the regulation of reward-related behaviors in animal models of mental illnesses. Here we demonstrate that BAZ1A, an accessory subunit of the ISWI family of chromatin remodeling complexes, is downregulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice exposed repeatedly to cocaine and of cocaine-addicted humans. Viral-mediated overexpression of BAZ1A in mouse NAc reduces cocaine reward as assessed by conditioned place preference (CPP), but increases cocaine-induced locomotor activation. Furthermore, we investigate nucleosome repositioning genome-wide by conducting chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-sequencing for total H3 in NAc of control mice and after repeated cocaine administration, and find extensive nucleosome occupancy and shift changes across the genome in response to cocaine exposure. These findings implicate BAZ1A in molecular and behavioral plasticity to cocaine and offer new insight into the pathophysiology of cocaine addiction. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. EBNA1 efficiently assembles on chromatin containing the Epstein-Barr virus latent origin of replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avolio-Hunter, Tina M.; Frappier, Lori

    2003-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) protein, EBNA1, activates the replication of latent EBV episomes and the transcription of EBV latency genes by binding to recognition sites in the DS and FR elements of oriP. Since EBV episomes exist as chromatin, we have examined the interaction of EBNA1 with oriP templates assembled with physiologically spaced nucleosomes. We show that EBNA1 retains the ability to efficiently bind its recognition sites within the DS and FR elements in oriP chromatin and that this property is intrinsic to the EBNA1 DNA binding domain. The efficient assembly of EBNA1 on oriP chromatin does not require ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors and does not cause the precise positioning of nucleosomes within or adjacent to the FR and DS elements. Thus EBNA1 belongs to a select group of proteins that can efficiently access their recognition sites within nucleosomes without the need for additional chromatin remodeling factors

  19. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  20. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Jenna; Ekwall, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  1. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  2. Functional analysis of a Wheat Homeodomain protein, TaR1, reveals that host chromatin remodelling influences the dynamics of the switch to necrotrophic growth in the phytopathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jack; Orosa, Beatriz; Millyard, Linda; Edwards, Martin; Kanyuka, Kostya; Gatehouse, Angharad; Rudd, Jason; Hammond-Kosack, Kim; Pain, Naomi; Sadanandom, Ari

    2015-04-01

    A distinguishing feature of Septoria leaf blotch disease in wheat is the long symptomless growth of the fungus amongst host cells followed by a rapid transition to necrotrophic growth resulting in disease lesions. Global reprogramming of host transcription marks this switch to necrotrophic growth. However no information exists on the components that bring about host transcriptional reprogramming. Gene-silencing, confocal-imaging and protein-protein interaction assays where employed to identify a plant homeodomain (PHD) protein, TaR1 in wheat that plays a critical role during the transition from symptomless to necrotrophic growth of Septoria. TaR1-silenced wheat show earlier symptom development upon Septoria infection but reduced fungal sporulation indicating that TaR1 is key for prolonging the symptomless phase and facilitating Septoria asexual reproduction. TaR1 is localized to the nucleus and binds to wheat Histone 3. Trimethylation of Histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4) and lysine 36 (H3K36) are found on open chromatin with actively transcribed genes, whereas methylation of H3K27 and H3K9 are associated with repressed loci. TaR1 specifically recognizes dimethylated and trimethylated H3K4 peptides suggesting that it regulates transcriptional activation at open chromatin. We conclude that TaR1 is an important component for the pathogen life cycle in wheat that promotes successful colonization by Septoria. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Direct demonstration of ATP-dependent release of SecA from a translocating preprotein by surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Keyzer, J; van der Does, C; Kloosterman, TG; Driessen, AJM

    2003-01-01

    Translocase mediates the transport of preproteins across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. SecA binds with high affinity to the membrane-embedded protein-conducting SecYEG complex and serves as both a receptor for secretory proteins and as an ATP-driven molecular motor. Cycles of ATP binding

  4. Mg(2+,ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. ІІ. Regulation of activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. О. Veklich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane Ca2+-pump is one of key proteins, which takes part in Ca2+ exchange in smooth muscle cells. It has a lot of diverse functions from control of basal cytoplasmal Ca2+ concentration to regulation of proteins involved in Ca2+-dependent signal pathway. Ca2+ pump function is often depen­dent on the isoform or even form of alternative splicing. Allowing for a variety of Ca2+-pump functions and properties, which were reviewed in detail in the first part of our review article cycle (Ukr. Biochem. J., 2015; 87(1, the precise control of the mentioned pump activity is very important for cell functioning­. The other part of this article is dedicated to different regulation factors of smooth muscle plasma membrane Ca2+-pump activity: endogenous and exo­genous, biotic and abiotic factors. Special attention is given to literature data and own results about design and the search of selective plasma membrane Ca2+-pump inhibitor which would allow examining its functioning in smooth muscle cells more meticulously.

  5. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander

    2015-01-01

    modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp68, Lys170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp68...... or Lys170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 ms and 700 ms for Trp68Leu and Lys170Asn, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using phi-value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies...

  6. CO2-Induced ATP-Dependent Release of Acetylcholine on the Ventral Surface of the Medulla Oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckstepp, Robert T R; Llaudet, Enrique; Gourine, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Complex mechanisms that detect changes in brainstem parenchymal PCO2/[H+] and trigger adaptive changes in lung ventilation are responsible for central respiratory CO2 chemosensitivity. Previous studies of chemosensory signalling pathways suggest that at the level of the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata (VMS), CO2-induced changes in ventilation are (at least in part) mediated by the release and actions of ATP and/or acetylcholine (ACh). Here we performed simultaneous real-time biosensor recordings of CO2-induced ATP and ACh release from the VMS in vivo and in vitro, to test the hypothesis that central respiratory CO2 chemosensory transduction involves simultaneous recruitment of purinergic and cholinergic signalling pathways. In anaesthetised and artificially ventilated rats, an increase in inspired CO2 triggered ACh release on the VMS with a peak amplitude of ~5 μM. Release of ACh was only detected after the onset of CO2-induced activation of the respiratory activity and was markedly reduced (by ~70%) by ATP receptor blockade. In horizontal slices of the VMS, CO2-induced release of ATP was reliably detected, whereas CO2 or bath application of ATP (100 μM) failed to trigger release of ACh. These results suggest that during hypercapnia locally produced ATP induces or potentiates the release of ACh (likely from the medullary projections of distal groups of cholinergic neurones), which may also contribute to the development and/or maintenance of the ventilatory response to CO2.

  7. ATP-dependent paracrine communication between enteric neurons and glia in a primary cell culture derived from embryonic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, P; Chevalier, J; Boesmans, W; Roosen, L; van den Abbeel, V; Neunlist, M; Tack, J; Vanden Berghe, P

    2009-08-01

    The importance of dynamic interactions between glia and neurons is increasingly recognized, both in the central and enteric nervous system. However, apart from their protective role, little is known about enteric neuro-glia interaction. The aim was to investigate neuro-glia intercellular communication in a mouse culture model using optical techniques. Complete embryonic (E13) guts were enzymatically dissociated, seeded on coverslips and studied with immunohistochemistry and Ca(2+)-imaging. Putative progenitor-like cells (expressing both PGP9.5 and S-100) differentiated over approximately 5 days into glia or neurons expressing typical cell-specific markers. The glia-neuron ratio could be manipulated by specific supplements (N2, G5). Neurons and glia were functionally identified both by their Ca(2+)-response to either depolarization (high K(+)) or lysophosphatidic acid and by the expression of typical markers. Neurons responded to ACh, DMPP, 5-HT, ATP and electrical stimulation, while glia responded to ATP and ADPbetas. Inhibition of glial responses by MRS2179 suggests involvement of P2Y1 receptors. Neuronal stimulation also caused delayed glial responses, which were reduced by suramin and by exogenous apyrases that catalyse nucleotide breakdown. Conversely, glial responses were enhanced by ARL-67156, an ecto-ATPase inhibitor. In this mouse enteric co-culture, functional glia and neurons can be easily monitored using optical techniques. Glial cells can be activated directly by ATP or ADPbetas. Activation of neuronal cells (DMPP, K(+)) causes secondary responses in glial cells, which can be modulated by tuning ATP and ADP breakdown. This strongly supports the involvement of paracrine purinergic communication between enteric neurons and glia.

  8. The energetic state of mitochondria modulates complex III biogenesis through the ATP-dependent activity of Bcs1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Nouet, Cécile; Courtin, Florence; Blancard, Corinne; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Dujardin, Geneviève

    2013-10-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial biogenesis has continuously expanded during the last decades, yet little is known about how they are modulated to optimize the functioning of mitochondria. Here, we show that mutations in the ATP binding domain of Bcs1, a chaperone involved in the assembly of complex III, can be rescued by mutations that decrease the ATP hydrolytic activity of the ATP synthase. Our results reveal a Bcs1-mediated control loop in which the biogenesis of complex III is modulated by the energy-transducing activity of mitochondria. Although ATP is well known as a regulator of a number of cellular activities, we show here that ATP can be also used to modulate the biogenesis of an enzyme by controlling a specific chaperone involved in its assembly. Our study further highlights the intramitochondrial adenine nucleotide pool as a potential target for the treatment of Bcs1-based disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mg(2+),ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump of smooth muscle cells. ІІ. Regulation of activity

    OpenAIRE

    T. О. Veklich; Iu. Iu. Mazur; S. О. Kosterin

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-pump is one of key proteins, which takes part in Ca2+ exchange in smooth muscle cells. It has a lot of diverse functions from control of basal cytoplasmal Ca2+ concentration to regulation of proteins involved in Ca2+-dependent signal pathway. Ca2+ pump function is often depen­dent on the isoform or even form of alternative splicing. Allowing for a variety of Ca2+-pump functions and properties, which were reviewed in detail in the first part of our review article cycle (U...

  10. Proton Motive Force-Driven and ATP-Dependent Drug Extrusion Systems in Multidrug-Resistant Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOLHUIS, H; MOLENAAR, D; POELARENDS, G; VANVEEN, HW; POOLMAN, B; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN

    1994-01-01

    Three mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363, termed Eth(R), Dau(R), and Rho(R), were selected for resistance to high concentrations of ethidium bromide, daunomycin, and rhodamine 6G, respectively. These mutants were found to be cross resistant to a number of structurally and

  11. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-07-03

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [(3)H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Identification of a lysosome membrane protein which could mediate ATP-dependent stable association of lysosomes to microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mithieux, G.; Rousset, B.

    1989-01-01

    We have previously reported that purified thyroid lysosomes bind to reconstituted microtubules to form stable complexes, a process which is inhibited by ATP. Among detergent-solubilized lysosomal membrane protein, we identified a 50-kDa molecular component which binds to preassembled microtubules. The binding of this polypeptide to microtubules was decreased in the presence of ATP. We purified this 50-kDa protein by affinity chromatography on immobilized ATP. The 50-kDa protein bound to the ATP column was eluted by 1 mM ATP. The purified protein, labeled with 125I, exhibited the ability of interacting with microtubules. The binding process was inhibited by increasing concentrations of ATP, the half-maximal inhibitory effect being obtained at an ATP concentration of 0.35 mM. The interaction of the 50-kDa protein with microtubules is a saturable phenomenon since the binding of the 125I-labeled 50-kDa protein was inhibited by unlabeled solubilized lysosomal membrane protein containing the 50-kDa polypeptide but not by the same protein fraction from which the 50-kDa polypeptide had been removed by the ATP affinity chromatography procedure. The 50-kDa protein has the property to bind to pure tubulin coupled to an insoluble matrix. The 50-kDa protein was eluted from the tubulin affinity column by ATP. These findings support the conclusion that a protein inserted into the lysosomal membrane is able to bind directly to microtubules in a process which can be regulated by ATP. We propose that this protein could account for the association of lysosomes to microtubules demonstrated both in vitro and in intact cells

  13. The Type 1 Homodimeric Reaction Center in Heliobacterium modesticaldum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    In this funding period, we (i) found that strong illumination of Heliobacterium modesticaldum cells results in saturation of the electron acceptor pool, leading to reduction of the acceptor side and the creation of a back-reacting state that gives rise to delayed fluorescence; (ii) noted that when the FX cluster is reduced in purified reaction centers, no electron transfer occurs beyond A0, even though a quinone is present; (iii) observed by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) studies of whole cells of Heliobacterium mobilis that primary charge separation is retained even after conversion of the majority of BChl g to Chl aF. ; and (iv) purified a homogeneous preparation of reaction center cores, which led to promising crystallization trials to obtain a three-dimensional structure.

  14. Experiment list: SRX186646 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available metalloenzymes that play a role a chromatin remodeling and histone demethylation. PHF8 also bears...mes that play a role a chromatin remodeling and histone demethylation. PHF8 also bears a PHD (plant homeodom

  15. Experiment list: SRX186705 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t play a role a chromatin remodeling and histone demethylation. PHF8 also bears a...a chromatin remodeling and histone demethylation. PHF8 also bears a PHD (plant homeodomain)- type zinc-finge

  16. Preclinical Evidence of Anti-Tumor Activity Induced by EZH2 Inhibition in Human Models of Synovial Sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kawano

    Full Text Available The catalytic activities of covalent and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling are central to regulating the conformational state of chromatin and the resultant transcriptional output. The enzymes that catalyze these activities are often contained within multiprotein complexes in nature. Two such multiprotein complexes, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 methyltransferase and the SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler have been reported to act in opposition to each other during development and homeostasis. An imbalance in their activities induced by mutations/deletions in complex members (e.g. SMARCB1 has been suggested to be a pathogenic mechanism in certain human cancers. Here we show that preclinical models of synovial sarcoma-a cancer characterized by functional SMARCB1 loss via its displacement from the SWI/SNF complex through the pathognomonic SS18-SSX fusion protein-display sensitivity to pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2. Treatment with tazemetostat, a clinical-stage, selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitor of EZH2 enzymatic activity reverses a subset of synovial sarcoma gene expression and results in concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition and cell death specifically in SS18-SSX fusion-positive cells in vitro. Treatment of mice bearing either a cell line or two patient-derived xenograft models of synovial sarcoma leads to dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition with correlative inhibition of trimethylation levels of the EZH2-specific substrate, lysine 27 on histone H3. These data demonstrate a dependency of SS18-SSX-positive, SMARCB1-deficient synovial sarcomas on EZH2 enzymatic activity and suggests the potential utility of EZH2-targeted drugs in these genetically defined cancers.

  17. Stimulation by ATP of proinsulin to insulin conversion in isolated rat pancreatic islet secretory granules. Association with the ATP-dependent proton pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.J.; Lucas, C.A.; Mutkoski, R.L.; Orci, L.; Halban, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated rat pancreatic islets were pulse-labeled for 5 min with [ 3 H]leucine then chased for 25 min, during which time endogenously labeled [ 3 H]proinsulin becomes predominantly compartmented in immature secretory granules. The islets were then homogenized in isotonic sucrose (pH 7.4) and a beta-granule preparation obtained by differential centrifugation and discontinuous sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. This preparation was enriched 8-fold in beta-granules. Aside from contamination with mitochondria and a limited number of lysosomes, the beta-granule preparation was essentially free of any other organelles involved in proinsulin synthesis and packaging (i.e. microsomal elements and, more particularly, Golgi complex). Conversion of endogenously labeled [ 3 H]proinsulin was followed in this beta-granule fraction for up to 2 h at 37 degrees C in a buffer (pH 7.3) that mimicked the cationic constituents of B-cell cytosol, during which time 92% of the beta-granules remained intact. Proinsulin conversion was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The rate of proinsulin conversion to insulin was stimulated by 2.2 +/- 0.1-fold (n = 6) (at a 60-min incubation) in the presence of ATP (2 mM) and an ATP regenerating system compared to beta-granule preparations incubated without ATP. This ATP stimulation was abolished in the presence of beta-granule proton pump ATPase inhibitors (tributyltin, 2.5 microM, or 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, 50 microM). Inhibitors of mitochondrial proton pump ATPases had no effect on the ATP stimulation of proinsulin conversion. When granules were incubated in a more acidic buffer, proinsulin conversion was increased relative to that at pH 7.3. At pH 5.5, ATP no longer stimulated conversion, and tributyltin and 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide had no effect

  18. Kinetics of Ca2+- and ATP-dependent, voltage-controlled anion conductance in the plasma membrane of mesophyll cells of Pisum sativum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, J.T.M.; van Volkenburgh, E.

    Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to measure anion currents through the plasma membrane of protoplasts of mesophyll cells of expanding pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. Voltage-induced changes of the currents could be modelled with single exponential activation and deactivation kinetics. The

  19. Involvement of an ATP-dependent carboxylase in a CO2-dependent pathway of acetone metabolism by Xanthobacter strain Py2.

    OpenAIRE

    Sluis, M K; Small, F J; Allen, J R; Ensign, S A

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of acetone by the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter strain Py2 was investigated. Cell suspensions of Xanthobacter strain Py2 grown with propylene or glucose as carbon sources were unable to metabolize acetone. The addition of acetone to cultures grown with propylene or glucose resulted in a time-dependent increase in acetone-degrading activity. The degradation of acetone by these cultures was prevented by the addition of rifampin and chloramphenicol, demonstrating that new protein...

  20. Identification of novel oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon-like protease Pim1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayot, Aurélien; Gareil, Monique; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2010-01-01

    , yeast cells have been shown to accumulate electron-dense inclusion bodies in the matrix space, to lose integrity of mitochondrial genome, and to be respiration-deficient. Because of the severity of phenotypes associated with the depletion of Pim1, this protease appears to be an essential component...

  1. Cas3 is a single-stranded DNA nuclease and ATP-dependent helicase in the CRISPR/Cas immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkunas, Tomas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Fremaux, Christophe; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2011-04-06

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a recently discovered adaptive prokaryotic immune system that provides acquired immunity against foreign nucleic acids by utilizing small guide crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs) to interfere with invading viruses and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, Cas3 is essential for crRNA-guided interference with virus proliferation. Cas3 contains N-terminal HD phosphohydrolase and C-terminal Superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase domains. Here, we provide the first report of the cloning, expression, purification and in vitro functional analysis of the Cas3 protein of the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR4 (Ecoli subtype) system. Cas3 possesses a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-stimulated ATPase activity, which is coupled to unwinding of DNA/DNA and RNA/DNA duplexes. Cas3 also shows ATP-independent nuclease activity located in the HD domain with a preference for ssDNA substrates. To dissect the contribution of individual domains, Cas3 separation-of-function mutants (ATPase(+)/nuclease(-) and ATPase(-)/nuclease(+)) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. We propose that the Cas3 ATPase/helicase domain acts as a motor protein, which assists delivery of the nuclease activity to Cascade-crRNA complex targeting foreign DNA.

  2. Lassomycin, a ribosomally synthesized cyclic peptide, kills mycobacterium tuberculosis by targeting the ATP-dependent protease ClpC1P1P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrish, Ekaterina; Sit, Clarissa S; Cao, Shugeng; Kandror, Olga; Spoering, Amy; Peoples, Aaron; Ling, Losee; Fetterman, Ashley; Hughes, Dallas; Bissell, Anthony; Torrey, Heather; Akopian, Tatos; Mueller, Andreas; Epstein, Slava; Goldberg, Alfred; Clardy, Jon; Lewis, Kim

    2014-04-24

    Languishing antibiotic discovery and flourishing antibiotic resistance have prompted the development of alternative untapped sources for antibiotic discovery, including previously uncultured bacteria. Here, we screen extracts from uncultured species against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and identify lassomycin, an antibiotic that exhibits potent bactericidal activity against both growing and dormant mycobacteria, including drug-resistant forms of M. tuberculosis, but little activity against other bacteria or mammalian cells. Lassomycin is a highly basic, ribosomally encoded cyclic peptide with an unusual structural fold that only partially resembles that of other lasso peptides. We show that lassomycin binds to a highly acidic region of the ClpC1 ATPase complex and markedly stimulates its ATPase activity without stimulating ClpP1P2-catalyzed protein breakdown, which is essential for viability of mycobacteria. This mechanism, uncoupling ATPase from proteolytic activity, accounts for the bactericidal activity of lassomycin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solution NMR structure of the HLTF HIRAN domain: a conserved module in SWI2/SNF2 DNA damage tolerance proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Neculai, Dante; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Bezsonova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    HLTF is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme that acts in the error-free branch of DNA damage tolerance (DDT), a cellular mechanism that enables replication of damaged DNA while leaving damage repair for a later time. Human HLTF and a closely related protein SHPRH, as well as their yeast homologue Rad5, are multi-functional enzymes that share E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity required for activation of the error-free DDT. HLTF and Rad5 also function as ATP-dependent dsDNA translocases and possess replication fork reversal activities. Thus, they can convert Y-shaped replication forks into X-shaped Holliday junction structures that allow error-free replication over DNA lesions. The fork reversal activity of HLTF is dependent on 3′-ssDNA-end binding activity of its N-terminal HIRAN domain. Here we present the solution NMR structure of the human HLTF HIRAN domain, an OB-like fold module found in organisms from bacteria (as a stand-alone domain) to plants, fungi and metazoan (in combination with SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like domain). The obtained structure of free HLTF HIRAN is similar to recently reported structures of its DNA bound form, while the NMR analysis also reveals that the DNA binding site of the free domain exhibits conformational heterogeneity. Sequence comparison of N-terminal regions of HLTF, SHPRH and Rad5 aided by knowledge of the HLTF HIRAN structure suggests that the SHPRH N-terminus also includes an uncharacterized structured module, exhibiting weak sequence similarity with HIRAN regions of HLTF and Rad5, and potentially playing a similar functional role.

  4. Solution NMR structure of the HLTF HIRAN domain: a conserved module in SWI2/SNF2 DNA damage tolerance proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M. [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Neculai, Dante [Zhejiang University, School of Medicine (China); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Cancer Biology (United States); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States)

    2016-11-15

    HLTF is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme that acts in the error-free branch of DNA damage tolerance (DDT), a cellular mechanism that enables replication of damaged DNA while leaving damage repair for a later time. Human HLTF and a closely related protein SHPRH, as well as their yeast homologue Rad5, are multi-functional enzymes that share E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity required for activation of the error-free DDT. HLTF and Rad5 also function as ATP-dependent dsDNA translocases and possess replication fork reversal activities. Thus, they can convert Y-shaped replication forks into X-shaped Holliday junction structures that allow error-free replication over DNA lesions. The fork reversal activity of HLTF is dependent on 3′-ssDNA-end binding activity of its N-terminal HIRAN domain. Here we present the solution NMR structure of the human HLTF HIRAN domain, an OB-like fold module found in organisms from bacteria (as a stand-alone domain) to plants, fungi and metazoan (in combination with SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like domain). The obtained structure of free HLTF HIRAN is similar to recently reported structures of its DNA bound form, while the NMR analysis also reveals that the DNA binding site of the free domain exhibits conformational heterogeneity. Sequence comparison of N-terminal regions of HLTF, SHPRH and Rad5 aided by knowledge of the HLTF HIRAN structure suggests that the SHPRH N-terminus also includes an uncharacterized structured module, exhibiting weak sequence similarity with HIRAN regions of HLTF and Rad5, and potentially playing a similar functional role.

  5. Covalent Modifications of Histone H3K9 Promote Binding of CHD3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam H. Tencer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodeling is required for genome function and is facilitated by ATP-dependent complexes, such as nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD. Among its core components is the chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 3 (CHD3 whose functional significance is not well established. Here, we show that CHD3 co-localizes with the other NuRD subunits, including HDAC1, near the H3K9ac-enriched promoters of the NuRD target genes. The tandem PHD fingers of CHD3 bind histone H3 tails and posttranslational modifications that increase hydrophobicity of H3K9—methylation or acetylation (H3K9me3 or H3K9ac—enhance this interaction. Binding of CHD3 PHDs promotes H3K9Cme3-nucleosome unwrapping in vitro and perturbs the pericentric heterochromatin structure in vivo. Methylation or acetylation of H3K9 uniquely alleviates the intra-nucleosomal interaction of histone H3 tails, increasing H3K9 accessibility. Collectively, our data suggest that the targeting of covalently modified H3K9 by CHD3 might be essential in diverse functions of NuRD.

  6. BAF200 is required for heart morphogenesis and coronary artery development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjuan He

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes utilize ATP hydrolysis to non-covalently change nucleosome-DNA interactions and are essential in stem cell development, organogenesis, and tumorigenesis. Biochemical studies show that SWI/SNF in mammalian cells can be divided into two subcomplexes BAF and PBAF based on the subunit composition. ARID2 or BAF200 has been defined as an intrinsic subunit of PBAF complex. However, the function of BAF200 in vivo is not clear. To dissect the possible role of BAF200 in regulating embryogenesis and organ development, we generated BAF200 mutant mice and found they were embryonic lethal. BAF200 mutant embryos exhibited multiple cardiac defects including thin myocardium, ventricular septum defect, common atrioventricular valve, and double outlet right ventricle around E14.5. Moreover, we also detected reduced intramyocardial coronary arteries in BAF200 mutants, suggesting that BAF200 is required for proper migration and differentiation of subepicardial venous cells into arterial endothelial cells. Our work revealed that PBAF complex plays a critical role in heart morphogenesis and coronary artery angiogenesis.

  7. Sp1 and CREB regulate basal transcription of the human SNF2L gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yu; Jiang Baichun; Zou Yongxin; Gao Guimin; Shang Linshan; Chen Bingxi; Liu Qiji; Gong Yaoqin

    2008-01-01

    Imitation Switch (ISWI) is a member of the SWI2/SNF2 superfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, which are involved in multiple nuclear functions, including transcriptional regulation, replication, and chromatin assembly. Mammalian genomes encode two ISWI orthologs, SNF2H and SNF2L. In order to clarify the molecular mechanisms governing the expression of human SNF2L gene, we functionally examined the transcriptional regulation of human SNF2L promoter. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that the minimal SNF2L promoter was located between positions -152 to -86 relative to the transcription start site. In this region we have identified a cAMP-response element (CRE) located at -99 to -92 and a Sp1-binding site at -145 to -135 that play a critical role in regulating basal activity of human SNF2L gene, which were proven by deletion and mutation of specific binding sites, EMSA, and down-regulating Sp1 and CREB via RNAi. This study provides the first insight into the mechanisms that control basal expression of human SNF2L gene

  8. Identification of multiple distinct Snf2 subfamilies with conserved structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaus, Andrew; Martin, David M A; Barton, Geoffrey J; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins includes the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes found in all eukaryotes. These act to regulate the structure and dynamic properties of chromatin and so influence a broad range of nuclear processes. We have exploited progress in genome sequencing to assemble a comprehensive catalogue of over 1300 Snf2 family members. Multiple sequence alignment of the helicase-related regions enables 24 distinct subfamilies to be identified, a considerable expansion over earlier surveys. Where information is known, there is a good correlation between biological or biochemical function and these assignments, suggesting Snf2 family motor domains are tuned for specific tasks. Scanning of complete genomes reveals all eukaryotes contain members of multiple subfamilies, whereas they are less common and not ubiquitous in eubacteria or archaea. The large sample of Snf2 proteins enables additional distinguishing conserved sequence blocks within the helicase-like motor to be identified. The establishment of a phylogeny for Snf2 proteins provides an opportunity to make informed assignments of function, and the identification of conserved motifs provides a framework for understanding the mechanisms by which these proteins function.

  9. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Nicolai

    Full Text Available The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER known as transcription coupled repair (TCR. CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  10. ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang (Harvard-Med); (Ottawa Hosp.); (MSKCC); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston); (Tsinghua); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

    2011-07-19

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  11. ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

    2011-12-31

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  12. Epigenetic control of plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, María E; Nota, Florencia; Cambiagno, Damián A

    2010-07-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, gene expression and DNA recombination are affected by structural chromatin traits. Chromatin structure is shaped by the activity of enzymes that either introduce covalent modifications in DNA and histone proteins or use energy from ATP to disrupt histone-DNA interactions. The genomic 'marks' that are generated by covalent modifications of histones and DNA, or by the deposition of histone variants, are susceptible to being altered in response to stress. Recent evidence has suggested that proteins generating these epigenetic marks play crucial roles in the defence against pathogens. Histone deacetylases are involved in the activation of jasmonic acid- and ethylene-sensitive defence mechanisms. ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers mediate the constitutive repression of the salicylic acid-dependent pathway, whereas histone methylation at the WRKY70 gene promoter affects the activation of this pathway. Interestingly, bacterial-infected tissues show a net reduction in DNA methylation, which may affect the disease resistance genes responsible for the surveillance against pathogens. As some epigenetic marks can be erased or maintained and transmitted to offspring, epigenetic mechanisms may provide plasticity for the dynamic control of emerging pathogens without the generation of genomic lesions.

  13. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkman, Loy E.

    2015-01-01

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management. - Highlights: • Baculoviruses have negatively-supercoiled, circular ds DNA. • Negatively-supercoiled DNA spontaneously forms nucleosomes in the nucleus. • Nucleosomes must be mobilized for replication and transcription to proceed. • Actin-containing chromatin modifiers participate in baculovirus replication

  14. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Loy E., E-mail: lvolkman@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-15

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management. - Highlights: • Baculoviruses have negatively-supercoiled, circular ds DNA. • Negatively-supercoiled DNA spontaneously forms nucleosomes in the nucleus. • Nucleosomes must be mobilized for replication and transcription to proceed. • Actin-containing chromatin modifiers participate in baculovirus replication.

  15. Coffin-Siris syndrome is a SWI/SNF complex disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Y; Okamoto, N; Ohashi, H; Mizuno, S; Matsumoto, N; Makita, Y; Fukuda, M; Isidor, B; Perrier, J; Aggarwal, S; Dalal, A B; Al-Kindy, A; Liebelt, J; Mowat, D; Nakashima, M; Saitsu, H; Miyake, N; Matsumoto, N

    2014-06-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a congenital disorder characterized by intellectual disability, growth deficiency, microcephaly, coarse facial features, and hypoplastic or absent fifth fingernails and/or toenails. We previously reported that five genes are mutated in CSS, all of which encode subunits of the switch/sucrose non-fermenting (SWI/SNF) ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex: SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCE1, ARID1A, and ARID1B. In this study, we examined 49 newly recruited CSS-suspected patients, and re-examined three patients who did not show any mutations (using high-resolution melting analysis) in the previous study, by whole-exome sequencing or targeted resequencing. We found that SMARCB1, SMARCA4, or ARID1B were mutated in 20 patients. By examining available parental samples, we ascertained that 17 occurred de novo. All mutations in SMARCB1 and SMARCA4 were non-truncating (missense or in-frame deletion) whereas those in ARID1B were all truncating (nonsense or frameshift deletion/insertion) in this study as in our previous study. Our data further support that CSS is a SWI/SNF complex disorder. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The role of BAF (mSWI/SNF) complexes in mammalian neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Esther Y; Crabtree, Gerald R

    2014-09-01

    The BAF (mammalian SWI/SNF) complexes are a family of multi-subunit ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers that use ATP hydrolysis to alter chromatin structure. Distinct BAF complex compositions are possible through combinatorial assembly of homologous subunit families and can serve non-redundant functions. In mammalian neural development, developmental stage-specific BAF assemblies are found in embryonic stem cells, neural progenitors and postmitotic neurons. In particular, the neural progenitor-specific BAF complexes are essential for controlling the kinetics and mode of neural progenitor cell division, while neuronal BAF function is necessary for the maturation of postmitotic neuronal phenotypes as well as long-term memory formation. The microRNA-mediated mechanism for transitioning from npBAF to nBAF complexes is instructive for the neuronal fate and can even convert fibroblasts into neurons. The high frequency of BAF subunit mutations in neurological disorders underscores the rate-determining role of BAF complexes in neural development, homeostasis, and plasticity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic control of plant heat responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzhong eLiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved sophisticated genetic and epigenetic regulatory systems to respond quickly to unfavorable environmental conditions such as heat, cold, drought, and pathogen infections. In particular, heat greatly affects plant growth and development, immunity and circadian rhythm, and poses a serious threat to the global food supply. According to temperatures exposing, heat can be usually classified as warm ambient temperature (about 22-27℃, high temperature (27-30℃ and extremely high temperature (37-42℃, also known as heat stress for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The genetic mechanisms of plant responses to heat have been well studied, mainly focusing on elevated ambient temperature-mediated morphological acclimation and acceleration of flowering, modulation of plant immunity and circadian clock by high temperatures, and thermotolerance to heat stress. Recently, great progress has been achieved on epigenetic regulation of heat responses, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, histone chaperones, small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and other undefined epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic modifications regulate the expression of heat-responsive genes and function to prevent heat-related damage. This review focuses on recent progresses regarding the genetic and epigenetic control of heat responses in plants, and pays more attention to the role of the major epigenetic mechanisms in plant heat responses. Further research perspectives are also discussed.

  18. Deletion of SMARCA4 impairs alveolar epithelial type II cells proliferation and aggravates pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyi Peng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs injury and failed reconstitution of the AECs barrier are both integral to alveolar flooding and subsequent pulmonary fibrosis (PF. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms regulating the regeneration of AECs post-injury still remain unclear. SMARCA4 is a part of the large ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complex SWI/SNF, which is essential for kidney and heart fibrosis. We investigates SMARCA4 function in lung fibrosis by establishing PF mice model with bleomycin firstly and found that the expression of SMARCA4 was mainly enhanced in alveolar type II (ATII cells. Moreover, we established an alveolar epithelium-specific SMARCA4-deleted SP-C-rtTA/(tetO7-Cre/SMARCA4f/f mice (SOSM4Δ/Δ model, as well as a new SMARCA4-deleted alveolar type II (ATII-like mle-12 cell line. We found that the bleomycin-induced PF was more aggressive in SOSM4Δ/Δ mice. Also, the proliferation of ATII cells was decreased with the loss of SMARCA4 in vivo and in vitro. In addition, we observed increased proliferation of ATII cells accompanied by abnormally high expression of SMARCA4 in human PF lung sections. These data uncovered the indispensable role of SMARCA4 in the proliferation of ATII cells, which might affect the progression of PF.

  19. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  20. MUTATIONS OF THE SMARCB1 GENE IN HUMAN CANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Mikhaylenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, the full exome sequencing helped to reveal a  set of mutations in the genes that are not oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes by definition, but play an important role in carcinogenesis and encode proteins involved in chromatin remodeling. Among chromatin remodeling systems, which operate through the ATP-dependent mechanism, the complex SWI/ SNF attracts the great attention. The complex consists of the catalytic ATPase (SMARCA2/4, a group of conservative core subunits (SMARCB1, SMARCC1/2, and variant subunits. Abnormalities in the genes coding for each of these components have been identified as driver mutations in various human tumors. The SMARCB1 gene is of interest for practical oncogenetics, with its typical genotype-phenotype correlations. Germinal inactivating mutations (frameshift insertions/deletions, full deletions of the gene, nonsense mutations lead to development of rhabdoid tumors in the kidneys and the brain in children in their first years of life, or even in utero. These tumors are highly malignant (Rhabdoid Tumor Predisposition Syndrome 1 – RTPS1. If a mutation carrier survives his/hers four years of life without manifestation RTPS1 with a missense mutation or has the mutation in the "hot spot" of the first or the last exon, then he/she will not develop rhabdoid tumors, but after 20 years of life, shwannomatosis may develop as multiple benign tumors of peripheral nerves. Finally, some point mutations in the exons 8–9 can result in Coffin-Siris syndrome characterized by mental retardation and developmental disorders, but no neoplasms. In this regard, rational referral of patients for direct DNA diagnostics of each of the described disease entities plays an important role, based on respective minimal criteria, as well as necessity of further development of NGS technologies (full genome and full exome sequencing that are able to sequence not only individual exons, but all candidate genes of the

  1. A green and efficient method for the synthesis of homodimeric (β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... derivatives by intramolecular cyclization in various yields. Of particular interest is the use of the water as solvent of reaction and in absence of catalyst. Also these operating conditions protect the environment and economic points of view. Keywords: aqueous synthesis; bioactivity; dihydropyridine; dimedone; green method; ...

  2. Structural changes of human RNase L upon homodimerization investigated by Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříž, M.; Snášel, Jan; Kopecký, V. Jr.; Páv, Ondřej; Rosenberg, Ivan; Štepánek, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1824, č. 9 (2012), s. 1039-1044 ISSN 1570-9639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0193; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB101120805 Program:KJ Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : RNase L * Raman spectroscopy * DCDR spectroscopy * phosphonate oligoadenylate * ligand binding Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.733, year: 2012

  3. Impact of subunit linkages in an engineered homodimeric binding protein to α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauhar, Aziz; Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Gremer, Lothar; Mirecka, Ewa A; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Aggregation of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn) has been implicated in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as synucleinopathies. The β-wrapin AS69 is a small engineered binding protein to α-syn that stabilizes a β-hairpin conformation of monomeric α-syn and inhibits α-syn aggregation at substoichiometric concentrations. AS69 is a homodimer whose subunits are linked via a disulfide bridge between their single cysteine residues, Cys-28. Here we show that expression of a functional dimer as a single polypeptide chain is achievable by head-to-tail linkage of AS69 subunits. Choice of a suitable linker is essential for construction of head-to-tail dimers that exhibit undiminished α-syn affinity compared with the solely disulfide-linked dimer. We characterize AS69-GS3, a head-to-tail dimer with a glycine-serine-rich linker, under oxidized and reduced conditions in order to evaluate the impact of the Cys28-disulfide bond on structure, stability and α-syn binding. Formation of the disulfide bond causes compaction of AS69-GS3, increases its thermostability, and is a prerequisite for high-affinity binding to α-syn. Comparison of AS69-GS3 and AS69 demonstrates that head-to-tail linkage promotes α-syn binding by affording accelerated disulfide bond formation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Characterisation of a novel homodimeric N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase from Streptococcus gordonii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, Derek W.S.; Chen Yingjian; Simpson, Christine L.; Berg, Tracey; Cook, Simon L.; Mayo, John A.; Hunter, Neil; Jacques, Nicholas A.

    2004-01-01

    An N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (GcnA) from Streptococcus gordonii FSS2 was cloned and sequenced. GcnA had a deduced molecular mass of 72,120 Da. The molecular weight after gel-filtration chromatography was 140,000 Da and by SDS-PAGE was 70,000 Da, indicating that the native protein was a homodimer. The deduced amino acid sequence had significant homology to a glycosyl hydrolase from Streptococcus pneumoniae and the conserved catalytic domain of the Family 20 glycosyl hydrolases. GcnA catalysed the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl (4MU)-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminide, 4MU-N-acetyl-β-D-galactosaminide, 4-MU-β-D-N,N ' -diacetylchitobioside, and 4-MU-β-D-N,N ' ,N''-chitotrioside as well as the respective chito-oligosaccharides. GcnA was optimally active at pH 6.6 and 42 deg. C. The K m for 4-MU-β-D-N,N ' ,N''-chitotrioside, 45 μM, was the lowest for all the substrates tested. Hg 2+ , Cu 2+ , Fe 2+ , and Zn 2+ completely inhibited while Co 2+ , Mn 2+ , and Ni 2+ partially inhibited activity. S. gordonii FSS2 and a GcnA negative mutant grew equally well on chito-oligosaccharides as substrates. The S. gordonii sequencing projects indicate two further N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activities

  5. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 functions as an epigenetic activator of the androgen receptor to promote prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, X; Shao, G; Zhang, H-T; Li, C; Zhang, D; Cheng, L; Elzey, B D; Pili, R; Ratliff, T L; Huang, J; Hu, C-D

    2017-03-02

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an emerging epigenetic enzyme that mainly represses transcription of target genes via symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues on histones H4R3, H3R8 and H2AR3. Accumulating evidence suggests that PRMT5 may function as an oncogene to drive cancer cell growth by epigenetic inactivation of several tumor suppressors. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 promotes prostate cancer cell growth by epigenetically activating transcription of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of PRMT5 or inhibition of PRMT5 by a specific inhibitor reduces the expression of AR and suppresses the growth of multiple AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells. Significantly, knockdown of PRMT5 in AR-positive LNCaP cells completely suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Molecular analysis reveals that PRMT5 binds to the proximal promoter region of the AR gene and contributes mainly to the enriched symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 in the same region. Mechanistically, PRMT5 is recruited to the AR promoter by its interaction with Sp1, the major transcription factor responsible for AR transcription, and forms a complex with Brg1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, on the proximal promoter region of the AR gene. Furthermore, PRMT5 expression in prostate cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and PRMT5 expression correlates positively with AR expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Taken together, our results identify PRMT5 as a novel epigenetic activator of AR in prostate cancer. Given that inhibiting AR transcriptional activity or androgen synthesis remains the major mechanism of action for most existing anti-androgen agents, our findings also raise an interesting possibility that targeting PRMT5 may represent a novel approach for prostate cancer treatment by eliminating AR expression.

  6. Haploinsufficiency of BAZ1B contributes to Williams syndrome through transcriptional dysregulation of neurodevelopmental pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, Matthew A; Jang, Jiwon; Park, Joo-Hye C; Wang, Yidi; Guzman, Elmer; Zhou, Hongjun; Audouard, Morgane; Bridges, Daniel; Tovar, Kenneth R; Papuc, Sorina M; Tutulan-Cunita, Andreea C; Huang, Yadong; Budisteanu, Magdalena; Arghir, Aurora; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a genomic deletion of ∼28 genes that results in a cognitive and behavioral profile marked by overall intellectual impairment with relative strength in expressive language and hypersocial behavior. Advancements in protocols for neuron differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells allowed us to elucidate the molecular circuitry underpinning the ontogeny of WS. In patient-derived stem cells and neurons, we determined the expression profile of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region-deleted genes and the genome-wide transcriptional consequences of the hemizygous genomic microdeletion at chromosome 7q11.23. Derived neurons displayed disease-relevant hallmarks and indicated novel aberrant pathways in WS neurons including over-activated Wnt signaling accompanying an incomplete neurogenic commitment. We show that haploinsufficiency of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, BAZ1B, which is deleted in WS, significantly contributes to this differentiation defect. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq) revealed BAZ1B target gene functions are enriched for neurogenesis, neuron differentiation and disease-relevant phenotypes. BAZ1B haploinsufficiency caused widespread gene expression changes in neural progenitor cells, and together with BAZ1B ChIP-seq target genes, explained 42% of the transcriptional dysregulation in WS neurons. BAZ1B contributes to regulating the balance between neural precursor self-renewal and differentiation and the differentiation defect caused by BAZ1B haploinsufficiency can be rescued by mitigating over-active Wnt signaling in neural stem cells. Altogether, these results reveal a pivotal role for BAZ1B in neurodevelopment and implicate its haploinsufficiency as a likely contributor to the neurological phenotypes in WS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Coordinating repair of oxidative DNA damage with transcription and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) preferentially removes DNA lesions from template strands of active genes. Defects in TCR, which acts both on lesions removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and on oxidative lesions removed by base excision repair (BER), underlie the fatal developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. Although its detailed mechanism remains unknown, TCR involves recognition of a stalled RNA polymerase (RNAP), removal or remodeling of RNAP to allow access to the lesion, and recruitment of repair enzymes. At a minimum, these early steps require a non-enzymatic function of the multifunctional repair protein XPG, the CSB protein with ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity, and the TFIIH complex (including the XPB and XPD helicases) that is also required for basal transcription initiation and NER. XPG exists in the cell in a complex with TFIIH, and in vitro evidence has suggested that it interacts with CSB. To address the mechanism of TCR, we are characterizing protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions of XPG. We show that XPG preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA containing bubbles resembling in size the unpaired regions associated with transcription. Two distinct domains of XPG are required for the observed strong binding specificity and stability. XPG both interacts directly with CSB and synergistically binds with it to bubble DNA, and it strongly stimulates the bubble DNA-dependent ATPase activity of CSB. Significantly for TCR, XPG also interacts directly with RNAP II, binds both the protein and nucleic acid components (the R-loop) of a stalled RNA polymerase, and forms a ternary complex with CSB and the stalled RNAP. These results are consistent with the model that XPG and CSB jointly interact with the DNA/chromatin structure in the vicinity of the stalled transcriptional apparatus and with the transcriptional machinery itself to remodel the chromatin and either move or remodel the blocked RNA polymerase to expose the lesion

  8. Heterozygosity for ARID2 loss-of-function mutations in individuals with a Coffin-Siris syndrome-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramswig, Nuria C; Caluseriu, O; Lüdecke, H-J; Bolduc, F V; Noel, N C L; Wieland, T; Surowy, H M; Christen, H-J; Engels, H; Strom, T M; Wieczorek, D

    2017-03-01

    Chromatin remodeling is a complex process shaping the nucleosome landscape, thereby regulating the accessibility of transcription factors to regulatory regions of target genes and ultimately managing gene expression. The SWI/SNF (switch/sucrose nonfermentable) complex remodels the nucleosome landscape in an ATP-dependent manner and is divided into the two major subclasses Brahma-associated factor (BAF) and Polybromo Brahma-associated factor (PBAF) complex. Somatic mutations in subunits of the SWI/SNF complex have been associated with different cancers, while germline mutations have been associated with autism spectrum disorder and the neurodevelopmental disorders Coffin-Siris (CSS) and Nicolaides-Baraitser syndromes (NCBRS). CSS is characterized by intellectual disability (ID), coarsening of the face and hypoplasia or absence of the fifth finger- and/or toenails. So far, variants in five of the SWI/SNF subunit-encoding genes ARID1B, SMARCA4, SMARCB1, ARID1A, and SMARCE1 as well as variants in the transcription factor-encoding gene SOX11 have been identified in CSS-affected individuals. ARID2 is a member of the PBAF subcomplex, which until recently had not been linked to any neurodevelopmental phenotypes. In 2015, mutations in the ARID2 gene were associated with intellectual disability. In this study, we report on two individuals with private de novo ARID2 frameshift mutations. Both individuals present with a CSS-like phenotype including ID, coarsening of facial features, other recognizable facial dysmorphisms and hypoplasia of the fifth toenails. Hence, this study identifies mutations in the ARID2 gene as a novel and rare cause for a CSS-like phenotype and enlarges the list of CSS-like genes.

  9. Nucleosome dynamics: HMGB1 facilitates nucleosome restructuring and collaborates in estrogen-responsive gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Scovell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The genome in the human cell is extraordinarily compacted in the nucleus. As a result, much of the DNA is inaccessible and functionally inert. Notwithstanding the highly efficient packaging, mechanisms have evolved to render DNA sites accessible that then enable a multitude of factors to carry out ongoing and vital functions. The compaction is derived from DNA complexation within nucleosomes, which can further consolidate into a higher-order chromatin structure. The nucleosome and nucleosomal DNA are not static in nature, but are dynamic, undergoing structural and functional changes as the cell responds to stresses and/or metabolic or environmental cues. We are only beginning to understand the forces and the complexes that engage the nucleosome to unearth the tightly bound and inaccessible DNA sequences and provide an opening to more accessible target sites. In many cases, current findings support a major role for the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs in providing an avenue to factor accessibility that leads to the activation of transcription. The estrogen receptor α (ERα does not bind to the estrogen response element (ERE in the canonical nucleosome. However, evidence will be presented that HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome in an ATP-independent manner and also facilitates access and strong binding of ERα to ERE. The features that appear important in the mechanism of action for HMGB1 will be highlighted, in addition to the characteristic features of the restructured nucleosome. These findings, together with previous evidence, suggest a collaborative role for HMGB1 in the step-wise transcription of estrogen-responsive genes. In addition, alternate mechanistic pathways will be discussed, with consideration that “HMGB1 restructuring” of the nucleosome may generally be viewed as a perturbation of the equilibrium of an ensemble of nearly isoenergetic nucleosome states in an energy landscape that is driven by

  10. Mycobacterium smegmatis RqlH defines a novel clade of bacterial RecQ-like DNA helicases with ATP-dependent 3'-5' translocase and duplex unwinding activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Heather; Unciuleac, Mihaela; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-05-01

    The Escherichia coli RecQ DNA helicase participates in a pathway of DNA repair that operates in parallel to the recombination pathway driven by the multisubunit helicase-nuclease machine RecBCD. The model mycobacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis executes homologous recombination in the absence of its helicase-nuclease machine AdnAB, though it lacks a homolog of E. coli RecQ. Here, we identify and characterize M. smegmatis RqlH, a RecQ-like helicase with a distinctive domain structure. The 691-amino acid RqlH polypeptide consists of a RecQ-like ATPase domain (amino acids 1-346) and tetracysteine zinc-binding domain (amino acids 435-499), separated by an RqlH-specific linker. RqlH lacks the C-terminal HRDC domain found in E. coli RecQ. Rather, the RqlH C-domain resembles bacterial ComF proteins and includes a phosphoribosyltransferase-like module. We show that RqlH is a DNA-dependent ATPase/dATPase that translocates 3'-5' on single-stranded DNA and has 3'-5' helicase activity. These functions inhere to RqlH-(1-505), a monomeric motor unit comprising the ATPase, linker and zinc-binding domains. RqlH homologs are distributed widely among bacterial taxa. The mycobacteria that encode RqlH lack a classical RecQ, though many other Actinobacteria have both RqlH and RecQ. Whereas E. coli K12 encodes RecQ but lacks a homolog of RqlH, other strains of E. coli have both RqlH and RecQ.

  11. Genomic, RNAseq, and Molecular Modeling Evidence Suggests That the Major Allergen Domain in Insects Evolved from a Homodimeric Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Thomas A.; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects. PMID:24253356

  12. Homodimeric β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081: expression in Lactobacillus plantarum and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien-Thanh; Nguyen, Hoang Anh; Arreola, Sheryl Lozel; Mlynek, Georg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Mathiesen, Geir; Nguyen, Thu-Ha; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2012-02-22

    The lacZ gene from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081, encoding a β-galactosidase of the glycoside hydrolase family GH2, was cloned into different inducible lactobacillal expression vectors for overexpression in the host strain Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. High expression levels were obtained in laboratory cultivations with yields of approximately 53000 U of β-galactosidase activity per liter of medium, which corresponds to ~170 mg of recombinant protein per liter and β-galactosidase levels amounting to 63% of the total intracellular protein of the host organism. The wild-type (nontagged) and histidine-tagged recombinant enzymes were purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and further characterized. β-Galactosidase from L. bulgaricus was used for lactose conversion and showed very high transgalactosylation activity. The maximum yield of galacto-oligosaccharides (GalOS) was approximately 50% when using an initial concentration of 600 mM lactose, indicating that the enzyme can be of interest for the production of GalOS.

  13. Malachite green mediates homodimerization of antibody VL domains to form a fluorescent ternary complex with singular symmetric interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Chris; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Andreko, Susan; Dempsey, Alison; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Capek, Sara; Waggoner, Alan; Wilson, Ian A.; Bruchez, Marcel P.

    2013-01-01

    We report that a symmetric small molecule ligand mediates the assembly of antibody light chain variable domains (VLs) into a correspondent symmetric ternary complex with novel interfaces. The L5* Fluorogen Activating Protein (FAP) is a VL domain that binds malachite green dye (MG) to activate intense fluorescence. Crystallography of liganded L5* reveals a 2:1 protein:ligand complex with inclusive C2 symmetry, where MG is almost entirely encapsulated between an antiparallel arrangement of the two VL domains. Unliganded L5* VL domains crystallize as a similar antiparallel VL/VL homodimer. The complementarity determining regions (CDRs) are spatially oriented to form novel VL/VL and VL/ligand interfaces that tightly constrain a propeller conformer of MG. Binding equilibrium analysis suggests highly cooperative assembly to form a very stable VL/MG/VL complex, such that MG behaves as a strong chemical inducer of dimerization. Fusion of two VL domains into a single protein tightens MG binding over 1,000-fold to low picomolar affinity without altering the large binding enthalpy, suggesting that bonding interactions with ligand and restriction of domain movements make independent contributions to binding. Fluorescence activation of a symmetrical fluorogen provides a selection mechanism for the isolation and directed evolution of ternary complexes where unnatural symmetric binding interfaces are favored over canonical antibody interfaces. As exemplified by L5*, these self-reporting complexes may be useful as modulators of protein association or as high affinity protein tags and capture reagents. PMID:23978698

  14. Constitutive activation of a variant of the env-mpl oncogene product by disulfide-linked homodimerization.

    OpenAIRE

    Courtois, G; Bénit, L; Mikaeloff, Y; Pauchard, M; Charon, M; Varlet, P; Gisselbrecht, S

    1995-01-01

    The myeloproliferative leukemia retrovirus (MPLV) has the v-mpl cellular sequences transduced in frame with the deleted and rearranged Friend murine leukemia virus env gene. The resulting env-mpl fusion oncogene is responsible for an acute myeloproliferative disorder induced in mice by MPLV. v-mpl is a truncated form of the c-mpl gene which encodes the receptor for thrombopoietin. We investigated the contribution of the Env-Mpl extracellular domain in the constitutive activation of this trunc...

  15. Acrolein with an alpha, beta-unsaturated Carbonyl Group Inhibits LPS-induced Homodimerization of Toll-like Receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acrolein is a highly electrophilic a,ß-unsaturated aldehyde present in a number of environmental sources, especially cigarette smoke. It reacts strongly with the thiol groups of cysteine residues by Michael addition and has been reported to inhibit nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) activation by lipopolysac...

  16. Inhibiting epigenetic enzymes to improve atherogenic macrophage functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bossche, Jan; Neele, Annette E.; Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Heij, Femke; Boshuizen, Marieke C. S.; van der Velden, Saskia; de Boer, Vincent C.; Reedquist, Kris A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages determine the outcome of atherosclerosis by propagating inflammatory responses, foam cell formation and eventually necrotic core development. Yet, the pathways that regulate their atherogenic functions remain ill-defined. It is now apparent that chromatin remodeling chromatin modifying

  17. NF-Y dependent epigenetic modifications discriminate between proliferating and postmitotic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtner, Aymone; Fuschi, Paola; Magi, Fiorenza

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of gene transcription requires posttranslational modifications of histones that, in concert with chromatin remodeling factors, shape the structure of chromatin. It is currently under intense investigation how this structure is modulated, in particular in the context of proliferatio...

  18. Molecular mechanisms of canalization: Hsp90 and beyond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-03-26

    Mar 26, 2007 ... In plants, Hsp90 function remained little characterized until recent .... unknown if Hsp90 and chromatin remodeling factors act independently or in ..... protein 90 in plant disease resistance; EMBO J. 22 5690–5699. Maloof J N ...

  19. Identification of in planta protein–protein interactions using IP-MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamge, Suraj; Angenent, Gerco; Bemer, Marian

    2018-01-01

    Gene regulation by transcription factors involves complex protein interaction networks, which include chromatin remodeling and modifying proteins as an integral part. Decoding these protein interactions is crucial for our understanding of chromatin-mediated gene regulation. Here, we describe a

  20. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B-mediated disorders and identification of altered cell-cycle dynamics due to ARID1B haploinsufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sim, J. C. H.; White, S. M.; Fitzpatrick, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mutations in genes encoding components of the Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex have recently been shown to contribute to multiple syndromes characterised by developmental delay and intellectual disability. ARID1B mutations have been identified as the predomi......Background: Mutations in genes encoding components of the Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex have recently been shown to contribute to multiple syndromes characterised by developmental delay and intellectual disability. ARID1B mutations have been identified...

  1. The FA Core Complex Contains a Homo-dimeric Catalytic Module for the Symmetric Mono-ubiquitination of FANCI-FANCD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Swuec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the main DNA interstrand crosslink repair pathway in higher eukaryotes requires mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 by FANCL, the E3 ligase subunit of the Fanconi anemia core complex. FANCI and FANCD2 form a stable complex; however, the molecular basis of their ubiquitination is ill defined. FANCD2 mono-ubiquitination by FANCL is stimulated by the presence of the FANCB and FAAP100 core complex components, through an unknown mechanism. How FANCI mono-ubiquitination is achieved remains unclear. Here, we use structural electron microscopy, combined with crosslink-coupled mass spectrometry, to find that FANCB, FANCL, and FAAP100 form a dimer of trimers, containing two FANCL molecules that are ideally poised to target both FANCI and FANCD2 for mono-ubiquitination. The FANCC-FANCE-FANCF subunits bridge between FANCB-FANCL-FAAP100 and the FANCI-FANCD2 substrate. A transient interaction with FANCC-FANCE-FANCF alters the FANCI-FANCD2 configuration, stabilizing the dimerization interface. Our data provide a model to explain how equivalent mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 occurs.

  2. Coiled-coil domain-dependent homodimerization of intracellular barley immune receptors defines a minimal functional module for triggering cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maekawa, T.; Cheng, W.; Spiridon, L.N.; Töller, A.; Lukasik, E.; Saijo, Y.; Liu, P.; Shen, Q.H.; Micluta, M.A.; Somssich, I.E.; Takken, F.L.W.; Petrescu, A.J.; Chai, J.; Schulze-Lefert, P.

    2011-01-01

    Plants and animals have evolved structurally related innate immune sensors, designated NLRs, to detect intracellular nonself molecules. NLRs are modular, consisting of N-terminal coiled-coil (CC) or TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, a central nucleotide-binding (NB) domain, and C-terminal

  3. Receptor homodimerization plays a critical role in a novel dominant negative P2RY12 variant identified in a family with severe bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, S J; Rabbolini, D; Gabrielli, S; Chen, Q; Aungraheeta, R; Hutchinson, J L; Kilo, T; Mackay, J; Ward, C M; Stevenson, W; Morel-Kopp, M-C

    2018-01-01

    Essentials Three dominant variants for the autosomal recessive bleeding disorder type-8 have been described. To date, there has been no phenotype/genotype correlation explaining their dominant transmission. Proline plays an important role in P2Y12R ligand binding and signaling defects. P2Y12R homodimer formation is critical for the receptor function and signaling. Background Although inherited platelet disorders are still underdiagnosed worldwide, advances in molecular techniques are improving disease diagnosis and patient management. Objective To identify and characterize the mechanism underlying the bleeding phenotype in a Caucasian family with an autosomal dominant P2RY12 variant. Methods Full blood counts, platelet aggregometry, flow cytometry and western blotting were performed before next-generation sequencing (NGS). Detailed molecular analysis of the identified variant of the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) was subsequently performed in mammalian cells overexpressing receptor constructs. Results All three referred individuals had markedly impaired ADP-induced platelet aggregation with primary wave only, despite normal total and surface P2Y12R expression. By NGS, a single P2RY12:c.G794C substitution (p.R265P) was identified in all affected individuals, and this was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Mammalian cell experiments with the R265P-P2Y12R variant showed normal receptor surface expression versus wild-type (WT) P2Y12R. Agonist-stimulated R265P-P2Y12R function (both signaling and surface receptor loss) was reduced versus WT P2Y12R. Critically, R265P-P2Y12R acted in a dominant negative manner, with agonist-stimulated WT P2Y12R activity being reduced by variant coexpression, suggesting dramatic loss of WT homodimers. Importantly, platelet P2RY12 cDNA cloning and sequencing in two affected individuals also revealed three-fold mutant mRNA overexpression, decreasing even further the likelihood of WT homodimer formation. R265 located within extracellular loop 3 (EL3) is one of four residues that are important for receptor functional integrity, maintaining the binding pocket conformation and allowing rotation following ligand binding. Conclusion This novel dominant negative variant confirms the important role of R265 in EL3 in the functional integrity of P2Y12R, and suggests that pathologic heterodimer formation may underlie this family bleeding phenotype. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Functional NifD-K fusion protein in Azotobacter vinelandii is a homodimeric complex equivalent to the native heterotetrameric MoFe protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara

    2005-01-01

    The MoFe protein of the complex metalloenzyme nitrogenase folds as a heterotetramer containing two copies each of the homologous α and β subunits, encoded by the nifD and the nifK genes respectively. Recently, the functional expression of a fusion NifD-K protein of nitrogenase was demonstrated in Azotobacter vinelandii, strongly implying that the MoFe protein is flexible as it could accommodate major structural changes, yet remain functional [M.H. Suh, L. Pulakat, N. Gavini, J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003) 5353-5360]. This finding led us to further explore the type of interaction between the fused MoFe protein units. We aimed to determine whether an interaction exists between the two fusion MoFe proteins to form a homodimer that is equivalent to native heterotetrameric MoFe protein. Using the Bacteriomatch Two-Hybrid System, translationally fused constructs of NifD-K (fusion) with the full-length λCI of the pBT bait vector and also NifD-K (fusion) with the N-terminal α-RNAP of the pTRG target vector were made. To compare the extent of interaction between the fused NifD-K proteins to that of the β-β interactions in the native MoFe protein, we proceeded to generate translationally fused constructs of NifK with the α-RNAP of the pTRG vector and λCI protein of the pBT vector. The strength of the interaction between the proteins in study was determined by measuring the β-galactosidase activity and extent of ampicillin resistance of the colonies expressing these proteins. This analysis demonstrated that direct protein-protein interaction exists between NifD-K fusion proteins, suggesting that they exist as homodimers. As the interaction takes place at the β-interfaces of the NifD-K fusion proteins, we propose that these homodimers of NifD-K fusion protein may function in a similar manner as that of the heterotetrameric native MoFe protein. The observation that the extent of protein-protein interaction between the β-subunits of the native MoFe protein in BacterioMatch Two-Hybrid System is comparable to the extent of protein-protein interaction observed between the NifD-K fusion proteins in the same system further supports this idea

  5. Comparative studies of a new subfamily of human Ste20-like kinases: homodimerization, subcellular localization, and selective activation of MKK3 and p38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustein, Jason T; Xia, Liang; Kahlenburg, J Michelle; Robinson, Dan; Templeton, Dennis; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2003-09-18

    The Sterile-20 or Ste20 family of serine/threonine kinases is a group of signaling molecules whose physiological roles within mammalian cells are just starting to be elucidated. Here, in this report we present the characterization of three human Ste20-like kinases with greater than 90% similarity within their catalytic domains that define a novel subfamily of Ste20s. Members of this kinase family include rat thousand and one (TAO1) and chicken KFC (kinase from chicken). For the lack of a consensus nomenclature in the literature, in this report, we shall call this family hKFC (for their homology to chicken KFC) and the three members hKFC-A, hKFC-B, and hKFC-C, respectively. These kinases have many similarities including an aminoterminal kinase domain, a serine-rich region, and a coiled-coil configuration within the C-terminus. All three kinases are able to activate the p38 MAP kinase pathway through the specific activation of the upstream MKK3 kinase. We also offer evidence, both theoretical and biochemical, showing that these kinases can undergo self-association. Despite these similarities, these kinases differ in tissue distribution, apparent subcellular localization, and feature structural differences largely within the carboxyl-terminal sequence.

  6. A new non-catalytic role for ubiquitin ligase RNF8 in unfolding higher-order chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Acs, Klara; Ackermann, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 orchestrate DNA damage signalling through the ubiquitylation of histone H2A and the recruitment of downstream repair factors. Here, we demonstrate that RNF8, but not RNF168 or the canonical H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF2, mediates extensive chromatin decondensation....... Our data show that CHD4, the catalytic subunit of the NuRD complex, interacts with RNF8 and is essential for RNF8-mediated chromatin unfolding. The chromatin remodelling activity of CHD4 promotes efficient ubiquitin conjugation and assembly of RNF168 and BRCA1 at DNA double-strand breaks....... Interestingly, RNF8-mediated recruitment of CHD4 and subsequent chromatin remodelling were independent of the ubiquitin-ligase activity of RNF8, but involved a non-canonical interaction with the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. Our study reveals a new mechanism of chromatin remodelling-assisted ubiquitylation...

  7. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination) and chromatin remodeling that contribute to plant immunity against pathogens. Functions of key histone-modifying and chromatin remodeling enzymes are discussed. PMID:26388882

  8. The DAG1 transcription factor negatively regulates the seed-to-seedling transition in Arabidopsis acting on ABA and GA levels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, A.; Lorrai, R.; Ruta, V.; Frey, A.; Mercey-Boutet, S.; Marion-Poll, F.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Strnad, Miroslav; Costantino, P.; Vittorioso, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, SEP 9 (2016), s. 198 ISSN 1471-2229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21306; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA14-34792S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : DAG1 * Seed development * Chromatin remodelling Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.964, year: 2016

  9. Polycomb group proteins in cell cycle progression and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Epigenetic deregulation of gene expression is emerging as key mechanism in tumorigenesis. Deregulated activity of the chromatin remodeling Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) has recently been shown to be a frequent event in human tumors. Here we discuss these findings and speculate on the role ...

  10. Plant-specific histone deacetylases HDT1/2 regulate GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE2 expression to control arabidopsis root meristem cell number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Huchen; Torres-Garcia, Jesus; Latrasse, David; Benhamed, Moussa; Schilderink, Stefan; Zhou, Wenkun; Kulikova, Olga; Hirt, Heribert; Bisseling, Ton

    2017-01-01

    Root growth is modulated by environmental factors and depends on cell production in the root meristem (RM). New cells in the meristem are generated by stem cells and transit-amplifying cells, which together determine RM cell number. Transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling factors have been

  11. ERECTA signaling controls Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture through chromatin-mediated activation of PRE1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hanyang; Zhao, Lihua; Wang, Lulu; Zhang, Man; Su, Zhenxia; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Heming; Qin, Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Flowering plants display a remarkable diversity in inflorescence architecture, and pedicel length is one of the key contributors to this diversity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the receptor-like kinase ERECTA (ER) mediated signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating inflorescence architecture by promoting cell proliferation. However, the regulating mechanism remains elusive in the pedicel. Genetic interactions between ERECTA signaling and the chromatin remodeling complex SWR1 in the control of inflorescence architecture were studied. Comparative transcriptome analysis was applied to identify downstream components. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nucleosome occupancy was further investigated. The results indicated that the chromatin remodeler SWR1 coordinates with ERECTA signaling in regulating inflorescence architecture by activating the expression of PRE1 family genes and promoting pedicel elongation. It was found that SWR1 is required for the incorporation of the H2A.Z histone variant into nucleosomes of the whole PRE1 gene family and the ERECTA controlled expression of PRE1 gene family through regulating nucleosome dynamics. We propose that utilization of a chromatin remodeling complex to regulate gene expression is a common theme in developmental control across kingdoms. These findings shed light on the mechanisms through which chromatin remodelers orchestrate complex transcriptional regulation of gene expression in coordination with a developmental cue. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sambathkumar, Rangarajan; Kalo, Eric; Van Rossom, Rob; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs) as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) Trichostatin A (TSA) combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM) induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and

  13. Meta-analysis of DNA double-strand break response kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochan, Jakub A.; Desclos, Emilie C. B.; Bosch, Ruben; Meister, Luna; Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Attikum, Haico V.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2017-01-01

    Most proteins involved in the DNA double-strand break response (DSBR) accumulate at the damage sites, where they perform functions related to damage signaling, chromatin remodeling and repair. Over the last two decades, studying the accumulation of many DSBR proteins provided information about their

  14. Immunometabolic Pathways in BCG-Induced Trained Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, R.J.; Carvalho, A.; Rocca, C. La; Palma, C.; Rodrigues, F.; Silvestre, R.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.; Lachmandas, E.; Goncalves, L.G.; Belinha, A.; Cunha, C.; Oosting, M.; Joosten, L.A.; Matarese, G.; Crevel, R. van; Netea, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    The protective effects of the tuberculosis vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) on unrelated infections are thought to be mediated by long-term metabolic changes and chromatin remodeling through histone modifications in innate immune cells such as monocytes, a process termed trained immunity.

  15. Reference: 632 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ludmila et al. 2007 Sep. Plant J. 51(5):874-85. One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental str...elopment in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene...R12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental

  16. Epigenetics of inflammation, maternal infection and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have demonstrated that epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling are linked to an increased inflammatory response as well as increased risk for chronic disease development. A few studies have begun to investigate whether dietary nutrients play...

  17. The SWI/SNF BAF-A complex is essential for neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Ronald L; Magnuson, Terry

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that chromatin remodeler mutations underlie the pathogenesis of human neurocristopathies or disorders that affect neural crest cells (NCCs). However, causal relationships among chromatin remodeler subunit mutations and NCC defects remain poorly understood. Here we show that homozygous loss of ARID1A-containing, SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes (BAF-A) in NCCs results in embryonic lethality in mice, with mutant embryos succumbing to heart defects. Strikingly, monoallelic loss of ARID1A in NCCs led to craniofacial defects in adult mice, including shortened snouts and low set ears, and these defects were more pronounced following homozygous loss of ARID1A, with the ventral cranial bones being greatly reduced in size. Early NCC specification and expression of the BRG1 NCC target gene, PLEXINA2, occurred normally in the absence of ARID1A. Nonetheless, mutant embryos displayed incomplete conotruncal septation of the cardiac outflow tract and defects in the posterior pharyngeal arteries, culminating in persistent truncus arteriosus and agenesis of the ductus arteriosus. Consistent with this, migrating cardiac NCCs underwent apoptosis within the circumpharyngeal ridge. Our data support the notion that multiple, distinct chromatin remodeling complexes govern genetically separable events in NCC development and highlight a potential pathogenic role for NCCs in the human BAF complex disorder, Coffin-Siris Syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CHD5 is required for neurogenesis and has a dual role in facilitating gene expression and polycomb gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egan, Chris M; Nyman, Ulrika; Skotte, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler CHD5 is expressed in neural tissue and is frequently deleted in aggressive neuroblastoma. Very little is known about the function of CHD5 in the nervous system or its mechanism of action. Here we report that depletion of Chd5 in the developing neocortex blocks neuronal...... of this candidate tumor suppressor might contribute to neuroblastoma....

  19. A Role for Histone Deacetylases in the Cellular and Behavioral Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Melissa; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of chromatin remodeling enzymes that restrict access of transcription factors to the DNA, thereby repressing gene expression. In contrast, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) relax the chromatin structure allowing for an active chromatin state and promoting gene transcription. Accumulating data have…

  20. Soaking suggests "alternative facts": Only co-crystallization discloses major ligand-induced interface rearrangements of a homodimeric tRNA-binding protein indicating a novel mode-of-inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Rainer Ehrmann

    Full Text Available For the efficient pathogenesis of Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, full functionality of tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT is mandatory. TGT performs post-transcriptional modifications of tRNAs in the anticodon loop taking impact on virulence development. This suggests TGT as a putative target for selective anti-shigellosis drug therapy. Since bacterial TGT is only functional as homodimer, its activity can be inhibited either by blocking its active site or by preventing dimerization. Recently, we discovered that in some crystal structures obtained by soaking the full conformational adaptation most likely induced in solution upon ligand binding is not displayed. Thus, soaked structures may be misleading and suggest irrelevant binding modes. Accordingly, we re-investigated these complexes by co-crystallization. The obtained structures revealed large conformational rearrangements not visible in the soaked complexes. They result from spatial perturbations in the ribose-34/phosphate-35 recognition pocket and, consequently, an extended loop-helix motif required to prevent access of water molecules into the dimer interface loses its geometric integrity. Thermodynamic profiles of ligand binding in solution indicate favorable entropic contributions to complex formation when large conformational adaptations in the dimer interface are involved. Native MS titration experiments reveal the extent to which the homodimer is destabilized in the presence of each inhibitor. Unexpectedly, one ligand causes a complete rearrangement of subunit packing within the homodimer, never observed in any other TGT crystal structure before. Likely, this novel twisted dimer is catalytically inactive and, therefore, suggests that stabilizing this non-productive subunit arrangement may be used as a further strategy for TGT inhibition.

  1. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2012-12-21

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3'-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotides and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologues of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both from a Mycobacterium smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5'-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ.

  2. The Arabidopsis SWI/SNF protein BAF60 mediates seedling growth control by modulating DNA accessibility

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2017-06-15

    Plant adaptive responses to changing environments involve complex molecular interplays between intrinsic and external signals. Whilst much is known on the signaling components mediating diurnal, light, and temperature controls on plant development, their influence on chromatin-based transcriptional controls remains poorly explored.In this study we show that a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler subunit, BAF60, represses seedling growth by modulating DNA accessibility of hypocotyl cell size regulatory genes. BAF60 binds nucleosome-free regions of multiple G box-containing genes, opposing in cis the promoting effect of the photomorphogenic and thermomorphogenic regulator Phytochrome Interacting Factor 4 (PIF4) on hypocotyl elongation. Furthermore, BAF60 expression level is regulated in response to light and daily rhythms.These results unveil a short path between a chromatin remodeler and a signaling component to fine-tune plant morphogenesis in response to environmental conditions.

  3. ΔNp63α is an oncogene that induces Lsh expression and promotes stem-like proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, William M.; Pecoraro, Matteo; Aranda, Victoria; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Li, Wangzhi; Vogel, Hannes; Guo, Xuecui; Garcia, Elvin L.; Michurina, Tatyana V.; Enikolopov, Grigori; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.; Mills, Alea A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The p53 homolog p63 is essential for development, yet its role in cancer is not clear. We discovered that p63 deficiency evokes the tumor suppressive mechanism of cellular senescence, causing a striking absence of stratified epithelia such as the skin. Here we identify the predominant p63 isoform, ΔNp63α, as a protein that bypasses oncogene induced senescence to drive tumorigenesis in vivo. Interestingly, bypass of senescence promotes stem-like proliferation and maintains survival of the keratin 15-positive stem cell population. Furthermore, we identify the chromatin remodeling protein Lsh as a new target of ΔNp63α that is an essential mediator of senescence bypass. These findings indicate that ΔNp63α is an oncogene that cooperates with Ras to promote tumor-initiating stem-like proliferation, and suggest that Lsh-mediated chromatin remodeling events are critical to this process. PMID:21295273

  4. The Arabidopsis SWI/SNF protein BAF60 mediates seedling growth control by modulating DNA accessibility

    KAUST Repository

    Jé gu, Teddy; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Ramirez Prado, Juan Sebastian; Rizzi-Paillet, Charley; Perez, Magalie; Lhomme, Anaï s; Latrasse, David; Coleno, Emeline; Vicaire, Serge; Legras, Sté phanie; Jost, Bernard; Rougé e, Martin; Barneche, Fredy; Bergounioux, Catherine; Crespi, Martin; Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Hirt, Heribert; Raynaud, Cé cile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2017-01-01

    Plant adaptive responses to changing environments involve complex molecular interplays between intrinsic and external signals. Whilst much is known on the signaling components mediating diurnal, light, and temperature controls on plant development, their influence on chromatin-based transcriptional controls remains poorly explored.In this study we show that a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler subunit, BAF60, represses seedling growth by modulating DNA accessibility of hypocotyl cell size regulatory genes. BAF60 binds nucleosome-free regions of multiple G box-containing genes, opposing in cis the promoting effect of the photomorphogenic and thermomorphogenic regulator Phytochrome Interacting Factor 4 (PIF4) on hypocotyl elongation. Furthermore, BAF60 expression level is regulated in response to light and daily rhythms.These results unveil a short path between a chromatin remodeler and a signaling component to fine-tune plant morphogenesis in response to environmental conditions.

  5. Mediator-dependent Nuclear Receptor Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Roeder, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As gene-specific transcription factors, nuclear hormone receptors are broadly involved in many important biological processes. Their function on target genes requires the stepwise assembly of different coactivator complexes that facilitate chromatin remodeling and subsequent preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and function. Mediator has proved to be a crucial, and general, nuclear receptor-interacting coactivator, with demonstrated functions in transcription steps ranging from chromatin remodeling to subsequent PIC formation and function. Here we discuss (i) our current understanding of pathways that nuclear receptors and other interacting cofactors employ to recruit Mediator to target gene enhancers and promoters, including conditional requirements for the strong NR-Mediator interactions mediated by the NR AF2 domain and the MED1 LXXLLL motifs and (ii) mechanisms by which Mediator acts to transmit signals from enhancer-bound nuclear receptors to the general transcription machinery at core promoters to effect PIC formation and function. PMID:21854863

  6. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an important DNA repair mechanism required for cellular resistance against UV light and toxic chemicals such as those found in tobacco smoke. In living cells, NER efficiently detects and removes DNA lesions within the large nuclear macromolecular complex called...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER....

  7. The development prospection of HDAC inhibitors as a potential therapeutic direction in Alzheimer?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Shuang-shuang; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-fang

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer?s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with learning and memory impairment in the elderly. Recent studies have found that treating AD in the way of chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation is a promising therapeutic regimen. In a number of recent studies, inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDACs) have been found to be a novel promising therapeutic?agents for neurological disorders, particularly for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Alth...

  8. eRNAs promote transcription by establishing chromatin accessibility at defined genomic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousavi, Kambiz; Zare, Hossein; Dell'orso, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    )RNA acted to activate the downstream myogenic genes. The deployment of transcriptional machinery to appropriate loci is contingent on chromatin accessibility, a rate-limiting step preceding Pol II assembly. By nuclease sensitivity assay, we found that eRNAs regulate genomic access of the transcriptional...... complex to defined regulatory regions. In conclusion, our data suggest that eRNAs contribute to establishing a cell-type-specific transcriptional circuitry by directing chromatin-remodeling events....

  9. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  10. Increased histone H3 phosphorylation in neurons in specific brain structures after induction of status epilepticus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Mori

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE induces pathological and morphological changes in the brain. Recently, it has become clear that excessive neuronal excitation, stress and drug abuse induce chromatin remodeling in neurons, thereby altering gene expression. Chromatin remodeling is a key mechanism of epigenetic gene regulation. Histone H3 phosphorylation is frequently used as a marker of chromatin remodeling and is closely related to the upregulation of mRNA transcription. In the present study, we analyzed H3 phosphorylation levels in vivo using immunohistochemistry in the brains of mice with pilocarpine-induced SE. A substantial increase in H3 phosphorylation was detected in neurons in specific brain structures. Increased H3 phosphorylation was dependent on neuronal excitation. In particular, a robust upregulation of H3 phosphorylation was detected in the caudate putamen, and there was a gradient of phosphorylated H3(+ (PH3(+ neurons along the medio-lateral axis. After unilateral ablation of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, the distribution of PH3(+ neurons changed in the caudate putamen. Moreover, our histological analysis suggested that, in addition to the well-known MSK1 (mitogen and stress-activated kinase/H3 phosphorylation/c-fos pathway, other signaling pathways were also activated. Together, our findings suggest that a number of genes involved in the pathology of epileptogenesis are upregulated in PH3(+ brain regions, and that H3 phosphorylation is a suitable indicator of strong neuronal excitation.

  11. The regulation of transactivator of transcription on the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianyi; Zhang Shimeng; Qin Xia; Li Bing; Liu Xiaodan; Zhou Pingkun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of human immunodeficiency virus transactivator of transcription (TAT) on the promoter activity of DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Methods: The truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs were cloned by PCR from the template DNA from HeLa genomic DNA, and the pGL3-basic-DNA-PKcs promoter reporter plasmids were constructed. The activity of DNA-PKcs promoters was detected by dual-luciferase reporter assay system. A Lac-repressor and Lacoperator based green fluorescent protein imaging system was used to assay the chromatin remodeling activity. Results: A series of reporter plasmids harboring the truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs from -939 bp to -1 bp were constructed. The sequence of -64 bp to-1 bp was identified as a critical element for the activity of DNA-PKes promoter. TAT can suppress the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter. TAT participates in the regulation of the large scale chromatin relaxation. Ionizing radiation attenuates the activity of TAT played in the chromatin remodeling. Conclusion: TAT represses the promoter activity of DNA repair protein DNA-PKcs, and also play a role of large scale chromatin remodeling which can te attenuated by ionizing radiation. (authors)

  12. Dancing on damaged chromatin. Functions of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in cellular responses to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kenta; Ohara, Maki; Seki, Ryota; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In order to preserve and protect genetic information, eukaryotic cells have developed a signaling or communications network to help the cell respond to DNA damage, and ATM and NBS1 are key players in this network. ATM is a protein kinase which is activated immediately after a DNA double strand break (DSB) is formed, and the resulting signal cascade generated in response to cellular DSBs is regulated by post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In addition, to ensure the efficient functioning of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, the highly ordered structure of eukaryotic chromatin must be appropriately altered to permit access of repair-related factors to DNA. These alterations are termed chromatin remodeling, and are executed by a specific remodeling complex in conjunction with histone modifications. Current advances in the molecular analysis of DNA damage responses have shown that the auto-phosphorylation of ATM and the interaction between ATM and NBS1 are key steps for ATM activation, and that the association of ATM and NBS1 is involved in chromatin remodeling. Identification of novel factors which function in ubiquitination (RNF8, Ubc13, Rap80, etc.) has also enabled us to understand more details of the early stages in DNA repair pathways which respond to DSBs. In this review, the focus is on the role of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in DSB response pathways, and their role in DSB repair and in the regulation of chromatin remodeling. (author)

  13. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  14. Selective recruitment of nuclear factors to productively replicating herpes simplex virus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, Jill A; DeLuca, Neal A

    2015-05-01

    Much of the HSV-1 life cycle is carried out in the cell nucleus, including the expression, replication, repair, and packaging of viral genomes. Viral proteins, as well as cellular factors, play essential roles in these processes. Isolation of proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) was developed to label and purify cellular replication forks. We adapted aspects of this method to label viral genomes to both image, and purify replicating HSV-1 genomes for the identification of associated proteins. Many viral and cellular factors were enriched on viral genomes, including factors that mediate DNA replication, repair, chromatin remodeling, transcription, and RNA processing. As infection proceeded, packaging and structural components were enriched to a greater extent. Among the more abundant proteins that copurified with genomes were the viral transcription factor ICP4 and the replication protein ICP8. Furthermore, all seven viral replication proteins were enriched on viral genomes, along with cellular PCNA and topoisomerases, while other cellular replication proteins were not detected. The chromatin-remodeling complexes present on viral genomes included the INO80, SWI/SNF, NURD, and FACT complexes, which may prevent chromatinization of the genome. Consistent with this conclusion, histones were not readily recovered with purified viral genomes, and imaging studies revealed an underrepresentation of histones on viral genomes. RNA polymerase II, the mediator complex, TFIID, TFIIH, and several other transcriptional activators and repressors were also affinity purified with viral DNA. The presence of INO80, NURD, SWI/SNF, mediator, TFIID, and TFIIH components is consistent with previous studies in which these complexes copurified with ICP4. Therefore, ICP4 is likely involved in the recruitment of these key cellular chromatin remodeling and transcription factors to viral genomes. Taken together, iPOND is a valuable method for the study of viral genome dynamics during infection and

  15. Selective recruitment of nuclear factors to productively replicating herpes simplex virus genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Dembowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Much of the HSV-1 life cycle is carried out in the cell nucleus, including the expression, replication, repair, and packaging of viral genomes. Viral proteins, as well as cellular factors, play essential roles in these processes. Isolation of proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND was developed to label and purify cellular replication forks. We adapted aspects of this method to label viral genomes to both image, and purify replicating HSV-1 genomes for the identification of associated proteins. Many viral and cellular factors were enriched on viral genomes, including factors that mediate DNA replication, repair, chromatin remodeling, transcription, and RNA processing. As infection proceeded, packaging and structural components were enriched to a greater extent. Among the more abundant proteins that copurified with genomes were the viral transcription factor ICP4 and the replication protein ICP8. Furthermore, all seven viral replication proteins were enriched on viral genomes, along with cellular PCNA and topoisomerases, while other cellular replication proteins were not detected. The chromatin-remodeling complexes present on viral genomes included the INO80, SWI/SNF, NURD, and FACT complexes, which may prevent chromatinization of the genome. Consistent with this conclusion, histones were not readily recovered with purified viral genomes, and imaging studies revealed an underrepresentation of histones on viral genomes. RNA polymerase II, the mediator complex, TFIID, TFIIH, and several other transcriptional activators and repressors were also affinity purified with viral DNA. The presence of INO80, NURD, SWI/SNF, mediator, TFIID, and TFIIH components is consistent with previous studies in which these complexes copurified with ICP4. Therefore, ICP4 is likely involved in the recruitment of these key cellular chromatin remodeling and transcription factors to viral genomes. Taken together, iPOND is a valuable method for the study of viral genome dynamics

  16. Mediator, TATA-binding protein, and RNA polymerase II contribute to low histone occupancy at active gene promoters in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z; Rode, Kara A; Barber, Wesley T; Ellis, Laura C; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H

    2014-05-23

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment is associated with decreases in cell proliferation and histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briones Teresita L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we examined the effects of cyclophosphamide, methothrexate, and 5-Fluorouracil (CMF drug combination on various aspects of learning and memory. We also examined the effects of CMF on cell proliferation and chromatin remodeling as possible underlying mechanisms to explain chemotherapy-associated cognitive dysfunction. Twenty-four adult female Wistar rats were included in the study and had minimitter implantation for continuous activity monitoring two weeks before the chemotherapy regimen was started. Once baseline activity data were collected, rats were randomly assigned to receive either CMF or saline injections given intraperitoneally. Treatments were given once a week for a total of 4 weeks. Two weeks after the last injection, rats were tested in the water maze for spatial learning and memory ability as well as discrimination learning. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU injection was given at 100 mg/Kg intraperitoneally 4 hours prior to euthanasia to determine hippocampal cell proliferation while histone acetylation and histone deacetylase activity was measured to determine CMF effects on chromatin remodeling. Results Our data showed learning and memory impairment following CMF administration independent of the drug effects on physical activity. In addition, CMF-treated rats showed decreased hippocampal cell proliferation, associated with increased histone acetylation and decreased histone deacetylase activity. Conclusions These results suggest the negative consequences of chemotherapy on brain function and that anti-cancer drugs can adversely affect the self-renewal potential of neural progenitor cells and also chromatin remodeling in the hippocampus. The significance of our findings lie on the possible usefulness of animal models in addressing the clinical phenomenon of 'chemobrain.'

  18. Nuclear alpha spectrin: Critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link repair and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-01-01

    Non-erythroid alpha spectrin (?IISp) is a structural protein which we have shown is present in the nucleus of human cells. It interacts with a number of nuclear proteins such as actin, lamin, emerin, chromatin remodeling factors, and DNA repair proteins. ?IISp?s interaction with DNA repair proteins has been extensively studied. We have demonstrated that nuclear ?IISp is critical in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair in S phase, in both genomic (non-telomeric) and telomeric DNA, and in ma...

  19. The intimate genetics of Drosophila fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loppin, Benjamin; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Horard, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    The union of haploid gametes at fertilization initiates the formation of the diploid zygote in sexually reproducing animals. This founding event of embryogenesis includes several fascinating cellular and nuclear processes, such as sperm–egg cellular interactions, sperm chromatin remodelling, centrosome formation or pronuclear migration. In comparison with other aspects of development, the exploration of animal fertilization at the functional level has remained so far relatively limited, even in classical model organisms. Here, we have reviewed our current knowledge of fertilization in Drosophila melanogaster, with a special emphasis on the genes involved in the complex transformation of the fertilizing sperm nucleus into a replicated set of paternal chromosomes. PMID:26246493

  20. Drosophila Studies on Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Tian; Zi Chao Zhang; Junhai Han

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade,numerous genes associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been identified.These genes encode key regulators of synaptogenesis,synaptic function,and synaptic plasticity.Drosophila is a prominent model system for ASD studies to define novel genes linked to ASDs and decipher their molecular roles in synaptogenesis,synaptic function,synaptic plasticity,and neural circuit assembly and consolidation.Here,we review Drosophila studies on ASD genes that regulate synaptogenesis,synaptic function,and synaptic plasticity through modulating chromatin remodeling,transcription,protein synthesis and degradation,cytoskeleton dynamics,and synaptic scaffolding.

  1. Long non-coding RNAs as novel players in β cell function and type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Aashiq H; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    , or proteins. Accumulating body of evidence based on multitude studies has highlighted the role of lncRNAs in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Main body of abstract This review highlights emerging roles of lncRNAs in immune and islet β cell function as well as some...... of the challenges and opportunities in understanding the pathogenesis of T1D and its complications. Conclusion We accentuate that the lncRNAs within T1D-loci regions in consort with regulatory variants and enhancer clusters orchestrate the chromatin remodeling in β cells and thereby act as cis...

  2. The Prdm13 histone methyltransferase encoding gene is a Ptf1a-Rbpj downstream target that suppresses glutamatergic and promotes GABAergic neuronal fate in the dorsal neural tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanotel, Julie; Bessodes, Nathalie; Thélie, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional activator Ptf1a determines inhibitory GABAergic over excitatory glutamatergic neuronal cell fate in progenitors of the vertebrate dorsal spinal cord, cerebellum and retina. In an in situ hybridization expression survey of PR domain containing genes...... encoding putative chromatin-remodeling zinc finger transcription factors in Xenopus embryos, we identified Prdm13 as a histone methyltransferase belonging to the Ptf1a synexpression group. Gain and loss of Ptf1a function analyses in both frog and mice indicates that Prdm13 is positively regulated by Ptf1a...

  3. Chromatin in embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshorer, E

    2007-03-01

    Chromatin, the basic regulatory unit of the eukaryotic genetic material, is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications, histone variants, DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling. Cellular differentiation involves large changes in gene expression concomitant with alterations in genome organization and chromatin structure. Such changes are particularly evident in self-renewing pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which begin, in terms of cell fate, as a tabula rasa, and through the process of differentiation, acquire distinct identities. Here I describe the changes in chromatin that accompany neuronal differentiation, particularly of embryonic stem cells, and discuss how chromatin serves as the master regulator of cellular destiny.

  4. MiRNA Biogenesis and Intersecting Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Chaabane, Samir

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function as guide molecules in RNA silencing. Plant miRNAs are critical for plant growth, development and stress response, and are processed in Arabidopsis from primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) by the endonuclease activity of the DICER-LIKE1...... questions need to be addressed to establish a valid link, we provide encouraging evidence of the involvement of chromatin remodeling factors FAS1 and FAS2 in miRNA biogenesis. Together, we have expanded our understanding of the intersections between miRNA biogenesis and other pathways....

  5. Environmental Epigenetics: Crossroad between Public Health, Lifestyle, and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Massimo; Pistillo, Maria Pia; Banelli, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics provides the key to transform the genetic information into phenotype and because of its reversibility it is considered an ideal target for therapeutic interventions. This paper reviews the basic mechanisms of epigenetic control: DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling, and ncRNA expression and their role in disease development. We describe also the influence of the environment, lifestyle, nutritional habits, and the psychological influence on epigenetic marks and how these factors are related to cancer and other diseases development. Finally we discuss the potential use of natural epigenetic modifiers in the chemoprevention of cancer to link together public health, environment, and lifestyle. PMID:26339624

  6. A code for transcription initiation in mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Martin C.; Valen, Eivind Dale; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    that initiation events are clustered on the chromosomes at multiple scales - clusters within clusters - indicating multiple regulatory processes. Within the smallest of such clusters, which can be interpreted as core promoters, the local DNA sequence predicts the relative transcription start usage of each...... of large- and small-scale effects: the selection of transcription start sites is largely governed by the local DNA sequence, whereas the transcriptional activity of a locus is regulated at a different level; it is affected by distal features or events such as enhancers and chromatin remodeling....

  7. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  8. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  9. Reprogramming chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensberger, Andreas Hasso; Svejstrup, Jesper Qualmann

    2012-01-01

    attributed to high kinetic barriers that affect all cells equally and can only be overcome by rare stochastic events. The barriers to reprogramming are likely to involve transformations of chromatin state because (i) inhibitors of chromatin-modifying enzymes can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming...... and (ii) knockdown or knock-out of chromatin-modifying enzymes can lower the efficiency of reprogramming. Here, we review the relationship between chromatin state transformations (chromatin reprogramming) and cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors...

  10. Enzyme catalysis: a new definition accounting for noncovalent substrate- and product-like states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purich, D L

    2001-07-01

    Biological catalysis frequently causes changes in noncovalent bonding. By building on Pauling's assertion that any long-lived, chemically distinct interaction is a chemical bond, this article redefines enzyme catalysis as the facilitated making and/or breaking of chemical bonds, not just of covalent bonds. It is also argued that nearly every ATPase or GTPase is misnamed as a hydrolase and actually belongs to a distinct class of enzymes, termed here 'energases'. By transducing covalent bond energy into mechanical work, energases mediate such fundamental processes as protein folding, self-assembly, G-protein interactions, DNA replication, chromatin remodeling and even active transport.

  11. ING1 induces apoptosis through direct effects at the mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, P; Thakur, S; Thalappilly, S

    2013-01-01

    The ING family of tumor suppressors acts as readers and writers of the histone epigenetic code, affecting DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, cellular senescence, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. The best characterized member of the ING family, ING1,interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear....... Bioinformatic analysis of the yeast interactome indicates that yeast ING proteins interact with 64 mitochondrial proteins. Also, sequence analysis of ING1 reveals the presence of a BH3-like domain. These data suggest a model in which stress-induced cytoplasmic relocalization of ING1 by14-3-3 induces ING1-BAX...

  12. Roles, Functions, and Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Fang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs play important roles in cancer. They are involved in chromatin remodeling, as well as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, through a variety of chromatin-based mechanisms and via cross-talk with other RNA species. lncRNAs can function as decoys, scaffolds, and enhancer RNAs. This review summarizes the characteristics of lncRNAs, including their roles, functions, and working mechanisms, describes methods for identifying and annotating lncRNAs, and discusses future opportunities for lncRNA-based therapies using antisense oligonucleotides.

  13. Characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms. Association with differentiation of hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and macroglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Kjaerulff, Karen M; Pedersen, Hans C

    2002-01-01

    BTB/POZ (broad complex tramtrack bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger) zinc finger factors are a class of nuclear DNA-binding proteins involved in development, chromatin remodeling, and cancer. However, BTB/POZ domain zinc finger factors linked to development of the mammalian cerebral cortex......, cerebellum, and macroglia have not been described previously. We report here the isolation and characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms, designated HOF(L) and HOF(S), that are specifically expressed in early hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and gliogenic...

  14. C/EBP maintains chromatin accessibility in liver and facilitates glucocorticoid receptor recruitment to steroid response elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; John, Sam; Baek, Songjoon

    2013-01-01

    -binding sites are occupied by C/EBPβ. At the majority of these sites, chromatin is preaccessible suggesting a priming function of C/EBPβ for GR recruitment. Disruption of C/EBPβ binding to chromatin results in attenuation of pre-programmed chromatin accessibility, GR recruitment and GR-induced chromatin...... remodelling specifically at sites co-occupied by GR and C/EBPβ. Collectively, we demonstrate a highly cooperative mechanism by which C/EBPβ regulates selective GR binding to the genome in liver tissue. We suggest that selective targeting of GR in other tissues is likely mediated by the combined action of cell...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-2084 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-2084 ref|YP_865674.1| ATP-dependent Clp protease, ATP-binding subunit clpA [Magnet...ococcus sp. MC-1] gb|ABK44268.1| ATP-dependent Clp protease ATP-binding subunit ClpA [Magnetococcus sp. MC-1] YP_865674.1 1.0 34% ...

  16. The BAH domain of BAF180 is required for PCNA ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Atsuko [Department of Genome Dynamics, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Hopkins, Suzanna R; Downs, Jessica A [Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom); Masutani, Chikahide, E-mail: masutani@riem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Genome Dynamics, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The expression of BAF180 promotes UV-induced PCNA ubiquitination during S phase. • The BAH domains of BAF180 alone are sufficient to promote PCNA ubiquitination. • The BAH domains are not assembled into the PBAF in the absence of the C-terminus. - Abstract: Monoubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a critical regulator of post replication repair (PRR). The depletion of BAF180, a unique subunit of the PBAF chromatin remodeling complex in human cells results in reduced PCNA ubiquitination leading to less efficient fork progression following DNA damage, but little is known about the mechanism. Here, we report that the expression of exogenous BAF180 in cells promotes PCNA ubiquitination during S-phase after UV irradiation and it persists for many hours. No correlation was observed between the protein level of ubiquitin-specific protease 1 (USP1) and ubiquitinated PCNA in BAF180 expressing cells. Analysis of cells expressing BAF180 deletion mutants showed that the bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domains are responsible for this effect. Surprisingly, a deletion construct encoding only the BAH domain region is able to increase the level of ubiquitinated PCNA, even though it is unable to be assembled into the PBAF complex. These results suggest that the ATPase-dependent chromatin remodeling activity of PBAF is not necessary, but instead the BAH domains are sufficient to promote PCNA ubiquitination.

  17. Voluntary wheel running reverses age-induced changes in hippocampal gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Kohman

    Full Text Available Normal aging alters expression of numerous genes within the brain. Some of these transcription changes likely contribute to age-associated cognitive decline, reduced neural plasticity, and the higher incidence of neuropathology. Identifying factors that modulate brain aging is crucial for improving quality of life. One promising intervention to counteract negative effects of aging is aerobic exercise. Aged subjects that exercise show enhanced cognitive performance and increased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Currently, the mechanisms behind the anti-aging effects of exercise are not understood. The present study conducted a microarray on whole hippocampal samples from adult (3.5-month-old and aged (18-month-old male BALB/c mice that were individually housed with or without running wheels for 8 weeks. Results showed that aging altered genes related to chromatin remodeling, cell growth, immune activity, and synapse organization compared to adult mice. Exercise was found to modulate many of the genes altered by aging, but in the opposite direction. For example, wheel running increased expression of genes related to cell growth and attenuated expression of genes involved in immune function and chromatin remodeling. Collectively, findings show that even late-onset exercise may attenuate age-related changes in gene expression and identifies possible pathways through which exercise may exert its beneficial effects.

  18. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  19. Manipulation of Cell Cycle and Chromatin Configuration by Means of Cell-Penetrating Geminin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ohno

    Full Text Available Geminin regulates chromatin remodeling and DNA replication licensing which play an important role in regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation. Transcription of the Geminin gene is regulated via an E2F-responsive region, while the protein is being closely regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our objective was to directly transduce Geminin protein into cells. Recombinant cell-penetrating Geminin (CP-Geminin was generated by fusing Geminin with a membrane translocating motif from FGF4 and was efficiently incorporated into NIH 3T3 cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The withdrawal study indicated that incorporated CP-Geminin was quickly reduced after removal from medium. We confirmed CP-Geminin was imported into the nucleus after incorporation and also that the incorporated CP-Geminin directly interacted with Cdt1 or Brahma/Brg1 as the same manner as Geminin. We further demonstrated that incorporated CP-Geminin suppressed S-phase progression of the cell cycle and reduced nuclease accessibility in the chromatin, probably through suppression of chromatin remodeling, indicating that CP-Geminin constitutes a novel tool for controlling chromatin configuration and the cell cycle. Since Geminin has been shown to be involved in regulation of stem cells and cancer cells, CP-Geminin is expected to be useful for elucidating the role of Geminin in stem cells and cancer cells, and for manipulating their activity.

  20. Transcriptional changes in epigenetic modifiers associated with gene silencing in the intestine of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka), during aestivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianming; Yang, Hongsheng; Zhao, Huan; Chen, Muyan; Wang, Bing

    2011-11-01

    The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, undergoes aestivation to improve survival during periods of high-temperature. During aestivation, the metabolic rate is depressed to reduce the consumption of reserved energy. We evaluated the role of epigenetic modification on global gene silencing during metabolic rate depression in the sea cucumber. We compared the expression of epigenetic modifiers in active and aestivating sea cucumbers. The expression of three genes involved in DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling (DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1, Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2), and Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 5) was significantly higher during aestivation (Days 20 and 40). Similarly, we observed an increase in the expression of genes involved in histone acetylation (Histone deacetylase 3) and Histone-binding protein RBBP4) during the early (Days 5 and 10) and late phases (Days 20 and 40) of aestivation. There was no change in the expression of KAT2B, a histone acetyltransferase. However, the expression of histone methylation associated modifiers (Histone-arginine methyltransferase CARMER and Histone-lysine N-methyltransferase MLL5) was significantly higher after 5 d in the aestivating group. The results suggest that the expression of epigenetic modifiers involved in DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone methylation is upregulated during aestivation. We hypothesize that these changes regulate global gene silencing during aestivation in A. japonicus.

  1. The RSF1 histone-remodelling factor facilitates DNA double-strand break repair by recruiting centromeric and Fanconi Anaemia proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pessina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ATM is a central regulator of the cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Here we identify a biochemical interaction between ATM and RSF1 and we characterise the role of RSF1 in this response. The ATM-RSF1 interaction is dependent upon both DSBs and ATM kinase activity. Together with SNF2H/SMARCA5, RSF1 forms the RSF chromatin-remodelling complex. Although RSF1 is specific to the RSF complex, SNF2H/SMARCA5 is a catalytic subunit of several other chromatin-remodelling complexes. Although not required for checkpoint signalling, RSF1 is required for efficient repair of DSBs via both end-joining and homology-directed repair. Specifically, the ATM-dependent recruitment to sites of DSBs of the histone fold proteins CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, previously identified at centromeres, is RSF1-dependent. In turn these proteins recruit and regulate the mono-ubiquitination of the Fanconi Anaemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI. We propose that by depositing CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, the RSF complex either directly or indirectly contributes to the reorganisation of chromatin around DSBs that is required for efficient DNA repair.

  2. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  3. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones.

  4. An in vitro, short-term culture method for mammalian haploid round spermatids amenable for molecular manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnugara, Tushna; Dhar, Surbhi; Rao, M R Satyanarayana

    2012-01-01

    Extensive chromatin remodeling is a characteristic feature of mammalian spermiogenesis. To date, methods for the molecular manipulation of haploid spermatids are not available as there is a lack of a well-established culture system. Biochemical experiments and knockout studies reveal only the final outcome; studying the incremental details of the intricate mechanisms involved is still a challenge. We have established an in vitro culture system for pure haploid round spermatids isolated from rat testes that can be maintained with good viability for up to 72 hr. Changes in cell morphology and flagellar growth were also studied in the cultured spermatids. Further, we have demonstrated that upon treatment of cells with specific histone deacetylase inhibitors, sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, there is an increase in the hyperacetylation status of histone H4, mimicking an important event characteristic of histone replacement process that occurs during later stages of spermiogenesis. We have also tried various methods for introducing DNA and protein into these round spermatids in culture, and report that while DNA transfection is still a challenging task, protein transfection could be achieved using Chariot™ peptide as a transfection reagent. Thus, the method described here sets a stage to study the molecular roles of spermatid-specific proteins and chromatin remodelers in the cellular context. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Systematic Identification of Determinants for Single-Strand Annealing-Mediated Deletion Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Segura-Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To ensure genomic integrity, living organisms have evolved diverse molecular processes for sensing and repairing damaged DNA. If improperly repaired, DNA damage can give rise to different types of mutations, an important class of which are genomic structural variants (SVs. In spite of their importance for phenotypic variation and genome evolution, potential contributors to SV formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast, a highly tractable model organism, are not fully recognized. Here, we developed and applied a genome-wide assay to identify yeast gene knockout mutants associated with de novo deletion formation, in particular single-strand annealing (SSA-mediated deletion formation, in a systematic manner. In addition to genes previously linked to genome instability, our approach implicates novel genes involved in chromatin remodeling and meiosis in affecting the rate of SSA-mediated deletion formation in the presence or absence of stress conditions induced by DNA-damaging agents. We closely examined two candidate genes, the chromatin remodeling gene IOC4 and the meiosis-related gene MSH4, which when knocked-out resulted in gene expression alterations affecting genes involved in cell division and chromosome organization, as well as DNA repair and recombination, respectively. Our high-throughput approach facilitates the systematic identification of processes linked to the formation of a major class of genetic variation.

  6. An extracellular subtilase switch for immune priming in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Ramírez

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, induced resistance associates with acquisition of a priming state of the cells for a more effective activation of innate immunity; however, the nature of the components for mounting this type of immunological memory is not well known. We identified an extracellular subtilase from Arabidopsis, SBT3.3, the overexpression of which enhances innate immune responses while the loss of function compromises them. SBT3.3 expression initiates a durable autoinduction mechanism that promotes chromatin remodeling and activates a salicylic acid(SA-dependent mechanism of priming of defense genes for amplified response. Moreover, SBT3.3 expression-sensitized plants for enhanced expression of the OXI1 kinase gene and activation of MAP kinases following pathogen attack, providing additional clues for the regulation of immune priming by SBT3.3. Conversely, in sbt3.3 mutant plants pathogen-mediated induction of SA-related defense gene expression is drastically reduced and activation of MAP kinases inhibited. Moreover, chromatin remodeling of defense-related genes normally associated with activation of an immune priming response appear inhibited in sbt3.3 plants, further indicating the importance of the extracellular SBT3.3 subtilase in the establishment of immune priming. Our results also point to an epigenetic control in the regulation of plant immunity, since SBT3.3 is up-regulated and priming activated when epigenetic control is impeded. SBT3.3 represents a new regulator of primed immunity.

  7. Actin, actin-binding proteins, and actin-related proteins in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristó, Ildikó; Bajusz, Izabella; Bajusz, Csaba; Borkúti, Péter; Vilmos, Péter

    2016-04-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has significantly broadened our view about the role actin plays in the life of the cell and added novel aspects to actin research. One of these new aspects is the discovery of the existence of nuclear actin which became evident only recently. Nuclear activities including transcriptional activation in the case of all three RNA polymerases, editing and nuclear export of mRNAs, and chromatin remodeling all depend on actin. It also became clear that there is a fine-tuned equilibrium between cytoplasmic and nuclear actin pools and that this balance is ensured by an export-import system dedicated to actin. After over half a century of research on conventional actin and its organizing partners in the cytoplasm, it was also an unexpected finding that the nucleus contains more than 30 actin-binding proteins and new classes of actin-related proteins which are not able to form filaments but had evolved nuclear-specific functions. The actin-binding and actin-related proteins in the nucleus have been linked to RNA transcription and processing, nuclear transport, and chromatin remodeling. In this paper, we attempt to provide an overview of the wide range of information that is now available about actin, actin-binding, and actin-related proteins in the nucleus.

  8. Protein acetylation sites mediated by Schistosoma mansoni GCN5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Furtado Madeiro da Costa, Rodrigo; Meirelles Bastosde Oliveira, Francisco; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional co-activator GCN5, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), is part of large multimeric complexes that are required for chromatin remodeling and transcription activation. As in other eukaryotes, the DNA from the parasite Schistosome mansoni is organized into nucleosomes and the genome encodes components of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Using a series of synthetic peptides we determined that Lys-14 of histone H3 was acetylated by the recombinant SmGCN5-HAT domain. SmGCN5 was also able to acetylate schistosome non-histone proteins, such as the nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1, and the co-activator SmNCoA-62. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of SmGCN5 protein in the nuclei of vitelline cells. Within the nucleus, SmGCN5 was found to be located in interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs), which are transcriptionally active structures. The data suggest that SmGCN5 is involved in transcription activation

  9. In silico evidence for sequence-dependent nucleosome sliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lequieu, Joshua; Schwartz, David C.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-10-18

    Nucleosomes represent the basic building block of chromatin and provide an important mechanism by which cellular processes are controlled. The locations of nucleosomes across the genome are not random but instead depend on both the underlying DNA sequence and the dynamic action of other proteins within the nucleus. These processes are central to cellular function, and the molecular details of the interplay between DNA sequence and nudeosome dynamics remain poorly understood. In this work, we investigate this interplay in detail by relying on a molecular model, which permits development of a comprehensive picture of the underlying free energy surfaces and the corresponding dynamics of nudeosome repositioning. The mechanism of nudeosome repositioning is shown to be strongly linked to DNA sequence and directly related to the binding energy of a given DNA sequence to the histone core. It is also demonstrated that chromatin remodelers can override DNA-sequence preferences by exerting torque, and the histone H4 tail is then identified as a key component by which DNA-sequence, histone modifications, and chromatin remodelers could in fact be coupled.

  10. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  11. The intervening domain from MeCP2 enhances the DNA affinity of the methyl binding domain and provides an independent DNA interaction site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Lanuza, Pilar M; Morales-Chueca, Ignacio; Jorge-Torres, Olga C; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Esteller, Manel; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-01-31

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) preferentially interacts with methylated DNA and it is involved in epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodelling. Mutations in MeCP2 are linked to Rett syndrome, the leading cause of intellectual retardation in girls and causing mental, motor and growth impairment. Unstructured regions in MeCP2 provide the plasticity for establishing interactions with multiple binding partners. We present a biophysical characterization of the methyl binding domain (MBD) from MeCP2 reporting the contribution of flanking domains to its structural stability and dsDNA interaction. The flanking disordered intervening domain (ID) increased the structural stability of MBD, modified its dsDNA binding profile from an entropically-driven moderate-affinity binding to an overwhelmingly enthalpically-driven high-affinity binding. Additionally, ID provided an additional site for simultaneously and autonomously binding an independent dsDNA molecule, which is a key feature linked to the chromatin remodelling and looping activity of MeCP2, as well as its ability to interact with nucleosomes replacing histone H1. The dsDNA interaction is characterized by an unusually large heat capacity linked to a cluster of water molecules trapped within the binding interface. The dynamics of disordered regions together with extrinsic factors are key determinants of MeCP2 global structural properties and functional capabilities.

  12. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation

  13. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Matsumori, Haruka [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel [Department of Biology of the Cell Nucleus, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Goldberg, Ilya G. [Image Informatics and Computational Biology Unit, Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Nakao, Mitsuyoshi [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Saitoh, Noriko [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Harata, Masahiko, E-mail: mharata@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  15. Connecting the dots: chromatin and alternative splicing in EMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warns, Jessica A; Davie, James R; Dhasarathy, Archana

    2016-02-01

    Nature has devised sophisticated cellular machinery to process mRNA transcripts produced by RNA Polymerase II, removing intronic regions and connecting exons together, to produce mature RNAs. This process, known as splicing, is very closely linked to transcription. Alternative splicing, or the ability to produce different combinations of exons that are spliced together from the same genomic template, is a fundamental means of regulating protein complexity. Similar to transcription, both constitutive and alternative splicing can be regulated by chromatin and its associated factors in response to various signal transduction pathways activated by external stimuli. This regulation can vary between different cell types, and interference with these pathways can lead to changes in splicing, often resulting in aberrant cellular states and disease. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which leads to cancer metastasis, is influenced by alternative splicing events of chromatin remodelers and epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of epigenetic factors including chromatin, chromatin remodelers, DNA methyltransferases, and microRNAs in the context of alternative splicing, and discuss their potential involvement in alternative splicing during the EMT process.

  16. Arid1b haploinsufficient mice reveal neuropsychiatric phenotypes and reversible causes of growth impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celen, Cemre; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Luo, Xin; Nijem, Nadine; Walker, Angela K; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Chung, Andrew S; Nguyen, Liem H; Nassour, Ibrahim; Budhipramono, Albert; Sun, Xuxu; Bok, Levinus A; McEntagart, Meriel; Gevers, Evelien F; Birnbaum, Shari G; Eisch, Amelia J; Powell, Craig M; Ge, Woo-Ping; Santen, Gijs We; Chahrour, Maria; Zhu, Hao

    2017-07-11

    Sequencing studies have implicated haploinsufficiency of ARID1B , a SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling subunit, in short stature (Yu et al., 2015), autism spectrum disorder (O'Roak et al., 2012), intellectual disability (Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study, 2015), and corpus callosum agenesis (Halgren et al., 2012). In addition, ARID1B is the most common cause of Coffin-Siris syndrome, a developmental delay syndrome characterized by some of the above abnormalities (Santen et al., 2012; Tsurusaki et al., 2012; Wieczorek et al., 2013). We generated Arid1b heterozygous mice, which showed social behavior impairment, altered vocalization, anxiety-like behavior, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and growth impairment. In the brain, Arid1b haploinsufficiency resulted in changes in the expression of SWI/SNF-regulated genes implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. A focus on reversible mechanisms identified Insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) deficiency with inadequate compensation by Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and Growth hormone (GH), underappreciated findings in ARID1B patients. Therapeutically, GH supplementation was able to correct growth retardation and muscle weakness. This model functionally validates the involvement of ARID1B in human disorders, and allows mechanistic dissection of neurodevelopmental diseases linked to chromatin-remodeling.

  17. Therapeutic Approaches to Histone Reprogramming in Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Andre K; Kleinman, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Recent data have revealed epigenetic derangements and subsequent chromatin remodeling as a potent biologic switch for chronic inflammation and cell survival which are important therapeutic targets in the pathogenesis of several retinal degenerations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a major component of this system and serve as a unique control of the chromatin remodeling process. With a multitude of targeted HDAC inhibitors now available, their use in both basic science and clinical studies has widened substantially. In the field of ocular biology, there are data to suggest that HDAC inhibition may suppress neovascularization and may be a possible treatment for retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the effects of these inhibitors on cell survival and chemokine expression in the chorioretinal tissues remain very unclear. Here, we review the multifaceted biology of HDAC activity and pharmacologic inhibition while offering further insight into the importance of this epigenetic pathway in retinal degenerations. Our laboratory investigations aim to open translational avenues to advance dry AMD therapeutics while exploring the role of acetylation on inflammatory gene expression in the aging and degenerating retina.

  18. Interconnection between flowering time control and activation of systemic acquired resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Zahoor Banday

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to avoid or neutralize pathogens is inherent to all higher organisms including plants. Plants recognize pathogens through receptors, and mount resistance against the intruders, with the help of well-elaborated defense arsenal. In response to some local infections, plants develop systemic acquired resistance (SAR, which provides heightened resistance during subsequent infections. Infected tissues generate mobile signalling molecules that travel to the systemic tissues, where they epigenetically modify expression of a set of genes to initiate the manifestation of SAR in distant tissues. Immune responses are largely regulated at transcriptional level. Flowering is a developmental transition that occurs as a result of the coordinated action of large numbers of transcription factors that respond to intrinsic signals and environmental conditions. The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA which is required for SAR activation positively regulates flowering. Certain components of chromatin remodelling complexes that are recruited for suppression of precocious flowering are also involved in suppression of SAR in healthy plants. FLOWERING LOCUS D (FLD, a putative histone demethylase positively regulates SAR manifestation and flowering transition in Arabidopsis. Similarly, incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z in nucleosomes mediated by PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING 1 (PIE1, an orthologue of yeast chromatin remodelling complex SWR1, concomitantly influences SAR and flowering time. SUMO conjugation and deconjugation mechanisms also similarly affect SAR and flowering in an SA-dependent manner. The evidences suggest a common underlying regulatory mechanism for activation of SAR and flowering in plants.

  19. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schrader

    Full Text Available The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  20. Hypoxia-induced tumor cell resistance is overcome by synergistic GAPDH-siRNA and chemotherapy co-delivered by long-circulating and cationic-interior liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, J.; Sun, J.; Sun, F.; Lou, B.; Zhang, D.; Mashayekhi, V.; Sadeghi, N.; Storm, G.; Mastrobattista, E.; He, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance of tumor cells under hypoxic conditions is caused by the inhibition of apoptosis by autophagy and drug efflux via adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent transporter activation, among other factors. Here, we demonstrate that disrupting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate

  1. Sequence Classification: 893537 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available licase in the DEAH-box family involved in the second catalytic step of splicing, exhibits ATP-dependent RNA unwinding activity; Prp16p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6322939 ...

  2. AcEST: DK953938 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on tr|A3TZ18|A3TZ18_9RHOB ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH OS=Oceanicola batsensis HTCC2597 Align length 7...0E06711p OS=Kluyveromyces lactis GN=K... 33 9.8 >tr|A3TZ18|A3TZ18_9RHOB ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH OS=Oceanicola bats

  3. AcEST: BP919546 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Definition tr|A3TZ18|A3TZ18_9RHOB ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH OS=Oceanicola batsensis HTCC2597 Align ...r... 33 9.2 >tr|A3TZ18|A3TZ18_9RHOB ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH OS=Oceanicola batsensis HTCC2597 GN=O

  4. AcEST: BP917685 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ra... 262 7e-69 tr|Q1PWY3|Q1PWY3_9BACT Strongly similar to ATP-dependent proteas... 262 7e-69 tr|B5IL34...|B5IL34_9CHRO ATP-dependent chaperone ClpB OS=Cyanobium... 262 7e-69 >tr|Q9LF37|Q9LF37

  5. Recent advances in understanding the biology of marginal zone lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Emanuele

    2018-01-01

    There are three different marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs): the extranodal MZL of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type (MALT lymphoma), the splenic MZL, and the nodal MZL. The three MZLs share common lesions and deregulated pathways but also present specific alterations that can be used for their differential diagnosis. Although trisomies of chromosomes 3 and 18, deletions at 6q23, deregulation of nuclear factor kappa B, and chromatin remodeling genes are frequent events in all of them, the three MZLs differ in the presence of recurrent translocations, mutations affecting the NOTCH pathway, and the transcription factor Kruppel like factor 2 ( KLF2) or the receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase delta ( PTPRD). Since a better understanding of the molecular events underlying each subtype may have practical relevance, this review summarizes the most recent and main advances in our understanding of the genetics and biology of MZLs. PMID:29657712

  6. Autism genes keep turning up chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalle, Janine M

    2013-06-19

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex genetic disorders collectively characterized by impaired social interactions and language as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. Of the hundreds of genes implicated in ASD, those encoding proteins acting at neuronal synapses have been most characterized by candidate gene studies. However, recent unbiased genome-wide analyses have turned up a multitude of novel candidate genes encoding nuclear factors implicated in chromatin remodeling, histone demethylation, histone variants, and the recognition of DNA methylation. Furthermore, the chromatin landscape of the human genome has been shown to influence the location of de novo mutations observed in ASD as well as the landscape of DNA methylation underlying neurodevelopmental and synaptic processes. Understanding the interactions of nuclear chromatin proteins and DNA with signal transduction pathways and environmental influences in the developing brain will be critical to understanding the relevance of these ASD candidate genes and continued uncovering of the "roots" of autism etiology.

  7. Merging data from genetic and epigenetic approaches to better understand autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Dennis R; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by a wide range of cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. Genetic research has identified large numbers of genes that contribute to ASD phenotypes. There is compelling evidence that environmental factors contribute to ASD through influences that differentially impact the brain through epigenetic mechanisms. Both genetic mutations and epigenetic influences alter gene expression in different cell types of the brain. Mutations impact the expression of large numbers of genes and also have downstream consequences depending on specific pathways associated with the mutation. Environmental factors impact the expression of sets of genes by altering methylation/hydroxymethylation patterns, local histone modification patterns and chromatin remodeling. Herein, we discuss recent developments in the research of ASD with a focus on epigenetic pathways as a complement to current genetic screening.

  8. Epigenetics, autism spectrum, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; D'Mello, Santosh R; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2013-10-01

    Epigenetic marks are modifications of DNA and histones. They are considered to be permanent within a single cell during development, and are heritable across cell division. Programming of neurons through epigenetic mechanisms is believed to be critical in neural development. Disruption or alteration in this process causes an array of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Recent studies have provided evidence for an altered epigenetic landscape in ASDs and demonstrated the central role of epigenetic mechanisms in their pathogenesis. Many of the genes linked to the ASDs encode proteins that are involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. In this review we highlight selected neurodevelopmental disorders in which epigenetic dysregulation plays an important role. These include Rett syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Kabuki syndrome. For each of these disorders, we discuss how advances in our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches.

  9. Epigenetics: relevance and implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Laura S; Dolinoy, Dana C; Sartor, Maureen A; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of the multilayer regulation of the human genome has led to a greater appreciation of environmental, nutritional, and epigenetic risk factors for human disease. Chromatin remodeling, histone tail modifications, and DNA methylation are dynamic epigenetic changes responsive to external stimuli. Careful interpretation can provide insights for actionable public health through collaboration between population and basic scientists and through integration of multiple data sources. We review key findings in environmental epigenetics both in human population studies and in animal models, and discuss the implications of these results for risk assessment and public health protection. To ultimately succeed in identifying epigenetic mechanisms leading to complex phenotypes and disease, researchers must integrate the various animal models, human clinical approaches, and human population approaches while paying attention to life-stage sensitivity, to generate effective prescriptions for human health evaluation and disease prevention.

  10. Structure and Function of SET and MYND Domain-Containing Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Spellmon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available SET (Suppressor of variegation, Enhancer of Zeste, Trithorax and MYND (Myeloid-Nervy-DEAF1 domain-containing proteins (SMYD have been found to methylate a variety of histone and non-histone targets which contribute to their various roles in cell regulation including chromatin remodeling, transcription, signal transduction, and cell cycle control. During early development, SMYD proteins are believed to act as an epigenetic regulator for myogenesis and cardiomyocyte differentiation as they are abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle. SMYD proteins are also of therapeutic interest due to the growing list of carcinomas and cardiovascular diseases linked to SMYD overexpression or dysfunction making them a putative target for drug intervention. This review will examine the biological relevance and gather all of the current structural data of SMYD proteins.

  11. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SET/TAF-Iß δN from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Yang, Weili; Shi, Nuo; Gao, Yongxiang; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen

    2010-08-01

    The histone chaperone SET encoded by the SET gene, which is also known as template-activating factor Iß (TAF-Iß), is a multifunctional molecule that is involved in many biological phenomena such as histone binding, nucleosome assembly, chromatin remodelling, replication, transcription and apoptosis. A truncated SET/TAF-Iß ΔN protein that lacked the first 22 residues of the N-terminus but contained the C-terminal acidic domain and an additional His6 tag at the C-terminus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using sodium acetate as precipitant at 283 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 A resolution and belonged to space group P4(3)2(1)2.

  13. The Yin and Yang of chromatin dynamics in adult stem cell fate selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rene C.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms rely on tissue stem cells for maintenance and repair. During homeostasis, the concerted action of local niche signals and epigenetic regulators establish stable gene expression patterns to ensure that stem cells are not lost over time. However, stem cells also provide host tissues with a remarkable plasticity to respond to perturbations. How adult stem cells choose and acquire new fates is unknown, but the genome-wide mapping of epigenetic landscapes suggests a critical role for chromatin remodeling in these processes. Here, we explore the emerging role of chromatin modifiers and pioneer transcription factors in adult stem cell fate decisions and plasticity, which ensure that selective lineage choices are only made when environmentally cued. PMID:26689127

  14. The epigenetic landscape of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Harish R; Sakharkar, Amul J; Teppen, Tara L; Berkel, Tiffani D M; Pandey, Subhash C

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex psychiatric disorder that has a multifactorial etiology. Epigenetic mechanisms are uniquely capable of accounting for the multifactorial nature of the disease in that they are highly stable and are affected by environmental factors, including alcohol itself. Chromatin remodeling causes changes in gene expression in specific brain regions contributing to the endophenotypes of alcoholism such as tolerance and dependence. The epigenetic mechanisms that regulate changes in gene expression observed in addictive behaviors respond not only to alcohol exposure but also to comorbid psychopathology such as the presence of anxiety and stress. This review summarizes recent developments in epigenetic research that may play a role in alcoholism. We propose that pharmacologically manipulating epigenetic targets, as demonstrated in various preclinical models, hold great therapeutic potential in the treatment and prevention of alcoholism. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CHD1 regulates cell fate determination by activation of differentiation-induced genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgart, Simon J; Najafova, Zeynab; Hossan, Tareq

    2017-01-01

    The coordinated temporal and spatial activation of gene expression is essential for proper stem cell differentiation. The Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (CHD1) is a chromatin remodeler closely associated with transcription and nucleosome turnover downstream of the transcriptional start...... site (TSS). In this study, we show that CHD1 is required for the induction of osteoblast-specific gene expression, extracellular-matrix mineralization and ectopic bone formation in vivo. Genome-wide occupancy analyses revealed increased CHD1 occupancy around the TSS of differentiation-activated genes....... Furthermore, we observed that CHD1-dependent genes are mainly induced during osteoblast differentiation and are characterized by higher levels of CHD1 occupancy around the TSS. Interestingly, CHD1 depletion resulted in increased pausing of RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) and decreased H2A.Z occupancy close...

  16. The BRCA1 Ubiquitin ligase function sets a new trend for remodelling in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densham, Ruth M; Morris, Joanna R

    2017-03-04

    The protein product of the breast and ovarian cancer gene, BRCA1, is part of an obligate heterodimer with BARD1. Together these RING bearing proteins act as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Several functions have been attributed to BRCA1 that contribute to genome integrity but which of these, if any, require this enzymatic function was unclear. Here we review recent studies clarifying the role of BRCA1 E3 ubiquitin ligase in DNA repair. Perhaps the most surprising finding is the narrow range of BRCA1 functions this activity relates to. Remarkably ligase activity promotes chromatin remodelling and 53BP1 positioning through the remodeller SMARCAD1, but the activity is dispensable for the cellular survival in response to cisplatin or replication stressing agents. Implications for therapy response and tumor susceptibility are discussed.

  17. The histone codes for meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Xu, Zhiliang; Khawar, Muhammad Babar; Liu, Chao; Li, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Meiosis is a specialized process that produces haploid gametes from diploid cells by a single round of DNA replication followed by two successive cell divisions. It contains many special events, such as programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation, homologous recombination, crossover formation and resolution. These events are associated with dynamically regulated chromosomal structures, the dynamic transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling are mainly modulated by histone modifications, termed 'histone codes'. The purpose of this review is to summarize the histone codes that are required for meiosis during spermatogenesis and oogenesis, involving meiosis resumption, meiotic asymmetric division and other cellular processes. We not only systematically review the functional roles of histone codes in meiosis but also discuss future trends and perspectives in this field. © 2017 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  18. Cyc17, a meiosis-specific cyclin, is essential for anaphase initiation and chromosome segregation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guan-Xiong; Dang, Huai; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Jing; Shodhan, Anura; Ning, Ying-Zhi; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei

    2016-07-17

    Although the role of cyclins in controlling nuclear division is well established, their function in ciliate meiosis remains unknown. In ciliates, the cyclin family has undergone massive expansion which suggests that diverse cell cycle systems exist, and this warrants further investigation. A screen for cyclins in the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila showed that there are 34 cyclins in this organism. Only 1 cyclin, Cyc17, contains the complete cyclin core and is specifically expressed during meiosis. Deletion of CYC17 led to meiotic arrest at the diakinesis-like metaphase I stage. Expression of genes involved in DNA metabolism and chromosome organization (chromatin remodeling and basic chromosomal structure) was repressed in cyc17 knockout matings. Further investigation suggested that Cyc17 is involved in regulating spindle pole attachment, and is thus essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis. These findings suggest a simple model in which chromosome segregation is influenced by Cyc17.

  19. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.

    2010-01-01

    Certain pathogens deliver effectors into plant cells to modify host protein targets and thereby suppress immunity. These target modifications can be detected by intracellular immune receptors, or Resistance (R) proteins, that trigger strong immune responses including localized host cell death....... The accelerated cell death 11 (acd11) "lesion mimic" mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits autoimmune phenotypes such as constitutive defense responses and cell death without pathogen perception. ACD11 encodes a putative sphingosine transfer protein, but its precise role during these processes is unknown......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  20. Activation of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interferes with Early Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolis Gialitakis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional program of early embryonic development is tightly regulated by a set of well-defined transcription factors that suppress premature expression of differentiation genes and sustain the pluripotent identity. It is generally accepted that this program can be perturbed by environmental factors such as chemical pollutants; however, the precise molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is a widely expressed nuclear receptor that senses environmental stimuli and modulates target gene expression. Here, we have investigated the AHR interactome in embryonic stem cells by mass spectrometry and show that ectopic activation of AHR during early differentiation disrupts the differentiation program via the chromatin remodeling complex NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation. The activated AHR/NuRD complex altered the expression of differentiation-specific genes that control the first two developmental decisions without affecting the pluripotency program. These findings identify a mechanism that allows environmental stimuli to disrupt embryonic development through AHR signaling.

  1. Regulation of Floral Stem Cell Termination in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro eIto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, floral stem cells are maintained only at the initial stages of flower development, and they are terminated at a specific time to ensure proper development of the reproductive organs. Floral stem cell termination is a dynamic and multi-step process involving many transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors and signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in floral stem cell maintenance and termination, highlighting the interplay between transcriptional regulation and epigenetic machinery in the control of specific floral developmental genes. In addition, we discuss additional factors involved in floral stem cell regulation, with the goal of untangling the complexity of the floral stem cell regulatory network.

  2. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N.; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, and not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins and accumulate DDR signals. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  3. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  4. Epigenetic Regulation in Prostate Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggero, Katia; Farran-Matas, Sonia; Martinez-Tebar, Adrian; Aytes, Alvaro

    2018-01-01

    An important number of newly identified molecular alterations in prostate cancer affect gene encoding master regulators of chromatin biology epigenetic regulation. This review will provide an updated view of the key epigenetic mechanisms underlying prostate cancer progression, therapy resistance, and potential actionable mechanisms and biomarkers. Key players in chromatin biology and epigenetic master regulators has been recently described to be crucially altered in metastatic CRPC and tumors that progress to AR independency. As such, epigenetic dysregulation represents a driving mechanism in the reprograming of prostate cancer cells as they lose AR-imposed identity. Chromatin integrity and accessibility for transcriptional regulation are key features altered in cancer progression, and particularly relevant in nuclear hormone receptor-driven tumors like prostate cancer. Understanding how chromatin remodeling dictates prostate development and how its deregulation contributes to prostate cancer onset and progression may improve risk stratification and treatment selection for prostate cancer patients.

  5. THE EPIGENETICS OF RENAL CELL TUMORS: FROM BIOLOGY TO BIOMARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eHenrique

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell tumors (RCT collectively constitute the third most common type of genitourinary neoplasms, only surpassed by prostate and bladder cancer. They comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinctive clinical, morphological and genetic features. Epigenetic alterations are a hallmark of cancer cells and their role in renal tumorigenesis is starting to emerge. Aberrant DNA methylation, altered chromatin remodeling / histone onco-modifications and deregulated microRNA expression not only contribute to the emergence and progression of RCTs, but owing to their ubiquity, they also constitute a promising class of biomarkers tailored for disease detection, diagnosis, assessment of prognosis and prediction of response to therapy. Moreover, due to their dynamic and reversible properties, those alterations represent a target for epigenetic-directed therapies. In this review, the current knowledge about epigenetic mechanisms and their altered status in RCT is summarized and their envisaged use in a clinical setting is also provided.

  6. MGMT expression: insights into its regulation. 1. Epigenetic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsyshyna A. P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT is the DNA repair enzyme responsible for removing of alkylation adducts from the O6-guanine in DNA. Despite MGMT prevents mutations and cell death, this enzyme can provide resistance of cancer cells to alkylating agents of chemotherapy. The high intra- and inter-individual variations in the human MGMT expression level have been observed indicating to a complicated regulation of this gene. This review is focused on the study of epigenetic factors which could be potentially involved in regulation of the human MGMT gene expression. These include chromatin remodeling via histone modifications and DNA methylation of promoter region and gene body, as well as RNA-based mechanisms, alternative splicing, protein post- translational modifications, and other.

  7. Widespread Chromatin Accessibility at Repetitive Elements Links Stem Cells with Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C. Gomez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is critical for differentiation and disease. However, features linking the chromatin environment of stem cells with disease remain largely unknown. We explored chromatin accessibility in embryonic and multipotent stem cells and unexpectedly identified widespread chromatin accessibility at repetitive elements. Integrating genomic and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that these sites of increased accessibility are associated with well-positioned nucleosomes marked by distinct histone modifications. Differentiation is accompanied by chromatin remodeling at repetitive elements associated with altered expression of genes in relevant developmental pathways. Remarkably, we found that the chromatin environment of Ewing sarcoma, a mesenchymally derived tumor, is shared with primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Accessibility at repetitive elements in MSCs offers a permissive environment that is exploited by the critical oncogene responsible for this cancer. Our data demonstrate that stem cells harbor a unique chromatin landscape characterized by accessibility at repetitive elements, a feature associated with differentiation and oncogenesis.

  8. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Cytoskeletal Proteins: Molecular Mechanism and Biological Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kumeta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various nuclear functional complexes contain cytoskeletal proteins as regulatory subunits; for example, nuclear actin participates in transcriptional complexes, and actin-related proteins are integral to chromatin remodeling complexes. Nuclear complexes such as these are involved in both basal and adaptive nuclear functions. In addition to nuclear import via classical nuclear transport pathways or passive diffusion, some large cytoskeletal proteins spontaneously migrate into the nucleus in a karyopherin-independent manner. The balance of nucleocytoplasmic distribution of such proteins can be altered by several factors, such as import versus export, or capture and release by complexes. The resulting accumulation or depletion of the nuclear populations thereby enhances or attenuates their nuclear functions. We propose that such molecular dynamics constitute a form of cytoskeleton-modulated regulation of nuclear functions which is mediated by the translocation of cytoskeletal components in and out of the nucleus.

  9. It's fun to transcribe with Fun30: A model for nucleosome dynamics during RNA polymerase II-mediated elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junwoo; Choi, Eun Shik; Lee, Daeyoup

    2018-01-01

    The ability of elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to regulate the nucleosome barrier is poorly understood because we do not know enough about the involved factors and we lack a conceptual framework to model this process. Our group recently identified the conserved Fun30/SMARCAD1 family chromatin-remodeling factor, Fun30 Fft3 , as being critical for relieving the nucleosome barrier during RNAPII-mediated elongation, and proposed a model illustrating how Fun30 Fft3 may contribute to nucleosome disassembly during RNAPII-mediated elongation. Here, we present a model that describes nucleosome dynamics during RNAPII-mediated elongation in mathematical terms and addresses the involvement of Fun30 Fft3 in this process.

  10. Advances in epigenetics and epigenomics for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors-literally those that are "over" or "above" genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes-have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  11. Discussing epigenetics in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    With the goal of discussing how epigenetic control and chromatin remodeling contribute to the various processes that lead to cellular plasticity and disease, this symposium marks the collaboration between the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France and the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Organized by Paolo Sassone-Corsi (UCI) and held at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences at the UCI campus December 15–16, 2011, this was the first of a series of international conferences on epigenetics dedicated to the scientific community in Southern California. The meeting also served as the official kick off for the newly formed Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the School of Medicine, UCI (http://cem.igb.uci.edu). PMID:22414797

  12. Discussing epigenetics in Southern California: a report from the International Symposium on Epigenetic Control and Cellular Plasticity, UCI, December 15-16, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barbara P

    2012-04-01

    With the goal of discussing how epigenetic control and chromatin remodeling contribute to the various processes that lead to cellular plasticity and disease, this symposium marks the collaboration between the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France and the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Organized by Paolo Sassone-Corsi (UCI) and held at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences at the UCI campus December 15-16, 2011, this was the first of a series of international conferences on epigenetics dedicated to the scientific community in Southern California. The meeting also served as the official kick off for the newly formed Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the School of Medicine, UCI (http://cem.igb.uci.edu).

  13. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.

    2010-01-01

    . In a screen for lazarus (laz) mutants that suppress acd11 death we identified two genes, LAZ2 and LAZ5. LAZ2 encodes the histone lysine methyltransferase SDG8, previously shown to epigenetically regulate flowering time via modification of histone 3 (H3). LAZ5 encodes an RPS4-like R-protein, defined by several...... dominant negative alleles. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that LAZ2/SDG8 is required for LAZ5 expression and H3 lysine 36 trimethylation at LAZ5 chromatin to maintain a transcriptionally active state. We hypothesize that LAZ5 triggers cell death in the absence of ACD11......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  14. Epigenetics as an emerging tool for improvement of fungal strains used in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghcheh, Razieh Karimi; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-08-01

    Filamentous fungi are today a major source of industrial biotechnology for the production of primary and secondary metabolites, as well as enzymes and recombinant proteins. All of them have undergone extensive improvement strain programs, initially by classical mutagenesis and later on by genetic manipulation. Thereby, strategies to overcome rate-limiting or yield-reducing reactions included manipulating the expression of individual genes, their regulatory genes, and also their function. Yet, research of the last decade clearly showed that cells can also undergo heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve changes in the underlying DNA sequences (=epigenetics). This involves three levels of regulation: (i) DNA methylation, (ii) chromatin remodeling by histone modification, and (iii) RNA interference. The demonstration of the occurrence of these processes in fungal model organisms such as Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa has stimulated its recent investigation as a tool for strain improvement in industrially used fungi. This review describes the progress that has thereby been obtained.

  15. Coffin-Siris syndrome: phenotypic evolution of a novel SMARCA4 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Michael; du Souich, Christèle; Cheung, Helen Wing-Hong; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2014-07-01

    Coffin-Siris Syndrome (CSS) is an intellectual disability disorder caused by mutation of components of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We describe the evolution of the phenotypic features for a male patient with CSS from birth to age 7 years and 9 months and by review of reported CSS patients, we expand the phenotype to include neonatal and infantile hypertonia and upper airway obstruction. The propositus had a novel de novo heterozygous missense mutation in exon 17 of SMARCA4 (NM_001128849.1:c.2434C>T (NP_001122321.1:p.Leu812Phe)). This is the first reported mutation within motif Ia of the SMARCA4 SNF2 domain. In summary, SMARCA4-associated CSS is a pleiotropic disorder in which the pathognomic clinical features evolve and for which the few reported individuals do not demonstrate a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. SWI/SNF complex in disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Gijs W.E.; Kriek, Marjolein; van Attikum, Haico

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in components of switch/sucrose nonfermenting (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complexes were recently identified in patients with non-syndromic intellectual disability, Coffin-Siris syndrome and Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome. The common denominator of the phenotype of these patients is severe intellectual disability and speech delay. Somatic and germline mutations in SWI/SNF components were previously implicated in tumor development. This raises the question whether patients with intellectual disability caused by SWI/SNF mutations in the germline are exposed to an increased risk of developing cancer. Here we compare the mutational spectrum of SWI/SNF components in intellectual disability syndromes and cancer, and discuss the implications of the results of this comparison for the patients. PMID:23010866

  17. Overview of the "epigenetic end points in toxicologic pathology and relevance to human health" session of the 2014 Society Of Toxicologic Pathology Annual Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Hartke, James

    2015-01-01

    The theme of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology 2014 Annual Symposium was "Translational Pathology: Relevance of Toxicologic Pathology to Human Health." The 5th session focused on epigenetic end points in biology, toxicity, and carcinogenicity, and how those end points are relevant to human exposures. This overview highlights the various presentations in this session, discussing integration of epigenetics end points in toxicologic pathology studies, investigating the role of epigenetics in product safety assessment, epigenetic changes in cancers, methodologies to detect them, and potential therapies, chromatin remodeling in development and disease, and epigenomics and the microbiome. The purpose of this overview is to discuss the application of epigenetics to toxicologic pathology and its utility in preclinical or mechanistic based safety, efficacy, and carcinogenicity studies. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  18. Non-coding RNA networks in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Eleni; Jacob, Leni S; Slack, Frank J

    2018-01-01

    Thousands of unique non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences exist within cells. Work from the past decade has altered our perception of ncRNAs from 'junk' transcriptional products to functional regulatory molecules that mediate cellular processes including chromatin remodelling, transcription, post-transcriptional modifications and signal transduction. The networks in which ncRNAs engage can influence numerous molecular targets to drive specific cell biological responses and fates. Consequently, ncRNAs act as key regulators of physiological programmes in developmental and disease contexts. Particularly relevant in cancer, ncRNAs have been identified as oncogenic drivers and tumour suppressors in every major cancer type. Thus, a deeper understanding of the complex networks of interactions that ncRNAs coordinate would provide a unique opportunity to design better therapeutic interventions.

  19. The connection between BRG1, CTCF and topoisomerases at TAD boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcu, A Rasim; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; Imbalzano, Anthony N

    2017-03-04

    The eukaryotic genome is partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs). Despite recent advances characterizing TADs and TAD boundaries, the organization of these structures is an important dimension of genome architecture and function that is not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that knockdown of BRG1, an ATPase driving the chromatin remodeling activity of mammalian SWI/SNF enzymes, globally alters long-range genomic interactions and results in a reduction of TAD boundary strength. We provided evidence suggesting that this effect may be due to BRG1 affecting nucleosome occupancy around CTCF sites present at TAD boundaries. In this review, we elaborate on our findings and speculate that BRG1 may contribute to the regulation of the structural and functional properties of chromatin at TAD boundaries by affecting the function or the recruitment of CTCF and DNA topoisomerase complexes.

  20. Chromosome aberration model combining radiation tracks, chromatin structure, DSB repair and chromatin mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, W.; Kundrat, P.

    2015-01-01

    The module that simulates the kinetics and yields of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations within the biophysical code PARTRAC is described. Radiation track structures simulated by Monte Carlo methods are overlapped with multi-scale models of DNA and chromatin to assess the resulting DNA damage. Spatial mobility of individual DNA ends from double-strand breaks is modelled simultaneously with their processing by the non-homologous end-joining enzymes. To score diverse types of chromosome aberrations, the joined ends are classified regarding their original chromosomal location, orientation and the involvement of centromeres. A comparison with experimental data on dicentrics induced by gamma and alpha particles shows that their relative dose dependence is predicted correctly, although the absolute yields are overestimated. The critical model assumptions on chromatin mobility and on the initial damage recognition and chromatin remodelling steps and their future refinements to solve this issue are discussed. (authors)

  1. Sigma-1 Receptor as a Pluripotent Modulator in the Living System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tsung-Ping; Su, Tzu-Chieh; Nakamura, Yoki; Tsai, Shang-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein resides specifically at the interface between ER and mitochondria, called the MAM, where the Sig-1R is recently reported to be involved in certain CNS diseases. In addition to being able to translocate to the plasma membrane to interact with ion channels and other receptors, the Sig-1R is found to exist at the nuclear envelope where it recruits chromatin-remodeling factors to affect the transcription of genes. As well, thorough experimental and bioinformatic means, Sig-1Rs are reported to interact with other membranous or soluble proteins at other loci, including the cytosol. We propose that the Sig-1R is a pluripotent modulator with resultant multiple functional manifestations in the living system. PMID:26869505

  2. The Sigma-1 Receptor as a Pluripotent Modulator in Living Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tsung-Ping; Su, Tzu-Chieh; Nakamura, Yoki; Tsai, Shang-Yi

    2016-04-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein that resides specifically in the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM), an interface between ER and mitochondria. In addition to being able to translocate to the plasma membrane (PM) to interact with ion channels and other receptors, Sig-1R also occurs at the nuclear envelope, where it recruits chromatin-remodeling factors to affect the transcription of genes. Sig-1Rs have also been reported to interact with other membranous or soluble proteins at other loci, including the cytosol, and to be involved in several central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Here, we propose that Sig-1R is a pluripotent modulator with resultant multiple functional manifestations in living systems. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Epigenetic: A missing paradigm in cellular and molecular pathways of sulfur mustard lung: a prospective and comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Imani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur mustard (SM, bis- (2-chloroethyl sulphide is a chemical warfare agent that causes DNA alkylation, protein modification and membrane damage. SM can trigger several molecular pathways involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, which cause cell necrosis and apoptosis, and loss of cells integrity and function. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a growing research topic and is addressed by DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and noncoding RNAs expression. It seems SM can induce the epigenetic modifications that are translated into change in gene expression. Classification of epigenetic modifications long after exposure to SM would clarify its mechanism and paves a better strategy for the treatment of SM-affected patients. In this study, we review the key aberrant epigenetic modifications that have important roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and compared with mustard lung.

  4. Testis-Specific Histone Variant H3t Gene Is Essential for Entry into Spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ueda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation is associated with dynamic chromatin remodeling in establishing a cell-type-specific epigenomic landscape. Here, we find that mouse testis-specific and replication-dependent histone H3 variant H3t is essential for very early stages of spermatogenesis. H3t gene deficiency leads to azoospermia because of the loss of haploid germ cells. When differentiating spermatogonia emerge in normal spermatogenesis, H3t appears and replaces the canonical H3 proteins. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that H3t-containing nucleosomes are more flexible than the canonical nucleosomes. Thus, by incorporating H3t into the genome during spermatogonial differentiation, male germ cells are able to enter meiosis and beyond.

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Hormone-dependent Plant Growth Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Joseph Robert [The Salk Inst. for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    Impact of EIN6, EEN and ethylene on the H3K27me3 dynamics in Arabidopsis: To assess the dynamic responsiveness of H3K27me3 levels to ethylene and how this might affect ethylene-induced gene expression, we plan to perform H3K27me3 ChIP-seq and RNA- seq experiments in parallel with etiolated seedlings in the absence and presence of ethylene. Further implementation of ein6, een and ein6een mutants will visualize how the H3K27me3 landscape (-/+ET) is altered when H3K27me3 demethylation and/or INO80-mediated chromatin remodeling is compromised. Additional ChIP-seq analyses with EIN6 will show if ethylene- induced H3K27me3 removal at certain genes is always accompanied by the presence of EIN6.

  6. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  7. A map of directional genetic interactions in a metazoan cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernd; Sandmann, Thomas; Horn, Thomas; Billmann, Maximilian; Chaudhary, Varun; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2015-03-06

    Gene-gene interactions shape complex phenotypes and modify the effects of mutations during development and disease. The effects of statistical gene-gene interactions on phenotypes have been used to assign genes to functional modules. However, directional, epistatic interactions, which reflect regulatory relationships between genes, have been challenging to map at large-scale. Here, we used combinatorial RNA interference and automated single-cell phenotyping to generate a large genetic interaction map for 21 phenotypic features of Drosophila cells. We devised a method that combines genetic interactions on multiple phenotypes to reveal directional relationships. This network reconstructed the sequence of protein activities in mitosis. Moreover, it revealed that the Ras pathway interacts with the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodelling complex, an interaction that we show is conserved in human cancer cells. Our study presents a powerful approach for reconstructing directional regulatory networks and provides a resource for the interpretation of functional consequences of genetic alterations.

  8. The role of meiotic drive in hybrid male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Shannon R; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2010-04-27

    Meiotic drive causes the distortion of allelic segregation away from Mendelian expected ratios, often also reducing fecundity and favouring the evolution of drive suppressors. If different species evolve distinct drive-suppressor systems, then hybrid progeny may be sterile as a result of negative interactions of these systems' components. Although the hypothesis that meiotic drive may contribute to hybrid sterility, and thus species formation, fell out of favour early in the 1990s, recent results showing an association between drive and sterility have resurrected this previously controversial idea. Here, we review the different forms of meiotic drive and their possible roles in speciation. We discuss the recent empirical evidence for a link between drive and hybrid male sterility, also suggesting a possible mechanistic explanation for this link in the context of chromatin remodelling. Finally, we revisit the population genetics of drive that allow it to contribute to speciation.

  9. Bap1 and Pbrm1: Determinants of Tumor Grade and mTOR Activation in VHL-Deficient Mouse Models of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Janet Y; Kim, William Y

    2017-08-01

    Large genome sequencing efforts have identified frequent mutations in the histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling genes BAP1 and PBRM1 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In this issue of Cancer Discovery , Gu and colleagues model these genetic events in mice and report that dual inactivation of Vhl with either Bap1 or Pbrm1 results in faithful genetically engineered murine models of ccRCC. Moreover, their work establishes that Bap1 and Pbrm1 are determinants of tumor grade and mTORC1 activation and provocatively suggests that the cell of origin of ccRCC may lie in PAX8-expressing Bowman capsule cells. Cancer Discov; 7(8); 802-4. ©2017 AACR See related article by Gu et al., p. 900 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibition as an alternative strategy against invasive aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic eLamoth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a life-threatening infection due to Aspergillus fumigatus and other Aspergillus spp. Drugs targeting the fungal cell membrane (triazoles, amphotericin B or cell wall (echinocandins are currently the sole therapeutic options against IA. Their limited efficacy and the emergence of resistance warrant the identification of new antifungal targets. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are enzymes responsible of the deacetylation of lysine residues of core histones, thus controlling chromatin remodeling and transcriptional activation. HDACs also control the acetylation and activation status of multiple non-histone proteins, including the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90, an essential molecular chaperone for fungal virulence and antifungal resistance. This review provides an overview of the different HDACs in Aspergillus spp. as well as their respective contribution to total HDAC activity, fungal growth, stress responses, and virulence. The potential of HDAC inhibitors, currently under development for cancer therapy, as novel alternative antifungal agents against IA is discussed.

  11. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  12. Multifunctional role of the transcription factor Blimp1 in coordinating plasma cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnich, Martina; Tagoh, Hiromi; Bönelt, Peter; Axelsson, Elin; Fischer, Maria; Cebolla, Beatriz; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Nutt, Stephen L.; Jaritz, Markus; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2018-01-01

    Blimp1 is an essential regulator of plasma cells. Here we studied its functions in plasmablast differentiation by identifying regulated Blimp1 target genes. Blimp1 promoted plasmablast migration and adhesion. It repressed several transcription factor genes and Aicda, thus silencing B-cell-specific gene expression, antigen presentation and class switch recombination in plasmablasts. It directly activated genes, leading to increased expression of the plasma cell regulator IRF4 and proteins involved in immunoglobulin secretion. Blimp1 induced immunoglobulin gene transcription by controlling Igh and Igk 3’ enhancers and regulated the posttranscriptional expression switch from the membrane-bound to secreted immunoglobulin heavy-chain by activating Ell2. Notably, Blimp1 recruited chromatin-remodeling and histone-modifying complexes to regulate its target genes. Hence, many essential functions of plasma cells are under Blimp1 control. PMID:26779602

  13. Thrombopoietin/MPL participates in initiating and maintaining RUNX1-ETO acute myeloid leukemia via PI3K/AKT signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Pulikkan (John); D. Madera (Dmitri); L. Xue (Liting); P. Bradley (Paul); S.F. Landrette (Sean Francis); Y.-H. Kuo (Ya-Huei); S. Abbas (Saman); L.J. Zhu (Lihua Julie); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); L.H. Castilla (Lucio)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOncogenic mutations in components of cytokine signaling pathways elicit ligand-independent activation of downstream signaling, enhancing proliferation and survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene, MPL, a homodimeric receptor activated by

  14. Role of Brg1 in progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Torkamandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Epigenetic regulation of gene expression can be carried out through chromatin remodeling enzymes such as SWI/SNF. Brg1 also known as SMARCA4 is a catalytic subunit of SWI/SNF, which is necessary for MMPs expression. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are known as important player enzymes during tumor progression and metastasis. Aberrant epigenetic modification of chromatin should be precisely clarified to reveal probable unknown pathways in ESCC progression. Probable role of Brg1 in ESCC tumorigenesis and metastasis was studied through the assessment of Brg1 mRNA expression in KYSE30, and further evaluation about the biology of Brg1 was performed through the Brg1 silencing. Materials and Methods: Level of Brg1 mRNA expression in KYSE30 was compared to normal tissues using the real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Moreover, KYSE30 cells were transfected with Brg1-siRNA to silence the Brg1. Results: Our results showed for the first time that Brg1 mRNA expression was increased in KYSE30 cell line (ESCC cell line compared with normal esophageal tissue of ESCC patients. Rate of transfection in KYSE30 was also between 40 to 50%, using the pSilencer-Brg1shRNA (1:1 ratio. Conclusion: Our data indicated that chromatin remodeling machinery is a novel aspect in tumor biology of ESCC, and overexpression of Brg1 as an important member of SWI/SNF might be involved in the migration and invasion of ESCC tumoral cells.

  15. Regulation of protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) signalling by the TPα and TPβ isoforms of the human thromboxane A2 receptor: Implications for thromboxane- and androgen- dependent neoplastic and epigenetic responses in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Aine G; Mulvaney, Eamon P; Kinsella, B Therese

    2017-04-01

    The prostanoid thromboxane (TX) A 2 and its T Prostanoid receptor (the TP) are increasingly implicated in prostate cancer (PCa). Mechanistically, we recently discovered that both TPα and TPβ form functional signalling complexes with members of the protein kinase C-related kinase (PRK) family, AGC- kinases essential for the epigenetic regulation of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcription and promising therapeutic targets for treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Critically, similar to androgens, activation of the PRKs through the TXA 2 /TP signalling axis induces phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr11 (H3Thr11), a marker of androgen-induced chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation, raising the possibility that TXA 2 -TP signalling can mimic and/or enhance AR-induced cellular changes even in the absence of circulating androgens such as in CRPC. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate whether TXA 2 /TP-induced PRK activation can mimic and/or enhance AR-mediated cellular responses in the model androgen-responsive prostate adenocarcinoma LNCaP cell line. We reveal that TXA 2 /TP signalling can act as a neoplastic- and epigenetic-regulator, promoting and enhancing both AR-associated chromatin remodelling (H3Thr11 phosphorylation, WDR5 recruitment and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16) and AR-mediated transcriptional activation (e.g of the KLK3/prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2 genes) through mechanisms involving TPα/TPβ mediated-PRK1 and PRK2, but not PRK3, signalling complexes. Overall, these data demonstrate that TPα/TPβ can act as neoplastic and epigenetic regulators by mimicking and/or enhancing the actions of androgens within the prostate and provides further mechanistic insights into the role of the TXA 2 /TP signalling axis in PCa, including potentially in CRPC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene expression profiling of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma indicates fusion protein-mediated activation of the Wnt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyl, Joanna; Kidzinski, Lukasz; Hastie, Trevor; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Nusse, Roel; van de Rijn, Matt

    2018-05-01

    Low-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (LGESS) harbor chromosomal translocations that affect proteins associated with chromatin remodeling Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), including SUZ12, PHF1 and EPC1. Roughly half of LGESS also demonstrate nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, which is a hallmark of Wnt signaling activation. However, the targets affected by the fusion proteins and the role of Wnt signaling in the pathogenesis of these tumors remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a meta-analysis of three independent gene expression profiling studies on LGESS and immunohistochemical evaluation of nuclear expression of β-catenin and Lef1 in 112 uterine sarcoma specimens obtained from 20 LGESS and 89 LMS patients. Our results demonstrate that 143 out of 310 genes overexpressed in LGESS are known to be directly regulated by SUZ12. In addition, our gene expression meta-analysis shows activation of multiple genes implicated in Wnt signaling. We further emphasize the role of the Wnt signaling pathway by demonstrating concordant nuclear expression of β-catenin and Lef1 in 7/16 LGESS. Based on our findings, we suggest that LGESS-specific fusion proteins disrupt the repressive function of the PRC2 complex similar to the mechanism seen in synovial sarcoma, where the SS18-SSX fusion proteins disrupt the mSWI/SNF (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex. We propose that these fusion proteins in LGESS contribute to overexpression of Wnt ligands with subsequent activation of Wnt signaling pathway and formation of an active β-catenin/Lef1 transcriptional complex. These observations could lead to novel therapeutic approaches that focus on the Wnt pathway in LGESS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Benzheng; Ma Shumei; Yi Heqing; Kong Dejuan; Zhao Guangtong; Gao Lin; Liu Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  18. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) interacts with p400 ATPase for an efficient DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca J; Savoian, Matthew S; Weber, Lauren E; Park, Jeong Hyeon

    2016-11-04

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and TRRAP proteins belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase family and are involved in DNA damage repair and chromatin remodeling. ATM is a checkpoint kinase that is recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks where it phosphorylates a diverse range of proteins that are part of the chromatin and DNA repair machinery. As an integral subunit of the TRRAP-TIP60 complexes, p400 ATPase is a chromatin remodeler that is also targeted to DNA double-strand break sites. While it is understood that DNA binding transcriptional activators recruit p400 ATPase into a regulatory region of the promoter, how p400 recognises and moves to DNA double-strand break sites is far less clear. Here we investigate a possibility whether ATM serves as a shuttle to deliver p400 to break sites. Our data indicate that p400 co-immunoprecipitates with ATM independently of DNA damage state and that the N-terminal domain of p400 is vital for this interaction. Heterologous expression studies using Sf9 cells revealed that the ATM-p400 complex can be reconstituted without other mammalian bridging proteins. Overexpression of ATM-interacting p400 regions in U2OS cells induced dominant negative effects including the inhibition of both DNA damage repair and cell proliferation. Consistent with the dominant negative effect, the stable expression of an N-terminal p400 fragment showed a decrease in the association of p400 with ATM, but did not alter the association of p400 with TRRAP. Taken together, our findings suggest that a protein-protein interaction between ATM and p400 ATPase occurs independently of DNA damage and contributes to efficient DNA damage response and repair.

  19. Hereditary kidney cancer syndromes: Genetic disorders driven by alterations in metabolism and epigenome regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    Although hereditary kidney cancer syndrome accounts for approximately five percent of all kidney cancers, the mechanistic insight into tumor development in these rare conditions has provided the foundation for the development of molecular targeting agents currently used for sporadic kidney cancer. In the late 1980s, the comprehensive study for hereditary kidney cancer syndrome was launched in the National Cancer Institute, USA and the first kidney cancer-associated gene, VHL, was identified through kindred analysis of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome in 1993. Subsequent molecular studies on VHL function have elucidated that the VHL protein is a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which provided the basis for the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the HIF-VEGF/PDGF pathway. Recent whole-exome sequencing analysis of sporadic kidney cancer exhibited the recurrent mutations in chromatin remodeling genes and the later study has revealed that several chromatin remodeling genes are altered in kidney cancer kindred at the germline level. To date, more than 10 hereditary kidney cancer syndromes together with each responsible gene have been characterized and most of the causative genes for these genetic disorders are associated with either metabolism or epigenome regulation. In this review article, we describe the molecular mechanisms of how an alteration of each kidney cancer-associated gene leads to renal tumorigenesis as well as denote therapeutic targets elicited by studies on hereditary kidney cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Essential Roles for ARID1B in Dendritic Arborization and Spine Morphology of Developing Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Minhan; Chopra, Divyan A.; Dravid, Shashank M.

    2016-01-01

    De novo truncating mutations in ARID1B, a chromatin-remodeling gene, cause Coffin–Siris syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability and speech impairment; however, how the genetic elimination leads to cognitive dysfunction remains unknown. Thus, we investigated the neural functions of ARID1B during brain development. Here, we show that ARID1B regulates dendritic differentiation in the developing mouse brain. We knocked down ARID1B expression in mouse pyramidal neurons using in utero gene delivery methodologies. ARID1B knockdown suppressed dendritic arborization of cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons in mice. The abnormal development of dendrites accompanied a decrease in dendritic outgrowth into layer I. Furthermore, knockdown of ARID1B resulted in aberrant dendritic spines and synaptic transmission. Finally, ARID1B deficiency led to altered expression of c-Fos and Arc, and overexpression of these factors rescued abnormal differentiation induced by ARID1B knockdown. Our results demonstrate a novel role for ARID1B in neuronal differentiation and provide new insights into the origin of cognitive dysfunction associated with developmental intellectual disability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Haploinsufficiency of ARID1B, a component of chromatin remodeling complex, causes intellectual disability. However, the role of ARID1B in brain development is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ARID1B is required for neuronal differentiation in the developing brain, such as in dendritic arborization and synapse formation. Our findings suggest that ARID1B plays a critical role in the establishment of cognitive circuitry by regulating dendritic complexity. Thus, ARID1B deficiency may cause intellectual disability via abnormal brain wiring induced by the defective differentiation of cortical neurons. PMID:26937011

  1. Depression of calcium pump activity in renal cortex of vitamin D-deficient rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Saitoh, Michiyo; Takita, Yumiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Tamura, Teiichi

    1990-01-01

    To examine the hormonal regulation of the ATP-dependent Ca 2+ pump in the kidneys, the ATP-dependent Ca 2+ uptake by the basolateral membrane vesicles in the renal cortex was measured using radioactive calcium ( 45 Ca 2+ ) in rats with vitamin D deficiency or rats undergoing thyroparathyroidectomy. The V max of the Ca 2+ pump activity was increased not only by administering calcitriol, but also by normalizing the serum calcium level in vitamin D-deficient rats. PTH suppressed the Ca 2+ pump activity in normocalcemic vitamin D-deficient rats. Thyroparathyroidectomy did not affect the Ca 2+ pump activity in the kidneys of normal rats. It was concluded that the ATP-dependent Ca 2+ pump activity was depressed by secondary hyperparathyroidism in vitamin D-deficient rats. (author)

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12068-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e-11 1 ( EX440985 ) GQ04101.B7_M01 GQ041 - Shoot tip - Dormant (Norma... 82 7e-11 1 ( AF120269 ) Caenorhabditis elegans sex determ...AC0283 ) ATP-dependent helicase [imported] - Yersinia pest... 87 2e-15 CP000058_1...robable ATP-dependent RNA helicase A [imported] -... 83 3e-14 CP000462_2159( CP000462 |pid:none) Aeromonas h...ingitidis serogrou... 73 3e-11 A81960( A81960 ) probable DNA helicase NMA0430 [imported] - Neisse... 73 3e-1...keilllllhhh midemigaviemiieemievviemiieemievvvvigemiiegmikvvvvvvigmiiegm ievaiekiikemtevhhigevriliktlklhkedim

  3. Role of the import motor in insertion of transmembrane segments by the mitochondrial TIM23 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Waegemann, Karin; Mapa, Koyeli; Neupert, Walter; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2011-06-01

    The TIM23 complex mediates translocation of proteins across, and their lateral insertion into, the mitochondrial inner membrane. Translocation of proteins requires both the membrane-embedded core of the complex and its ATP-dependent import motor. Insertion of some proteins, however, occurs in the absence of ATP, questioning the need for the import motor during lateral insertion. We show here that the import motor associates with laterally inserted proteins even when its ATPase activity is not required. Furthermore, our results suggest a role for the import motor in lateral insertion. Thus, the import motor is involved in ATP-dependent translocation and ATP-independent lateral insertion.

  4. Purification and properties of the glutathione S-transferases from the anoxia-tolerant turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmore, William G; Storey, Kenneth B

    2005-07-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play critical roles in detoxification, response to oxidative stress, regeneration of S-thiolated proteins, and catalysis of reactions in nondetoxification metabolic pathways. Liver GSTs were purified from the anoxia-tolerant turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans. Purification separated a homodimeric (subunit relative molecular mass =34 kDa) and a heterodimeric (subunit relative molecular mass = 32.6 and 36.8 kDa) form of GST. The enzymes were purified 23-69-fold and 156-174-fold for homodimeric and heterodimeric GSTs, respectively. Kinetic data gathered using a variety of substrates and inhibitors suggested that both homodimeric and heterodimeric GSTs were of the alpha class although they showed significant differences in substrate affinities and responses to inhibitors. For example, homodimeric GST showed activity with known alpha class substrates, cumene hydroperoxide and p-nitrobenzylchloride, whereas heterodimeric GST showed no activity with cumene hydroperoxide. The specific activity of liver GSTs with chlorodinitrobenzene (CDNB) as the substrate was reduced by 2.6- and 8.7-fold for homodimeric and heterodimeric GSTs isolated from liver of anoxic turtles as compared with aerobic controls, suggesting an anoxia-responsive stable modification of the protein that may alter its function during natural anaerobiosis.

  5. Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Holloway, Adele; Cook, Anthony L.; Chin, Suyin P.; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin which increases skin cancer risk for exposed populations worldwide; however the underlying biomolecular mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is complex and poorly defined. Recent investigations show that histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase activity is impaired, and epigenetic patterns of gene regulation are consistently altered in cancers associated with arsenic exposure. Expression of the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is altered in solid tumours and haematological malignancies; however its role in arsenic-induced pathology is unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of arsenic on epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 and its targeting microRNA, miR-34a in primary human keratinocytes. Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) increased in keratinocytes exposed to 0.5 μM arsenite [As(III)]; and this was associated with chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a promoter. Moreover, although SIRT1 protein initially increased in these As(III)-exposed cells, after 24 days expression was not significantly different from untreated controls. Extended exposure to low-dose As(III) (0.5 μM; > 5 weeks) compromised the pattern of CpG methylation at SIRT1 and miR-34a gene promoters, and this was associated with altered expression for both genes. We have found that arsenic alters epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 expression via structural reorganisation of chromatin at the miR-34a gene promoter in the initial 24 h of exposure; and over time, through shifts in miR-34a and SIRT1 gene methylation. Taken together, this investigation demonstrates that arsenic produces cumulative disruptions to epigenetic regulation of miR-34a expression, and this is associated with impaired coordination of SIRT1 functional activity. - Highlights: • Submicromolar arsenic concentrations disrupt SIRT1 activity and expression in human keratinocytes. • Arsenic-induced chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a gene promoter is associated with hyperacetylation

  6. A de novo t(10;19)(q22.3;q13.33) leads to ZMIZ1/PRR12 reciprocal fusion transcripts in a girl with intellectual disability and neuropsychiatric alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Fletes, Carlos; Domínguez, Ma Guadalupe; Delint-Ramirez, Ilse; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia G; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María; Barros-Núñez, Patricio; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Neira, Vivian Alejandra

    2015-10-01

    We report a girl with intellectual disability (ID), neuropsychiatric alterations, and a de novo balanced t(10;19)(q22.3;q13.33) translocation. After chromosome sorting, fine mapping of breakpoints by array painting disclosed disruptions of the zinc finger, MIZ-type containing 1 (ZMIZ1) (on chr10) and proline-rich 12 (PRR12) (on chr19) genes. cDNA analyses revealed that the translocation resulted in gene fusions. The resulting hybrid transcripts predict mRNA decay or, if translated, formation of truncated proteins, both due to frameshifts that introduced premature stop codons. Though other molecular mechanisms may be operating, these results suggest that haploinsufficiency of one or both genes accounts for the patient's phenotype. ZMIZ1 is highly expressed in the brain, and its protein product appears to interact with neuron-specific chromatin remodeling complex (nBAF) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) complexes which play a role regulating the activity of genes essential for normal synapse and dendrite growth/behavior. Strikingly, the patient's phenotype overlaps with phenotypes caused by mutations in SMARCA4 (BRG1), an nBAF subunit presumably interacting with ZMIZ1 in brain cells as suggested by our results of coimmunoprecipitation in the mouse brain. PRR12 is also expressed in the brain, and its protein product possesses domains and residues thought to be related in formation of large protein complexes and chromatin remodeling. Our observation from E15 mouse brain cells that a Prr12 isoform was confined to nucleus suggests a role as a transcription nuclear cofactor likely involved in neuronal development. Moreover, a pilot transcriptome analysis from t(10;19) lymphoblastoid cell line suggests dysregulation of genes linked to neurodevelopment processes/neuronal communication (e.g., NRCAM) most likely induced by altered PRR12. This case represents the first constitutional balanced translocation disrupting and fusing both genes and provides clues for the potential

  7. Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Katharine J. [School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS 7250 (Australia); Holloway, Adele [Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7000 (Australia); Cook, Anthony L. [School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS 7250 (Australia); Chin, Suyin P. [Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7000 (Australia); Snow, Elizabeth T., E-mail: elizabeth.snow@utas.edu.au [School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS 7250 (Australia)

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin which increases skin cancer risk for exposed populations worldwide; however the underlying biomolecular mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is complex and poorly defined. Recent investigations show that histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase activity is impaired, and epigenetic patterns of gene regulation are consistently altered in cancers associated with arsenic exposure. Expression of the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is altered in solid tumours and haematological malignancies; however its role in arsenic-induced pathology is unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of arsenic on epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 and its targeting microRNA, miR-34a in primary human keratinocytes. Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) increased in keratinocytes exposed to 0.5 μM arsenite [As(III)]; and this was associated with chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a promoter. Moreover, although SIRT1 protein initially increased in these As(III)-exposed cells, after 24 days expression was not significantly different from untreated controls. Extended exposure to low-dose As(III) (0.5 μM; > 5 weeks) compromised the pattern of CpG methylation at SIRT1 and miR-34a gene promoters, and this was associated with altered expression for both genes. We have found that arsenic alters epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 expression via structural reorganisation of chromatin at the miR-34a gene promoter in the initial 24 h of exposure; and over time, through shifts in miR-34a and SIRT1 gene methylation. Taken together, this investigation demonstrates that arsenic produces cumulative disruptions to epigenetic regulation of miR-34a expression, and this is associated with impaired coordination of SIRT1 functional activity. - Highlights: • Submicromolar arsenic concentrations disrupt SIRT1 activity and expression in human keratinocytes. • Arsenic-induced chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a gene promoter is associated with hyperacetylation

  8. A unique enhancer boundary complex on the mouse ribosomal RNA genes persists after loss of Rrn3 or UBF and the inactivation of RNA polymerase I transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, Chelsea; Mars, Jean-Clement; Stefanovsky, Victor Y; Tremblay, Michel G; Sabourin-Felix, Marianne; Lindsay, Helen; Robinson, Mark D; Moss, Tom

    2017-07-01

    Transcription of the several hundred of mouse and human Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes accounts for the majority of RNA synthesis in the cell nucleus and is the determinant of cytoplasmic ribosome abundance, a key factor in regulating gene expression. The rRNA genes, referred to globally as the rDNA, are clustered as direct repeats at the Nucleolar Organiser Regions, NORs, of several chromosomes, and in many cells the active repeats are transcribed at near saturation levels. The rDNA is also a hotspot of recombination and chromosome breakage, and hence understanding its control has broad importance. Despite the need for a high level of rDNA transcription, typically only a fraction of the rDNA is transcriptionally active, and some NORs are permanently silenced by CpG methylation. Various chromatin-remodelling complexes have been implicated in counteracting silencing to maintain rDNA activity. However, the chromatin structure of the active rDNA fraction is still far from clear. Here we have combined a high-resolution ChIP-Seq protocol with conditional inactivation of key basal factors to better understand what determines active rDNA chromatin. The data resolve questions concerning the interdependence of the basal transcription factors, show that preinitiation complex formation is driven by the architectural factor UBF (UBTF) independently of transcription, and that RPI termination and release corresponds with the site of TTF1 binding. They further reveal the existence of an asymmetric Enhancer Boundary Complex formed by CTCF and Cohesin and flanked upstream by phased nucleosomes and downstream by an arrested RNA Polymerase I complex. We find that the Enhancer Boundary Complex is the only site of active histone modification in the 45kbp rDNA repeat. Strikingly, it not only delimits each functional rRNA gene, but also is stably maintained after gene inactivation and the re-establishment of surrounding repressive chromatin. Our data define a poised state of rDNA chromatin

  9. Transcription and chromatin determinants of de novo DNA methylation timing in oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahurova, Lenka; Tomizawa, Shin-Ichi; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Stewart-Morgan, Kathleen R; Saadeh, Heba; Kim, Jeesun; Andrews, Simon R; Chen, Taiping; Kelsey, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    Gametogenesis in mammals entails profound re-patterning of the epigenome. In the female germline, DNA methylation is acquired late in oogenesis from an essentially unmethylated baseline and is established largely as a consequence of transcription events. Molecular and functional studies have shown that imprinted genes become methylated at different times during oocyte growth; however, little is known about the kinetics of methylation gain genome wide and the reasons for asynchrony in methylation at imprinted loci. Given the predominant role of transcription, we sought to investigate whether transcription timing is rate limiting for de novo methylation and determines the asynchrony of methylation events. Therefore, we generated genome-wide methylation and transcriptome maps of size-selected, growing oocytes to capture the onset and progression of methylation. We find that most sequence elements, including most classes of transposable elements, acquire methylation at similar rates overall. However, methylation of CpG islands (CGIs) is delayed compared with the genome average and there are reproducible differences amongst CGIs in onset of methylation. Although more highly transcribed genes acquire methylation earlier, the major transitions in the oocyte transcriptome occur well before the de novo methylation phase, indicating that transcription is generally not rate limiting in conferring permissiveness to DNA methylation. Instead, CGI methylation timing negatively correlates with enrichment for histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation and dependence on the H3K4 demethylases KDM1A and KDM1B, implicating chromatin remodelling as a major determinant of methylation timing. We also identified differential enrichment of transcription factor binding motifs in CGIs acquiring methylation early or late in oocyte growth. By combining these parameters into multiple regression models, we were able to account for about a fifth of the variation in methylation timing of CGIs. Finally

  10. SMARCA4 inactivating mutations cause concomitant Coffin–Siris syndrome, microphthalmia and small‐cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Noor; Vetro, Annalisa; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; de Jonge, Hugo; Rinaldi, Berardo; Vergani, Debora; Giglio, Sabrina Rita; Morbini, Patrizia; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract SMARCA4 chromatin remodelling factor is mutated in 11% of Coffin–Siris syndrome (CSS) patients and in almost all small‐cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type (SCCOHT) tumours. Missense mutations with gain‐of‐function or dominant‐negative effects are associated with CSS, whereas inactivating mutations, leading to loss of SMARCA4 expression, have been exclusively found in SCCOHT. We applied whole‐exome sequencing to study a 15‐year‐old patient with mild CSS who concomitantly developed SCCOHT at age 13 years. Interestingly, our patient also showed congenital microphthalmia, which has never previously been reported in CSS patients. We detected a de novo germline heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 19 of SMARCA4 (c.2935C > T;p.Arg979*), and a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 6 (c.1236_1236delC;p.Gln413Argfs*88), causing complete loss of SMARCA4 immunostaining in the tumour. The immunohistochemical findings are supported by the observation that the c.2935C > T mutant transcript was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction at a much lower level than the wild‐type allele in whole blood and the lymphoblastoid cell line of the proband, confirming nonsense‐mediated mRNA decay. Accordingly, immunoblotting demonstrated that there was approximately half the amount of SMARCA4 protein in the proband's cells as in controls. This study suggests that SMARCA4 constitutional mutations associated with CSS are not necessarily non‐truncating, and that haploinsufficiency may explain milder CSS phenotypes, as previously reported for haploinsufficient ARID1B. In addition, our case supports the dual role of chromatin remodellers in developmental disorders and cancer, as well as the involvement of SMARCA4 in microphthalmia, confirming previous findings in mouse models and the DECIPHER database. Finally, we speculate that mild CSS might be under‐recognized in a proportion of SCCOHT patients harbouring SMARCA4 mutations

  11. SMARCA4 inactivating mutations cause concomitant Coffin-Siris syndrome, microphthalmia and small-cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichiello, Edoardo; Mustafa, Noor; Vetro, Annalisa; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; de Jonge, Hugo; Rinaldi, Berardo; Vergani, Debora; Giglio, Sabrina Rita; Morbini, Patrizia; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2017-09-01

    SMARCA4 chromatin remodelling factor is mutated in 11% of Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) patients and in almost all small-cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type (SCCOHT) tumours. Missense mutations with gain-of-function or dominant-negative effects are associated with CSS, whereas inactivating mutations, leading to loss of SMARCA4 expression, have been exclusively found in SCCOHT. We applied whole-exome sequencing to study a 15-year-old patient with mild CSS who concomitantly developed SCCOHT at age 13 years. Interestingly, our patient also showed congenital microphthalmia, which has never previously been reported in CSS patients. We detected a de novo germline heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 19 of SMARCA4 (c.2935C > T;p.Arg979*), and a somatic frameshift mutation in exon 6 (c.1236_1236delC;p.Gln413Argfs*88), causing complete loss of SMARCA4 immunostaining in the tumour. The immunohistochemical findings are supported by the observation that the c.2935C > T mutant transcript was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction at a much lower level than the wild-type allele in whole blood and the lymphoblastoid cell line of the proband, confirming nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Accordingly, immunoblotting demonstrated that there was approximately half the amount of SMARCA4 protein in the proband's cells as in controls. This study suggests that SMARCA4 constitutional mutations associated with CSS are not necessarily non-truncating, and that haploinsufficiency may explain milder CSS phenotypes, as previously reported for haploinsufficient ARID1B. In addition, our case supports the dual role of chromatin remodellers in developmental disorders and cancer, as well as the involvement of SMARCA4 in microphthalmia, confirming previous findings in mouse models and the DECIPHER database. Finally, we speculate that mild CSS might be under-recognized in a proportion of SCCOHT patients harbouring SMARCA4 mutations. © 2017 The Authors. The

  12. A unique enhancer boundary complex on the mouse ribosomal RNA genes persists after loss of Rrn3 or UBF and the inactivation of RNA polymerase I transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Herdman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcription of the several hundred of mouse and human Ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes accounts for the majority of RNA synthesis in the cell nucleus and is the determinant of cytoplasmic ribosome abundance, a key factor in regulating gene expression. The rRNA genes, referred to globally as the rDNA, are clustered as direct repeats at the Nucleolar Organiser Regions, NORs, of several chromosomes, and in many cells the active repeats are transcribed at near saturation levels. The rDNA is also a hotspot of recombination and chromosome breakage, and hence understanding its control has broad importance. Despite the need for a high level of rDNA transcription, typically only a fraction of the rDNA is transcriptionally active, and some NORs are permanently silenced by CpG methylation. Various chromatin-remodelling complexes have been implicated in counteracting silencing to maintain rDNA activity. However, the chromatin structure of the active rDNA fraction is still far from clear. Here we have combined a high-resolution ChIP-Seq protocol with conditional inactivation of key basal factors to better understand what determines active rDNA chromatin. The data resolve questions concerning the interdependence of the basal transcription factors, show that preinitiation complex formation is driven by the architectural factor UBF (UBTF independently of transcription, and that RPI termination and release corresponds with the site of TTF1 binding. They further reveal the existence of an asymmetric Enhancer Boundary Complex formed by CTCF and Cohesin and flanked upstream by phased nucleosomes and downstream by an arrested RNA Polymerase I complex. We find that the Enhancer Boundary Complex is the only site of active histone modification in the 45kbp rDNA repeat. Strikingly, it not only delimits each functional rRNA gene, but also is stably maintained after gene inactivation and the re-establishment of surrounding repressive chromatin. Our data define a poised state

  13. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...

  14. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, M.; de Vries, E. G.; Jansen, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells. Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  15. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M; deVries, EGE; Jansen, PLM

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells, Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  16. Search for the ouabain-binding site of Na,K-ATPase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, L.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane protein found in almost all plasma membranes of higher eukaryotic cells. It maintains the electrochemical gradients present across the plasma membrane of the cells by catalyzing ATP-dependent transport of sodium and potassium ions. This enzyme is composed of two

  17. Role of enzymes of homologous recombination in illegitimate plasmid recombination in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meima, R; Haijema, BJ; Haan, GJ; Venema, G; Bron, S

    The structural stability of plasmid pGP1, which encodes a fusion between the penicillinase gene (penP) of Bacillus licheniformis and the Escherichia coli lacZ gene, was investigated in Bacillus subtilis strains expressing mutated subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease, AddAB, and strains lacking the

  18. Inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin discriminate endoplasmic reticulum stores of calcium in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, A; Hirsch, D J; Hanley, M R

    1990-01-01

    ATP dependent Ca2+ accumulation into oxalate-loaded rat brain microsomes is potently inhibited by thapsigargin with an IC50 of 2 nM and maximal inhibition at 10 nM. Approximately 15% of the total A23187-releasable microsomal calcium store is insensitive to thapsigargin concentrations up to 100 mi...

  19. A novel bile acid biosynthesis defect due to a deficiency of peroxisomal ABCD3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Koster, Janet; Denis, Simone; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Moser, Ann B.; Visser, Wouter F.; Gulluoglu, Mine; Durmaz, Ozlem; Demirkol, Mubeccel; Waterham, Hans R.; Gökcay, Gülden; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Valle, David

    2015-01-01

    ABCD3 is one of three ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters present in the peroxisomal membrane catalyzing ATP-dependent transport of substrates for metabolic pathways localized in peroxisomes. So far, the precise function of ABCD3 is not known. Here, we report the identification of the first

  20. Dicty_cDB: CHQ519 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available otein, complete cds. 56 0.002 1 AY398693 |AY398693.1 Enterococcus mundtii strain CRL35 enterocin... CRL35 (munA), enterocin CRL 35 ATP-dependent transporter (mun B), and enterocin CRL 35 immun

  1. ADP-dependent Phosphofructokinases in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Methanogenic Archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, C.H.; Tuininga, J.E.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway in all domains of life. Two related PFKs, ATP-dependent and PPi-dependent PFK, have been distinguished in bacteria and eucarya, as well as in some archaea. Hyperthermophilic archaea of the order Thermococcales, including Pyrococcus

  2. Identification of novel open reading frames from metagenomic libraries generated from extremophilic organisms: application of metagenomics and high throughput screening for novel enzyme isolation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, Daniel F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available : Olive Oil / Rhodamine B Tributyrin Fluorescence under UV Secondary Screening Colorimet- ric - PNP-ester substrates (C2, C4, C18); Substrate, Temperature and pH Profiling 16S ribosomal RNA gene (DNA level) Amidase ATP-dependant protease Beta...

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    What history tells us XX. Felix Haurowitz (1896–1987) – A difficult journey in the political and scientific upheavals of the 20th century · Michel Morange · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 21-25 Brief communication. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant -glutamyl cycle enzymes, -glutamyl cysteine synthetase and ...

  4. Promotion of mitochondrial membrane complex assembly by a proteolytically inactive yeast Lon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M; van Dijl, J M; Suda, K; Schatz, G; Grivell, L A; Suzuki, C K

    1996-01-01

    Afg3p and Rca1p are adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent metalloproteases in yeast mitochondria. Cells lacking both proteins exhibit defects in respiration-dependent growth, degradation of mitochondrially synthesized proteins, and assembly of inner-membrane complexes. Defects in growth and protein

  5. The ATPase and protease domains of yeast mitochondrial Lon : Roles in proteolysis and respiration-dependent growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijl, JM; Kutejova, E; Suda, K; Perecko, D; Schatz, G; Suzuki, CK

    1998-01-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria is required for selective proteolysis in the matrix, maintenance of mitochondrial DNA, and respiration-dependent growth. Lon may also possess a chaperone-like function that facilitates protein degradation and protein-complex

  6. Expression, purification and characterization of the human MTA2-RBBP7 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Christoffer; Dorosz, Jerzy; Wiuf, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The repressive Nucleosome Remodeling and histone Deacetylation (NuRD) complex remodels the chromatin structure by coupling ATP-dependent remodeling activity with histone deacetylase function and plays important roles in regulating gene transcription, DNA damage repair and chromatin assembly. The ...

  7. Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of Novel PET Probes for P-Glycoprotein Function and Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K.; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Berardi, Francesco; de Jong, Johan R.; Kwizera, Chantal; Perrone, Roberto; Cantore, Mariangela; Sijbesma, Jurgen W. A.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Colabufo, Nicola A.

    2009-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-dependent efflux pump protecting the body against xenobiotics. A P-gp substrate (7) and an inhibitor (6) were labeled with (11)C, resulting in potential tracers of P-gp function and expression. Methods: 6 and 7 were labeled using (11)CH(3)I. (11)C-verapamil was

  8. Mutations to a glycine loop in the catalytic site of human Lon changes its protease, peptidase and ATPase activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambro, L.; Pevala, V.; Ondrovičová, G.; Bellová, J.; Kunová, N.; Kutejová, Eva; Bauer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 7 (2014), s. 1784-1797 ISSN 1742-464X Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ATP-dependent protease * glycine loop * human Lon protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.001, year: 2014

  9. Arabidopsis RecQsim, a plant-specific member of the RecQ helicase family, can suppress the MMS hypersensitivity of the yeast sgs1 mutant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagherieh-Najjar, MB; de Vries, OMH; Kroon, JTM; Wright, EL; Elborough, KM; Hille, J; Dijkwel, PP

    The Arabidopsis genome contains seven genes that belong to the RecQ family of ATP-dependent DNA helicases. RecQ members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SGS1) and man (WRN, BLM and RecQL4) are involved in DNA recombination, repair and genome stability maintenance, but little is known about the function

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100988 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100988 J023145H17 At1g63440.1 copper-exporting ATPase, putative / responsive-to-a...ntagonist 1, putative / copper-transporting ATPase, putative similar to ATP dependent copper transporter SP|Q9S7J8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063759 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063759 001-121-A10 At1g63440.1 copper-exporting ATPase, putative / responsive-to-...antagonist 1, putative / copper-transporting ATPase, putative similar to ATP dependent copper transporter SP|Q9S7J8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK072990 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072990 J023144D18 At1g63440.1 copper-exporting ATPase, putative / responsive-to-a...ntagonist 1, putative / copper-transporting ATPase, putative similar to ATP dependent copper transporter SP|Q9S7J8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  13. Conversion of DNA gyrase into a conventional type II topoisomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1996-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among topoisomerases in its ability to introduce negative supercoils into closed-circular DNA. We have demonstrated that deletion of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the A subunit of gyrase gives rise to an enzyme that cannot supercoil DNA but relaxes DNA in an ATP-depend...

  14. UniProt search blastx result: AK318569 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK318569 J080307D05 B0TZA5|CLPP_FRAP2 ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit OS=Francisella philo...miragia subsp. philomiragia (strain ATCC 25017) GN=clpP PE=3 SV=1 6.00E-34 ...

  15. TUG1: a pivotal oncogenic long non-coding RNA of human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a group greater than 200 nucleotides in length. An increasing number of studies has shown that lncRNAs play important roles in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, invasion and chromatin remodelling. In this regard, deregulation of lncRNAs has been documented in human cancers. TUG1 is a recently identified oncogenic lncRNA whose aberrant upregulation has been detected in different types of cancer, including B-cell malignancies, oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, bladder cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma and osteosarcoma. In these malignancies, knock-down of TUG1 has been shown to suppress cell proliferation, invasion and/or colony formation. Interestingly, TUG1 has been found to be downregulated in non-small cell lung carcinoma, indicative of its tissue-specific function in tumourigenesis. Pertinent to clinical practice, TUG1 may act as a prognostic biomarker for tumours. In this review, we summarize current knowledge concerning the role of TUG1 in tumour progression and discuss mechanisms associated with it. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. miRNA778 and SUVH6 are involved in phosphate homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; ZengJ, Hou Qing; Song, Jun; Feng, Sheng Jun; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-09-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in plant adaptation to phosphate (Pi) starvation. Histone methylation can remodel chromatin structure and mediate gene expression. This study identified Arabidopsis miR778, a Pi-responsive miRNA, and its target gene Su(var) 3-9 homologs 6 (SUVH6) encoding a histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase. Overexpression of miR778 moderately enhanced primary and lateral root growth, free phosphate accumulation in shoots, and accumulation of anthocyanin under Pi deficient conditions. miR778 overexpression relieved the arrest of columella cell development under Pi starvation. Conversely, transgenic plants overexpressing a miR778-target mimic (35S::MIM778), that act as a sponge and sequesters miR778, showed opposite phenotypes of 35S::miR778 plants under Pi deficiency. Expression of several Pi deficiency-responsive genes such as miR399, Phosphate Transporter (PHT1;4), Low Phosphate-Resistant1 (LPR1) and Production of Anthocyanin Pigment 1 (PAP1) were elevated in the miR778 overexpressing plants, suggesting that both miR778 and SUVH6 are involved in phosphate homeostasis in plants. This study has provided a basis for further investigation on how SUVH6 regulates its downstream genes through chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation in plants stressed by Pi deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using 16O /18O labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xin; Tian, Changhai; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yongxiang; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Sharma, Seema; Yu, Fang; Fu, Kai; Zheng, Jialin; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2012-04-06

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) hold great promise for regenerative medicine as well as for investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases. Understanding of key intracellular signaling pathways and protein targets that control development of iPSC from somatic cells is essential for designing new approaches to improve reprogramming efficiency. Here we report the development and application of an integrated quantitative proteomics platform for investigating differences in protein expressions between mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and MEF-derived iPSC. This platform consists of 16O/18O labeling, multidimensional peptide separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, and data analysis with UNiquant software. Using this platform a total of 2,481 proteins were identified and quantified from the 16O/18O-labeled MEF-iPSC proteome mixtures with a false discovery rate of 0.01. Among them, 218 proteins were significantly upregulated, while 247 proteins were significantly downregulated in iPSC compared to MEF. Many nuclear proteins, including Hdac1, Dnmt1, Pcna, Ccnd1, Smarcc1, and subunits in DNA replication and RNA polymerase II complex were found to be enhanced in iPSC. Protein network analysis revealed that Pcna functions as a hub orchestrating complicated mechanisms including DNA replication, epigenetic inheritance (Dnmt1) and chromatin remodeling (Smarcc1) to reprogram MEF and maintain stemness of iPSC.

  18. Regulatory functions and pathological relevance of the MECP2 3′UTR in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather McGowan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2, encoded by the gene MECP2, is a transcriptional regulator and chromatin-remodeling protein, which is ubiquitously expressed and plays an essential role in the development and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS. Highly enriched in post-migratory neurons, MeCP2 is needed for neuronal maturation, including dendritic arborization and the development of synapses. Loss-of-function mutations in MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT, a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a phase of normal development, followed by the progressive loss of milestones and cognitive disability. While a great deal has been discovered about the structure, function, and regulation of MeCP2 in the time since its discovery as the genetic cause of RTT, including its involvement in a number of RTT-related syndromes that have come to be known as MeCP2-spectrum disorders, much about this multifunctional protein remains enigmatic. One unequivocal fact that has become apparent is the importance of maintaining MeCP2 protein levels within a narrow range, the limits of which may depend upon the cell type and developmental time point. As such, MeCP2 is amenable to complex, multifactorial regulation. Here, we summarize the role of the MECP2 3' untranslated region (UTR in the regulation of MeCP2 protein levels and how mutations in this region contribute to autism and other non-RTT neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. The DNA-encoded nucleosome organization of a eukaryotic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Noam; Moore, Irene K; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Gossett, Andrea J; Tillo, Desiree; Field, Yair; LeProust, Emily M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lieb, Jason D; Widom, Jonathan; Segal, Eran

    2009-03-19

    Nucleosome organization is critical for gene regulation. In living cells this organization is determined by multiple factors, including the action of chromatin remodellers, competition with site-specific DNA-binding proteins, and the DNA sequence preferences of the nucleosomes themselves. However, it has been difficult to estimate the relative importance of each of these mechanisms in vivo, because in vivo nucleosome maps reflect the combined action of all influencing factors. Here we determine the importance of nucleosome DNA sequence preferences experimentally by measuring the genome-wide occupancy of nucleosomes assembled on purified yeast genomic DNA. The resulting map, in which nucleosome occupancy is governed only by the intrinsic sequence preferences of nucleosomes, is similar to in vivo nucleosome maps generated in three different growth conditions. In vitro, nucleosome depletion is evident at many transcription factor binding sites and around gene start and end sites, indicating that nucleosome depletion at these sites in vivo is partly encoded in the genome. We confirm these results with a micrococcal nuclease-independent experiment that measures the relative affinity of nucleosomes for approximately 40,000 double-stranded 150-base-pair oligonucleotides. Using our in vitro data, we devise a computational model of nucleosome sequence preferences that is significantly correlated with in vivo nucleosome occupancy in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results indicate that the intrinsic DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes have a central role in determining the organization of nucleosomes in vivo.

  20. Reduced seed germination in Arabidopsis over-expressing SWI/SNF2 ATPase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeggangers, Hendrika A C F; Folta, Adam; Muras, Aleksandra; Nap, Jan-Peter; Mlynarova, Ludmila

    2015-02-01

    In the life of flowering plants, seed germination is a critical step to ensure survival into the next generation. Generally the seed prior to germination has been in a dormant state with a low rate of metabolism. In the transition from a dormant seed to a germinating seed, various epigenetic mechanisms play a regulatory role. Here, we demonstrate that the over-expression of chromatin remodeling ATPase genes (AtCHR12 or AtCHR23) reduced the frequency of seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana up to 30% relative to the wild-type seeds. On the other hand, single loss-of-function mutations of the two genes did not affect seed germination. The reduction of germination in over-expressing mutants was more pronounced in stress conditions (salt or high temperature), showing the impact of the environment. Reduced germinations upon over-expression coincided with increased transcript levels of seed maturation genes and with reduced degradation of their mRNAs stored in dry seeds. Our results indicate that repression of AtCHR12/23 gene expression in germinating wild-type Arabidopsis seeds is required for full germination. This establishes a functional link between chromatin modifiers and regulatory networks towards seed maturation and germination. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  1. Genome-wide identification of physically clustered genes suggests chromatin-level co-regulation in male reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimegård, Johan; Kundu, Snehangshu; Pendle, Ali; Irish, Vivian F; Shaw, Peter; Nakayama, Naomi; Sundström, Jens F; Emanuelsson, Olof

    2017-04-07

    Co-expression of physically linked genes occurs surprisingly frequently in eukaryotes. Such chromosomal clustering may confer a selective advantage as it enables coordinated gene regulation at the chromatin level. We studied the chromosomal organization of genes involved in male reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana. We developed an in-silico tool to identify physical clusters of co-regulated genes from gene expression data. We identified 17 clusters (96 genes) involved in stamen development and acting downstream of the transcriptional activator MS1 (MALE STERILITY 1), which contains a PHD domain associated with chromatin re-organization. The clusters exhibited little gene homology or promoter element similarity, and largely overlapped with reported repressive histone marks. Experiments on a subset of the clusters suggested a link between expression activation and chromatin conformation: qRT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization showed that the clustered genes were up-regulated within 48 h after MS1 induction; out of 14 chromatin-remodeling mutants studied, expression of clustered genes was consistently down-regulated only in hta9/hta11, previously associated with metabolic cluster activation; DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that transcriptional activation of the clustered genes was correlated with open chromatin conformation. Stamen development thus appears to involve transcriptional activation of physically clustered genes through chromatin de-condensation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Routes to DNA accessibility: alternative pathways for nucleosome unwinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlingman, Daniel J; Mack, Andrew H; Kamenetska, Masha; Mochrie, Simon G J; Regan, Lynne

    2014-07-15

    The dynamic packaging of DNA into chromatin is a key determinant of eukaryotic gene regulation and epigenetic inheritance. Nucleosomes are the basic unit of chromatin, and therefore the accessible states of the nucleosome must be the starting point for mechanistic models regarding these essential processes. Although the existence of different unwound nucleosome states has been hypothesized, there have been few studies of these states. The consequences of multiple states are far reaching. These states will behave differently in all aspects, including their interactions with chromatin remodelers, histone variant exchange, and kinetic properties. Here, we demonstrate the existence of two distinct states of the unwound nucleosome, which are accessible at physiological forces and ionic strengths. Using optical tweezers, we measure the rates of unwinding and rewinding for these two states and show that the rewinding rates from each state are different. In addition, we show that the probability of unwinding into each state is dependent on the applied force and ionic strength. Our results demonstrate not only that multiple unwound states exist but that their accessibility can be differentially perturbed, suggesting possible roles for these states in gene regulation. For example, different histone variants or modifications may facilitate or suppress access to DNA by promoting unwinding into one state or the other. We anticipate that the two unwound states reported here will be the basis for future models of eukaryotic transcriptional control. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epigenetic regulation in Autism spectrum disorder

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    Sraboni Chaudhury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an impaired social communication skill and often results in repetitive, stereotyped behavior which is observed in children during the first few years of life. Other characteristic of this disorder includes language disabilities, difficulties in sensory integration, lack of reciprocal interactions and in some cases, cognitive delays. One percentage of the general population is affected by ASD and is four times more common in boys than girls. There are hundreds of genes, which has been identified to be associated with ASD etiology. However it remains difficult to comprehend our understanding in defining the genetic architecture necessary for complete exposition of its pathophysiology. Seeing the complexity of the disease, it is important to adopt a multidisciplinary approach which should not only focus on the “genetics” of autism but also on epigenetics, transcriptomics, immune system disruption and environmental factors that could all impact the pathogenesis of the disease. As environmental factors also play a key role in regulating the trigger of ASD, the role of chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation has started to emerge. Such epigenetic modifications directly link molecular regulatory pathways and environmental factors, which might be able to explain some aspects of complex disorders like ASD. The present review will focus on the role of epigenetic regulation in defining the underlying cause for ASD

  4. SNF5 is an essential executor of epigenetic regulation during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jueng Soo; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Dai, Chao; Liu, Minmin; Pandiyan, Kurinji; Zhou, Xianghong J; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Nucleosome occupancy controls the accessibility of the transcription machinery to DNA regulatory regions and serves an instructive role for gene expression. Chromatin remodelers, such as the BAF complexes, are responsible for establishing nucleosome occupancy patterns, which are key to epigenetic regulation along with DNA methylation and histone modifications. Some reports have assessed the roles of the BAF complex subunits and stemness in murine embryonic stem cells. However, the details of the relationships between remodelers and transcription factors in altering chromatin configuration, which ultimately affects gene expression during cell differentiation, remain unclear. Here for the first time we demonstrate that SNF5, a core subunit of the BAF complex, negatively regulates OCT4 levels in pluripotent cells and is essential for cell survival during differentiation. SNF5 is responsible for generating nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) at the regulatory sites of OCT4 repressed target genes such as PAX6 and NEUROG1, which are crucial for cell fate determination. Concurrently, SNF5 closes the NDRs at the regulatory regions of OCT4-activated target genes such as OCT4 itself and NANOG. Furthermore, using loss- and gain-of-function experiments followed by extensive genome-wide analyses including gene expression microarrays and ChIP-sequencing, we highlight that SNF5 plays dual roles during differentiation by antagonizing the expression of genes that were either activated or repressed by OCT4, respectively. Together, we demonstrate that SNF5 executes the switch between pluripotency and differentiation.

  5. SNF5 is an essential executor of epigenetic regulation during differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jueng Soo You

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosome occupancy controls the accessibility of the transcription machinery to DNA regulatory regions and serves an instructive role for gene expression. Chromatin remodelers, such as the BAF complexes, are responsible for establishing nucleosome occupancy patterns, which are key to epigenetic regulation along with DNA methylation and histone modifications. Some reports have assessed the roles of the BAF complex subunits and stemness in murine embryonic stem cells. However, the details of the relationships between remodelers and transcription factors in altering chromatin configuration, which ultimately affects gene expression during cell differentiation, remain unclear. Here for the first time we demonstrate that SNF5, a core subunit of the BAF complex, negatively regulates OCT4 levels in pluripotent cells and is essential for cell survival during differentiation. SNF5 is responsible for generating nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs at the regulatory sites of OCT4 repressed target genes such as PAX6 and NEUROG1, which are crucial for cell fate determination. Concurrently, SNF5 closes the NDRs at the regulatory regions of OCT4-activated target genes such as OCT4 itself and NANOG. Furthermore, using loss- and gain-of-function experiments followed by extensive genome-wide analyses including gene expression microarrays and ChIP-sequencing, we highlight that SNF5 plays dual roles during differentiation by antagonizing the expression of genes that were either activated or repressed by OCT4, respectively. Together, we demonstrate that SNF5 executes the switch between pluripotency and differentiation.

  6. CHR729 Is a CHD3 Protein That Controls Seedling Development in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoding; Ma, Jian; Zhai, Honghong; Xin, Peiyong; Chu, Jinfang; Qiao, Yongli; Han, Longzhi

    2015-01-01

    CHD3 is one of the chromatin-remodeling factors that contribute to controlling the expression of genes associated with plant development. Loss-of-function mutants display morphological and growth defects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying CHD3 regulation of plant development remain unclear. In this study, a rice CHD3 protein, CHR729, was identified. The corresponding mutant line (t483) exhibited late seed germination, low germination rate, dwarfism, low tiller number, root growth inhibition, adaxial albino leaves, and short and narrow leaves. CHR729 encoded a nuclear protein and was expressed in almost all organs. RNA-sequencing analysis showed that several plant hormone-related genes were up- or down-regulated in t483 compared to wild type. In particular, expression of the gibberellin synthetase gibberellin 20 oxidase 4 gene was elevated in the mutant. Endogenous gibberellin assays demonstrated that the content of bioactive GA3 was reduced in t483 compared to wild type. Moreover, the seedling dwarfism, late seed germination, and short root length phenotypes of t483 were partially rescued by treatment with exogenous GA3. These results suggest that the rice CHD3 protein CHR729 plays an important role in many aspects of seedling development and controls this development via the gibberellin pathway.

  7. A Novel Gibberellin-Induced Gene from Rice and Its Potential Regulatory Role in Stem Growth1

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Esther; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Kende, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Os-GRF1 (Oryza sativa-GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR1) was identified in a search for genes that are differentially expressed in the intercalary meristem of deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) internodes in response to gibberellin (GA). Os-GRF1 displays general features of transcription factors, contains a functional nuclear localization signal, and has three regions with similarities to sequences in the database. One of these regions is similar to a protein interaction domain of SWI2/SNF2, which is a subunit of a chromatin-remodeling complex in yeast. The two other domains are novel and found only in plant proteins of unknown function. To study its role in plant growth, Os-GRF1 was expressed in Arabidopsis. Stem elongation of transformed plants was severely inhibited, and normal growth could not be recovered by the application of GA. Our results indicate that Os-GRF1 belongs to a novel class of plant proteins and may play a regulatory role in GA-induced stem elongation. PMID:10712532

  8. Snf2 family gene distribution in higher plant genomes reveals DRD1 expansion and diversification in the tomato genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargsten, Joachim W; Folta, Adam; Mlynárová, Ludmila; Nap, Jan-Peter

    2013-01-01

    As part of large protein complexes, Snf2 family ATPases are responsible for energy supply during chromatin remodeling, but the precise mechanism of action of many of these proteins is largely unknown. They influence many processes in plants, such as the response to environmental stress. This analysis is the first comprehensive study of Snf2 family ATPases in plants. We here present a comparative analysis of 1159 candidate plant Snf2 genes in 33 complete and annotated plant genomes, including two green algae. The number of Snf2 ATPases shows considerable variation across plant genomes (17-63 genes). The DRD1, Rad5/16 and Snf2 subfamily members occur most often. Detailed analysis of the plant-specific DRD1 subfamily in related plant genomes shows the occurrence of a complex series of evolutionary events. Notably tomato carries unexpected gene expansions of DRD1 gene members. Most of these genes are expressed in tomato, although at low levels and with distinct tissue or organ specificity. In contrast, the Snf2 subfamily genes tend to be expressed constitutively in tomato. The results underpin and extend the Snf2 subfamily classification, which could help to determine the various functional roles of Snf2 ATPases and to target environmental stress tolerance and yield in future breeding.

  9. Insulator protein Su(Hw) recruits SAGA and Brahma complexes and constitutes part of Origin Recognition Complex-binding sites in the Drosophila genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyeva, Nadezhda E.; Mazina, Marina U.; Golovnin, Anton K.; Kopytova, Daria V.; Gurskiy, Dmitriy Y.; Nabirochkina, Elena N.; Georgieva, Sofia G.; Georgiev, Pavel G.; Krasnov, Aleksey N.

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasing data on the properties of replication origins, molecular mechanisms underlying origin recognition complex (ORC) positioning in the genome are still poorly understood. The Su(Hw) protein accounts for the activity of best-studied Drosophila insulators. Here, we show that Su(Hw) recruits the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA and chromatin remodeler Brahma to Su(Hw)-dependent insulators, which gives rise to regions with low nucleosome density and creates conditions for ORC binding. Depletion in Su(Hw) leads to a dramatic drop in the levels of SAGA, Brahma and ORC subunits and a significant increase in nucleosome density on Su(Hw)-dependent insulators, whereas artificial Su(Hw) recruitment itself is sufficient for subsequent SAGA, Brahma and ORC binding. In contrast to the majority of replication origins that associate with promoters of active genes, Su(Hw)-binding sites constitute a small proportion (6%) of ORC-binding sites that are localized preferentially in transcriptionally inactive chromatin regions termed BLACK and BLUE chromatin. We suggest that the key determinants of ORC positioning in the genome are DNA-binding proteins that constitute different DNA regulatory elements, including insulators, promoters and enhancers. Su(Hw) is the first example of such a protein. PMID:23609538

  10. Rapid and reversible epigenome editing by endogenous chromatin regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Simon M G; Kirkland, Jacob G; Chory, Emma J; Husmann, Dylan; Calarco, Joseph P; Crabtree, Gerald R

    2017-09-15

    Understanding the causal link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation remains a central question in chromatin biology. To edit the epigenome we developed the FIRE-Cas9 system for rapid and reversible recruitment of endogenous chromatin regulators to specific genomic loci. We enhanced the dCas9-MS2 anchor for genome targeting with Fkbp/Frb dimerizing fusion proteins to allow chemical-induced proximity of a desired chromatin regulator. We find that mSWI/SNF (BAF) complex recruitment is sufficient to oppose Polycomb within minutes, leading to activation of bivalent gene transcription in mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, Hp1/Suv39h1 heterochromatin complex recruitment to active promoters deposits H3K9me3 domains, resulting in gene silencing that can be reversed upon washout of the chemical dimerizer. This inducible recruitment strategy provides precise kinetic information to model epigenetic memory and plasticity. It is broadly applicable to mechanistic studies of chromatin in mammalian cells and is particularly suited to the analysis of endogenous multi-subunit chromatin regulator complexes.Understanding the link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation requires the development of new tools to directly manipulate chromatin. Here the authors demonstrate a Cas9-based system to recruit chromatin remodelers to loci of interest, allowing rapid, reversible manipulation of epigenetic states.

  11. Microbial communication leading to the activation of silent fungal secondary metabolite gene clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eNetzker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms form diverse multispecies communities in various ecosystems. The high abundance of fungal and bacterial species in these consortia results in specific communication between the microorganisms. A key role in this communication is played by secondary metabolites (SMs, which are also called natural products. Recently, it was shown that interspecies ‘talk’ between microorganisms represents a physiological trigger to activate silent gene clusters leading to the formation of novel SMs by the involved species. This review focuses on mixed microbial cultivation, mainly between bacteria and fungi, with a special emphasis on the induced formation of fungal SMs in co-cultures. In addition, the role of chromatin remodeling in the induction is examined, and methodical perspectives for the analysis of natural products are presented. As an example for an intermicrobial interaction elucidated at the molecular level, we discuss the specific interaction between the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus with the soil bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus, which provides an excellent model system to enlighten molecular concepts behind regulatory mechanisms and will pave the way to a novel avenue of drug discovery through targeted activation of silent SM gene clusters through co-cultivations of microorganisms.

  12. Transcriptomic profiling of the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens in rhesus macaques following long-term cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallender, Eric J; Goswami, Dharmendra B; Shinday, Nina M; Westmoreland, Susan V; Yao, Wei-Dong; Rowlett, James K

    2017-06-01

    The behavioral consequences associated with addiction are thought to arise from drug-induced neuroadaptation. The mesolimbic system plays an important initial role in this process, and while the dopaminergic system specifically has been strongly interrogated, a complete understanding of the broad transcriptomic effects associated with cocaine use remains elusive. Using next generation sequencing approaches, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of gene expression differences in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens of rhesus macaques that had self-administered cocaine for roughly 100days and saline-yoked controls. During self-administration, the monkeys increased daily consumption of cocaine until almost the maximum number of injections were taken within the first 15min of the one hour session for a total intake of 3mg/kg/day. We confirm the centrality of dopaminergic differences in the ventral tegmental area, but in the nucleus accumbens we see the strongest evidence for an inflammatory response and large scale chromatin remodeling. These findings suggest an expanded understanding of the pathology of cocaine addiction with the potential to lead to the development of alternative treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Solar Simulated Ultraviolet Radiation Induces Global Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Kluz, Thomas; Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Costa, Max; Sun, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight is the primary effector of skin DNA damage. Chromatin remodeling and histone post-translational modification (PTM) are critical factors in repairing DNA damage and maintaining genomic integrity, however, the dynamic changes of histone marks in response to solar UVR are not well characterized. Here we report global changes in histone PTMs induced by solar simulated UVR (ssUVR). A decrease in lysine acetylation of histones H3 and H4, particularly at positions of H3 lysine 9, lysine 56, H4 lysine 5, and lysine 16, was found in human keratinocytes exposed to ssUVR. These acetylation changes were highly associated with ssUVR in a dose-dependent and time-specific manner. Interestingly, H4K16ac, a mark that is crucial for higher order chromatin structure, exhibited a persistent reduction by ssUVR that was transmitted through multiple cell divisions. In addition, the enzymatic activities of histone acetyltransferases were significantly reduced in irradiated cells, which may account for decreased global acetylation. Moreover, depletion of histone deacetylase SIRT1 in keratinocytes rescued ssUVR-induced H4K16 hypoacetylation. These results indicate that ssUVR affects both HDAC and HAT activities, leading to reduced histone acetylation.

  14. The protease degrading sperm histones post-fertilization in sea urchin eggs is a nuclear cathepsin L that is further required for embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Morin

    Full Text Available Proteolysis of sperm histones in the sea urchin male pronucleus is the consequence of the activation at fertilization of a maternal cysteine protease. We previously showed that this protein is required for male chromatin remodelling and for cell-cycle progression in the newly formed embryos. This enzyme is present in the nucleus of unfertilized eggs and is rapidly recruited to the male pronucleus after insemination. Interestingly, this cysteine-protease remains co-localized with chromatin during S phase of the first cell cycle, migrates to the mitotic spindle in M-phase and is re-located to the nuclei of daughter cells after cytokinesis. Here we identified the protease encoding cDNA and found a high sequence identity to cathepsin proteases of various organisms. A phylogenetical analysis clearly demonstrates that this sperm histone protease (SpHp belongs to the cathepsin L sub-type. After an initial phase of ubiquitous expression throughout cleavage stages, SpHp gene transcripts become restricted to endomesodermic territories during the blastula stage. The transcripts are localized in the invaginating endoderm during gastrulation and a gut specific pattern continues through the prism and early pluteus stages. In addition, a concomitant expression of SpHp transcripts is detected in cells of the skeletogenic lineage and in accordance a pharmacological disruption of SpHp activity prevents growth of skeletal rods. These results further document the role of this nuclear cathepsin L during development.

  15. The interplay between ventro striatal BDNF levels and the effects of valproic acid on the acquisition of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Manuel Alves; Escudeiro, Sarah Sousa; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Matos, Natália Castelo Branco; de Souza, Marcos Romário Matos; Patrocínio, Manoel Cláudio Azevedo; Dantas, Leonardo Pimentel; Macêdo, Danielle; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2017-11-01

    Alcohol addiction is a chronic, relapsing and progressive brain disease with serious consequences for health. Compulsive use of alcohol is associated with the capacity to change brain structures involved with the reward pathway, such as ventral striatum. Recent evidence suggests a role of chromatin remodeling in the pathophysiology of alcohol dependence and addictive-like behaviors. In addition, neuroadaptive changes mediated by the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems to be an interesting pharmacological target for alcoholism treatment. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of the deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) (300mg/kg) on the conditioned rewarding effects of ethanol using conditioned place preference (CPP) (15% v/v; 2g/kg). Ethanol rewarding effect was investigated using a biased protocol of CPP. BDNF levels were measured in the ventral striatum. Ethanol administration induced CPP. VPA pretreatment did not reduce ethanol-CPP acquisition. VPA pretreatment increased BDNF levels when compared to ethanol induced-CPP. VPA pretreatment increased BDNF levels even in saline conditioned mice. Taken together, our results indicate a modulatory effect of VPA on the BDNF levels in the ventral striatum. Overall, this study brings initial insights into the involvement of neurotrophic mechanisms in the ventral striatum in ethanol-induced addictive-like behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

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    Christopher A Lavender

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment.

  17. The Effect of Preconception Paternal Alcohol Exposure on Epigenetic Remodelling of the H19 and Rasgrf1 Imprinting Control Regions in Mouse Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaysen Gregory Knezovich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted loci play a critical role in fetal development. Their expression is often regulated by CTCF protein binding at imprinting control regions (ICRs. Parental alcohol exposure has been shown to reduce global DNA methylation in the developing mouse fetus. This study explored the effect of preconception paternal alcohol exposure on DNA methylation at two paternally methylated ICRs (H19 and Rasgrf1 in the sperm of exposed males and somatic DNA of sired offspring. Significant reductions at the H19 CTCF 1 (p=0.0027 and CTCF 2 (p=0.0009 binding sites were observed in the offspring of ethanol-treated sires, which was significantly correlated with reduced weight at postnatal days 35 to 42 (p<0.05. As birth weight was unaffected and growth was only delayed during the postnatal weaning period, with subsequent re-convergence, we hypothesise that this may be the result of a mental deficit causing delayed establishment of independent feeding following weaning and would explain why this effect is transient. No difference in DNA methylation was observed in the sperm of alcohol-exposed males, indicating that the transmission of the epigenetic signal at conception is not due to altered methylation, but may be the result of an RNA-mediated mechanism or altered chromatin remodelling.

  18. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Depression and Antidepressants Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialou, Vincent; Feng, Jian; Robison, Alfred J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which control chromatin structure and function, mediate changes in gene expression that occur in response to diverse stimuli. Recent research has established that environmental events and behavioral experience induce epigenetic changes at particular gene loci that help shape neuronal plasticity and function, and hence behavior, and that some of these changes can be very stable and even persist for a lifetime. Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that aberrations in chromatin remodeling and subsequent effects on gene expression within limbic brain regions contribute to the pathogenesis of depression and other stress-related disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety syndromes. Likewise, the gradually developing but persistent therapeutic effects of antidepressant medications may be achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms. This review discusses recent advances in understanding epigenetic regulation of stress-related disorders and focuses on three distinct aspects of stress-induced epigenetic pathology: the effects of stress and antidepressant treatment during adulthood, the life-long effects of early life stress on subsequent stress vulnerability, and the possible trans-generational transmission of stress-induced abnormalities. PMID:23020296

  19. Proteomic identification of early salicylate- and flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Peng

    2015-02-27

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the early defense responses against pathogen infection in plants. The mechanism about the initial and direct regulation of the defense signaling pathway by ROS remains elusive. Perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis by ROS is believed to alter functions of redox-sensitive proteins through their oxidative modifications. Here we report an OxiTRAQ-based proteomic study in identifying proteins whose cysteines underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells during the early response to salicylate or flg22, two defense pathway elicitors that are known to disturb cellular redox homeostasis. Among the salicylate- and/or flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins are those involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, RNA processing, post-translational modifications, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The identification of the salicylate-/flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins provides a foundation from which further study can be conducted toward understanding biological significance of their oxidative modifications during the plant defense response.

  20. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi, E-mail: Paivi.Peltomaki@Helsinki.Fi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  1. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds. PMID:26082827

  2. PHL1 of Cercospora zeae-maydis encodes a member of the photolyase/cryptochrome family involved in UV protection and fungal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, B H; Dunkle, L D

    2008-10-01

    DNA photolyases harvest light energy to repair genomic lesions induced by UV irradiation, whereas cryptochromes, presumptive descendants of 6-4 DNA photolyases, have evolved in plants and animals as blue-light photoreceptors that function exclusively in signal transduction. Orthologs of 6-4 photolyases are predicted to exist in the genomes of some filamentous fungi, but their function is unknown. In this study, we identified two putative photolyase-encoding genes in the maize foliar pathogen Cercospora zeae-maydis: CPD1, an ortholog of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases described in other filamentous fungi, and PHL1, a cryptochrome/6-4 photolyase-like gene. Strains disrupted in PHL1 (Deltaphl1) displayed abnormalities in development and secondary metabolism but were unaffected in their ability to infect maize leaves. After exposure to lethal doses of UV light, conidia of Deltaphl1 strains were abolished in photoreactivation and displayed reduced expression of CPD1, as well as RAD2 and RVB2, orthologs of genes involved in nucleotide excision and chromatin remodeling during DNA damage repair. This study presents the first characterization of a 6-4 photolyase ortholog in a filamentous fungus and provides evidence that PHL1 regulates responses to UV irradiation.

  3. Whole-genome landscape of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Aldo; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Corbo, Vincenzo; Patch, Ann-Marie; Bailey, Peter; Lawlor, Rita T; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Mafficini, Andrea; Rusev, Borislav; Scardoni, Maria; Antonello, Davide; Barbi, Stefano; Sikora, Katarzyna O; Cingarlini, Sara; Vicentini, Caterina; McKay, Skye; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; McLean, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew J; Fink, J Lynn; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen H; Leonard, Conrad; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nagaraj, Shivashankar Hiriyur; Amato, Eliana; Dalai, Irene; Bersani, Samantha; Cataldo, Ivana; Dei Tos, Angelo P; Capelli, Paola; Davì, Maria Vittoria; Landoni, Luca; Malpaga, Anna; Miotto, Marco; Whitehall, Vicki L J; Leggett, Barbara A; Harris, Janelle L; Harris, Jonathan; Jones, Marc D; Humphris, Jeremy; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Chin, Venessa; Nagrial, Adnan M; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia; Rooman, Ilse; Toon, Christopher; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark; Barbour, Andrew; Mawson, Amanda; Humphrey, Emily S; Colvin, Emily K; Chou, Angela; Lovell, Jessica A; Jamieson, Nigel B; Duthie, Fraser; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Fisher, William E; Dagg, Rebecca A; Lau, Loretta M S; Lee, Michael; Pickett, Hilda A; Reddel, Roger R; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Zeps, Nikolajs; Falconi, Massimo; Simbolo, Michele; Butturini, Giovanni; Van Buren, George; Partelli, Stefano; Fassan, Matteo; Khanna, Kum Kum; Gill, Anthony J; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bassi, Claudio; Tortora, Giampaolo; Pederzoli, Paolo; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2017-03-02

    The diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNETs) is increasing owing to more sensitive detection methods, and this increase is creating challenges for clinical management. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 102 primary PanNETs and defined the genomic events that characterize their pathogenesis. Here we describe the mutational signatures they harbour, including a deficiency in G:C > T:A base excision repair due to inactivation of MUTYH, which encodes a DNA glycosylase. Clinically sporadic PanNETs contain a larger-than-expected proportion of germline mutations, including previously unreported mutations in the DNA repair genes MUTYH, CHEK2 and BRCA2. Together with mutations in MEN1 and VHL, these mutations occur in 17% of patients. Somatic mutations, including point mutations and gene fusions, were commonly found in genes involved in four main pathways: chromatin remodelling, DNA damage repair, activation of mTOR signalling (including previously undescribed EWSR1 gene fusions), and telomere maintenance. In addition, our gene expression analyses identified a subgroup of tumours associated with hypoxia and HIF signalling.

  4. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SET/TAF-Iβ ΔN from Homo sapiens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhen; Yang, Weili; Shi, Nuo; Gao, Yongxiang; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen

    2010-01-01

    The SET/TAF-Iβ that lacked the first 22 residues of the N-terminus from Homo sapiens was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.7 Å resolution. The histone chaperone SET encoded by the SET gene, which is also known as template-activating factor Iβ (TAF-Iβ), is a multifunctional molecule that is involved in many biological phenomena such as histone binding, nucleosome assembly, chromatin remodelling, replication, transcription and apoptosis. A truncated SET/TAF-Iβ ΔN protein that lacked the first 22 residues of the N-terminus but contained the C-terminal acidic domain and an additional His 6 tag at the C-terminus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using sodium acetate as precipitant at 283 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4 3 2 1 2

  5. Expression of the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ during the strobilation process of Mesocestoides corti (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Caroline B; Monteiro, Karina M; Teichmann, Aline; da Silva, Edileuza D; Lorenzatto, Karina R; Cancela, Martín; Paes, Jéssica A; Benitz, André de N D; Castillo, Estela; Margis, Rogério; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-08-01

    The histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ is implicated in processes of chromatin remodelling and gene expression regulation. It has been associated with the control of developmental processes, but little is known about its function in helminth parasites. In Mesocestoides corti, a partial cDNA sequence related to SET/TAF-Iβ was isolated in a screening for genes differentially expressed in larvae (tetrathyridia) and adult worms. Here, the full-length coding sequence of the M. corti SET/TAF-Iβ gene was analysed and the encoded protein (McSET/TAF) was compared with orthologous sequences, showing that McSET/TAF can be regarded as a SET/TAF-Iβ family member, with a typical nucleosome-assembly protein (NAP) domain and an acidic tail. The expression patterns of the McSET/TAF gene and protein were investigated during the strobilation process by RT-qPCR, using a set of five reference genes, and by immunoblot and immunofluorescence, using monospecific polyclonal antibodies. A gradual increase in McSET/TAF transcripts and McSET/TAF protein was observed upon development induction by trypsin, demonstrating McSET/TAF differential expression during strobilation. These results provided the first evidence for the involvement of a protein from the NAP family of epigenetic effectors in the regulation of cestode development.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22 interacts with TAF-I proteins and inhibits nucleosome assembly but not regulation of histone acetylation by INHAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Hans; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Hong, Rui; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Nagata, Kyosuke; O'Hare, Peter

    2003-09-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify cellular proteins that interact with the herpes simplex virus (HSV) tegument protein VP22. Among a small set of proteins that bind specifically to VP22, we identified TAF-I (template-activating factor I), a chromatin remodelling protein and close homologue of the histone chaperone protein NAP-1. TAF-I has been shown previously to promote more ordered transfer of histones to naked DNA through a direct interaction with histones. TAF-I, as a subunit of the INHAT (inhibitor of acetyltransferases) protein complex, also binds to histones and masks them from being substrates for the acetyltransferases p300 and PCAF. Using in vitro assays for TAF-I activity in chromatin assembly, we show that VP22 inhibits nucleosome deposition on DNA by binding to TAF-I. We also observed that VP22 binds non-specifically to DNA, an activity that is abolished by TAF-I. However, the presence of VP22 does not affect the property of INHAT in inhibiting the histone acetyltransferase activity of p300 or PCAF in vitro. We speculate that this interaction could be relevant to HSV DNA organization early in infection, for example, by interfering with nucleosomal deposition on the genome. Consistent with this possibility was the observation that overexpression of TAF-I in transfected cells interferes with the progression of HSV-1 infection.

  7. Hippo Signaling Influences HNF4A and FOXA2 Enhancer Switching during Hepatocyte Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Alder

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cell fate acquisition is heavily influenced by direct interactions between master regulators and tissue-specific enhancers. However, it remains unclear how lineage-specifying transcription factors, which are often expressed in both progenitor and mature cell populations, influence cell differentiation. Using in vivo mouse liver development as a model, we identified thousands of enhancers that are bound by the master regulators HNF4A and FOXA2 in a differentiation-dependent manner, subject to chromatin remodeling, and associated with differentially expressed target genes. Enhancers exclusively occupied in the embryo were found to be responsive to developmentally regulated TEAD2 and coactivator YAP1. Our data suggest that Hippo signaling may affect hepatocyte differentiation by influencing HNF4A and FOXA2 interactions with temporal enhancers. In summary, transcription factor-enhancer interactions are not only tissue specific but also differentiation dependent, which is an important consideration for researchers studying cancer biology or mammalian development and/or using transformed cell lines. : It is unclear how key transcription factors are critical for both lineage specification during embryonic development and maintenance of a differentiated, adult phenotype. By profiling the enhancer occupancy of the key transcription factors HNF4A and FOXA2 during mouse liver development, Alder et al. have found that YAP1 can influence enhancer interactions and target gene expression levels. Enhancer switching enables HNF4A and FOXA2 to fulfill distinct roles during organ development.

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibition and dietary short-chain Fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, Paul V; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-01-01

    Changes in diet can also have dramatic effects on the composition of gut microbiota. Commensal bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract are critical regulators of health and disease by protecting against pathogen encounter whilst also maintaining immune tolerance to certain allergens. Moreover, consumption of fibre and vegetables typical of a non-Western diet generates substantial quantities of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which have potent anti-inflammatory properties. Dietary interventions such as probiotic supplementation have been investigated for their pleiotropic effects on microbiota composition and immune function. Probiotics may restore intestinal dysbiosis and improve clinical disease through elevated SCFA levels in the intestine. Although the precise mechanisms by which such dietary factors mediate these effects, SCFA metabolites such as butyrate also function as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), that can act on the epigenome through chromatin remodeling changes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of HDAC enzymes and to discuss the biological effects of HDACi. Further, we discuss the important relationship between diet and the balance between health and disease and how novel dietary interventions such as probiotics could be alternative approach for the prevention and/or treatment of chronic inflammatory disease through modulation of the intestinal microbiome.

  9. Epigenetic marks: regulators of livestock phenotypes and conceivable sources of missing variation in livestock improvement programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline M Ibeagha-Awemu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in animal productivity has been achieved over the years through careful breeding and selection programs. Today, variations in the genome are gaining increasing importance in livestock improvement strategies. Genomic information alone however explains only a part of the phenotypic variance in traits. It is likely that a portion of the unaccounted variance is embedded in the epigenome. The epigenome encompasses epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, chromatin remodeling and other molecules that can transmit epigenetic information such as non-coding RNA species. Epigenetic factors respond to external or internal environmental cues such as nutrition, pathogens and climate, and have the ability to change gene expression leading to emergence of specific phenotypes. Accumulating evidence shows that epigenetic marks influence gene expression and phenotypic outcome in livestock species. This review examines available evidence of the influence of epigenetic marks on livestock (cattle, sheep, goat and pig traits and discusses the potential for consideration of epigenetic markers in livestock improvement programs. However, epigenetic research activities on farm animal species are currently limited partly due to lack of recognition, funding and a global network of researchers. Therefore, considerable less attention has been given to epigenetic research in livestock species in comparison to extensive work in humans and model organisms. Elucidating therefore the epigenetic determinants of animal diseases and complex traits may represent one of the principal challenges to use epigenetic markers for further improvement of animal productivity.

  10. Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome caused by SMARCB1 constitutional deletion: prenatal detection of new case of recurrence in siblings due to gonadal mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Laura; Paganini, Irene; Frontali, Marina; Ciabattoni, Serena; Sangiuolo, Federica Carla; Papi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumors are aggressive malignancies that show loss-of-function mutations of SMARCB1 gene, a member of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex controlling gene transcription. One-third of patients affected by rhabdoid tumor harbor a germ-line mutation of SMARCB1 defining a rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome. The occurrence of a second somatic mutation determines the development of neoplasia in a two-hit model. Most germ-line mutations occur de novo, and few cases of recurrence in a sibship have been described. Here we report on a new Italian family with recurrence of SMARCB1 germ-line deletion in two siblings due to gonadal mosaicism. The deletion was identified in the 9-month-old proband with malignant rhabdoid tumor of the right kidney and disseminated metastases. Testing of both parents confirmed the de novo origin of the mutation, but recurrence was then detected prenatally in a new pregnancy. This is the sixth family with malignant rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome with the recurrence of the same germ-line SMARCB1 mutation in the sibship but not in healthy parents, suggesting that gonadal mosaicism is a less rare event than supposed. The clinical outcome in our patient confirms previous data of poorer outcome in patients with rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome.

  11. System-level analysis of genes and functions affecting survival during nutrient starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, David; Boer, Viktor M; Caudy, Amy; Ziv, Naomi; Brandt, Nathan J; Storey, John D; Botstein, David

    2011-01-01

    An essential property of all cells is the ability to exit from active cell division and persist in a quiescent state. For single-celled microbes this primarily occurs in response to nutrient deprivation. We studied the genetic requirements for survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae when starved for either of two nutrients: phosphate or leucine. We measured the survival of nearly all nonessential haploid null yeast mutants in mixed populations using a quantitative sequencing method that estimates the abundance of each mutant on the basis of frequency of unique molecular barcodes. Starvation for phosphate results in a population half-life of 337 hr whereas starvation for leucine results in a half-life of 27.7 hr. To measure survival of individual mutants in each population we developed a statistical framework that accounts for the multiple sources of experimental variation. From the identities of the genes in which mutations strongly affect survival, we identify genetic evidence for several cellular processes affecting survival during nutrient starvation, including autophagy, chromatin remodeling, mRNA processing, and cytoskeleton function. In addition, we found evidence that mitochondrial and peroxisome function is required for survival. Our experimental and analytical methods represent an efficient and quantitative approach to characterizing genetic functions and networks with unprecedented resolution and identified genotype-by-environment interactions that have important implications for interpretation of studies of aging and quiescence in yeast.

  12. Regulation of Histone Acetyltransferase TIP60 Function by Histone Deacetylase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jingjie; Huang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yuxia; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Gu, Wei; Luo, Jianyuan

    2014-01-01

    The key member of the MOZ (monocyticleukaemia zinc finger protein), Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2, and TIP60 acetyltransferases family, Tat-interactive protein, 60 kD (TIP60), tightly modulates a wide array of cellular processes, including chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest. The function of TIP60 can be regulated by SIRT1 through deacetylation. Here we found that TIP60 can also be functionally regulated by HDAC3. We identified six lysine residues as its autoacetylation sites. Mutagenesis of these lysines to arginines completely abolishes the autoacetylation of TIP60. Overexpression of HDAC3 increases TIP60 ubiquitination levels. However, unlike SIRT1, HDAC3 increased the half-life of TIP60. Further study found that HDAC3 colocalized with TIP60 both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which could be the reason why HDAC3 can stabilize TIP60. The deacetylation of TIP60 by both SIRT1 and HDAC3 reduces apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Knockdown of HDAC3 in cells increased TIP60 acetylation levels and increased apoptosis after DNA damage. Together, our findings provide a better understanding of TIP60 regulation mechanisms, which is a significant basis for further studies of its cellular functions. PMID:25301942

  13. A novel microduplication of ARID1B: Clinical, genetic, and proteomic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Catarina M; Szoko, Nicholas; Erdin, Serkan; Ragavendran, Ashok; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Maciel, Patrícia; Lundberg, Kathleen; Schlatzer, Daniela; Smith, Janice; Talkowski, Michael E; Gusella, James F; Natowicz, Marvin R

    2017-09-01

    Genetic alterations of ARID1B have been recently recognized as one of the most common mendelian causes of intellectual disability and are associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic phenotypes. The ARID1B protein, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF-A, is involved in the regulation of transcription and multiple downstream cellular processes. We report here the clinical, genetic, and proteomic phenotypes of an individual with a unique apparent de novo mutation of ARID1B due to an intragenic duplication. His neurodevelopmental phenotype includes a severe speech/language disorder with full scale IQ scores 78-98 and scattered academic skill levels, expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B mutations. Haploinsufficiency of ARID1B was determined both by RNA sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis supported an intragenic localization of the ARID1B copy number gain. Principal component analysis revealed marked differentiation of the subject's lymphoblast proteome from that of controls. Of 3426 proteins quantified, 1014 were significantly up- or down-regulated compared to controls (q constitutional haploinsufficiency of ARID1B causes syndromic and non-syndromic developmental disabilities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Protein-protein interactions in the regulation of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yingjun; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2013-03-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor, SPF1, from sweet potato. Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the functional diversity, almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TTGACC/T W-box sequences and, therefore, mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors. Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors. It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes. In this review, we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute, at different levels, to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  15. Artificial Epigenetic Networks: Automatic Decomposition of Dynamical Control Tasks Using Topological Self-Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Alexander P; Caves, Leo S D; Stepney, Susan; Tyrrell, Andy M; Lones, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the artificial epigenetic network, a recurrent connectionist architecture that is able to dynamically modify its topology in order to automatically decompose and solve dynamical problems. The approach is motivated by the behavior of gene regulatory networks, particularly the epigenetic process of chromatin remodeling that leads to topological change and which underlies the differentiation of cells within complex biological organisms. We expected this approach to be useful in situations where there is a need to switch between different dynamical behaviors, and do so in a sensitive and robust manner in the absence of a priori information about problem structure. This hypothesis was tested using a series of dynamical control tasks, each requiring solutions that could express different dynamical behaviors at different stages within the task. In each case, the addition of topological self-modification was shown to improve the performance and robustness of controllers. We believe this is due to the ability of topological changes to stabilize attractors, promoting stability within a dynamical regime while allowing rapid switching between different regimes. Post hoc analysis of the controllers also demonstrated how the partitioning of the networks could provide new insights into problem structure.

  16. Where Environment Meets Cognition: A Focus on Two Developmental Intellectual Disability Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. De Toma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging questions in neuroscience is to dissect how learning and memory, the foundational pillars of cognition, are grounded in stable, yet plastic, gene expression states. All known epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodelling, and noncoding RNAs regulate brain gene expression, both during neurodevelopment and in the adult brain in processes related to cognition. On the other hand, alterations in the various components of the epigenetic machinery have been linked to well-known causes of intellectual disability disorders (IDDs. Two examples are Down Syndrome (DS and Fragile X Syndrome (FXS, where global and local epigenetic alterations lead to impairments in synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning. Since epigenetic modifications are reversible, it is theoretically possible to use epigenetic drugs as cognitive enhancers for the treatment of IDDs. Epigenetic treatments act in a context specific manner, targeting different regions based on cell and state specific chromatin accessibility, facilitating the establishment of the lost balance. Here, we discuss epigenetic studies of IDDs, focusing on DS and FXS, and the use of epidrugs in combinatorial therapies for IDDs.

  17. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca 2+ on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms of alcoholism and stress-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Martina; Pandey, Subhash C

    2017-05-01

    Stress-related disorders, such as anxiety, early life stress, and posttraumatic stress disorder appear to be important factors in promoting alcoholism, as alcohol consumption can temporarily attenuate the negative affective symptoms of these disorders. Several molecules involved in signaling pathways may contribute to the neuroadaptation induced during alcohol dependence and stress disorders, and among these, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and opioid peptides (i.e., nociceptin and dynorphin) are involved in the interaction of stress and alcohol. In fact, alterations in the expression and function of these molecules have been associated with the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders and alcoholism. In recent years, various studies have focused on the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate chromatin architecture, thereby modifying gene expression. Interestingly, epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions have been shown to be associated with the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders, including alcoholism and stress. In particular, the enzymes responsible for chromatin remodeling (i.e., histone deacetylases and methyltransferases, DNA methyltransferases) have been identified as common molecular mechanisms for the interaction of stress and alcohol and have become promising therapeutic targets to treat or prevent alcoholism and associated emotional disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Epigenetics—Beyond the Genome in Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkman, Bela G.; Sakharkar, Amul J.; Pandey, Subhash C.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development of alcoholism. Whole-genome expression profiling has highlighted the importance of several genes that may contribute to alcohol abuse disorders. In addition, more recent findings have added yet another layer of complexity to the overall molecular mechanisms involved in a predisposition to alcoholism and addiction by demonstrating that processes related to genetic factors that do not manifest as DNA sequence changes (i.e., epigenetic processes) play a role. Both acute and chronic ethanol exposure can alter gene expression levels in specific neuronal circuits that govern the behavioral consequences related to tolerance and dependence. The unremitting cycle of alcohol consumption often includes satiation and self-medication with alcohol, followed by excruciating withdrawal symptoms and the resultant relapse, which reflects both the positive and negative affective states of alcohol addiction. Recent studies have indicated that behavioral changes induced by acute and chronic ethanol exposure may involve chromatin remodeling resulting from covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation in the neuronal circuits involving a brain region called the amygdala. These findings have helped identify enzymes involved in epigenetic mechanisms, such as the histone deacetylase, histone acetyltransferase, and DNA methyltransferase enzymes, as novel therapeutic targets for the development of future pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcoholism. PMID:23134045

  20. Consecutive epigenetically-active agent combinations act in ID1-RUNX3-TET2 and HOXA pathways for Flt3ITD+ve AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Hamid; Liu, Yan; Gao, Rui; Zaid, Mohammad Abu; Cripe, Larry D; Weisenbach, Jill; Sargent, Katie J; Nassiri, Mehdi; Li, Lang; Konig, Heiko; Suvannasankha, Attaya; Pan, Feng; Shanmugam, Rajasubramaniam; Goswami, Chirayu; Kapur, Reuben; Xu, Mingjiang; Boswell, H Scott

    2018-01-19

    Co-occurrence of Flt3ITD and TET2 mutations provoke an animal model of AML by epigenetic repression of Wnt pathway antagonists, including RUNX3, and by hyperexpression of ID1, encoding Wnt agonist. These affect HOXA over-expression and treatment resistance. A comparable epigenetic phenotype was identified among adult AML patients needing novel intervention. We chose combinations of targeted agents acting on distinct effectors, at the levels of both signal transduction and chromatin remodeling, in relapsed/refractory AML's, including Flt3ITD+ve, described with a signature of repressed tumor suppressor genes, involving Wnt antagonist RUNX3 , occurring along with ID1 and HOXA over-expressions. We tracked patient response to combination of Flt3/Raf inhibitor, Sorafenib, and Vorinostat, pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor, without or with added Bortezomib, in consecutive phase I trials. A striking association of rapid objective remissions (near-complete, complete responses) was noted to accompany induced early pharmacodynamic changes within patient blasts in situ, involving these effectors, significantly linking RUNX3 /Wnt antagonist de-repression (80%) and ID1 downregulation (85%), to a response, also preceded by profound HOXA9 repression. Response occurred in context of concurrent TET2 mutation/hypomorphy and Flt3ITD+ve mutation (83% of complete responses). Addition of Bortezomib to the combination was vital to attainment of complete response in Flt3ITD+ve cases exhibiting such Wnt pathway dysregulation.

  1. Multiple layers of posttranslational regulation refine circadian clock activity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Mas, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock is a cellular time-keeper mechanism that regulates biological rhythms with a period of ~24 h. The circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and development are synchronized by environmental cues such as light and temperature. In plants, proper matching of the internal circadian time with the external environment confers fitness advantages on plant survival and propagation. Accordingly, plants have evolved elaborated regulatory mechanisms that precisely control the circadian oscillations. Transcriptional feedback regulation of several clock components has been well characterized over the past years. However, the importance of additional regulatory mechanisms such as chromatin remodeling, protein complexes, protein phosphorylation, and stability is only starting to emerge. The multiple layers of circadian regulation enable plants to properly synchronize with the environmental cycles and to fine-tune the circadian oscillations. This review focuses on the diverse posttranslational events that regulate circadian clock function. We discuss the mechanistic insights explaining how plants articulate a high degree of complexity in their regulatory networks to maintain circadian homeostasis and to generate highly precise waveforms of circadian expression and activity.

  2. Epigenetics in adipose tissue, obesity, weight loss, and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I; Claycombe, Kate J; Schalinske, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    Given the role that diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that external factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, and chromatin remodeling, the regulation of these processes, the magnitude of the changes and the cell types in which they occur, the individuals more predisposed, and the more crucial stages of life remain to be elucidated. There is evidence that obese and diabetic people have a pattern of epigenetic marks different from nonobese and nondiabetic individuals. The main long-term goals in this field are the identification and understanding of the role of epigenetic marks that could be used as early predictors of metabolic risk and the development of drugs or diet-related treatments able to delay these epigenetic changes and even reverse them. But weight gain and insulin resistance/diabetes are influenced not only by epigenetic factors; different epigenetic biomarkers have also been identified as early predictors of weight loss and the maintenance of body weight after weight loss. The characterization of all the factors that are able to modify the epigenetic signatures and the determination of their real importance are hindered by the following factors: the magnitude of change produced by dietary and environmental factors is small and cumulative; there are great differences among cell types; and there are many factors involved, including age, with multiple interactions between them.

  3. Epigenetics in Adipose Tissue, Obesity, Weight Loss, and Diabetes12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J. Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I.; Claycombe, Kate J.; Schalinske, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Given the role that diet and other environmental factors play in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the implication of different epigenetic processes is being investigated. Although it is well known that external factors can cause cell type-dependent epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, histone tail modifications, and chromatin remodeling, the regulation of these processes, the magnitude of the changes and the cell types in which they occur, the individuals more predisposed, and the more crucial stages of life remain to be elucidated. There is evidence that obese and diabetic people have a pattern of epigenetic marks different from nonobese and nondiabetic individuals. The main long-term goals in this field are the identification and understanding of the role of epigenetic marks that could be used as early predictors of metabolic risk and the development of drugs or diet-related treatments able to delay these epigenetic changes and even reverse them. But weight gain and insulin resistance/diabetes are influenced not only by epigenetic factors; different epigenetic biomarkers have also been identified as early predictors of weight loss and the maintenance of body weight after weight loss. The characterization of all the factors that are able to modify the epigenetic signatures and the determination of their real importance are hindered by the following factors: the magnitude of change produced by dietary and environmental factors is small and cumulative; there are great differences among cell types; and there are many factors involved, including age, with multiple interactions between them. PMID:24425725

  4. Epigenetics and maternal nutrition: nature v. nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Under- and over-nutrition during pregnancy has been linked to the later development of diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Epigenetic modifications may be one mechanism by which exposure to an altered intrauterine milieu or metabolic perturbation may influence the phenotype of the organism much later in life. Epigenetic modifications of the genome provide a mechanism that allows the stable propagation of gene expression from one generation of cells to the next. This review highlights our current knowledge of epigenetic gene regulation and the evidence that chromatin remodelling and histone modifications play key roles in adipogenesis and the development of obesity. Epigenetic modifications affecting processes important to glucose regulation and insulin secretion have been described in the pancreatic β-cells and muscle of the intrauterine growth-retarded offspring, characteristics essential to the pathophysiology of type-2 diabetes. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression contributes to both adipocyte determination and differentiation in in vitro models. The contributions of histone acetylation, histone methylation and DNA methylation to the process of adipogenesis in vivo remain to be evaluated.

  5. [Nutritionnal epigenomics: consequences of unbalanced diets on epigenetics processes of programming during lifespan and between generations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junien, C; Gallou-Kabani, C; Vigé, A; Gross, M-S

    2005-04-01

    Epigenetic changes associated with DNA methylation and histone modifications leading to chromatin remodeling and regulation of gene expression underlie the developmental programming of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on converging data supporting the hypothesis that, in addition to "thrifty genotype" inheritance, individuals with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases have suffered improper "epigenetic programming" during their fetal/postnatal development due to maternal inadequate nutrition and metabolic disturbances and also during their lifetime, that could even be transmitted to the next generation(s). We highlight the susceptibility of epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression to environmental influences due to their inherent malleability, emphasizing the participation of transposable elements and the potential role of imprinted genes during critical time windows in epigenetic programming, from the very beginning of development, throughout life. Increasing our understanding on epigenetic patterns significance and their role in development, evolution and adaptation and on small molecules (nutrients, drugs) that reverse epigenetic (in)activation should provide us with the means to "unlock" silenced (enhanced) genes, and to "convert" the obsolete human thrifty genotype into a "squandering" phenotype.

  6. Aging and Intermittent Fasting Impact on Transcriptional Regulation and Physiological Responses of Adult Drosophila Neuronal and Muscle Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sharon; Ratliff, Eric P; Molina, Brandon; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Mastroianni, Jessica; Kotzebue, Roxanne W; Achal, Madhulika; Mauntz, Ruth E; Gonzalez, Arysa; Barekat, Ayeh; Bray, William A; Macias, Andrew M; Daugherty, Daniel; Harris, Greg L; Edwards, Robert A; Finley, Kim D

    2018-04-10

    The progressive decline of the nervous system, including protein aggregate formation, reflects the subtle dysregulation of multiple functional pathways. Our previous work has shown intermittent fasting (IF) enhances longevity, maintains adult behaviors and reduces aggregates, in part, by promoting autophagic function in the aging Drosophila brain. To clarify the impact that IF-treatment has upon aging, we used high throughput RNA-sequencing technology to examine the changing transcriptome in adult Drosophila tissues. Principle component analysis (PCA) and other analyses showed ~1200 age-related transcriptional differences in head and muscle tissues, with few genes having matching expression patterns. Pathway components showing age-dependent expression differences were involved with stress response, metabolic, neural and chromatin remodeling functions. Middle-aged tissues also showed a significant increase in transcriptional drift-variance (TD), which in the CNS included multiple proteolytic pathway components. Overall, IF-treatment had a demonstrably positive impact on aged transcriptomes, partly ameliorating both fold and variance changes. Consistent with these findings, aged IF-treated flies displayed more youthful metabolic, behavioral and basal proteolytic profiles that closely correlated with transcriptional alterations to key components. These results indicate that even modest dietary changes can have therapeutic consequences, slowing the progressive decline of multiple cellular systems, including proteostasis in the aging nervous system.

  7. Aging and Intermittent Fasting Impact on Transcriptional Regulation and Physiological Responses of Adult Drosophila Neuronal and Muscle Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The progressive decline of the nervous system, including protein aggregate formation, reflects the subtle dysregulation of multiple functional pathways. Our previous work has shown intermittent fasting (IF enhances longevity, maintains adult behaviors and reduces aggregates, in part, by promoting autophagic function in the aging Drosophila brain. To clarify the impact that IF-treatment has upon aging, we used high throughput RNA-sequencing technology to examine the changing transcriptome in adult Drosophila tissues. Principle component analysis (PCA and other analyses showed ~1200 age-related transcriptional differences in head and muscle tissues, with few genes having matching expression patterns. Pathway components showing age-dependent expression differences were involved with stress response, metabolic, neural and chromatin remodeling functions. Middle-aged tissues also showed a significant increase in transcriptional drift-variance (TD, which in the CNS included multiple proteolytic pathway components. Overall, IF-treatment had a demonstrably positive impact on aged transcriptomes, partly ameliorating both fold and variance changes. Consistent with these findings, aged IF-treated flies displayed more youthful metabolic, behavioral and basal proteolytic profiles that closely correlated with transcriptional alterations to key components. These results indicate that even modest dietary changes can have therapeutic consequences, slowing the progressive decline of multiple cellular systems, including proteostasis in the aging nervous system.

  8. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eBeneke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose, the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1, was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor.

  9. Histone Deacetylase Rpd3 Regulates Olfactory Projection Neuron Dendrite Targeting via the Transcription Factor Prospero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tea, Joy S.; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the mechanisms of axon guidance, relatively little is known about the transcriptional control of dendrite guidance. The Drosophila olfactory system with its stereotyped organization provides an excellent model to study the transcriptional control of dendrite wiring specificity. Each projection neuron (PN) targets its dendrites to a specific glomerulus in the antennal lobe and its axon stereotypically to higher brain centers. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified a mutation in Rpd3 that disrupts PN targeting specificity. Rpd3 encodes a class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) homologous to mammalian HDAC1 and HDAC2. Rpd3−/− PN dendrites that normally target to a dorsolateral glomerulus mistarget to medial glomeruli in the antennal lobe, and axons exhibit a severe overbranching phenotype. These phenotypes can be rescued by postmitotic expression of Rpd3 but not HDAC3, the only other class I HDAC in Drosophila. Furthermore, disruption of the atypical homeodomain transcription factor Prospero (Pros) yields similar phenotypes, which can be rescued by Pros expression in postmitotic neurons. Strikingly, overexpression of Pros can suppress Rpd3−/− phenotypes. Our study suggests a specific function for the general chromatin remodeling factor Rpd3 in regulating dendrite targeting in neurons, largely through the postmitotic action of the Pros transcription factor. PMID:20660276

  10. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  11. ATM and SIRT6/SNF2H Mediate Transient H2AX Stabilization When DSBs Form by Blocking HUWE1 to Allow Efficient γH2AX Foci Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Atsumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, H2AX is rapidly phosphorylated at Ser139 to promote DSB repair. Here we show that H2AX is rapidly stabilized in response to DSBs to efficiently generate γH2AX foci. This mechanism operated even in quiescent cells that barely expressed H2AX. H2AX stabilization resulted from the inhibition of proteasome-mediated degradation. Synthesized H2AX ordinarily underwent degradation through poly-ubiquitination mediated by the E3 ligase HUWE1; however, H2AX ubiquitination was transiently halted upon DSB formation. Such rapid H2AX stabilization by DSBs was associated with chromatin incorporation of H2AX and halting of its poly-ubiquitination mediated by the ATM kinase, the sirtuin protein SIRT6, and the chromatin remodeler SNF2H. H2AX Ser139, the ATM phosphorylation site, was essential for H2AX stabilization upon DSB formation. Our results reveal a pathway controlled by ATM, SIRT6, and SNF2H to block HUWE1, which stabilizes H2AX and induces its incorporation into chromatin only when cells are damaged.

  12. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of reprogramming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Marie N. [Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla 92037, CA (United States); University Hospital of Würzburg, Department of Pediatrics, 2 Josef-Schneiderstrasse, 97080 Würzburg (Germany); Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio [Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla 92037, CA (United States); Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, King' s College London, 28th Floor, Tower Wing, Guy' s Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London (United Kingdom); Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos, E-mail: belmonte@salk.edu [Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla 92037, CA (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Despite the profound and rapid advancements in reprogramming technologies since the generation of the first induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in 2006[1], the molecular basics of the process and its implications are still not fully understood. Recent work has suggested that a subset of TFs, so called “Pioneer TFs”, play an important role during the stochastic phase of iPSC reprogramming [2–6]. Pioneer TFs activities differ from conventional transcription factors in their mechanism of action. They bind directly to condensed chromatin and elicit a series of chromatin remodeling events that lead to opening of the chromatin. Chromatin decondensation by pioneer factors progressively occurs during cell division and in turn exposes specific gene promoters in the DNA to which TFs can now directly bind to promoters that are readily accessible[2, 6]. Here, we will summarize recent advancements on our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying reprogramming to iPSC as well as the implications that pioneer Transcription Factor activities might play during different lineage conversion processes. - Highlights: • Pioneer transcription factor activity underlies the initial steps of iPSC generation. • Reprogramming can occur by cis- and/or trans- reprogramming events. • Cis-reprogramming implies remodeling of the chromatin for enabling TF accessibility. • Trans-reprogramming encompasses direct binding of Tfs to their target gene promoters.

  13. Path from schizophrenia genomics to biology: gene regulation and perturbation in neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a devastating mental disorder afflicting 1% of the population. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of SZ have identified >100 risk loci. However, the causal variants/genes and the causal mechanisms remain largely unknown, which hinders the translation of GWAS findings into disease biology and drug targets. Most risk variants are noncoding, thus likely regulate gene expression. A major mechanism of transcriptional regulation is chromatin remodeling, and open chromatin is a versatile predictor of regulatory sequences. MicroRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation plays an important role in SZ pathogenesis. Neurons differentiated from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an experimental model to characterize the genetic perturbation of regulatory variants that are often specific to cell type and/or developmental stage. The emerging genome-editing technology enables the creation of isogenic iPSCs and neurons to efficiently characterize the effects of SZ-associated regulatory variants on SZ-relevant molecular and cellular phenotypes involving dopaminergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic neurotransmissions. SZ GWAS findings equipped with the emerging functional genomics approaches provide an unprecedented opportunity for understanding new disease biology and identifying novel drug targets.

  14. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of chromatin-associated proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    The nucleus is the organelle where basically all DNA-related processes take place in eukaryotes, such as replication, transcription, and splicing as well as epigenetic regulation. The identification and description of the nuclear proteins is one of the requisites toward a comprehensive understanding of the biological functions accomplished in the nucleus. Many of the regulatory mechanisms of protein functions rely on their PTMs among which phosphorylation is probably one of the most important properties affecting enzymatic activity, interaction with other molecules, localization, or stability. So far, the nuclear and subnuclear proteome and phosphoproteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been the subject of very few studies. In this work, we developed a purification protocol of Arabidopsis chromatin-associated proteins and performed proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses identifying a total of 879 proteins of which 198 were phosphoproteins that were mainly involved in chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, and RNA processing. From 230 precisely localized phosphorylation sites (phosphosites), 52 correspond to hitherto unidentified sites. This protocol and data thereby obtained should be a valuable resource for many domains of plant research.

  15. A stochastic model of epigenetic dynamics in somatic cell reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max eFloettmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cell reprogramming has dramatically changed stem cell research inrecent years. The high pace of new findings in the field and an ever increasingamount of data from new high throughput techniques make it challengingto isolate core principles of the process. In order to analyze suchmechanisms, we developed an abstract mechanistic model of a subset of theknown regulatory processes during cell differentiation and production of inducedpluripotent stem cells. This probabilistic Boolean network describesthe interplay between gene expression, chromatin modifications and DNAmethylation. The model incorporates recent findings in epigenetics and reproducesexperimentally observed reprogramming efficiencies and changes inmethylation and chromatin remodeling. It enables us to investigate in detail,how the temporal progression of the process is regulated. It also explicitlyincludes the transduction of factors using viral vectors and their silencing inreprogrammed cells, since this is still a standard procedure in somatic cellreprogramming. Based on the model we calculate an epigenetic landscape.Simulation results show good reproduction of experimental observations duringreprogramming, despite the simple stucture of the model. An extensiveanalysis and introduced variations hint towards possible optimizations of theprocess, that could push the technique closer to clinical applications. Fasterchanges in DNA methylation increase the speed of reprogramming at theexpense of efficiency, while accelerated chromatin modifications moderatelyimprove efficiency.

  16. SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation in renal medullary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Julien; Moroch, Julien; Pierron, Gaelle; Pedeutour, Florence; Grison, Camille; Maillé, Pascale; Soyeux, Pascale; de la Taille, Alexandre; Couturier, Jérome; Vieillefond, Annick; Rousselet, Marie Christine; Delattre, Olivier; Allory, Yves

    2012-09-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC), a rare and highly aggressive tumour which occurs in patients with sickle-cell disease, shares many clinicopathological features with collecting duct carcinoma (CDC). The molecular mechanisms underlying RMC and CDC are mainly unknown, and there is ongoing debate about their status as distinct entities. Loss of expression of SMARCB1/INI1, a chromatin remodelling regulator and repressor of cyclin D1 transcription, has been reported recently in RMC. The aim of our study was to investigate if such loss of expression is specific for RMC. SMARCB1/INI1 genetic alterations and cyclin D1 expression were also studied. Using immunochemistry, neoplastic cells showed complete loss of SMARCB1/INI1 expression in all six cases of RMC but in only one of 22 cases of CDC. In two RMC cases investigated, comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated complete loss of one SMARCB1/INI1 allele, with no other genomic imbalances, and no mutations were found on the remaining allele. Cyclin D1 was expressed in all RMCs, suggesting that SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation may result in increased cyclin D1 transcription. The specific SMARCB1/INI1 inactivation observed in RMCs suggests that RMC and CDC are different entities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. 'Omic' genetic technologies for herbal medicines in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Ng, Chee Hong; Schweitzer, Isaac

    2012-04-01

    The field of genetics, which includes the use of 'omic' technologies, is an evolving area of science that has emerging application in phytotherapy. Omic studies include pharmacogenomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Herbal medicines, as monotherapies, or complex formulations such as traditional Chinese herbal prescriptions, may benefit from omic studies, and this new field may be termed 'herbomics'. Applying herbomics in the field of psychiatry may provide answers about which herbal interventions may be effective for individuals, which genetic processes are triggered, and the subsequent neurochemical pathways of activity. The use of proteomic technology can explore the differing epigenetic effects on neurochemical gene expression between individual herbs, isolated constituents and complex formulae. The possibilities of side effects or insufficient response to the herb can also be assessed via pharmacogenomic analysis of polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 liver enzymes or P-glycoprotein. While another novel application of omic technology is for the validation of the concept of synergy in individual herbal extracts and prescriptive formulations. Chronic administration of psychotropic herbal medicines may discover important effects on chromatin remodelling via modification of histone and DNA methylation. This paper focuses on the emerging field of herbomics, and is to our knowledge the first publication to explore this in the area of psychiatry. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Stimulation of Pol III-dependent 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA gene expression by AP-1 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Richa; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-07-01

    RNA polymerase III transcribes structurally diverse group of essential noncoding RNAs including 5S ribosomal RNA (5SrRNA) and U6 snRNA. These noncoding RNAs are involved in RNA processing and ribosome biogenesis, thus, coupling Pol III activity to the rate of protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Even though a few Pol II-associated transcription factors have been reported to participate in Pol III-dependent transcription, its activation by activator protein 1 (AP-1) factors, c-Fos and c-Jun, has remained unexplored. Here, we show that c-Fos and c-Jun bind to specific sites in the regulatory regions of 5S rRNA (type I) and U6 snRNA (type III) gene promoters and stimulate their transcription. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation studies suggested that endogenous AP-1 factors bind to their cognate promoter elements during the G1/S transition of cell cycle apparently synchronous with Pol III transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the interaction of c-Jun with histone acetyltransferase p300 promoted the recruitment of p300/CBP complex on the promoters and facilitated the occupancy of Pol III transcriptional machinery via histone acetylation and chromatin remodeling. The findings of our study, together, suggest that AP-1 factors are novel regulators of Pol III-driven 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA expression with a potential role in cell proliferation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Evaluation of Potential Mechanisms Controlling the Catalase Expression in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Glorieux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of cancer cell resistance against prooxidant drugs limits its potential clinical use. MCF-7 breast cancer cells chronically exposed to ascorbate/menadione became resistant (Resox cells by increasing mainly catalase activity. Since catalase appears as an anticancer target, the elucidation of mechanisms regulating its expression is an important issue. In MCF-7 and Resox cells, karyotype analysis showed that chromosome 11 is not altered compared to healthy mammary epithelial cells. The genomic gain of catalase locus observed in MCF-7 and Resox cells cannot explain the differential catalase expression. Since ROS cause DNA lesions, the activation of DNA damage signaling pathways may influence catalase expression. However, none of the related proteins (i.e., p53, ChK was activated in Resox cells compared to MCF-7. The c-abl kinase may lead to catalase protein degradation via posttranslational modifications, but neither ubiquitination nor phosphorylation of catalase was detected after catalase immunoprecipitation. Catalase mRNA levels did not decrease after actinomycin D treatment in both cell lines. DNMT inhibitor (5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased catalase protein level in MCF-7 and its resistance to prooxidant drugs. In line with our previous report, chromatin remodeling appears as the main regulator of catalase expression in breast cancer after chronic exposure to an oxidative stress.