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Sample records for homodimeric atp-dependent chromatin-remodeling

  1. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

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    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  2. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

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    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  3. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

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    Cho, Iltaeg; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Lake, Robert J; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-04-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  4. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

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    Iltaeg Cho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  5. The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes CHD6, CHD7, and CHD8 exhibit distinct nucleosome binding and remodeling activities.

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    Manning, Benjamin J; Yusufzai, Timur

    2017-07-14

    Proper chromatin regulation is central to genome function and maintenance. The group III chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, comprising CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9, has well-documented roles in transcription regulation, impacting both organism development and disease etiology. These four enzymes are similar in their constituent domains, but they fill surprisingly non-redundant roles in the cell, with deficiencies in individual enzymes leading to dissimilar disease states such as CHARGE syndrome or autism spectrum disorders. The mechanisms explaining their divergent, non-overlapping functions are unclear. In this study, we performed an in-depth biochemical analysis of purified CHD6, CHD7, and CHD8 and discovered distinct differences in chromatin remodeling specificities and activities among them. We report that CHD6 and CHD7 both bind with high affinity to short linker DNA, whereas CHD8 requires longer DNA for binding. As a result, CHD8 slides nucleosomes into positions with more flanking linker DNA than CHD7. Moreover, we found that, although CHD7 and CHD8 slide nucleosomes, CHD6 disrupts nucleosomes in a distinct non-sliding manner. The different activities of these enzymes likely lead to differences in chromatin structure and, thereby, transcriptional control, at the enhancer and promoter loci where these enzymes bind. Overall, our work provides a mechanistic basis for both the non-redundant roles and the diverse mutant disease states of these enzymes in vivo. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. ISWI chromatin remodellers sense nucleosome modifications to determine substrate preference

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    Dann, Geoffrey P; Liszczak, Glen P; Bagert, John D

    2017-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers regulate access to genetic information by controlling nucleosome positions in vivo. However, the mechanism by which remodellers discriminate between different nucleosome substrates is poorly understood. Many chromatin remodelling proteins possess conserved...... activity of all ISWI remodellers evaluated. This dependence also extends to CHD and SWI/SNF family remodellers, suggesting that the acidic patch may be generally required for chromatin remodelling. Critically, remodelling activity can be regulated by modifications neighbouring the acidic patch, signifying...... that it may act as a tunable interaction hotspot for ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers and, by extension, many other chromatin effectors that engage this region of the nucleosome surface....

  7. SUMO and Chromatin Remodeling.

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    Wotton, David; Pemberton, Lucy F; Merrill-Schools, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Many of the known SUMO substrates are nuclear proteins, which regulate gene expression and chromatin dynamics. Sumoylation, in general, appears to correlate with decreased transcriptional activity, and in many cases modulation of the chromatin template is implicated. Sumoylation of the core histones is associated with transcriptional silencing, and transcription factor sumoylation can decrease gene expression by promoting recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes. Additionally, sumoylation of transcriptional corepressors and chromatin remodeling enzymes can influence interactions with other transcriptional regulators, and alter their enzymatic activity. In some cases, proteins that are components of transcriptional corepressor complexes have been shown to be SUMO E3 ligases, further emphasizing the integration of sumoylation with the regulation of chromatin remodeling. Despite the evidence suggesting that sumoylation is primarily repressive for access to chromatin, recent analyses suggest that protein sumoylation on the chromatin template may play important roles at highly expressed genes. Elucidating the dynamic interplay of sumoylation with other post-translational modifications of histones and chromatin associated proteins will be key to fully understanding the regulation of access to the chromatin template.

  8. [Structural studies of chromatin remodeling factors].

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    Volokh, O I; Derkacheva, N I; Studitsky, V M; Sokolova, O S

    2016-01-01

    Changes of chromatin structure require participation of chromatin remodeling factors (CRFs), which are ATP-dependent multisubunit complexes that change the structure of the nucleosome without covalently modifying its components. CRFs act together with other protein factors to regulate the extent of chromatin condensation. Four CRF families are currently distinguished based on their structural and biochemical characteristics: SWI/SNF, ISWI, Mi-2/CHD, and SWR/INO80. X-ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy are the main methods to obtain structural information about macromolecules. CRFs are difficult to obtain in crystal because of their large sizes and structural heterogeneity, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is mostly employed in their structural studies. The review considers all structures obtained for CRFs by TEM and discusses several models of CRF-nucleosome interactions.

  9. Chromatin remodeling in mammalian embryos.

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    Cabot, Birgit; Cabot, Ryan A

    2018-03-01

    The mammalian embryo undergoes a dramatic amount of epigenetic remodeling during the first week of development. In this review, we discuss several epigenetic changes that happen over the course of cleavage development, focusing on covalent marks (e.g., histone methylation and acetylation) and non-covalent remodeling (chromatin remodeling via remodeling complexes; e.g., SWI/SNF-mediated chromatin remodeling). Comparisons are also drawn between remodeling events that occur in embryos from a variety of mammalian species. © 2018 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  10. Sliding and peeling of histone during chromatin remodelling

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    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific stretches of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. We investigate the mechanism of peeling of the histone spool, and its complete detachment, from the dsDNA by a CRE. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean times for histone detachment. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the measurable quantities can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments.

  11. Chromatin remodeling in plant development.

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    Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel; Cubas, Pilar; Martínez-Zapater, José M

    2009-01-01

    Plant development results from specific patterns of gene expression that are tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal manner. Chromatin remodeling plays a central role in establishing these expression patterns and maintaining epigenetic transcriptional states through successive rounds of mitosis that take place within a cell lineage. Plant epigenetic switches occur not only at the embryo stage, but also during postembryonic developmental transitions, suggesting that chromatin remodeling activities in plants can provide a higher degree of regulatory flexibility which probably underlies their developmental plasticity. Here, we highlight recent progress in the understanding of plant chromatin dynamic organization, facilitating the activation or repression of specific sets of genes involved in different developmental programs and integrating them with the response to environmental signals. Chromatin conformation controls gene expression both in actively dividing undifferentiated cells and in those already fate-determined. In this context, we first describe chromatin reorganization activities required to maintain meristem function stable through DNA replication and cell division. Organ initiation at the apex, with emphasis on reproductive development, is next discussed to uncover the chromatin events involved in the establishment and maintenance of expression patterns associated with differentiating cells; this is illustrated with the complex epigenetic regulation of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Finally, we discuss the involvement of chromatin remodeling in plant responses to environmental cues and to different types of stress conditions.

  12. The transcriptional coactivator SAYP is a trithorax group signature subunit of the PBAP chromatin remodeling complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); K. Langenberg (Karin); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); A. Blastyak (Andras); H. Gyurkovics (Henrik); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (remodelers) perform critical functions in eukaryotic gene expression control. BAP and PBAP are the fly representatives of the two evolutionarily conserved major subclasses of SWI/SNF remodelers. Both complexes share seven core

  13. A Functional Switch of NuRD Chromatin Remodeling Complex Subunits Regulates Mouse Cortical Development

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    Justyna Nitarska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications and chromatin remodeling represent universal mechanisms by which cells adapt their transcriptional response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Extensive chromatin remodeling takes place during neuronal development, allowing the transition of pluripotent cells into differentiated neurons. Here, we report that the NuRD complex, which couples ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling with histone deacetylase activity, regulates mouse brain development. Subunit exchange of CHDs, the core ATPase subunits of the NuRD complex, is required for distinct aspects of cortical development. Whereas CHD4 promotes the early proliferation of progenitors, CHD5 facilitates neuronal migration and CHD3 ensures proper layer specification. Inhibition of each CHD leads to defects of neuronal differentiation and migration, which cannot be rescued by expressing heterologous CHDs. Finally, we demonstrate that NuRD complexes containing specific CHDs are recruited to regulatory elements and modulate the expression of genes essential for brain development.

  14. DNA repair goes hip-hop: SMARCA and CHD chromatin remodellers join the break dance.

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    Rother, Magdalena B; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-10-05

    Proper signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical to prevent genome instability and diseases such as cancer. The packaging of DNA into chromatin, however, has evolved as a mere obstacle to these DSB responses. Posttranslational modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling help to overcome this barrier by modulating nucleosome structures and allow signalling and repair machineries access to DSBs in chromatin. Here we recap our current knowledge on how ATP-dependent SMARCA- and CHD-type chromatin remodellers alter chromatin structure during the signalling and repair of DSBs and discuss how their dysfunction impacts genome stability and human disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Footprint traversal by adenosine-triphosphate-dependent chromatin remodeler motor

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    Garai, Ashok; Mani, Jesrael; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Adenosine-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CREs) are biomolecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, ATP. CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific segments of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp ˜ 50 nm of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. The helical path of histone-DNA contact on a nucleosome is also called “footprint.” We investigate the mechanism of footprint traversal by a CRE that translocates along the dsDNA. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechanochemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean time of traversal. Our predictions on the ATP dependence of the mean traversal time can be tested by carrying out in vitro experiments on mononucleosomes.

  16. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

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    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  17. Kinetic proofreading of chromatin remodeling: from gene activation to gene repression and back

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    Raghvendra P Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is the active displacement of nucleosomes along or off DNA induced by chromatin remodeling complexes. This key process of gene regulation in eukaryote organisms has recently been argued to be controlled by a kinetic proofreading mechanism. In this paper we present a discussion of the current understanding of this process. We review the case of gene repression via heterochromatin formation by remodelers from the ISWI family and then discuss the activation of the IFN-β gene, where the displacement of the nucleosome is initiated by histone tail acetylations by the enzyme GCN5 which are required for the recruitment of SWI-SNF remodelers. We quantify the speci city of the acetylation step in the remodeling process by peptide docking simulations.

  18. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor

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    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a

  19. Glucocorticoid receptor binding to chromatin is selectively controlled by the coregulator Hic-5 and chromatin remodeling enzymes.

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    Lee, Brian H; Stallcup, Michael R

    2017-06-02

    The steroid hormone-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulates cellular stress pathways by binding to genomic regulatory elements of target genes and recruiting coregulator proteins to remodel chromatin and regulate transcription complex assembly. The coregulator hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone 5 (Hic-5) is required for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of some genes but not others and blocks the regulation of a third gene set by inhibiting GR binding. How Hic-5 exerts these gene-specific effects and specifically how it blocks GR binding to some genes but not others is unclear. Here we show that site-specific blocking of GR binding is due to gene-specific requirements for ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes. By depletion of 11 different chromatin remodelers, we found that ATPases chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 9 (CHD9) and Brahma homologue (BRM, a product of the SMARCA2 gene) are required for GC-regulated expression of the blocked genes but not for other GC-regulated genes. Furthermore, CHD9 and BRM were required for GR occupancy and chromatin remodeling at GR-binding regions associated with blocked genes but not at GR-binding regions associated with other GC-regulated genes. Hic-5 selectively inhibits GR interaction with CHD9 and BRM, thereby blocking chromatin remodeling and robust GR binding at GR-binding sites associated with blocked genes. Thus, Hic-5 regulates GR binding site selection by a novel mechanism, exploiting gene-specific requirements for chromatin remodeling enzymes to selectively influence DNA occupancy and gene regulation by a transcription factor. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break response

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    Smeenk, Godelieve

    2012-01-01

    During my PhD project, I studied the role of several chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break (DSB) response. We discovered that both CHD4 and SMARCA5 are required for ubiquitin signaling through the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, which is a central signaling event in the response

  1. Frequent involvement of chromatin remodeler alterations in gastric field cancerization.

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    Takeshima, Hideyuki; Niwa, Tohru; Takahashi, Takamasa; Wakabayashi, Mika; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ando, Takayuki; Inagawa, Yuki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Katai, Hitoshi; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2015-02-01

    A field for cancerization, or a field defect, is formed by the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in normal-appearing tissues, and is involved in various cancers, especially multiple cancers. Epigenetic alterations are frequently present in chronic inflammation-exposed tissues, but information on individual genes involved in the formation of a field defect is still fragmental. Here, using non-cancerous gastric tissues of cancer patients, we isolated 16 aberrantly methylated genes, and identified chromatin remodelers ACTL6B and SMARCA1 as novel genes frequently methylated in non-cancerous tissues. SMARCA1 was expressed at high levels in normal gastric tissues, but was frequently silenced by aberrant methylation in gastric cancer cells. Moreover, somatic mutations of additional chromatin remodelers, such as ARID1A, SMARCA2, and SMARCA4, were found in 30% of gastric cancers. Mutant allele frequency suggested that the majority of cancer cells harbored a mutation when present. Depletion of a chromatin remodeler, SMARCA1 or SMARCA2, in cancer cell lines promoted their growth. These results showed that epigenetic and genetic alterations of chromatin remodelers are induced at an early stage of carcinogenesis and are frequently involved in the formation of a field defect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide overlap in the binding location and function of chromatin-remodeling proteins | Center for Cancer Research

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    A single strand of DNA can stretch several meters. Yet dozens of these strands, which can be one-tenth as thin as a human hair, need to fit into the cell’s nucleus. To pack those strands into such a small space, DNA tightly winds itself around histone proteins, forming nucleosomes that are strung together into complexes called chromatin. Beyond efficiently packaging DNA, chromatin also regulates how and when DNA is used. The condensed coiling of the genome makes it inaccessible to proteins such as RNA polymerases and transcription factors that control the expression of specific genes. For DNA to become accessible local chromatin regions need to be “opened” up. This process is called chromatin remodeling, and involves the ATP-dependent removal, ejection, or restructuring of nucleosomes by large, multiprotein enzymes.

  3. The CSB chromatin remodeler and CTCF architectural protein cooperate in response to oxidative stress.

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    Lake, Robert J; Boetefuer, Erica L; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2016-03-18

    Cockayne syndrome is a premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological abnormalities, and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species have been found in cells derived from Cockayne syndrome patients. The majority of Cockayne syndrome cases contain mutations in the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler CSB; however, how CSB protects cells from oxidative stress remains largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that oxidative stress alters the genomic occupancy of the CSB protein and increases CSB occupancy at promoters. Additionally, we found that the long-range chromatin-structure regulator CTCF plays a pivotal role in regulating sites of genomic CSB occupancy upon oxidative stress. We show that CSB directly interacts with CTCF in vitro and that oxidative stress enhances the CSB-CTCF interaction in cells. Reciprocally, we demonstrate that CSB facilitates CTCF-DNA interactions in vitro and regulates CTCF-chromatin interactions in oxidatively stressed cells. Together, our results indicate that CSB and CTCF can regulate each other's chromatin association, thereby modulating chromatin structure and coordinating gene expression in response to oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The chromatin remodelling factor dATRX is involved in heterochromatin formation.

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    Andrew R Bassett

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive study of heterochromatin, relatively little is known about the mechanisms by which such a structure forms. We show that the Drosophila homologue of the human alpha-thalassemia and mental retardation X-linked protein (dATRX, is important in the formation or maintenance of heterochromatin through modification of position effect variegation. We further show that there are two isoforms of the dATRX protein, the longer of which interacts directly with heterochromatin protein 1 (dHP-1 through a CxVxL motif both in vitro and in vivo. These two proteins co-localise at heterochromatin in a manner dependent on this motif. Consistent with this observation, the long isoform of the dATRX protein localises primarily to the heterochromatin at the chromocentre on salivary gland polytene chromosomes, whereas the short isoform binds to many sites along the chromosome arms. We suggest that the establishment of a regular nucleosomal organisation may be common to heterochromatin and transcriptionally repressed chromatin in other locations, and may require the action of ATP dependent chromatin remodelling factors.

  5. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

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    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  6. PRC2 and SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complexes in Health and Disease.

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    Kadoch, Cigall; Copeland, Robert A; Keilhack, Heike

    2016-03-22

    The dynamic structure of histones and DNA, also known as chromatin, is regulated by two classes of enzymes: those that mediate covalent modifications on either histone proteins or DNA and those that use the energy generated by ATP hydrolysis to mechanically alter chromatic structure. Both classes of enzymes are often found in large protein complexes. In this review, we describe two such complexes: polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), with the protein methyltransferase EZH2 as its catalytic subunit, and the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF). EZH2 catalyzes the methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3, a covalent chromatin modification that is associated with repressed heterochromatin. The catalytic activity of SWI/SNF, in contrast, leads to a state of open chromatin associated with active transcription. In this review, we discuss the biochemical properties of both complexes, outline the principles of their regulation, and describe their opposing roles in normal development, which can be perturbed in disease settings such as cancer.

  7. The Core Subunit of A Chromatin-Remodeling Complex, ZmCHB101, Plays Essential Roles in Maize Growth and Development.

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    Yu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Lili; Wu, Rui; Meng, Xinchao; Zhang, Ai; Li, Ning; Xia, Qiong; Qi, Xin; Pang, Jinsong; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Bao

    2016-12-05

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play essential roles in the regulation of diverse biological processes by formulating a DNA template that is accessible to the general transcription apparatus. Although the function of chromatin remodelers in plant development has been studied in A. thaliana, how it affects growth and development of major crops (e.g., maize) remains uninvestigated. Combining genetic, genomic and bioinformatic analyses, we show here that the maize core subunit of chromatin remodeling complex, ZmCHB101, plays essential roles in growth and development of maize at both vegetative and reproductive stages. Independent ZmCHB101 RNA interference plant lines displayed abaxially curling leaf phenotype due to increase of bulliform cell numbers, and showed impaired development of tassel and cob. RNA-seq-based transcriptome profiling revealed that ZmCHB101 dictated transcriptional reprogramming of a significant set of genes involved in plant development, photosynthesis, metabolic regulation, stress response and gene expressional regulation. Intriguingly, we found that ZmCHB101 was required for maintaining normal nucleosome density and 45 S rDNA compaction. Our findings suggest that the SWI3 protein, ZmCHB101, plays pivotal roles in maize normal growth and development via regulation of chromatin structure.

  8. Multiple modes of chromatin remodeling by Forkhead box proteins.

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    Lalmansingh, Avin S; Karmakar, Sudipan; Jin, Yetao; Nagaich, Akhilesh K

    2012-07-01

    Forkhead box (FOX) proteins represent a large family of transcriptional regulators unified by their DNA binding domain (DBD) known as a 'forkhead' or 'winged helix' domain. Over 40 FOX genes have been identified in the mammalian genome. FOX proteins share significant sequence similarities in the DBD which allow them to bind to a consensus DNA response element. However, their modes of action are quite diverse as they regulate gene expression by acting as pioneer factors, transcription factors, or both. This review focuses on the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling with an emphasis on three sub-classes-FOXA, FOXO, and FOXP members. FOXA proteins serve as pioneer factors to open up local chromatin structure and thereby increase accessibility of chromatin to factors regulating transcription. FOXP proteins, in contrast, function as classic transcription factors to recruit a variety of chromatin modifying enzymes to regulate gene expression. FOXO proteins represent a hybrid subclass having dual roles as pioneering factors and transcription factors. A subset of FOX proteins interacts with condensed mitotic chromatin and may function as 'bookmarking' agents to maintain transcriptional competence at specific genomic sites. The overall diversity in chromatin remodeling function by FOX proteins is related to unique structural motifs present within the DBD flanking regions that govern selective interactions with core histones and/or chromatin coregulatory proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene

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    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain with the ATP......DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain...... cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD+-metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation....

  10. Epigenetic effects of chromatin remodeling agents on organotypic cultures.

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    Sirchia, Silvia M; Faversani, Alice; Rovina, Davide; Russo, Maria V; Paganini, Leda; Savi, Federica; Augello, Claudia; Rosso, Lorenzo; Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Tabano, Silvia; Bosari, Silvano; Miozzo, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Tumor epigenetic defects are of increasing relevance to clinical practice, because they are 'druggable' targets for cancer therapy using chromatin-remodeling agents (CRAs). New evidences highlight the importance of the microenvironment on the epigenome regulation and the need to use culture models able to preserve tissue morphology, to better understand the action of CRAs. Methods & methods: We studied the epigenetic response induced by culturing and CRAs in a preclinical model, preserving ex vivo the original tissue microenvironment and morphology, assessing different epigenetic signatures. Our overall findings suggest that culturing and CRAs cause heterogeneous effects on the genes methylation; CRAs affect the global DNA methylation and can trigger an active DNA demethylation; the culture induces alterations in the histone deacetylase expression. Despite the limited number of cases, these findings can be considered a proof of concept of the possibility to test CRAs epigenetic effects on ex vivo tissues maintained in their native tissue architecture.

  11. Dysregulation of chromatin remodelling complexes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibshirani, Michael; Zhao, Beibei; Gentil, Benoit J; Minotti, Sandra; Marques, Christine; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rouaux, Caroline; Robertson, Janice; Durham, Heather D

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with paralysis resulting from dysfunction and loss of motor neurons. A common neuropathological finding is attrition of motor neuron dendrites, which make central connections vital to motor control. The chromatin remodelling complex, neuronal Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1)-associated factor complex (nBAF), is critical for neuronal differentiation, dendritic extension and synaptic function. We have identified loss of the crucial nBAF subunits Brg1, Brg1-associated factor 53b and calcium responsive transactivator in cultured motor neurons expressing FUS or TAR-DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) mutants linked to familial ALS. When plasmids encoding wild-type or mutant human FUS or TDP-43 were expressed in motor neurons of dissociated spinal cord cultures prepared from E13 mice, mutant proteins in particular accumulated in the cytoplasm. Immunolabelling of nBAF subunits was reduced in proportion to loss of nuclear FUS or TDP-43 and depletion of Brg1 was associated with nuclear retention of Brg1 mRNA. Dendritic attrition (loss of intermediate and terminal dendritic branches) occurred in motor neurons expressing mutant, but not wild-type, FUS or TDP-43. This attrition was delayed by ectopic over-expression of Brg1 and was reproduced by inhibiting Brg1 activity either through genetic manipulation or treatment with the chemical inhibitor, (E)-1-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-3-((1R, 4R)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2, 5-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one, demonstrating the importance of Brg1 to maintenance of dendritic architecture. Loss of nBAF subunits was also documented in spinal motor neurons in autopsy tissue from familial amyotrophic sclerosis (chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 with G4C2 nucleotide expansion) and from sporadic cases with no identified mutation, pointing to dysfunction of nBAF chromatin remodelling in multiple forms of ALS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  12. The Circadian NAD+ Metabolism: Impact on Chromatin Remodeling and Aging

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    Yasukazu Nakahata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression is known to be a stochastic phenomenon. The stochastic gene expression rate is thought to be altered by topological change of chromosome and/or by chromatin modifications such as acetylation and methylation. Changes in mechanical properties of chromosome/chromatin by soluble factors, mechanical stresses from the environment, or metabolites determine cell fate, regulate cellular functions, or maintain cellular homeostasis. Circadian clock, which drives the expression of thousands of genes with 24-hour rhythmicity, has been known to be indispensable for maintaining cellular functions/homeostasis. During the last decade, it has been demonstrated that chromatin also undergoes modifications with 24-hour rhythmicity and facilitates the fine-tuning of circadian gene expression patterns. In this review, we cover data which suggests that chromatin structure changes in a circadian manner and that NAD+ is the key metabolite for circadian chromatin remodeling. Furthermore, we discuss the relationship among circadian clock, NAD+ metabolism, and aging/age-related diseases. In addition, the interventions of NAD+ metabolism for the prevention and treatment of aging and age-related diseases are also discussed.

  13. Circadian Rhythms and Memory Formation: Regulation by Chromatin Remodeling

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    Saurabh eSahar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation or histone modification, can remodel the chromatin and regulate gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin provides an efficient mechanism of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, to regulate gene expression. CLOCK:BMAL1 mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Recent research has demonstrated that chromatin remodeling is at the cross-roads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and aging. It would be of interest to identify if similar pathways exist in the epigenetic regulation of memory formation.

  14. IUGR increases chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter in newborn male rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xingrao; McKnight, Robert A; Gracey Maniar, Lia E; Sun, Ying; Callaway, Christopher W; Majnik, Amber; Lane, Robert H; Cohen, Susan S

    2015-07-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for neurodevelopment delay and neuroendocrine reprogramming in both humans and rats. Neuroendocrine reprogramming involves the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene that is epigenetically regulated in the hippocampus. Using a well-characterized rodent model, we have previously shown that IUGR increases GR exon 1.7 mRNA variant and total GR expressions in male rat pup hippocampus. Epigenetic regulation of GR transcription may involve chromatin remodeling of the GR gene. A key chromatin remodeler is Brahma-related gene-1(Brg1), a member of the ATP-dependent SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Brg1 regulates gene expression by affecting nucleosome repositioning and recruiting transcriptional components to target promoters. We hypothesized that IUGR would increase hippocampal Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter, as well as alter nucleosome positioning over GR promoters in newborn male pups. Further, we hypothesized that IUGR would lead to accumulation of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and RNA pol II at GR exon 1.7 promoter. Indeed, we found that IUGR increased Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter. We also found that increased Brg1 binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter was associated with accumulation of Sp1 and RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain pSer-5 (a marker of active transcription). Furthermore, the transcription start site of GR exon 1.7 was located within a nucleosome-depleted region. We speculate that changes in hippocampal Brg1 expression mediate GR expression and subsequently trigger neuroendocrine reprogramming in male IUGR rats. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Compact tomato seedlings and plants upon overexpression of a tomato chromatin remodelling ATPase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folta, A.; Bargsten, J.W.; Bisseling, T.; Nap, J.P.H.; Mlynarova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Control of plant growth is an important aspect of crop productivity and yield in agriculture. Overexpression of the AtCHR12/23 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana reduced growth habit without other morphological changes. These two genes encode Snf2 chromatin remodelling ATPases. Here, we translate this

  16. Functional Interplay of Two Paralogs Encoding SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Accessory Subunits During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Iris; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Cornes, Eric; Fontrodona, Laura; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter; Cabello, Juan; Cerón, Julián

    2016-03-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes have been related to several cellular processes such as transcription, regulation of chromosomal stability, and DNA repair. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene ham-3 (also known as swsn-2.1) and its paralog swsn-2.2 encode accessory subunits of SWI/SNF complexes. Using RNA interference (RNAi) assays and diverse alleles we investigated whether ham-3 and swsn-2.2 have different functions during C. elegans development since they encode proteins that are probably mutually exclusive in a given SWI/SNF complex. We found that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 display similar functions in vulva specification, germline development, and intestinal cell proliferation, but have distinct roles in embryonic development. Accordingly, we detected functional redundancy in some developmental processes and demonstrated by RNA sequencing of RNAi-treated L4 animals that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 regulate the expression of a common subset of genes but also have specific targets. Cell lineage analyses in the embryo revealed hyper-proliferation of intestinal cells in ham-3 null mutants whereas swsn-2.2 is required for proper cell divisions. Using a proteomic approach, we identified SWSN-2.2-interacting proteins needed for early cell divisions, such as SAO-1 and ATX-2, and also nuclear envelope proteins such as MEL-28. swsn-2.2 mutants phenocopy mel-28 loss-of-function, and we observed that SWSN-2.2 and MEL-28 colocalize in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SWSN-2.2 is required for correct chromosome segregation and nuclear reassembly after mitosis including recruitment of MEL-28 to the nuclear periphery. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

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    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  18. Chromatin-remodeling factor OsINO80 is involved in regulation of gibberellin biosynthesis and is crucial for rice plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Liu, Yuhao; Shen, Wen-Hui; Yu, Yu; Dong, Aiwu

    2017-10-17

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays essential roles in plant growth and development. Here, we report that OsINO80, a conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factor in rice (Oryza sativa), functions in diverse biological processes and GA biosynthesis. OsINO80-knockdown mutants, derived from either T-DNA insertion or RNA interference, display typical GA-deficient phenotypes, including dwarfism, reduced cell length, late flowering, retarded seed germination and impaired reproductive development. Consistently, transcriptome analyses reveal that OsINO80 knockdown results in down-regulation by more than two-fold of over 1000 genes, including the GA biosynthesis genes CPS1 and GA3ox2, and the dwarf phenotype of OsINO80-knockdown mutants can be rescued by the application of exogenous GA3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments show that OsINO80 directly binds to the chromatin of CPS1 and GA3ox2 loci. Biochemical assays prove that OsINO80 specially interacts with histone variant H2A.Z and the H2A.Z enrichments at CPS1 and GA3ox2 is decreased in OsINO80-knockdown mutants. Thus, our study identified a new rice chromatin-remodeling factor, OsINO80, and demonstrated that OsINO80 is involved in regulation of the GA biosynthesis pathway and plays critical functions at many aspects of rice plant growth and development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Is Required for Base Excision Repair in Conventional but Not in Variant H2A.Bbd Nucleosomes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Hervé; Gasparutto, Didier; Hamiche, Ali; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe; Angelov, Dimitar

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotes, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for the repair of oxidatively generated lesions. The mechanism of BER on naked DNA substrates has been studied in detail, but how it operates on chromatin remains unclear. Here we have studied the mechanism of BER by introducing a single 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) lesion in the DNA of reconstituted positioned conventional and histone variant H2A.Bbd nucleosomes. We found that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, and polymerase β activities were strongly reduced in both types of nucleosomes. In conventional nucleosomes SWI/SNF stimulated the processing of 8-oxoG by each one of the three BER repair factors to efficiencies similar to those for naked DNA. Interestingly, SWI/SNF-induced remodeling, but not mobilization of conventional nucleosomes, was required to achieve this effect. A very weak effect of SWI/SNF on the 8-oxoG BER removal in H2A.Bbd histone variant nucleosomes was observed. The possible implications of our data for the understanding of in vivo mechanisms of BER are discussed. PMID:17591702

  20. Inactivation of chromatin remodeling factors sensitizes cells to selective cytotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Miles D Freeman, Tryphon Mazu, Jana S Miles, Selina Darling-Reed, Hernan Flores-Rozas College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL, USA Abstract: The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex plays an essential role in several cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and DNA repair. Loss of normal function of the SWI/SNF complex because of mutations in its subunits correlates with tumorigenesis in humans. For many of these cancers, cytotoxic chemotherapy is the primary, and sometimes the only, therapeutic alternative. Among the antineoplastic agents, anthracyclines are a common treatment option. Although effective, resistance to these agents usually develops and serious dose-related toxicity, namely, chronic cardiotoxicity, limits its use. Previous work from our laboratory showed that a deletion of the SWI/SNF factor SNF2 resulted in hypersensitivity to doxorubicin. We further investigated the contribution of other chromatin remodeling complex components in the response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Our results indicate that, of the eight SWI/SNF strains tested, snf2, taf14, and swi3 were the most sensitive and displayed distinct sensitivity to different cytotoxic agents, while snf5 displayed resistance. Our experimental results indicate that the SWI/SNF complex plays a critical role in protecting cells from exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy and other cytotoxic agents. Our findings may prove useful in the development of a strategy aimed at targeting these genes to provide an alternative by hypersensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Keywords: chromatin remodeling, cancer, DNA damage/repair, heat-shock response, oxidative stress

  1. Diverse chromatin remodeling genes antagonize the Rb-involved SynMuv pathways in C. elegans.

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    Mingxue Cui

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans, vulval cell-fate specification involves the activities of multiple signal transduction and regulatory pathways that include a receptor tyrosine kinase/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and synthetic multivulva (SynMuv pathways. Many genes in the SynMuv pathways encode transcription factors including the homologs of mammalian Rb, E2F, and components of the nucleosome-remodeling deacetylase complex. To further elucidate the functions of the SynMuv genes, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen to search for genes that antagonize the SynMuv gene activities. Among those that displayed a varying degree of suppression of the SynMuv phenotype, 32 genes are potentially involved in chromatin remodeling (called SynMuv suppressor genes herein. Genetic mutations of two representative genes (zfp-1 and mes-4 were used to further characterize their positive roles in vulval induction and relationships with Ras function. Our analysis revealed antagonistic roles of the SynMuv suppressor genes and the SynMuv B genes in germline-soma distinction, RNAi, somatic transgene silencing, and tissue specific expression of pgl-1 and the lag-2/Delta genes. The opposite roles of these SynMuv B and SynMuv suppressor genes on transcriptional regulation were confirmed in somatic transgene silencing. We also report the identifications of ten new genes in the RNAi pathway and six new genes in germline silencing. Among the ten new RNAi genes, three encode homologs of proteins involved in both protein degradation and chromatin remodeling. Our findings suggest that multiple chromatin remodeling complexes are involved in regulating the expression of specific genes that play critical roles in developmental decisions.

  2. Chromatin remodeling of human subtelomeres and TERRA promoters upon cellular senescence: commonalities and differences between chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Peter E; Tobi, Elmar W; Balog, Judit; Schouten, Suzanne G; Kremer, Dennis; El Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Henneman, Peter; Putter, Hein; Eline Slagboom, P; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-05-01

    Subtelomeres are patchworks of evolutionary conserved sequence blocks and harbor the transcriptional start sites for telomere repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). Recent studies suggest that the interplay between telomeres and subtelomeric chromatin is required for maintaining telomere function. To further characterize chromatin remodeling of subtelomeres in relation to telomere shortening and cellular senescence, we systematically quantified histone modifications and DNA methylation at the subtelomeres of chromosomes 7q and 11q in primary human WI-38 fibroblasts. Upon senescence, both subtelomeres were characterized by a decrease in markers of constitutive heterochromatin, suggesting relative chromatin relaxation. However, we did not find increased levels of markers of euchromatin or derepression of the 7q VIPR2 gene. The repressed state of the subtelomeres was maintained upon senescence, which could be attributed to a rise in levels of facultative heterochromatin markers at both subtelomeres. While senescence-induced subtelomeric chromatin remodeling was similar for both chromosomes, chromatin remodeling at TERRA promoters displayed chromosome-specific patterns. At the 7q TERRA promoter, chromatin structure was co-regulated with the more proximal subtelomere. In contrast, the 11q TERRA promoter, which was previously shown to be bound by CCCTC-binding factor CTCF, displayed lower levels of markers of constitutive heterochromatin that did not change upon senescence, whereas levels of markers of facultative heterochromatin decreased upon senescence. In line with the chromatin state data, transcription of 11q TERRA but not 7q TERRA was detected. Our study provides a detailed description of human subtelomeric chromatin dynamics and shows distinct regulation of the TERRA promoters of 7q and 11q upon cellular senescence.

  3. MRN1 implicates chromatin remodeling complexes and architectural factors in mRNA maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6¿¿ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin....... Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309¿, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing....

  4. O-GlcNAcylation and chromatin remodeling in mammals: an up-to-date overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leturcq, Maïté; Lefebvre, Tony; Vercoutter-Edouart, Anne-Sophie

    2017-04-15

    Post-translational modifications of histones and the dynamic DNA methylation cycle are finely regulated by a myriad of chromatin-binding factors and chromatin-modifying enzymes. Epigenetic modifications ensure local changes in the architecture of chromatin, thus controlling in fine the accessibility of the machinery of transcription, replication or DNA repair to the chromatin. Over the past decade, the nutrient-sensor enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) has emerged as a modulator of chromatin remodeling. In mammals, OGT acts either directly through dynamic and reversible O-GlcNAcylation of histones and chromatin effectors, or in an indirect manner through its recruitment into chromatin-bound multiprotein complexes. In particular, there is an increasing amount of evidence of a cross-talk between OGT and the DNA dioxygenase ten-eleven translocation proteins that catalyze active DNA demethylation. Conversely, the stability of OGT itself can be controlled by the histone lysine-specific demethylase 2 (LSD2). Finally, a few studies have explored the role of O-GlcNAcase (OGA) in chromatin remodeling. In this review, we summarize the recent findings on the link between OGT, OGA and chromatin regulators in mammalian cellular models, and discuss their relevance in physiological and pathological conditions. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Compact tomato seedlings and plants upon overexpression of a tomato chromatin remodelling ATPase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, Adam; Bargsten, Joachim W; Bisseling, Ton; Nap, Jan-Peter; Mlynarova, Ludmila

    2016-02-01

    Control of plant growth is an important aspect of crop productivity and yield in agriculture. Overexpression of the AtCHR12/23 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana reduced growth habit without other morphological changes. These two genes encode Snf2 chromatin remodelling ATPases. Here, we translate this approach to the horticultural crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We identified and cloned the single tomato ortholog of the two Arabidopsis Snf2 genes, designated SlCHR1. Transgenic tomato plants (cv. Micro-Tom) that constitutively overexpress the coding sequence of SlCHR1 show reduced growth in all developmental stages of tomato. This confirms that SlCHR1 combines the functions of both Arabidopsis genes in tomato. Compared to the wild type, the transgenic seedlings of tomato have significantly shorter roots, hypocotyls and reduced cotyledon size. Transgenic plants have a much more compact growth habit with markedly reduced plant height, severely compacted reproductive structures with smaller flowers and smaller fruits. The results indicate that either GMO-based or non-GMO-based approaches to modulate the expression of chromatin remodelling ATPase genes could develop into methods to control plant growth, for example to replace the use of chemical growth retardants. This approach is likely to be applicable and attractive for any crop for which growth habit reduction has added value. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Osa-containing Brahma chromatin remodeling complexes are required for the repression of Wingless target genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Russell T.; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2000-01-01

    The Wingless signaling pathway directs many developmental processes in Drosophila by regulating the expression of specific downstream target genes. We report here that the product of the trithorax group gene osa is required to repress such genes in the absence of the Wingless signal. The Wingless-regulated genes nubbin, Distal-less, and decapentaplegic and a minimal enhancer from the Ultrabithorax gene are misexpressed in osa mutants and repressed by ectopic Osa. Osa-mediated repression occurs downstream of the up-regulation of Armadillo but is sensitive both to the relative levels of activating Armadillo/Pangolin and repressing Groucho/Pangolin complexes present and to the responsiveness of the promoter to Wingless. Osa functions as a component of the Brahma chromatin-remodeling complex; other components of this complex are likewise required to repress Wingless target genes. These results suggest that altering the conformation of chromatin is an important mechanism by which Wingless signaling activates gene expression. PMID:11124806

  8. The chromatin-remodeling factor CHD4 coordinates signaling and repair after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Poinsignon, Catherine; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2010-01-01

    -dependent chromatin-remodeling protein CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4) as a factor that becomes transiently immobilized on chromatin after IR. Knockdown of CHD4 triggers enhanced Cdc25A degradation and p21(Cip1) accumulation, which lead to more pronounced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition...... and extended cell cycle delay. At DNA double-strand breaks, depletion of CHD4 disrupts the chromatin response at the level of the RNF168 ubiquitin ligase, which in turn impairs local ubiquitylation and BRCA1 assembly. These cell cycle and chromatin defects are accompanied by elevated spontaneous and IR......-induced DNA breakage, reduced efficiency of DNA repair, and decreased clonogenic survival. Thus, CHD4 emerges as a novel genome caretaker and a factor that facilitates both checkpoint signaling and repair events after DNA damage....

  9. Nascent DNA Proteomics Reveals a Chromatin Remodeler Required for Topoisomerase I Loading at Replication Forks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Ribeyre

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During transcription and DNA replication, the DNA template is overwound ahead of RNA and DNA polymerases and relaxed by DNA topoisomerases. Inhibitors of topoisomerases are potent anti-cancer agents. Camptothecin traps topoisomerase I on DNA and exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells by way of its interference with the progression of replication forks. Starting with an unbiased proteomic analysis, we find that the chromatin remodeling complex BAZ1B-SMARCA5 accumulates near replication forks in camptothecin-exposed cells. We report that BAZ1B associates with topoisomerase I and facilitates its access to replication forks. Single-molecule analyses of replication structures show that BAZ1B contributes to replication interference by camptothecin. A lack of BAZ1B confers increased cellular tolerance of camptothecin. These findings reveal BAZ1B as a key facilitator of topoisomerase I function during DNA replication that affects the response of cancer cells to topoisomerase I inhibitors.

  10. The Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Shifts Nucleosomal DNA Bidirectionally as a Monomer

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    Qiu, Yupeng; Levendosky, Robert F.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D.; Myong, Sua

    2017-10-01

    Chromatin remodelers catalyze dynamic packaging of the genome by carrying out nucleosome assembly/disassembly, histone exchange, and nucleosome repositioning. Remodeling results in evenly spaced nucleosomes, which requires probing both sides of the nucleosome, yet the way remodelers organize sliding activity to achieve this task is not understood. Here, we show that the monomeric Chd1 remodeler shifts DNA back and forth by dynamically alternating between different segments of the nucleosome. During sliding, Chd1 generates unstable remodeling intermediates that spontaneously relax to a pre-remodeled position. We demonstrate that nucleosome sliding is tightly controlled by two regulatory domains: the DNA-binding domain, which interferes with sliding when its range is limited by a truncated linking segment, and the chromodomains, which play a key role in substrate discrimination. We propose that active interplay of the ATPase motor with the regulatory domains may promote dynamic nucleosome structures uniquely suited for histone exchange and chromatin reorganization during transcription.

  11. Frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gui, Yaoting; Guo, Guangwu; Huang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer. Here we sequenced the exomes of nine individuals with TCC and screened all the somatically mutated genes in a prevalence set of 88 additional individuals with TCC with different tumor stages and grades. In our study, we...... discovered a variety of genes previously unknown to be mutated in TCC. Notably, we identified genetic aberrations of the chromatin remodeling genes (UTX, MLL-MLL3, CREBBP-EP300, NCOR1, ARID1A and CHD6) in 59% of our 97 subjects with TCC. Of these genes, we showed UTX to be altered substantially more...... frequently in tumors of low stages and grades, highlighting its potential role in the classification and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Our results provide an overview of the genetic basis of TCC and suggest that aberration of chromatin regulation might be a hallmark of bladder cancer....

  12. The selector gene Pax7 dictates alternate pituitary cell fates through its pioneer action on chromatin remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budry, L.; Balsalobre, A.; Gauthier, Y.; Khetchoumian, K.; L'Honore, A.; Vallette-Kasic, S.; Brue, T; Figarella-Branger, D.; Meij, B.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/164045805; Drouin, J.

    2012-01-01

    Genes Dev. 2012 Oct 15;26(20):2299-310. doi: 10.1101/gad.200436.112. The selector gene Pax7 dictates alternate pituitary cell fates through its pioneer action on chromatin remodeling. Budry L, Balsalobre A, Gauthier Y, Khetchoumian K, L'honoré A, Vallette S, Brue T, Figarella-Branger D, Meij B,

  13. Mutation of Neuron-Specific Chromatin Remodeling Subunit BAF53b: Rescue of Plasticity and Memory by Manipulating Actin Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciernia, Annie Vogel; Kramár, Enikö A.; Matheos, Dina P.; Havekes, Robbert; Hemstedt, Thekla J.; Magnan, Christophe N.; Sakata, Keith; Tran, Ashley; Azzawi, Soraya; Lopez, Alberto; Dang, Richard; Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian; Tong, Joyce; Barrett, Ruth M.; Post, Rebecca J.; Baldi, Pierre; Abel, Ted; Lynch, Gary; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent human exome-sequencing studies have implicated polymorphic Brg1-associated factor (BAF) complexes (mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes) in several intellectual disabilities and cognitive disorders, including autism. However, it remains unclear how mutations in BAF complexes result in impaired cognitive function. Post-mitotic…

  14. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo-Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel [Physiological Genomics Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Patrick, Steve M., E-mail: Stephan.Patrick@utoledo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo-Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  15. The chromatin remodeling Isw1a complex is regulated by SUMOylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qingtang; Beyrouthy, Nissrine; Matabishi-Bibi, Laura; Dargemont, Catherine

    2017-10-05

    The ISWI class of proteins consists of a family of chromatin remodeling ATPases that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes and predominantly functions to slide nucleosomes laterally. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isw1 partners with several non-essential alternative subunits - Ioc2, Ioc3, or Ioc4 - to form two distinct complexes Isw1a and Isw1b. Besides its ATPase domain, Isw1 presents a C-terminal region formed by HAND, SANT, and SLIDE domains responsible for interaction with the Ioc proteins and optimal association of Isw1 to chromatin. Despite diverse studies on the functions of the Isw1-containing complexes, molecular evidence for a regulation of this chromatin remodeling ATPase is still elusive. Results presented here indicate that Isw1 is not only ubiquitylated but also strongly SUMOylated on multiple lysine residues by the redundant Siz1/Siz2 SUMO E3 ligases. However, Isw1 is a poor substrate of the Ulp1 and Ulp2 SUMO proteases, thus resulting in a high level of modification. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis allowed us to identify the major SUMOylation sites and develop a SUMO-defective mutant of Isw1. Using this molecular tool, we show that SUMOylation of Isw1 specifically facilitates and/or stabilizes its interaction with its cofactor Ioc3 and consequently the efficient recruitment of the Isw1-Ioc3 complex onto chromatin. Together these data reveal a new regulatory mechanism for this fascinating remodeling factor. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex transcriptionally regulates the BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein (BCCIP in cells

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    Jiaming Su

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The BCCIP (BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein is an important cofactor for BRCA2 in tumor suppression. Although the low expression of BCCIP is observed in multiple clinically diagnosed primary tumor tissues such as ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal carcinoma, the mechanism of how BCCIP is regulated in cells is still unclear. The human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex composed of 15 subunits catalyzes ATP-dependent sliding of nucleosomes along DNA. Here, we first report that BCCIP is a novel target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex by presenting a series of experimental evidence. Gene expression studies combined with siRNA knockdown data locked candidate genes including BCCIP of the INO80/YY1 complex. Silencing or over-expressing the subunits of the INO80/YY1 complex regulates the expression level of BCCIP both in mRNA and proteins in cells. Also, the functions of INO80/YY1 complex in regulating the transactivation of BCCIP were confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments clarify the enrichment of INO80 and YY1 at +0.17 kb downstream of the BCCIP transcriptional start site. However, this enrichment is significantly inhibited by either knocking down INO80 or YY1, suggesting the existence of both INO80 and YY1 is required for recruiting the INO80/YY1 complex to BCCIP promoter region. Our findings strongly indicate that BCCIP is a potential target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex.

  17. The Osa-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates stem cell commitment in the adult Drosophila intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiankun; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X.

    2013-01-01

    The proportion of stem cells versus differentiated progeny is well balanced to maintain tissue homeostasis, which in turn depends on the balance of the different signaling pathways involved in stem cell self-renewal versus lineage-specific differentiation. In a screen for genes that regulate cell lineage determination in the posterior midgut, we identified that the Osa-containing SWI/SNF (Brahma) chromatin-remodeling complex regulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Mutations in subunits of the Osa-containing complex result in intestinal stem cell (ISC) expansion as well as enteroendocrine (EE) cell reduction. We further demonstrated that Osa regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation into enterocytes by elaborating Notch signaling, and ISC commitment to differentiation into EE cells by regulating the expression of Asense, an EE cell fate determinant. Our data uncover a unique mechanism whereby the commitment of stem cells to discrete lineages is coordinately regulated by chromatin-remodeling factors. PMID:23942514

  18. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor ‘hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam; Sung, Myong-Hee; Baek, Songjoon; Loft, Anne; Hager, Gordon L; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is tightly controlled by a complex network of transcription factors acting at different stages of differentiation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family members are key regulators of this process. We have employed DNase I hypersensitive site analysis to investigate the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that accompany the binding of adipogenic transcription factors. These analyses revealed a dramatic and dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during the first hours of adipocyte differentiation that coincides with cooperative binding of multiple early transcription factors (including glucocorticoid receptor, retinoid X receptor, Stat5a, C/EBPβ and -δ) to transcription factor ‘hotspots'. Our results demonstrate that C/EBPβ marks a large number of these transcription factor ‘hotspots' before induction of differentiation and chromatin remodelling and is required for their establishment. Furthermore, a subset of early remodelled C/EBP-binding sites persists throughout differentiation and is later occupied by PPARγ, indicating that early C/EBP family members, in addition to their well-established role in activation of PPARγ transcription, may act as pioneering factors for PPARγ binding. PMID:21427703

  19. An overproduction of astellolides induced by genetic disruption of chromatin-remodeling factors in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Kawatani, Makoto; Futamura, Yushi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae is an important industrial mold. Recent genomic analysis indicated that A. oryzae has a large number of biosynthetic genes for secondary metabolites (SMs), but many of the SMs they produce have not been identified. For better understanding of SMs production by A. oryzae, we screened a gene-disruption library of transcription factors including chromatin-remodeling factors and found two gene disruptions that show similarly altered SM production profiles. One is a homolog of Aspergillus nidulans cclA, a component of the histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complex of proteins associated with Set1 complex, and the other, sppA, is an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPP1, another component of a complex of proteins associated with Set1 complex. The cclA and sppA disruptions in A. oryzae are deficient in trimethylation of H3K4. Furthermore, one of the SMs that increased in the cclA disruptant was identified as astellolide F (14-deacetyl astellolide B). These data indicate that both cclA and sppA affect production of SMs including astellolides by affecting the methylation status of H3K4 in A. oryzae.

  20. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Sebald

    Full Text Available The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

  1. The Chromatin-Remodeling Protein Osa Interacts With CyclinE in Drosophila Eye Imaginal Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Jawaid; Chanut, Francoise; Kornberg, Thomas B.; Klebes, Ansgar

    2010-01-01

    Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation is essential during organogenesis. In Drosophila, the photoreceptor, pigment, and support cells of the eye are specified in an orchestrated wave as the morphogenetic furrow passes across the eye imaginal disc. Cells anterior of the furrow are not yet differentiated and remain mitotically active, while most cells in the furrow arrest at G1 and adopt specific ommatidial fates. We used microarray expression analysis to monitor changes in transcription at the furrow and identified genes whose expression correlates with either proliferation or fate specification. Some of these are members of the Polycomb and Trithorax families that encode epigenetic regulators. Osa is one; it associates with components of the Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Our studies of this Trithorax factor in eye development implicate Osa as a regulator of the cell cycle: Osa overexpression caused a small-eye phenotype, a reduced number of M- and S-phase cells in eye imaginal discs, and a delay in morphogenetic furrow progression. In addition, we present evidence that Osa interacts genetically and biochemically with CyclinE. Our results suggest a dual mechanism of Osa function in transcriptional regulation and cell cycle control. PMID:20008573

  2. Protooncogene Ski cooperates with the chromatin-remodeling factor Satb2 in specifying callosal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranek, Constanze; Dittrich, Manuela; Parthasarathy, Srinivas; Bonnon, Carine Gaiser; Britanova, Olga; Lanshakov, Dmitriy; Boukhtouche, Fatiha; Sommer, Julia E; Colmenares, Clemencia; Tarabykin, Victor; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2012-02-28

    First insights into the molecular programs orchestrating the progression from neural stem cells to cortical projection neurons are emerging. Loss of the transcriptional regulator Ski has been linked to the human 1p36 deletion syndrome, which includes central nervous system defects. Here, we report critical roles for Ski in the maintenance of the neural stem cell pool and the specification of callosal neurons. Ski-deficient callosal neurons lose their identity and ectopically express the transcription factor Ctip2. The misspecified callosal neurons largely fail to form the corpus callosum and instead redirect their axons toward subcortical targets. We identify the chromatin-remodeling factor Satb2 as a partner of Ski, and show that both proteins are required for transcriptional repression of Ctip2 in callosal neurons. We propose a model in which Satb2 recruits Ski to the Ctip2 locus, and Ski attracts histone deacetylases, thereby enabling the formation of a functional nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase repressor complex. Our findings establish a central role for Ski-Satb2 interactions in regulating transcriptional mechanisms of callosal neuron specification.

  3. The chromatin remodeling factor CHD5 is a transcriptional repressor of WEE1.

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    Jinhua Quan

    Full Text Available Loss of the chromatin remodeling ATPase CHD5 has been linked to the progression of neuroblastoma tumors, yet the underlying mechanisms behind the tumor suppressor role of CHD5 are unknown. In this study, we purified the human CHD5 complex and found that CHD5 is a component of the full NuRD transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone deacetylases. The CHD5/NuRD complex appears mutually exclusive with the related CHD4/NuRD complex as overexpression of CHD5 results in loss of the CHD4 protein in cells. Following a search for genes that are regulated by CHD5 in neuroblastoma cells, we found that CHD5 binds to and represses the G2/M checkpoint gene WEE1. Reintroduction of CHD5 into neuroblastoma cells represses WEE1 expression, demonstrating that CHD5 can function as a repressor in cells. A catalytically inactive mutant version of CHD5 is able to associate with a NuRD cofactor but fails to repress transcription. Our study shows that CHD5 is a NuRD-associated transcriptional repressor and identifies WEE1 as one of the CHD5-regulated genes that may link CHD5 to tumor suppression.

  4. Modulation of chromatin remodelling induced by the freshwater cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin in human intestinal caco-2 cells.

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    Antoine Huguet

    Full Text Available Cylindrospermopsin (CYN is a cyanotoxin that has been recognised as an emerging potential public health risk. Although CYN toxicity has been demonstrated, the mechanisms involved have not been fully characterised. To identify some key pathways related to this toxicity, we studied the transcriptomic profile of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to a sub-toxic concentration of CYN (1.6 µM for 24hrs using a non-targeted approach. CYN was shown to modulate different biological functions which were related to growth arrest (with down-regulation of cdkn1a and uhrf1 genes, and DNA recombination and repair (with up-regulation of aptx and pms2 genes. Our main results reported an increased expression of some histone-modifying enzymes (histone acetyl and methyltransferases MYST1, KAT5 and EHMT2 involved in chromatin remodelling, which is essential for initiating transcription. We also detected greater levels of acetylated histone H2A (Lys5 and dimethylated histone H3 (Lys4, two products of these enzymes. In conclusion, CYN overexpressed proteins involved in DNA damage repair and transcription, including modifications of nucleosomal histones. Our results highlighted some new cell processes induced by CYN.

  5. Cotranscriptional Chromatin Remodeling by Small RNA Species: An HTLV-1 Perspective

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    Nishat Aliya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell type specificity of human T cell leukemia virus 1 has been proposed as a possible reason for differential viral outcome in primary target cells versus secondary. Through chromatin remodeling, the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax interacts with cellular factors at the chromosomally integrated viral promoter to activate downstream genes and control viral transcription. RNA interference is the host innate defense mechanism mediated by short RNA species (siRNA or miRNA that regulate gene expression. There exists a close collaborative functioning of cellular transcription factors with miRNA in order to regulate the expression of a number of eukaryotic genes including those involved in suppression of cell growth, induction of apoptosis, as well as repressing viral replication and propagation. In addition, it has been suggested that retroviral latency is influenced by chromatin alterations brought about by miRNA. Since Tax requires the assembly of transcriptional cofactors to carry out viral gene expression, there might be a close association between miRNA influencing chromatin alterations and Tax-mediated LTR activation. Herein we explore the possible interplay between HTLV-1 infection and miRNA pathways resulting in chromatin reorganization as one of the mechanisms determining HTLV-1 cell specificity and viral fate in different cell types.

  6. Essential role of chromatin remodeling protein Bptf in early mouse embryos and embryonic stem cells.

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    Joseph Landry

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the biological functions of the chromatin remodeling protein Bptf (Bromodomain PHD-finger Transcription Factor, the largest subunit of NURF (Nucleosome Remodeling Factor in a mammal. Bptf mutants manifest growth defects at the post-implantation stage and are reabsorbed by E8.5. Histological analyses of lineage markers show that Bptf(-/- embryos implant but fail to establish a functional distal visceral endoderm. Microarray analysis at early stages of differentiation has identified Bptf-dependent gene targets including homeobox transcriptions factors and genes essential for the development of ectoderm, mesoderm, and both definitive and visceral endoderm. Differentiation of Bptf(-/- embryonic stem cell lines into embryoid bodies revealed its requirement for development of mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm tissue lineages, and uncovered many genes whose activation or repression are Bptf-dependent. We also provide functional and physical links between the Bptf-containing NURF complex and the Smad transcription factors. These results suggest that Bptf may co-regulate some gene targets of this pathway, which is essential for establishment of the visceral endoderm. We conclude that Bptf likely regulates genes and signaling pathways essential for the development of key tissues of the early mouse embryo.

  7. IRAK-M regulates chromatin remodeling in lung macrophages during experimental sepsis.

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    Kenneth Lyn-Kew

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis results in a profound state of immunosuppression, which is temporally associated with impaired leukocyte function. The mechanism of leukocyte reprogramming in sepsis is incompletely understood. In this study, we explored mechanisms contributing to dysregulated inflammatory cytokine expression by pulmonary macrophages during experimental sepsis. Pulmonary macrophages (PM recovered from the lungs of mice undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP display transiently reduced expression of some, but not all innate genes in response to LPS. Impaired expression of TNF-alpha and iNOS was associated with reduced acetylation and methylation of specific histones (AcH4 and H3K4me3 and reduced binding of RNA polymerase II to the promoters of these genes. Transient impairment in LPS-induced cytokine responses in septic PM temporally correlated with induction of IRAK-M mRNA and protein, which occurred in a MyD88-dependent fashion. PM isolated from IRAK-M(-/- mice were largely refractory to CLP-induced impairment in cytokine expression, chromatin remodeling, recruitment of RNA polymerase II, and induction of histone deacetylase-2 observed during sepsis. Our findings indicate that systemic sepsis induces epigenetic silencing of cytokine gene expression in lung macrophages, and IRAK-M appears to be a critical mediator of this response.

  8. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and...... process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.......A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co......-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated...

  9. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  10. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebald, Johanna; Willi, Michaela; Schoberleitner, Ines; Krogsdam, Anne; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

  11. The chromatin remodeling complex Swi/Snf regulates splicing of meiotic transcripts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramanan, Srivats; Douglass, Stephen; Galivanche, Anoop R; Johnson, Tracy L

    2017-07-27

    Despite its relatively streamlined genome, there are important examples of regulated RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as splicing of meiotic transcripts. Like other eukaryotes, S. cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic reprogramming of gene expression during meiosis, including regulated splicing of a number of crucial meiosis-specific RNAs. Splicing of a subset of these is dependent upon the splicing activator Mer1. Here we show a crucial role for the chromatin remodeler Swi/Snf in regulation of splicing of meiotic genes and find that the complex affects meiotic splicing in two ways. First, we show that Swi/Snf regulates nutrient-dependent downregulation of ribosomal protein encoding RNAs, leading to the redistribution of spliceosomes from this abundant class of intron-containing RNAs (the ribosomal protein genes) to Mer1-regulated transcripts. We also demonstrate that Mer1 expression is dependent on Snf2, its acetylation state and histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation at the MER1 locus. Hence, Snf2 exerts systems level control of meiotic gene expression through two temporally distinct mechanisms, demonstrating that it is a key regulator of meiotic splicing in S. cerevisiae. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism whereby the cell redirects its energy from maintaining its translational capacity to the process of meiosis. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. The chromatin remodelling factor BRG1 is a novel binding partner of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a

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    Mann Graham J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CDKN2A/p16INK4a is frequently altered in human cancers and it is the most important melanoma susceptibility gene identified to date. p16INK4a inhibits pRb phosphorylation and induces cell cycle arrest, which is considered its main tumour suppressor function. Nevertheless, additional activities may contribute to the tumour suppressor role of p16INK4a and could help explain its specific association with melanoma predisposition. To identify such functions we conducted a yeast-two-hybrid screen for novel p16INK4a binding partners. Results We now report that p16INK4a interacts with the chromatin remodelling factor BRG1. We investigated the cooperative roles of p16INK4a and BRG1 using a panel of cell lines and a melanoma cell model with inducible p16INK4a expression and BRG1 silencing. We found evidence that BRG1 is not required for p16INK4a-induced cell cycle inhibition and propose that the p16INK4a-BRG1 complex regulates BRG1 chromatin remodelling activity. Importantly, we found frequent loss of BRG1 expression in primary and metastatic melanomas, implicating this novel p16INK4a binding partner as an important tumour suppressor in melanoma. Conclusion This data adds to the increasing evidence implicating the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex in tumour development and the association of p16INK4a with chromatin remodelling highlights potentially new functions that may be important in melanoma predisposition and chemoresistance.

  13. EBF2 transcriptionally regulates brown adipogenesis via the histone reader DPF3 and the BAF chromatin remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Suzanne N; Lim, Hee-Woong; Rajakumari, Sona; Sakers, Alexander P; Ishibashi, Jeff; Harms, Matthew J; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Seale, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The transcription factor early B-cell factor 2 (EBF2) is an essential mediator of brown adipocyte commitment and terminal differentiation. However, the mechanisms by which EBF2 regulates chromatin to activate brown fat-specific genes in adipocytes were unknown. ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] followed by deep sequencing) analyses in brown adipose tissue showed that EBF2 binds and regulates the activity of lineage-specific enhancers. Mechanistically, EBF2 physically interacts with the chromatin remodeler BRG1 and the BAF chromatin remodeling complex in brown adipocytes. We identified the histone reader protein DPF3 as a brown fat-selective component of the BAF complex that was required for brown fat gene programming and mitochondrial function. Loss of DPF3 in brown adipocytes reduced chromatin accessibility at EBF2-bound enhancers and led to a decrease in basal and catecholamine-stimulated expression of brown fat-selective genes. Notably, Dpf3 is a direct transcriptional target of EBF2 in brown adipocytes, thereby establishing a regulatory module through which EBF2 activates and also recruits DPF3-anchored BAF complexes to chromatin. Together, these results reveal a novel mechanism by which EBF2 cooperates with a tissue-specific chromatin remodeling complex to activate brown fat identity genes. © 2017 Shapira et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Activation of the ADE genes requires the chromatin remodeling complexes SAGA and SWI/SNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Rebecca N; Rachfall, Nicole; Rolfes, Ronda J

    2007-08-01

    The activation of the ADE regulon genes requires the pair of transcription factors Bas1 and Pho2. In a genome-wide screen for additional regulators of the pathway, strains with mutations in multiple subunits of the chromatin remodeling complexes SAGA and SWI/SNF were uncovered. These mutants exhibited decreased expression of an ADE5,7-lacZ reporter and native ADE compared to the wild-type strains, but the expression of the BAS1 and PHO2 genes was not substantially decreased. An unregulated Bas1-Pho2 fusion protein depended upon SAGA and SWI/SNF activity to promote transcription of a reporter. A significant but low-level association of Gcn5-myc and Snf2-myc with the ADE5,7 promoter was independent of adenine growth conditions and independent of the presence of the activator proteins Bas1 and Pho2. However, the increase in occupancy of Bas1 and Pho2 at ADE5,7 depended on both SAGA and SWI/SNF. The loss of catalytic activity of both SAGA and SWI/SNF complexes in the gcn5Delta snf2Delta double mutant was severely detrimental to ADE-lacZ reporter expression and native ADE gene expression, indicating complementary roles for these complexes. We conclude that Bas1 and Pho2 do not recruit the SAGA and SWI/SNF complexes to the ADE5,7 promoter but that the remodeling complexes are necessary to increase the binding of Bas1 and Pho2 in response to the adenine regulatory signal. Our data support the model that the SAGA and SWI/SNF complexes engage in global surveillance that is necessary for the specific response by Bas1 and Pho2.

  15. Mutations and modeling of the chromatin remodeler CHD8 define an emerging autism etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Barnard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong but complex genetic component. Recent family based exome-sequencing strategies have identified recurrent de novo mutations at specific genes, providing strong evidence for ASD risk, but also highlighting the extreme genetic heterogeneity of the disorder. However, disruptions in these genes converge on key molecular pathways early in development. In particular, functional enrichment analyses have found that there is a bias towards genes involved in transcriptional regulation, such as chromatin regulators. Here we review recent genetic, animal model, co-expression network, and functional genomics studies relating to the high confidence ASD risk gene, CHD8. CHD8 a chromatin remodeling factor, may serve as a master regulator of a common ASD etiology. Individuals with a CHD8 mutation show an ASD subtype that includes similar physical characteristics, such as macrocephaly and prolonged GI problems including recurrent constipation. Similarly, animal models of CHD8 disruption exhibit enlarged head circumference and reduced gut motility phenotypes. Systems biology approaches suggest CHD8 and other candidate ASD risk genes are enriched during mid-fetal development, which may represent a critical time window in ASD etiology. Transcription profiles from cell and primary tissue models of early development indicate that CHD8 may also positively regulate other candidate ASD risk genes through both direct and indirect means. However continued study is needed to elucidate the mechanism of regulation as well as identify which CHD8 targets are most relevant to ASD risk. Overall, these initial studies suggest the potential for common ASD etiologies and the development of personalized treatments in the future.

  16. Putative molecular mechanism underlying sperm chromatin remodelling is regulated by reproductive hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill-Sharma Manjeet Kaur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The putative regulatory role of the male reproductive hormones in the molecular mechanism underlying chromatin condensation remains poorly understood. In the past decade, we developed two adult male rat models wherein functional deficits of testosterone or FSH, produced after treatments with 20 mg/Kg/d of cyproterone acetate (CPA per os, for a period of 15 days or 3 mg/Kg/d of fluphenazine decanoate (FD subcutaneously, for a period of 60 days, respectively, affected the rate of sperm chromatin decondensation in vitro. These rat models have been used in the current study in order to delineate the putative roles of testosterone and FSH in the molecular mechanism underlying remodelling of sperm chromatin. Results We report that deficits of both testosterone and FSH affected the turnover of polyubiquitylated histones and led to their accumulation in the testis. Functional deficits of testosterone reduced expression of MIWI, the 5-methyl cap binding RNA-binding protein (PIWIlike murine homologue of the Drosophila protein PIWI/P-element induced wimpy testis containing a PAZ/Piwi-Argonaut-Zwille domain and levels of histone deacetylase1 (HDAC1, ubiquitin ligating enzyme (URE-B1/E3, 20S proteasome α1 concomitant with reduced expression of ubiquitin activating enzyme (ube1, conjugating enzyme (ube2d2, chromodomain Y like protein (cdyl, bromodomain testis specific protein (brdt, hdac6 (histone deacetylase6, androgen-dependent homeobox placentae embryonic protein (pem/RhoX5, histones h2b and th3 (testis-specific h3. Functional deficits of FSH reduced the expression of cdyl and brdt genes in the testis, affected turnover of ubiquitylated histones, stalled the physiological DNA repair mechanism and culminated in spermiation of DNA damaged sperm. Conclusions We aver that deficits of both testosterone and FSH differentially affected the process of sperm chromatin remodelling through subtle changes in the ‘chromatin condensation

  17. Selection on a Subunit of the NURF Chromatin Remodeler Modifies Life History Traits in a Domesticated Strain of Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Edward E Large

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary life history theory seeks to explain how reproductive and survival traits are shaped by selection through allocations of an individual's resources to competing life functions. Although life-history traits evolve rapidly, little is known about the genetic and cellular mechanisms that control and couple these tradeoffs. Here, we find that two laboratory-adapted strains of C. elegans descended from a single common ancestor that lived in the 1950s have differences in a number of life-history traits, including reproductive timing, lifespan, dauer formation, growth rate, and offspring number. We identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL of large effect that controls 24%-75% of the total trait variance in reproductive timing at various timepoints. Using CRISPR/Cas9-induced genome editing, we show this QTL is due in part to a 60 bp deletion in the 3' end of the nurf-1 gene, which is orthologous to the human gene encoding the BPTF component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex. Besides reproduction, nurf-1 also regulates growth rate, lifespan, and dauer formation. The fitness consequences of this deletion are environment specific-it increases fitness in the growth conditions where it was fixed but decreases fitness in alternative laboratory growth conditions. We propose that chromatin remodeling, acting through nurf-1, is a pleiotropic regulator of life history trade-offs underlying the evolution of multiple traits across different species.

  18. Selection on a Subunit of the NURF Chromatin Remodeler Modifies Life History Traits in a Domesticated Strain of Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Large, Edward E; Xu, Wen; Zhao, Yuehui; Brady, Shannon C; Long, Lijiang; Butcher, Rebecca A; Andersen, Erik C; McGrath, Patrick T

    2016-07-01

    Evolutionary life history theory seeks to explain how reproductive and survival traits are shaped by selection through allocations of an individual's resources to competing life functions. Although life-history traits evolve rapidly, little is known about the genetic and cellular mechanisms that control and couple these tradeoffs. Here, we find that two laboratory-adapted strains of C. elegans descended from a single common ancestor that lived in the 1950s have differences in a number of life-history traits, including reproductive timing, lifespan, dauer formation, growth rate, and offspring number. We identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect that controls 24%-75% of the total trait variance in reproductive timing at various timepoints. Using CRISPR/Cas9-induced genome editing, we show this QTL is due in part to a 60 bp deletion in the 3' end of the nurf-1 gene, which is orthologous to the human gene encoding the BPTF component of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex. Besides reproduction, nurf-1 also regulates growth rate, lifespan, and dauer formation. The fitness consequences of this deletion are environment specific-it increases fitness in the growth conditions where it was fixed but decreases fitness in alternative laboratory growth conditions. We propose that chromatin remodeling, acting through nurf-1, is a pleiotropic regulator of life history trade-offs underlying the evolution of multiple traits across different species.

  19. Differential expression of ATP-dependent RNA helicase gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-02-07

    Feb 7, 2012 ... lysogeny broth (LB) medium at 4°C was induced for VBNC state; activated genes were detected using. mRNA differential display .... 191 amino acids. This cDNA sequence had a homology of 95 to 100% to the nucleotide of adenosine tripho- sphate (ATP)-dependent RNA helicase rh1B gene in different ...

  20. The Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 controls nuclear organization and chromatin structure of insulators and subtelomeres in fission yeast.

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    Babett Steglich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, local chromatin structure and chromatin organization in the nucleus both influence transcriptional regulation. At the local level, the Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 is essential for maintaining proper chromatin structure at centromeres and subtelomeres in fission yeast. Using genome-wide mapping and live cell imaging, we show that this role is linked to controlling nuclear organization of its targets. In fft3∆ cells, subtelomeres lose their association with the LEM domain protein Man1 at the nuclear periphery and move to the interior of the nucleus. Furthermore, genes in these domains are upregulated and active chromatin marks increase. Fft3 is also enriched at retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeat (LTR elements and at tRNA genes. In cells lacking Fft3, these sites lose their peripheral positioning and show reduced nucleosome occupancy. We propose that Fft3 has a global role in mediating association between specific chromatin domains and the nuclear envelope.

  1. Noradrenergic Activation of the Basolateral Amygdala Enhances Object Recognition Memory and Induces Chromatin Remodeling in the Insular Cortex

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    Hassiba eBeldjoud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that arousal-induced memory enhancement requires noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA and modulatory influences on information storage processes in its many target regions. While this concept is well accepted, the molecular basis of such BLA effects on neural plasticity changes within other brain regions remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether noradrenergic activation of the BLA after object recognition training induces chromatin remodeling through histone post-translational modifications in the insular cortex (IC, a brain region that is importantly involved in object recognition memory. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were trained on an object recognition task, followed immediately by bilateral microinfusions of norepinephrine (1.0 µg or saline administered into the BLA. Saline-treated control rats exhibited poor 24-h retention, whereas norepinephrine treatment induced robust 24-h object recognition memory. Most importantly, this memory-enhancing dose of norepinephrine induced a global reduction in the acetylation levels of histone H3 at lysine 14, H2B and H4 in the IC 1 h later, whereas it had no effect on the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 or tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. Norepinephrine administered into the BLA of non-trained control rats did not induce any changes in the histone marks investigated in this study. These findings indicate that noradrenergic activation of the BLA induces training-specific effects on chromatin remodeling mechanisms, and presumably gene transcription, in its target regions, which may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress and emotional arousal effects on memory consolidation.

  2. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

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    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal.

  3. Multiple aspects of ATP-dependent nucleosome translocation by RSC and Mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence.

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    Joke J F A van Vugt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the nucleosome positions can be predicted simply by DNA sequence, especially within promoter regions. This seemingly contrasts with remodeler induced nucleosome mobility. The ability of remodeling enzymes to mobilise nucleosomes over short DNA distances is well documented. However, the nucleosome translocation processivity along DNA remains elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown what determines the initial direction of movement and how new nucleosome positions are adopted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used AFM imaging and high resolution PAGE of mononucleosomes on 600 and 2500 bp DNA molecules to analyze ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by native and recombinant SNF2-type enzymes. We report that the underlying DNA sequence can control the initial direction of translocation, translocation distance, as well as the new positions adopted by nucleosomes upon enzymatic mobilization. Within a strong nucleosomal positioning sequence both recombinant Drosophila Mi-2 (CHD-type and native RSC from yeast (SWI/SNF-type repositioned the nucleosome at 10 bp intervals, which are intrinsic to the positioning sequence. Furthermore, RSC-catalyzed nucleosome translocation was noticeably more efficient when beyond the influence of this sequence. Interestingly, under limiting ATP conditions RSC preferred to position the nucleosome with 20 bp intervals within the positioning sequence, suggesting that native RSC preferentially translocates nucleosomes with 15 to 25 bp DNA steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nucleosome repositioning thus appears to be influenced by both remodeler intrinsic and DNA sequence specific properties that interplay to define ATPase

  4. Involvement of Chromatin Remodeling Genes and the Rho GTPases RhoB and CDC42 in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

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    Nicolai Skovbjerg Arildsen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveOvarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCCs constitute a rare ovarian cancer subtype with distinct clinical features, but may nonetheless be difficult to distinguish morphologically from other subtypes. There is limited knowledge of genetic events driving OCCC tumorigenesis beyond ARID1A, which is reportedly mutated in 30–50% of OCCCs. We aimed to further characterize OCCCs by combined global transcriptional profiling and targeted deep sequencing of a panel of well-established cancer genes. Increased knowledge of OCCC-specific genetic aberrations may help in guiding development of targeted treatments and ultimately improve patient outcome.MethodsGene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue from a cohort of the major ovarian cancer subtypes (cohort 1; n = 67 was performed using whole-genome cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (WG-DASL bead arrays, followed by pathway, gene module score, and gene ontology analyses, respectively. A second FFPE cohort of 10 primary OCCCs was analyzed by targeted DNA sequencing of a panel of 60 cancer-related genes (cohort 2. Non-synonymous and non-sense variants affecting single-nucleotide variations and insertions or deletions were further analyzed. A tissue microarray of 43 OCCCs (cohort 3 was used for validation by immunohistochemistry and chromogenic in situ hybridization.ResultsGene expression analyses revealed a distinct OCCC profile compared to other histological subtypes, with, e.g., ERBB2, TFAP2A, and genes related to cytoskeletal actin regulation being overexpressed in OCCC. ERBB2 was, however, not overexpressed on the protein level and ERBB2 amplification was rare in the validation cohort. Targeted deep sequencing revealed non-synonymous variants or insertions/deletions in 11/60 cancer-related genes. Genes involved in chromatin remodeling, including ARID1A, SPOP, and KMT2D were frequently mutated across OCCC tumors.ConclusionOCCCs appear

  5. Nuclear/cytoplasmic transport defects in BBS6 underlie congenital heart disease through perturbation of a chromatin remodeling protein.

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    Charles Anthony Scott

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in BBS6 cause two clinically distinct syndromes, Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, a syndrome caused by defects in cilia transport and function, as well as McKusick-Kaufman syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by congenital heart defects. Congenital heart defects are rare in BBS, and McKusick-Kaufman syndrome patients do not develop retinitis pigmentosa. Therefore, the McKusick-Kaufman syndrome allele may highlight cellular functions of BBS6 distinct from the presently understood functions in the cilia. In support, we find that the McKusick-Kaufman syndrome disease-associated allele, BBS6H84Y; A242S, maintains cilia function. We demonstrate that BBS6 is actively transported between the cytoplasm and nucleus, and that BBS6H84Y; A242S, is defective in this transport. We developed a transgenic zebrafish with inducible bbs6 to identify novel binding partners of BBS6, and we find interaction with the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling protein Smarcc1a (SMARCC1 in humans. We demonstrate that through this interaction, BBS6 modulates the sub-cellular localization of SMARCC1 and find, by transcriptional profiling, similar transcriptional changes following smarcc1a and bbs6 manipulation. Our work identifies a new function for BBS6 in nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, and provides insight into the disease mechanism underlying the congenital heart defects in McKusick-Kaufman syndrome patients.

  6. Phosphorylation of the chromatin remodeling factor DPF3a induces cardiac hypertrophy through releasing HEY repressors from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Huanhuan; Schlesinger, Jenny; Schoenhals, Sophia; Tönjes, Martje; Dunkel, Ilona; Meierhofer, David; Cano, Elena; Schulz, Kerstin; Berger, Michael F; Haack, Timm; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Bulyk, Martha L; Sauer, Sascha; Sperling, Silke R

    2016-04-07

    DPF3 (BAF45c) is a member of the BAF chromatin remodeling complex. Two isoforms have been described, namely DPF3a and DPF3b. The latter binds to acetylated and methylated lysine residues of histones. Here, we elaborate on the role of DPF3a and describe a novel pathway of cardiac gene transcription leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Upon hypertrophic stimuli, casein kinase 2 phosphorylates DPF3a at serine 348. This initiates the interaction of DPF3a with the transcriptional repressors HEY, followed by the release of HEY from the DNA. Moreover, BRG1 is bound by DPF3a, and is thus recruited to HEY genomic targets upon interaction of the two components. Consequently, the transcription of downstream targets such as NPPA and GATA4 is initiated and pathological cardiac hypertrophy is established. In human, DPF3a is significantly up-regulated in hypertrophic hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or aortic stenosis. Taken together, we show that activation of DPF3a upon hypertrophic stimuli switches cardiac fetal gene expression from being silenced by HEY to being activated by BRG1. Thus, we present a novel pathway for pathological cardiac hypertrophy, whose inhibition is a long-term therapeutic goal for the treatment of the course of heart failure. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. RNAi-independent de novo DNA methylation revealed in Arabidopsis mutants of chromatin remodeling gene DDM1.

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    Sasaki, Taku; Kobayashi, Akie; Saze, Hidetoshi; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2012-06-01

    Methylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me) and small RNAs are associated with constitutively silent chromatin in diverse eukaryotes including plants. In plants, silent transposons are also marked by cytosine methylation, especially at non-CpG sites. Transposon-specific non-CpG methylation in plants is controlled by small RNAs and H3K9me. Although it is often assumed that small RNA directs H3K9me, interaction between small RNA and H3K9me has not been directly demonstrated in plants. We have previously shown that a mutation in the chromatin remodeling gene DDM1 (DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION 1) induces a global decrease but a local increase of cytosine methylation and accumulation of small RNA at a locus called BONSAI. Here we show that de novo BONSAI methylation does not depend on RNAi but does depend on H3K9me. In mutants of H3K9 methyltransferase gene KRYPTONITE or the H3K9me-dependent DNA methyltransferase gene CHROMOMETHYALSE3, the ddm1-induced de novo cytosine methylation was abolished for all three contexts (CpG, CpHpG and CpHpH). Furthermore, RNAi mutants showed strong developmental defects when combined with the ddm1 mutation. Our results revealed unexpected interactions of epigenetic modifications that may be conserved among diverse eukaryotes. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. ARID1A, a component of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes, is required for porcine embryo development.

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    Tseng, Yu-Chun; Cabot, Birgit; Cabot, Ryan A

    2017-12-01

    Mammalian embryos undergo dramatic epigenetic remodeling that can have a profound impact on both gene transcription and overall embryo developmental competence. Members of the SWI/SNF (Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable) family of chromatin-remodeling complexes reposition nucleosomes and alter transcription factor accessibility. These large, multi-protein complexes possess an SNF2-type ATPase (either SMARCA4 or SMARCA2) as their core catalytic subunit, and are directed to specific loci by associated subunits. Little is known about the identity of specific SWI/SNF complexes that serve regulatory roles during cleavage development. ARID1A, one of the SWI/SNF complex subunits, can affect histone methylation in somatic cells; here, we determined the developmental requirements of ARID1A in porcine oocytes and embryos. We found ARID1A transcript levels were significantly reduced in 4-cell porcine embryos as compared to germinal vesicle-stage oocytes, suggesting that ARID1A would be required for porcine cleavage-stage development. Indeed, injecting in vitro-matured and fertilized porcine oocytes with double-stranded interfering RNAs that target ARID1A, and evaluating their phenotype after seven days, revealed that the depletion of ARID1A results in significantly fewer cells than their respective control groups (p < 0.001). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. MORC2 Signaling Integrates Phosphorylation-Dependent, ATPase-Coupled Chromatin Remodeling during the DNA Damage Response

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    Da-Qiang Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin dynamics play a central role in maintaining genome integrity, but how this is achieved remains largely unknown. Here, we report that microrchidia CW-type zinc finger 2 (MORC2, an uncharacterized protein with a derived PHD finger domain and a conserved GHKL-type ATPase module, is a physiological substrate of p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1, an important integrator of extracellular signals and nuclear processes. Following DNA damage, MORC2 is phosphorylated on serine 739 in a PAK1-dependent manner, and phosphorylated MORC2 regulates its DNA-dependent ATPase activity to facilitate chromatin remodeling. Moreover, MORC2 associates with chromatin and promotes gamma-H2AX induction in a PAK1 phosphorylation-dependent manner. Consequently, cells expressing MORC2-S739A mutation displayed a reduction in DNA repair efficiency and were hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agent. These findings suggest that the PAK1-MORC2 axis is critical for orchestrating the interplay between chromatin dynamics and the maintenance of genomic integrity through sequentially integrating multiple essential enzymatic processes.

  10. Evidence for chromatin-remodeling complex PBAP-controlled maintenance of the Drosophila ovarian germline stem cells.

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    Jie He

    Full Text Available In the Drosophila oogenesis, germline stem cells (GSCs continuously self-renew and differentiate into daughter cells for consecutive germline lineage commitment. This developmental process has become an in vivo working platform for studying adult stem cell fate regulation. An increasing number of studies have shown that while concerted actions of extrinsic signals from the niche and intrinsic regulatory machineries control GSC self-renewal and germline differentiation, epigenetic regulation is implicated in the process. Here, we report that Brahma (Brm, the ATPase subunit of the Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes, is required for maintaining GSC fate. Removal or knockdown of Brm function in either germline or niche cells causes a GSC loss, but does not disrupt normal germline differentiation within the germarium evidenced at the molecular and morphological levels. There are two Drosophila SWI/SNF complexes: the Brm-associated protein (BAP complex and the polybromo-containing BAP (PBAP complex. More genetic studies reveal that mutations in polybromo/bap180, rather than gene encoding Osa, the BAP complex-specific subunit, elicit a defect in GSC maintenance reminiscent of the brm mutant phenotype. Further genetic interaction test suggests a functional association between brm and polybromo in controlling GSC self-renewal. Taken together, studies in this paper provide the first demonstration that Brm in the form of the PBAP complex functions in the GSC fate regulation.

  11. Functional genomics indicates yeast requires Golgi/ER transport, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair for low dose DMSO tolerance

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    Brandon David Gaytán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is frequently utilized as a solvent in toxicological and pharmaceutical investigations. It is therefore important to establish the cellular and molecular targets of DMSO in order to differentiate its intrinsic effects from those elicited by a compound of interest. We performed a genome-wide functional screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify deletion mutants exhibiting sensitivity to 1% DMSO, a concentration standard to yeast chemical profiling studies. We report that mutants defective in Golgi/ER transport are sensitive to DMSO, including those lacking components of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG complex. Moreover, strains deleted for members of the SWR1 histone exchange complex are hypersensitive to DMSO, with additional chromatin remodeling mutants displaying a range of growth defects. We also identify DNA repair genes important for DMSO tolerance. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of histone H2A.Z, which replaces chromatin-associated histone H2A in a SWR1-catalyzed reaction, confers resistance to DMSO. Many yeast genes described in this study have homologs in more complex organisms, and the data provided is applicable to future investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DMSO toxicity.

  12. DNA methylation-independent removable insulator controls chromatin remodeling at the HOXA locus via retinoic acid signaling.

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    Ishihara, Ko; Nakamoto, Masafumi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-12-15

    Chromatin insulators partition the genome into functional units to control gene expression, particularly in complex chromosomal regions. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an insulator-binding protein that functions in transcriptional regulation and higher-order chromatin formation. Variable CTCF-binding sites have been identified to be cell type-specific partly due to differential DNA methylation. Here, we show that DNA methylation-independent removable CTCF insulator is responsible for retinoic acid (RA)-mediated higher-order chromatin remodeling in the human HOXA gene locus. Detailed chromatin analysis characterized multiple CTCF-enriched sites and RA-responsive enhancers at this locus. These regulatory elements and transcriptionally silent HOXA genes are closely positioned under basal conditions. Notably, upon RA signaling, the RAR/RXR transcription factor induced loss of adjacent CTCF binding and changed the higher-order chromatin conformation of the overall locus. Targeted disruption of a CTCF site by genome editing with zinc finger nucleases and CRISPR/Cas9 system showed that the site is required for chromatin conformations that maintain the initial associations among insulators, enhancers and promoters. The results indicate that the initial chromatin conformation affects subsequent RA-induced HOXA gene activation. Our study uncovers that a removable insulator spatiotemporally switches higher-order chromatin and multiple gene activities via cooperation of CTCF and key transcription factors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The chromatin remodeling protein CHD7, mutated in CHARGE syndrome, is necessary for proper craniofacial and tracheal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Ethan D; Hurd, Elizabeth A; Durham, Mark A; Reamer, Elyse N; Stein, Adam B; Martin, Donna M

    2014-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the chromatin remodeling gene CHD7 cause CHARGE syndrome, a developmental disorder with variable craniofacial dysmorphisms and respiratory difficulties. The molecular etiologies of these malformations are not well understood. Homozygous Chd7 null mice die by E11, whereas Chd7(Gt/+) heterozygous null mice are a viable and excellent model of CHARGE. We explored skeletal phenotypes in Chd7(Gt/+) and Chd7 conditional knockout mice, using Foxg1-Cre to delete Chd7 (Foxg1-CKO) in the developing eye, ear, nose, pharyngeal pouch, forebrain, and gut and Wnt1-Cre (Wnt1-CKO) to delete Chd7 in migrating neural crest cells. Foxg1-CKO mice exhibited postnatal respiratory distress and death, dysplasia of the eye, concha, and frontal bone, hypoplastic maxillary shelves and nasal epithelia, and reduced tracheal rings. Wnt1-CKO mice exhibited frontal and occipital bone dysplasia, hypoplasia of the maxillary shelves and mandible, and cleft palate. In contrast, heterozygous Chd7(Gt/+) mice had apparently normal skeletal development. Conditional deletion of Chd7 in ectodermal and endodermal derivatives (Foxg1-Cre) or migrating neural crest cells (Wnt1-Cre) results in varied and more severe craniofacial defects than in Chd7(Gt/+) mice. These studies indicate that CHD7 has an important, dosage-dependent role in development of several different craniofacial tissues. © 2014 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists.

  14. The Short Isoform of BRD4 Promotes HIV-1 Latency by Engaging Repressive SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Ryan J; Fozouni, Parinaz; Thomas, Sean; Sy, Hendrik; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Ott, Melanie

    2017-09-21

    BET proteins commonly activate cellular gene expression, yet inhibiting their recruitment paradoxically reactivates latent HIV-1 transcription. Here we identify the short isoform of BET family member BRD4 (BRD4S) as a corepressor of HIV-1 transcription. We found that BRD4S was enriched in chromatin fractions of latently infected T cells, and it was more rapidly displaced from chromatin upon BET inhibition than the long isoform. BET inhibition induced marked nucleosome remodeling at the latent HIV-1 promoter, which was dependent on the activity of BRG1-associated factors (BAF), an SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex with known repressive functions in HIV-1 transcription. BRD4S directly bound BRG1, a catalytic subunit of BAF, via its bromodomain and extraterminal (ET) domain, and this isoform was necessary for BRG1 recruitment to latent HIV-1 chromatin. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) combined with assay for transposase-accessible chromatin coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) data, we found that the latent HIV-1 promoter phenotypically resembles endogenous long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, pointing to a select role of BRD4S-BRG1 complexes in genomic silencing of invasive retroelements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HTLV-1 Tax mediated downregulation of miRNAs associated with chromatin remodeling factors in T cells with stably integrated viral promoter.

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    Saifur Rahman

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a natural cellular mechanism to silence gene expression and is predominantly mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs that target messenger RNA. Viruses can manipulate the cellular processes necessary for their replication by targeting the host RNAi machinery. This study explores the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 transactivating protein Tax on the RNAi pathway in the context of a chromosomally integrated viral long terminal repeat (LTR using a CD4(+ T-cell line, Jurkat. Transcription factor profiling of the HTLV-1 LTR stably integrated T-cell clone transfected with Tax demonstrates increased activation of substrates and factors associated with chromatin remodeling complexes. Using a miRNA microarray and bioinformatics experimental approach, Tax was also shown to downregulate the expression of miRNAs associated with the translational regulation of factors required for chromatin remodeling. These observations were validated with selected miRNAs and an HTLV-1 infected T cells line, MT-2. miR-149 and miR-873 were found to be capable of directly targeting p300 and p/CAF, chromatin remodeling factors known to play critical role in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Overall, these results are first in line establishing HTLV-1/Tax-miRNA-chromatin concept and open new avenues toward understanding retroviral latency and/or replication in a given cell type.

  16. miR-151-5p, targeting chromatin remodeler SMARCA5, as a marker for the BRCAness phenotype.

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    Tommasi, Stefania; Pinto, Rosamaria; Danza, Katia; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Micale, Lucia; De Summa, Simona

    2016-12-06

    In recent years, the assessment of biomarkers useful for "precision medicine" has been a hot topic in research. The involvement of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of breast cancer has been highly investigated with the aim of being able to molecularly stratify this highly heterogeneous disease. Our aim was to identify microRNAs targeting DNA repair machinery, through Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays, in a cohort of BRCA-related and sporadic breast cancers. Moreover, we analyzed microRNA expression taking into account our previous results on the expression of PARP1, because of its importance in targeted therapy. miR-361-5p and miR-151-5p were found to be overexpressed in PARP1-upregulating BRCA-germline mutated and sporadic breast tumors. Pathway enrichment analysis was performed to identify potential target genes to be analyzed in the validation step in an independent cohort. Our results confirmed the overexpression of miR-151-5p and, interestingly, its role in the targeting of SMARCA5, a chromatin remodeler. This result was also confirmed in vitro, both through luciferase assay and by analyzing endogenous levels of SMARCA5 in MCF-7 cell lines using miR-151-5p mimic and inhibitor. In conclusion, our data showed the possibility of considering the overexpression of PARP1 and miR-151-5p as biomarkers useful to correctly treat sporadic breast cancers, which eventually could be considered as BRCAness tumors, with PARP-inhibitors.

  17. Brg1 chromatin remodeling ATPase balances germ layer patterning by amplifying the transcriptional burst at midblastula transition.

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    Wagner, Gabriele; Singhal, Nishant; Nicetto, Dario; Straub, Tobias; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Rupp, Ralph A W

    2017-05-01

    Zygotic gene expression programs control cell differentiation in vertebrate development. In Xenopus, these programs are initiated by local induction of regulatory genes through maternal signaling activities in the wake of zygotic genome activation (ZGA) at the midblastula transition (MBT). These programs lay down the vertebrate body plan through gastrulation and neurulation, and are accompanied by massive changes in chromatin structure, which increasingly constrain cellular plasticity. Here we report on developmental functions for Brahma related gene 1 (Brg1), a key component of embyronic SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes. Carefully controlled, global Brg1 protein depletion in X. tropicalis and X. laevis causes embryonic lethality or developmental arrest from gastrulation on. Transcriptome analysis at late blastula, before development becomes arrested, indicates predominantly a role for Brg1 in transcriptional activation of a limited set of genes involved in pattern specification processes and nervous system development. Mosaic analysis by targeted microinjection defines Brg1 as an essential amplifier of gene expression in dorsal (BCNE/Nieuwkoop Center) and ventral (BMP/Vent) signaling centers. Moreover, Brg1 is required and sufficient for initiating axial patterning in cooperation with maternal Wnt signaling. In search for a common denominator of Brg1 impact on development, we have quantitatively filtered global mRNA fluctuations at MBT. The results indicate that Brg1 is predominantly required for genes with the highest burst of transcriptional activity. Since this group contains many key developmental regulators, we propose Brg1 to be responsible for raising their expression above threshold levels in preparation for embryonic patterning.

  18. Brg1 chromatin remodeling ATPase balances germ layer patterning by amplifying the transcriptional burst at midblastula transition.

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    Gabriele Wagner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zygotic gene expression programs control cell differentiation in vertebrate development. In Xenopus, these programs are initiated by local induction of regulatory genes through maternal signaling activities in the wake of zygotic genome activation (ZGA at the midblastula transition (MBT. These programs lay down the vertebrate body plan through gastrulation and neurulation, and are accompanied by massive changes in chromatin structure, which increasingly constrain cellular plasticity. Here we report on developmental functions for Brahma related gene 1 (Brg1, a key component of embyronic SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes. Carefully controlled, global Brg1 protein depletion in X. tropicalis and X. laevis causes embryonic lethality or developmental arrest from gastrulation on. Transcriptome analysis at late blastula, before development becomes arrested, indicates predominantly a role for Brg1 in transcriptional activation of a limited set of genes involved in pattern specification processes and nervous system development. Mosaic analysis by targeted microinjection defines Brg1 as an essential amplifier of gene expression in dorsal (BCNE/Nieuwkoop Center and ventral (BMP/Vent signaling centers. Moreover, Brg1 is required and sufficient for initiating axial patterning in cooperation with maternal Wnt signaling. In search for a common denominator of Brg1 impact on development, we have quantitatively filtered global mRNA fluctuations at MBT. The results indicate that Brg1 is predominantly required for genes with the highest burst of transcriptional activity. Since this group contains many key developmental regulators, we propose Brg1 to be responsible for raising their expression above threshold levels in preparation for embryonic patterning.

  19. Mutation of neuron-specific chromatin remodeling subunit BAF53b: rescue of plasticity and memory by manipulating actin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel Ciernia, Annie; Kramár, Enikö A; Matheos, Dina P; Havekes, Robbert; Hemstedt, Thekla J; Magnan, Christophe N; Sakata, Keith; Tran, Ashley; Azzawi, Soraya; Lopez, Alberto; Dang, Richard; Wang, Weisheng; Trieu, Brian; Tong, Joyce; Barrett, Ruth M; Post, Rebecca J; Baldi, Pierre; Abel, Ted; Lynch, Gary; Wood, Marcelo A

    2017-05-01

    Recent human exome-sequencing studies have implicated polymorphic Brg1-associated factor (BAF) complexes (mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes) in several intellectual disabilities and cognitive disorders, including autism. However, it remains unclear how mutations in BAF complexes result in impaired cognitive function. Post-mitotic neurons express a neuron-specific assembly, nBAF, characterized by the neuron-specific subunit BAF53b. Subdomain 2 of BAF53b is essential for the differentiation of neuronal precursor cells into neurons. We generated transgenic mice lacking subdomain 2 of Baf53b (BAF53bΔSB2). Long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and long-term memory, both of which are associated with phosphorylation of the actin severing protein cofilin, were assessed in these animals. A phosphorylation mimic of cofilin was stereotaxically delivered into the hippocampus of BAF53bΔSB2 mice in an effort to rescue LTP and memory. BAF53bΔSB2 mutant mice show impairments in phosphorylation of synaptic cofilin, LTP, and memory. Both the synaptic plasticity and memory deficits are rescued by overexpression of a phosphorylation mimetic of cofilin. Baseline physiology and behavior were not affected by the mutation or the experimental treatment. This study suggests a potential link between nBAF function, actin cytoskeletal remodeling at the dendritic spine, and memory formation. This work shows that a targeted manipulation of synaptic function can rescue adult plasticity and memory deficits caused by manipulations of nBAF, and thereby provides potential novel avenues for therapeutic development for multiple intellectual disability disorders. © 2017 Vogel Ciernia et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Regulation of Rvb1/Rvb2 by a Domain within the INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Implicates the Yeast Rvbs as Protein Assembly Chaperones

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    Coral Y. Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric AAA+ ATPases Rvb1 and Rvb2 (Rvbs are essential for diverse processes ranging from metabolic signaling to chromatin remodeling, but their functions are unknown. While originally thought to act as helicases, recent proposals suggest that Rvbs act as protein assembly chaperones. However, experimental evidence for chaperone-like behavior is lacking. Here, we identify a potent protein activator of the Rvbs, a domain in the Ino80 ATPase subunit of the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex, termed Ino80INS. Ino80INS stimulates Rvbs’ ATPase activity by 16-fold while concomitantly promoting their dodecamerization. Using mass spectrometry, cryo-EM, and integrative modeling, we find that Ino80INS binds asymmetrically along the dodecamerization interface, resulting in a conformationally flexible dodecamer that collapses into hexamers upon ATP addition. Our results demonstrate the chaperone-like potential of Rvb1/Rvb2 and suggest a model where binding of multiple clients such as Ino80 stimulates ATP-driven cycling between hexamers and dodecamers, providing iterative opportunities for correct subunit assembly.

  1. Differential expression of key subunits of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes in porcine embryos derived in vitro or in vivo.

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    Cabot, Birgit; Tseng, Yu-Chun; Crodian, Jennifer S; Cabot, Ryan

    2017-12-01

    In vitro embryo production is an established method for both humans and animals, but is fraught with inferior development and health issues in offspring born after in vitro fertilization procedures. Analysis of epigenetic changes caused by exposure to in vitro conditions should shed light on potential sources of these phenotypes. Using immunocytochemistry, we investigated the localization and relative abundance of components associated with the SWI/SNF (Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable) chromatin-remodeling complex-including BAF155, BAF170, BAF180, BAF53A, BAF57, BAF60A, BAF45D, ARID1A, ARID1B, ARID2, SNF5, and BRD7-in oocytes and in in vitro-produced and in vivo-derived porcine embryos. Differences in the localization of BAF155, BAF170, BAF60A, and ARID1B among these sources indicate that improper timing of chromatin remodeling and cellular differentiation might occur in early preimplantation embryos produced and cultured in vitro. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Reproduction and Development Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  2. Use of chromatin remodeling ATPases as RNAi targets for parental control of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) and Neotropical brown stink bug (Euschistus heros).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Khajuria, Chitvan; Frey, Meghan L F; Hamm, Ronda L; Wang, Haichuan; Schulenberg, Greg A; Bowling, Andrew J; Pence, Heather E; Gandra, Premchand; Arora, Kanika; Storer, Nicholas P; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism that is present in animals and plants and is triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA), depending on the organism. In the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), RNAi can be achieved by feeding rootworms dsRNA added to artificial diet or plant tissues transformed to express dsRNA. The effect of RNAi depends on the targeted gene function and can range from an absence of phenotypic response to readily apparent responses, including lethality. Furthermore, RNAi can directly affect individuals that consume dsRNA or the effect may be transferred to the next generation. Our previous work described the potential use of genes involved in embryonic development as a parental RNAi technology for the control of WCR. In this study, we describe the use of chromatin-remodeling ATPases as target genes to achieve parental gene silencing in two insect pests, a coleopteran, WCR, and a hemipteran, the Neotropical brown stink bug, Euschistus heros Fabricius (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Our results show that dsRNA targeting chromatin-remodeling ATPase transcripts, brahma, mi-2, and iswi strongly reduced the fecundity of the exposed females in both insect species. Additionally, knockdown of chd1 reduced the fecundity of E. heros. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Drosophila TAP/p32 is a core histone chaperone that cooperates with NAP-1, NLP, and nucleophosmin in sperm chromatin remodeling during fertilization.

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    Emelyanov, Alexander V; Rabbani, Joshua; Mehta, Monika; Vershilova, Elena; Keogh, Michael C; Fyodorov, Dmitry V

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear DNA in the male gamete of sexually reproducing animals is organized as sperm chromatin compacted primarily by sperm-specific protamines. Fertilization leads to sperm chromatin remodeling, during which protamines are expelled and replaced by histones. Despite our increased understanding of the factors that mediate nucleosome assembly in the nascent male pronucleus, the machinery for protamine removal remains largely unknown. Here we identify four Drosophila protamine chaperones that mediate the dissociation of protamine-DNA complexes: NAP-1, NLP, and nucleophosmin are previously characterized histone chaperones, and TAP/p32 has no known function in chromatin metabolism. We show that TAP/p32 is required for the removal of Drosophila protamine B in vitro, whereas NAP-1, NLP, and Nph share roles in the removal of protamine A. Embryos from P32-null females show defective formation of the male pronucleus in vivo. TAP/p32, similar to NAP-1, NLP, and Nph, facilitates nucleosome assembly in vitro and is therefore a histone chaperone. Furthermore, mutants of P32, Nlp, and Nph exhibit synthetic-lethal genetic interactions. In summary, we identified factors mediating protamine removal from DNA and reconstituted in a defined system the process of sperm chromatin remodeling that exchanges protamines for histones to form the nucleosome-based chromatin characteristic of somatic cells. © 2014 Emelyanov et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. New ligands of the Cellular Retinoic Acid-Binding Protein 2 (CRABP2 suggest a role for this protein in chromatin remodeling

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    Daniella de Barros Rossetto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA regulates the transcription of a series of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis by binding to the RA Receptor (RAR and Retinoid X Receptor (RXR heterodimers. The cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2 is involved in the transport of RA from the cytosol to specific RA receptors in the nucleus, acting as a coactivator of nuclear retinoid receptors. In order to have a better understanding of the role of CRABP2 in RA signaling, we used the yeast two-hybrid system as a tool for the identification of physical protein-protein interactions. Twenty-three putative CRABP2-interacting proteins were identified by screening in the presence of RA, five of which are related to transcription regulation or, more specifically, to the process of chromatin remodeling: t-complex 1 (TCP1; H3 histone, family 3A (H3F3A; H3 histone, family 3B (H3F3B; β-tubulin (TUBB and SR-related CTD-associated factor 1 (SCAF1. These results suggest a more direct role for CRABP2 in chromatin remodeling and may be a starting point for the elucidation of the fine-tuning control of transcription by RA receptors.

  5. The pioneer factor OCT4 requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1 to support gene regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells.

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    King, Hamish W; Klose, Robert J

    2017-03-13

    Pioneer transcription factors recognise and bind their target sequences in inaccessible chromatin to establish new transcriptional networks throughout development and cellular reprogramming. During this process, pioneer factors establish an accessible chromatin state to facilitate additional transcription factor binding, yet it remains unclear how different pioneer factors achieve this. Here, we discover that the pluripotency-associated pioneer factor OCT4 binds chromatin to shape accessibility, transcription factor co-binding, and regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells. Chromatin accessibility at OCT4-bound sites requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1, which is recruited to these sites by OCT4 to support additional transcription factor binding and expression of the pluripotency-associated transcriptome. Furthermore, the requirement for BRG1 in shaping OCT4 binding reflects how these target sites are used during cellular reprogramming and early mouse development. Together this reveals a distinct requirement for a chromatin remodeller in promoting the activity of the pioneer factor OCT4 and regulating the pluripotency network.

  6. Mutations in the Arabidopsis SWC6 gene, encoding a component of the SWR1 chromatin remodelling complex, accelerate flowering time and alter leaf and flower development.

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    Lázaro, Ana; Gómez-Zambrano, Angeles; López-González, Leticia; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Mutations affecting the Arabidopsis SWC6 gene encoding a putative orthologue of a component of the SWR1 chromatin remodelling complex in plants have been characterized. swc6 mutations cause early flowering, shortened inflorescence internodes, and altered leaf and flower development. These phenotypic defects resemble those of the photoperiod independent early flowering 1 (pie1) and early in short days 1 (esd1) mutants, also affected in homologues of the SWR1 complex subunits. SWC6 is a ubiquitously expressed nuclear HIT-Zn finger-containing protein, with the highest levels found in pollen. Double mutant analyses suggest that swc6 abolishes the FLC-mediated late-flowering phenotype of plants carrying active alleles of FRI and of mutants of the autonomous pathway. It was found that SWC6 is required for the expression of the FLC repressor to levels that inhibit flowering. However, the effect of swc6 in an flc null background and the down-regulation of other FLC-like/MAF genes in swc6 mutants suggest that flowering inhibition mediated by SWC6 occurs through both FLC- and FLC-like gene-dependent pathways. Both genetic and physical interactions between SWC6 and ESD1 have been demonstrated, suggesting that both proteins act in the same complex. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, it has been determined that SWC6, as previously shown for ESD1, is required for both histone H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation of the FLC chromatin. Altogether, these results suggest that SWC6 and ESD1 are part of an Arabidopsis SWR1 chromatin remodelling complex involved in the regulation of diverse aspects of plant development, including floral repression through the activation of FLC and FLC-like genes.

  7. A unique missense allele of BAF155, a core BAF chromatin remodeling complex protein, causes neural tube closure defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmacek, Laura; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E; Chen, Jianfu; Jones, Kenneth L; Pavan, William J; Salbaum, J Michael; Niswander, Lee

    2014-05-01

    Failure of embryonic neural tube closure results in the second most common class of birth defects known as neural tube defects (NTDs). While NTDs are likely the result of complex multigenic dysfunction, it is not known whether polymorphisms in epigenetic regulators may be risk factors for NTDs. Here we characterized Baf155(msp3) , a unique ENU-induced allele in mice. Homozygous Baf155(mps3) embryos exhibit highly penetrant exencephaly, allowing us to investigate the roles of an assembled, but malfunctional BAF chromatin remodeling complex in vivo at the time of neural tube closure. Evidence of defects in proliferation and apoptosis were found within the neural tube. RNA-Seq analysis revealed that surprisingly few genes showed altered expression in Baf155 mutant neural tissue, given the broad epigenetic role of the BAF complex, but included genes involved in neural development and cell survival. Moreover, gene expression changes between individual mutants were variable even though the NTD was consistently observed. This suggests that inconsistent gene regulation contributes to failed neural tube closure. These results shed light on the role of the BAF complex in the process of neural tube closure and highlight the importance of studying missense alleles to understand epigenetic regulation during critical phases of development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Heritable epigenetic mutation of a transposon-flanked Arabidopsis gene due to lack of the chromatin-remodeling factor DDM1.

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    Saze, Hidetoshi; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2007-08-08

    Epigenetically silent transposons and repeats constitute a substantial proportion of eukaryotic genomes, but their impact on cellular gene function remains largely unexplored. In Arabidopsis, transposons are silenced by DNA methylation, and this methylation is often abolished by mutations in a chromatin-remodeling gene DDM1 (DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION 1). The ddm1 mutation induces various types of developmental abnormalities through de-repression of transposons and repeats. Here, we report a novel mechanism for a ddm1-induced syndrome, called bonsai (bns). We identified the gene responsible for the bns phenotypes by genetic linkage analysis and subsequent transcriptional analysis. The bns phenotypes are due to silencing of a putative Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) 13 gene. The BNS gene silencing was associated with DNA hypermethylation, which is in contrast to the ddm1-induced hypomethylation in the other genomic regions. This paradoxical BNS hypermethylation was reproducibly induced during self-pollination of the ddm1 mutant, and it was mediated by a long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) retrotransposon flanking the BNS gene. We discuss possible molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary implications of transposon-mediated epigenetic changes in the BNS locus.

  9. Transcriptionally Repressive Chromatin Remodelling and CpG Methylation in the Presence of Expanded CTG-Repeats at the DM1 Locus.

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    Brouwer, Judith Rixt; Huguet, Aline; Nicole, Annie; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    An expanded CTG-repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene is responsible for myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1). Somatic and intergenerational instability cause the disease to become more severe during life and in subsequent generations. Evidence is accumulating that trinucleotide repeat instability and disease progression involve aberrant chromatin dynamics. We explored the chromatin environment in relation to expanded CTG-repeat tracts in hearts from transgenic mice carrying the DM1 locus with different repeat lengths. Using bisulfite sequencing we detected abundant CpG methylation in the regions flanking the expanded CTG-repeat. CpG methylation was postulated to affect CTCF binding but we found that CTCF binding is not affected by CTG-repeat length in our transgenic mice. We detected significantly decreased DMPK sense and SIX5 transcript expression levels in mice with expanded CTG-repeats. Expression of the DM1 antisense transcript was barely affected by CTG-repeat expansion. In line with altered gene expression, ChIP studies revealed a locally less active chromatin conformation around the expanded CTG-repeat, namely, decreased enrichment of active histone mark H3K9/14Ac and increased H3K9Me3 enrichment (repressive chromatin mark). We also observed binding of PCNA around the repeats, a candidate that could launch chromatin remodelling cascades at expanded repeats, ultimately affecting gene transcription and repeat instability.

  10. ALT1, a Snf2 family chromatin remodeling ATPase, negatively regulates alkaline tolerance through enhanced defense against oxidative stress in rice.

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    Mingxin Guo

    Full Text Available Alkaline salt stress adversely affects rice growth, productivity and grain quality. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. We characterized here an alkaline tolerant mutant, alt1 in rice. Map-based cloning revealed that alt1 harbors a mutation in a chromatin remodeling ATPase gene. ALT1-RNAi transgenic plants under different genetic background mimicked the alt1 phenotype, exhibiting tolerance to alkaline stress in a transcript dosage-dependent manner. The predicted ALT1 protein belonged to the Ris1 subgroup of the Snf2 family and was localized in the nucleus, and transcription of ALT1 was transiently suppressed after alkaline treatment. Although the absorption of several metal ions maintained well in the mutant under alkaline stress, expression level of the genes involved in metal ions homeostasis was not altered in the alt1 mutant. Classification of differentially expressed abiotic stress related genes, as revealed by microarray analysis, found that the majority (50/78 were involved in ROS production, ROS scavenging, and DNA repair. This finding was further confirmed by that alt1 exhibited lower levels of H2O2 under alkaline stress and tolerance to methyl viologen treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that ALT1 negatively functions in alkaline tolerance mainly through the defense against oxidative damage, and provide a potential two-step strategy for improving the tolerance of rice plants to alkaline stress.

  11. Progressive loss of CD3 expression after HTLV-I infection results from chromatin remodeling affecting all the CD3 genes and persists despite early viral genes silencing

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    Martiat Philippe

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HTLV-I infected CD4+ T-cells lines usually progress towards a CD3- or CD3low phenotype. In this paper, we studied expression, kinetics, chromatin remodeling of the CD3 gene at different time-points post HTLV-I infection. Results The onset of this phenomenon coincided with a decrease of CD3γ followed by the subsequent progressive reduction in CD3δ, then CD3ε and CD3ζ mRNA. Transient transfection experiments showed that the CD3γ promoter was still active in CD3- HTLV-I infected cells demonstrating that adequate amounts of the required transcription factors were available. We next looked at whether epigenetic mechanisms could be responsible for this progressive decrease in CD3 expression using DNase I hypersensitivity (DHS experiments examining the CD3γ and CD3δ promoters and the CD3δ enhancer. In uninfected and cells immediately post-infection all three DHS sites were open, then the CD3γ promoter became non accessible, and this was followed by a sequential closure of all the DHS sites corresponding to all three transcriptional control regions. Furthermore, a continuous decrease of in vivo bound transcription initiation factors to the CD3γ promoter was observed after silencing of the viral genome. Coincidently, cells with a lower expression of CD3 grew more rapidly. Conclusion We conclude that HTLV-I infection initiates a process leading to a complete loss of CD3 membrane expression by an epigenetic mechanism which continues along time, despite an early silencing of the viral genome. Whether CD3 progressive loss is an epiphenomenon or a causal event in the process of eventual malignant transformation remains to be investigated.

  12. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

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    Chenlong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM is a Trithorax Group (TrxG protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3 in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq. Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF or SWINGER (SWN. ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development.

  13. BRAHMA ATPase of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex acts as a positive regulator of gibberellin-mediated responses in arabidopsis.

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    Rafal Archacki

    Full Text Available SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes perform a pivotal function in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in major SWI/SNF subunits display embryo-lethal or dwarf phenotypes, indicating their critical role in molecular pathways controlling development and growth. As gibberellins (GA are major positive regulators of plant growth, we wanted to establish whether there is a link between SWI/SNF and GA signaling in Arabidopsis. This study revealed that in brm-1 plants, depleted in SWI/SNF BRAHMA (BRM ATPase, a number of GA-related phenotypic traits are GA-sensitive and that the loss of BRM results in markedly decreased level of endogenous bioactive GA. Transcriptional profiling of brm-1 and the GA biosynthesis mutant ga1-3, as well as the ga1-3/brm-1 double mutant demonstrated that BRM affects the expression of a large set of GA-responsive genes including genes responsible for GA biosynthesis and signaling. Furthermore, we found that BRM acts as an activator and directly associates with promoters of GA3ox1, a GA biosynthetic gene, and SCL3, implicated in positive regulation of the GA pathway. Many GA-responsive gene expression alterations in the brm-1 mutant are likely due to depleted levels of active GAs. However, the analysis of genetic interactions between BRM and the DELLA GA pathway repressors, revealed that BRM also acts on GA-responsive genes independently of its effect on GA level. Given the central position occupied by SWI/SNF complexes within regulatory networks controlling fundamental biological processes, the identification of diverse functional intersections of BRM with GA-dependent processes in this study suggests a role for SWI/SNF in facilitating crosstalk between GA-mediated regulation and other cellular pathways.

  14. BRAHMA ATPase of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Acts as a Positive Regulator of Gibberellin-Mediated Responses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archacki, Rafal; Buszewicz, Daniel; Sarnowski, Tomasz J.; Sarnowska, Elzbieta; Rolicka, Anna T.; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kotlinski, Maciej; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Kalisiak, Katarzyna; Patryn, Jacek; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Kamiya, Yuji; Davis, Seth J.; Koblowska, Marta K.; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes perform a pivotal function in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants in major SWI/SNF subunits display embryo-lethal or dwarf phenotypes, indicating their critical role in molecular pathways controlling development and growth. As gibberellins (GA) are major positive regulators of plant growth, we wanted to establish whether there is a link between SWI/SNF and GA signaling in Arabidopsis. This study revealed that in brm-1 plants, depleted in SWI/SNF BRAHMA (BRM) ATPase, a number of GA-related phenotypic traits are GA-sensitive and that the loss of BRM results in markedly decreased level of endogenous bioactive GA. Transcriptional profiling of brm-1 and the GA biosynthesis mutant ga1-3, as well as the ga1-3/brm-1 double mutant demonstrated that BRM affects the expression of a large set of GA-responsive genes including genes responsible for GA biosynthesis and signaling. Furthermore, we found that BRM acts as an activator and directly associates with promoters of GA3ox1, a GA biosynthetic gene, and SCL3, implicated in positive regulation of the GA pathway. Many GA-responsive gene expression alterations in the brm-1 mutant are likely due to depleted levels of active GAs. However, the analysis of genetic interactions between BRM and the DELLA GA pathway repressors, revealed that BRM also acts on GA-responsive genes independently of its effect on GA level. Given the central position occupied by SWI/SNF complexes within regulatory networks controlling fundamental biological processes, the identification of diverse functional intersections of BRM with GA-dependent processes in this study suggests a role for SWI/SNF in facilitating crosstalk between GA-mediated regulation and other cellular pathways. PMID:23536800

  15. Mechanistic Basis for ATP-Dependent Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase by Tabtoxinine-β-lactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Garrett J; Fang, Luting; Schaefer, Jacob; Singh, Sukrit; Bowman, Gregory R; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2018-01-09

    Tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL), also known as wildfire toxin, is a time- and ATP-dependent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase produced by plant pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Here we demonstrate that recombinant glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli phosphorylates the C3-hydroxyl group of the TβL 3-(S)-hydroxy-β-lactam (3-HβL) warhead. Phosphorylation of TβL generates a stable, noncovalent enzyme-ADP-inhibitor complex that resembles the glutamine synthetase tetrahedral transition state. The TβL β-lactam ring remains intact during enzyme inhibition, making TβL mechanistically distinct from traditional β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin. Our findings could enable the design of new 3-HβL transition state inhibitors targeting enzymes in the ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase superfamily with broad therapeutic potential in many disease areas.

  16. Transfer RNA is an essential component of the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciechanover, A.; Wolin, S.L.. Steitz, J.A.; Lodish, H.F.

    1985-03-01

    Protein degradation via the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent pathway in rabbit reticulocytes involves a number of components. In the initial event, ubiquitin, an abundant 76-residue polypeptide, becomes covalently linked to the protein substrate in an ATP-requiring reaction. Once marked in this way, the conjugated protein is proteolyzed in a reaction that also requires ATP. Here the authors show that tRNA is another essential component of the system. Ribonucleases strongly inhibit the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine serum albumin in the reticulocyte system in vitro. RNAs extracted from fractions of the reticulocyte extract or from mouse cells restore proteolytic activity. When the RNA is fractionated by gel electrophoresis, only the tRNA fraction is active in restoring proteolysis. Furthermore, pure mouse tRNA/sup His/, isolated by immunoprecipitation with patient autoimmune sera, restores the proteolytic activity. The possibility that the level of uncharged tRNA in mammalian cells regulates the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system is discussed.

  17. Impaired Chromatin Remodelling at STAT1-Regulated Promoters Leads to Global Unresponsiveness of Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Macrophages to IFN-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Christine; Hildebrandt, Anke; Brand, Franziska; Opitz, Lennart; Dihazi, Hassan; Lüder, Carsten G. K.

    2012-01-01

    unable to respond to IFN-γ due to disturbed chromatin remodelling, but can be rescued using histone deacetylase inhibitors. PMID:22275866

  18. Recruitment by the Repressor Freud-1 of Histone Deacetylase-Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes to Strengthen HTR1A Gene Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souslova, Tatiana; Mirédin, Kim; Millar, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Five-prime repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1)/CC2D1A is genetically linked to intellectual disability and implicated in neuronal development. Freud-1 represses the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene HTR1A by histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent or HDAC-independent mechanisms in 5-HT1A-negative (e.g., HEK-293) or 5-HT1A-expressing cells (SK-N-SH), respectively. To identify the underlying mechanisms, Freud-1-associated proteins were affinity-purified from HEK-293 nuclear extracts and members of the Brg1/SMARCCA chromatin remodeling and Sin3A-HDAC corepressor complexes were identified. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that Freud-1 interacts directly with the Brg1 carboxyl-terminal domain; interaction with Brg1 required the carboxyl-terminal of Freud-1. Freud-1 complexes in HEK-293 and SK-N-SH cells differed, with low levels of BAF170/SMARCC2 and BAF57/SMARCE1 in HEK-293 cells and low-undetectable BAF155/SMARCC1, Sin3A, and HDAC1/2 in SK-N-SH cells. Similarly, by quantitative chromatin immuno-precipitation, Brg1-BAF170/57 and Sin3A-HDAC complexes were observed at the HTR1A promoter in HEK-293 cells, whereas in SK-N-SH cells, Sin3A-HDAC proteins were not detected. Quantifying 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in cells treated with siRNA to Freud-1, Brg1, or both RNAs addressed the functional role of the Freud-1-Brg1 complex. In HEK-293 cells, 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels were increased only when both Freud-1 and Brg1 were depleted, but in SK-N-SH cells, depletion of either protein upregulated 5-HT1A receptor RNA. Thus, recruitment by Freud-1 of Brg1, BAF155, and Sin3A-HDAC complexes appears to strengthen repression of the HTR1A gene to prevent its expression inappropriate cell types, while recruitment of the Brg1-BAF170/57 complex is permissive to 5-HT1A receptor expression. Alterations in Freud-1-Brg1 interactions in mutants associated with intellectual disability could impair gene repression leading to altered neuronal

  19. Recruitment by the Repressor Freud-1 of Histone Deacetylase-Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes to Strengthen HTR1A Gene Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souslova, Tatiana; Mirédin, Kim; Millar, Anne M; Albert, Paul R

    2017-12-01

    Five-prime repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1)/CC2D1A is genetically linked to intellectual disability and implicated in neuronal development. Freud-1 represses the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene HTR1A by histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent or HDAC-independent mechanisms in 5-HT1A-negative (e.g., HEK-293) or 5-HT1A-expressing cells (SK-N-SH), respectively. To identify the underlying mechanisms, Freud-1-associated proteins were affinity-purified from HEK-293 nuclear extracts and members of the Brg1/SMARCCA chromatin remodeling and Sin3A-HDAC corepressor complexes were identified. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that Freud-1 interacts directly with the Brg1 carboxyl-terminal domain; interaction with Brg1 required the carboxyl-terminal of Freud-1. Freud-1 complexes in HEK-293 and SK-N-SH cells differed, with low levels of BAF170/SMARCC2 and BAF57/SMARCE1 in HEK-293 cells and low-undetectable BAF155/SMARCC1, Sin3A, and HDAC1/2 in SK-N-SH cells. Similarly, by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, Brg1-BAF170/57 and Sin3A-HDAC complexes were observed at the HTR1A promoter in HEK-293 cells, whereas in SK-N-SH cells, Sin3A-HDAC proteins were not detected. Quantifying 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in cells treated with siRNA to Freud-1, Brg1, or both RNAs addressed the functional role of the Freud-1-Brg1 complex. In HEK-293 cells, 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels were increased only when both Freud-1 and Brg1 were depleted, but in SK-N-SH cells, depletion of either protein upregulated 5-HT1A receptor RNA. Thus, recruitment by Freud-1 of Brg1, BAF155, and Sin3A-HDAC complexes appears to strengthen repression of the HTR1A gene to prevent its expression inappropriate cell types, while recruitment of the Brg1-BAF170/57 complex is permissive to 5-HT1A receptor expression. Alterations in Freud-1-Brg1 interactions in mutants associated with intellectual disability could impair gene repression leading to altered neuronal

  20. Differences in the epigenetic and reprogramming properties of pluripotent and extra-embryonic stem cells implicate chromatin remodelling as an important early event in the developing mouse embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Joana

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions These data provide evidence that the diversification of defined embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages is accompanied by chromatin remodelling at specific loci. Stem cell lines from the ICM, TE and PrE can each dominantly reprogramme somatic cells but reset gene expression differently, reflecting their separate lineage identities and increasingly restricted developmental potentials.

  1. Temperature dependence of unitary properties of an ATP-dependent potassium channel in cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    McLarnon, J G; Hamman, B.N.; Tibbits, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the properties of unitary currents in cultured rat ventricular myocytes has been studied. Currents flowing through an ATP-dependent K+ channel were recorded from inside-out patches with the bath temperature varied from 10 degrees to 30 degrees C. The channel conductance was 56 pS at room temperature (22 degrees C), and the amplitudes of unitary currents and the channel conductance exhibited a relatively weak (Q10 from 1.4 to 1.6) dependence on temperature. The te...

  2. HAB1–SWI3B Interaction Reveals a Link between Abscisic Acid Signaling and Putative SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Angela; Rodrigues, Americo; Santiago, Julia; Rubio, Silvia; Rodriguez, Pedro L.

    2008-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has an important role for plant growth, development, and stress adaptation. HYPERSENSITIVE TO ABA1 (HAB1) is a protein phosphatase type 2C that plays a key role as a negative regulator of ABA signaling; however, the molecular details of HAB1 action in this process are not known. A two-hybrid screen revealed that SWI3B, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the yeast SWI3 subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes, is a prevalent interacting partner of HAB1. The interaction mapped to the N-terminal half of SWI3B and required an intact protein phosphatase catalytic domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction of HAB1 and SWI3B in the nucleus of plant cells. swi3b mutants showed a reduced sensitivity to ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination and growth and reduced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the presence of HAB1 in the vicinity of RD29B and RAB18 promoters was abolished by ABA, which suggests a direct involvement of HAB1 in the regulation of ABA-induced transcription. Additionally, our results uncover SWI3B as a novel positive regulator of ABA signaling and suggest that HAB1 modulates ABA response through the regulation of a putative SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. PMID:19033529

  3. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  4. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-12-09

    After being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22 degrees C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes.

  5. Antispasmodic activity of Symplocos paniculata is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent K+ channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Symplocos paniculata is a medicinal plant used by native healers to manage gastrointestinal ailments. The crude methanolic extract of S. paniculata was screened pharmacologically both in vitro and in vivo for the validation of its therapeutic potential. It suppressed the spontaneous activity of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations and also caused inhibition of the low K+ (20 mM- induced spastic contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations in a manner comparable to cromakalim. The relaxant effect was found to be blocked following glibenclamide exposure of the isolated tissue preparations similar to cromakalim, suggesting that observed response was likely to be mediated through opening of ATP dependent K+ channels. Following oral administration to mice provided protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in a manner similar to loperamide. The plant material was found safe in toxicity study up to oral dose of 8 g/kg in mice. Hence, present study provides a scientific basis for the vernacular use of S. paniculata in gastro-intestinal system.

  6. Multitasking in the mitochondrion by the ATP-dependent Lon protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Lee, Jae; Singh, Kamalendra; Lee, Irene; Suzuki, Carolyn K

    2012-01-01

    The AAA(+) Lon protease is a soluble single-ringed homo-oligomer, which represents the most streamlined operational unit mediating ATP-dependent proteolysis. Despite its simplicity, the architecture of Lon proteases exhibits a species-specific diversity. Homology modeling provides insights into the structural features that distinguish bacterial and human Lon proteases as hexameric complexes from yeast Lon, which is uniquely heptameric. The best-understood functions of mitochondrial Lon are linked to maintaining proteostasis under normal metabolic conditions, and preventing proteotoxicity during environmental and cellular stress. An intriguing property of human Lon is its specific binding to G-quadruplex DNA, and its association with the mitochondrial genome in cultured cells. A fraction of Lon preferentially binds to the control region of mitochondrial DNA where transcription and replication are initiated. Here, we present an overview of the diverse functions of mitochondrial Lon, as well as speculative perspectives on its role in protein and mtDNA quality control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidrug resistance in Lactococcus lactis : Evidence for ATP-dependent drug extrusion from the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H; van Veen, H.W.; Molenaar, D.; Poolman, B.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1996-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis possesses an ATP-dependent drug extrusion system which shares functional properties with the mammalian multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter P-glycoprotein, One of the intriguing aspects of both transporters is their ability to interact with a broad range of structurally

  8. Recombination in Escherichia coli V. Genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recipients deficient in ATP-dependent exonuclease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, P.G. de; Hoekstra, W.P.M.; Verhoef, C.

    A genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recombination-deficient recipients, lacking the ATP-dependent exonuclease activity, demonstrated differences in the inheritance pattern of donor markers compared with a Rec+ recipient. In particular the donor markers proximal to the transfer

  9. CgII cleaves DNA using a mechanism distinct from other ATP-dependent restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliusis, Paulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Silanskas, Arunas; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-08-21

    The restriction endonuclease CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum recognizes an asymmetric 5'-GCCGC-3' site and cleaves the DNA 7 and 6/7 nucleotides downstream on the top and bottom DNA strands, respectively, in an NTP-hydrolysis dependent reaction. CglI is composed of two different proteins: an endonuclease (R.CglI) and a DEAD-family helicase-like ATPase (H.CglI). These subunits form a heterotetrameric complex with R2H2 stoichiometry. However, the R2H2·CglI complex has only one nuclease active site sufficient to cut one DNA strand suggesting that two complexes are required to introduce a double strand break. Here, we report studies to evaluate the DNA cleavage mechanism of CglI. Using one- and two-site circular DNA substrates we show that CglI does not require two sites on the same DNA for optimal catalytic activity. However, one-site linear DNA is a poor substrate, supporting a mechanism where CglI complexes must communicate along the one-dimensional DNA contour before cleavage is activated. Based on experimental data, we propose that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis by CglI produces translocation on DNA preferentially in a downstream direction from the target, although upstream translocation is also possible. Our results are consistent with a mechanism of CglI action that is distinct from that of other ATP-dependent restriction-modification enzymes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. The WSTF-ISWI chromatin remodeling complex transiently associates with the human inactive X chromosome during late S-phase prior to BRCA1 and γ-H2AX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E Culver-Cochran

    Full Text Available Replicating the genome prior to each somatic cell division not only requires precise duplication of the genetic information, but also accurately reestablishing the epigenetic signatures that instruct how the genetic material is to be interpreted in the daughter cells. The mammalian inactive X chromosome (Xi, which is faithfully inherited in a silent state in each daughter cell, provides an excellent model of epigenetic regulation. While much is known about the early stages of X chromosome inactivation, much less is understood with regards to retaining the Xi chromatin through somatic cell division. Here we report that the WSTF-ISWI chromatin remodeling complex (WICH associates with the Xi during late S-phase as the Xi DNA is replicated. Elevated levels of WICH at the Xi is restricted to late S-phase and appears before BRCA1 and γ-H2A.X. The sequential appearance of WICH and BRCA1/γ-H2A.X implicate each as performing important but distinct roles in the maturation and maintenance of heterochromatin at the Xi.

  11. All-trans retinoic acid induces chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the mouse liver, bone, and kidney alkaline phosphatase gene in C3H10T 1/2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yang; Yang, Songhai; Sun, Fenyong; Wang, Jiayi; Chen, Qiongyu; Hong, An

    2012-08-01

    The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) gene is an important marker of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Although the molecular mechanisms of increased ALP expression in response to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) have been reported, the role of ATRA in chromatin structure changes remains unknown. Our results show that the expression of mouse liver, bone, and kidney ALP (mL/B/K-ALP) induced by ATRA in C3H10T 1/2 cells was related to the retinoic acid nuclear receptors, RARα and RARβ, which are not involved in the MAPK pathway. DNase I hypersensitivity analysis revealed an inducible hypersensitive site in the mL/B/K-ALP promoter at ~520 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed a cascade of transcription cofactor recruitment events during ATRA-induced upregulation of mL/B/K-ALP. Together, our results provide a link between ATRA-induced mL/B/K-ALP gene transcription and chromatin remodeling.

  12. Swi/SNF-GCN5-dependent chromatin remodelling determines induced expression of GDH3, one of the paralogous genes responsible for ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, Amaranta; Riego, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; Aranda, Cristina; Romero, Guillermo; Ishida, Cecilia; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rodarte, Beatriz; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Valenzuela, Lourdes; Zonszein, Sergio; González, Alicia

    2005-07-01

    It is accepted that Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome arose from complete duplication of eight ancestral chromosomes; functionally normal ploidy was recovered because of the massive loss of 90% of duplicated genes. There is evidence that indicates that part of this selective conservation of gene pairs is compelling to yeast facultative metabolism. As an example, the duplicated NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase pathway has been maintained because of the differential expression of the paralogous GDH1 and GDH3 genes, and the biochemical specialization of the enzymes they encode. The present work has been aimed to the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that modulate GDH3 transcriptional activation. Our results show that GDH3 expression is repressed in glucose-grown cultures, as opposed to what has been observed for GDH1, and induced under respiratory conditions, or under stationary phase. Although GDH3 pertains to the nitrogen metabolic network, and its expression is Gln3p-regulated, complete derepression is ultimately determined by the carbon source through the action of the SAGA and SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes. GDH3 carbon-mediated regulation is over-imposed to that exerted by the nitrogen source, highlighting the fact that operation of facultative metabolism requires strict control of enzymes, like Gdh3p, involved in biosynthetic pathways that use tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates.

  13. Activity-Regulated Cytoskeleton-Associated Protein Accumulates in the Nucleus in Response to Cocaine and Acts as a Brake on Chromatin Remodeling and Long-Term Behavioral Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salery, Marine; Dos Santos, Marc; Saint-Jour, Estefani; Moumné, Lara; Pagès, Christiane; Kappès, Vincent; Parnaudeau, Sébastien; Caboche, Jocelyne; Vanhoutte, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Addiction relies on persistent alterations of neuronal properties, which depends on gene regulation. Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) is an immediate early gene that modulates neuronal plasticity underlying learning and memory. Its role in cocaine-induced neuronal and behavioral adaptations remains elusive. Acute cocaine-treated mice were used for quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry, and confocal imaging from striatum. Live imaging and transfection assays for Arc overexpression were performed from primary cultures. Molecular and behavioral adaptations to cocaine were studied from Arc-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates. Arc messenger RNA and proteins are rapidly induced in the striatum after acute cocaine administration, via an extracellular-signal regulated kinase-dependent de novo protein synthesis. Although detected in dendrites, Arc accumulates in the nucleus in active zones of transcription, where it colocalizes with phospho-Ser10-histone H3, an important component of nucleosomal response. In vitro, Arc overexpression downregulates phospho-Ser10-histone H3 without modifying extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in the nucleus. In vivo, Arc-deficient mice display decreased heterochromatin domains, a high RNA-polymerase II activity and enhanced c-Fos expression. These mice presented an exacerbated psychomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference induced by low doses of cocaine. Cocaine induces the rapid induction of Arc and its nuclear accumulation in striatal neurons. Locally, it alters the nucleosomal response, and acts as a brake on chromatin remodeling and gene regulation. These original observations posit Arc as a major homeostatic modulator of molecular and behavioral responses to cocaine. Thus, modulating Arc levels may provide promising therapeutic approaches in drug addiction. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by

  14. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the first archaeal ATP-dependent glucokinase from aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Mitani, Yuri; Goda, Shuichiro; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2003-02-01

    The gene encoding the ATP-dependent glucokinase of hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was identified, cloned, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 40% identity to that of the putative glucokinase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobacurum aerophilum. The purified recombinant enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 35 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity on heating at 70 degrees C for 10 min and retained 65% of the activity after 10-min incubation at 100 degrees C. The enzyme exclusively catalyzed the phosphorylation of D-glucose using ATP as a phosphoryl donor. ITP was accepted in addition to ATP. The rate dependence with both glucose and ATP followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) values of 0.054 and 0.50 mM, respectively. The enzyme activity required divalent cations; Mg(2+), which was most effective, could partially be replaced by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the glucokinase from A. pernix does not belong to the clusters of enzymes found in bacteria and eukarya. This is the first description of the characteristics of an ATP-dependent glucokinase from an archaeon.

  15. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications...

  16. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander

    2015-01-01

    elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of approximately 60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly...... modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp68, Lys170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp68...... or Lys170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 ms and 700 ms for Trp68Leu and Lys170Asn, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using phi-value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies...

  17. Lung neuroendocrine tumours: deep sequencing of the four World Health Organization histotypes reveals chromatin-remodelling genes as major players and a prognostic role for TERT, RB1, MEN1 and KMT2D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Sikora, Katarzyna O; Fassan, Matteo; Barbi, Stefano; Corbo, Vincenzo; Mastracci, Luca; Rusev, Borislav; Grillo, Federica; Vicentini, Caterina; Ferrara, Roberto; Pilotto, Sara; Davini, Federico; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Lawlor, Rita T; Chilosi, Marco; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bria, Emilio; Fontanini, Gabriella; Volante, Marco; Scarpa, Aldo

    2017-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied to 148 lung neuroendocrine tumours (LNETs) comprising the four World Health Organization classification categories: 53 typical carcinoid (TCs), 35 atypical carcinoid (ACs), 27 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and 33 small-cell lung carcinomas. A discovery screen was conducted on 46 samples by the use of whole-exome sequencing and high-coverage targeted sequencing of 418 genes. Eighty-eight recurrently mutated genes from both the discovery screen and current literature were verified in the 46 cases of the discovery screen, and validated on additional 102 LNETs by targeted NGS; their prevalence was then evaluated on the whole series. Thirteen of these 88 genes were also evaluated for copy number alterations (CNAs). Carcinoids and carcinomas shared most of the altered genes but with different prevalence rates. When mutations and copy number changes were combined, MEN1 alterations were almost exclusive to carcinoids, whereas alterations of TP53 and RB1 cell cycle regulation genes and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway genes were significantly enriched in carcinomas. Conversely, mutations in chromatin-remodelling genes, including those encoding histone modifiers and members of SWI-SNF complexes, were found at similar rates in carcinoids (45.5%) and carcinomas (55.0%), suggesting a major role in LNET pathogenesis. One AC and one TC showed a hypermutated profile associated with a POLQ damaging mutation. There were fewer CNAs in carcinoids than in carcinomas; however ACs showed a hybrid pattern, whereby gains of TERT, SDHA, RICTOR, PIK3CA, MYCL and SRC were found at rates similar to those in carcinomas, whereas the MEN1 loss rate mirrored that of TCs. Multivariate survival analysis revealed RB1 mutation (p = 0.0005) and TERT copy gain (p = 0.016) as independent predictors of poorer prognosis. MEN1 mutation was associated with poor prognosis in AC (p = 0.0045), whereas KMT2D mutation correlated with longer survival in SCLC

  18. Ubiquitous Over-Expression of Chromatin Remodeling Factor SRG3 Ameliorates the T Cell-Mediated Exacerbation of EAE by Modulating the Phenotypes of both Dendritic Cells and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Won; Park, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Sung Ho; Lee, Changjin; Seong, Rho Hyun; Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2015-01-01

    Although SWI3-related gene (SRG3), a chromatin remodeling factor, is critical for various biological processes including early embryogenesis and thymocyte development, it is unclear whether SRG3 is involved in the differentiation of CD4+ T cells, the key mediator of adaptive immune responses. Because it is known that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) development is determined by the activation of CD4+ T helper cells, here, we investigated the role of SRG3 in EAE development using SRG3 transgenic mouse models exhibiting two distinct SRG3 expression patterns: SRG3 expression driven by either the CD2 or β-actin promoter. We found that the outcome of EAE development was completely different depending on the expression pattern of SRG3. The specific over-expression of SRG3 using the CD2 promoter facilitated EAE via the induction of Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 using the β-actin promoter inhibited EAE by promoting Th2 differentiation and suppressing Th1 and Th17 differentiation. In addition, the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 polarized CD4+ T cell differentiation towards the Th2 phenotype by converting dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages to Th2 types. SRG3 over-expression not only reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by DCs but also shifted macrophages from the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-expressing M1 phenotype to the arginase-1-expressing M2 phenotype during EAE. In addition, Th2 differentiation in β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice during EAE was associated with an increase in the basophil and mast cell populations and in IL4 production. Furthermore, the increased frequency of Treg cells in the spinal cord of β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice might induce the suppression of and accelerate the recovery from EAE symptoms. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence supporting the development of a new therapeutic strategy for EAE involving the modulation of SRG3 expression to induce M2 and Th2 polarization

  19. ATP-dependent regulation of actin monomer-filament equilibrium by cyclase-associated protein and ADF/cofilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-07-15

    CAP (cyclase-associated protein) is a conserved regulator of actin filament dynamics. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CAS-1 is an isoform of CAP that is expressed in striated muscle and regulates sarcomeric actin assembly. In the present study, we report that CAS-2, a second CAP isoform in C. elegans, attenuates the actin-monomer-sequestering effect of ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin to increase the steady-state levels of actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. CAS-2 binds to actin monomers without a strong preference for either ATP- or ADP-actin. CAS-2 strongly enhances the exchange of actin-bound nucleotides even in the presence of UNC-60A, a C. elegans ADF/cofilin that inhibits nucleotide exchange. UNC-60A induces the depolymerization of actin filaments and sequesters actin monomers, whereas CAS-2 reverses the monomer-sequestering effect of UNC-60A in the presence of ATP, but not in the presence of only ADP or the absence of ATP or ADP. A 1:100 molar ratio of CAS-2 to UNC-60A is sufficient to increase actin filaments. CAS-2 has two independent actin-binding sites in its N- and C-terminal halves, and the C-terminal half is necessary and sufficient for the observed activities of the full-length CAS-2. These results suggest that CAS-2 (CAP) and UNC-60A (ADF/cofilin) are important in the ATP-dependent regulation of the actin monomer-filament equilibrium.

  20. Assembly of the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease in Arabidopsis is regulated by the ClpT accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Lars L E; Clarke, Adrian K

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-dependent caseinolytic protease (Clp) is an essential housekeeping enzyme in plant chloroplasts. It is by far the most complex of all known Clp proteases, with a proteolytic core consisting of multiple catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. It also includes a unique form of Clp protein of unknown function designated ClpT, two of which exist in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Inactivation of ClpT1 or ClpT2 significantly reduces the amount of Clp proteolytic core, whereas loss of both proves seedling lethal under autotrophic conditions. During assembly of the Clp proteolytic core, ClpT1 first binds to the P-ring (consisting of ClpP3-6 subunits) followed by ClpT2, and only then does the P-ring combine with the R-ring (ClpP1, ClpR1-4 subunits). Most of the ClpT proteins in chloroplasts exist in vivo as homodimers, which then apparently monomerize prior to association with the P-ring. Despite their relative abundance, however, the availability of both ClpT proteins is rate limiting for the core assembly, with the addition of recombinant ClpT1 and ClpT2 increasing core content up to fourfold. Overall, ClpT appears to regulate the assembly of the chloroplast Clp protease, revealing a new and sophisticated control mechanism on the activity of this vital protease in plants.

  1. Tetrahydroisoquinolines affect the whole-cell phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by inhibiting the ATP-dependent MurE ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Juan D; Pesnot, Thomas; Barrera, Diana A; Davies, Heledd M; McMahon, Eleanor; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Mortazavi, Parisa N; Munshi, Tulika; Maitra, Arundhati; Lamming, Eleanor D; Angell, Richard; Gershater, Markus C; Redmond, Joanna M; Needham, Deborah; Ward, John M; Cuca, Luis E; Hailes, Helen C; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    (S)-Leucoxine, isolated from the Colombian Lauraceae tree Rhodostemonodaphne crenaticupula Madriñan, was found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. A biomimetic approach for the chemical synthesis of a wide array of 1-substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines was undertaken with the aim of elucidating a common pharmacophore for these compounds with novel mode(s) of anti-TB action. Biomimetic Pictet-Spengler or Bischler-Napieralski synthetic routes were employed followed by an evaluation of the biological activity of the synthesized compounds. In this work, the synthesized tetrahydroisoquinolines were found to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and affect its whole-cell phenotype as well as the activity of the ATP-dependent MurE ligase, a key enzyme involved in the early stage of cell wall peptidoglycan biosynthesis. As the correlation between the MIC and the half-inhibitory enzymatic concentration was not particularly strong, there is a credible possibility that these compounds have pleiotropic mechanism(s) of action in M. tuberculosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  2. An Arabidopsis ATP-dependent, DEAD-box RNA helicase loses activity upon iosAsp formation but is restored by Protein Isoaspartyl Methltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT RNA HELICASE75 (AtPRH75) demonstrated an ATP-dependent, RNA duplex unwinding capacity and an ATP-independent, RNA duplex reforming ability. It is known to accumulate isoAsp, but the consequences of isoAsp formation in AtPRH75 are unknown. Duplex unwinding was abolished by ...

  3. Asymmetric switching in a homodimeric ABC transporter: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Aittoniemi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are a large family of membrane proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including multidrug and tumor resistance and ion channel regulation. Advances in the structural and functional understanding of ABC transporters have revealed that hydrolysis at the two canonical nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs is co-operative and non-simultaneous. A conserved core architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic ABC exporters has been established, as exemplified by the crystal structure of the homodimeric multidrug exporter Sav1866. Currently, it is unclear how sequential ATP hydrolysis arises in a symmetric homodimeric transporter, since it implies at least transient asymmetry at the NBSs. We show by molecular dynamics simulation that the initially symmetric structure of Sav1866 readily undergoes asymmetric transitions at its NBSs in a pre-hydrolytic nucleotide configuration. MgATP-binding residues and a network of charged residues at the dimer interface are shown to form a sequence of putative molecular switches that allow ATP hydrolysis only at one NBS. We extend our findings to eukaryotic ABC exporters which often consist of two non-identical half-transporters, frequently with degeneracy substitutions at one of their two NBSs. Interestingly, many residues involved in asymmetric conformational switching in Sav1866 are substituted in degenerate eukaryotic NBS. This finding strengthens recent suggestions that the interplay of a consensus and a degenerate NBS in eukaroytic ABC proteins pre-determines the sequence of hydrolysis at the two NBSs.

  4. Identification of new protein substrates for the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease supports its constitutive role in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanne, Tara M; Sjögren, Lars L E; Koussevitzky, Shai; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-dependent Clp protease in plant chloroplasts consists of a heterogeneous proteolytic core containing multiple ClpP and ClpR paralogues. In this study, we have examined in detail the only viable knockout mutant to date of one of these subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana, ClpR1. Loss of ClpR1 caused a slow-growth phenotype, with chlorotic leaves during early development that later partially recovered upon maturity. Analysis of the Clp proteolytic core in the clpR1 mutant (clpR1-1) revealed approx. 10% of the wild-type levels remaining, probably due to a relative increase in the closely related ClpR3 protein and its partial substitution of ClpR1 in the core complex. A proteomic approach using an in organello proteolytic assay revealed 19 new potential substrates for the chloroplast Clp protease. Many of these substrates were constitutive enzymes involved in different metabolic pathways, including photosynthetic carbon fixation, nitrogen metabolism and chlorophyll/haem biosynthesis, whereas others function in housekeeping roles such as RNA maturation, protein synthesis and maturation, and recycling processes. In contrast, degradation of the stress-related chloroplast proteins Hsp21 (heat-shock protein 21) and lipoxygenase 2 was unaffected in the clpR1-1 line and thus not facilitated by the Clp protease. Overall, we show that the chloroplast Clp protease is principally a constitutive enzyme that degrades numerous stromal proteins, a feature that almost certainly underlies its vital importance for chloroplast function and plant viability.

  5. Rational design of substrate binding pockets in polyphosphate kinase for use in cost-effective ATP-dependent cascade reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hao; Nie, Kaili; Li, Chengcheng; Xu, Haijun; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Liu, Luo

    2017-07-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the energy equivalent of the living system. Polyphosphate (polyP) is the ancient energy storage equivalent of organisms. Polyphosphate kinases (PPKs) catalyze the polyP formation or ATP formation, to store energy or to regenerate ATP, respectively. However, most PPKs are active only in the presence of long polyPs, which are more difficult and more expensive to generate than the short polyPs. We investigated the PPK preference towards polyPs by site-directed mutagenesis and computational simulation, to understand the mechanism and further design enzymes for effective ATP regeneration using short polyPs for in vitro cascade reactions, which are highly desired for research and applications. The results suggest that the short polyPs inhibit PPK by blocking the ADP-binding pocket. Structural comparison between PPK (Corynebacterium glutamicum) and PPK (Sinorhizobium meliloti) indicates that three amino acid residues, i.e., lysine, glutamate, and threonine, are involved in the activity towards short polyP by fixing the adenosine group of ADP in between the subunits of the dimer, while the terminal phosphate group of ADP still offers an active site, which presents a binding pocket for ADP. A proposed triple mutant PPK (SMc02148-KET) demonstrates significant activity towards short polyP to form ATP from ADP. The obtained high glutathione titer (38.79 mM) and glucose-6-phosphate titer (87.35 mM) in cascade reactions with ATP regeneration using the triple mutant PPK (SMc02148-KET) reveal that the tailored PPK establishes the effective ATP regeneration system for ATP-dependent reactions.

  6. Initial rate and equilibrium isotope exchange studies on the ATP-dependent activity of polyphosphate Glucokinase from Propionibacterium shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, T H; Horn, P J; Pan, W H; Phillips, N F

    1996-05-28

    Polyphosphate glucokinase [EC 2.7.1.63] catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose using either inorganic polyphosphate [poly(P)] or ATP as the phosphoryl donor. Both activities purified from Propionibacterium shermanii are the functional properties of a single enzyme with separate binding sites for the two phosphoryl donor substrates. The enzyme was found to utilize poly(P) much more efficiently than it does ATP, with a kcat/Kpoly(P) to kcat/KATP ratio of 2800. The catalytic constant for poly(P) is about 2-fold higher than for ATP. Other nucleotides like GTP and dATP also served as substrates with good efficiencies. The ATP-dependent reaction was analyzed using steady-state kinetics and isotopic exchange kinetics at chemical equilibrium. Intersecting initial velocity patterns for both glucose and ATP indicate sequential addition of substrates. Product inhibition studies resulted in two competitive and two noncompetitive patterns, which is characteristic of a Theorell-Chance mechanism or a random mechanism with two dead-end complexes. Results of isotope exchange experiments, however, rule out a Theorell-Chance mechanism, as well as a truly random mechanism. They are not consistent with a partially random mechanism (although a kinetically compulsory order of substrate binding is not excluded), where glucose is preferentially bound to free enzyme before ATP, and ADP is preferentially released as the first product, followed by glucose 6-phosphate. Dead-end inhibition analysis confirms this order of substrate binding. Competitive inhibition of ADP vs ATP is explained as resulting primarily from binding as a dead-end inhibitor (E.Glc.ADP) and not as a product. Another weaker abortive complex, E.ATP.G6P, is also formed. The chemical transformation or the release of ADP is the rate-limiting step in ATP utilization.

  7. Engineering an ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase for synthesizing amino acid amides from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yuta; Okazaki, Seiji; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-05-01

    We successfully engineered a new enzyme that catalyzes the formation of D-Ala amide (D-AlaNH2) from D-Ala by modifying ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase (EC 6.3.2.4) from Thermus thermophilus, which catalyzes the formation of D-Ala-D-Ala from two molecules of D-Ala. The new enzyme was created by the replacement of the Ser293 residue with acidic amino acids, as it was speculated to bind to the second D-Ala of D-Ala-D-Ala. In addition, a replacement of the position with Glu performed better than that with Asp with regards to specificity for D-AlaNH2 production. The S293E variant, which was selected as the best enzyme for D-AlaNH2 production, exhibited an optimal activity at pH 9.0 and 40 °C for D-AlaNH2 production. The apparent K m values of this variant for D-Ala and NH3 were 7.35 mM and 1.58 M, respectively. The S293E variant could catalyze the synthesis of 9.3 and 35.7 mM of D-AlaNH2 from 10 and 50 mM D-Ala and 3 M NH4Cl with conversion yields of 93 and 71.4 %, respectively. This is the first report showing the enzymatic formation of amino acid amides from amino acids.

  8. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain identified previously in BfiI and EcoRII REases, and in plant transcription factors. Structural comparison of the B3-like domains of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and the plant transcription factors revealed a conserved DNA-binding surface comprised of N- and C-arms that together grip the DNA. The C-arms of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and plant B3 domains are similar in size, but the R.NgoAVII N-arm which makes the majority of the contacts to the target site is much longer. The overall structures of R.NgoAVII and BfiI are similar; however, whilst BfiI has stand-alone catalytic activity, R.NgoAVII requires an auxiliary cognate N.NgoAVII protein and ATP hydrolysis in order to cleave DNA at the target site. The structures we present will help formulate future experiments to explore the molecular mechanisms of intersubunit crosstalk that control DNA cleavage by R.NgoAVII and related endonucleases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Ammonium ion substitutes for K/sup +/ in ATP-dependent Na/sup +/ transport by basolateral membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towle, D.W.; Hoelleland, T.

    1987-03-01

    Ion-transporting cells from posterior gills of blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) acclimated to low salinity were used as starting material for the preparation of microsomal membrane vesicles by density gradient centrifugation. The Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase)-enriched basolateral vesicles were loaded with KCl- or NH/sub 4//sup +/-containing medium by dilution and centrifugation, and initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake into the vesicles were measured by a rapid filtration procedure. Varying the extravesicular sucrose concentration altered equilibrium uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/, indicating the existence of osmotically sensitive vesicles. Monensin, a sodium-specific ionophore, enhanced passive uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ across the vesicle membrane in the absence of ATP. With 100 mM KCl in the intravesicular medium, addition of ATP to the extravesicular medium increased initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake 10- to 20-fold over levels measured without ATP. A nonhydrolyzable ATP analog failed to stimulate /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake. Intravesicular K/sup +/ could be replaced by NH/sub 4//sup +/ but not by choline. With NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion, Na/sup +/ transport was inhibited by digitoxin, but valinomycin had no effect. A study of the kinetic effects of intravesicular K/sup +/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ on initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake indicated the existence of two classes of binding sites, one responding to counterion concentrations in the millimolar range and a second class responding to counterion concentrations over 50 mM. The results indicate that ATP-dependent /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake by membrane vesicles from Callinectes sapidus gill, mediated by Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase, can utilize either K/sup +/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion.

  10. Activities and specificities of homodimeric TALENs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-10-01

    The development of highly efficient genome engineering reagents is of paramount importance to launch the next wave of biotechnology. TAL effectors have been developed as an adaptable DNA binding scaffold that can be engineered to bind to any user-defined sequence. Thus, TAL-based DNA binding modules have been used to generate chimeric proteins for a variety of targeted genome modifications across eukaryotic species. For example, TAL effectors fused to the catalytic domain of FokI endonuclease (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs), the repair of which can be harnessed to dictate user-desired, genome-editing outcomes. To cleave DNA, FokI endonuclease must dimerize which can be achieved using a pair of TALENs that bind to the DNA targeted in a tail-to-tail orientation with proper spacing allowing the dimer formation. Because TALENs binding to DNA are dependent on their repeat sequences and nucleotides binding specificities, homodimers and heterodimers binding can be formed. In the present study, we used several TALEN monomers with increased repeats binding degeneracy to allow homodimer formation at increased number of genomic loci. We assessed their binding specificities and genome modification activities. Our results indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to modify the yeast genome in a site-specific manner and their binding to the promoter regions might modulate the expression of target genes. Taken together, our data indicate that homodimeric TALENs could be used to achieve different engineering possibilities of biotechnological applications and that their transcriptional modulations need to be considered when analyzing their phenotypic effects. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Homodimeric BODIPY Rotor as a Fluorescent Viscosity Sensor for Membrane-Mimicking and Cellular Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sangram; Kimball, Joseph; Fudala, Rafal; Doan, Hung; Maliwal, Badri; Sabnis, Nirupama; Lacko, Andras; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Dzyuba, Sergei V.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence properties of a novel homodimeric BODIPY dye rotor for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) are reported. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements established the viscosity dependant behaviour in vitro. Homodimeric BODIPY embedded in different membrane mimicking lipid vesicles (DPPC, POPC and POPC plus cholesterol) demonstrated to be a viable sensor for fluorescence lifetime based viscosity measurements. Moreover, SKOV3 cells readily endocytosed the dye, which accumulated in membranous structures inside cytoplasm thereby allowing viscosity mapping of internal cell components. PMID:25381865

  12. Crosstalk between the subunits of the homodimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomosa-Signoret, Viviana; Aguirre-López, Beatriz; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marietta Tuena; Gómez-Puyou, Armando

    2007-04-01

    Homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcTIM) and T. brucei (TbTIM) are markedly similar in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. In their dimer interfaces, each monomer has a Cys15 that is surrounded by loop3 of the adjoining subunit. Perturbation of Cys15 by methylmethane thiosulfonate (MMTS) induces abolition of catalysis and structural changes. In the two TIMs, the structural arrangements of their Cys15 are almost identical. Nevertheless, the susceptibility of TcTIM to MMTS is nearly 100-fold higher than in TbTIM. To ascertain the extent to which the characteristics of the interface Cys depend on the dynamics of its own monomer or on those of the adjacent monomer, we studied MMTS action on mutants of TcTIM that had the interface residues of TbTIM, and hybrids that have only one interfacial Cys15 (C15ATcTIM-wild type TbTIM). We found that the solvent exposure of the interfacial Cys depends predominantly on the characteristics of the adjoining monomer. The maximal inhibition of activity induced by perturbation of the sole interface Cys in the C15ATcTIM-TbTIM hybrid is around 60%. Hybrids formed with C15ATcTIM monomers and catalytically inert TbTIM monomers (E168DTbTIM) were also studied. Their activity drops by nearly 50% when the only interfacial Cys is perturbed. These results in conjunction with those on C15ATcTIM-wild type TbTIM hybrid indicate that about half of the activity of each monomer depends on the integrity of each of the two Cys15-loop3 portions of the interface. This could be another reason of why TIM is an obligatory dimer. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cooperative mechanism in the homodimeric myoglobin from Nassa mutabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, M; Ascenzi, P; Polizio, F; Smulevich, G; del Gaudio, R; Piscopo, M; Geraci, G

    1998-03-03

    Oxygen binding and spectroscopic properties of the homodimeric myoglobin (Mb) from the prosobranchia sea snail Nassa mutabilis have been investigated. Oxygen equilibrium curves are pH-independent and cooperative with P50 = 5 +/- 1 mmHg and n approximately 1.5. Circular dichroism spectra of the oxygenated and deoxygenated form of N. mutabilis Mb are superimposable between 190 and 250 nm, suggesting a mechanism for cooperative ligand binding that does not involve changes in the alpha-helical content of the whole protein. The oxygen dissociation process is biphasic and pH-dependent, with different pKa values (=6.7 +/- 0.2 and 8.5 +/- 0.3) for the two phases. Moreover, the activation energy is essentially the same for both oxygen dissociation processes (Ea = 56.4 +/- 2.1 kJ/mol for the fast phase, and Ea = 53.8 +/- 1.9 kJ/mol for the slow phase), indicating that the rate difference for O2 dissociation between the diliganded and the monoliganded species is mostly dependent on a variation of the activation entropy. Ferrous nitrosylated N. mutabilis Mb shows, at alkaline and neutral pH, axial and rhombic X-band EPR signals, respectively, which display below pH 6 a three-hyperfine pattern typical of five-coordination. The results presented here suggest that in N.mutabilis Mb the kinetic control of cooperativity operates through a mechanism never observed before in other hemoproteins, which requires a ligand-linked large enhancement for the value of the oxygen association process in a molecule not undergoing changes in quaternary structure.

  14. Extent of Structural Asymmetry in Homodimeric Proteins: Prevalence and Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, Lakshmipuram Seshadri; Srikeerthana, Kuchi; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Most homodimeric proteins have symmetric structure. Although symmetry is known to confer structural and functional advantage, asymmetric organization is also observed. Using a non-redundant dataset of 223 high-resolution crystal structures of biologically relevant homodimers, we address questions on the prevalence and significance of asymmetry. We used two measures to quantify global and interface asymmetry, and assess the correlation of several molecular and structural parameters with asymmetry. We have identified rare cases (11/223) of biologically relevant homodimers with pronounced global asymmetry. Asymmetry serves as a means to bring about 2∶1 binding between the homodimer and another molecule; it also enables cellular signalling arising from asymmetric macromolecular ligands such as DNA. Analysis of these cases reveals two possible mechanisms by which possible infinite array formation is prevented. In case of homodimers associating via non-topologically equivalent surfaces in their tertiary structures, ligand-dependent mechanisms are used. For stable dimers binding via large surfaces, ligand-dependent structural change regulates polymerisation/depolymerisation; for unstable dimers binding via smaller surfaces that are not evolutionarily well conserved, dimerisation occurs only in the presence of the ligand. In case of homodimers associating via interaction surfaces with parts of the surfaces topologically equivalent in the tertiary structures, steric hindrance serves as the preventive mechanism of infinite array. We also find that homodimers exhibiting grossly symmetric organization rarely exhibit either perfect local symmetry or high local asymmetry. Binding of small ligands at the interface does not cause any significant variation in interface asymmetry. However, identification of biologically relevant interface asymmetry in grossly symmetric homodimers is confounded by the presence of similar small magnitude changes caused due to artefacts of

  15. Acetone and Butanone Metabolism of the Denitrifying Bacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” Demonstrates Novel Biochemical Properties of an ATP-Dependent Aliphatic Ketone Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schühle, Karola

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic and aerobic metabolism of acetone and butanone in the betaproteobacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” is initiated by their ATP-dependent carboxylation to acetoacetate and 3-oxopentanoic acid, respectively. Both reactions are catalyzed by the same enzyme, acetone carboxylase, which was purified and characterized. Acetone carboxylase is highly induced under growth on acetone or butanone and accounts for at least 5.5% of total cell protein. The enzyme consists of three subunits of 85, 75, and 20 kDa, respectively, in a (αβγ)2 composition and contains 1 Zn and 2 Fe per heterohexamer but no organic cofactors. Chromatographic analysis of the ATP hydrolysis products indicated that ATP was exclusively cleaved to AMP and 2 Pi. The stoichiometry was determined to be 2 ATP consumed per acetone carboxylated. Purified acetone carboxylase from A. aromaticum catalyzes the carboxylation of acetone and butanone as the only substrates. However, the enzyme shows induced (uncoupled) ATPase activity with many other substrates that were not carboxylated. Acetone carboxylase is a member of a protein family that also contains acetone carboxylases of various other organisms, acetophenone carboxylase of A. aromaticum, and ATP-dependent hydantoinases/oxoprolinases. While the members of this family share several characteristic features, they differ with respect to the products of ATP hydrolysis, subunit composition, and metal content. PMID:22020645

  16. Analysis of homodimeric protein interfaces by graph-spectral methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinda, K V; Kannan, N; Vishveshwara, S

    2002-04-01

    The quaternary structures impart structural and functional credibility to proteins. In a multi-subunit protein, it is important to understand the factors that drive the association or dissociation of the subunits. It is a well known fact that both hydrophobic and charged interactions contribute to the stability of the protein interface. The interface residues are also known to be highly conserved. Though they are buried in the oligomer, these residues are either exposed or partially exposed in the monomer. It is felt that a systematic and objective method of identifying interface clusters and their analysis can significantly contribute to the identification of a residue or a collection of residues important for oligomerization. Recently, we have applied the techniques of graph-spectral methods to a variety of problems related to protein structure and folding. A major advantage of this methodology is that the problem is viewed from a global protein topology point of view rather than localized regions of the protein structure. In the present investigation, we have applied the methods of graph-spectral analysis to identify side chain clusters at the interface and the centers of these clusters in a set of homodimeric proteins. These clusters are analyzed in terms of properties such as amino acid composition, accessibility to solvent and conservation of residues. Interesting results such as participation of charged and aromatic residues like arginine, glutamic acid, histidine, phenylalanine and tyrosine, consistent with earlier investigations, have emerged from these analyses. Important additional information is that the residues involved are a part of a cluster(s) and that they are sequentially distant residues which have come closer to each other in the three-dimensional structure of the protein. These residues can easily be detected using our graph-spectral algorithm. This method has also been used to identify important residues ('hot spots') in dimerization and also

  17. The First Archaeal ATP-Dependent Glucokinase, from the Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix, Represents a Monomeric, Extremely Thermophilic ROK Glucokinase with Broad Hexose Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Reichstein, Bianca; Schmid, Roland; Schönheit, Peter

    2002-01-01

    An ATP-dependent glucokinase of the hyperthermophilic aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix was purified 230-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 36 kDa. The apparent Km values for ATP and glucose (at 90°C and pH 6.2) were 0.42 and 0.044 mM, respectively; the apparent Vmax was about 35 U/mg. The enzyme was specific for ATP as a phosphoryl donor, but showed a broad spectrum for phosphoryl acceptors: in addition to glucose, which showed the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), the enzyme also phosphorylates glucosamin, fructose, mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose. Divalent cations were required for maximal activity: Mg2+, which was most effective, could partially be replaced with Co2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+. The enzyme had a temperature optimum of at least 100°C and showed significant thermostability up to 100°C. The coding function of open reading frame (ORF) APE2091 (Y. Kawarabayasi, Y. Hino, H. Horikawa, S. Yamazaki, Y. Haikawa, K. Jin-no, M. Takahashi, M. Sekine, S. Baba, A. Ankai, H. Kosugi, A. Hosoyama, S. Fukui, Y. Nagai, K. Nishijima, H. Nakazawa, M. Takamiya, S. Masuda, T. Funahashi, T. Tanaka, Y. Kudoh, J. Yamazaki, N. Kushida, A. Oguchi, and H. Kikuchi, DNA Res. 6:83-101, 145-152, 1999), previously annotated as gene glk, coding for ATP-glucokinase of A. pernix, was proved by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant ATP-dependent glucokinase showed a 5-kDa higher molecular mass on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but almost identical kinetic and thermostability properties in comparison to the native enzyme purified from A. pernix. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the native enzyme revealed that the translation start codon is a GTG 171 bp downstream of the annotated start codon of ORF APE2091. The amino acid sequence deduced from the truncated ORF APE2091 revealed sequence similarity to members of the ROK family, which comprise bacterial sugar kinases and

  18. Identification of novel oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon-like protease Pim1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayot, Aurélien; Gareil, Monique; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2010-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are currently emerging as key regulators of mitochondrial functions. Among these proteolytic systems, Pim1, a Lon-like serine protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in the control of selective protein turnover in the mitochondrial matrix. In the absence of Pim1......, yeast cells have been shown to accumulate electron-dense inclusion bodies in the matrix space, to lose integrity of mitochondrial genome, and to be respiration-deficient. Because of the severity of phenotypes associated with the depletion of Pim1, this protease appears to be an essential component...... of oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of Pim1 protease under non-repressing growth conditions. The results presented here supply evidence that Pim1-mediated proteolysis is required for elimination of oxidatively damaged proteins in mitochondria....

  19. Influence of ¹H chemical shift assignments of the interface residues on structure determinations of homodimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jan; Kirchner, Donata K; Güntert, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Homodimeric proteins pose a difficulty for NMR structure determination because the degeneracy of the chemical shifts in the two identical monomers implies an ambiguity in all assignments of distance restraints. For homodimeric proteins, residues involved in the interface between two monomers provide essential intermolecular NOEs. The structure determination of homodimeric proteins hence relies strongly on chemical shift assignments of these interface residues. Our paper discusses the influence of the extent of (1)H chemical shift assignments of interface residues on the structure determinations of homodimeric proteins using the CYANA program. The results reveal that successful structure determinations of homodimeric proteins with automated NOE assignment depend on the percentage of assigned interface residues and that a high completeness of around 80-90% of the (1)H chemical shift assignment in the interface is needed for reliable NMR structure determinations of homodimeric proteins for which no experimental distinction between intra- and intermolecular NOEs, e.g. by filtered NOESY experiments, is available. Our results also show that RMSD and target function values are insufficient to judge the quality of homodimeric structures determined using automated NOE assignment. Structure determinations of homodimeric proteins by NMR using conventional NOESY experiments are thus possible but more challenging than for monomeric proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SwissProt search result: AK241918 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling prot...ein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 2e-11 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK067393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling prot...ein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 2e-19 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK101745 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling prot...ein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 3e-18 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK063555 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling pro...tein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 1e-19 ...

  4. Dbp6p Is an Essential Putative ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase Required for 60S-Ribosomal-Subunit Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús; Rojo, Manuel; Linder, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame, YNR038W, was analyzed in the context of the European Functional Analysis Network. YNR038W encodes a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase of the DEAD-box protein family and was therefore named DBP6 (DEAD-box protein 6). Dbp6p is essential for cell viability. In vivo depletion of Dbp6p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA and steady-state analysis of pre-rRNA and mature rRNA by Northern hybridization and primer extension show that Dbp6p depletion leads to decreased production of the 27S and 7S precursors, resulting in a depletion of the mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. Furthermore, hemagglutinin epitope-tagged Dbp6p is detected exclusively within the nucleolus. We propose that Dbp6p is required for the proper assembly of preribosomal particles during the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits, probably by acting as an rRNA helicase. PMID:9528757

  5. A unique set of SH3-SH3 interactions controls IB1 homodimerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Guenat, Sylvie; Dar, Imran

    2006-01-01

    Islet-brain 1 (IB1 or JIP-1) is a scaffold protein that interacts with components of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signal-transduction pathway. IB1 is expressed at high levels in neurons and in pancreatic beta-cells, where it controls expression of several insulin-secretory components...... and secretion. IB1 has been shown to homodimerize, but neither the molecular mechanisms nor the function of dimerization have yet been characterized. Here, we show that IB1 homodimerizes through a novel and unique set of Src homology 3 (SH3)-SH3 interactions. X-ray crystallography studies show that the dimer...... interface covers a region usually engaged in PxxP-mediated ligand recognition, even though the IB1 SH3 domain lacks this motif. The highly stable IB1 homodimer can be significantly destabilized in vitro by three individual point mutations directed against key residues involved in dimerization. Each mutation...

  6. RIM Proteins Activate Vesicle Priming by Reversing Auto-Inhibitory Homodimerization of Munc13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lunbin; Kaeser, Pascal S.; Xu, Wei; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    At a synapse, the presynaptic active zone mediates synaptic vesicle exocytosis. RIM proteins are active-zone scaffolding molecules that – among others – mediate vesicle priming, and directly or indirectly interact with most other essential presynaptic proteins. In particular, the Zn2+-finger domain of RIMs binds to the C2A-domain of the priming factor Munc13, which forms a homodimer in the absence of RIM, but a heterodimer with it. Here we show that RIMs mediate vesicle priming not by coupling Munc13 to other active zone proteins as thought, but by directly activating Munc13. Specifically, we found that the isolated Zn2+-finger domain of RIMs autonomously promotes vesicle priming by binding to Munc13, thereby relieving Munc13 homodimerization. Strikingly, constitutively monomeric mutants of Munc13 rescued priming in RIM-deficient synapses, whereas wild-type Munc13 did not. Both mutant and wild-type Munc13, however, rescued priming in Munc13-deficient synapses. Thus, homodimerization of Munc13 inhibits its priming function, and RIMs activate priming by disrupting Munc13 homodimerization. PMID:21262469

  7. Nuclei of Taxus baccata: Flavanols Linked to Chromatin Remodeling Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Feucht

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic studies of young needles and shoot tips from Taxus baccata showed that flavanols are localized in the nuclei. This observation is based on the histochemical staining of flavanols with the DMACA reagent. The colour that is obtained with this reagent varies from pale to deep blue, depending on the amount of flavanols. This study is focused on nondifferentiated cell lineages and on differentiating cells. The key point to note is that all nuclei of a cell lineage showed a uniform DMACA staining pattern based on the amount and structural appearence of nuclear flavanols. This points to transcriptional and epigenetic programming. However, comparing various cell lineages from different shoot tips and needles revealed a lineage-specific expression of nuclear flavanols. This result implied that both positional and developmental signals from neighbouring cells were involved in the nuclear flavanol binding of lineages. The cells of a developmentally advanced lineage loose their intimate contact and, then, they separate from each other to undergo an autonomous, individual sequence of differentiation. This in turn was accompanied by differences in the nuclear flavanol patterns of the single cells. Investigating different mitotic stages revealed a wide spectrum in flavanol staining intensities of the chromosomes. These observations should be linked to UV-VIS spectroscopical kinetic results indicating that nuclear flavanols bound to histones are involved in epigenetically regulated modification of chromatin. The kinetic studies show that catechin is relatively rapidly degraded by oxygen in the presence of Mg2+-ions. However, this degradation reaction is strongly inhibited when histone proteins were added. This behaviour is a clear indication that coregulatory interactions exist between catechin and histones.

  8. Chromatin remodeling and stem cell theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Jan; Quesenberry, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology is currently being redefined. Stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) differentiation has been considered hierarchical in nature, but recent data suggest that there is no progenitor/stem cell hierarchy, but rather a reversible continuum. The stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) phenotype, the total differentiation capacity (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic), gene expression as well as other stem cell functional characteristics (homing, receptor and adhesion molecule expression) vary throughout a cell-cycle transit widely. This seems to be dependent on shifting chromatin and gene expression with cell-cycle transit. The published data on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and also RNAi, the major regulators of gene expression, conjoins very well and provides an explanation for the major issues of stem cell biology. Those features of stem cells mentioned above can be rather difficult to apprehend when a classical hierarchy biology view is applied, but they become clear and easier to understand once they are correlated with the underlining epigenetic changes. We are entering a new era of stem cell biology the era of "chromatinomics." We are one step closer to the practical use of cellular therapy for degenerative diseases.

  9. DNA Methylation and Chromatin Remodeling: The Blueprint of Cancer Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Bhattacharjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics deals with the interactions between genes and the immediate cellular environment. These interactions go a long way in shaping up each and every person’s individuality. Further, reversibility of epigenetic interactions may offer a dynamic control over the expression of various critical genes. Thus, tweaking the epigenetic machinery may help cause or cure diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, cancer epigenetics, especially at a molecular level, needs to be scrutinised closely, as it could potentially serve as the future pharmaceutical goldmine against neoplastic diseases. However, in view of its rapidly enlarging scope of application, it has become difficult to keep abreast of scientific information coming out of various epigenetic studies directed against cancer. Using this review, we have attempted to shed light on two of the most important mechanisms implicated in cancer, that is, DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid methylation and histone modifications, and their place in cancer pathogenesis. Further, we have attempted to take stock of the new epigenetic drugs that have emerged onto the market as well as those in the pipeline that offer hope in mankind’s fight against cancer.

  10. period -1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-08

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  11. Identification of critical amino acids in the proximal C-terminal of TREK-2 K+ channel for activation by acidic pHi and ATP-dependent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Joohan; Jun, Young Keul; Zhang, Yin-Hua; Nam, Joo Hyun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Sung Joon

    2018-02-01

    TWIK-related two-pore domain K+ channels (TREKs) are regulated by intracellular pH (pHi) and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2). Previously, Glu306 in proximal C-terminal (pCt) of mouse TREK-1 was identified as the pHi-sensing residue. The direction of PI(4,5)P2 sensitivity is controversial, and we have recently shown that TREKs are inhibited by intracellular ATP via endogenous PI(4,5)P2 formation. Here we investigate the anionic and cationic residues of pCt for the pHi and ATP-sensitivity in human TREK-2 (hTREK-2). In inside-out patch clamp recordings (ITREK-2,i-o), acidic pHi-induced activation was absent in E332A and was partly attenuated in E335A. Neutralization of cationic Lys (K330A) also eliminated the acidic pHi sensitivity of ITREK-2,i-o. Unlike the inhibition of wild-type (WT) ITREK-2,i-o by intracellular ATP, neither E332A nor K330A was sensitive to ATP. Nevertheless, exogenous PI(4,5)P2 (10 μM) abolished ITREK-2 i-o in all the above mutants as well as in WT, indicating unspecific inhibition by exogenous PI(4,5)P2. In whole-cell recordings of TREK-2 (ITREK-2,w-c), K330A and E332A showed higher or fully active basal activity, showing attenuated or insignificant activation by 2-APB, arachidonic acid, or acidic pHe 6.9. ITREK-1,w-c of WT is largely suppressed by pHe 6.9, and the inhibition is slightly attenuated in K312A and E315A. The results show concerted roles of the oppositely charged Lys and Glu in pCt for the ATP-dependent low basal activity and pHi sensitivity.

  12. The ATP-dependent RNA helicase HrpB plays an important role in motility and biofilm formation in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Laís Moreira; Picchi, Simone Cristina; Andrade, Maxuel de Oliveira; Takita, Marco Aurélio; de Souza, Alessandra Alves; Wang, Nian; Machado, Marcos Antonio

    2016-03-23

    RNA helicases are enzymes that catalyze the separation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using the free energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis. DEAD/DEAH families participate in many different aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA synthesis, RNA folding, RNA-RNA interactions, RNA localization and RNA degradation. Several important bacterial DEAD/DEAH-box RNA helicases have been extensively studied. In this study, we characterize the ATP-dependent RNA helicase encoded by the hrpB (XAC0293) gene using deletion and genetic complementation assays. We provide insights into the function of the hrpB gene in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri by investigating the roles of hrpB in biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and host leaves, cell motility, host virulence of the citrus canker bacterium and growth in planta. The hrpB gene is highly conserved in the sequenced strains of Xanthomonas. Mutation of the hrpB gene (∆hrpB) resulted in a significant reduction in biofilms on abiotic surfaces and host leaves. ∆hrpB also exhibited increased cell dispersion on solid medium plates. ∆hrpB showed reduced adhesion on biotic and abiotic surfaces and delayed development in disease symptoms when sprayed on susceptible citrus leaves. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays indicated that deletion of hrpB reduced the expression of four type IV pili genes. The transcriptional start site of fimA (XAC3241) was determined using rapid amplification of 5'-cDNA Ends (5'RACE). Based on the results of fimA mRNA structure predictions, the fimA 5' UTR may contain three different loops. HrpB may be involved in alterations to the structure of fimA mRNA that promote the stability of fimA RNA. Our data show that hrpB is involved in adherence of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri to different surfaces. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a DEAH RNA helicase has been implicated in the regulation of type IV pili in Xanthomonas.

  13. Evolution of class B floral homeotic proteins: obligate heterodimerization originated from homodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Kai-Uwe; Weiser, Christof; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Bohne, Arend; Kirchner, Charlotte; Kanno, Akira; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter

    2002-05-01

    The class B floral homeotic genes from the higher eudicot model systems Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum are involved in specifying the identity of petals and stamens during flower development. These genes exist in two different types termed DEF- and GLO-like genes. The proteins encoded by the class B genes are stable and functional in the cell only as heterodimeric complexes of a DEF- and a GLO-like protein. In line with this, heterodimerization is obligate for DNA binding in vitro. The genes whose products have to heterodimerize to be stable and functional are each other's closest relatives within their genomes. This suggests that the respective genes originated by gene duplication, and that heterodimerization is of relative recent origin and evolved from homodimerization. To test this hypothesis we have investigated the dimerization behavior of putative B proteins from phylogenetic informative taxa, employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and the yeast two-hybrid system. We find that an ancestral B protein from the gymnosperm Gnetum gnemon binds DNA in a sequence-specific manner as a homodimer. Of the two types of B proteins from the monocot Lilium regale, the GLO-like protein is still able to homodimerize, whereas the DEF-like protein binds to DNA only as a heterodimeric complex with the GLO-like protein. These data suggest that heterodimerization evolved in two steps after a gene duplication that gave rise to DEF- and GLO-like genes. Heterodimerization may have originated after the gymnosperm-angiosperm split about 300 MYA but before the monocot-eudicot split 140-200 MYA. Heterodimerization may have become obligate for both types of flowering plant B proteins in the eudicot lineage after the monocot-eudicot split.

  14. Homodimerization of the PAS-B domains of hypoxia-inducible factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Cardoso, Rosa; Yan, Jiangli; Love, Robert A; Grodsky, Neil; Brooun, Alexei; Dyson, H Jane

    2012-06-14

    The Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF) mediate heterodimer formation between the HIF-α forms that are induced in the event of cellular hypoxia and the constitutive HIF-β variants. Previous efforts toward structural characterization of the HIF-1α PAS domains were limited by protein stability. Using homology modeling based on the published crystal structure of the PAS-B domain of the homologous protein HIF-2α in complex with the partner HIF-β (also known as ARNT), we have identified a variant of HIF-1α with improved solubility, monodispersity, and stability. Purified solutions of the PAS-B domains of HIF-1α and HIF-2α differ in their propensity for homodimer formation. In an attempt to understand the structural basis for this difference, and to document the structural changes that accompany homodimer formation, we have undertaken a comparative NMR study of the PAS-B domains of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and mutants of HIF-1α that mimic the behavior of HIF-2α. The NMR spectra of all of these domains are very similar, consistent with the similarity of their amino acid sequences. However, the greater propensity of the HIF-1α PAS-B domain to form dimers as the concentration was increased allowed us to determine the site of homodimerization and pointed toward possible sequence changes in HIF-1α that might discourage the formation of homodimers.

  15. Drosophila Ncd reveals an evolutionarily conserved powerstroke mechanism for homodimeric and heterodimeric kinesin-14s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengwei; Dai, Wei; Hahn, Juergen; Gilbert, Susan P

    2015-05-19

    Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-14 Ncd cross-links parallel microtubules at the spindle poles and antiparallel microtubules within the spindle midzone to play roles in bipolar spindle assembly and proper chromosome distribution. As observed for Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-14 Kar3Vik1 and Kar3Cik1, Ncd binds adjacent microtubule protofilaments in a novel microtubule binding configuration and uses an ATP-promoted powerstroke mechanism. The hypothesis tested here is that Kar3Vik1 and Kar3Cik1, as well as Ncd, use a common ATPase mechanism for force generation even though the microtubule interactions for both Ncd heads are modulated by nucleotide state. The presteady-state kinetics and computational modeling establish an ATPase mechanism for a powerstroke model of Ncd that is very similar to those determined for Kar3Vik1 and Kar3Cik1, although these heterodimers have one Kar3 catalytic motor domain and a Vik1/Cik1 partner motor homology domain whose interactions with microtubules are not modulated by nucleotide state but by strain. The results indicate that both Ncd motor heads bind the microtubule lattice; two ATP binding and hydrolysis events are required for each powerstroke; and a slow step occurs after microtubule collision and before the ATP-promoted powerstroke. Note that unlike conventional myosin-II or other processive molecular motors, Ncd requires two ATP turnovers rather than one for a single powerstroke-driven displacement or step. These results are significant because all metazoan kinesin-14s are homodimers, and the results presented show that despite their structural and functional differences, the heterodimeric and homodimeric kinesin-14s share a common evolutionary structural and mechanochemical mechanism for force generation.

  16. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy eSabila

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93% sequence identity between them. Loss of function mutant in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways.

  17. DNA-dependent homodimerization, sub-cellular partitioning, and protein destabilization control WUSCHEL levels and spatial patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kevin; Perales, Mariano; Snipes, Stephen; Yadav, Ram Kishor; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Reddy, G Venugopala

    2016-10-11

    The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) promotes stem cell maintenance in inflorescence meristems of Arabidopsis thaliana WUS, which is synthesized in the rib meristem, migrates and accumulates at lower levels in adjacent cells. Maintenance of WUS protein levels and spatial patterning distribution is not well-understood. Here, we show that the last 63-aa stretch of WUS is necessary for maintaining different levels of WUS protein in the rib meristem and adjacent cells. The 63-aa region contains the following transcriptional regulatory domains: the acidic region, the WUS-box, which is conserved in WUS-related HOMEOBOX family members, and the ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR-like) domain. Our analysis reveals that the opposing functions of WUS-box, which is required for nuclear retention, and EAR-like domain, which participates in nuclear export, are necessary to maintain higher nuclear levels of WUS in cells of the rib meristem and lower nuclear levels in adjacent cells. We also show that the N-terminal DNA binding domain, which is required for both DNA binding and homodimerization, along with the homodimerization sequence located in the central part of the protein, restricts WUS from spreading excessively and show that the homodimerization is critical for WUS function. Our analysis also reveals that a higher level of WUS outside the rib meristem leads to protein destabilization, suggesting a new tier of regulation in WUS protein regulation. Taken together our data show that processes that influence WUS protein levels and spatial distribution are highly coupled to its transcriptional activity.

  18. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabila, Mercy; Kundu, Nabanita; Smalls, Deana; Ullah, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93%) sequence identity among them. Loss of function mutation in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways.

  19. Crystal structure of human importin-α1 (Rch1, revealing a potential autoinhibition mode involving homodimerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Miyatake

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the crystal structure of N-terminal importin-β-binding domain (IBB-truncated human importin-α1 (ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 at 2.63 Å resolution. The crystal structure of ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 reveals a novel closed homodimer. The homodimer exists in an autoinhibited state in which both the major and minor nuclear localization signal (NLS binding sites are completely buried in the homodimerization interface, an arrangement that restricts NLS binding. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies revealed that ΔIBB-h-importin-α1 is in equilibrium between monomers and dimers and that NLS peptides shifted the equilibrium toward the monomer side. This finding suggests that the NLS binding sites are also involved in the dimer interface in solution. These results show that when the IBB domain dissociates from the internal NLS binding sites, e.g., by binding to importin-β, homodimerization possibly occurs as an autoinhibition state.

  20. In silico exploration of the fructose-6-phosphate phosphorylation step in glycolysis: genomic evidence of the coexistence of an atypical ATP-dependent along with a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase in Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurice, Guillaume; Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel; Falentin, Hélène; Boyaval, Patrick; Dimova, Diliana

    2004-01-01

    We performed a detailed bioinformatic study of the catalytic step of fructose-6-phosphate phosphorylation in glycolysis based on the raw genomic draft of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii (P. shermanii) ATCC9614 [Meurice et al., 2004]. Our results provide the first in silico evidence of the coexistence of genes coding for an ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ATP-PFK) and a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK), whereas the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP) and ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ADP-PFK) are absent. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponding to the PPi-PFK (AJ508922) shares 100% similarity with the already characterised propionibacterial protein (P29495; Ladror et al., 1991]. The unexpected ATP-PFK gene (AJ509827) encodes a protein of 373 aa which is highly similar (50% positive residues) along at least 95% of its sequence length to different well-characterised ATP-PFKs. The characteristic PROSITE pattern important for the enzyme function of ATP-PFKs (PS00433) was conserved in the putative ATP-PFK sequence: 8 out of 9 amino acid residues. According to the recent evolutionary study of PFK proteins with different phosphate donors [Bapteste et al., 2003], the propionibacterial ATP-PFK harbours a G104-K124 residue combination, which strongly suggested that this enzyme belongs to the group of atypical ATP-PFKs. According to our phylogenetic analyses the amino acid sequence of the ATP-PFK is clustered with the atypical ATP-PFKs from group III of the Siebers classification [Siebers et al., 1998], whereas the expected PPi-PFK protein is closer to the PPi-PFKs from clade P [Müller et al., 2001]. The possible significance of the co-existence of these two PFKs and their importance for the regulation of glycolytic pathway flux in P. shermanii is discussed.

  1. Homodimerization of amyloid precursor protein at the plasma membrane: a homoFRET study by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available Classical FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer using two fluorescent labels (one for the donor and another one for the acceptor is not efficient for studying the homodimerization of a protein as only half of the homodimers formed can be identified by this technique. We thus resorted to homoFRET detected by time-resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy IMaging (tr-FAIM. To specifically image the plasma membrane of living cells, an original combination of tr-FAIM and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscope (TIRFLIM was implemented. The correcting factor accounting for the depolarization due to the high numerical aperture (NA objective, mandatory for TIRF microscopy, was quantified on fluorescein solutions and on HEK293 cells expressing enhanced Green Fluorescence Protein (eGFP. Homodimerization of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP, a key mechanism in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, was measured on this original set-up. We showed, both in epifluorescence and under TIRF excitation, different energy transfer rates associated with the homodimerization of wild type APP-eGFP or of a mutated APP-eGFP, which forms constitutive dimers. This original set-up thus offers promising prospects for future studies of protein homodimerization in living cells in control and pathological conditions.

  2. Isolation of a homodimeric lectin with antifungal and antiviral activities from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X Y; Ng, T B; Tsang, P W; Wang, J

    2001-07-01

    A homodimeric lectin adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and CM-Sepharose and possessing a molecular weight of 67 kDa was isolated from red kidney beans. The hemagglutinating activity of this lectin was inhibited by glycoproteins but not by simple sugars. The lectin manifested inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase and alpha-glucosidase. The N-terminal sequence of the lectin exhibited some differences from previously reported lectins from Phaseolus vulgaris but showed some similarity to chitinases. It exerted a suppressive effect on growth of the fungal species Fusarium oxysporum, Coprinus comatus, and Rhizoctonia solani. The lectin had low ribonuclease and negligible translation-inhibitory activities.

  3. Atomistic simulations of the effects of polyglutamine chain length and solvent quality on conformational equilibria and spontaneous homodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitalis, Andreas; Wang, Xiaoling; Pappu, Rohit V

    2008-12-05

    Aggregation of expanded polyglutamine tracts is associated with nine different neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. Experiments and computer simulations have demonstrated that monomeric forms of polyglutamine molecules sample heterogeneous sets of collapsed structures in water. The current work focuses on a mechanistic characterization of polyglutamine homodimerization as a function of chain length and temperature. These studies were carried out using molecular simulations based on a recently developed continuum solvation model that was designed for studying conformational and binding equilibria of intrinsically disordered molecules such as polyglutamine systems. The main results are as follows: Polyglutamine molecules form disordered, collapsed globules in aqueous solution. These molecules spontaneously associate at conditions approaching those of typical in vitro experiments for chains of length N>/=15. The spontaneity of these homotypic associations increases with increasing chain length and decreases with increasing temperature. Similar and generic driving forces govern both collapse and spontaneous homodimerization of polyglutamine in aqueous milieus. Collapse and dimerization maximize self-interactions and reduce the interface between polyglutamine molecules and the surrounding solvent. Other than these generic considerations, there do not appear to be any specific structural requirements for either chain collapse or chain dimerization; that is, both collapse and dimerization are nonspecific in that disordered globules form disordered dimers. In fact, it is shown that the driving force for intermolecular associations is governed by spontaneous conformational fluctuations within monomeric polyglutamine. These results suggest that polyglutamine aggregation is unlikely to follow a homogeneous nucleation mechanism with the monomer as the critical nucleus. Instead, the results support the formation of disordered, non-beta-sheet-like soluble

  4. SWI/SNF Subunits SMARCA4, SMARCD2 and DPF2 Collaborate in MLL-Rearranged Leukaemia Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruickshank, V Adam; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Sankar, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure caused by deregulated epigenetic mechanisms collaborate with underlying genetic lesions to promote cancer. SMARCA4/BRG1, a core component of the SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complex, has been implicated by its mutational spectrum as exerting...

  5. Alteration of the proximal bond energy in the unliganded form of the homodimeric myoglobin from Nassa mutabilis. Kinetic and spectroscopic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, M; Ascenzi, P; Smulevich, G; Mantini, A R; Del Gaudio, R; Piscopo, M; Geraci, G

    1992-01-20

    CO binding kinetics to the homodimeric myoglobin (Mb) from Nassa mutabilis has been investigated between pH 1.9 and 7.0. Protonation of the proximal imidazole at low pH (less than or equal to 3.0) and the consequent cleavage of the HisF8NE2-Fe proximal bond brings about a approximately 20-fold increase of the second-order rate constant for CO binding. This process displays a pKa = 4.0 +/- 0.2, significantly higher than that observed in all other deoxygenated hemoproteins investigated up to now. Such a feature underlies a decreased energy for the HisF8NE2-Fe proximal bond in the unliganded form and it also appears supported by resonance Raman spectroscopy in the low frequency region of the Fe(II) deoxygenated hemoprotein. Further, the pH-rate profile of N. mutabilis Mb, like that of the homodimeric hemoglobin (Hb) from Scapharca inaequivalvis (Coletta, M., Boffi, A., Ascenzi, P., Brunori, M. and Chiancone, E. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 4828-4830), can be described only by assuming a concerted proton-linked transition with n = 1.8 +/- 0.1. Such a characteristic suggests, also on the basis of the amino acid sequence homology between N. mutabilis Mb and S. inaequivalvis Hb in the region forming the subunit interface, that the interaction mechanism is similar for the two homodimeric proteins, and drastically different Hb in the region forming the subunit interface, that the interaction mechanism is similar for the two homodimeric proteins, and drastically different from that operative in other hemoproteins.

  6. Resonance Raman studies of the heme active site of the homodimeric myoglobin from Nassa mutabilis: a peculiar case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulevich, G; Mantini, A R; Paoli, M; Coletta, M; Geraci, G

    1995-06-06

    A spectroscopic investigation by resonance Raman has been carried out at pH 7.0 in 0.1 M phosphate buffer on the cooperative homodimeric myoglobin from Nassa mutabilis. The study has been performed on the unligated ferrous form, as well as on the ligated species MbO2 and MbC, and on the ferric form met-Mb. Two v(C = C) vinyl stretching modes have been observed in all the investigated forms, reflecting different degrees of vinyl conjugation with the porphyrin ring, as a consequence of a strongly asymmetric environment for the two side groups of the heme. Furthermore, the ferric form displays a hexacoordinate low-spin heme, which suggests the presence of an endogenous ligand bound to the Fe atom. The frequency of the v(Fe-Im) stretching mode of Mb from Nassa mutabilis shifts down by 4 cm-1 as compared with that of horse heart myoglobin, reflecting a protein-induced proximal strain as a result of heme-heme interaction due to the close proximity of the two hemes in the dimer. The lower frequency of the v(Fe-Im) stretching mode agrees well with the lower affinity for oxygen binding found for Nassa mutabilis Mb and with the slight heme core expansion with respect to horse heart Mb, suggesting a critical role for the Fe-His bond on the heme's function and structure.

  7. Structural and functional characterization of a novel homodimeric three-finger neurotoxin from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amrita; Zhou, Xingding; Chong, Ming Zhi; D'hoedt, Dieter; Foo, Chun Shin; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Bertrand, Daniel; Sivaraman, J; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2010-03-12

    Snake venoms are a mixture of pharmacologically active proteins and polypeptides that have led to the development of molecular probes and therapeutic agents. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a novel neurotoxin, haditoxin, from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra). Haditoxin exhibited novel pharmacology with antagonism toward muscle (alphabetagammadelta) and neuronal (alpha(7), alpha(3)beta(2), and alpha(4)beta(2)) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with highest affinity for alpha(7)-nAChRs. The high resolution (1.5 A) crystal structure revealed haditoxin to be a homodimer, like kappa-neurotoxins, which target neuronal alpha(3)beta(2)- and alpha(4)beta(2)-nAChRs. Interestingly however, the monomeric subunits of haditoxin were composed of a three-finger protein fold typical of curaremimetic short-chain alpha-neurotoxins. Biochemical studies confirmed that it existed as a non-covalent dimer species in solution. Its structural similarity to short-chain alpha-neurotoxins and kappa-neurotoxins notwithstanding, haditoxin exhibited unique blockade of alpha(7)-nAChRs (IC(50) 180 nm), which is recognized by neither short-chain alpha-neurotoxins nor kappa-neurotoxins. This is the first report of a dimeric short-chain alpha-neurotoxin interacting with neuronal alpha(7)-nAChRs as well as the first homodimeric three-finger toxin to interact with muscle nAChRs.

  8. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor ‘hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam; Sung, Myong-Hee; Baek, Songjoon; Loft, Anne; Hager, Gordon L; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is a tightly controlled differentiation process regulated by a complex transcriptional network. Here, DNase I hypersensitive site analysis, DHSseq, reveals the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that occur during adipogenesis and identifies sites that are bound by multiple transcription factors.

  9. Sirtuins: Molecular Traffic Lights in the Crossroad of Oxidative Stress, Chromatin Remodeling, and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Rajendran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription is regulated by acetylation/deacetylation reactions of histone and nonhistone proteins mediated by enzymes called KATs and HDACs, respectively. As a major mechanism of transcriptional regulation, protein acetylation is a key controller of physiological processes such as cell cycle, DNA damage response, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. The deacetylase activity of class III histone deacetylases or sirtuins depends on the presence of NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and therefore, their function is closely linked to cellular energy consumption. This activity of sirtuins connects the modulation of chromatin dynamics and transcriptional regulation under oxidative stress to cellular lifespan, glucose homeostasis, inflammation, and multiple aging-related diseases including cancer. Here we provide an overview of the recent developments in relation to the diverse biological activities associated with sirtuin enzymes and stress responsive transcription factors, DNA damage, and oxidative stress and relate the involvement of sirtuins in the regulation of these processes to oncogenesis. Since the majority of the molecular mechanisms implicated in these pathways have been described for Sirt1, this sirtuin family member is more extensively presented in this paper.

  10. Protein phosphatase 2A enables expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) through chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidis, Sokratis A; Rauen, Thomas; Hedrich, Christian M; Tsokos, George C; Crispín, José C

    2013-09-13

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine phosphatase involved in essential cellular functions. T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express high levels of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac). A mouse overexpressing PP2Ac in T cells develops glomerulonephritis in an IL-17-dependent manner. Here, using microarray analyses, we demonstrate that increased expression of PP2Ac grants T cells the capacity to produce an array of proinflammatory effector molecules. Because IL-17 is important in the expression of glomerulonephritis, we studied the mechanism through which PP2Ac dysregulation facilitates its production. We report that PP2Ac is involved in the regulation of the Il17 locus by enhancing histone 3 acetylation through a mechanism that involves activation of interferon regulatory factor 4. Increased histone 3 acetylation of the Il17 locus is shared between T cells of PP2Ac transgenic mice and patients with SLE. We propose that, by promoting the inflammatory capacity of T cells, PP2Ac dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE.

  11. IUGR prevents IGF-1 upregulation in juvenile male mice by perturbing postnatal IGF-1 chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Camille M; Yang, Yueqin; Fu, Qi; Brown, Ashley S; Yu, Baifeng; Callaway, Christopher W; Li, Jicheng; Lane, Robert H; McKnight, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) offspring with rapid catch-up growth are at increased risk for early obesity especially in males. Persistent insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) reduction is an important risk factor. Using a mouse model of maternal hypertension-induced IUGR, we examined IGF-1 levels, promoter DNA methylation, and histone H3 covalent modifications at birth (D1). We additionally investigated whether prenatal perturbations could reset at preadolescence (D21). IUGR was induced via maternal thromboxane A2-analog infusion in mice. IUGR uniformly decreased D1 IGF-1 mRNA and protein levels with reduced promoter 1 (P1) transcription and increased P1 DNA methylation. IUGR males also had increased H3K4ac at exon 5 and 3' distal UTR. At D21, IUGR males continued to have decreased IGF-1 levels, originating from both P1 and P2 with reduced 1A variant. IUGR males also had decreased activation mark of H3K4me3 at P1 compared with sham males. In contrast, D21 IUGR females normalized their IGF-1 levels, in association with an increased activation mark of H3K4me3 at P1 compared with sham females. IUGR uniformly affected D1 hepatic IGF-1 epigenetic modifications in both sexes. However, at preadolescence, IUGR males are unable to correct for the prenatal reduction possibly due to a more perturbed IGF-1 chromatin structure.

  12. Osa associates with the Brahma chromatin remodeling complex and promotes the activation of some target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R T; Furukawa, T; Tanese, N; Treisman, J E

    1999-01-01

    The yeast SWI/SNF complex and its Drosophila and mammalian homologs are thought to control gene expression by altering chromatin structure, but the mechanism and specificity of this process are not fully understood. The Drosophila osa gene, like yeast SWI1, encodes an AT-rich interaction (ARID) domain protein. We present genetic and biochemical evidence that Osa is a component of the Brahma complex, the Drosophila homolog of SWI/SNF. The ARID domain of Osa binds DNA without sequence specificity in vitro, but it is sufficient to direct transcriptional regulatory domains to specific target genes in vivo. Endogenous Osa appears to promote the activation of some of these genes. We show evidence that some Brahma-containing complexes do not contain Osa and that Osa is not required to localize Brahma to chromatin. These data suggest that Osa modulates the function of the Brahma complex. PMID:10601025

  13. UV Irradiation Stimulates Histone Acetylation and Chromatin Remodeling at a Repressed Yeast Locus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yachuan Yu; Yumin Teng; Hairong Liu; Simon H. Reed; Raymond Waters; Philip C. Hanawalt

    2005-01-01

    ... (K5, K8, K12, and K16) antibodies shows that Lys-9 and/or Lys-14 of histone H3, but not the relevant sites of histone H4 in nucleosomes at the repressed MFA2 promoter, are hyperacetylated after UV irradiation...

  14. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor 'hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is tightly controlled by a complex network of transcription factors acting at different stages of differentiation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family members are key regulators of this process. We have employed DNase I...... hypersensitive site analysis to investigate the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that accompany the binding of adipogenic transcription factors. These analyses revealed a dramatic and dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during the first hours of adipocyte differentiation that coincides...... with cooperative binding of multiple early transcription factors (including glucocorticoid receptor, retinoid X receptor, Stat5a, C/EBPβ and -δ) to transcription factor 'hotspots'. Our results demonstrate that C/EBPβ marks a large number of these transcription factor 'hotspots' before induction of differentiation...

  15. Function of Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Factor in Sonic Hedgehog-Dependent Medulloblastoma Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    be tumor-type dependent, consistent with its diverse subunit compositions and functions in different tissues 71. Using the ATPase dependent...Sci U S A 2010; 107: 9736-9741. 33 Lessard J, Wu JI, Ranish JA, Wan M, Winslow MM, Staahl BT et al. An Essential Switch in Subunit Composition of a...and cancer. Nat Rev Cancer 2011; 11: 481-492. 70 Witkowski L, Carrot -Zhang J, Albrecht S, Fahiminiya S, Hamel N, Tomiak E et al. Germline and

  16. Restricted expression of chromatin remodeling associated factor Chd3 during tooth root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Y; Yokoyama, Y; Kondo, H; Kuroda, S; Ohya, K; Ota, M S; Iseki, S; Kasugai, S

    2012-04-01

    The tooth root is one of the critical parts to maintain tooth function; however, the molecular mechanisms of root development remain unknown. We aimed to identify specific factors for root morphogenesis using a newly developed experimental system. Tentative cementoblasts and periodontal ligament cells from mouse mandibular molars were isolated using laser capture microdissection. More than 500 cementoblasts and periodontal ligament cells were separately captured. After RNA extraction and amplification, mRNA expression in isolated cementoblasts was compared with that of periodontal ligament cells by cDNA microarray analysis. Then, putative cementoblast-specific genes were subjected to in situ hybridization analysis to confirm the results in mouse mandible. Approximately 2000 genes were differentially expressed between these tissues. Among those genes, zinc finger helicase (ZFH), also termed chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 3 (Chd3), was one of the highly expressed transcripts in tentative cementoblasts. In situ hybridization revealed that ZFH/Chd3 was strongly expressed in Hertwig's epithelial root sheath rather than in cementum. Moreover, its expression disappeared when root formation was advanced in the first molar. In contrast, Chd3 was continuously expressed in dental epithelial cells of the cervical loop, in which root extension is never terminated. These results suggest that ZFH/Chd3 might play an important role in tooth root development and subsequent cementogenesis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Structure of the SANT domain from the Xenopus chromatin remodeling factor ISWI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, John R.; Elgar, Stuart J.; Khan, Seema I.; Zhang, Xing; Wade, Paul A.; Cheng, Xiaodong (Emory-MED)

    2008-09-17

    The SANT (Swi3, Ada2, N-Cor, and TFIIIB) module was first described as a putative DNA-binding domain with strong similarity to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain of Myb-related proteins. The X-ray structure of the C-terminal one third portion of the ATPase ISWI of Drosophila melangoaster, containing both SANT and SLIDE (SANT-Like ISWI Domain), confirmed the overall helix-turn-helix structural architecture of SANT as well as SLIDE. However, the DNA-contacting residues in Myb are not conserved in SANT and the structurally corresponding residues in the ISWI SANT domain are acidic, and therefore incompatible with DNA interaction. Recent studies suggested that SANT domains might be a histone-tail-binding module, including the DNA binding SANT domain of c-Myb. Here they present the X-ray structure of Xenopus laevis ISWI SANT domain, derived from limited proteolysis of a C-terminal fragment of ISWI protein.

  18. Chromatin remodeling by rosuvastatin normalizes TSC2-/meth cell phenotype through the expression of tuberin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesma, Elena; Ancona, Silvia; Orpianesi, Emanuela; Grande, Vera; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gorio, Alfredo

    2013-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multi-systemic syndrome caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 gene. In TSC2-null cells, Rheb, a member of the Ras family of GTPases, is constitutively activated. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and block the synthesis of isoprenoid lipids with inhibition of Rheb farnesylation and RhoA geranylgeranylation. The effects of rosuvastatin on the function of human TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) α-actin smooth muscle (ASM) cells have been investigated. The TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, previously isolated in our laboratory from the renal angiomyolipoma of two TSC patients, do not express tuberin and bear loss of heterozigosity caused by a double hit on TSC2 and methylation of TSC2 promoter, respectively. Exposure to rosuvastatin affected TSC2(-/meth) ASM cell growth and promoted tuberin expression by acting as a demethylating agent. This occurred without changes in interleukin release. Rosuvastatin also reduced RhoA activation in TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, and it required coadministration with the specific mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin to be effective in TSC2(-/-) ASM cells. Rapamycin enhanced rosuvastatin effect in inhibiting cell proliferation in TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells. Rosuvastatin alone did not alter phosphorylation of S6 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and at the higher concentration, rosuvastatin and rapamycin slightly decreased ERK phosphorylation. These results suggest that rosuvastatin may potentially represent a treatment adjunct to the therapy with mTOR inhibitors now in clinical development for TSC. In particular, rosuvastatin appears useful when the disease is originated by epigenetic defects.

  19. Transcriptional repression of the yeast CHA1 gene requires the chromatin-remodeling complex RSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin, a compact structure that must be disrupted when genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. For transcription to take place, chromatin is remodeled via nucleosome disruption or displacement, a fundamental transcriptional regulatory mechanism in eukar...

  20. Expression of ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization is associated with alteration of chromatin remodeling in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Botia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization (EIBS is proposed to play a role in early and recurring steps of addiction. EIBS does not occur uniformly in all animals even from the same inbred strain. Since recent data demonstrate that epigenetic mechanisms are likely to be involved in the development and the persistence of ethanol-related behaviors, we explored the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in ethanol response after EIBS development. METHODOLOGY: DBA/2J mice were i.p. injected with saline or ethanol (2 g/kg once a day for 10 consecutive days. At day 17, ethanol-treated mice were split in resistant and sensitized groups. Brains were then removed 30 min after a saline or 2 g/kg ethanol challenge to assess i gene expression using PCR array targeting 84 epigenetic-related genes and ii histone deacetylases (HDAC, histone acetylases (HAT and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT activities as well as H4K12 acetylation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Acute ethanol administration decreased dnmt1, esco2 and rps6ka5 genes expression. These genes were similarly altered in sensitized but not in resistant mice after an ethanol challenge, suggesting that resistant mice were tolerant to the transcriptional outcomes of an ethanol challenge. Whereas global HAT or DNMT activity was not affected, global HDAC activity was reduced after an acute ethanol injection. HDAC inhibition occurred in all ethanol-treated mice but with a lesser extent in sensitized animals. As a consequence, H4 acetylation was specifically potentiated in the core of the Nac proportionally to the striatal HDAC activity decrease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study highlights that the contrasted behavioral response to an ethanol challenge between resistant and sensitized mice may be mediated by epigenetic mechanisms occurring specifically in the striatum. Here we show that vulnerability to ethanol dependence and relapse could be, at least in part, due to individual variability in acute ethanol-induced epigenetic response.

  1. gammaH2AX signalling during sperm chromatin remodelling in the mouse zygote.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derijck, A.H.A.; Heijden, G.W. van der; Giele, M.M.; Philippens, M.E.P.; Bavel, C.C.A.W. van; Boer, P. de

    2006-01-01

    In the mouse, the paternal post-meiotic chromatin is assumed to be devoid of DNA repair after nuclear elongation and protamine-induced compaction. Hence, DNA lesions induced thereafter will have to be restored upon gamete fusion in the zygote. Misrepair of such lesions often results in chromosome

  2. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Doyen (Cécile); G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); O. Voets (Olaf); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDuring spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG) box, which we termed

  3. SHORT HYPOCOTYL 1 encodes a SMARCA3-like chromatin remodeling factor regulating elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the mechanisms and control of hypocotyl elongation is important for greenhouse vegetable crop production. In this study, we identified SHORT HYPOCOTYL1 (SH1) in cucumber which regulates low-dosage ultraviolet B (LDUVB)-dependent hypocotyl elongation by recruiting the cucumber UVR8 sign...

  4. Knockdown Brm and Baf170, components of chromatin remodeling complex, facilitates reprogramming of somatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SWI/SNF (SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable or BAF, Brg/Brahma-associated factors) complexes are epigenetic modifiers of chromatin structure and undergo progressive changes in subunit composition during cellular differentiation. For example, in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) esBAF contains Brg1 and Baf...

  5. Recombinant expression of homodimeric 660 kDa human thyroglobulin in soybean seeds: an alternative source of human thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rebecca; Hudson, Laura C; Lambirth, Kevin C; Luth, Diane; Wang, Kan; Bost, Kenneth L; Piller, Kenneth J

    2011-07-01

    Soybean seeds possess many qualities that make them ideal targets for the production of recombinant proteins. However, one quality often overlooked is their ability to stockpile large amounts of complex storage proteins. Because of this characteristic, we hypothesized that soybean seeds would support recombinant expression of large and complex proteins that are currently difficult or impossible to express using traditional plant and non-plant-based host systems. To test this hypothesis, we transformed soybeans with a synthetic gene encoding human thyroglobulin (hTG)-a 660 kDa homodimeric protein that is widely used in the diagnostic industry for screening and detection of thyroid disease. In the absence of a recombinant system that can produce recombinant hTG, research and diagnostic grade hTG continues to be purified from cadaver and surgically removed thyroid tissue. These less-than-ideal tissue sources lack uniform glycosylation and iodination and therefore introduce variability when purified hTG is used in sensitive ELISA screens. In this study, we report the successful expression of recombinant hTG in soybean seeds. Authenticity of the soy-derived protein was demonstrated using commercial ELISA kits developed specifically for the detection of hTG in patient sera. Western analyses and gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that recombinant hTG and thyroid-purified hTG are biologically similar with respect to size, mass, charge and subunit interaction. The recombinant protein was stable over three generations and accumulated to ~1.5% of total soluble seed protein. These results support our hypothesis that soybeans represent a practical alternative to traditional host systems for the expression of large and complex proteins.

  6. Effect of disulphide bond position on salt resistance and LPS-neutralizing activity of α-helical homo-dimeric model antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Shin, Song Yub

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effects of disulphide bond position on the salt resistance and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing activity of α-helical homo-dimeric antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), we synthesized an α-helical model peptide (K6L4W1) and its homo-dimeric peptides (di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-N, di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-M, and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-C) with a disulphide bond at the N-terminus, the central position, and the C-terminus of the molecules, respectively. Unlike (6)L(4)W(1) and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-M, the antimicrobial activity of di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-N and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-C was unaffected by 150 mM NaCl. Both di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-N and di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-C caused much greater inhibitory effects on nitric oxide (NO) release in LPS-induced mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, compared to di-K(6)L(4)W(1)-M. Taken together, our results indicate that the presence of a disulphide bond at the N- or C-terminus of the molecule, rather than at the central position, is more effective when designing salt-resistant α-helical homo-dimeric AMPs with potent antimicrobial and LPS-neutralizing activities. [BMB reports 2011; 44(11): 747-752].

  7. 1H NMR studies of the bis-intercalation of a homodimeric oxazole yellow dye in DNA oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, F; Jacobsen, J P

    1998-10-01

    We have used one and two dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy to characterize the binding of a homodimeric oxazole yellow dye, 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diaza-undecamethylene)-bis-4-( 3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-oxazole)-2-methylidene)-quinoliniu m tetraiodide (YOYO), to oligonucleotides containing the (5'-CTAG-3')2 and the (5'-CCGG-3')2 binding sites in either different oligonucleotides or in the same oligonucleotide. YOYO bis-intercalates strongly in all the oligonucleotides used and binds preferentially to a (5'-CTAG-3')2 binding site in the oligonucleotide d(CGCTAGCG)2 (1). YOYO also binds preferentially to a (5'-CCGG-3')2 sequence in the oligonucleotide d(CGCCGGCG)2 (2) but slightly less favorably than to the (5'- CTAG-3')2 sequence in 1. The binding of YOYO to the d(CGCTAGCCGGCG):d(CGCCGGCTAGCG) (3) oligonucleotide, containing two preferential binding sites, was also examined. YOYO forms mixtures of 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with oligonucleotide 3 in ratios dependent on the relative amount of YOYO and the oligonucleotides in the sample. The binding of YOYO to the oligonucleotide 3 occur sequence selective in the (5'-CTAG-3')2 site and the (5'- CCGG-3')2 site. We have also used two dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of the DNA oligonucleotide d(5'-CGCTAGCG-3')2 complexed with YOYO. The determination of the structure was based on a total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross peaks intensities. DQF-COSY spectra were used to obtain coupling constants for the deoxyribose ring protons. The coupling constants were transformed into angle estimates. The NOE derived distance and dihedral restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for the YOYO-complex from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures giving a total of 40 final structures. Since many NOE contacts were observed between YOYO and dsDNA the resulting structure has a fairly high resolution and

  8. NAP1L1 accelerates activation and decreases pausing to enhance nucleosome remodeling by CSB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lake, Robert J; Kirk, Jaewon; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Fan, Hua-Ying; Hohng, Sungchul

    2017-05-05

    Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB) belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, and CSB is the only ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler essential for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision DNA repair. CSB alone remodels nucleosomes ∼10-fold slower than the ACF remodeling complex. Strikingly, NAP1-like histone chaperones interact with CSB and greatly enhance CSB-mediated chromatin remodeling. While chromatin remodeling by CSB and NAP1-like proteins is crucial for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair, the mechanism by which NAP1-like proteins enhance chromatin remodeling by CSB remains unknown. Here we studied CSB's DNA-binding and nucleosome-remodeling activities at the single molecule level in real time. We also determined how the NAP1L1 chaperone modulates these activities. We found that CSB interacts with DNA in two principle ways: by simple binding and a more complex association that involves gross DNA distortion. Remarkably, NAP1L1 suppresses both these interactions. Additionally, we demonstrate that nucleosome remodeling by CSB consists of three distinct phases: activation, translocation and pausing, similar to ACF. Importantly, we found that NAP1L1 promotes CSB-mediated remodeling by accelerating both activation and translocation. Additionally, NAP1L1 increases CSB processivity by decreasing the pausing probability during translocation. Our study, therefore, uncovers the different steps of CSB-mediated chromatin remodeling that can be regulated by NAP1L1. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Monitoring interactions at ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, NH

    2000-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer patients is often unsuccessful, due to the involvement of various mechanisms, leading to multidrug resistance (MDR). In this review, I describe the mechanisms involved in MDR. Furthermore, results obtained by imaging of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the multidrug

  10. Phenomenological analysis of ATP dependence of motor protein

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, through phenomenological comparison of the velocity-force data of processive motor proteins, including conventional kinesin, cytoplasmic dynein and myosin V, we found that, the ratio between motor velocities of two different ATP concentrations is almost invariant for any substall, superstall or negative external loads. Therefore, the velocity of motor can be well approximated by a Michaelis-Menten like formula $V=\\atp k(F)L/(\\atp +K_M)$, with $L$ the step size, and $k(F)$ the external load $F$ dependent rate of one mechanochemical cycle of motor motion in saturated ATP solution. The difference of Michaelis-Menten constant $K_M$ for substall, superstall and negative external load indicates, the ATP molecule affinity of motor head for these three cases are different, though the expression of $k(F)$ as a function of $F$ might be unchanged for any external load $F$. Verifications of this Michaelis-Menten like formula has also been done by fitting to the recent experimental data.

  11. Structure and mechanism of ATP-dependent phospholipid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura; Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    , despite differences in overall architecture, both appear to operate by an alternating access mechanism and during transport they might allow access of phospholipids to the internal part of the transmembrane domain. The latter feature is obvious for ABC transporters, but phospholipids and other hydrophobic......Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and P4-ATPases are two large and seemingly unrelated families of primary active pumps involved in moving phospholipids from one leaflet of a biological membrane to the other. Scope of review This review aims to identify common mechanistic features...... in the way phospholipid flipping is carried out by two evolutionarily unrelated families of transporters. Major conclusions Both protein families hydrolyze ATP, although they employ different mechanisms to use it, and have a comparable size with twelve transmembrane segments in the functional unit. Further...

  12. Transcriptional regulation of egr-1 gene in murine cells. Towards the understanding of the role of chromatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Tur Arlandis, Gema

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is a highly regulated process that has to ensure the right cellular response to any type of stimulus. Nevertheless, chromatin structure, despite the fact of being dinamic, imposes certain contraints to this regulation. To solve this restrictions, cells have organized the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzymes. The first class of enzymes are responsible for the covalent modifications of histones which alter the glob...

  13. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  14. The Structure of the RAGE:S100A6 Complex Reveals a Unique Mode of Homodimerization for S100 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatime, Laure; Betzer, Cristine; Jensen, Rasmus Kjeldsen; Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Poul Henning; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-12-06

    S100 proteins are calcium-dependent regulators of homeostatic processes. Upon cellular response to stress, and notably during tumorigenesis, they relocalize to the extracellular environment where they induce pro-inflammatory signals by activating the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), thereby facilitating tumor growth and metastasis. Despite its importance in sustaining inflammation, the structural basis for RAGE-S100 crosstalk is still unknown. Here we report two crystal structures of the RAGE:S100A6 complex encompassing a full-length RAGE ectodomain. The structures, in combination with a comprehensive interaction analysis, suggest that the primary S100A6 binding site is formed by the RAGE C1 domain. Complex formation with S100A6 induces a unique dimeric conformation of RAGE that appears suited for signal transduction and intracellular effector recruitment. Intriguingly, S100A6 adopts a dimeric conformation radically different from all known S100 dimers. We discuss the physiological relevance of this non-canonical homodimeric form in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, J N Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal domains from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF(11-130)) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT(1-128)). Both structures contain similar Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) folds, which further homodimerize through the N-terminal helix and the structurally conserved β-sheet of the PAS fold from each protomer. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. TraJ is specific in activating its cognate tra operon promoter; however, heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that the allelic specificity of TraJ is solely mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  16. AT1 receptor induced alterations in histone H2A reveal novel insights into GPCR control of chromatin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaganapathi Jagannathan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic activation of angiotensin II (AngII type 1 receptor (AT(1R, a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR induces gene regulatory stress which is responsible for phenotypic modulation of target cells. The AT(1R-selective drugs reverse the gene regulatory stress in various cardiovascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. We speculate that activation states of AT(1R modify the composition of histone isoforms and post-translational modifications (PTM, thereby alter the structure-function dynamics of chromatin. We combined total histone isolation, FPLC separation, and mass spectrometry techniques to analyze histone H2A in HEK293 cells with and without AT(1R activation. We have identified eight isoforms: H2AA, H2AG, H2AM, H2AO, H2AQ, Q96QV6, H2AC and H2AL. The isoforms, H2AA, H2AC and H2AQ were methylated and H2AC was phosphorylated. The relative abundance of specific H2A isoforms and PTMs were further analyzed in relationship to the activation states of AT(1R by immunochemical studies. Within 2 hr, the isoforms, H2AA/O exchanged with H2AM. The monomethylated H2AC increased rapidly and the phosphorylated H2AC decreased, thus suggesting that enhanced H2AC methylation is coupled to Ser1p dephosphorylation. We show that H2A125Kme1 promotes interaction with the heterochromatin associated protein, HP1α. These specific changes in H2A are reversed by treatment with the AT(1R specific inhibitor losartan. Our analysis provides a first step towards an awareness of histone code regulation by GPCRs.

  17. Acetylome Analysis Identifies SIRT1 Targets in mRNA-Processing and Chromatin-Remodeling in Mouse Liver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Tang, Hui; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification found on numerous proteins, a strategy used in cell signaling to change protein activity in response to internal or external cues. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1...

  18. Acetylome Analysis Identifies SIRT1 Targets in mRNA-Processing and Chromatin-Remodeling in Mouse Liver: e0140619

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun-Yee Kim; Choon Kiat Sim; Hui Tang; Weiping Han; Kangling Zhang; Feng Xu

    2015-01-01

      Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification found on numerous proteins, a strategy used in cell signaling to change protein activity in response to internal or external cues. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1...

  19. The BRG1 chromatin remodeler protects against ovarian cysts, uterine tumors, and mammary tumors in a lineage-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Serber

    Full Text Available The BRG1 catalytic subunit of SWI/SNF-related complexes is required for mammalian development as exemplified by the early embryonic lethality of Brg1 null homozygous mice. BRG1 is also a tumor suppressor and, in mice, 10% of heterozygous (Brg1(null/+ females develop mammary tumors. We now demonstrate that BRG1 mRNA and protein are expressed in both the luminal and basal cells of the mammary gland, raising the question of which lineage requires BRG1 to promote mammary homeostasis and prevent oncogenic transformation. To investigate this question, we utilized Wap-Cre to mutate both Brg1 floxed alleles in the luminal cells of the mammary epithelium of pregnant mice where WAP is exclusively expressed within the mammary gland. Interestingly, we found that Brg1(Wap-Cre conditional homozygotes lactated normally and did not develop mammary tumors even when they were maintained on a Brm-deficient background. However, Brg1(Wap-Cre mutants did develop ovarian cysts and uterine tumors. Analysis of these latter tissues showed that both, like the mammary gland, contain cells that normally express Brg1 and Wap. Thus, tumor formation in Brg1 mutant mice appears to be confined to particular cell types that require BRG1 and also express Wap. Our results now show that such cells exist both in the ovary and the uterus but not in either the luminal or the basal compartments of the mammary gland. Taken together, these findings indicate that SWI/SNF-related complexes are dispensable in the luminal cells of the mammary gland and therefore argue against the notion that SWI/SNF-related complexes are essential for cell survival. These findings also suggest that the tumor-suppressor activity of BRG1 is restricted to the basal cells of the mammary gland and demonstrate that this function extends to other female reproductive organs, consistent with recent observations of recurrent ARID1A/BAF250a mutations in human ovarian and endometrial tumors.

  20. Structural Modeling of GR Interactions with the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex and C/EBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muratcioglu, Serena; Presman, Diego M; Pooley, John R

    2015-01-01

    to regulate gene expression. This study suggests models for the assembly of the SWI/SNF-A (SWItch/Sucrose-NonFermentable) complex and its interaction with the GR. We used the PRISM algorithm (PRotein Interactions by Structural Matching) to predict the three-dimensional complex structures of the target...... proteins. The structural models indicate that BAF57 and/or BAF250 mediate the interaction between the GR and the SWI/SNF-A complex, corroborating experimental data. They further suggest that a BAF60a/BAF155 and/or BAF60a/BAF170 interaction is critical for association between the core and variant subunits....... Further, we model the interaction between GR and CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs), since the GR can regulate gene expression indirectly by interacting with other transcription factors like C/EBPs. We observe that GR can bind to bZip domains of the C/EBPα homodimer as both a monomer and dimer...

  1. The IKAROS interaction with a complex including chromatin remodeling and transcription elongation activities is required for hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bottardi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IKAROS is a critical regulator of hematopoietic cell fate and its dynamic expression pattern is required for proper hematopoiesis. In collaboration with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD complex, it promotes gene repression and activation. It remains to be clarified how IKAROS can support transcription activation while being associated with the HDAC-containing complex NuRD. IKAROS also binds to the Positive-Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb at gene promoters. Here, we demonstrate that NuRD and P-TEFb are assembled in a complex that can be recruited to specific genes by IKAROS. The expression level of IKAROS influences the recruitment of the NuRD-P-TEFb complex to gene regulatory regions and facilitates transcription elongation by transferring the Protein Phosphatase 1α (PP1α, an IKAROS-binding protein and P-TEFb activator, to CDK9. We show that an IKAROS mutant that is unable to bind PP1α cannot sustain gene expression and impedes normal differentiation of Ik(NULL hematopoietic progenitors. Finally, the knock-down of the NuRD subunit Mi2 reveals that the occupancy of the NuRD complex at transcribed regions of genes favors the relief of POL II promoter-proximal pausing and thereby, promotes transcription elongation.

  2. Defeating EpCAM(+) liver cancer stem cells by targeting chromatin remodeling enzyme CHD4 in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nio, Kouki; Yamashita, Taro; Okada, Hikari; Kondo, Mitsumasa; Hayashi, Takehiro; Hara, Yasumasa; Nomura, Yoshimoto; Zeng, Sha Sha; Yoshida, Mariko; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Sunagozaka, Hajime; Oishi, Naoki; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2015-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is composed of a subset of cells with enhanced tumorigenicity and chemoresistance that are called cancer stem (or stem-like) cells. We explored the role of chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 4, which is encoded by the CHD4 gene and is known to epigenetically control gene regulation and DNA damage responses in EpCAM(+) liver cancer stem cells. Gene and protein expression profiles were determined by microarray and immunohistochemistry in 245 and 144 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, respectively. The relationship between gene/protein expression and prognosis was examined. The functional role of CHD4 was evaluated in primary hepatocellular carcinoma cells and in cell lines in vitro and in vivo. CHD4 was abundantly expressed in EpCAM(+) hepatocellular carcinoma with expression of hepatic stem cell markers and poor prognosis in two independent cohorts. In cell lines, CHD4 knockdown increased chemosensitivity and CHD4 overexpression induced epirubicin chemoresistance. To inhibit the functions of CHD4 that are mediated through histone deacetylase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, we evaluated the effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberohydroxamic acid and the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor AG-014699. Treatment with either suberohydroxamic acid or AG-014699 reduced the number of EpCAM(+) liver cancer stem cells in vitro, and suberohydroxamic acid and AG-014699 in combination successfully inhibited tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. CHD4 plays a pivotal role in chemoresistance and the maintenance of stemness in liver cancer stem cells and is therefore a good target for the eradication of hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Nelson, Celeste M.; Muschler, John L.; Veiseh, Mandana; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    Epithelial cells, once dissociated and placed in two-dimensional (2D) cultures, rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. We showed previously that in addition to prolactin, signaling by laminin-111 was necessary to restore functional differentiation of mammary epithelia. Here, we elucidate two additional aspects of laminin-111 action. We show that in 2D cultures, the prolactin receptor is basolaterally localized and physically segregated from its apically placed ligand. Detachment of the cells exposes the receptor to ligation by prolactin leading to signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 5 (STAT5) activation, but only transiently and not sufficiently for induction of milk protein expression. We show that laminin-111 reorganizes mammary cells into polarized acini, allowing both the exposure of the prolactin receptor and sustained activation of STAT5. The use of constitutively active STAT5 constructs showed that the latter is necessary and sufficient for chromatin reorganization and {beta}-casein transcription. These results underscore the crucial role of continuous laminin signaling and polarized tissue architecture in maintenance of transcription factor activation, chromatin organization, and tissue-specific gene expression.

  4. p63 regulates Satb1 to control tissue-specific chromatin remodeling during development of the epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessing, Michael Y.; Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Gdula, Michal R.; Sharov, Andrey A.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Rapisarda, Valentina; Gordon, Konstantin B.; Smorodchenko, Anna D.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Ferone, Giustina; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Missero, Caterina

    2011-01-01

    During development, multipotent progenitor cells establish tissue-specific programs of gene expression. In this paper, we show that p63 transcription factor, a master regulator of epidermal morphogenesis, executes its function in part by directly regulating expression of the genome organizer Satb1 in progenitor cells. p63 binds to a proximal regulatory region of the Satb1 gene, and p63 ablation results in marked reduction in the Satb1 expression levels in the epidermis. Satb1−/− mice show impaired epidermal morphology. In Satb1-null epidermis, chromatin architecture of the epidermal differentiation complex locus containing genes associated with epidermal differentiation is altered primarily at its central domain, where Satb1 binding was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation–on-chip analysis. Furthermore, genes within this domain fail to be properly activated upon terminal differentiation. Satb1 expression in p63+/− skin explants treated with p63 small interfering ribonucleic acid partially restored the epidermal phenotype of p63-deficient mice. These data provide a novel mechanism by which Satb1, a direct downstream target of p63, contributes in epidermal morphogenesis via establishing tissue-specific chromatin organization and gene expression in epidermal progenitor cells. PMID:21930775

  5. Histone demethylase KDM5A regulates the ZMYND8-NuRD chromatin remodeler to promote DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fade; Clouaire, Thomas; Aguirrebengoa, Marion; Legube, Gaëlle; Miller, Kyle M

    2017-07-03

    Upon DNA damage, histone modifications are dynamically reshaped to accommodate DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin. In this study, we report the identification of the histone demethylase KDM5A as a key regulator of the bromodomain protein ZMYND8 and NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation) complex in the DNA damage response. We observe KDM5A-dependent H3K4me3 demethylation within chromatin near DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites. Mechanistically, demethylation of H3K4me3 is required for ZMYND8-NuRD binding to chromatin and recruitment to DNA damage. Functionally, KDM5A deficiency results in impaired transcriptional silencing and repair of DSBs by homologous recombination. Thus, this study identifies a crucial function for KDM5A in demethylating H3K4 to allow ZMYND8-NuRD to operate within damaged chromatin to repair DSBs. © 2017 Gong et al.

  6. Involvement of Chromatin Remodeling Genes and the Rho GTPases RhoB and CDC42 in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Nicolai Skovbjerg; Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Bartuma, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCCs) constitute a rare ovarian cancer subtype with distinct clinical features, but may nonetheless be difficult to distinguish morphologically from other subtypes. There is limited knowledge of genetic events driving OCCC tumorigenesis beyond ARID1A, wh...

  7. Serotonin 2A receptor disulfide bridge integrity is crucial for ligand binding to different signalling states but not for its homodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Alba; Cimadevila, Marta; la Fuente, Rocío Ailim de; Martí-Solano, María; Cadavid, María Isabel; Castro, Marián; Selent, Jana; Loza, María Isabel; Brea, José

    2017-11-15

    The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) with a conserved disulfide bridge formed by Cys148 (transmembrane helix 3, TM3) and Cys227 (extracellular loop 2, ECL-2). We hypothesized that disulfide bridges may determine serotonin 5-HT2A receptor functions such as receptor activation, functional selectivity and ligand recognition. We used the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) to determine how the reduction of disulfide bridges affects radioligand binding, second messenger mobilization and receptor dimerization. A DTT-induced decrease in the number of binding sites (1190 ± 63.55 fmol/mg protein for control cells compared with 921.2 ± 60.84 fmol/mg protein for DTT-treated cells) as well as in the efficacy of both signalling pathways characterized was observed, although the affinity and potency were unchanged. Bioluminiscence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays revealed the DTT treatment did not modify the homodimeric nature of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. In molecular dynamic simulations, the ECL-2 of the receptor with a broken cysteine bond adopts a wider variety of conformations, some of which protrude deeper into the receptor orthosteric binding pocket leading to collapse of the pocket. A shrunken binding pocket would be incapable of accommodating lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Our findings suggest that the decrease of efficacy may be due to disruption of disulfide bridge between TM3 and ECL-2. This reveals the integrity of the ECL-2 epitope, which should be explored in the development of novel ligands acting as allosteric modulators of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Short-term Pharmacological Inhibition of MyD88 Homodimerization by a Novel Inhibitor Promotes Robust Allograft Tolerance in Mouse Cardiac and Skin Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xue; Huang, Xia; Liu, Yong; Li, Ming-Qiang; Xing, Shuai; Yang, Tao; Xie, Lin; Jiang, Feng-Chao; Jiang, Han-Ying; He, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Most strategies for antirejection and tolerance induction in clinical transplantation have focused on modifying adaptive immunity, it is unclear whether pharmacological suppressing the innate immune system can promote transplant tolerance. We inhibited innate immunity by using our self-generated inhibitor of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), TJ-M2010-5, and investigated its therapeutic effects and mechanisms in cardiac and skin transplant models. TJ-M2010-5 directly and indirectly interacted with the Toll/IL-1R domain of MyD88, inhibiting MyD88 homodimerization. In vitro, TJ-M2010-5 inhibited maturation of dendritic cells, which suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB and T cell activation. In vivo, short-term (10 days) monotherapy of TJ-M2010-5 resulted in long time survival of 50% of the cardiac allografts, and longer-term (14 days) combination treatment of TJ-M2010-5 with CD154 mAb resulted in survival of 29% of skin allografts, which outperformed far more than CsA did and stimulated the proliferation of CD4CD25FoxP3 Regulatory T cells in recipient mice. Pharmacological inhibition of MyD88 signaling by this novel inhibitor TJ-M2010-5 shows a powerful anti-rejection effect, which may have therapeutic potential in clinical transplantation. The inhibition of both innate and adaptive immunity may be necessary for tolerance induction in nonsolid organs.

  9. Characterization of zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) antibodies in autoimmune diabetic patients from Argentinian population using monomeric, homodimeric, and heterodimeric ZnT8 antigen variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccinetti, Natalia I; Guerra, Luciano L; Penas Steinhardt, Alberto; Iacono, Ruben F; Frechtel, Gustavo D; Trifone, Liliana; Poskus, Edgardo; Trabucchi, Aldana; Valdez, Silvina N

    2016-02-01

    In order to gain further knowledge of the structure of zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) epitopes, we studied the role of the amino acid at position 325 in the antigen and its dimeric conformation for autoantibodies to ZnT8 (ZnT8A) recognition. For this purpose, several ZnT8 C-terminal domain variants were designed: monomer carrying Arg325 or Trp325, homo-dimers ZnT8-Arg-Arg325 and ZnT8-Trp-Trp325, and hetero-dimer ZnT8-Arg-Trp325. Two groups of Argentinian diabetic patients were subjected to analysis using [(35)S]-ZnT8 variants by radioligand binding assay (RBA): i) 100 new-onset, insulin-dependent, type 1 diabetic patients and ii) 282 slowly progressing to insulin requirement, non-obese adult-onset diabetic patients. In addition, 50 type 1 diabetic patients and 100 normal control sera provided by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) were evaluated in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of ZnT8A assays for each antigenic variant. Other routine β-cell autoantibodies were also tested by RBA. Of the 100 Argentinian type 1 diabetic patients, 65 were ZnT8A+. Out of them, 8 patients recognized all recombinant forms of ZnT8 and most patients (56) reacted against the heterodimer. Additionally, out of 282 non-obese adult-onset diabetic patients 46 were ZnT8A+, whereas 29 patients recognized only dimers. Besides, exclusive reactivity against ZnT8A was found in 9.0% for type 1 diabetes mellitus and 10.3% for non-obese adult-onset diabetic patients. Significantly higher signal values in RBA were obtained with the heterodimeric variant. An increased detection of humoral autoimmunity was found in both groups when ZnT8A was employed in combination with the other β-cell autoantibodies. The inclusion of homodimeric immunoreactive peptides revealed the existence of quaternary structure-defined epitopes probably resembling the actual state of the autoantigen in vivo. Finally, the differential profiles of ZnT8A exhibited by type 1 and non-obese adult-onset diabetic

  10. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Goo Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3 and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI.

  11. Whole exome sequencing implicates an INO80D mutation in a syndrome of aortic hypoplasia, premature atherosclerosis, and arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameer, Khader; Klee, Eric W; Dalenberg, Angela K; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2014-10-01

    Massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing technology is helping to generate new insights into the genetic basis of human diseases. We used whole exome sequencing to identify the mutation underlying a syndrome affecting 2 siblings with aortic hypoplasia, calcific atherosclerosis, systolic hypertension, and premature cataract. Exonic regions were captured and sequenced using a next-generation sequencing platform to generate 100 bases paired-end reads. A computational genomic data analysis pipeline was used to perform quality control, align reads to a reference genome, and identify genetic variants; findings were confirmed using a different exome analyses pipeline. The 2 siblings were homozygous for a rare missense mutation (Ser818Cys) in INO80D, a subunit of the human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex. Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing confirmed that the mutation is located in one of the runs of homozygosity on chromosome 2. INO80D encodes a key subunit of the human IN080 complex, a multiprotein complex involved in DNA binding, chromatin modification, organization of chromosome structure, and ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By introducing a new disulphide-bond in the protein product and also disrupting the composition of low-complexity regions, the Ser818Cys mutation may affect INO80D function, protein-protein interactions, and chromatin remodeling. Our findings suggest a link between the Ser818Cys mutation in INO80D, a subunit of the human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, and accelerated arterial aging. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Differential acetylation of histone H3 at the regulatory region of OsDREB1b promoter facilitates chromatin remodelling and transcription activation during cold stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipan Roy

    Full Text Available The rice ortholog of DREB1, OsDREB1b, is transcriptionally induced by cold stress and over-expression of OsDREB1b results in increase tolerance towards high salt and freezing stress. This spatio-temporal expression of OsDREB1b is preceded by the change in chromatin structure at the promoter and the upstream region for gene activation. The promoter and the upstream region of OsDREB1b genes appear to be arranged into a nucleosome array. Nucleosome mapping of ∼ 700 bp upstream region of OsDREB1b shows two positioned nucleosomes between -610 to -258 and a weakly positioned nucleosome at the core promoter and the TSS. Upon cold stress, there is a significant change in the nucleosome arrangement at the upstream region with increase in DNaseI hypersensitivity or MNase digestion in the vicinity of cis elements and TATA box at the core promoter. ChIP assays shows hyper-acetylation of histone H3K9 throughout the locus whereas region specific increase was observed in H3K14ac and H3K27ac. Moreover, there is an enrichment of RNA PolII occupancy at the promoter region during transcription activation. There is no significant change in the H3 occupancy in OsDREB1b locus negating the possibility of nucleosome loss during cold stress. Interestingly, cold induced enhanced transcript level of OsDREB1b as well as histone H3 acetylation at the upstream region was found to diminish when stressed plants were returned to normal temperature. The result indicates absolute necessity of changes in chromatin conformation for the transcription up-regulation of OsDREB1b gene in response to cold stress. The combined results show the existence of closed chromatin conformation at the upstream and promoter region of OsDREB1b in the transcription "off" state. During cold stress, changes in region specific histone modification marks promote the alteration of chromatin structure to facilitate the binding of transcription machinery for proper gene expression.

  13. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, G.; Wiegant, W.W.; Luijsterburg, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    , selectively promotes spreading of SMARCA5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168, ubiquitin conjugates and the ubiquitin-binding factors RAD18 and the RAP80-BRCA1 complex throughout DSB-flanking chromatin. This suggests that PARP regulates the spatial organization of the RNF168-driven ubiquitin response to DNA...... ubiquitin cascade. Moreover, SMARCA5 was found to regulate the ubiquitin response by promoting RNF168 accumulation at DSBs, which subsequently facilitates efficient ubiquitin conjugation and BRCA1 assembly. Underlining the importance of these findings, we show that SMARCA5 depletion renders cells sensitive...

  14. TnaA, an SP-RING Protein, Interacts with Osa, a Subunit of the Chromatin Remodeling Complex BRAHMA and with the SUMOylation Pathway in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monribot-Villanueva, Juan; Juárez-Uribe, R. Alejandro; Palomera-Sánchez, Zoraya; Gutiérrez-Aguiar, Lucía; Zurita, Mario; Kennison, James A.; Vázquez, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Tonalli A (TnaA) is a Drosophila melanogaster protein with an XSPRING domain. The XSPRING domain harbors an SP-RING zinc-finger, which is characteristic of proteins with SUMO E3 ligase activity. TnaA is required for homeotic gene expression and is presumably involved in the SUMOylation pathway. Here we analyzed some aspects of the TnaA location in embryo and larval stages and its genetic and biochemical interaction with SUMOylation pathway proteins. We describe that there are at least two TnaA proteins (TnaA130 and TnaA123) differentially expressed throughout development. We show that TnaA is chromatin-associated at discrete sites on polytene salivary gland chromosomes of third instar larvae and that tna mutant individuals do not survive to adulthood, with most dying as third instar larvae or pupae. The tna mutants that ultimately die as third instar larvae have an extended life span of at least 4 to 15 days as other SUMOylation pathway mutants. We show that TnaA physically interacts with the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9, and with the BRM complex subunit Osa. Furthermore, we show that tna and osa interact genetically with SUMOylation pathway components and individuals carrying mutations for these genes show a phenotype that can be the consequence of misexpression of developmental-related genes. PMID:23620817

  15. Chromatin remodeling agent trichostatin A: a key-factor in the hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived of adult bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinken Mathieu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC derived of adult bone marrow to undergo in vitro hepatic differentiation was investigated. Results Exposure of hMSC to a cocktail of hepatogenic factors [(fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, insulin-transferrin-sodium-selenite (ITS and dexamethasone] failed to induce hepatic differentiation. Sequential exposure to these factors (FGF-4, followed by HGF, followed by HGF+ITS+dexamethasone, however, resembling the order of secretion during liver embryogenesis, induced both glycogen-storage and cytokeratin (CK18 expression. Additional exposure of the cells to trichostatin A (TSA considerably improved endodermal differentiation, as evidenced by acquisition of an epithelial morphology, chronological expression of hepatic proteins, including hepatocyte-nuclear factor (HNF-3β, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, CK18, albumin (ALB, HNF1α, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα, and functional maturation, i.e. upregulated ALB secretion, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP-dependent activity. Conclusion hMSC are able to undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. TSA is hereby essential to promote differentiation of hMSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells.

  16. TnaA, an SP-RING protein, interacts with Osa, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex BRAHMA and with the SUMOylation pathway in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Monribot-Villanueva

    Full Text Available Tonalli A (TnaA is a Drosophila melanogaster protein with an XSPRING domain. The XSPRING domain harbors an SP-RING zinc-finger, which is characteristic of proteins with SUMO E3 ligase activity. TnaA is required for homeotic gene expression and is presumably involved in the SUMOylation pathway. Here we analyzed some aspects of the TnaA location in embryo and larval stages and its genetic and biochemical interaction with SUMOylation pathway proteins. We describe that there are at least two TnaA proteins (TnaA130 and TnaA123 differentially expressed throughout development. We show that TnaA is chromatin-associated at discrete sites on polytene salivary gland chromosomes of third instar larvae and that tna mutant individuals do not survive to adulthood, with most dying as third instar larvae or pupae. The tna mutants that ultimately die as third instar larvae have an extended life span of at least 4 to 15 days as other SUMOylation pathway mutants. We show that TnaA physically interacts with the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9, and with the BRM complex subunit Osa. Furthermore, we show that tna and osa interact genetically with SUMOylation pathway components and individuals carrying mutations for these genes show a phenotype that can be the consequence of misexpression of developmental-related genes.

  17. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danna Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi trichostatin A (TSA promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation.

  18. Age-associated DNA methylation changes in immune genes, histone modifiers and chromatin remodeling factors within 5 years after birth in human blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E; Vitezic, Morana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related changes in DNA methylation occurring in blood leukocytes during early childhood may reflect epigenetic maturation. We hypothesized that some of these changes involve gene networks of critical relevance in leukocyte biology and conducted a prospective study to elucidate...... factors (for example, HDAC4, KDM2A, KDM2B, JARID2, ARID3A, and SMARCD3) undergo DNA methylation changes in leukocytes during early childhood. These results open new perspectives to understand leukocyte maturation and provide a catalogue of CpG sites that may need to be corrected for age effects when...

  19. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J., E-mail: Luc_ellis@yahoo.co.uk [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Hawksworth, Gabrielle M. [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Weaver, Richard J. [Biologie Servier, Drug Safety Research Centre, 905 Route de Saran, 45520 Gidy (France)

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  20. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant γ-glutamyl cycle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the ...

  1. Arsenic Alters ATP-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Human Airway Epithelial Cell Wound Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., arsenic reduces purinergic Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca2+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca2+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  2. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.BEWLEY,M.C.

    2002-10-01

    It is generally accepted that the information necessary to specify the native, functional, three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded entirely within its amino acid sequence; however, efficient reversible folding and unfolding is observed only with a subset of small single-domain proteins. Refolding experiments often lead to the formation of kinetically-trapped, misfolded species that aggregate, even in dilute solution. In the cellular environment, the barriers to efficient protein folding and maintenance of native structure are even larger due to the nature of this process. First, nascent polypeptides must fold in an extremely crowded environment where the concentration of macromolecules approaches 300-400 mg/mL and on average, each ribosome is within its own diameter of another ribosome (1-3). These conditions of severe molecular crowding, coupled with high concentrations of nascent polypeptide chains, favor nonspecific aggregation over productive folding (3). Second, folding of newly-translated polypeptides occurs in the context of their vehtorial synthesis process. Amino acids are added to a growing nascent chain at the rate of {approx}5 residues per set, which means that for a 300 residue protein its N-terminus will be exposed to the cytosol {approx}1 min before its C-terminus and be free to begin the folding process. However, because protein folding is highly cooperative, the nascent polypeptide cannot reach its native state until a complete folding domain (50-250 residues) has emerged from the ribosome. Thus, for a single-domain protein, the final steps in ffolding are only completed post-translationally since {approx}40 residues of a nascent chain are sequestered within the exit channel of the ribosome and are not available for folding (4). A direct consequence of this limitation in cellular folding is that during translation incomplete domains will exist in partially-folded states that tend to expose hydrophobic residues that are prone to aggregation and/or mislfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  3. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.; BEWLEY,M.C.

    2001-12-03

    It is generally accepted that the information necessary to specify the native, functional, three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded entirely within its amino acid sequence; however, efficient reversible folding and unfolding is observed only with a subset of small single-domain proteins. Refolding experiments often lead to the formation of kinetically-trapped, misfolded species that aggregate, even in dilute solution. In the cellular environment, the barriers to efficient protein folding and maintenance of native structure are even larger due to the nature of this process. First, nascent polypeptides must fold in an extremely crowded environment where the concentration of macromolecules approaches 300-400 mg/mL and on average, each ribosome is within its own diameter of another ribosome (1-3). These conditions of severe molecular crowding, coupled with high concentrations of nascent polypeptide chains, favor nonspecific aggregation over productive folding (3). Second, folding of newly-translated polypeptides occurs in the context of their vehtorial synthesis process. Amino acids are added to a growing nascent chain at the rate of -5 residues per set, which means that for a 300 residue protein its N-terminus will be exposed to the cytosol {approx}1 min before its C-terminus and be free to begin the folding process. However, because protein folding is highly cooperative, the nascent polypeptide cannot reach its native state until a complete folding domain (50-250 residues) has emerged from the ribosome. Thus, for a single-domain protein, the final steps in folding are only completed post-translationally since {approx}40 residues of a nascent chain are sequestered within the exit channel of the ribosome and are not available for folding (4). A direct consequence of this limitation in cellular folding is that during translation incomplete domains will exist in partially-folded states that tend to expose hydrophobic residues that are prone to aggregation and/or misfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  4. Structural basis of PP2A activation by PTPA, an ATP-dependent activation chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng; Stanevich, Vitali; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Sengupta, Rituparna; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Xing, Yongna

    2013-10-08

    Proper activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit is central for the complex PP2A regulation and is crucial for broad aspects of cellular function. The crystal structure of PP2A bound to PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) and ATPγS reveals that PTPA makes broad contacts with the structural elements surrounding the PP2A active site and the adenine moiety of ATP. PTPA-binding stabilizes the protein fold of apo-PP2A required for activation, and orients ATP phosphoryl groups to bind directly to the PP2A active site. This allows ATP to modulate the metal-binding preferences of the PP2A active site and utilize the PP2A active site for ATP hydrolysis. In vitro, ATP selectively and drastically enhances binding of endogenous catalytic metal ions, which requires ATP hydrolysis and is crucial for acquisition of pSer/Thr-specific phosphatase activity. Furthermore, both PP2A- and ATP-binding are required for PTPA function in cell proliferation and survival. Our results suggest novel mechanisms of PTPA in PP2A activation with structural economy and a unique ATP-binding pocket that could potentially serve as a specific therapeutic target.

  5. Corynebacterium glutamicum glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms with opposite, ATP-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omumasaba, Crispinus A; Okai, Naoko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum gapA and gapB encode glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) that differ in molecular weight and activity in the presence of ATP. Comparative genome analysis revealed that GapA, the product of gapA, represented the canonical GAPDH that is highly conserved across the three major life forms. GapB, with an additional 110-residue-long sequence upstream of its GAPDH-specific domain, was homologous only to select microbial putative GAPDHs. Upon gene disruption, the initial growth rates of the wild-type, DeltagapA and DeltagapB strains on glucose (0.77, 0.00 and 0.76 h(-1), respectively), lactate (0.20, 0.18 and 0.15 h(-1), respectively), pyruvate (0.39, 0.29 and 0.20 h(-1), respectively), and acetate (0.06, 0.06 and 0.04 h(-1), respectively), implied that GapA was indispensable for growth on glucose, that GapB, but not GapA, affected early growth on acetate, and that GapB had a greater influence on growth under gluconeogenic conditions than GapA. The disruption of either gapA or gapB showed no significant effect on the transcription of any of the other gap cluster genes although it led to reduced triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activities. Glycolytic GAPDH activity at low in vitro ATP concentrations was solely attributed to the 35.9-kDa GapA. At higher ATP concentrations, the same activity was attributed to the 51.2-kDa GapB. Both enzymes, however, exhibited similar NADP-dependent GAPDH activities at the higher ATP concentrations. In effect therefore, the GAPDH-catalyzed reaction at low ATP concentrations was irreversible, with all the glycolytic activity strictly NAD-dependent and attributed to GapA. At higher ATP concentrations, the reaction was reversible, with glycolytic activity NAD- or NADP-dependent and attributed to GapB, while gluconeogenic activity was attributable to both GapA and GapB.

  6. Structure and function of a novel type of ATP-dependent Clp protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Fredrik I; Tryggvesson, Anders; Sharon, Michal; Diemand, Alexander V; Classen, Mirjam; Best, Christoph; Schmidt, Ronny; Schelin, Jenny; Stanne, Tara M; Bukau, Bernd; Robinson, Carol V; Witt, Susanne; Mogk, Axel; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-05-15

    The Clp protease is conserved among eubacteria and most eukaryotes, and uses ATP to drive protein substrate unfolding and translocation into a chamber of sequestered proteolytic active sites. The main constitutive Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms has evolved into a functionally essential and structurally intricate enzyme. The model Clp protease from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus consists of the HSP100 molecular chaperone ClpC and a mixed proteolytic core comprised of two distinct subunits, ClpP3 and ClpR. We have purified the ClpP3/R complex, the first for a Clp proteolytic core comprised of heterologous subunits. The ClpP3/R complex has unique functional and structural features, consisting of twin heptameric rings each with an identical ClpP3(3)ClpR(4) configuration. As predicted by its lack of an obvious catalytic triad, the ClpR subunit is shown to be proteolytically inactive. Interestingly, extensive modification to ClpR to restore proteolytic activity to this subunit showed that its presence in the core complex is not rate-limiting for the overall proteolytic activity of the ClpCP3/R protease. Altogether, the ClpP3/R complex shows remarkable similarities to the 20 S core of the proteasome, revealing a far greater degree of convergent evolution than previously thought between the development of the Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms and that of the eukaryotic 26 S proteasome.

  7. Characterization of the ATP-Dependent Lon-Like Protease in Methanobrevibacter smithii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua Pei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lon protease is highly evolutionarily conserved. However, little is known about Lon in the context of gut microbial communities. A gene encoding a Lon-like protease (Lon-like-Ms was identified and characterized from Methanobrevibacter smithii, the predominant archaeon in the human gut ecosystem. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that Lon-like-Ms and its homologs are newly identified members of the Lon family. A recombinant form of the enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography, and its catalytic properties were examined. Recombinant Lon-like-Ms exhibited ATPase activity and cleavage activity toward fluorogenic peptides and casein. The peptidase activity of Lon-like-Ms relied strictly on Mg2+ (or other divalent cations and ATP. These results highlight a new type of Lon-like protease that differs from its bacterial counterpart.

  8. Role of ATP-dependent K channels in the effects of erythropoietin in renal ischaemia injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonguç Utku Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the cell proliferative, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects of EPO were associated with KATP channels in the renal tubular cell culture model under hypoxic/normal conditions.

  9. The RIG-I ATPase domain structure reveals insights into ATP-dependent antiviral signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civril, Filiz; Bennett, Matthew; Moldt, Manuela; Deimling, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Schiesser, Stefan; Carell, Thomas; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2011-10-28

    RIG-I detects cytosolic viral dsRNA with 5' triphosphates (5'-ppp-dsRNA), thereby initiating an antiviral innate immune response. Here we report the crystal structure of superfamily 2 (SF2) ATPase domain of RIG-I in complex with a nucleotide analogue. RIG-I SF2 comprises two RecA-like domains 1A and 2A and a helical insertion domain 2B, which together form a 'C'-shaped structure. Domains 1A and 2A are maintained in a 'signal-off' state with an inactive ATP hydrolysis site by an intriguing helical arm. By mutational analysis, we show surface motifs that are critical for dsRNA-stimulated ATPase activity, indicating that dsRNA induces a structural movement that brings domains 1A and 2A/B together to form an active ATPase site. The structure also indicates that the regulatory domain is close to the end of the helical arm, where it is well positioned to recruit 5'-ppp-dsRNA to the SF2 domain. Overall, our results indicate that the activation of RIG-I occurs through an RNA- and ATP-driven structural switch in the SF2 domain.

  10. Structural Basis for the Mechanism of ATP-Dependent Acetone Carboxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mus, Florence; Eilers, Brian J; Alleman, Alexander B; Kabasakal, Burak V; Wells, Jennifer N; Murray, James W; Nocek, Boguslaw P; DuBois, Jennifer L; Peters, John W

    2017-08-03

    Microorganisms use carboxylase enzymes to form new carbon-carbon bonds by introducing carbon dioxide gas (CO2) or its hydrated form, bicarbonate (HCO3-), into target molecules. Acetone carboxylases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of substrates acetone and HCO3- to form the product acetoacetate. Many bicarbonate-incorporating carboxylases rely on the organic cofactor biotin for the activation of bicarbonate. ACs contain metal ions but not organic cofactors, and use ATP to activate substrates through phosphorylation. How the enzyme coordinates these phosphorylation events and new C-C bond formation in the absence of biotin has remained a mystery since these enzymes were discovered. The first structural rationale for acetone carboxylation is presented here, focusing on the 360 kDa (αβγ)2 heterohexameric AC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus in the ligand-free, AMP-bound, and acetate coordinated states. These structures suggest successive steps in a catalytic cycle revealing that AC undergoes large conformational changes coupled to substrate activation by ATP to perform C-C bond ligation at a distant Mn center. These results illustrate a new chemical strategy for the conversion of CO2 into biomass, a process of great significance to the global carbon cycle.

  11. Multitasking in the mitochondrion by the ATP-dependent Lon protease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Lee, Jae; Singh, Kamalendra; Lee, Irene; Suzuki, Carolyn K

    2012-01-01

    .... The best-understood functions of mitochondrial Lon are linked to maintaining proteostasis under normal metabolic conditions, and preventing proteotoxicity during environmental and cellular stress...

  12. Genetic identification of a network of factors that functionally interact with the nucleosome remodeling ATPase ISWI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giosalba Burgio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosome remodeling and covalent modifications of histones play fundamental roles in chromatin structure and function. However, much remains to be learned about how the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors and histone-modifying enzymes is coordinated to modulate chromatin organization and transcription. The evolutionarily conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factor ISWI plays essential roles in chromosome organization, DNA replication, and transcription regulation. To gain insight into regulation and mechanism of action of ISWI, we conducted an unbiased genetic screen to identify factors with which it interacts in vivo. We found that ISWI interacts with a network of factors that escaped detection in previous biochemical analyses, including the Sin3A gene. The Sin3A protein and the histone deacetylase Rpd3 are part of a conserved histone deacetylase complex involved in transcriptional repression. ISWI and the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex co-localize at specific chromosome domains. Loss of ISWI activity causes a reduction in the binding of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to chromatin. Biochemical analysis showed that the ISWI physically interacts with the histone deacetylase activity of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex. Consistent with these findings, the acetylation of histone H4 is altered when ISWI activity is perturbed in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI associates with the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to support its function in vivo.

  13. Mouse BAZ1A (ACF1 is dispensable for double-strand break repair but is essential for averting improper gene expression during spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Dowdle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers control DNA access for transcription, recombination, and other processes. Acf1 (also known as BAZ1A in mammals is a defining subunit of the conserved ISWI-family chromatin remodelers ACF and CHRAC, first purified over 15 years ago from Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Much is known about biochemical properties of ACF and CHRAC, which move nucleosomes in vitro and in vivo to establish ordered chromatin arrays. Genetic studies in yeast, flies and cultured human cells clearly implicate these complexes in transcriptional repression via control of chromatin structures. RNAi experiments in transformed mammalian cells in culture also implicate ACF and CHRAC in DNA damage checkpoints and double-strand break repair. However, their essential in vivo roles in mammals are unknown. Here, we show that Baz1a-knockout mice are viable and able to repair developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks in the immune system and germ line, I-SceI endonuclease-induced breaks in primary fibroblasts via homologous recombination, and DNA damage from mitomycin C exposure in vivo. However, Baz1a deficiency causes male-specific sterility in accord with its high expression in male germ cells, where it displays dynamic, stage-specific patterns of chromosomal localization. Sterility is caused by pronounced defects in sperm development, most likely a consequence of massively perturbed gene expression in spermatocytes and round spermatids in the absence of BAZ1A: the normal spermiogenic transcription program is largely intact but more than 900 other genes are mis-regulated, primarily reflecting inappropriate up-regulation. We propose that large-scale changes in chromatin composition that occur during spermatogenesis create a window of vulnerability to promiscuous transcription changes, with an essential function of ACF and/or CHRAC chromatin remodeling activities being to safeguard against these alterations.

  14. H2A.Z mediates different aspects of chromatin function and modulates flowering responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic organisms have canonical histones and a number of histone variants that perform specialized functions and confer particular structural properties to the nucleosomes that contain them. The histone H2A family comprises several variants, with H2A.Z being the most evolutionarily conserved. This variant is essential in eukaryotes and has emerged as a key player in chromatin function, performing an essential role in gene transcription and genome stability. During recent years, biochemical, genetic and genomic studies have begun to uncover the role of several ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes in H2A.Z deposition and removal. These ATPase complexes are widely conserved from yeast to mammals. In Arabidopsis there are homologs for most of the subunits of these complexes, and their functions are just beginning to be unveiled. In this review, we discuss the major contributions made in relation to the biology of the H2A.Z in plants, and more specifically concerning the function of this histone variant in the transition from vegetative to reproductive development. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the H2A.Z-mediated modulation of the floral transition, and thermosensory flowering responses in particular, are discussed. The emerging picture shows that plants contain chromatin-remodeling complexes related to those involved in modulating the dynamics of H2A.Z in other eukaryotes, but their precise biochemical nature remains elusive. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  16. Nucleosomes protect DNA from DNA methylation in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felle, Max; Hoffmeister, Helen; Rothammer, Julia; Fuchs, Andreas; Exler, Josef H.; Längst, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Positioned nucleosomes limit the access of proteins to DNA. However, the impact of nucleosomes on DNA methylation in vitro and in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the de novo methyltransferases. We show that compared to linker DNA, nucleosomal DNA is largely devoid of CpG methylation. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling frees nucleosomal CpG dinucleotides and renders the remodelled nucleosome a 2-fold better substrate for Dnmt3a methyltransferase compared to free DNA. These results reflect the situation in vivo, as quantification of nucleosomal DNA methylation levels in HeLa cells shows a 2-fold decrease of nucleosomal DNA methylation levels compared to linker DNA. Our findings suggest that nucleosomal positions are stably maintained in vivo and nucleosomal occupancy is a major determinant of global DNA methylation patterns in vivo. PMID:21622955

  17. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  18. The Drosophila nucleosome remodeling factor NURF is required for Ecdysteroid signaling and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Paul; Xiao, Hua; Cherbas, Lucy; Kwon, So Yeon; Voas, Matt; Rebay, Ilaria; Cherbas, Peter; Wu, Carl

    2005-11-01

    Drosophila NURF is an ISWI-containing ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex that regulates transcription by catalyzing nucleosome sliding. To determine in vivo gene targets of NURF, we performed whole genome expression analysis on mutants lacking the NURF-specific subunit NURF301. Strikingly, a large set of ecdysone-responsive targets is included among several hundred NURF-regulated genes. Null Nurf301 mutants do not undergo larval to pupal metamorphosis, and also enhance dominant-negative mutations in ecdysone receptor. Moreover, purified NURF binds EcR in an ecdysone-dependent manner, suggesting it is a direct effector of nuclear receptor activity. The conservation of NURF in mammals has broad implications for steroid signaling.

  19. CHD proteins: a diverse family with strong ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J Adam; Georgel, Philippe T

    2007-08-01

    Chromodomain/helicase/DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms. Despite common features, such as their chromodomain and helicase domain, they have been described as having multiple roles and interacting partners. However, a common theme for the main role of CHD proteins appears to be linked to their ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling activity. Their actual activity as either repressor or activator, and their cell or gene specificity, is connected to their interacting partner(s). In this minireview, we attempt to match the members of the CHD family with the presence of structural domains, cofactors, and cellular roles in the regulation of gene expression, recombination, genome organization, and chromatin structure, as well as their potential activity in RNA processing.

  20. Specificity of ATP-dependent and GTP-dependent protein kinases with respect to ribosomal proteins of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Kiefer, M C; Traut, R R

    1975-01-01

    of the small ribosomal subunit, and to a lesser extent proteins L7 and L12 or the large subunit. Evidence is presented showing different phosphorylation patterns when either whole subunits or the extracted proteins were used as substrate for the protein kinase. Kinetic studies showed proteins S1 and S4......Two protein kinases differing in substrate specificity were used to phosphorylate the 30-S and the 50-S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli. The catalytic subunit from the rabbit skeletal muscle protein kinase phosphorylates proteins S1, S4, S9, S13 and S18 of the 30-S subunit and proteins L2, L......4, L5, L16, L18 and L23 of the 50-S subunit with (gamma-32P)ATP as phosphoryl donor. A second protein kinase isolated from rabbit reticulocytes, formerly shown to phosphorylate preferentially acidic proteins and to use GTP as well as ATP, strongly phosphorylated protein S6, an acidic protein...

  1. ATP-dependent arsenical pumps, gene products of the arsenical resistance operon of R-factor R773

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.M.; San Francisco, M.J.D.; Weigel, U.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-05-01

    Plasmid-encoded resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals is frequently through synthesis of new transport systems for extrusion of the toxic compound. The inducible arsenical resistance (ars) operon of the conjugative R-factor R773 encodes two transport systems: one for arsenate and one for arsenite. In vivo studies of the energetics of arsenical extrusion have suggested that ATP is the driving force and that a PNF is neither necessary nor sufficient. The 4.3 Kb HindIII fragment containing the ars operon was cloned into M13 mWB2348 in both orientations, a series of ordered deletions were created using Ba131 digestion, and the sequence of the operon determined. Four open reading frames, arsA, B, C, and D, were found. From genetic evidence, the ArsA and B proteins comprise the arsenite pump, while the ArsC and D proteins are involved in arsenate pumping. The arsA ORF encodes a soluble protein of 63,167 Da with two potential adenylate binding sites. The ArsA protein was purified from the cytosol and shown to bind ATP. The arsB ORF encodes a membrane protein of 31,197 Da. The arsC ORF encodes a membrane protein of 17,311 Da. Mini-Nu phage transposition was used to create gene fusions between the arsC gene and lacZ. By immunoprecipitation and immunoblots using anti-..beta..-galactosidase serum, this strain was shown to produce a 133 kDa hybrid protein localized in inner membrane and not found in the cytosol. The arsD ORF encodes a 15,811 Da soluble protein. The ArsD protein has been purified from the cytosol. In summary, the data suggest that the ars operon produces a single transcript for the synthesis of two resistances and two anion pumps.

  2. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-07-03

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [(3)H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [3H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment. PMID:25991724

  4. In vitro FRAP reveals the ATP-dependent nuclear mobilization of the exon junction complex protein SRm160

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Stefan; Chiosea, Simion; Ivshina, Maria; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new in vitro system for characterizing the binding and mobility of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)–labeled nuclear proteins by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in digitonin-permeabilized cells. This assay reveals that SRm160, a splicing coactivator and component of the exon junction complex (EJC) involved in RNA export, has an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–dependent mobility. Endogenous SRm160, lacking the EGFP moiety, could also be released from sites at splic...

  5. RIG-I forms signaling-competent filaments in an ATP-dependent, ubiquitin-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisley, Alys; Wu, Bin; Yao, Hui; Walz, Thomas; Hur, Sun

    2013-09-12

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) are paralogous receptors for viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with divergent specificity. We have previously shown that MDA5 forms filaments upon viral dsRNA recognition and that this filament formation is essential for interferon signal activation. Here, we show that while RIG-I binds to a dsRNA end as a monomer in the absence of ATP, it assembles in the presence of ATP into a filament that propagates from the dsRNA end to the interior. Furthermore, RIG-I filaments directly stimulate mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) filament formation without any cofactor, such as polyubiquitin chains, and forced juxtaposition of the isolated signaling domain of RIG-I, as it would be in the filament, is sufficient to activate interferon signaling. Our findings thus define filamentous architecture as a common yet versatile molecular platform for divergent viral RNA detection and proximity-induced signal activation by RIG-I and MDA5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantum yields of decomposition and homo-dimerization of solid L-alanine induced by 7.2 eV Vacuum ultraviolet light irradiation: an estimate of the half-life of L-alanine on the surface of space objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yudai; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2011-08-01

    One of the leading hypotheses regarding the origin of prebiotic molecules on primitive Earth is that they formed from inorganic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and were delivered by meteorites, space dust and comets. To evaluate the availability of extraterrestrial amino acids, it is necessary to examine their decomposition and oligomerization rates as induced by extraterrestrial energy sources, such as vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray photons and high energy particles. This paper reports the quantum yields of decomposition ((8.2 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) photon(-1)) and homo-dimerization ((1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-3) photon(-1)) and decomposition of the dimer (0.24 ± 0.06 photon(-1)) of solid L-alanine (Ala) induced by VUV light with an energy of 7.2 eV. Using these quantum yields, the half-life of L-Ala on the surface of a space object in the present earth orbit was estimated to be about 52 days, even when only photons with an energy of 7.2 eV emitted from the present Sun were considered. The actual half-life of solid L-Ala on the surface of a space object orbit around the present day Earth would certainly be much shorter than our estimate, because of the added effect of photons and particles of other energies. Thus, we propose that L-Ala needs to be shielded from solar VUV in protected environments, such as the interior of a meteorite, within a time scale of days after synthesis to ensure its arrival on the primitive Earth.

  7. EARLY IN SHORT DAYS 1 (ESD1) encodes ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN 6 (AtARP6), a putative component of chromatin remodelling complexes that positively regulates FLC accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Trillo, Mar; Lázaro, Ana; Poethig, R Scott; Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Piñeiro, Manuel A; Martinez-Zapater, Jose M; Jarillo, Jose A

    2006-04-01

    We have characterized Arabidopsis esd1 mutations, which cause early flowering independently of photoperiod, moderate increase of hypocotyl length, shortened inflorescence internodes, and altered leaf and flower development. Phenotypic analyses of double mutants with mutations at different loci of the flowering inductive pathways suggest that esd1 abolishes the FLC-mediated late flowering phenotype of plants carrying active alleles of FRI and of mutants of the autonomous pathway. We found that ESD1 is required for the expression of the FLC repressor to levels that inhibit flowering. However, the effect of esd1 in a flc-3 null genetic background and the downregulation of other members of the FLC-like/MAF gene family in esd1 mutants suggest that flowering inhibition mediated by ESD1 occurs through both FLC-and FLC-like gene-dependent pathways. The ESD1 locus was identified through a map-based cloning approach. ESD1 encodes ARP6, a homolog of the actin-related protein family that shares moderate sequence homology with conventional actins. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, we have determined that ARP6 is required for both histone acetylation and methylation of the FLC chromatin in Arabidopsis.

  8. Functional analysis of a Wheat Homeodomain protein, TaR1, reveals that host chromatin remodelling influences the dynamics of the switch to necrotrophic growth in the phytopathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jack; Orosa, Beatriz; Millyard, Linda; Edwards, Martin; Kanyuka, Kostya; Gatehouse, Angharad; Rudd, Jason; Hammond-Kosack, Kim; Pain, Naomi; Sadanandom, Ari

    2015-04-01

    A distinguishing feature of Septoria leaf blotch disease in wheat is the long symptomless growth of the fungus amongst host cells followed by a rapid transition to necrotrophic growth resulting in disease lesions. Global reprogramming of host transcription marks this switch to necrotrophic growth. However no information exists on the components that bring about host transcriptional reprogramming. Gene-silencing, confocal-imaging and protein-protein interaction assays where employed to identify a plant homeodomain (PHD) protein, TaR1 in wheat that plays a critical role during the transition from symptomless to necrotrophic growth of Septoria. TaR1-silenced wheat show earlier symptom development upon Septoria infection but reduced fungal sporulation indicating that TaR1 is key for prolonging the symptomless phase and facilitating Septoria asexual reproduction. TaR1 is localized to the nucleus and binds to wheat Histone 3. Trimethylation of Histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4) and lysine 36 (H3K36) are found on open chromatin with actively transcribed genes, whereas methylation of H3K27 and H3K9 are associated with repressed loci. TaR1 specifically recognizes dimethylated and trimethylated H3K4 peptides suggesting that it regulates transcriptional activation at open chromatin. We conclude that TaR1 is an important component for the pathogen life cycle in wheat that promotes successful colonization by Septoria. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. The absence of the Isw2p-ItcIp chromatin-remodelling complex induces mating type-specific andFlo I Ip-independent invasive growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trachtulcová, Petra; Frýdlová, Ivana; Janatová, Ivana; Hašek, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 21, - (2004), s. 389-401 ISSN 0749-503X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : nitrogen * pheromone response * pseudohyphal Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.941, year: 2004

  10. The Type 1 Homodimeric Reaction Center in Heliobacterium modesticaldum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    In this funding period, we (i) found that strong illumination of Heliobacterium modesticaldum cells results in saturation of the electron acceptor pool, leading to reduction of the acceptor side and the creation of a back-reacting state that gives rise to delayed fluorescence; (ii) noted that when the FX cluster is reduced in purified reaction centers, no electron transfer occurs beyond A0, even though a quinone is present; (iii) observed by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) studies of whole cells of Heliobacterium mobilis that primary charge separation is retained even after conversion of the majority of BChl g to Chl aF. ; and (iv) purified a homogeneous preparation of reaction center cores, which led to promising crystallization trials to obtain a three-dimensional structure.

  11. Evidence for a Homodimeric Structure of Human Monocarboxylate Transporter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, W. Edward; Philp, Nancy J.; van Dijk, Thamar B.; Klootwijk, Wim; Friesema, Edith C. H.; Jansen, Jurgen; Beesley, Philip W.; Ianculescu, Alexandra G.; Visser, Theo J.

    2009-01-01

    The human monocarboxylate transporter 8 (hMCT8) protein mediates transport of thyroid hormone across the plasma membrane. Association of hMCT8 mutations with severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed thyroid hormone levels has established its physiological relevance, but little is still known about the basic properties of hMCT8. In this study we present evidence that hMCT8 does not form heterodimers with the ancillary proteins basigin, embigin, or neuroplastin, unlike other MCTs. In contrast, it is suggested that MCT8 exists as monomer and homodimer in transiently and stably transfected cells. Apparently hMCT8 forms stable dimers because the complex is resistant to denaturing conditions and dithiothreitol. Cotransfection of wild-type hMCT8 with a mutant lacking amino acids 267–360 resulted in formation of homo-and heterodimers of the variants, indicating that transmembrane domains 4–6 are not involved in the dimerization process. Furthermore, we explored the structural and functional role of the 10 Cys residues in hMCT8. All possible Cys>Ala mutants did not behave differently from wild-type hMCT8 in protein expression, cross-linking experiments with HgCl2 and transport function. Our findings indicate that individual Cys residues are not important for the function of hMCT8 or suggest that hMCT8 has other yet-undiscovered functions in which cysteines play an essential role. PMID:19797118

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241408 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241408 J065159I10 At4g31900.1 68417.m04533 chromatin remodeling factor, putative ...strong similarity to chromatin remodeling factor CHD3 (PICKLE) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:6478518; contains P

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242828 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242828 J090067I06 At4g31900.1 68417.m04533 chromatin remodeling factor, putative ...strong similarity to chromatin remodeling factor CHD3 (PICKLE) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:6478518; contains P

  14. Preclinical Evidence of Anti-Tumor Activity Induced by EZH2 Inhibition in Human Models of Synovial Sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kawano

    Full Text Available The catalytic activities of covalent and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling are central to regulating the conformational state of chromatin and the resultant transcriptional output. The enzymes that catalyze these activities are often contained within multiprotein complexes in nature. Two such multiprotein complexes, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 methyltransferase and the SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler have been reported to act in opposition to each other during development and homeostasis. An imbalance in their activities induced by mutations/deletions in complex members (e.g. SMARCB1 has been suggested to be a pathogenic mechanism in certain human cancers. Here we show that preclinical models of synovial sarcoma-a cancer characterized by functional SMARCB1 loss via its displacement from the SWI/SNF complex through the pathognomonic SS18-SSX fusion protein-display sensitivity to pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2. Treatment with tazemetostat, a clinical-stage, selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitor of EZH2 enzymatic activity reverses a subset of synovial sarcoma gene expression and results in concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition and cell death specifically in SS18-SSX fusion-positive cells in vitro. Treatment of mice bearing either a cell line or two patient-derived xenograft models of synovial sarcoma leads to dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition with correlative inhibition of trimethylation levels of the EZH2-specific substrate, lysine 27 on histone H3. These data demonstrate a dependency of SS18-SSX-positive, SMARCB1-deficient synovial sarcomas on EZH2 enzymatic activity and suggests the potential utility of EZH2-targeted drugs in these genetically defined cancers.

  15. CHD7 cooperates with PBAF to control multipotent neural crest formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Ruchi; Chen, Denise A.; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Zhang, Junmei; Xiong, Yiqin; Helms, Jill; Chang, Ching-Pin; Zhao, Yingming; Swigut, Tomek; Wysocka, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding CHD7, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler result in a complex constellation of congenital anomalies called CHARGE syndrome. Here we show that in humans and in Xenopus, CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, a transient cell population that is ectodermal in origin, but undergoes a major gene expression reprogramming to acquire a remarkably broad differentiation potential and ability to migrate throughout the body to give rise to bones, cartilages, nerves, and cardiac structures. We demonstrate that CHD7 function is essential for activation of core components of neural crest transcriptional circuitry, including Sox9, Twist and Slug. Moreover, the major features of CHARGE are recapitulated in Xenopus embryo by the downregulation of CHD7 levels or overexpression of its catalytically inactive ATP-ase mutant. We further show that in human multipotent neural crest cells, CHD7 associates with a BRG1-containing complex PBAF, and both factors co-occupy a neural crest-specific distal SOX9 enhancer, as well as a novel genomic element located upstream from TWIST1 gene and marked by H3K4me1. Furthermore, in the embryo CHD7 and PBAF act synergistically to promote neural crest gene expression and cell migration. Our work identifies an evolutionary conserved role for CHD7 in orchestrating neural crest gene expression programs, provides insights into the synergistic regulation of distal genomic elements by two distinct chromatin remodelers, and illuminates the patho-embryology of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:20130577

  16. Individual Bromodomains of Polybromo-1 Contribute to Chromatin Association and Tumor Suppression in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Elizabeth G; Dykhuizen, Emily C

    2017-02-17

    The architecture of chromatin is governed, in part, by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. These multiprotein complexes contain targeting domains that recognize post-translational marks on histones. One such targeting domain is the bromodomain (BD), which recognizes acetyl-lysines and recruits proteins to sites of acetylation across the genome. Polybromo1 (PBRM1), a subunit of the Polybromo-associated BRG1- or hBRM-associated factors (PBAF) chromatin remodeler, contains six tandem BDs and is frequently mutated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Mutations in the PBRM1 gene often lead to the loss of protein expression; however, missense mutations in PBRM1 have been identified and tend to cluster in the BDs, particularly BD2 and BD4, suggesting that individual BDs are critical for PBRM1 function. To study the role of these six BDs, we inactivated each of the six BDs of PBRM1 and re-expressed these mutants in Caki2 cells (ccRCC cells with the loss of function mutation in PBRM1). Four of the six BDs abrogated PBRM1 tumor suppressor function, gene regulation, and chromatin affinity with the degree of importance correlating strongly to the rate of missense mutations in patients. Furthermore, we identified BD2 as the most critical for PBRM1 and confirmed BD2-mediated association to histone H3 peptides acetylated at lysine 14 (H3K14Ac), validating the importance of this specific acetylation mark for PBRM1 binding. From these data, we conclude that four of the BDs act together to target PBRM1 to sites on chromatin; when a single BD is mutated, PBRM1 no longer controls gene expression properly, leading to increased cell proliferation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. A long non-coding RNA protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pei; Yang, Jin; Shang, Ching; Nuernberg, Sylvia T.; Jin, Kevin Kai; Xu, Weihong; Lin, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Chien-Jung; Xiong, Yiqin; Chien, Huanchieh; Zhou, Bin; Ashley, Euan; Bernstein, Daniel; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Chen, Huei-sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in adult hearts is unknown; also unclear is how lncRNA modulates nucleosome remodeling. An estimated 70% of mouse genes undergo antisense transcription1, including myosin heavy chain 7 (Myh7) that encodes molecular motor proteins for heart contraction2. Here, we identify a cluster of lncRNA transcripts from Myh7 loci and show a new lncRNA–chromatin mechanism for heart failure. In mice, these transcripts, which we named Myosin Heavy Chain Associated RNA Transcripts (MyHEART or Mhrt), are cardiac-specific and abundant in adult hearts. Pathological stress activates the Brg1-Hdac-Parp chromatin repressor complex3 to inhibit Mhrt transcription in the heart. Such stress-induced Mhrt repression is essential for cardiomyopathy to develop: restoring Mhrt to the pre-stress level protects the heart from hypertrophy and failure. Mhrt antagonizes the function of Brg1, a chromatin-remodeling factor that is activated by stress to trigger aberrant gene expression and cardiac myopathy3. Mhrt prevents Brg1 from recognizing its genomic DNA targets, thus inhibiting chromatin targeting and gene regulation by Brg1. Mhrt binds to the helicase domain of Brg1, and this domain is crucial for tethering Brg1 to chromatinized DNA targets. Brg1 helicase has dual nucleic acid-binding specificities: it is capable of binding lncRNA (Mhrt) and chromatinized—but not naked—DNA. This dual-binding feature of helicase enables a competitive inhibition mechanism by which Mhrt sequesters Brg1 from its genomic DNA targets to prevent chromatin remodeling. A Mhrt-Brg1 feedback circuit is thus crucial for heart function. Human MHRT also originates from MYH7 loci and is repressed in various types of myopathic hearts, suggesting a conserved lncRNA mechanism in human cardiomyopathy. Our studies identify the first cardioprotective lncRNA, define a new targeting mechanism for ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors, and establish a new paradigm for lnc

  18. Dbp7p, a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for 60S ribosomal subunit assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DAUGERON, MARIE-CLAIRE; LINDER, PATRICK

    1998-01-01

    .... Subsequent analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicates that this 60S ribosomal subunit deficit is due to a strong decrease in the production of 27S and 7S precursor rRNAs, which leads to reduced...

  19. Profile of the GSK Published Protein Kinase Inhibitor Set Across ATP-Dependent and-Independent Luciferases: Implications for Reporter-Gene Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranchak, Patricia; MacArthur, Ryan; Guha, Rajarshi; Zuercher, William J.; Drewry, David H.; Auld, Douglas S.; Inglese, James

    2013-01-01

    A library of 367 protein kinase inhibitors, the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS), which has been annotated for protein kinase family activity and is available for public screening efforts, was assayed against the commonly used luciferase reporter enzymes from the firefly, Photinus pyralis (FLuc) and marine sea pansy, Renilla reniformis (RLuc). A total of 22 compounds (∼6% of the library) were found to inhibit FLuc with 10 compounds showing potencies ≤1 µM. Only two compounds were found to inhibit RLuc, and these showed relatively weak potency values (∼10 µM). An inhibitor series of the VEGFR2/TIE2 protein kinase family containing either an aryl oxazole or benzimidazole-urea core illustrate the different structure activity relationship profiles FLuc inhibitors can display for kinase inhibitor chemotypes. Several FLuc inhibitors were broadly active toward the tyrosine kinase and CDK families. These data should aid in interpreting the results derived from screens employing the GSK PKIS in cell-based assays using the FLuc reporter. The study also underscores the general need for strategies such as the use of orthogonal reporters to identify kinase or non-kinase mediated cellular responses. PMID:23505445

  20. Profile of the GSK published protein kinase inhibitor set across ATP-dependent and-independent luciferases: implications for reporter-gene assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Dranchak

    Full Text Available A library of 367 protein kinase inhibitors, the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS, which has been annotated for protein kinase family activity and is available for public screening efforts, was assayed against the commonly used luciferase reporter enzymes from the firefly, Photinus pyralis (FLuc and marine sea pansy, Renilla reniformis (RLuc. A total of 22 compounds (∼6% of the library were found to inhibit FLuc with 10 compounds showing potencies ≤1 µM. Only two compounds were found to inhibit RLuc, and these showed relatively weak potency values (∼10 µM. An inhibitor series of the VEGFR2/TIE2 protein kinase family containing either an aryl oxazole or benzimidazole-urea core illustrate the different structure activity relationship profiles FLuc inhibitors can display for kinase inhibitor chemotypes. Several FLuc inhibitors were broadly active toward the tyrosine kinase and CDK families. These data should aid in interpreting the results derived from screens employing the GSK PKIS in cell-based assays using the FLuc reporter. The study also underscores the general need for strategies such as the use of orthogonal reporters to identify kinase or non-kinase mediated cellular responses.

  1. Involvement of an ATP-dependent carboxylase in a CO2-dependent pathway of acetone metabolism by Xanthobacter strain Py2.

    OpenAIRE

    Sluis, M K; Small, F J; Allen, J R; Ensign, S A

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of acetone by the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter strain Py2 was investigated. Cell suspensions of Xanthobacter strain Py2 grown with propylene or glucose as carbon sources were unable to metabolize acetone. The addition of acetone to cultures grown with propylene or glucose resulted in a time-dependent increase in acetone-degrading activity. The degradation of acetone by these cultures was prevented by the addition of rifampin and chloramphenicol, demonstrating that new protein...

  2. Complexes of the ATP-dependent Lon protease and DNA aptamers with G-quadruplexes as a model for developing a nanosensor biomagnetic immunoassay system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiridonova, V. A.; Sizov, V. A.; Kuzmenko, E. O.; Melnichuk, A. V.; Oleinichenko, E. A.; Kudzhaev, A. M.; Rotanova, T. V.; Snigirev, O. V.

    2017-07-01

    The binding to Lon protease through biotinylated aptamers whose structures contain G-quadruplex fragments with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) functionalized by streptavidin was investigated. The conditions of binding of target aptamers to MNPs are met. The resulting complexes are proposed for detection of Lon protease in different biological sources and for constructing a novel biomagnetic nanosensor immunoassay system.

  3. Solution NMR structure of the HLTF HIRAN domain: a conserved module in SWI2/SNF2 DNA damage tolerance proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M. [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Neculai, Dante [Zhejiang University, School of Medicine (China); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Cancer Biology (United States); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States)

    2016-11-15

    HLTF is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme that acts in the error-free branch of DNA damage tolerance (DDT), a cellular mechanism that enables replication of damaged DNA while leaving damage repair for a later time. Human HLTF and a closely related protein SHPRH, as well as their yeast homologue Rad5, are multi-functional enzymes that share E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity required for activation of the error-free DDT. HLTF and Rad5 also function as ATP-dependent dsDNA translocases and possess replication fork reversal activities. Thus, they can convert Y-shaped replication forks into X-shaped Holliday junction structures that allow error-free replication over DNA lesions. The fork reversal activity of HLTF is dependent on 3′-ssDNA-end binding activity of its N-terminal HIRAN domain. Here we present the solution NMR structure of the human HLTF HIRAN domain, an OB-like fold module found in organisms from bacteria (as a stand-alone domain) to plants, fungi and metazoan (in combination with SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like domain). The obtained structure of free HLTF HIRAN is similar to recently reported structures of its DNA bound form, while the NMR analysis also reveals that the DNA binding site of the free domain exhibits conformational heterogeneity. Sequence comparison of N-terminal regions of HLTF, SHPRH and Rad5 aided by knowledge of the HLTF HIRAN structure suggests that the SHPRH N-terminus also includes an uncharacterized structured module, exhibiting weak sequence similarity with HIRAN regions of HLTF and Rad5, and potentially playing a similar functional role.

  4. Two-step Mechanism for Modifier of Transcription 1 (Mot1) Enzyme-catalyzed Displacement of TATA-binding Protein (TBP) from DNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle-Heyrman, Georgette; Viswanathan, Ramya; Widom, Jonathan; Auble, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The TATA box binding protein (TBP) is a central component of the transcription preinitiation complex, and its occupancy at a promoter is correlated with transcription levels. The TBP-promoter DNA complex contains sharply bent DNA and its interaction lifetime is limited by the ATP-dependent TBP displacement activity of the Snf2/Swi2 ATPase Mot1. Several mechanisms for Mot1 action have been proposed, but how it catalyzes TBP removal from DNA is unknown. To better understand the Mot1 mechanism, native gel electrophoresis and FRET were used to determine how Mot1 affects the trajectory of DNA in the TBP-DNA complex. Strikingly, in the absence of ATP, Mot1 acts to unbend DNA, whereas TBP remains closely associated with the DNA in a stable Mot1-TBP-DNA ternary complex. Interestingly, and in contrast to full-length Mot1, the isolated Mot1 ATPase domain binds DNA, and its affinity for DNA is nucleotide-dependent, suggesting parallels between the Mot1 mechanism and DNA translocation-based mechanisms of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Based on these findings, a model is presented for Mot1 that links a DNA conformational change with ATP-induced DNA translocation. PMID:22298788

  5. Two-step mechanism for modifier of transcription 1 (Mot1) enzyme-catalyzed displacement of TATA-binding protein (TBP) from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle-Heyrman, Georgette; Viswanathan, Ramya; Widom, Jonathan; Auble, David T

    2012-03-16

    The TATA box binding protein (TBP) is a central component of the transcription preinitiation complex, and its occupancy at a promoter is correlated with transcription levels. The TBP-promoter DNA complex contains sharply bent DNA and its interaction lifetime is limited by the ATP-dependent TBP displacement activity of the Snf2/Swi2 ATPase Mot1. Several mechanisms for Mot1 action have been proposed, but how it catalyzes TBP removal from DNA is unknown. To better understand the Mot1 mechanism, native gel electrophoresis and FRET were used to determine how Mot1 affects the trajectory of DNA in the TBP-DNA complex. Strikingly, in the absence of ATP, Mot1 acts to unbend DNA, whereas TBP remains closely associated with the DNA in a stable Mot1-TBP-DNA ternary complex. Interestingly, and in contrast to full-length Mot1, the isolated Mot1 ATPase domain binds DNA, and its affinity for DNA is nucleotide-dependent, suggesting parallels between the Mot1 mechanism and DNA translocation-based mechanisms of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Based on these findings, a model is presented for Mot1 that links a DNA conformational change with ATP-induced DNA translocation.

  6. ATP-independent cooperative binding of yeast Isw1a to bare and nucleosomal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne De Cian

    Full Text Available Among chromatin remodeling factors, the ISWI family displays a nucleosome-enhanced ATPase activity coupled to DNA translocation. While these enzymes are known to bind to DNA, their activity has not been fully characterized. Here we use TEM imaging and single molecule manipulation to investigate the interaction between DNA and yeast Isw1a. We show that Isw1a displays a highly cooperative ATP-independent binding to and bridging between DNA segments. Under appropriate tension, rare single nucleation events can sometimes be observed and loop DNA with a regular step. These nucleation events are often followed by binding of successive complexes bridging between nearby DNA segments in a zipper-like fashion, as confirmed by TEM observations. On nucleosomal substrates, we show that the specific ATP-dependent remodeling activity occurs in the context of cooperative Isw1a complexes bridging extranucleosomal DNA. Our results are interpreted in the context of the recently published partial structure of Isw1a and support its acting as a "protein ruler" (with possibly more than one tick.

  7. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Nicolai

    Full Text Available The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER known as transcription coupled repair (TCR. CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  8. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB) Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Serena; Filippi, Silvia; Caputo, Manuela; Cipak, Lubos; Gregan, Juraj; Ammerer, Gustav; Frontini, Mattia; Willems, Daniela; Prantera, Giorgio; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) known as transcription coupled repair (TCR). CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP) technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  9. ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang (Harvard-Med); (Ottawa Hosp.); (MSKCC); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston); (Tsinghua); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

    2011-07-19

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  10. ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

    2011-12-31

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  11. ISWI regulates higher-order chromatin structure and histone H1 assembly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide F V Corona

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Imitation SWI (ISWI and other ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors play key roles in transcription and other processes by altering the structure and positioning of nucleosomes. Recent studies have also implicated ISWI in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure, but its role in this process remains poorly understood. To clarify the role of ISWI in vivo, we examined defects in chromosome structure and gene expression resulting from the loss of Iswi function in Drosophila. Consistent with a broad role in transcriptional regulation, the expression of a large number of genes is altered in Iswi mutant larvae. The expression of a dominant-negative form of ISWI leads to dramatic alterations in higher-order chromatin structure, including the apparent decondensation of both mitotic and polytene chromosomes. The loss of ISWI function does not cause obvious defects in nucleosome assembly, but results in a significant reduction in the level of histone H1 associated with chromatin in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI plays a global role in chromatin compaction in vivo by promoting the association of the linker histone H1 with chromatin.

  12. Chromatin—a global buffer for eukaryotic gene control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Moshkin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of eukaryotic DNA is embedded into nucleosome arrays formed by DNA wrapped around a core histone octamer. Nucleosome is a fundamental repeating unit of chromatin guarding access to the genetic information. Here, I will discuss two facets of nucleosome in eukaryotic gene control. On the one hand, nucleosome acts as a regulatory unit, which controls gene switches through a set of post-translational modifications occurring on histone tails. On the other hand, global configuration of nucleosome arrays with respect to nucleosome positioning, spacing and turnover acts as a tuning parameter for all genomic functions. A “histone code” hypothesis extents the Jacob-Monod model for eukaryotic gene control; however, when considering factors capable of reconfiguring entire nucleosome array, such as ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, this model becomes limited. Global changes in nucleosome arrays will be sensed by every gene, yet the transcriptional responses might be specific and appear as gene targeted events. What determines such specificity is unclear, but it’s likely to depend on initial gene settings, such as availability of transcription factors, and on configuration of new nucleosome array state.

  13. The Composition of the Arabidopsis RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation Complex Reveals the Interplay between Elongation and mRNA Processing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosz, Wojciech; Pfab, Alexander; Ehrnsberger, Hans F; Holzinger, Philipp; Köllen, Karin; Mortensen, Simon A; Bruckmann, Astrid; Schubert, Thomas; Längst, Gernot; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Schubert, Veit; Grasser, Marion; Grasser, Klaus D

    2017-04-01

    Transcript elongation factors (TEFs) are a heterogeneous group of proteins that control the efficiency of transcript elongation of subsets of genes by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in the chromatin context. Using reciprocal tagging in combination with affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis thaliana , the TEFs SPT4/SPT5, SPT6, FACT, PAF1-C, and TFIIS copurified with each other and with elongating RNAPII, while P-TEFb was not among the interactors. Additionally, NAP1 histone chaperones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors, and some histone-modifying enzymes including Elongator were repeatedly found associated with TEFs. Analysis of double mutant plants defective in different combinations of TEFs revealed genetic interactions between genes encoding subunits of PAF1-C, FACT, and TFIIS, resulting in synergistic/epistatic effects on plant growth/development. Analysis of subnuclear localization, gene expression, and chromatin association did not provide evidence for an involvement of the TEFs in transcription by RNAPI (or RNAPIII). Proteomics analyses also revealed multiple interactions between the transcript elongation complex and factors involved in mRNA splicing and polyadenylation, including an association of PAF1-C with the polyadenylation factor CstF. Therefore, the RNAPII transcript elongation complex represents a platform for interactions among different TEFs, as well as for coordinating ongoing transcription with mRNA processing. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. BAF200 is required for heart morphogenesis and coronary artery development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjuan He

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes utilize ATP hydrolysis to non-covalently change nucleosome-DNA interactions and are essential in stem cell development, organogenesis, and tumorigenesis. Biochemical studies show that SWI/SNF in mammalian cells can be divided into two subcomplexes BAF and PBAF based on the subunit composition. ARID2 or BAF200 has been defined as an intrinsic subunit of PBAF complex. However, the function of BAF200 in vivo is not clear. To dissect the possible role of BAF200 in regulating embryogenesis and organ development, we generated BAF200 mutant mice and found they were embryonic lethal. BAF200 mutant embryos exhibited multiple cardiac defects including thin myocardium, ventricular septum defect, common atrioventricular valve, and double outlet right ventricle around E14.5. Moreover, we also detected reduced intramyocardial coronary arteries in BAF200 mutants, suggesting that BAF200 is required for proper migration and differentiation of subepicardial venous cells into arterial endothelial cells. Our work revealed that PBAF complex plays a critical role in heart morphogenesis and coronary artery angiogenesis.

  15. Congenital Disseminated Extrarenal Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjemaa, Sabah; Petit, Arnaud; Dainese, Linda; Bourdeaut, Franck; Lipsett, Jill; Coulomb, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue tumors arising in association with genetic or malformation syndromes have been increasingly reported. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a highly aggressive neoplasm of infancy and young childhood, characterized by typical morphology and biallelic inactivation of the SMARCB1 (INI1/hSNF5/BAF47) gene on chromosome 22q.2 which encodes a subunit of the SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex. Congenital infantile disseminated MRT represents a unique clinicopathologic presentation of this tumor. We report a case occurring in a female neonate who presented at birth a voluminous left thigh mass. Surgical biopsy performed at day 9 showed morphology and immunoprofile of MRT. Staging evaluation identified hypercalcemia and distant nodules. The mass showed rapid growth. Despite chemotherapy, the tumor progressed with exteriorization through the biopsy scar. Chemotherapy was discontinued and treatment limited to palliative care and the child died on day 51. The tumor was homozygous for the SMARCB1 deletion with apparent de novo heterozygous germ line deletion in the infant, not identified in the parents.

  16. Genetic and epigenetic control of plant heat responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzhong eLiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved sophisticated genetic and epigenetic regulatory systems to respond quickly to unfavorable environmental conditions such as heat, cold, drought, and pathogen infections. In particular, heat greatly affects plant growth and development, immunity and circadian rhythm, and poses a serious threat to the global food supply. According to temperatures exposing, heat can be usually classified as warm ambient temperature (about 22-27℃, high temperature (27-30℃ and extremely high temperature (37-42℃, also known as heat stress for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The genetic mechanisms of plant responses to heat have been well studied, mainly focusing on elevated ambient temperature-mediated morphological acclimation and acceleration of flowering, modulation of plant immunity and circadian clock by high temperatures, and thermotolerance to heat stress. Recently, great progress has been achieved on epigenetic regulation of heat responses, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, histone chaperones, small RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and other undefined epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic modifications regulate the expression of heat-responsive genes and function to prevent heat-related damage. This review focuses on recent progresses regarding the genetic and epigenetic control of heat responses in plants, and pays more attention to the role of the major epigenetic mechanisms in plant heat responses. Further research perspectives are also discussed.

  17. The CHD3 Remodeler PICKLE Promotes Trimethylation of Histone H3 Lysine 27*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Rider, Stanley Dean; Henderson, James T.; Fountain, Matthew; Chuang, King; Kandachar, Vasundhara; Simons, Alexis; Edenberg, Howard J.; Romero-Severson, Jeanne; Muir, William M.; Ogas, Joe

    2008-01-01

    CHD3 proteins are ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers that contribute to repression of developmentally regulated genes in both animal and plant systems. In animals, this repression has been linked to a multiple subunit complex, Mi-2/NuRD, whose constituents include a CHD3 protein, a histone deacetylase, and a methyl-CpG-binding domain protein. In Arabidopsis, PICKLE (PKL) codes for a CHD3 protein that acts during germination to repress expression of seed-associated genes. Repression of seed-associated traits is promoted in pkl seedlings by the plant growth regulator gibberellin (GA). We undertook a microarray analysis to determine how PKL and GA act to promote the transition from seed to seedling. We found that PKL and GA act in separate pathways to repress expression of seed-specific genes. Comparison of genomic datasets revealed that PKL-dependent genes are enriched for trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), a repressive epigenetic mark. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate that PKL promotes H3K27me3 in both germinating seedlings and in adult plants but do not identify a connection between PKL-dependent expression and acetylation levels. Taken together, our analyses illuminate a new pathway by which CHD3 remodelers contribute to repression in eukaryotes. PMID:18539592

  18. Deletion of SMARCA4 impairs alveolar epithelial type II cells proliferation and aggravates pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyi Peng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs injury and failed reconstitution of the AECs barrier are both integral to alveolar flooding and subsequent pulmonary fibrosis (PF. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms regulating the regeneration of AECs post-injury still remain unclear. SMARCA4 is a part of the large ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complex SWI/SNF, which is essential for kidney and heart fibrosis. We investigates SMARCA4 function in lung fibrosis by establishing PF mice model with bleomycin firstly and found that the expression of SMARCA4 was mainly enhanced in alveolar type II (ATII cells. Moreover, we established an alveolar epithelium-specific SMARCA4-deleted SP-C-rtTA/(tetO7-Cre/SMARCA4f/f mice (SOSM4Δ/Δ model, as well as a new SMARCA4-deleted alveolar type II (ATII-like mle-12 cell line. We found that the bleomycin-induced PF was more aggressive in SOSM4Δ/Δ mice. Also, the proliferation of ATII cells was decreased with the loss of SMARCA4 in vivo and in vitro. In addition, we observed increased proliferation of ATII cells accompanied by abnormally high expression of SMARCA4 in human PF lung sections. These data uncovered the indispensable role of SMARCA4 in the proliferation of ATII cells, which might affect the progression of PF.

  19. Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulates the Histone Code for Long-Term Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koshibu, Kyoko; Graff, Johannes; Beullens, Monique; Heitz, Fabrice D; Berchtold, Dominik; Russig, Holger; Farinelli, Melissa; Bollen, Mathieu; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling through histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and DNA methylation has recently been implicated in cognitive functions, but the mechanisms involved in such epigenetic regulation remain poorly understood...

  20. Fetal metabolic programming and epigenetic modifications: a systems biology approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sookoian, Silvia; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Burgueño, Adriana L; Pirola, Carlos J

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the notion that epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, both involving chromatin remodeling, contribute to fetal metabolic programming...

  1. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  2. Bis-intercalation of homodimeric thiazole orange dye derivatives in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, M; Hamed, A A; Pedersen, E B; Jacobsen, J P

    1999-01-01

    The thiazole orange dye 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4, 8-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-[(3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-2(3H)-benzo-1 ,3-thiazolylidene)methyl]quinolinium tetraiodide (TOTO) binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in a sequence selective bis-intercalation. We have examined the binding of derivatives of TOTO with different substituents on the benzothiazole ring. The analogues are the following: 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4, 8-diazaundecamethylene)-[4-[3-(benzyl-2, 3-dihydro-2-(3H)-benzothiazolylidene)methyl]quinolinium]-[4-[3-(++ +methy l-2, 3-dihydro-2-(3H)-benzothiazolylidene)methyl]quinolinium]tetraio dide (TOTOBzl) and 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4, 8-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-[(3-ethyl-2,3-dihydro-2(3H)-benzo-1, 3-thiazole)methyl]quinolinium tetraiodide (TOTOEt). In this paper, we report the synthesis of TOTOBzl and TOTOEt together with the one- and two-dimensional 1H NMR investigations of complexes between these TOTO analogues and the dsDNA oligonucleotide d(CGCTAGCG)2. Both analogues yield extremely stable complexes in which each chromophore is sandwiched between two base pairs in a (5'-CpT-3'):(5'-ApG-3') site. The linker spans over two base pairs in the minor groove. The benzyl group in TOTOBzl and the ethyl groups in TOTOEt is pointing outward in the major groove.

  3. Concerted intercalation and minor groove recognition of DNA by a homodimeric thiazole orange dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkenborg, J; Gadjev, N I; Deligeorgiev, T; Jacobsen, J P

    2000-01-01

    The thiazole orange dye TOTO binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by a sequence selective bis-intercalation. Each chromophore is sandwiched between two base pairs in a (5'-CpT-3'):(5'-ApG-3') site, and the linker spans two base pairs in the minor groove. We have used one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to examine the dsDNA binding of an analogue of TOTO in which the linker has been modified to contain a bipyridyl group (viologen) that has minor groove binding properties. We have investigated the binding of this analogue, called TOTOBIPY, to three different dsDNA sequences containing a 5'-CTAG-3', a 5'-CTTAG-3', and a 5'-CTATAG-3' sites, respectively, demonstrating that TOTOBIPY prefers to span three base pairs. The many intermolecular NOE connectivities between TOTOBIPY and the d(CGCTTAGCG):d(CGCTAAGCG) oligonucleotide in the complex shows that the bipyridyl-containing linker is positioned in the minor groove and spans three base pairs. Consequently, we have succeeded in designing and synthesizing a ligand that recognizes an extended recognition sequence of dsDNA as the result of a concerted intercalation and minor groove binding mode.

  4. Concerted intercalation and minor groove recognition of DNA by a homodimeric thiazole orange dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Gadjev, N I; Deligeorgiev, T

    2000-01-01

    The thiazole orange dye TOTO binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by a sequence selective bis-intercalation. Each chromophore is sandwiched between two base pairs in a (5'-CpT-3'):(5'-ApG-3') site, and the linker spans two base pairs in the minor groove. We have used one- and two-dimensional NMR...

  5. Z-Selective Homodimerization of Terminal Olefins with a Ruthenium Metathesis Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitz, Benjamin K.; Endo, Koji; Herbert, Myles B.

    2011-01-01

    The cross-metathesis of terminal olefins using a novel ruthenium catalyst results in excellent selectivity for the Z-olefin homodimer. The reaction was found to tolerate a large number of functional groups, solvents, and temperatures while maintaining excellent Z-selectivity, even at high reaction conversions. PMID:21649443

  6. Phenylmethimazole Blocks dsRNA-Induced IRF3 Nuclear Translocation and Homodimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Courreges

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies revealed that phenylmethimazole (C10 inhibits IRF3 signaling, preventing dsRNA-induction of type 1 interferon gene expression, production, and downstream signaling. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis for C10 inhibition of dsRNA-stimulated IRF3 signaling. IRF-3 Trans-AM assays were used to measure C10 effects on dsRNA induction of IRF3 DNA binding. Green fluorescent protein-labeled IRF3 was used to measure C10 effects on dsRNA-induced IRF3 nuclear translocation. Native PAGE, SDS PAGE, and western blotting were used to identify effects of C10 on IRF3 homodimer formation and phosphorylation, respectively. There was a significant impairment of dsRNA-induced IRF3 DNA binding activity in human embryonic kidney and pancreatic cancer cells with C10 treatment. C10 also blocked dsRNA-induced IRF3 nuclear translocation and homodimer formation without blocking serine 396 phosphorylation of IRF3. Together, these results indicate that C10 interferes with IRF3 signaling by blocking dsRNA-induced IRF3 homodimer formation, a prerequisite for nuclear translocation and DNA binding activities.

  7. Localization of the substrate binding site in the homodimeric mannitol transporter, EIImtl, of Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opacic, Milena; Vos, Erwin P. P.; Hesp, Ben H.; Broos, Jaap

    2010-01-01

    The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EIImtl, belongs to a class of membrane proteins coupling the transport of substrates with their chemical modification. EIImtl is functional as a homodimer, and it harbors one high affinity mannitol-binding site in the membrane-embedded C domain

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR052W, YER092W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions Rows with this prey as prey (2) Rows with this...INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions Rows with this prey as prey Rows with this prey

  9. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR423C, YER092W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions Rows with this prey as prey (2) Rows with this...INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions Rows with this prey as prey Rows with this prey

  10. Gclust Server: 164329 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions 1 1.00e-60 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 12.5 Show 164329...INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions Number of Sequences 1 Homologs 1 Clustering threshold

  11. Gclust Server: 30156 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions 3 1.00e-25 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 37.5 Show 30156...INO80 chromatin remodeling complex under low-salt conditions Number of Sequences 3 Homologs 3 Clustering threshold

  12. BAZ1B is dispensable for H2AX phosphorylation on Tyrosine 142 during spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler J. Broering

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is precisely regulated by the factors involved in DNA damage response in somatic cells. Among them, phosphorylation of H2AX on Serine 139 (γH2AX is an essential signal for the silencing of unsynapsed sex chromosomes during male meiosis. However, it remains unknown how adjacent H2AX phosphorylation on Tyrosine 142 (pTyr142 is regulated in meiosis. Here we investigate the meiotic functions of BAZ1B (WSTF, the only known Tyr142 kinase in somatic cells, using mice possessing a conditional deletion of BAZ1B. Although BAZ1B deletion causes ectopic γH2AX signals on synapsed autosomes during the early pachytene stage, BAZ1B is dispensable for fertility and critical events during spermatogenesis. BAZ1B deletion does not alter events on unsynapsed axes and pericentric heterochromatin formation. Furthermore, BAZ1B is dispensable for localization of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling protein SMARCA5 (SNF2h during spermatogenesis despite the complex formation between BAZ1B and SMARCA5, known as the WICH complex, in somatic cells. Notably, pTyr142 is regulated independently of BAZ1B and is dephosphorylated on the sex chromosomes during meiosis in contrast with the presence of adjacent γH2AX. Dephosphorylation of pTyr142 is regulated by MDC1, a binding partner of γH2AX. These results reveal the distinct regulation of two adjacent phosphorylation sites of H2AX during meiosis, and suggest that another kinase mediates Tyr142 phosphorylation.

  13. Cloning and characterization of a novel alternatively spliced transcript of the human CHD7 putative helicase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa Ricardo G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CHD7 (Chromodomain Helicase DNA binding protein 7 gene encodes a member of the chromodomain family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes. Mutations in the CHD7 gene are found in individuals with CHARGE, a syndrome characterized by multiple birth malformations in several tissues. CHD7 was identified as a binding partner of PBAF complex (Polybromo and BRG Associated Factor containing complex playing a central role in the transcriptional reprogramming process associated to the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest, a transient cell population associated with the genesis of various tissues. CHD7 is a large gene containing 38 annotated exons and spanning 200 kb of genomic sequence. Although genes containing such number of exons are expected to have several alternative transcripts, there are very few evidences of alternative transcripts associated to CHD7 to date indicating that alternative splicing associated to this gene is poorly characterized. Findings Here, we report the cloning and characterization by experimental and computational studies of a novel alternative transcript of the human CHD7 (named CHD7 CRA_e, which lacks most of its coding exons. We confirmed by overexpression of CHD7 CRA_e alternative transcript that it is translated into a protein isoform lacking most of the domains displayed by the canonical isoform. Expression of the CHD7 CRA_e transcript was detected in normal liver, in addition to the DU145 human prostate carcinoma cell line from which it was originally isolated. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the splicing event associated to the CHD7 CRA_e alternative transcript is functional. The characterization of the CHD7 CRA_e novel isoform presented here not only sets the basis for more detailed functional studies of this isoform, but, also, contributes to the alternative splicing annotation of the CHD7 gene and the design of future functional studies aimed at the elucidation of the

  14. Insight into the machinery that oils chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Roni H G; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Oliva, Baldomero; Beato, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The packaging of genetic information in form of chromatin within the nucleus provides cells with the ability to store and protect massive amounts of information within a compact space. Storing information within chromatin allows selective access to specific DNA sequences by regulating the various levels of chromatin structure from nucleosomes, to chromatin fibers, loops and topological associating domains (TADs) using mechanisms that are being progressively unravelled. However, a relatively unexplored aspect is the energetic cost of changing the chromatin configuration to gain access to DNA information. Among the enzymes responsible for regulating chromatin access are the ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers that act on nucleosomes and use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to make chromatin DNA more accessible. It is assumed that the ATP used by these enzymes is provided by the mitochondria or by cytoplasmic glycolysis. We hypothesize that though this may be the case for cells in steady state, when gene expression has to be globally reprogramed in response to externals signals or stress conditions, the cell directs energy production to the cell nucleus, where rapid chromatin reorganization is needed for cell survival. We discovered that in response to hormones a nuclear ATP synthesis mechanism is activated that utilizing ADP-ribose and pyrophosphate as substrates. 1 This extra view aims to put this process within its historical context, to describe the enzymatic steps in detail, to propose a possible structure of the ATP synthesising enzyme, and to shed light on how this may link to other reactions within the cell providing a perspective for future lines of investigation.

  15. Cluster (Cyanobacteria): 1160286:203 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1160286:203 Tyrocidine synthase 3 (Includes: ATP-dependent asparagine adenylase ; ATP-dependent... glutamine adenylase ; ATP-dependent tyrosine adenylase ; ATP-dependent valine adenylase ; ATP-dependent... ornithine adenylase ; ATP-dependent leucine adenylase) (fragment) 1126:871 ...

  16. Hotspots in an obligate homodimeric anticancer target. Structural and functional effects of interfacial mutations in human thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Tochowicz, Anna; Pozzi, Cecilia; Cardinale, Daniela; Ferrari, Stefania; Boum, Yap; Mangani, Stefano; Stroud, Robert M; Saxena, Puneet; Myllykallio, Hannu; Costi, Maria Paola; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C

    2015-04-23

    Human thymidylate synthase (hTS), a target for antiproliferative drugs, is an obligate homodimer. Single-point mutations to alanine at the monomer-monomer interface may enable the identification of specific residues that delineate sites for drugs aimed at perturbing the protein-protein interactions critical for activity. We computationally identified putative hotspot residues at the interface and designed mutants to perturb the intersubunit interaction. Dimer dissociation constants measured by a FRET-based assay range from 60 nM for wild-type hTS up to about 1 mM for single-point mutants and agree with computational predictions of the effects of these mutations. Mutations that are remote from the active site retain full or partial activity, although the substrate KM values were generally higher and the dimer was less stable. The lower dimer stability of the mutants can facilitate access to the dimer interface by small molecules and thereby aid the design of inhibitors that bind at the dimer interface.

  17. Genomic, RNAseq, and Molecular Modeling Evidence Suggests That the Major Allergen Domain in Insects Evolved from a Homodimeric Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Thomas A.; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects. PMID:24253356

  18. An in vivo photo-cross-linking approach reveals a homodimerization domain of Aha1 in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Berg

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in almost any biological processes. Therefore, there is a particular need for methods which describe the interactions of a defined target protein in its physiological context. Here we report a method to photo-cross-link interacting proteins in S. cerevisiae by using the non-canonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzpa. Based on the expanded genetic code the photoreactive non-canonical amino acid pAzpa was site-specifically incorporated at eight positions into a domain of Aha1 that was previously described to bind Hsp90 in vitro to function as a cochaperone of Hsp90 and activates its ATPase activity. In vivo photo-cross-linking to the cognate binding partner of Aha1 was carried out by irradiation of mutant strains with UV light (365 nm to induce covalent intermolecular bonds. Surprisingly, an interaction between Aha1 and Hsp90 was not detected, although, we could confirm binding of suppressed pAzpa containing Aha1 to Hsp90 by native co-immunoprecipitation. However, a homodimer consisting of two covalently crosslinked Aha1 monomers was identified by mass spectrometry. This homodimer could also be confirmed using p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine, another photoreactive non-canonical amino acid. Crosslinking was highly specific as it was dependent on irradiation using UV light, the exact position of the non-canonical amino acid in the protein sequence as well as on the addition of the non-canonical amino acid to the growth medium. Therefore it seems possible that an interaction of Aha1 with Hsp90 takes place at different positions than previously described in vitro highlighting the importance of in vivo techniques to study protein-protein interactions. Accordingly, the expanded genetic code can easily be applied to other S. cerevisiae proteins to study their interaction under physiological relevant conditions in vivo.

  19. An In Vivo Photo-Cross-Linking Approach Reveals a Homodimerization Domain of Aha1 in S. cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael; Michalowski, Annette; Palzer, Silke; Rupp, Steffen; Sohn, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in almost any biological processes. Therefore, there is a particular need for methods which describe the interactions of a defined target protein in its physiological context. Here we report a method to photo-cross-link interacting proteins in S. cerevisiae by using the non-canonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzpa). Based on the expanded genetic code the photoreactive non-canonical amino acid pAzpa was site-specifically incorporated at eight positions into a domain of Aha1 that was previously described to bind Hsp90 in vitro to function as a cochaperone of Hsp90 and activates its ATPase activity. In vivo photo-cross-linking to the cognate binding partner of Aha1 was carried out by irradiation of mutant strains with UV light (365 nm) to induce covalent intermolecular bonds. Surprisingly, an interaction between Aha1 and Hsp90 was not detected, although, we could confirm binding of suppressed pAzpa containing Aha1 to Hsp90 by native co-immunoprecipitation. However, a homodimer consisting of two covalently crosslinked Aha1 monomers was identified by mass spectrometry. This homodimer could also be confirmed using p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine, another photoreactive non-canonical amino acid. Crosslinking was highly specific as it was dependent on irradiation using UV light, the exact position of the non-canonical amino acid in the protein sequence as well as on the addition of the non-canonical amino acid to the growth medium. Therefore it seems possible that an interaction of Aha1 with Hsp90 takes place at different positions than previously described in vitro highlighting the importance of in vivo techniques to study protein-protein interactions. Accordingly, the expanded genetic code can easily be applied to other S. cerevisiae proteins to study their interaction under physiological relevant conditions in vivo. PMID:24614167

  20. An in vivo photo-cross-linking approach reveals a homodimerization domain of Aha1 in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael; Michalowski, Annette; Palzer, Silke; Rupp, Steffen; Sohn, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in almost any biological processes. Therefore, there is a particular need for methods which describe the interactions of a defined target protein in its physiological context. Here we report a method to photo-cross-link interacting proteins in S. cerevisiae by using the non-canonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzpa). Based on the expanded genetic code the photoreactive non-canonical amino acid pAzpa was site-specifically incorporated at eight positions into a domain of Aha1 that was previously described to bind Hsp90 in vitro to function as a cochaperone of Hsp90 and activates its ATPase activity. In vivo photo-cross-linking to the cognate binding partner of Aha1 was carried out by irradiation of mutant strains with UV light (365 nm) to induce covalent intermolecular bonds. Surprisingly, an interaction between Aha1 and Hsp90 was not detected, although, we could confirm binding of suppressed pAzpa containing Aha1 to Hsp90 by native co-immunoprecipitation. However, a homodimer consisting of two covalently crosslinked Aha1 monomers was identified by mass spectrometry. This homodimer could also be confirmed using p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine, another photoreactive non-canonical amino acid. Crosslinking was highly specific as it was dependent on irradiation using UV light, the exact position of the non-canonical amino acid in the protein sequence as well as on the addition of the non-canonical amino acid to the growth medium. Therefore it seems possible that an interaction of Aha1 with Hsp90 takes place at different positions than previously described in vitro highlighting the importance of in vivo techniques to study protein-protein interactions. Accordingly, the expanded genetic code can easily be applied to other S. cerevisiae proteins to study their interaction under physiological relevant conditions in vivo.

  1. A homodimeric complex of HLA-G on normal trophoblast cells modulates antigen-presenting cells via LILRB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Richard; Gardner, Lucy; Sharkey, Andrew M; Holmes, Nick; Moffett, Ashley

    2007-07-01

    In healthy individuals, the non-classical MHC molecule HLA-G is only expressed on fetal trophoblast cells that invade the decidua during placentation. We show that a significant proportion of HLA-G at the surface of normal human trophoblast cells is present as a disulphide-linked homodimer of the conventional beta(2)m-associated HLA-I complex. HLA-G is a ligand for leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR), which bind much more efficiently to dimeric HLA-G than to conventional HLA-I molecules. We find that a LILRB1-Fc fusion protein preferentially binds the dimeric form of HLA-G on trophoblast cells. We detect LILRB1 expression on decidual myelomonocytic cells; therefore, trophoblast HLA-G may modulate the function of these cells. Co-culture with HLA-G(+) cells does not inhibit monocyte-derived dendritic cell up-regulation of HLA-DR and costimulatory molecules on maturation, but did increase production of IL-6 and IL-10. Furthermore, proliferation of allogeneic lymphocytes was inhibited by HLA-G binding to LILRB1/2 on responding antigen-presenting cells (APC). As HLA-G is the only HLA-I molecule that forms beta(2)m-associated dimers with increased avidity for LILRB1, this interaction could represent a placental-specific signal to decidual APC. We suggest that the placenta is modulating maternal immune responses locally in the uterus through HLA-G, a trophoblast-specific, monomorphic signal present in almost every pregnancy. See accompanying commentary: (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.200737515).

  2. A homodimeric complex of HLA-G on normal trophoblast cells modulates antigen-presenting cells via LILRB1

    OpenAIRE

    Apps, Richard; Gardner, Lucy; Sharkey, Andrew M.; Holmes, Nick; Moffett, Ashley

    2007-01-01

    In healthy individuals, the non-classical MHC molecule HLA-G is only expressed on fetal trophoblast cells that invade the decidua during placentation. We show that a significant proportion of HLA-G at the surface of normal human trophoblast cells is present as a disulphide-linked homodimer of the conventional ?2m-associated HLA-I complex. HLA-G is a ligand for leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR), which bind much more efficiently to dimeric HLA-G than to conventional HLA-I molecules...

  3. Function of histone deacetylase inhibitors in inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabiec, Aleksander M.; Tak, Paul P.; Reedquist, Kris A.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multi-faceted roles in coordinating the interaction of intracellular signaling pathways with chromatin remodeling and transcription factor function to finely specify gene alterations and maintenance of gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation,

  4. BRCA 1-Mediated Histone Monoubiquitylation: Effect on Nucleosome Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2008-01-01

    BRCA1, the protein product of the Breast Cancer Susceptibility Gene (BRCA1) has been implicated in multiple pathways that preserve genome stability, including cell cycle control, DNA repair, transcription, and chromatin remodeling...

  5. Brain plasticity and cognitive functions after ethanol consumption in C57BL/6J mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stragier, E; Martin, V; Davenas, E; Poilbout, C; Mongeau, R; Corradetti, R; Lanfumey, L

    2015-01-01

    .... However, we recently reported that chronic and moderate ethanol intake in C57BL/6J mice induced chromatin remodeling within the Bdnf promoters, leading to both enhanced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF...

  6. Protamine 3 expressions in crossbred bull spermatozoa may not be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... To differentiate finally into spermatozoa, haploid sperma- tids undergo complex morphological and physiological changes during spermatogenesis. These changes include chromatin remodeling and condensation mediated through the replacement of somatic histones by transition proteins and protamines ...

  7. Histone displacement during nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinant, C.; Bartek, J.; Bekker-Jensen, S.

    2012-01-01

    chromatin. The condensed nature of chromatin inhibits many DNA metabolizing activities, including NER. In order to promote efficient repair, detection of a lesion not only has to activate the NER pathway but also chromatin remodeling. In general, such remodeling is thought on the one hand to precede NER...... of histone variants and histone displacement (including nucleosome sliding). Here we review current knowledge, and speculate about current unknowns, regarding those chromatin remodeling activities that physically displace histones before, during and after NER....

  8. Comparative studies of a new subfamily of human Ste20-like kinases: homodimerization, subcellular localization, and selective activation of MKK3 and p38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustein, Jason T; Xia, Liang; Kahlenburg, J Michelle; Robinson, Dan; Templeton, Dennis; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2003-09-18

    The Sterile-20 or Ste20 family of serine/threonine kinases is a group of signaling molecules whose physiological roles within mammalian cells are just starting to be elucidated. Here, in this report we present the characterization of three human Ste20-like kinases with greater than 90% similarity within their catalytic domains that define a novel subfamily of Ste20s. Members of this kinase family include rat thousand and one (TAO1) and chicken KFC (kinase from chicken). For the lack of a consensus nomenclature in the literature, in this report, we shall call this family hKFC (for their homology to chicken KFC) and the three members hKFC-A, hKFC-B, and hKFC-C, respectively. These kinases have many similarities including an aminoterminal kinase domain, a serine-rich region, and a coiled-coil configuration within the C-terminus. All three kinases are able to activate the p38 MAP kinase pathway through the specific activation of the upstream MKK3 kinase. We also offer evidence, both theoretical and biochemical, showing that these kinases can undergo self-association. Despite these similarities, these kinases differ in tissue distribution, apparent subcellular localization, and feature structural differences largely within the carboxyl-terminal sequence.

  9. The FA Core Complex Contains a Homo-dimeric Catalytic Module for the Symmetric Mono-ubiquitination of FANCI-FANCD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Swuec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the main DNA interstrand crosslink repair pathway in higher eukaryotes requires mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 by FANCL, the E3 ligase subunit of the Fanconi anemia core complex. FANCI and FANCD2 form a stable complex; however, the molecular basis of their ubiquitination is ill defined. FANCD2 mono-ubiquitination by FANCL is stimulated by the presence of the FANCB and FAAP100 core complex components, through an unknown mechanism. How FANCI mono-ubiquitination is achieved remains unclear. Here, we use structural electron microscopy, combined with crosslink-coupled mass spectrometry, to find that FANCB, FANCL, and FAAP100 form a dimer of trimers, containing two FANCL molecules that are ideally poised to target both FANCI and FANCD2 for mono-ubiquitination. The FANCC-FANCE-FANCF subunits bridge between FANCB-FANCL-FAAP100 and the FANCI-FANCD2 substrate. A transient interaction with FANCC-FANCE-FANCF alters the FANCI-FANCD2 configuration, stabilizing the dimerization interface. Our data provide a model to explain how equivalent mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 occurs.

  10. Crystal structure of calpain-3 penta-EF-hand (PEF) domain - a homodimerized PEF family member with calcium bound at the fifth EF-hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partha, Sarathy K; Ravulapalli, Ravikiran; Allingham, John S; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    Calpains are Ca(2+) dependent intracellular cysteine proteases that cleave a wide range of protein substrates to help implement Ca(2+) signaling in the cell. The major isoforms of this enzyme family, calpain-1 and calpain-2, are heterodimers of a large and a small subunit, with the main dimer interface being formed through their C-terminal penta-EF hand (PEF) domains. Calpain-3, or p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific isoform that is genetically linked to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Biophysical and modeling studies with the PEF domain of calpain-3 support the suggestion that full-length calpain-3 exists as a homodimer. Here, we report the crystallization of calpain-3's PEF domain and its crystal structure in the presence of Ca(2+) , which provides evidence for the homodimer architecture of calpain-3 and supports the molecular model that places a protease core at either end of the elongated dimer. Unlike other calpain PEF domain structures, the calpain-3 PEF domain contains a Ca(2+) bound at the EF5-hand used for homodimer association. Three of the four Ca(2+) -binding EF-hands of the PEF domains are concentrated near the protease core, and have the potential to radically change the local charge within the dimer during Ca(2+) signaling. Examination of the homodimer interface shows that there would be steric clashes if the calpain-3 large subunit were to try to pair with a calpain small subunit. Database Structural data are available in the Protein Data Bank database under accession number 4OKH. © 2014 FEBS.

  11. Crystal structure of calpain-3 penta-EF-hand (PEF) domain - a homodimerized PEF family member with calcium bound at the fifth EF-hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partha, Sarathy K.; Ravulapalli, Ravikiran; Allingham, John S.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L. [Queens

    2014-08-21

    Calpains are Ca2+dependent intracellular cysteine proteases that cleave a wide range of protein substrates to help implement Ca2+ signaling in the cell. The major isoforms of this enzyme family, calpain-1 and calpain-2, are heterodimers of a large and a small subunit, with the main dimer interface being formed through their C-terminal penta-EF hand (PEF) domains. Calpain-3, or p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific isoform that is genetically linked to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Biophysical and modeling studies with the PEF domain of calpain-3 support the suggestion that full-length calpain-3 exists as a homodimer. Here, we report the crystallization of calpain-3's PEF domain and its crystal structure in the presence of Ca2+, which provides evidence for the homodimer architecture of calpain-3 and supports the molecular model that places a protease core at either end of the elongated dimer. Unlike other calpain PEF domain structures, the calpain-3 PEF domain contains a Ca2+ bound at the EF5-hand used for homodimer association. Three of the four Ca2+-binding EF-hands of the PEF domains are concentrated near the protease core, and have the potential to radically change the local charge within the dimer during Ca2+ signaling. Examination of the homodimer interface shows that there would be steric clashes if the calpain-3 large subunit were to try to pair with a calpain small subunit.

  12. Coiled-coil domain-dependent homodimerization of intracellular barley immune receptors defines a minimal functional module for triggering cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maekawa, T.; Cheng, W.; Spiridon, L.N.; Töller, A.; Lukasik, E.; Saijo, Y.; Liu, P.; Shen, Q.H.; Micluta, M.A.; Somssich, I.E.; Takken, F.L.W.; Petrescu, A.J.; Chai, J.; Schulze-Lefert, P.

    2011-01-01

    Plants and animals have evolved structurally related innate immune sensors, designated NLRs, to detect intracellular nonself molecules. NLRs are modular, consisting of N-terminal coiled-coil (CC) or TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, a central nucleotide-binding (NB) domain, and C-terminal

  13. Dynamics fingerprint and inherent asymmetric flexibility of a cold-adapted homodimeric enzyme. A case study of the Vibrio alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Elena; Renzetti, Giulia; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Asgeirsson, Bjarni

    2013-04-01

    Protein dynamics influence protein function and stability and modulate conformational changes. Such motions depend on the underlying networks of intramolecular interactions and communicating residues within the protein structure. Here, we provide the first characterization of the dynamic fingerprint of the dimeric alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the cold-adapted Vibrio strain G15-21 (VAP), which is among the APs with the highest known kcat at low temperatures. Multiple all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations were employed in conjunction with different metrics to analyze the dynamical patterns and the paths of intra- and intermolecular communication. Interactions and coupled motions at the interface between the two VAP subunits have been characterized, along with the networks of intramolecular interactions. It turns out a low number of intermolecular interactions and coupled motions, which result differently distributed in the two monomers. The paths of long-range communication mediated from the catalytic residues to distal sites were also characterized, pointing out a different information flow in the two subunits. A pattern of asymmetric flexibility is evident in the two identical subunits of the VAP dimer that is intimately linked to a different distribution of intra- and intermolecular interactions. The asymmetry was also evident in pairs of cross-correlated residues during the dynamics. The results here discussed provide a structural rationale to the half-of-site mechanism previously proposed for VAP and other APs, as well as a general framework to characterize asymmetric dynamics in homomeric enzymes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A new non-catalytic role for ubiquitin ligase RNF8 in unfolding higher-order chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Acs, Klara; Ackermann, Leena

    2012-01-01

    . Our data show that CHD4, the catalytic subunit of the NuRD complex, interacts with RNF8 and is essential for RNF8-mediated chromatin unfolding. The chromatin remodelling activity of CHD4 promotes efficient ubiquitin conjugation and assembly of RNF168 and BRCA1 at DNA double-strand breaks....... Interestingly, RNF8-mediated recruitment of CHD4 and subsequent chromatin remodelling were independent of the ubiquitin-ligase activity of RNF8, but involved a non-canonical interaction with the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. Our study reveals a new mechanism of chromatin remodelling-assisted ubiquitylation......, which involves the cooperation between CHD4 and RNF8 to create a local chromatin environment that is permissive to the assembly of checkpoint and repair machineries at DNA lesions....

  15. Identification of In Planta Protein-Protein Interactions Using IP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamge, Suraj; Angenent, Gerco C; Bemer, Marian

    2018-01-01

    Gene regulation by transcription factors involves complex protein interaction networks, which include chromatin remodeling and modifying proteins as an integral part. Decoding these protein interactions is crucial for our understanding of chromatin-mediated gene regulation. Here, we describe a method for the immunoprecipitation of in planta nuclear protein complexes followed by mass spectrometry (IP-MS) to identify interactions between transcription factors and chromatin remodelers/modifiers in plants. In addition to a step-by-step bench protocol for immunoprecipitation and subsequent mass spectrometry, we provide guidelines and pointers on necessary controls and data analysis approaches.

  16. The properties and potential metabolic role of glucokinase in halotolerant obligate methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Rozova, Olga N; Solntseva, Natalia P; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2017-03-01

    Aerobic bacteria utilizing methane as the carbon and energy source do not use sugars as growth substrates but possess the gene coding for glucokinase (Glk), an enzyme converting glucose into glucose 6-phosphate. Here we demonstrate the functionality and properties of Glk from an obligate methanotroph Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The recombinant Glk obtained by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli was found to be close in biochemical properties to other prokaryotic Glks. The homodimeric enzyme (2 × 35 kDa) catalyzed ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glucose and glucosamine with nearly equal activity, being inhibited by ADP (K i = 2.34 mM) but not affected by glucose 6-phosphate. Chromosomal deletion of the glk gene resulted in a loss of Glk activity and retardation of growth as well as in a decrease of intracellular glycogen content. Inactivation of the genes encoding sucrose phosphate synthase or amylosucrase, the enzymes involved in glycogen biosynthesis via sucrose as intermediate, did not prevent glycogen accumulation. In silico analysis revealed glk orthologs predominantly in methanotrophs harboring glycogen synthase genes. The data obtained suggested that Glk is implicated in the regulation of glycogen biosynthesis/degradation in an obligate methanotroph.

  17. Symmetry broken and rebroken during the ATP hydrolysis cycle of the mitochondrial Hsp90 TRAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnatan, Daniel; Betegon, Miguel; Liu, Yanxin; Ramelot, Theresa; Kennedy, Michael A; Agard, David A

    2017-07-25

    Hsp90 is a homodimeric ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that remodels its substrate 'client' proteins, facilitating their folding and activating them for biological function. Despite decades of research, the mechanism connecting ATP hydrolysis and chaperone function remains elusive. Particularly puzzling has been the apparent lack of cooperativity in hydrolysis of the ATP in each protomer. A crystal structure of the mitochondrial Hsp90, TRAP1, revealed that the catalytically active state is closed in a highly strained asymmetric conformation. This asymmetry, unobserved in other Hsp90 homologs, is due to buckling of one of the protomers and is most pronounced at the broadly conserved client-binding region. Here, we show that rather than being cooperative or independent, ATP hydrolysis on the two protomers is sequential and deterministic. Moreover, dimer asymmetry sets up differential hydrolysis rates for each protomer, such that the buckled conformation favors ATP hydrolysis. Remarkably, after the first hydrolysis, the dimer undergoes a flip in the asymmetry while remaining in a closed state for the second hydrolysis. From these results, we propose a model where direct coupling of ATP hydrolysis and conformational flipping rearranges client-binding sites, providing a paradigm of how energy from ATP hydrolysis can be used for client remodeling.

  18. Sequence Classification: 893816 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex that regulates transcription by remodeling chromosomes; required fo...Non-TMB TMH TMB TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|6325241|ref|NP_015309.1| One of 11 subunits of

  19. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of ARID1B-mediated disorders and identification of altered cell-cycle dynamics due to ARID1B haploinsufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sim, J. C. H.; White, S. M.; Fitzpatrick, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mutations in genes encoding components of the Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex have recently been shown to contribute to multiple syndromes characterised by developmental delay and intellectual disability. ARID1B mutations have been identified as the predomi...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK066811 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066811 J013088E08 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-24 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK063375 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063375 001-114-F01 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-21 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK066228 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066228 J013058B09 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 1e-91 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK100130 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100130 J023009O07 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 3e-16 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK102094 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102094 J033083D05 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 3e-21 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK122019 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK122019 J033111M24 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-15 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK109505 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109505 002-100-A02 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 1e-15 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK242828 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242828 J090067I06 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 5e-48 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK105265 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105265 001-115-D05 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 0.0 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK072085 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072085 J013119B08 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 5e-18 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK111184 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111184 002-177-G09 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 7e-59 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK119665 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119665 002-144-D03 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 1e-12 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK072159 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072159 J013132J03 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-20 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK066772 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066772 J013084I15 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 1e-16 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK120785 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120785 J023010H23 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 4e-41 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK071717 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071717 J023109O07 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 6e-57 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK068790 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068790 J013163J20 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 1e-33 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK064456 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064456 002-110-F11 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-67 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK072094 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072094 J013116F16 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 5e-18 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK107344 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK107344 002-126-G07 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 5e-11 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK068327 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068327 J013136J21 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 3e-23 ...

  1. Sequence Classification: 892441 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB TMB >gi|6323061|ref|NP_013133.1| Remodels t...he structure of chromatin complex 58KDa subunit; Chromatin Remodeling Complex subunit; Rsc58p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6323061 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK068173 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068173 J013133N02 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 1e-125 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK241408 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241408 J065159I10 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 5e-21 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK110250 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110250 002-162-H03 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 4e-19 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK067331 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067331 J013099F15 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-45 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK104850 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104850 001-043-A07 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-16 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK072184 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072184 J013136H24 (Q96T23) Hepatitis B virus X associated protein (HBV pX associated protein 8) (Remodel...ing and spacing factor 1) (Rsf-1) (p325 subunit of RSF chromatin remodelling complex) HBXAP_HUMAN 2e-12 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK068079 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068079 J013130J22 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-25 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK099822 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099822 J013101J07 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 5e-48 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK122151 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK122151 J033142K22 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 4e-21 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK073674 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073674 J033047B15 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 4e-21 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK069020 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069020 J013169J18 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 2e-30 ...

  13. Polycomb group proteins in cell cycle progression and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Epigenetic deregulation of gene expression is emerging as key mechanism in tumorigenesis. Deregulated activity of the chromatin remodeling Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) has recently been shown to be a frequent event in human tumors. Here we discuss these findings and speculate on the role ...

  14. A Role for Histone Deacetylases in the Cellular and Behavioral Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Melissa; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of chromatin remodeling enzymes that restrict access of transcription factors to the DNA, thereby repressing gene expression. In contrast, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) relax the chromatin structure allowing for an active chromatin state and promoting gene transcription. Accumulating data have…

  15. The influence of gibberellic acid and paclobutrazol on induction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... PICKLE (pkl), encodes a chromatin remodeling factor which represses embryogenic capacity (Ogas et al. 1997) and plays a role in gibberellin-dependet responses. (Henderson et al., 2004). Plant growth retardants (es- pecially inhibitors of gibberellins biosynthesis) are known to reduce stem elongation, ...

  16. SWI/SNF mediates polycomb eviction and epigenetic reprogramming of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.K. Kia; M.M. Gorski (Marcin); S. Giannakopoulos (Stavros); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStable silencing of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a tumor suppressor locus occurs in a variety of human cancers, including malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs). MRTs are extremely aggressive cancers caused by the loss of the hSNF5 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We found previously

  17. Impact of chromatin structure on PR signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) interacts with chromatin in a highly dynamic manner that requires ongoing chromatin remodeling, interaction with chaparones and activity of the proteasome. Here we discuss dynamic interaction of steroid receptor with chromatin, with special attention not only to PR ...

  18. Genome-wide analysis of Rad52 foci reveals diverse mechanisms impacting recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvaro, David; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    to humans. Along with genes involved in DNA replication, repair, and chromatin remodeling, we found 22 previously uncharacterized open reading frames. Analysis of recombination rates and synthetic genetic interactions with rad52Delta suggests that multiple mechanisms are responsible for elevated levels...

  19. Chromatin dynamics in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies in yeast, animals and plants have provided major breakthroughs in unraveling the molecular mechanism of higher-order gene regulation. In conjunction with the DNA code, proteins that are involved in chromatin remodeling, histone modification and epigenetic imprinting form a large

  20. Heterozygous variants in ACTL6A, encoding a component of the BAF complex, are associated with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marom, R.; Jain, M.; Burrage, L.C.; Song, I.W.; Graham, B.H.; Brown, C.W.; Stevens, S.J.C.; Stegmann, A.P.A.; Gunter, A.T.; Kaplan, J.D.; Gavrilova, R.H.; Shinawi, M.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Bae, Y.; Tran, A.A.; Lu, J.T.; Gibbs, R.A.; Eng, C.; Yang, Y; Rousseau, J.; Vries, B.B.A. de; Campeau, P.M.; Lee, B.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic variants in genes encoding components of the BRG1-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex have been associated with intellectual disability syndromes. We identified heterozygous, novel variants in ACTL6A, a gene encoding a component of the BAF complex, in three subjects with

  1. Reference: 632 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ludmila et al. 2007 Sep. Plant J. 51(5):874-85. One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental str...elopment in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene...R12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental

  2. ERECTA signaling controls Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture through chromatin-mediated activation of PRE1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hanyang; Zhao, Lihua; Wang, Lulu; Zhang, Man; Su, Zhenxia; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Heming; Qin, Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Flowering plants display a remarkable diversity in inflorescence architecture, and pedicel length is one of the key contributors to this diversity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the receptor-like kinase ERECTA (ER) mediated signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating inflorescence architecture by promoting cell proliferation. However, the regulating mechanism remains elusive in the pedicel. Genetic interactions between ERECTA signaling and the chromatin remodeling complex SWR1 in the control of inflorescence architecture were studied. Comparative transcriptome analysis was applied to identify downstream components. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nucleosome occupancy was further investigated. The results indicated that the chromatin remodeler SWR1 coordinates with ERECTA signaling in regulating inflorescence architecture by activating the expression of PRE1 family genes and promoting pedicel elongation. It was found that SWR1 is required for the incorporation of the H2A.Z histone variant into nucleosomes of the whole PRE1 gene family and the ERECTA controlled expression of PRE1 gene family through regulating nucleosome dynamics. We propose that utilization of a chromatin remodeling complex to regulate gene expression is a common theme in developmental control across kingdoms. These findings shed light on the mechanisms through which chromatin remodelers orchestrate complex transcriptional regulation of gene expression in coordination with a developmental cue. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Epigenetic Induction of Definitive and Pancreatic Endoderm Cell Fate in Human Fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sambathkumar, Rangarajan; Kalo, Eric; Van Rossom, Rob; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming can occur by the introduction of key transcription factors (TFs) as well as by epigenetic changes. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) Trichostatin A (TSA) combined with a chromatin remodeling medium (CRM) induced expression of a number of definitive endoderm and

  4. Epigenetics of inflammation, maternal infection and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have demonstrated that epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling are linked to an increased inflammatory response as well as increased risk for chronic disease development. A few studies have begun to investigate whether dietary nutrients play...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK100732 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100732 J023117L05 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 0.0 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK100332 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100332 J023080K24 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 4e-83 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK070470 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070470 J023054E15 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 3e-16 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK102284 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102284 J033089H07 (Q24368) Chromatin remodelling complex ATPase chain Iswi (EC 3....6.1.-) (Imitation swi protein) (Nucleosome remodeling factor 140 kDa subunit) (NURF-140) (CHRAC 140 kDa subunit) ISWI_DROME 5e-15 ...

  9. Mutation update on the CHD7 gene involved in CHARGE syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Nicole; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Swertz, Morris A.; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Lodahl, Marianne; Schoots, Jeroen; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.

    CHD7 is a member of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) protein family that plays a role in transcription regulation by chromatin remodeling. Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 are known to cause CHARGE syndrome, an autosomal-dominant malformation syndrome in which several organ systems, for

  10. SMARCE1 suppresses EGFR expression and controls responses to MET and ALK inhibitors in lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadakis, Andreas I; Sun, Chong; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Xue, Yibo; Grernrum, Wipawadee; Hölzel, Michael; Nijkamp, Wouter; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Bernards, Rene; Huang, Sidong

    Recurrent inactivating mutations in components of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes have been identified across cancer types, supporting their roles as tumor suppressors in modulating oncogenic signaling pathways. We report here that SMARCE1 loss induces EGFR expression and confers resistance

  11. Immunometabolic Pathways in BCG-Induced Trained Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, R.J.; Carvalho, A.; Rocca, C. La; Palma, C.; Rodrigues, F.; Silvestre, R.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.; Lachmandas, E.; Goncalves, L.G.; Belinha, A.; Cunha, C.; Oosting, M.; Joosten, L.A.; Matarese, G.; Crevel, R. van; Netea, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    The protective effects of the tuberculosis vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) on unrelated infections are thought to be mediated by long-term metabolic changes and chromatin remodeling through histone modifications in innate immune cells such as monocytes, a process termed trained immunity.

  12. Structural characterization of human Uch37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgie, E. Sethe; Bingman, Craig A.; Soni, Ameet B.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-06-28

    Uch37 is a deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) that is functionally linked with multiple protein complexes and signal transduction pathways. Uch37 associates with the 26S proteasome through Rpn13 where it serves to remove distal ubiquitin moeities from polyubiquitylated proteins. Uch37's proteasome associated activity was shown to liberate proteins from destruction. However, Uch37 may also specifically facilitate the destruction of inducible nitric oxide synthase and I{kappa}B-{alpha} at the proteasome. Wicks et al. established Uch37's potential to modulate the transforming growth factor-{beta}(TGF-{beta}) signaling cascade, through tis interaction with SMAD7. Yao et al. demonstrated that Uch37 also associates with the Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex (Ino80 complex), which is involved in DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Uch37's importance in metazoan development was underscored recently as Uch37 knockouts in mice result in prenatal lethality, where mutant embryos had severe defects in brain development. Protein ubiquitylation is an ATP-dependent post-translational modification that serves to signal a wide variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes. A protein cascade, generally comprising three enzymes, functions to activate, transport and specifically transfer ubiquitin to the targeted protein, culminating in an isopeptide linkage between the {epsilon}-amino group of a target protein's lysysl residue and the ubiquitin's terminal carboxylate. Monoubiquitination plays an important role in histone regulation, endocytosis, and viral budding. Further processing of the target protein may be accomplished by ubiquitylation of the protein on a different lysine, or through the formation of polyubiquitin chains, where the best-characterized outcome is destruction of the polyubiquitin-labeled protein in the proteasome. DUBs catalyze the removal of ubiquitin from proteins. This activity serves to reverse the effects of ubiquitination, permit

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 205526 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_10227544.1 1117:3878 1118:2761 1125:273 1160279:878 Linear gramicidin synthase s...e (ATP-hydrolyzing) ; ATP-dependent tryptophan adenylase ; ATP-dependent glycine adenylase ; Linear gramicid

  14. Cluster (Cyanobacteria): 1160282:1406 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1160282:1406 Linear gramicidin synthase subunit D (Includes: ATP-dependent tryptoph...phan adenylase ; ATP-dependent glycine adenylase ; Linear gramicidin--PCP reductase) (fragment) 1126:871 ...

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 205319 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_16391152.1 1117:3878 1118:2761 1125:273 1126:871 1160282:1406 Linear gramicidin ...ne racemase (ATP-hydrolyzing) ; ATP-dependent tryptophan adenylase ; ATP-dependent glycine adenylase ; Linear

  16. Degradation of phycobilisomes in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803: evidence for essential formation of an NblA1/NblA2 heterodimer and its codegradation by A Clp protease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Antje; Winkler, Wiebke; Korte, Thomas; Lockau, Wolfgang; Karradt, Anne

    2014-04-25

    When cyanobacteria acclimate to nitrogen deficiency, they degrade their large (3-5-MDa), light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes. This massive, yet specific, intracellular degradation of the pigmented phycobiliproteins causes a color change of cyanobacterial cultures from blue-green to yellow-green, a process referred to as chlorosis or bleaching. Phycobilisome degradation is induced by expression of the nblA gene, which encodes a protein of ~7 kDa. NblA most likely acts as an adaptor protein that guides a Clp protease to the phycobiliproteins, thereby initiating the degradation process. Most cyanobacteria and red algae possess just one nblA-homologous gene. As an exception, the widely used "model organism" Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 expresses two such genes, nblA16803 and nblA26803, both of whose products are required for phycobilisome degradation. Here, we demonstrate that the two NblA proteins heterodimerize in vitro and in vivo using pull-down assays and a Förster energy-transfer approach, respectively. We further show that the NblA proteins form a ternary complex with ClpC (the HSP100 chaperone partner of Clp proteases) and phycobiliproteins in vitro. This complex is susceptible to ATP-dependent degradation by a Clp protease, a finding that supports a proposed mechanism of the degradation process. Expression of the single nblA gene encoded by the genome of the N2-fixing, filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 in the nblA1/nblA2 mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 induced phycobilisome degradation, suggesting that the function of the NblA heterodimer of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is combined in the homodimeric protein of Nostoc sp. PCC7120.

  17. Architects of the genome: CHD dysfunction in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangzhi; Mills, Alea A

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is vital to normal cells, and its deregulation contributes to a spectrum of human ailments. An emerging concept is that aberrant chromatin regulation culminates in gene expression programs that set the stage for the seemingly diverse pathologies of cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes. However, the mechanisms responsible for such common etiology have been elusive. Recent evidence has implicated lesions affecting chromatin-remodeling proteins in cancer, developmental disorders and neurological syndromes, suggesting a common source for these different pathologies. Here, we focus on the chromodomain helicase DNA binding chromatin-remodeling family and the recent evidence for its deregulation in diverse pathological conditions, providing a new perspective on the underlying mechanisms and their implications for these prevalent human diseases.

  18. The Arabidopsis SWI/SNF protein BAF60 mediates seedling growth control by modulating DNA accessibility

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2017-06-15

    Plant adaptive responses to changing environments involve complex molecular interplays between intrinsic and external signals. Whilst much is known on the signaling components mediating diurnal, light, and temperature controls on plant development, their influence on chromatin-based transcriptional controls remains poorly explored.In this study we show that a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler subunit, BAF60, represses seedling growth by modulating DNA accessibility of hypocotyl cell size regulatory genes. BAF60 binds nucleosome-free regions of multiple G box-containing genes, opposing in cis the promoting effect of the photomorphogenic and thermomorphogenic regulator Phytochrome Interacting Factor 4 (PIF4) on hypocotyl elongation. Furthermore, BAF60 expression level is regulated in response to light and daily rhythms.These results unveil a short path between a chromatin remodeler and a signaling component to fine-tune plant morphogenesis in response to environmental conditions.

  19. Control of genic DNA methylation by a jmjC domain-containing protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saze, Hidetoshi; Shiraishi, Akiko; Miura, Asuka; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2008-01-25

    Differential cytosine methylation of repeats and genes is important for coordination of genome stability and proper gene expression. Through genetic screen of mutants showing ectopic cytosine methylation in a genic region, we identified a jmjC-domain gene, IBM1 (increase in bonsai methylation 1), in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition to the ectopic cytosine methylation, the ibm1 mutations induced a variety of developmental phenotypes, which depend on methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9. Paradoxically, the developmental phenotypes of the ibm1 were enhanced by the mutation in the chromatin-remodeling gene DDM1 (decrease in DNA methylation 1), which is necessary for keeping methylation and silencing of repeated heterochromatin loci. Our results demonstrate the importance of chromatin remodeling and histone modifications in the differential epigenetic control of repeats and genes.

  20. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-04-28

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo.

  1. Activation of 12/23-RSS-dependent RAG cleavage by hSWI/SNF complex in the absence of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hansen; Ishii, Haruhiko; Pazin, Michael J; Sen, Ranjan

    2008-09-05

    Maintenance of genomic integrity during antigen receptor gene rearrangements requires (1) regulated access of the V(D)J recombinase to specific loci and (2) generation of double-strand DNA breaks only after recognition of a pair of matched recombination signal sequences (RSSs). Here we recapitulate both key aspects of regulated recombinase accessibility in a cell-free system using plasmid substrates assembled into chromatin. We show that recruitment of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex to both RSSs increases coupled cleavage by RAG1 and RAG2 proteins. SWI/SNF functions by altering local chromatin structure in the absence of RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription or histone modifications. These observations demonstrate a direct role for cis-sequence-regulated local chromatin remodeling in RAG1/2-dependent initiation of V(D)J recombination.

  2. Molecular Pathways Involved in Pregnancy-Induced Prevention Against Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Maria; Santucci-Pereira, Julia; Russo, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy produces a protective effect against breast cancer in women who had their first full term pregnancy (FTP) in their middle twenties. The later in life the first delivery occurs, the higher the risk of breast cancer development. Also, transiently during the postpartum period, the risk of developing breast cancer increases. This transient increased risk is taken over by a long-lasting protective period. The genomic profile of parous women has shown pregnancy induces a long-lasting “genomic signature” that explains the preventive effect on breast cancer. This signature reveals that chromatin remodeling is the driver of the differentiation process conferred by FTP. The chromatin remodeling process may be the ultimate step mediating the protection of the breast against developing breast cancer in post-menopausal years. PMID:25540638

  3. Molecular pathways involved in pregnancy-induced prevention against breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eBarton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy produces a protective effect against breast cancer in women who had their first full term pregnancy in their middle twenties. Postponement of the first delivery increases a woman’s breast cancer risk. Also, transiently, during the postpartum period, the risk of developing breast cancer increases. This transient increased risk is taken over by a long lasting protective period. The genomic profile of parous women has shown pregnancy induces a long lasting genomic signature that explains the preventive effect on breast cancer. This signature reveals that the differentiation process, conferred by earlier full term pregnancy, is centered in chromatin remodeling. The chromatin remodeling process may be the ultimate step mediating the protection of the breast against developing breast cancer in postmenopausal years.

  4. Histone phosphorylation: a chromatin modification involved in diverse nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes.

  5. BPTF Maintains Chromatin Accessibility and the Self-Renewal Capacity of Mammary Gland Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley D. Frey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodeling is a key requirement for transcriptional control of cellular differentiation. However, the factors that alter chromatin architecture in mammary stem cells (MaSCs are poorly understood. Here, we show that BPTF, the largest subunit of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex, is essential for MaSC self-renewal and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs. BPTF depletion arrests cells at a previously undefined stage of epithelial differentiation that is associated with an incapacity to achieve the luminal cell fate. Moreover, genome-wide analysis of DNA accessibility following genetic or chemical inhibition, suggests a role for BPTF in maintaining the open chromatin landscape at enhancers regions in MECs. Collectively, our study implicates BPTF in maintaining the unique epigenetic state of MaSCs.

  6. Dietary factors, epigenetic modifications and obesity outcomes: Progresses and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Milagro-Yoldi, F.I. (Fermín Ignacio); Mansego-Talavera, M.L. (María Luisa); Miguel, C.; Martinez, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional factors play a life-long role in human health. Indeed, there is growing evidence that one of the mechanisms by which nutrients and bioactive compounds affect metabolic traits is epigenetics. Complex interactions among food components and histone modifications, DNA methylation, non-coding RNA expression and chromatin remodeling factors lead to a dynamic regulation of gene expression that controls the cellular phenotype. Although perinatal period is the time of highest phenotypic pl...

  7. Chd1 is essential for the high transcriptional output and rapid growth of the mouse epiblast

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman-Ayala, Marcela; Sachs, Michael; Koh, Fong Ming; Onodera, Courtney; Bulut-Karslioglu, Aydan; Lin, Chih-Jen; Wong, Priscilla; Nitta, Rachel; Song, Jun S.; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The pluripotent mammalian epiblast undergoes unusually fast cell proliferation. This rapid growth is expected to generate a high transcriptional demand, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We show here that the chromatin remodeler Chd1 is required for transcriptional output and development of the mouse epiblast. Chd1−/− embryos exhibit proliferation defects and increased apoptosis, are smaller than controls by E5.5 and fail to grow, to become patterned or to gastrulate. Removal of p...

  8. Rôle de Brm dans le contrôle du cycle cellulaire et Étude de l'équilibre prolifération/différenciation des kératinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Coisy-Quivy, Marjorie

    2004-01-01

    The main regulators of the cellular proliferation are the kinases Cdk, whose activity depends on their association with the cyclins. The control of cyclin expression is the first mechanism of cell cycle regulation, that is essential for the balance proliferation/differentiation in the keratinocytes. We show that Brm, main subunit of the chromatin remodeling complexes SWI/SNF, is necessary for cyclin A repression by positioning two nucleosomes on the proximal promoter of the gene. We also demo...

  9. THE COMPLEX ORGANIZATION OF EUKARYOTIC CELL NUCLEUS (III: THE NUCLEAR MATRIX AND THE NUCLEAR LAMINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian S. Cimpeanu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A large variety of nuclear fibrous proteins (such as actin, myosin, lamin B, transcription factors, topoisomerases, etc represent constitutive elements of complex structures present in the eukaryotic nuclei: the nuclear matrix and the nuclear lamina, repectively. These nuclear compartments, with fibrous network-like structure, play crucialroles in structural organization of nuclei, chromatin remodeling, DNA transcription, signals transduction, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and other nuclear basic processes.

  10. THE COMPLEX ORGANIZATION OF EUKARYOTIC CELL NUCLEUS (III): THE NUCLEAR MATRIX AND THE NUCLEAR LAMINA

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian S. Cimpeanu; Mirela Campeanu

    2015-01-01

    A large variety of nuclear fibrous proteins (such as actin, myosin, lamin B, transcription factors, topoisomerases, etc) represent constitutive elements of complex structures present in the eukaryotic nuclei: the nuclear matrix and the nuclear lamina, repectively. These nuclear compartments, with fibrous network-like structure, play crucialroles in structural organization of nuclei, chromatin remodeling, DNA transcription, signals transduction, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and...

  11. Epigenome dysregulation in cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Rourke, Colm J; Munoz-Garrido, Patricia; Aguayo, Esmeralda L

    2017-01-01

    Epigenomics is a fast-evolving field of research that has lately attracted considerable interest, mainly due to the reversibility of epigenetic marks. Clinically, among solid tumors, the field is still limited. In cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) it is well known that the epigenetic landscape is deregula...... on the role of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) interactions, DNA methylation, post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones and chromatin remodeling complexes....

  12. Decoding the Epigenetic Language of Plant Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Xiao-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to the study of heritable changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype without changes in DNA sequence. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is accomplished by DNA methylation, histone modifications, histone variants, chromatin remodeling, and may involve small RNAs. DNA methylation at cytosine is carried out by enzymes called DNA Methyltransferases and is involved in many cellular processes, such as silencing of transposable elements and pericentromeric repeats, X-...

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBL006C, YDR489W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p, Rsc30p, Npl6p, and Htl1p to form a module important for a broad range of RSC functions Rows with this bai...e RSC chromatin remodeling complex; interacts with Rsc3p, Rsc30p, Npl6p, and Htl1p to form a module import...ant for a broad range of RSC functions Rows with this bait as bait Rows with this b

  14. Reference: 417 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis, enhances only the loss-of-function cuc1 mutant. By investigating the activities of the CUC promoters in the cotyledon boundary...n of CUC2. Our results uncover a specific role for both chromatin remodeling ATPases in the formation and/or maintenance of boundary...ne expression in the Arabidopsis cotyledon boundary. 16 3223-30 16854978 2006 Aug

  15. JmjC: cupin metalloenzyme-like domains in jumonji, hairless and phospholipase A2beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clissold, P M; Ponting, C P

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of significant sequence similarity, we have identified JmjC domains in more than 100 eukaryotic and bacterial sequences. These include human hairless, mutated in individuals with alopecia universalis, retinoblastoma-binding protein 2 and several putative chromatin-associated proteins. JmjC domains are predicted to be metalloenzymes that adopt the cupin fold, and are candidates for enzymes that regulate chromatin remodelling.

  16. HDAC Activity Is Required during Xenopus Tail Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ai-Sun Tseng; Kátia Carneiro; Lemire, Joan M.; Michael Levin

    2011-01-01

    The ability to fully restore damaged or lost organs is present in only a subset of animals. The Xenopus tadpole tail is a complex appendage, containing epidermis, muscle, nerves, spinal cord, and vasculature, which regenerates after amputation. Understanding the mechanisms of tail regeneration may lead to new insights to promote biomedical regeneration in non-regenerative tissues. Although chromatin remodeling is known to be critical for stem cell pluripotency, its role in complex organ regen...

  17. The defining DNA methylation signature of Floating-Harbor Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hood, Rebecca L.; Schenkel, Laila C.; Nikkel, Sarah M.; Ainsworth, Peter J.; Pare, Guillaume; Boycott, Kym M.; Bulman, Dennis E.; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2016-01-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive language impairment, and unique facial dysmorphology. We previously identified mutations in the chromatin remodeling protein SRCAP (SNF2-related CBP Activator Protein) as the cause of FHS. SRCAP has multiple roles in chromatin and transcriptional regulation; however, specific epigenetic consequences of SRCAP mutations remain to be described. Using hi...

  18. Machine-assisted synthesis of modulators of the histone reader BRD9 using flow methods of chemistry and frontal affinity chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Guetzoyan, Lucie; Ingham, Richard J.; Nikbin, Nikzad; Rossignol, Julien; Wolling, Michael; Baumert, Mark; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A.; Strain-Damerell, Claire M.; Shrestha, Leela; Brennan, Paul E.; Fedorov, Oleg; Knapp, Stefan; Ley, Steven V.

    2014-01-01

    A combination of conventional organic synthesis, remotely monitored flow synthesis and bioassay platforms, were used for the evaluation of novel inhibitors targeting bromodomains outside the well-studied bromodomain and extra terminal (BET) family, here exemplified by activity measurements on the bromodomain of BRD9 protein, a component of some tissue-specific SWi/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes. The Frontal Affinity Chromatography combined with Mass Spectrometry (FAC-MS) method proved to...

  19. Role of elongator subunit Elp3 in Drosophila melanogaster larval development and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Jane; Kwon, So Yeon; Badenhorst, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Elongator complex has been implicated in several cellular processes, including gene expression and tRNA modification. We investigated the biological importance of the Elp3 gene in Drosophila melanogaster. Deletion of Elp3 results in larval lethality at the pupal stage. During early development...... demonstrate that Drosophila Elp3 is essential for viability, normal development, and hematopoiesis and suggest a functional overlap with the chromatin remodeler Domino....

  20. Zebrafish Model of NF1 for Structure-Function Analysis, Mechanisms of Glial Tumorigenesis, and Chemical Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    abnormalities and multiple benign and malignant tumors, including tumors of neural crest origin such as glioma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath...grade gliomas and MPNSTs, but not in the non-malignant neural crest -derived tissues, in the nf1a+/-;nf1b-/-;p53-/-;sox10:GFP adult zebrafish. This...ATRX (a-thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked) is a chromatin remodeling factor required for H3.3 incorporation at pericentric

  1. Structural Characterization and Determinants of Specificity of Single- Chain Antibody Inhibitors of Membrane-Type Serine Protease 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    protease involved in male chromatin remodeling blocks the development of sea urchin embryos at the initial cell cycle. J. Cell Biochem. 98, 335–342. 18...Macrophage Morphology Changes and Inhibition of Nitric Oxide Production by Macrophages. The cleavage of MSP-1 by MT-SP1 was then tested in primary cells in...inhibitor (Fig. 3) were studied. The morphology change in response to MSP-1 was independent of HAI-1 or anti-MT-SP1 antibody presence. Both inhibitors

  2. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  3. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YBL039C, YJR103W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final step in de novo biosynthesis ...ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final step in de novo b...atalyzes the ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final step...catalyzes the ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final ste

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJR103W, YBL039C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final step in de novo biosynthesis ...ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final step in de novo b...atalyzes the ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final step...catalyzes the ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to UTP, forming CTP, the final ste

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 205430 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_18822011.1 1117:3878 1118:2761 1125:273 1126:871 1160286:203 Linear gramicidin s...e racemase (ATP-hydrolyzing) ; ATP-dependent tryptophan adenylase ; ATP-dependent glycine adenylase ; Linear

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 495474973 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WP_008199660.1 NZ_CAIP01000115 1117:6947 ... 1118:2010 1301283:11227 ... 1125:91 1160279:763 ... Linear...nt glycine adenylase ; Linear gramicidin--PCP reductase) (fragment) Microcystis s... D-leucine adenylase ; Leucine racemase (ATP-hydrolyzing) ; ATP-dependent tryptophan adenylase ; ATP-depende

  7. SwissProt search result: AK070759 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070759 J023065N19 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-34 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK061762 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061762 001-039-B03 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-44 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK066142 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066142 J013055O07 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-25 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK072537 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072537 J023133N21 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-31 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK103801 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103801 J033146D17 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-42 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK069811 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069811 J023030D05 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-36 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK058626 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058626 001-018-C03 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 6e-29 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK099085 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099085 J023004D02 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-24 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK100245 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100245 J023056H19 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 6e-96 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK099259 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099259 J023004D09 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 7e-32 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK100060 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100060 J013159J17 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-42 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK060394 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060394 001-010-A12 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-72 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK119827 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119827 002-177-F10 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-28 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK104698 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104698 001-037-C01 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 8e-41 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK121641 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121641 J033055F21 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-45 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK099712 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099712 J013082G14 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-45 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK063158 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063158 001-044-C12 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 9e-41 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK101114 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101114 J033025G10 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-32 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK119311 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119311 001-130-G08 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-41 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK067644 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067644 J013114F09 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 6e-29 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK058779 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058779 001-002-C01 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-11 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK062185 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062185 001-046-E03 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-39 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK106217 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106217 001-208-H03 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-44 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK063910 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063910 001-123-A05 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 9e-18 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK109969 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109969 002-159-C04 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 3e-42 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK061771 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061771 001-039-C10 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-40 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK062071 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062071 001-044-E05 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-51 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK099978 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099978 J013129B19 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 3e-31 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK099889 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099889 J013112O07 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-45 ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0124 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0124 ref|NP_532463.1| ATP-dependent DNA helicase [Agrobacterium tumefa...ciens str. C58] gb|AAL42779.1| ATP-dependent DNA helicase [Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58] NP_532463.1 8.8 29% ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK105474 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105474 001-127-A04 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-28 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK110513 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110513 002-167-G06 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 9e-93 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK072047 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072047 J013111G24 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-100 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK071476 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071476 J023091H23 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-34 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK069899 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069899 J023035A18 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-29 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK060805 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060805 001-033-F12 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-101 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK068431 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068431 J013154E14 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 9e-49 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK099357 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099357 J033041G07 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-40 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK059564 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059564 001-029-H06 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-30 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK099264 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099264 J023018C04 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-36 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK058311 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058311 001-013-H11 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-36 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK110388 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110388 002-165-E01 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-26 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK071386 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071386 J023092N19 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 9e-36 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK066695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066695 J013074G13 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 8e-41 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK107421 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 2e-16 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK071943 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 9e-18 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK069932 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 3e-18 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK101765 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 1e-21 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK105769 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 2e-30 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK068985 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 9e-24 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK242087 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 5e-22 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK065637 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 8e-43 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK070083 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 2e-22 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK105636 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 1e-21 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK243122 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 5e-16 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK070181 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 3e-18 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK108656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 9e-20 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK105693 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 1e-22 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK063921 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 2e-16 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK121384 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 2e-30 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK243161 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 6e-20 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK106615 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 6e-14 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK119512 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available line adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activa...se); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 1e-22 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK120964 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 1e-23 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK241420 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine adenylase (ProA) (Proline activase); ATP-dependent phenylalanine adenylase (PheA) (Phenylalanine activas...e); ATP-dependent D-phenylalanine adenylase (D-PheA) (D-phenylalanine ac TYCB_BREPA 4e-19 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK107350 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK107350 002-126-H04 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 1e-31 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK063733 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063733 001-120-E10 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 4e-16 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK070084 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070084 J023044D08 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 9e-31 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK102585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102585 J033098E22 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 5e-28 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK069057 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069057 J023004J21 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-27 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK067051 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067051 J013093O11 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-39 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK241074 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241074 J065068E03 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-34 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK069248 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069248 J023014K18 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (YM...E1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 7e-30 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK061876 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061876 001-041-A12 (Q96TA2) ATP-dependent metalloprotease YME1L1 (EC 3.4.24.-) (Y...ME1-like protein 1) (ATP-dependent metalloprotease FtsH1) (Meg-4) (Presenilin-associated metalloprotease) (PAMP) YMEL1_HUMAN 2e-42 ...