WorldWideScience

Sample records for home-based telehealth stroke

  1. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbler, Neale R; Rose, Dorian K; Griffiths, Patricia; Quigley, Patricia; McGee-Hernandez, Nancy; Carlson, Katherine A; Vandenberg, Phyllis; Morey, Miriam C; Sanford, Jon; Hoenig, Helen

    2010-06-30

    Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR) intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT) that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) TR; or (b) Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and increase efficiency. This may be particularly relevant when

  2. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee-Hernandez Nancy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. Methods We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a TR; or (b Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. Discussion For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and

  3. Home-Based Telehealth Hospitalization for Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anna Svarre; Laursen, Lars C; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Telehealth interventions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have focused primarily on stable outpatients. Telehealth designed to handle the acute exacerbation that normally requires hospitalization could also be of interest. The aim of this study...

  4. The case for home based telehealth in pediatric palliative care: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford Natalie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade technology has rapidly changed the ability to provide home telehealth services. At the same time, pediatric palliative care has developed as a small, but distinct speciality. Understanding the experiences of providing home telehealth services in pediatric palliative care is therefore important. Methods A literature review was undertaken to identify and critically appraise published work relevant to the area. Studies were identified by searching the electronic databases Medline, CINAHL and Google Scholar. The reference list of each paper was also inspected to identify any further studies. Results There were 33 studies that met the inclusion criteria of which only six were pediatric focussed. Outcome measures included effects on quality of life and anxiety, substitution of home visits, economic factors, barriers, feasibility, acceptability, satisfaction and readiness for telehealth. While studies generally identified benefits of using home telehealth in palliative care, the utilisation of home telehealth programs was limited by numerous challenges. Conclusion Research in this area is challenging; ethical issues and logistical factors such as recruitment and attrition because of patient death make determining effectiveness of telehealth interventions difficult. Future research in home telehealth for the pediatric palliative care population should focus on the factors that influence acceptance of telehealth applications, including goals of care, access to alternative modes of care, perceived need for care, and comfort with using technology.

  5. Testing a home-telehealth programme for US veterans recovering from stroke and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Barbara J; Chumbler, Neale R; Lyles, Teresa; Hoffman, Nannette; Kobb, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The study purpose was to implement a stroke-specific, care coordination home telehealth (CCHT) programme for US veterans with stroke and their family caregivers. In a non-randomized open trial using a mixed methods design, we tested the utility of a stroke-specific, home telehealth programme with 18 veterans and 14 caregivers for 14 days. Programme questions assessed physical impairment, depressive symptoms, and fall prevalence among veterans, and burden level among family caregivers. Nine veterans and six caregivers completed post-programme interviews exploring their experiences with telehealth. During the 14-day trial, 55% of the veterans screened positive for depression at least once, 36% of the caregivers had clinically significant burden, half of the veterans and caregivers reported post-stroke concerns, and 90% believed post-stroke contact from a care coordinator would have been helpful. In the interviews, seven veterans indicated they had fallen or almost fallen post-stroke. Themes centred on tailoring CCHT to individual needs, coordinating with support services, identifying safety issues, and providing information about stroke prevention. Home telehealth offers innovative ways to target post-stroke rehabilitation programmes to the needs and concerns of patients and their caregivers, and should include regular real-time contact between stroke patients and their healthcare providers.

  6. Increasing Access to Cost Effective Home-Based Rehabilitation for Rural Veteran Stroke Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, S N; Garlow, A R; Ducote, K; Howard, A; Thomas, T; Wu, D; Richards, K; Butler, A J

    2016-08-25

    An estimated 750,000 Americans experience a stroke annually. Most stroke survivors require rehabilitation. Limited access to rehabilitation facilities has a pronounced burden on functional outcomes and quality of life. Robotic devices deliver reproducible therapy without the need for real-time human oversight. This study examined the efficacy of using home-based, telerobotic-assisted devices (Hand and Foot Mentor: HM and FM) to improve functional ability and reduce depression symptoms, while improving access and cost savings associated with rehabilitation. Twenty stroke survivors performed three months of home-based rehabilitation using a robotic device, while a therapist remotely monitored progress. Baseline and end of treatment function and depression symptoms were assessed. Satisfaction with the device and access to therapy were determined using qualitative surveys. Cost analysis was performed to compare home-based, robotic-assisted therapy to clinic-based physical therapy. Compared to baseline, significant improvement in upper extremity function (30.06%, p= 0.046), clinically significant benefits in gait speed (29.03%), moderate improvement in depressive symptoms (28.44%) and modest improvement in distance walked (30.2%) were observed. Participants indicated satisfaction with the device. Home-based robot therapy expanded access to post-stroke rehabilitation for 35% of the people no longer receiving formal services and increased daily access for the remaining 65%, with a cost savings of $2,352 (64.97%) compared to clinic-based therapy. Stroke survivors made significant clinically meaningful improvements in the use of their impaired extremities using a robotic device in the home. Home-based, robotic therapy reduced costs, while expanding access to a rehabilitation modality for people who would not otherwise have received care.

  7. Design of a home-based adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation system for stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Michael; Lehrer, Nicole; Siwiak, Diana; Chen, Yinpeng; Duff, Margaret; Ingalls, Todd; Rikakis, Thanassis

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a home-based adaptive mixed reality system (HAMRR) for upper extremity stroke rehabilitation. The goal of HAMRR is to help restore motor function to chronic stroke survivors by providing an engaging long-term reaching task therapy at home. The system uses an intelligent adaptation scheme to create a continuously challenging and unique multi-year therapy experience. The therapy is overseen by a physical therapist, but day-to-day use of the system can be independently set up and completed by a stroke survivor. The HAMMR system tracks movement of the wrist and torso and provides real-time, post-trial, and post-set feedback to encourage the stroke survivor to self-assess his or her movement and engage in active learning of new movement strategies. The HAMRR system consists of a custom table, chair, and media center, and is designed to easily integrate into any home.

  8. A low cost, adaptive mixed reality system for home-based stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinpeng; Baran, Michael; Sundaram, Hari; Rikakis, Thanassis

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, low-cost, real-time adaptive multimedia environment for home-based upper extremity rehabilitation of stroke survivors. The primary goal of this system is to provide an interactive tool with which the stroke survivor can sustain gains achieved within the clinical phase of therapy and increase the opportunity for functional recovery. This home-based mediated system has low cost sensing, off the shelf components for the auditory and visual feedback, and remote monitoring capability. The system is designed to continue active learning by reducing dependency on real-time feedback and focusing on summary feedback after a single task and sequences of tasks. To increase system effectiveness through customization, we use data from the training strategy developed by the therapist at the clinic for each stroke survivor to drive automated system adaptation at the home. The adaptation includes changing training focus, selecting proper feedback coupling both in real-time and in summary, and constructing appropriate dialogues with the stroke survivor to promote more efficient use of the system. This system also allows the therapist to review participant's progress and adjust the training strategy weekly.

  9. Use of outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation in the transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    treating stroke patients at home in three regions in Denmark. The three regions have a total population of three million. The survey was targeted at health care professionals that typically take part in municipal health service: nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech......-language pathologists, nursing assistants and neuropsychologists. The questionnaire had one open-ended question: “Which instruments, outcome measures or tests are commonly used to describe functioning in persons with stroke?”. The questionnaire underlined that only instruments routinely used to assess functioning were......Relevance: Stroke is one of the major chronic diseases leading to long-term disability. Stroke treatment has improved and in-hospital stays have been reduced, leading to increasing emphasis on home-based rehabilitation. The transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation is critical, as vital...

  10. Preliminary Study of the Effect of Low-Intensity Home-Based Physical Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jau-Hong Lin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was a preliminary examination of the effect of low-intensity home-based physical therapy on the performance of activities of daily living (ADL and motor function in patients more than 1 year after stroke. Twenty patients were recruited from a community stroke register in Nan-Tou County, Taiwan, to a randomized, crossover trial comparing intervention by a physical therapist immediately after entry into the trial (Group I or after a delay of 10 weeks (Group II. The intervention consisted of home-based physical therapy once a week for 10 weeks. The Barthel Index (BI and Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM were used as standard measures for ADL and motor function. At the first follow-up assessment at 11 weeks, Group I showed greater improvement in lower limb motor function than Group II. At the second follow-up assessment at 22 weeks, Group II showed improvement while Group I had declined. At 22 weeks, the motor function of upper limbs, mobility, and ADL performance in Group II had improved slightly more than in Group I, but the between-group differences were not significant. It appears that low-intensity home-based physical therapy can improve lower limb motor function in chronic stroke survivors. Further studies will be needed to confirm these findings.

  11. Home-based psychoeducational and mailed information programs for stroke-caregiving dyads post-discharge: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Sharon K; Godwin, Kyler M; Cron, Stanley G; Kelley, Carolyn P; Hersch, Gayle; Davis, Sally

    2014-01-01

    This randomized trial compared 6- and 12-month outcomes of a home-based psychoeducational program to mailed information provided to 159 survivors of stroke (SS) and their spousal caregivers (CG). SS (age 50+) and CG were recruited as dyads post-discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. All dyads received mailed information for 12 months. Dyads randomized to the home-based group received an average of 36.7 h of psychoeducation over 6 months. Health status, depression, stress, burden, coping, support, mutuality and function were obtained on all dyads. Repeated measures analysis with linear mixed models was used to compare the groups for change over time in the outcome variables. Both groups demonstrated less depression and stress over time. Compared to the mailed information group, SS in the home-based group demonstrated significantly improved self-reported health and cognitive function; CG demonstrated significantly improved self-reported health and coping strategies. Mutuality and social support decreased in both groups. The home-based intervention was effective in improving self-reported health, coping skills in CG and cognitive functioning in SS. However, the finding that dyads in both groups demonstrated decreased depression and stress suggests that providing repeated doses of relevant, personalized information by mail may result in positive changes. A stroke affects both the stroke survivor and the spousal caregiver, so nurses and therapists should use multicomponent strategies to provide education, support, counseling and linkages to community resources to ease the transition from hospital to home. Stroke may have a negative impact on the dyad's relationship with each other and also on the availability of support people in their lives during the 12 months after hospital discharge. Comprehensive stroke programs should encourage dyads to attend support groups and to seek individual and group counseling, as needed. Establishing an ongoing relationship with

  12. A low cost virtual reality system for home based rehabilitation of the arm following stroke: a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standen, P J; Threapleton, K; Richardson, A; Connell, L; Brown, D J; Battersby, S; Platts, F; Burton, A

    2017-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial of a home-based virtual reality system for rehabilitation of the arm following stroke. Two group feasibility randomised controlled trial of intervention versus usual care. Patients' homes. Patients aged 18 or over, with residual arm dysfunction following stroke and no longer receiving any other intensive rehabilitation. Eight weeks' use of a low cost home-based virtual reality system employing infra-red capture to translate the position of the hand into game play or usual care. The primary objective was to collect information on the feasibility of a trial, including recruitment, collection of outcome measures and staff support required. Patients were assessed at three time points using the Wolf Motor Function Test, Nine-Hole Peg Test, Motor Activity Log and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living. Over 15 months only 47 people were referred to the team. Twenty seven were randomised and 18 (67%) of those completed final outcome measures. Sample size calculation based on data from the Wolf Motor Function Test indicated a requirement for 38 per group. There was a significantly greater change from baseline in the intervention group on midpoint Wolf Grip strength and two subscales of the final Motor Activity Log. Training in the use of the equipment took a median of 230 minutes per patient. To achieve the required sample size, a definitive home-based trial would require additional strategies to boost recruitment rates and adequate resources for patient support.

  13. Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Alexander J; Magee, Wendy L; Bateman, Andrew; Parker, Michael; Odell-Miller, Helen; Fachner, Jorg

    2018-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate music therapy as a home-based intervention for arm hemiparesis in stroke. A pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial, with cross-over design. Randomization by statistician using computer-generated, random numbers concealed in opaque envelopes. Participants' homes across Cambridgeshire, UK. Eleven people with stroke and arm hemiparesis, 3-60 months post stroke, following discharge from community rehabilitation. Each participant engaged in therapeutic instrumental music performance in 12 individual clinical contacts, twice weekly for six weeks. Feasibility was estimated by recruitment from three community stroke teams over a 12-month period, attrition rates, completion of treatment and successful data collection. Structured interviews were conducted pre and post intervention to establish participant tolerance and preference. Action Research Arm Test and Nine-hole Peg Test data were collected at weeks 1, 6, 9, 15 and 18, pre and post intervention by a blinded assessor. A total of 11 of 14 invited participants were recruited (intervention n = 6, waitlist n = 5). In total, 10 completed treatment and data collection. It cannot be concluded whether a larger trial would be feasible due to unavailable data regarding a number of eligible patients screened. Adherence to treatment, retention and interview responses might suggest that the intervention was motivating for participants. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT 02310438.

  14. The effectiveness of home-based individual tele-care intervention for stroke caregivers in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S S; Kim, E J; Cheon, J Y; Chung, S K; Moon, S; Moon, K H

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop effective intervention programmes that can reduce family caregiver burden as they provide care to stroke patients so that family caregivers can adapt to and deal with the new circumstances from the early stages of stroke. We also intended to verify the effectiveness of the developed programme. This study employed a quasi-experimental design with a repeated-measures analysis. We included five hospitals specialized in stroke care in Seoul Metropolitan areas. Seventy-three patients from these hospitals agreed to participate in this study. The score of family caregiver burden decreased by 8.07 (±18.67) in the experimental group and increased by 1.65 (±7.47) in the control group, which was a significant difference (t=2.257, P=0.027) between pre- and post-intervention. The family caregiver burden of experimental group was significantly lower than the control group (F=3.649, P=0.033). The home-based individual tele-care intervention, in addition to the hospital-based group programme, was cost-effective and supportive in reducing family caregivers' burden by providing relevant information for their needs in timely manner. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Telehealth Activities in RCHE

    OpenAIRE

    William B. Collins

    2007-01-01

    Telehealth refers to a variety of mediated healthcare delivery and supporting methodologies, including: Synchronous provider/patient consultations through teleconferencing (telemedicine, teleoncology, telecardiology, etc.) Store and forward diagnostic imaging (teleradiology) Home-based patient monitoring (home telecare/tele homehealth) Distance education for healthcare professionals Etc.

  16. A randomized trial of two home-based exercise programmes to improve functional walking post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nancy E; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn J; Scott, Susan C; Moriello, Carolina; Brophy, James

    2013-07-01

    To estimate the relative effectiveness in improving walking ability and other mobility and health outcomes post-stroke of two home-based exercise programmes - stationary cycling and an exercise and walking programme. An observer-blinded, randomized, pragmatic, trial with repeated measures. Hospital centers in two Canadian cities. People within 12 months of acute stroke who were able to walk >10 meters independently and healthy enough to engage in exercise. Two dose-equivalent interventions, one involving stationary cycling and the other disability-targeted interventions were tested. Both protocols required daily moderate intensity exercise at home building up to 30 minutes per day. One group exercised on a stationary bicycle, the second group carried out mobility exercises and brisk walking. The primary outcome was walking capacity as measured by the six-minute walk test (6MWT). Secondary outcomes were physical function, role participation, health-related quality of life exercise adherence, and adverse events. The study failed to meet recruitment targets: 87 participants (cycle group, n = 43; exercise group, n = 44) participated. No significant effects of group or time were revealed for the 6MWT, which was approximately 320 m at randomization. A significant effect for role participation was found in favor of the exercise group (global odds ratio (OR) for cycling vs. exercise was 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.27-0.95). Change in the 6MWT between highest and lowest adherence categories was statistically significant (p = 0.022). Both programmes were equally effective in maintaining walking capacity after discharge from stroke rehabilitation; or were equally ineffective in improving walking capacity. Clinical Trials Gov number: NCT00786045.

  17. Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yi-Chieh; Lin, Mei-Feng; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Shyu, Meei-Ling; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Chang, Hsiu-Ju

    2017-08-01

    To examine the effects of home-based supportive care on improvements in physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. Seven electronic databases (eg, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, and Google Scholar) and 4 Chinese databases (eg, WANFANG MED ONLINE, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and National Central Library) were fully searched for all relevant articles up to June 25, 2016. Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of home-based supportive care on physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke were included. Finally, 16 articles in Chinese (n=4) and English (n=12) met the inclusion criteria. Data on patient characteristics, study characteristics, intervention details, and outcome were extracted. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Home-based supportive care had a small size effect on physical function (Hedges' g=.17; 95% confidence interval, .09-.26) and a moderate size effect on depressive symptoms (Hedges' g=-.44; 95% confidence interval, -.83 to -.05) in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The moderator analysis revealed that some components of study participants and intervention programs improved the effects on physical function and depressive symptoms; however, no significant moderators were further identified to have superiorly improved physical function and depressive symptoms. Regular performance of home-based supportive interventions should be considered for inclusion as routine care for managing and improving physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The present findings provide further evidence with which to design appropriate supportive interventions for home-dwelling stroke survivors. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  18. Influences of hand dominance on the maintenance of benefits after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy in individuals with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. M. Lima

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the influence of hand dominance on the maintenance of gains after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT. Method: Aprevious randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the addition of trunk restraint to the mCIMT. Twenty-two chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate motor impairments received individual home-based mCIMT with or without trunk restraints, five times per week, three hours daily over two weeks. In this study, the participants were separated into dominant group, which had their paretic upper limb as dominant before the stroke (n=8, and non-dominant group (n=14 for analyses. The ability to perform unimanual tasks was measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT and the Motor Activity Log (MAL, whereas the capacity to perform bimanual tasks was measured using the Bilateral Activity Assessment Scale (BAAS. Results: Analysis revealed significant positive effects on the MAL amount of use and quality of the movement scales, as well as on the BAAS scores after intervention, with no differences between groups. Both groups maintained the bimanual improvements during follow-ups (BAAS-seconds 0.1, 95% CI -10.0 to 10.0, however only the dominant group maintained the unilateral improvements (MAL-amount of use: 1.5, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3; MAL-quality: 1.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1. Conclusions: Upper limb dominance did not interfere with the acquisition of upper limb skills after mCIMT. However, the participants whose paretic upper limb was dominant demonstrated better abilities to maintain the unilateral gains. The bilateral improvements were maintained, regardless of upper limb dominance.

  19. Low-cost tele-assessment system for home-based evaluation of reaching ability following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Chi-Lun; Chen, Ya-Ping; Lai, Jin-Shin; Chen, Shih-Ching; Kuo, Te-Son; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Luh, Jer-Junn

    2013-12-01

    Tele-assessment techniques can provide healthcare professionals with easily accessible information regarding patients' clinical progress. Recently, kinematic analysis systems have been used to assess rehabilitative outcomes in stroke patients. Kinematic systems, however, are not compatible with tele-assessment. The objective of our study was to develop a tele-assessment system for acquiring kinematic data of forward reaching movements in stroke patients, with an emphasis on cost-effectiveness, portability, and ease of use. We selected four healthy control participants and eight hemiplegic stroke patients for our study. The stroke patients were classified as Brunnstrom stage III, stage IV, or stage V. Our tele-assessment system used two three-axes accelerometers, a potentiometer, a multifunctional data acquisition card, and two computers. A standardized kinematic system was applied simultaneously to validate the measurements recorded by our tele-assessment system during five repetitions of forward reaching movements. The correlation coefficients of the reaching displacement, velocity, and acceleration measurements obtained using our tele-assessment system and the standardized kinematic system were 0.956, 0.896, and 0.727, respectively. Differences in the maximum reaching distance and the maximum reaching velocity of forward reaching movements were observed among the study groups. There were no significant differences in the time required to complete the testing session among the study groups. Our tele-assessment system is valid for the evaluation of upper-extremity reaching ability in stroke patients. Further research is needed to investigate the feasibility of the use of the tele-assessment system in patients' homes.

  20. Botulinum Toxin Type a Injection, Followed by Home-Based Functional Training for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Toru; Kakuda, Wataru; Taguchi, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Sase, Yousuke; Abo, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported to be an effective treatment for limb spasticity after stroke. However, the reduction in the spasticity after BoNT-A injection alone does not ensure an improvement in the active motor function of the affected limb. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical effects of a BoNT-A injection,…

  1. Potential of a suite of robot/computer-assisted motivating systems for personalized, home-based, stroke rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need to improve semi-autonomous stroke therapy in home environments often characterized by low supervision of clinical experts and low extrinsic motivation. Our distributed device approach to this problem consists of an integrated suite of low-cost robotic/computer-assistive technologies driven by a novel universal access software framework called UniTherapy. Our design strategy for personalizing the therapy, providing extrinsic motivation and outcome assessment is presented and evaluated. Methods Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential of the suite. A conventional force-reflecting joystick, a modified joystick therapy platform (TheraJoy, and a steering wheel platform (TheraDrive were tested separately with the UniTherapy software. Stroke subjects with hemiparesis and able-bodied subjects completed tracking activities with the devices in different positions. We quantify motor performance across subject groups and across device platforms and muscle activation across devices at two positions in the arm workspace. Results Trends in the assessment metrics were consistent across devices with able-bodied and high functioning strokes subjects being significantly more accurate and quicker in their motor performance than low functioning subjects. Muscle activation patterns were different for shoulder and elbow across different devices and locations. Conclusion The Robot/CAMR suite has potential for stroke rehabilitation. By manipulating hardware and software variables, we can create personalized therapy environments that engage patients, address their therapy need, and track their progress. A larger longitudinal study is still needed to evaluate these systems in under-supervised environments such as the home.

  2. Potential of a suite of robot/computer-assisted motivating systems for personalized, home-based, stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle J; Feng, Xin; Johnson, Laura M; Winters, Jack M

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a need to improve semi-autonomous stroke therapy in home environments often characterized by low supervision of clinical experts and low extrinsic motivation. Our distributed device approach to this problem consists of an integrated suite of low-cost robotic/computer-assistive technologies driven by a novel universal access software framework called UniTherapy. Our design strategy for personalizing the therapy, providing extrinsic motivation and outcome assessment is presented and evaluated. Methods Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential of the suite. A conventional force-reflecting joystick, a modified joystick therapy platform (TheraJoy), and a steering wheel platform (TheraDrive) were tested separately with the UniTherapy software. Stroke subjects with hemiparesis and able-bodied subjects completed tracking activities with the devices in different positions. We quantify motor performance across subject groups and across device platforms and muscle activation across devices at two positions in the arm workspace. Results Trends in the assessment metrics were consistent across devices with able-bodied and high functioning strokes subjects being significantly more accurate and quicker in their motor performance than low functioning subjects. Muscle activation patterns were different for shoulder and elbow across different devices and locations. Conclusion The Robot/CAMR suite has potential for stroke rehabilitation. By manipulating hardware and software variables, we can create personalized therapy environments that engage patients, address their therapy need, and track their progress. A larger longitudinal study is still needed to evaluate these systems in under-supervised environments such as the home. PMID:17331243

  3. Home-based Computer Assisted Arm Rehabilitation (hCAAR) robotic device for upper limb exercise after stroke: results of a feasibility study in home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Manoj; Gallagher, Justin; Makower, Sophie; Keeling, David; Bhakta, Bipin; O'Connor, Rory J; Levesley, Martin

    2014-12-12

    Home-based robotic technologies may offer the possibility of self-directed upper limb exercise after stroke as a means of increasing the intensity of rehabilitation treatment. The current literature has a paucity of robotic devices that have been tested in a home environment. The aim of this research project was to evaluate a robotic device Home-based Computer Assisted Arm Rehabilitation (hCAAR) that can be used independently at home by stroke survivors with upper limb weakness. hCAAR device comprises of a joystick handle moved by the weak upper limb to perform tasks on the computer screen. The device provides assistance to the movements depending on users ability. Nineteen participants (stroke survivors with upper limb weakness) were recruited. Outcome measures performed at baseline (A0), at end of 8-weeks of hCAAR use (A1) and 1 month after end of hCAAR use (A2) were: Optotrak kinematic variables, Fugl Meyer Upper Extremity motor subscale (FM-UE), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Medical Research Council (MRC) and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI) and ABILHAND. Two participants were unable to use hCAAR: one due to severe paresis and the other due to personal problems. The remaining 17 participants were able to use the device independently in their home setting. No serious adverse events were reported. The median usage time was 433 minutes (IQR 250 - 791 min). A statistically significant improvement was observed in the kinematic and clinical outcomes at A1. The median gain in the scores at A1 were by: movement time 19%, path length 15% and jerk 19%, FM-UE 1 point, total MAS 1.5 point, total MRC 2 points, ARAT 3 points, CAHAI 5.5 points and ABILHAND 3 points. Three participants showed clinically significant improvement in all the clinical outcomes. The hCAAR feasibility study is the first clinical study of its kind reported in the current literature; in this study, 17 participants used the robotic device independently

  4. Stepping to the Beat: Feasibility and Potential Efficacy of a Home-Based Auditory-Cued Step Training Program in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Wright

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHemiparesis after stroke typically results in a reduced walking speed, an asymmetrical gait pattern and a reduced ability to make gait adjustments. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of home-based training involving auditory cueing of stepping in place.MethodsTwelve community-dwelling participants with chronic hemiparesis completed two 3-week blocks of home-based stepping to music overlaid with an auditory metronome. Tempo of the metronome was increased 5% each week. One 3-week block used a regular metronome, whereas the other 3-week block had phase shift perturbations randomly inserted to cue stepping adjustments.ResultsAll participants reported that they enjoyed training, with 75% completing all training blocks. No adverse events were reported. Walking speed, Timed Up and Go (TUG time and Dynamic Gait Index (DGI scores (median [inter-quartile range] significantly improved between baseline (speed = 0.61 [0.32, 0.85] m⋅s−1; TUG = 20.0 [16.0, 39.9] s; DGI = 14.5 [11.3, 15.8] and post stepping training (speed = 0.76 [0.39, 1.03] m⋅s−1; TUG = 16.3 [13.3, 35.1] s; DGI = 16.0 [14.0, 19.0] and was maintained at follow-up (speed = 0.75 [0.41, 1.03] m⋅s−1; TUG = 16.5 [12.9, 34.1] s; DGI = 16.5 [13.5, 19.8].ConclusionThis pilot study suggests that auditory-cued stepping conducted at home was feasible and well-tolerated by participants post-stroke, with improvements in walking and functional mobility. No differences were detected between regular and phase-shift training with the metronome at each assessment point.

  5. Acceptance of home-based telehealth problem-solving therapy for depressed, low-income homebound older adults: qualitative interviews with the participants and aging-service case managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Namkee G; Wilson, Nancy L; Sirrianni, Leslie; Marinucci, Mary Lynn; Hegel, Mark T

    2014-08-01

    To report low-income homebound older adults' experience of telehealth problem-solving therapy (tele-PST) and aging-service case managers' (CMs') experience/perception of client-level personal barriers to accessing psychotherapy in general and PST specifically. The study sample consisted of 42 homebound older adults who participated in the feasibility and efficacy trial of tele-PST and completed 36-week follow-up assessments and 12 CMs of a large home-delivered meals program who referred their clients to the tele-PST trial. In-depth interviews with the older adults and written feedback and focus group discussions with the CMs provided the data. Older adults reported a high rate of approval of PST procedures and acknowledged its positive treatment effect. Tele-PST participants were satisfied with videoconferenced sessions because they were convenient and allowed them to see their therapist. However, CMs reported that only about 10%-20% of potentially eligible older adults gave oral consent for PST. Significant treatment engagement barriers were the older adults' lack of motivation, denial of depression, perceived stigma, and other personal attitudinal factors. The real-world implementation of tele-PST or other psychotherapies needs to include educating and motivating depressed homebound elders to recognize their depression and accept treatment. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Telehealth in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Hefner, Jaye E; Kodish-Wachs, Jodi E; Iaccarino, Mary A; Paganoni, Sabrina

    2017-05-01

    Telehealth refers to health care interactions that leverage telecommunication devices to provide medical care outside the traditional face-to-face, in-person medical encounter. Technology advances and research have expanded use of telehealth in health care delivery. Physical medicine and rehabilitation providers may use telehealth to deliver care to populations with neurologic and musculoskeletal conditions, commonly treated in both acute care and outpatient settings. Patients with impaired mobility and those living in locations with reduced access to care may particularly benefit. Video-teleconferencing has been shown to be effective for management of burn patients during acute rehabilitation, including reduced health care use expenses and less disruptions to care. Telehealth can facilitate developing interprofessional care plans. Patients with neurologic conditions including stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may use telehealth to monitor symptoms and response to treatment. Telehealth also may facilitate occupational and physical therapy programs as well as improve weight management and skin care in patients with chronic conditions. Other applications include imaging review in sports medicine, symptom management and counseling in concussion, traumatic brain injury, and pain management programs. Limitations of telehealth include barriers in establishing relationship between medical provider and patient, ability to perform limited physical examination, and differences in payment models and liability coverage. The expansion of telehealth services is expected to grow and has potential to improve patient satisfaction by delivering high quality and value of care. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Telehealth: into the mainstream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Lisa

    2014-03-10

    Teleheath, and its subset telemedicine, extend across a range of technologies allowing patients to seek diagnosis, treatment, and other services from clinicians by electronic means. Telephone, videoconferencing, iPads, and apps are all employed. In its most established form, hospitals and medical centers use telehealth to reach patients in underserved rural areas. Proponents of telehealth suggest it can relieve medical workforce shortages; save patients time, money, and travel; reduce unnecessary hospital visits; improve the management of chronic conditions; and improve continuing medical education. But telehealth also faces ongoing challenges. States require physicians to be licensed in each state where they treat patients, even if from a distance. Most clinicians have not been trained in telehealth. Security concerns linger. Who should have access to telehealth and how it should be reimbursed are questions without fixed answers. This issue brief looks at telehealth's promise and its challenges and considers opportunities for policymakers to help in charting its future course.

  8. Telehealth and Mobile Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The E-Medicine, E-Health, M-Health, Telemedicine, and Telehealth Handbook provides extensive coverage of modern telecommunication in the medical industry, from sensors on and within the body to electronic medical records and beyond. Telehealth and Mobile Health is the second volume of this handbook. Featuring chapters written by leading experts and researchers in their respective fields.

  9. Technology support to a telehealth in the home service: Qualitative observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alan; Wade, Victoria; Morris, Greg; Pech, Joanne; Rechter, Stuart; Kidd, Michael; Carati, Colin

    2016-07-01

    The Flinders University Telehealth in the Home (FTH) trial was an action research initiative that introduced and evaluated the impact of telehealth services on palliative care patients living in the community, home-based rehabilitation services for the elderly, and services to the elderly in residential aged care. The aim of this study was to understand the issues encountered during the provision of technology services that supported this trial. A mixed methods approach was undertaken to analyse the roles of information and communication technology (ICT) and clinical staff in design, technology management and training. The data sources were staff observations and documents including job logs, meetings, emails and technology descriptions. Use of consumer technology for telehealth required customisation of applications and services. Clinicians played a key role in definition of applications and the embedding of workflow into applications. Usability of applications was key to their subsequent use. Management of design creep and technology services, coupled with support and training for clinicians were important to maintenance of a telehealth service. In the setting described, an iterative approach to the development of telehealth services to the home using consumer technologies was needed. The efficient management of consumer devices in multiple settings will become critical as telehealth services grow in scale. Effective collaboration between clinical and technical stakeholders and further workforce education in telehealth can be key enablers for the transition of face-to-face care to a telehealth mode of delivery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Telehealth and Autism: Treating Challenging Behavior at Lower Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Scott; Wacker, David; Suess, Alyssa; Schieltz, Kelly; Pelzel, Kelly; Kopelman, Todd; Lee, John; Romani, Patrick; Waldron, Debra

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether challenging behavior in young children with autism and other developmental disabilities can be treated successfully at lower cost by using telehealth to train parents to implement applied behavior analysis (ABA). We compared data on the outcomes and costs for implementing evidence-based ABA procedures to reduce problem behavior by using 3 service delivery models: in-home therapy, clinic-based telehealth, and home-based telehealth. Participants were 107 young children diagnosed with autism or other neurodevelopmental disorders, and data analysis focused on the 94 children who completed treatment. All 3 service delivery models demonstrated successful reduction of problem behavior by training parents to conduct functional analysis and functional communication training. The mean percentage reduction in problem behavior was >90% in all 3 groups after treatment, and treatment acceptability based on parent ratings was high for all groups. Total costs for implementing treatment were lowest for home telehealth, but both telehealth models were significantly less costly than in-home therapy. This research demonstrated that parents can use ABA procedures to successfully treat behavior problems associated with autism spectrum disorders regardless of whether treatment is directed by behavior consultants in person or via remote video coaching. Because ABA telehealth can achieve similar outcomes at lower cost compared with in-home therapy, geographic barriers to providing access to ABA for treating problem behavior can be minimized. These findings support the potential for using telehealth to provide research-based behavioral treatment to any family that has access to the Internet. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Personalized telehealth in the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, B.; Nonnecke, B.; Lindeman, David

    2016-01-01

    As telehealth plays an even greater role in global health care delivery, it will be increasingly important to develop a strong evidence base of successful, innovative telehealth solutions that can lead to scalable and sustainable telehealth programs. This paper has two aims: (1) to describe...

  12. Economic Modeling of Heart Failure Telehealth Programs: When Do They Become Cost Saving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena Xin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Telehealth programs for congestive heart failure have been shown to be clinically effective. This study assesses clinical and economic consequences of providing telehealth programs for CHF patients. A Markov model was developed and presented in the context of a home-based telehealth program on CHF. Incremental life expectancy, hospital admissions, and total healthcare costs were examined at periods ranging up to five years. One-way and two-way sensitivity analyses were also conducted on clinical performance parameters. The base case analysis yielded cost savings ranging from $2832 to $5499 and 0.03 to 0.04 life year gain per patient over a 1-year period. Applying telehealth solution to a low-risk cohort with no prior admission history would result in $2502 cost increase per person over the 1-year time frame with 0.01 life year gain. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the cost savings were most sensitive to patient risk, baseline cost of hospital admission, and the length-of-stay reduction ratio affected by the telehealth programs. In sum, telehealth programs can be cost saving for intermediate and high risk patients over a 1- to 5-year window. The results suggested the economic viability of telehealth programs for managing CHF patients and illustrated the importance of risk stratification in such programs.

  13. The Ottawa telehealth project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, S T; Davies, R F; Smith, K; Marsh, R; Sherrard, H; Keon, W J

    1998-01-01

    To examine the telehealth system as a means of improving access to cardiac consultations and specialized health services in remote areas of Ontario. The University of Ottawa Heart Institute has set up a telehealth test program, Healthcare and Education Access for Remote Residents by Telecommunications (HEARRT), in collaboration with industry and the provincial and federal government, as well as several remote clinical test sites. The program makes off-site cardiology consultations possible. History taking and physical examinations are conducted by video and electronic stethoscope. Laboratory results and echocardiograms are transmitted by document camera and VCR. The technology is being tested in both stable outpatient and emergency situations. Various telecommunications bandwidths and encoding systems are being evaluated, including satellite and terrestrial-based asynchronous transfer-mode circuits. Patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness are also being assessed. Bandwidths from as low as 384 kbps using H.320 encoders to 40 Mbps using digital transport of NTSC video signals have been evaluated. Although lower bandwidths are sufficient for sending echocardiographic and electrocardiogram data, bandwidths with transport speeds of 4 to 6 Mbps appear necessary to capture the nuances of the cardiac physical examination. A preliminary satisfaction survey of 19 patients noted that all felt that they could communicate effectively with the cardiologist by video, and each had confidence in the advice offered. None reported that he or she would rather have traveled to the doctor in person. Initial and projected examination of the costs suggested that telehealth will effectively reduce overall health care spending while decreasing travel expenses for rural patients. Telehealth technology is sufficiently sophisticated to allow off-site cardiology assessments. Preliminary results suggest there is a sound business case for the implementation of telehealth technology to meet

  14. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    of these systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account......Sustaining daily, unsupervised healthcare activities in non-clinical settings such as the private home can challenge, among others, older adults. To support such unsupervised care activities, an increasingly number of reminders and monitoring systems are being designed. However, most...... for the home setting and people’s everyday activities....

  15. Review of telehealth stuttering management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Robyn; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Telehealth is the use of communication technology to provide health care services by means other than typical in-clinic attendance models. Telehealth is increasingly used for the management of speech, language and communication disorders. The aim of this article is to review telehealth applications to stuttering management. We conducted a search of peer-reviewed literature for the past 20 years using the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science database, PubMed: The Bibliographic Database and a search for articles by hand. Outcomes for telehealth stuttering treatment were generally positive, but there may be a compromise of treatment efficiency with telehealth treatment of young children. Our search found no studies dealing with stuttering assessment procedures using telehealth models. No economic analyses of this delivery model have been reported. This review highlights the need for continued research about telehealth for stuttering management. Evidence from research is needed to inform the efficacy of assessment procedures using telehealth methods as well as guide the development of improved treatment procedures. Clinical and technical guidelines are urgently needed to ensure that the evolving and continued use of telehealth to manage stuttering does not compromise the standards of care afforded with standard in-clinic models.

  16. Palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective: benefits and disadvantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston BM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bridget M Johnston Sue Ryder Care Centre for the Study of Supportive, Palliative, and End of Life Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK Abstract: This critical review paper explores the concept of palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective. The aim of the critical review was to scope information available from published and unpublished research on the current state of palliative home-based technology, practitioner-focused perspectives, patient-focused perspectives, quality of life, and the implications for clinical practice. Published and unpublished studies were included. An example of one UK patient-centered home-based technology is explored as an exemplar. The evidence suggests that despite the challenges, there are numerous examples of good practice in relation to palliative home-based technology. Improvements in technology mean that telehealth has much to offer people being cared for at home with palliative needs. However, some of the evaluative evidence is limited, and further rigor is needed when evaluating future technology-based solutions innovations. Keywords: technology, telehealth, telemedicine, information technology, palliative care, hospice, terminal illness

  17. Making a case for telehealth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, I.; Cheek, C.; Jaffray, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Telehealth services are promoted to reduce the cost of travel for people living in rural areas. The previous Australian Government, through the national Digital Economy Strategy, invested heavily in telehealth service development, at the same time introducing a carbon pricing mechanis...

  18. Personalized telehealth in the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Birthe Irene; Nonnecke, Brandie; Lindeman, David

    2016-01-01

    a uniform framework for identifying and rapidly replicating best practices, while concurrently fostering global collaboration in the development and rigorous testing of new and emerging telehealth technologies. In this paper, the members of the Transatlantic Telehealth Research Network offer a 12-point...

  19. Stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pollack, Allan; Harrison, Christopher; Henderson, Joan; Miller, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, about 50,000 Australians had a stroke (cerebrovascular accident (CVA)). The risk of stroke is associated with increased age, previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus (DM...

  20. Telehealth coordinators in hospital based telehealth services: Who are they and what do they do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirippulige, Sisira; Armfield, Nigel R; Greenup, Phil; Bryett, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Many studies have identified the importance of 'telehealth coordinators' for successful telehealth implementation and operation. However, little is known about the telehealth coordinators' functions, the skills and competencies required and the reasons for their influence. This study aimed to examine the key functions of telehealth coordinators in the Queensland public health system, their perceptions about their role, and the level of competencies to support this role. All telehealth coordinators within Queensland Health Telehealth Services were invited to complete a questionnaire. We collected: (i) demographic information; (ii) details of their telehealth work; and (iii) information about knowledge and skills relevant to their telehealth coordinator role. Eighteen of 20 (90%) participants completed and submitted the survey. Telehealth coordinators were responsible for a range of tasks relating to telehealth consultations, technical assistance, administration, research, promotion and marketing. Nearly all telehealth coordinators (n = 17, 94%) were confident in carrying out the tasks of their job. The majority of telehealth coordinators (n = 13, 72%) thought education and training relating to telehealth would help improve their job. The top three topics that telehealth coordinators were keen to learn about were: (i) examples of clinical use of telehealth; (ii) types of technologies used; and (iii) telehealth clinical and business models. Our participants were all hospital-based; as the use of telehealth is growing outside of the traditional hospital settings, the role of telehealth coordinators is likely to change. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Telehealth on advanced networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laurence S; Stevenson, Duncan R; Cregan, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We address advanced Internet for complex telehealth applications by reviewing four hospital-based broadband telehealth projects and identifying common threads. These projects were conducted in Australia under a 6-year research project on broadband Internet applications. Each project addressed specific clinical needs and its development was guided by the clinicians involved. Each project was trialed in the field and evaluated against the initial requirements. The four projects covered remote management of a resuscitation team in a district hospital, remote guidance and interpretation of echocardiography, virtual-reality-based instructor-student surgical training, and postoperative outpatient consultations following pediatric surgery. Each was characterized by a high level of interpersonal communication, a high level of clinical expertise, and multiple participants. Each made use of multiple high-quality video and audio links and shared real-time access to clinical data. Four common threads were observed. Each application provided a high level of usability and task focus because the design and use of broadband capability was aimed directly to meet the clinicians' needs. Each used the media quality available over broadband to convey words, gestures, body movements, and facial expressions to support communication and a sense of presence among the participants. Each required a complex information space shared among the participants, including real-time access to stored patient data and real-time interactive access to the patients themselves. Finally, each application supported the social and organizational aspects of their healthcare focus, creating and maintaining relationships between the various participants, and this was done by placing the telehealth application into a wider functioning clinical context. These findings provide evidence for a significantly enhanced role for appropriate telemedicine systems running on advanced networks, in a wider range of clinical

  2. Transitioning from a single-site pilot project to a state-wide regional telehealth service: The experience from the Victorian Stroke Telemedicine programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, Kathleen L; Cadilhac, Dominique A; Kim, Joosup; Vu, Michelle; Savage, Mark; Bolitho, Les; Howlett, Glenn; Rabl, Justin; Dewey, Helen M; Hand, Peter J; Denisenko, Sonia; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Bladin, Christopher F

    2017-12-01

    Scaling of projects from inception to establishment within the healthcare system is rarely formally reported. The Victorian Stroke Telemedicine (VST) programme provided a very useful opportunity to describe how rural hospitals in Victoria were able to access a network of Melbourne-based neurologists via telemedicine. The VST programme was initially piloted at one site in 2010 and has gradually expanded as a state-wide regional service operating with 16 hospitals in 2017. The aim of this paper is to summarise the factors that facilitated the state-wide transition of the VST programme. A naturalistic case-study was used and data were obtained from programme documents, e.g. minutes of governance committees, including the steering committee, the management committee and six working groups; operational and evaluation documentation, interviews and research field-notes taken by project staff. Thematic analysis was undertaken, with results presented in narrative form to provide a summary of the lived experience of developing and scaling the VST programme. The main success factors were attaining funding from various sources, identifying a clinical need and evidence-based solution, engaging stakeholders and facilitating co-design, including embedding the programme within policy, iterative evaluation including performing financial sustainability modelling, and conducting dissemination activities of the interim results, including promotion of early successes.

  3. Telehealth and Medicare - Payment Policy, Current Use...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Despite legislative changes from 2001 to 2008 that increased Medicare payment rates for telehealth and decreased regulatory burdens, the study Telehealth and...

  4. Florida TeleHealth Summit: "Telemedicine -It's Here, It's Now"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samantha Wainright Haas

    2015-01-01

      The Southeastern Telehealth Resource Center, Florida State University College of Medicine, and the Florida Partnership for TeleHealth invites participation in the 2nd Annual Florida TeleHealth Summit...

  5. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause to help prevent a future stroke. Medical History and Physical Exam Your doctor will ask you ... clots from getting larger. Two common medicines are aspirin and clopidogrel. Medical Procedures If you have carotid ...

  6. Effect of telehealth-to-home interventions on quality of life for individuals with depressive and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Logan Durland,1 Alejandro Interian,1,2 Ingrid Pretzer-Aboff,3 Roseanne D Dobkin11Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Piscataway, NJ, 2The New Jersey Healthcare System, Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Lyons, NJ, 3University of Delaware, School of Nursing and Biomechanics and Movement Sciences Program, Newark, DE, USAAbstract: Although millions of individuals suffer from mental health problems worldwide, only a small fraction receives adequate treatment. The high prevalence of depression and anxiety observed worldwide, in conjunction with very low rates of treatment utilization, are of great clinical significance, as these psychiatric conditions are two of the most important determinants of quality of life (QoL. Telehealth interventions have been touted as potential solutions to these mental health care disparities, with great interest and utility demonstrated across a diverse array of medical and psychiatric populations. Telehealth interventions may be clinic-based or home-based. The primary objective of this paper is to highlight the extent to which telehealth-to-home interventions positively impact multiple facets of QoL for individuals with depression and anxiety disorders, including those with comorbid medical conditions. While QoL outcomes are important to consider in any assessment of treatment effectiveness, QoL enhancement has received limited attention in the telemental health literature to date. All studies included in the present review evaluate telehealth-to-home treatments, assess QoL outcomes, and incorporate some degree of live, synchronous therapist-patient contact. Recommendations to advance the application of telehealth-to-home approaches are proposed and include: additional research on video-to-home telehealth platforms, strategies to increase the adoption of telehealth-to-home interventions amongst mental health treatment providers, national legislative

  7. Telehealth for long term conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Car, Josip; Huckvale, Kit; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2012-01-01

    Almost 50 years of innovation in telehealth have seen great progress in tackling a wide range of conditions using a variety of technologies and covering a wide range of outcomes. Although this work shows great promise, it also creates challenges for interpretation. The uncertainties in defining

  8. Curating Complex, Dynamic and Distributed Data: Telehealth as a Laboratory for Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Ure

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Telehealth monitoring data is now being collected across large populations of patients with chronic diseases such as stroke, hypertension, COPD and dementia. These large, complex and heterogeneous datasets, including distributed sensor and mobile datasets, present real opportunities for knowledge discovery and re-use, however they also generate new challenges for curation. This paper uses qualitative research with stakeholders in two nationally-funded telehealth projects to outline the perceptions, practices and preferences of different stakeholders with regard to data curation. Telehealth provides a living laboratory for the very different challenges implicit in designing and managing data infrastructure for embedded and ubiquitous computing. Here, technical and human agents are distributed, and interaction and state change is a central component of design, rather than an inconvenient challenge to it. The authors argue that there are lessons to be learned from other domains where data infrastructure has been radically rethought to address these challenges.

  9. Practical aspects of telehealth: establishing telehealth in an institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, S; Allen, D T; Caldwell, P; Loh, P K; Mozer, R; Komesaroff, P A; Talman, P; Williams, M; Shaheen, N; Grabinski, O

    2014-02-01

    The fifth in a series of papers on practical aspects of telehealth, this paper discusses telehealth models that can facilitate the provision of specialist services to rural and remote patients closer to home. Some of the barriers to successful implementation of these models relates to workforce, funding and infrastructure at rural sites, as well as the traditional mindset of healthcare professionals. Therefore, the rural sector needs to be adequately resourced for telehealth models to be substantive and successful. This paper describes the development of a large teleoncology network over a vast geographical area in North Queensland. Adequate resourcing for the rural sites and undertaking quality improvement activities has continually enhanced the model over a 5- to 6-year period. The benefits of this model of care are twofold: (i) patients received their care closer to home and (ii) the workforce, service capabilities and infrastructure for the hospital in Mt Isa (a rural town 900 km away from its tertiary centre) has improved. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Integrating Telehealth Instruction into the Graduate Nursing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Christie

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth can be effective for those who use it; however, very few educational programs prepare their students to utilize telehealth. The goal of this project was to integrate telehealth into the graduate nursing curriculum. This was done by providing a 1-hour classroom educational demonstration and lecture on telehealth along with 4-hour…

  11. Unsustainable Home Telehealth: A Texas Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Xie, Bo; Jacelon, Cynthia S

    2016-10-01

    Telehealth has emerged as an innovative approach to aid older individuals in managing chronic diseases in their homes and avoid hospitalizations and institutionalization. However, the sustainability of home telehealth programs remains a major challenge. This qualitative study explored the reasons for the initial adoption and the eventual decline of a decade-long home telehealth program at a Texas home health agency (HHA). Barriers to and facilitators for sustaining home telehealth programs were also explored. Semistructured interviews of 13 HHA nursing staff and administrators, 1 physician, and 9 patients aged >55 years and their informal caregivers who used telehealth were conducted in summer 2013. Interview transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Data analysis generated 5 themes representing the decline of the Texas home telehealth program: its impact on patient-centered outcomes, its cost-effectiveness, patient-clinician and interprofessional communication, technology usability, and home health management culture. Lack of significant impact on patient outcomes, in addition to financial, technical, management, and communication-related challenges, adversely affected the sustainability of this home telehealth program. A home telehealth program that attains patient-centered outcomes, improves cost-effectiveness of managing chronic diseases, improves quality of communication among patients and clinicians, is user-friendly for older adults, and involves end users in decision making is likely to be sustainable. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Telehealth technology in case/disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Case managers can better coordinate and facilitate chronic illness care by adopting telehealth technology. This article overviews four major categories of telehealth technology based on patients' roles in self-management: surveillance, testing peripherals and messaging, decision support aids, and online support groups related to patients' subordinate, structured, collaborative, and autonomous roles, respectively. These various telehealth technologies should be selected on the basis of patients' care needs and preferences. Moreover, when they are integrated with other clinical information systems, case management practice can be better performed. However, the specific role functions and skill sets needed to be competent in telehealth environments have not yet been clearly identified. Considering role ambiguity and stress among telehealth clinicians, clarifying relevant roles is an urgent task.

  13. Telehealth ICT Infrastructures in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring; Hallenborg, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and recommendations of ICT infrastructures and reference architectures for telehealth in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden). This study shows that so far only Denmark has designed a complete reference architecture, and by the end......Health in general and not designed reference architectures or done implementations for telehealth specifically. This paper recommends that all the Nordic countries join Continua and collaborate to gain more influence of the organization’s decision making....

  14. Teaching Home-Based Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Ornstein, Katherine A; Wajnberg, Ania; Kopke, M Victoria; DeCherrie, Linda V

    Despite the growing homebound population and the development of innovative models of care that work to bring care to people in their homes, home visits are not a routine part of education for many healthcare providers. This manuscript describes the experience of Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors teaching home-based primary care to learners of various disciplines and reports the results of a survey performed to assess trainee experience. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors is the largest academic home-based primary care program in the country and trainees of various disciplines have nearly 1,700 contact days annually of directly supervised clinical teaching. In order to improve trainee education and meet our practice needs, trainees: 1) independently conduct urgent visits, 2) carry longitudinal panels of homebound patients, and 3) perform subspecialist consultations. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors has exposed thousands of trainees to home-based primary care in the past 20 years and trainees report positive reviews of their experiences. As the need to train future providers in home-based primary care grows, we will be challenged to provide trainees with adequate exposure to multidisciplinary teams and to teach about the importance of continuity of care.

  15. Sustaining and Expanding Telehealth: A Survey of Business Models from Selected Prominent U.S. Telehealth Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effertz, Glen; Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Duffy, Veronica; Noon, Charles; Langell, Kevin; Antoniotti, Nina; Lowery, Curtis

    2017-02-01

    Telehealth centers across the country, including our own center, are addressing sustainability and best practice business models. We undertook this survey to explore the business models being used at other established telehealth centers. In the literature on telehealth and sustainability, there is a paucity of comparative studies as to how successful telehealth centers function. In this study, we compared the business models of 10 successful telehealth centers. We conducted the study by interviewing key individuals at the centers, either through teleconference or telephone. We found that there are five general approaches to sustaining a telehealth center: grants, telehealth network membership fees, income from providing clinical services, per encounter charges, and operating as a cost center. We also found that most centers use more than one approach. We concluded that, although the first four approaches can contribute to the success of a center, telehealth centers are and should remain cost centers for their respective institutions.

  16. Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or talk with your health care provider using streaming media, video chats, email, or text messages. Your ... chat to talk to your provider or join online support groups. During an office visit, you and ...

  17. Self-reported impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers in Mutale Municipality, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntsieni S. Mashau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The establishment of home-based care (HBC programmes in developing countries has resulted in a shift of burden from hospitals to communities where palliative care is provided by voluntary home-based caregivers.Aim: The study investigated the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers.Setting: The study was conducted at HBC organisations located in Mutale Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa.Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional descriptive survey design was applied to investigate the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers. The sample was comprised of (N = 190 home-based caregivers. Home-based caregivers provide care to people in need of care in their homes, such as orphans, the elderly and those suffering from chronic illnesses such as tuberculosis, HIV and/or AIDS, cancer and stroke. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data which were analysed descriptively using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software, Version 20.Results: The results showed that 101 (53.2% participants were worried about their financial security because they were not registered as workers, whilst 74 (39.0% participants were always worried about getting infection from their clients because they often do not have protective equipment.Conclusion: Voluntary home-based caregivers have an important role in the provision of palliative care to people in their own homes, and therefore, the negative caregiving impact on the lives of caregivers may compromise the provision of quality palliative care.

  18. HUMANICS 1. A feasibility study to create a home internet based telehealth product to supplement acquired brain injury therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the project was to produce a unique, cost effective, and user-friendly computer based telehealth system product which had longevity and the ability to be integrated modularly into a future internet-based health care communication provision. This was conceptualised as an aid to home......-based self-training through motivated creativity via manipulation of a digital multimedia game form. The system was to be a supplementary tool for therapists. The targeted group was adults with acquired brain injury. This paper details the first phase of the product feasibility....

  19. Proposal for a telehealth concept in the translational research model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Angélica Baptista; Morel, Carlos Médicis; de Moraes, Ilara Hämmerli Sozzi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the conceptual relationship between telehealth and translational research. METHODS Bibliographical search on telehealth was conducted in the Scopus, Cochrane BVS, LILACS and MEDLINE databases to find experiences of telehealth in conjunction with discussion of translational research in health. The search retrieved eight studies based on analysis of models of the five stages of translational research and the multiple strands of public health policy in the context of telehealth in Brazil. The models were applied to telehealth activities concerning the Network of Human Milk Banks, in the Telemedicine University Network. RESULTS The translational research cycle of human milk collected, stored and distributed presents several integrated telehealth initiatives, such as video conferencing, and software and portals for synthesizing knowledge, composing elements of an information ecosystem, mediated by information and communication technologies in the health system. CONCLUSIONS Telehealth should be composed of a set of activities in a computer mediated network promoting the translation of knowledge between research and health services. PMID:24897057

  20. Patient Centric Ontology for Telehealth Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring; Hallenborg, Kasper; Demazeau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ontology for the telehealth domain, a domain that concerns the use of telecommunication to support and deliver health related services e.g. patient monitoring and rehabilitative training. Our vision for the future of telehealth solutions is that they adapt their behavior...... to the needs, habits, and personality of the patient through user modeling and context awareness. The ontology will be our foundation for user modeling of patients in the telehealth domain, and hence it is one of the initial steps toward our vision. Compared to other ontologies within the domain, ours has...... explicit focus on: 1) personality traits of the patient, which is vital for fulfillment of our vision in term of adaptability, and 2) use of international standards to describe diseases, func-tioning and physiological measurement – ICD, ICF and SNOMED respectively – to promote interoperability...

  1. Telehealth innovations in health education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, José G; De, Suvranu; Hall, Richard W; Johansen, Edward; Meglan, Dwight; Peng, Grace C Y

    2010-01-01

    Telehealth applications are increasingly important in many areas of health education and training. In addition, they will play a vital role in biomedical research and research training by facilitating remote collaborations and providing access to expensive/remote instrumentation. In order to fulfill their true potential to leverage education, training, and research activities, innovations in telehealth applications should be fostered across a range of technology fronts, including online, on-demand computational models for simulation; simplified interfaces for software and hardware; software frameworks for simulations; portable telepresence systems; artificial intelligence applications to be applied when simulated human patients are not options; and the development of more simulator applications. This article presents the results of discussion on potential areas of future development, barries to overcome, and suggestions to translate the promise of telehealth applications into a transformed environment of training, education, and research in the health sciences.

  2. Remote hearing screenings via telehealth in a rural elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Paul; Krumm, Mark; Ribera, John; Klich, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Telehealth (telepractice) is the provision of health care services using telecommunications. Telehealth technology typically has been employed to increase the level of health care access for consumers living in rural communities. In this way, audiologists can use telehealth to provide services in the rural school systems. This is important because school hearing screening programs are the foundation of educational audiology programs. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of providing hearing screening services by telehealth technology to school-age children. Hearing screening services-including otoscopy, pure-tone, and immittance audiometry-were conducted on 32 children in 3rd grade attending an elementary school in rural Utah. Each child received 1 screening on-site and another through telehealth procedures. Immittance and otoscopy results were identical for on-site and telehealth screening protocols. Five children responded differently to pure-tone stimuli presented by the telehealth protocol than by the on-site protocol. However, no statistically significant difference was found for pure-tone screening results obtained by telehealth or on-site screening procedures (binomial test, p = .37). Likewise, overall screening results obtained by traditional and telehealth procedures were not statistically significant (binomial test, p = .37). The results of this study suggest that school hearing screenings may be provided using telehealth technology. This study did find that 5 students performed differently to pure-tone screenings administered by the telehealth protocol in contrast to on-site hearing screening services. Further research is necessary to identify factors leading to false responses to pure-tone hearing screening when telehealth technology is used. In addition, telehealth hearing screening protocols should be conducted with participants of different age groups and experiencing a wide range of hearing loss to further clarify the

  3. The untapped potential of Telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, A B

    2001-05-01

    The people of Malaysia generally enjoy a high standard of health. This is largely attributed to the comprehensive range of health services provided by the Government and the private sector at affordable costs. However, there are changing trends that now seriously challenge this status quo. The changing population structure, lifestyle, disease patterns and globalization are causing healthcare costs to rise. New and innovative ways will have to be devised to further improve the health status and at the same time contain costs. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) presents unprecedented opportunities to help the health sector in Malaysia reinvent itself and transform the way health and healthcare is managed and delivered in the future. Malaysia's Telehealth initiative under the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC) project is designed to realize Malaysia's health vision and goals and meet future health challenges. Multimedia and Internet technology will be fully harnessed to deploy services that will shift the emphasis from episodic management of illness to proactive promotion of lifelong wellness and disease prevention. Health information content and interactive applications will engage the people to work as partners of health with healthcare professionals in maintaining their own health or managing their illnesses.

  4. Personalized Telehealth in the Future: A Global Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As telehealth plays an even greater role in global health care delivery, it will be increasingly important to develop a strong evidence base of successful, innovative telehealth solutions that can lead to scalable and sustainable telehealth programs. This paper has two aims: (1) to describe the challenges of promoting telehealth implementation to advance adoption and (2) to present a global research agenda for personalized telehealth within chronic disease management. Using evidence from the United States and the European Union, this paper provides a global overview of the current state of telehealth services and benefits, presents fundamental principles that must be addressed to advance the status quo, and provides a framework for current and future research initiatives within telehealth for personalized care, treatment, and prevention. A broad, multinational research agenda can provide a uniform framework for identifying and rapidly replicating best practices, while concurrently fostering global collaboration in the development and rigorous testing of new and emerging telehealth technologies. In this paper, the members of the Transatlantic Telehealth Research Network offer a 12-point research agenda for future telehealth applications within chronic disease management. PMID:26932229

  5. Personalized Telehealth in the Future: A Global Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesen, Birthe; Nonnecke, Brandie; Lindeman, David; Toft, Egon; Kidholm, Kristian; Jethwani, Kamal; Young, Heather M; Spindler, Helle; Oestergaard, Claus Ugilt; Southard, Jeffrey A; Gutierrez, Mario; Anderson, Nick; Albert, Nancy M; Han, Jay J; Nesbitt, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    As telehealth plays an even greater role in global health care delivery, it will be increasingly important to develop a strong evidence base of successful, innovative telehealth solutions that can lead to scalable and sustainable telehealth programs. This paper has two aims: (1) to describe the challenges of promoting telehealth implementation to advance adoption and (2) to present a global research agenda for personalized telehealth within chronic disease management. Using evidence from the United States and the European Union, this paper provides a global overview of the current state of telehealth services and benefits, presents fundamental principles that must be addressed to advance the status quo, and provides a framework for current and future research initiatives within telehealth for personalized care, treatment, and prevention. A broad, multinational research agenda can provide a uniform framework for identifying and rapidly replicating best practices, while concurrently fostering global collaboration in the development and rigorous testing of new and emerging telehealth technologies. In this paper, the members of the Transatlantic Telehealth Research Network offer a 12-point research agenda for future telehealth applications within chronic disease management.

  6. Telehealth and the Deaf: A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jaime A. B.; Wells, M. Gawain

    2009-01-01

    Within the deaf population, an extreme mental health professional shortage exists that may be alleviated with videoconferencing technology--also known as telehealth. Moreover, much needed mental health education within the deaf population remains largely inaccessible. Researchers have warned that the deaf population may remain underserved if…

  7. Telehealth in the Developing World | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-02-24

    Feb 24, 2009 ... Richard Wootton is Director of the Scottish Centre for Telehealth, Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland (Australia), and Professor at the University of Aberdeen (UK). Nivritti G. Patil is Professor of Surgery and Assistant Dean (Education and Student Affairs) at the Li Ka Shing Faculty of ...

  8. Attitudes to telehealth use among rural residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Fyhn Lykke

    2008-01-01

    Context: Rural communities tend to be underserved by medical services. Low access to medical services affects quality of life and may also affect settlement decisions. The use of telehealth has often been mentioned as an alternative way to provide health care services in remote, underserved areas...

  9. Telehealth: When Technology Meets Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... times have you heard it said that the internet has transformed modern life? Indeed it's probably changed how you stay in touch with family and friends, purchase goods and services, and even search for information about health problems. A variety of telehealth tools are available ...

  10. Telehealth technology applications in speech-language pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Casey Stewart; Doarn, Charles R

    2014-07-01

    Speech-language pathologists are anxious to adopt telehealth technologies but have encountered barriers such as limited reimbursement, state licensure laws, and medical information privacy laws. Moreover, speech-language pathologists are confronted with the hurdle of evolving face-to-face clinical practices into effective telehealth practice adapted to the current national infrastructure. Factors such as costs, availability of resources, and diagnostic/intervention and patient needs should be considered when selecting the telehealth infrastructure for service delivery. Understanding the new role of technology in the diagnosis and treatment of communication disorders is vital for the expansion of telehealth as a standard of care. The purpose of this article is to overview the current technologic infrastructure and procedures for telehealth applications in speech-language pathology (SLP) and the innate challenges and opportunities. A literature search was conducted for telehealth publications in the field of SLP. Given the rapid rate at which technology advances, only peer-reviewed articles published over the past 5 years (2008-2013) were included. The majority of articles reviewed used hybrid methodologies to maintain traditional SLP service standards. General technological components for telehealth activities included computers, Web cameras, headsets with an embedded microphone, and Internet connectivity. Advanced technology has limitations in the application of telehealth. Technological adversities were not reported as the cause of discontinuation of telehealth services by the practitioner or the individual. Audio and visual disturbances were primarily associated with videoconferencing. Supplemental asynchronous technology was widely reported as a solution to real-time instabilities.

  11. The telehealth skills, training, and implementation project: an evaluation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Andrew; Knight-Billington, Patricia; Mullan, Judy; Moscova, Michelle; Barnett, Stephen; Iverson, Don; Saffioti, Daniel; Eastland, Elisabeth; Guppy, Michelle; Weston, Kathryn; Wilson, Ian; Hudson, Judith Nicky; Pond, Dimity; Gill, Gerard; Hespe, Charlotte

    2015-01-07

    Telehealth appears to be an ideal mechanism for assisting rural patients and doctors and medical students/registrars in accessing specialist services. Telehealth is the use of enhanced broadband technology to provide telemedicine and education over distance. It provides accessible support to rural primary care providers and medical educators. A telehealth consultation is where a patient at a general practice, with the assistance of the general practitioner or practice nurse, undertakes a consultation by videoconference with a specialist located elsewhere. Multiple benefits of telehealth consulting have been reported, particularly those relevant to rural patients and health care providers. However there is a paucity of research on the benefits of telehealth to medical education and learning. This protocol explains in depth the process that will be undertaken by a collaborative group of universities and training providers in this unique project. Training sessions in telehealth consulting will be provided for participating practices and students. The trial will then use telehealth consulting as a real-patient learning experience for students, general practitioner trainees, general practitioner preceptors, and trainees. Results will be available when the trial has been completed in 2015. The protocol has been written to reflect the overarching premise that, by building virtual communities of practice with users of telehealth in medical education, a more sustainable and rigorous model can be developed. The Telehealth Skills Training and Implementation Project will implement and evaluate a theoretically driven model of Internet-facilitated medical education for vertically integrated, community-based learning environments.

  12. Growing up with confidence: using telehealth to support continence self-care deficits amongst young people with complex needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Levy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Many young people with chronic ill health use technology for selfcare activities, but little is known about the use of telehealth amongst those with spina bifida. The limited availability of specialist continence nurses in primary care settings, for this client group in the UK, exacerbates their reliance on parents or carers.Objectives1. Exploring the way in which home-based and technology-enabled clinical interventions affect young people’s engagement in continence self-care.2. Articulating the way in which telehealth impacts on nursing practice and the conduct of remote clinical encounters.Methods A virtual nurse-led clinic was established to support a small cohort of service users and their parents from home. Data from participants were collected and analysed alongside a narrative record of a reflective diary, used by the continence specialist nurse.Results Participants reported increased level of self-confidence, which was attributed to interacting remotely with the specialist nurse. The virtual clinic assisted users to attain some self-care goals as well as assert their role as partners in care planning. The specialist nurse gained new valuable skills in mastering telehealth technology and managing remote clinical provision.Conclusions Using Skype™ to support young people with complex needs is an effective intervention to support continence care at home. Dedicated technical support during the initial set-up phase and on-going clinical mentorship are needed to ensure that telehealth is successfully embedded within health care practice.

  13. Active home-based cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordonaro S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sebastiano Bordonaro Fabio Raiti, Annamaria Di Mari, Calogera Lopiano, Fabrizio Romano, Vitalinda Pumo, Sebastiano Rametta Giuliano, Margherita Iacono, Eleonora Lanteri, Elena Puzzo, Sebastiano Spada, Paolo TralongoUOC Medical Oncology, RAO, ASP 8 Siracusa, ItalyBackground: Active home-based treatment represents a new model of health care. Chronic treatment requires continuous access to facilities that provide cancer care, with considerable effort, particularly economic, on the part of patients and caregivers. Oral chemotherapy could be limited as a consequence of poor compliance and adherence, especially by elderly patients.Methods: We selected 30 cancer patients referred to our department and treated with oral therapy (capecitabine, vinorelbine, imatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib, temozolomide, ibandronate. This pilot study of oral therapy in the patient’s home was undertaken by a doctor and two nurses with experience in clinical oncology. The instruments used were clinical diaries recording home visits, hospital visits, need for caregiver support, and a questionnaire specially developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC, known as the QLQ-C30 version 2.0, concerning the acceptability of oral treatment from the patient’s perspective.Results: This program decreased the need to access cancer facilities by 98.1%, promoted better quality of life for patients, as reflected in increased EORTC QLQ-C30 scores over time, allowing for greater adherence to oral treatment as a result of control of drug administration outside the hospital. This model has allowed treatment of patients with difficult access to care (elderly, disabled or otherwise needed caregivers that in the project represent the majority (78% of these.Conclusions: This model of active home care improves quality of life and adherence with oral therapy, reduces the need to visit the hospital, and consequently decreases the number of lost hours of work on

  14. A Review of Telehealth Service Implementation Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Liezl

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential of telehealth services to increase the quality and accessibility of healthcare, the success rate of such services has been disappointing. The purpose of this paper is to find and compare existing frameworks for the implementation of telehealth services that can contribute to the success rate of future endeavors. After a thorough discussion of these frameworks, this paper outlines the development methodologies in terms of theoretical background, methodology and validation. Finally, the common themes and formats are identified for consideration in future implementation. It was confirmed that a holistic implementation approach is needed, which includes technology, organizational structures, change management, economic feasibility, societal impacts, perceptions, user-friendliness, evaluation and evidence, legislation, policy and governance. Furthermore, there is some scope for scientifically rigorous framework development and validation approaches. PMID:24464237

  15. The Calibration Home Base for Imaging Spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Felix Simon Brachmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Calibration Home Base (CHB is an optical laboratory designed for the calibration of imaging spectrometers for the VNIR/SWIR wavelength range. Radiometric, spectral and geometric calibration as well as the characterization of sensor signal dependency on polarization are realized in a precise and highly automated fashion. This allows to carry out a wide range of time consuming measurements in an ecient way. The implementation of ISO 9001 standards in all procedures ensures a traceable quality of results. Spectral measurements in the wavelength range 380–1000 nm are performed to a wavelength uncertainty of +- 0.1 nm, while an uncertainty of +-0.2 nm is reached in the wavelength range 1000 – 2500 nm. Geometric measurements are performed at increments of 1.7 µrad across track and 7.6 µrad along track. Radiometric measurements reach an absolute uncertainty of +-3% (k=1. Sensor artifacts, such as caused by stray light will be characterizable and correctable in the near future. For now, the CHB is suitable for the characterization of pushbroom sensors, spectrometers and cameras. However, it is planned to extend the CHBs capabilities in the near future such that snapshot hyperspectral imagers can be characterized as well. The calibration services of the CHB are open to third party customers from research institutes as well as industry.

  16. Continence advice by telehealth for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Caroline; Henderson, Lisa; Levy, Sharon

    Children and young people operate in an advanced technological world where new, exciting opportunities exist for remote interactions. To engage with these service users, we set up a nurse-led telehealth facility that enabled young people with spina bifida to access specialist continence service from home. This article describes efforts to embed this innovation into practice and offer insight to some of the challenges we faced in the process. It offers practical guidance on setting up similar services.

  17. Operation and challenges of home-based medical practices in the US: findings from six aggregated case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gregory J; Orton, Kristann; Wade, Amy; Morris, Andrea M; Slaboda, Jill C

    2018-01-27

    Home-based primary care (HBPC) is a multidisciplinary, ongoing care strategy that can provide cost-effective, in-home treatment to meet the needs of the approximately four million homebound, medically complex seniors in the U.S. Because there is no single model of HBPC that can be adopted across all types of health organizations and U.S. geographic regions, we conducted a six-site HBPC practice assessment to better understand different operation structures, common challenges, and approaches to delivering HBPC. Six practices varying in size, care team composition and location agreed to participate. At each site we conducted unstructured interviews with key informants and directly observed practices and procedures in the field and back office. The aggregated case studies revealed important issues focused on team composition, patient characteristics, use of technology and urgent care delivery. Common challenges across the practices included provider retention and unmet community demand for home-based care services. Most practices, regardless of size, faced challenges around using electronic medical records (EMRs) and scheduling systems not designed for use in a mobile practice. Although many practices offered urgent care, practices varied in the methods used to provide care including the use of community paramedics and telehealth technology. Learnings compiled from these observations can inform other HBPC practices as to potential best practices that can be implemented in an effort to improve efficiency and scalability of HBPC so that seniors with multiple chronic conditions can receive comprehensive primary care services in their homes.

  18. The Use of Telehealth in Schools. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Susan; Dolatowski, Rosemary; McDowell, Bernadette; Mancuso, Patty; Rochkes, Laura L.; Wavra, Theresa Ernst; Selekman, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Telehealth has been defined as "the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration" (United States Department of Health and Human Services [USDHHS], n.d.). Telehealth enables collaboration of…

  19. Competencies required for nursing telehealth activities: A Delphi-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. H.S.M. Kort; Anna H. Moerman; Olle ten Cate; Thijs van Houwelingen; Roelof G.A. Ettema

    2016-01-01

    Background: Telehealth is viewed as a major strategy to address the increasing demand for care and a shrinking care professional population. However, most nurses are not trained or are insufficiently trained to use these technologies effectively. Therefore, the potential of telehealth fails to reach

  20. Telehealth in the School Setting: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Cori A.; Maughan, Erin D.

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth, the provision of health care through long-distance telecommunications technology, is a tool that can be used by school nurses to address and improve the health status of schoolchildren. The purpose of this literature review is to examine research related to implementation of telehealth in the school setting. A review of the literature…

  1. End-to-End Security for Personal Telehealth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, R.P.; Asim, M.; Petkovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Personal telehealth is in rapid development with innovative emerging applications like disease management. With personal telehealth people participate in their own care supported by an open distributed system with health services. This poses new end-to-end security and privacy challenges. In this

  2. Telehealth in the Developing World | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Telehealth in the Developing World. Book cover Telehealth in the Developing World. Directeur(s) : Richard Wootton, Nivritti G. Patil, Richard E. Scott, and Kendall Ho. Maison(s) d'édition : Royal Society of Medicine Press, IDRC. 24 février 2009. ISBN : 9781853157844. 324 pages. e-ISBN : 9781552503966. Téléchargez le ...

  3. Environment for Telehealth Applications on Top of BDI4JADE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring; Hallenborg, Kasper; Demazeau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Patients using telehealth systems have different needs and hence their treatments must differ accordingly. Different compositions of smart home sensors, telehealth devices, and services are used depending on the needs of the individual. This paper presents an open and flexible infrastructure...

  4. Telehealth: misconceptions and experiences of healthcare professionals in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayyali, Reem; Hesso, Iman; Mahdi, Alyaa; Hamzat, Omowumi; Adu, Albert; Nabhani Gebara, Shereen

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to look at telehealth awareness and experiences among healthcare professionals (HCPs) from different disciplines, in addition to factors impeding its adoption in healthcare delivery. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 36 HCPs from different disciplines such as pharmacists, nurses and doctors in South London. A convenience sampling technique was used whereby HCPs working in local trusts, community pharmacies and general practitioners surgeries were approached for participation. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes using the NVIVO 10 software. The four main themes that emerged were awareness and understanding of telehealth, experiences and benefits of telehealth, barriers and facilitators of telehealth and misconceptions about telehealth. The study showed mixed response regarding telehealth awareness. Lack of telehealth experience was reported mainly among HCPs working in primary care. The barriers identified were cost and lack of funding and resources, whereas facilitators were raising awareness among staff and the public and investment in resources. Misconceptions identified were fear of losing face-to-face contact with patients and vital care information, patients' beliefs and confidence in using technology. This study showed experience and awareness level to be still low especially among HCPs working in primary care. Barriers and misconceptions identified are still the same as those reported in the literature which highlights that they have not yet been addressed to facilitate telehealth implementation in the UK. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Home-based HIV counselling and testing in Western Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Objective: To describe our experience with the feasibility and acceptance of home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBCT) in two large, rural, administrative divisions of western Kenya. Design: Setting: Results: Conclusion. : Home-based HIV counselling and testing was feasible among this rural population ...

  6. Assessment of Community Mobilization and Home-based HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBHCT) and community mobilization have been proven to be effective in increasing the number of people linked to HIV care and treatment. An assessment was conducted in 18 health facilities in Uganda to evaluate the availability and extent of home based testing services and ...

  7. Challenges for sustainability of home based economic activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors accountable for successful and sustainable home based economic activities were determined. Impacts of home based economic activities were found to be significant in the education of the children, income security and social welfare of families. The study emphasized home economic entrepreneurial education, ...

  8. Cognitive recovery after stroke : A 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochstenbach, JB; Mulder, TW; Den Otter, R.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine (1) whether long-term improvement of cognitive function takes place after stroke and (2) which clinical factors influence cognitive recovery. Design: Cohort study with patients who were assessed at 2.3 and 27.7 months after stroke. Setting: Home-based stroke patients.

  9. Telehealth: current practices and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yadin B.

    1996-02-01

    When we review the positive impact that the integration of ostensibly independent patient-care services have on the efficient management of quality care, education, and collaborative research, it is not surprising that telehealth deployment is on the rise. The forces that drive this phenomenon include: the need to manage the entire disease episode; the desire for wider geographically-distributed quality health care; the escalation of customer expectations; globalization of healthcare and its support services; an increase in patient and provider convenience; and the acceptance of the present technological community. At the Telehealth Center at the Texas Children's Hospital, current classifications of clinical applications are listed: (1) initial urgent evaluation of patients, (2) triage decisions and pretransfer arrangements, (3) medical and surgical follow-up and medication review, (4) consultation for primary care encounters, (5) real-time subspecialty care consultation and planning, (6) management of chronic diseases and conditions, (7) extended diagnostic work-ups, (8) review of diagnostic images, and (9) preventive medicine and patient education. The delivery of such services is associated with challenges and opportunities. As we move forward from limited data processing to an integrated communication system, from centralized main frame functions to personalized and location-independent workstations, and from hospitals to clinics and homecare, an increase in the minimum features provided by the equipment and the communication systems must accompany the widening variety of clinical applications. Future expansion of telehealth systems stands to revolutionize the delivery of services to the benefits of providers' networks, our economy, and patients through integration.

  10. Telehealth Regulatory and Legal Considerations: Frequently Asked Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cason

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As telehealth gains momentum as a service delivery model in the United States within the rehabilitation professions, regulatory and legal questions arise. This article examines the following questions:1. Is there a need to secure licenses in two states (i.e., where the practitioner resides, and where the client is located, before engaging in telehealth?2. Do state laws differ concerning if and how telehealth can occur?3. Do any states expressly disallow telehealth?4. Can services delivered through telehealth be billed the same way as services provided in-person?5. If practitioners fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure (e.g., continuing education obligations in their state of residence, do they also need to fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure for the state in which the client resides?6. Will professional malpractice insurance cover services delivered through telehealth?7. Does a sole practitioner need to abide by HIPAA regulations?Responses to these questions are offered to raise awareness of the regulatory and legal implications associated with the use of a telehealth service delivery model

  11. An Emergent Research and Policy Framework for Telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Margo; Tuckson, Reed; Lewis, Joy; Atchinson, Brian; Rheuban, Karen; Fanberg, Hank; Olinger, Lois; Rosati, Robert; Austein-Casnoff, Cheryl; Capistrant, Gary; Thomas, Latoya

    2017-01-01

    Telehealth is a fast-growing sector in health care, using a variety of technologies to exchange information across locations and to improve access, quality, and outcomes across the continuum of care. Thousands of studies and hundreds of systematic reviews have been done, but their variability leaves many questions about telehealth's effectiveness, implementation priorities, and return on investment. There is an urgent need for a systematic, policy-relevant framework to integrate regulatory, operational, and clinical factors and to guide future investments in telehealth research and practice. An invited multidisciplinary group of 21 experts from AcademyHealth, the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy (KP), and the Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA) met to review and discuss the components of a draft framework for policy-relevant telehealth research. The framework was revised and presented in a challenge workshop at Concordium 2016, and some additional refinements were made. The current framework encompasses the regulatory and payment policy context for telehealth, delivery system factors, and outcomes of telehealth interventions. Based on the feedback at Concordium 2016, the framework seems to have potential to help educate policymakers, payers, and health systems about the value of telehealth and to frame discussions about implementation barriers, including risk management concerns, technology costs, and organizational culture. However, questions remain about how to disseminate and use the framework to help coordinate policy, research, and implementation efforts in the delivery system.

  12. Telehealth regulatory and legal considerations: frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana; Brannon, Janice A

    2011-01-01

    As telehealth gains momentum as a service delivery model in the United States within the rehabilitation professions, regulatory and legal questions arise. This article examines the following questions: Is there a need to secure licenses in two states (i.e., where the practitioner resides, and where the client is located), before engaging in telehealth?Do state laws differ concerning if and how telehealth can occur?Do any states expressly disallow telehealth?Can services delivered through telehealth be billed the same way as services provided in-person?If practitioners fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure (e.g., continuing education obligations) in their state of residence, do they also need to fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure for the state in which the client resides?Will professional malpractice insurance cover services delivered through telehealth?Does a sole practitioner need to abide by HIPAA regulations?Responses to these questions are offered to raise awareness of the regulatory and legal implications associated with the use of a telehealth service delivery model within the professions of occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology and audiology.

  13. Telehealth: a rapidly developing service delivery model for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the practice of occupational therapy has been increasingly influenced by technological advances in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and associated changes in health care policy. Emergent from this evolution is the application of telehealth to deliver occupational therapy services to a client who is in a different physical location than the provider. This article furnishes an overview of the evidence for telehealth use in occupational therapy, discusses key policy considerations, and provides resources to guide practitioners in the ethical use of telehealth.

  14. Telehealth: A Rapidly Developing Service Delivery Model for Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cason

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the practice of occupational therapy has been increasingly influenced by technological advances in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT and associated changes in health care policy. Emergent from this evolution is the application of telehealth to deliver occupational therapy services to clients who are in a different physical location than the provider. This article furnishes an overview of the evidence for telehealth use in occupational therapy, discusses key policy considerations, and provides resources to guide practitioners in the ethical use of telehealth.

  15. A Home-Based Palliative Care Consult Service for Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Adam G; Antoni, Charles; Gammonley, Denise

    2016-11-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a home-based palliative care consult service for Veterans with advanced illness. A retrospective chart review was performed on 73 Veterans who received a home-based palliative care consult. Nearly one-third were 80 years of age or older, and nearly one-third had a palliative diagnosis of cancer. The most common interventions of the consult team included discussion of advance directives, completion of a "do not resuscitate" form, reduction/stoppage of at least 1 medication, explanation of diagnosis, referral to home-based primary care program, referral to hospice, and assessment/support for caregiver stress. The home-based consult service was therefore able to address clinical and psychosocial issues that can demonstrate a direct benefit to Veterans, families, and referring clinicians. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Ethical practice in Telehealth and Telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaet, Danielle; Clearfield, Ron; Sabin, James E; Skimming, Kathryn

    2017-10-01

    This article summarizes the report of the American Medical Association's (AMA) Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) on ethical practice in telehealth and telemedicine. Through its reports and recommendations, CEJA is responsible for maintaining and updating the AMA Code of Medical Ethics (Code). CEJA reports are developed through an iterative process of deliberation with input from multiple stakeholders; report recommendations, once adopted by the AMA House of Delegates, become ethics policy of the AMA and are issued as Opinions in the Code. To provide enduring guidance for the medical profession as a whole, CEJA strives to articulate expectations for conduct that are as independent of specific technologies or models of practice as possible. The present report, developed at the request of the House of Delegates, provides broad guidance for ethical conduct relating to key issues in telehealth/telemedicine. The report and recommendations were debated at meetings of the House in June and November 2015; recommendations were adopted in June 2016 and published as Opinion E-1.2.12, Ethical Practice in Telemedicine, in November 2016. A summary of the key points of the recommendations can be found in Appendix A (online), and the full text of the opinion can be found in Appendix B (online).

  17. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... communicate with your child’s doctor. Symptoms of a Stroke Stroke is an injury to part of the ...

  18. Telehealth in the developing world: current status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott RE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Richard E Scott,1,2 Maurice Mars11Department of TeleHealth, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; 2NT Consulting - Global e-Health Inc., Calgary, AB, CanadaAbstract: In a setting of constant change and confusing terminology, telehealth continues to gain ground in both developed and developing countries within the overarching milieu of e-health. Evidence shows telehealth has been used in essentially all countries of the world, but is embedded in few. Uses and needs of telehealth vary between the developed and developing world; the latter struggles with both communicable diseases and noncommunicable diseases, and with very few resources. Common clinical applications include teleconsultation, telecardiology (transmission of ECGs, teleradiology, and teledermatology. Many telehealth projects exist throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia, and Africa, but there is little published evidence and only isolated examples of sustained programs, although several sustained humanitarian networks exist. Application of mobile solutions (m-health is on the rise in many developing countries. Telehealth is still not integrated into existing health care systems globally. Reasons vary: lack of proven large-scale operations, poor evidence base, inadequate implementation, lack of attention to the “soft side” of implementation (readiness, change management, and many others. For the developing world, reasons can be more pragmatic, including limited resources, unreliable power, poor connectivity, and high cost for the poverty stricken – those most in need. Telehealth is poised to improve health and health care in the developing world, driven by both altruistic and profit motives. But to have the desired effect, telehealth must address very specific and evidence-based health “needs” of each facility, region, or country; the shortage of health workers and specialist services; and the required skills upgrading and training

  19. Telehealth: A Rapidly Developing Service Delivery Model For Occupational Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the practice of occupational therapy has been increasingly influenced by technological advances in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and associated changes in health care policy. Emergent from this evolution is the application of telehealth to deliver occupational therapy services to clients who are in a different physical location than the provider. This article furnishes an overview of the evidence for telehealth use in occupational therapy, d...

  20. Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Neibling, Bridee A; Barker, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    This single-case, mixed-method study explored the feasibility of self-administered, home-based SMART (sensorimotor active rehabilitation training) Arm training for a 57-yr-old man with severe upper-limb disability after a right frontoparietal hemorrhagic stroke 9 mo earlier. Over 4 wk of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training, the participant completed 2,100 repetitions unassisted. His wife provided support for equipment set-up and training progressions. Clinically meaningful improvements in arm impairment (strength), activity (arm and hand tasks), and participation (use of arm in everyday tasks) occurred after training (at 4 wk) and at follow-up (at 16 wk). Areas for refinement of SMART Arm training derived from thematic analysis of the participant's and researchers' journals focused on enabling independence, ensuring home and user friendliness, maintaining the motivation to persevere, progressing toward everyday tasks, and integrating practice into daily routine. These findings suggest that further investigation of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training is warranted for people with stroke who have severe upper-limb disability. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  1. Legal Mapping Analysis of State Telehealth Reimbursement Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Kate E; Rampa, Sankeerth; Wilson, Fernando A; Stimpson, Jim P

    2017-10-01

    There exists rapid growth and inconsistency in the telehealth policy environment, which makes it difficult to quantitatively evaluate the impact of telehealth reimbursement and other policies without the availability of a legal mapping database. We describe the creation of a legal mapping database of state-level policies related to telehealth reimbursement of healthcare services. Trends and characteristics of these policies are presented. Information provided by the Center for Connected Health Policy was used to identify statewide laws and regulations regarding telehealth reimbursement. Other information was retrieved by using: (1) LexisNexis database, (2) Westlaw database, and (3) retrieval from legislative Web sites, historical documents, and contacting state officials. We examined policies for live video, store-and-forward, and remote patient monitoring (RPM). In the United States, there are 24 states with policies regarding reimbursement for live video transmission. Fourteen states have store-and-forward policies, and six states have RPM-related policies. Mississippi is the only state that requires reimbursement for all three types of telehealth transmission modes. Most states (47 states) have Medicaid policies regarding live video transmission, followed by 37 states for store-and-forward and 20 states for RPM. Only 13 states require that live video will be reimbursed "consistent with" or at the "same rate" as in-person services in their Medicaid program. There are no widely accepted telehealth reimbursement policies across states. They contain diverse restrictions and requirements that present complexities in policy evaluation and in determining policy effectiveness across states.

  2. Preparing for success: Readiness models for rural telehealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennett P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Readiness is an integral and preliminary step in the successful implementation of telehealth services into existing health systems within rural communities. Methods and Materials: This paper details and critiques published international peer-reviewed studies that have focused on assessing telehealth readiness for rural and remote health. Background specific to readiness and change theories is provided, followed by a critique of identified telehealth readiness models, including a commentary on their readiness assessment tools. Results: Four current readiness models resulted from the search process. The four models varied across settings, such as rural outpatient practices, hospice programs, rural communities, as well as government agencies, national associations, and organizations. All models provided frameworks for readiness tools. Two specifically provided a mechanism by which communities could be categorized by their level of telehealth readiness. Discussion: Common themes across models included: an appreciation of practice context, strong leadership, and a perceived need to improve practice. Broad dissemination of these telehealth readiness models and tools is necessary to promote awareness and assessment of readiness. This will significantly aid organizations to facilitate the implementation of telehealth.

  3. 78 FR 53506 - Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... comments on the information collection required to obtain patient perspective on satisfaction with the CCHT... forms of information technology. Titles: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

  4. Being Spontaneous: The Future of Telehealth Implementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Maurice; Scott, Richard E

    2017-09-01

    The smartphone simplifies interprofessional communication, and smartphone applications can facilitate telemedicine activity. Much has been written about the steps that need to be followed to implement and establish a successful telemedicine service that is integrated into everyday clinical practice. A traditional and systematic approach has evolved incorporating activities such as strategy development, needs assessment, business cases and plans, readiness assessment, implementation plans, change management interventions, and ongoing monitoring and evaluation. This "best practice" has been promoted in the telehealth literature for many years. In contrast, several recent initiatives have arisen without any such formal undertakings. This article describes the strengths and weaknesses of two "spontaneous" telemedicine services in dermatology and burn management that have evolved in South Africa. Two spontaneous services were identified and reviewed. In one unsolicited service, doctors at rural referring hospitals have been taking photographs of skin lesions and sending them with a brief text message history to dermatologists using the instant messaging smartphone app, WhatsApp. In the other, burns service, admissions to the burns unit or the clinic were triaged by telephonic description of the case and completion of a preadmission questionnaire. More recently, management and referral decisions are made only after completion of the questionnaire and subsequent submission of photographs of the burn sent by WhatsApp, with the decision transmitted by text message. Although efficient and effective, potential legal and ethical shortcomings have been identified. These "spontaneous" telehealth services challenge traditional best practice, yet appear to lead to truly integrated practice and, therefore, are successful and warrant further study.

  5. Home-based telebehavioral health for U.S. military personnel and veterans with depression: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; Pruitt, Larry D; Wagner, Amy; Smolenski, Derek J; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A; Gahm, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Evidence of feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of home-based telebehavioral health (HBTBH) needs to be established before adoption of HBTBH in the military health system can occur. The purpose of this randomized controlled noninferiority trial was to compare the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of HBTBH to care provided in the traditional in-office setting among military personnel and veterans. One hundred and twenty-one U.S. military service members and veterans were recruited at a military treatment facility and a Veterans Health Administration hospital. Participants were randomized to receive 8 sessions of behavioral activation treatment for depression (BATD) either in the home via videoconferencing (VC) or in a traditional in-office (same room) setting. Participants were assessed at baseline, midtreatment (4 weeks), posttreatment (8 weeks), and 3 months posttreatment. Mixed-effects modeling results with Beck Hopelessness Scale and Beck Depression Inventory II scores suggested relatively strong and similar reductions in hopelessness and depressive symptoms for both groups; however, noninferiority analyses failed to reject the null hypothesis that in-home care was no worse than in-office treatment based on these measures. There were not any differences found between treatment groups in regards to treatment satisfaction. Safety procedures were successfully implemented, supporting the feasibility of home-based care. BATD can be feasibly delivered to the homes of active duty service members and veterans via VC. Small-group differences suggest a slight benefit of in-person care over in-home telehealth on some clinical outcomes. Reasons for this are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Internet-Based Telehealth Assessment of Language Using the CELF-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Monique C.; Theodoros, Deborah G.; Russell, Trevor G.; Cahill, Louise M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Telehealth has the potential to improve children's access to speech-language pathology services. Validation of telehealth applications, including the assessment of childhood language disorders, is necessary for telehealth to become an accepted alternative mode of service provision. The aim of this study was to validate an Internet-based…

  7. Acceptability and cost-effectiveness of military telehealth mental health screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Etherage, Joseph R; Harmon, S Cory; Okiishi, John C

    2012-05-01

    Telehealth has been touted as one solution to the shortage of mental health providers within the military. Despite developing evidence for the equivalence of telehealth mental health care, there is no research that covers the use of telehealth for population mental health screening, a standard component of postdeployment medical screening. This paper summarizes soldier perceptions of three separate screening events in which telehealth was used and the cost-effectiveness of telehealth versus in-person implementations of the same screening. Soldiers who have not been through telehealth screening report a strong preference for in-person screening. Soldiers who have been through telehealth screening still report preference for in-person screening, but they express more ambivalence about the screening method. Using telehealth-only mental health screening for large numbers of soldiers within a compressed time frame is more expensive than in-person screening. Telehealth resulted in higher referral rates than in-person screening. Government and military leaders should use care when making decisions about telehealth implementation. Although telehealth for small numbers may be sufficiently equivalent and economical, there is no evidence of cost savings or improved acceptability for telehealth mental health post-deployment screening.

  8. Delivering occupational therapy hand assessment and treatment sessions via telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worboys, Tess; Brassington, Melinda; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cornwell, Petrea L

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Telehealth offers a solution to assist delivery of occupational therapy (OT) services for hand therapy in rural and remote locations. However, there is currently no evidence to validate this service model. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of clinical decisions made during hand therapy sessions conducted via telehealth compared to a traditional clinical model (TCM) assessment, and explore patient and clinician satisfaction. Methods Eighteen patients referred for hand therapy to a rural/remote hospital-based outpatient service were assessed simultaneously via telehealth and a TCM assessment. An allied health assistant supported data collection at the patient end. Hand function was assessed using a range of objective measures, subjective scales and patient reported information. Minimal level of percent exact agreement (PEA) between the telehealth OT (T-OT) and the TCM-OT was set at ≥80%. Results Level of agreement for all objective measures (dynamometer and pinch gauge reading, goniometer flexion and extension, circumference in millimetres) ranged between 82% and 100% PEA. High agreement (>80% PEA) was also obtained for judgements of scar and general limb function, exercise compliance, pain severity and sensitivity location, activities of daily living and global ratings of change (GROC) scores. There was 100% PEA for overall recommendations. Minimal technical issues were experienced. Patient and clinician satisfaction was high. Discussion Clinical decisions made via telehealth were comparable to the TCM and consumers were satisfied with telehealth as a service option. Telehealth offers the potential to improve access to hand therapy services for rural and remote patients.

  9. Stroke Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Stroke Treatment Stroke used to rank fourth in leading causes of ... type of treatment depends on the type of stroke. Ischemic stroke happens when a clot blocks a ...

  10. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann Dorthe Olsen; Norten, RJ; Dean, SG

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for heart failure compared to either usual medical care (i.e. no CR) or centre-based CR on mortality, morbidity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, drop out, adherence rates, and costs. METHODS: Randomised...

  11. Home-based rehabilitation: Physiotherapy student and client ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) in under-resourced areas in a primary healthcare (PHC) context exposes students to the real-life situations of their clients. There is a scarcity of literature on student and client experiences of HBR in the physiotherapy context. Increased knowledge of HBR could result in an ...

  12. Effects of Apple Supplement and Unsupervised Home-based Brisk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Members in Group I (n = 7) were given apple fruit (Pyrus Malus) twice a day free of charge and were advised unsupervised home-based walking activity for three weeks. Members in Group II (n = 7) were given apple fruit alone. During the period of the study all participants were advised dietary fat restriction and their fasting ...

  13. Quality in home-based childcare : Impact and improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Marilene Gerarda

    2010-01-01

    The thesis ‘Quality in home-based childcare: Impact and improvement’ consists of two studies. The general aim of the first study is to examine children’s stress levels and wellbeing, and the role of caregiver stress and childcare quality. This first study is described in chapters 2, 3, and 4.

  14. A HOME-BASED MASSED PRACTICE SYSTEM FOR PEDIATRIC NEUROREHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ning Wu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel low-cost human-computer interface (HCI system for home-based massed practice for children with upper limb impairment due to brain injury. Successful massed practice, a type of neurorehabilitation, may be of value for children with brain injury because it facilitates impaired limb use. Use of automated, home-based systems could provide a practical means for massed practice. However, the optimal strategy to deliver and monitor home-based massed practice is still unclear. We integrated motion sensor, video game, and HCI software technologies to create a useful home-based massed practice at targeted joints. The system records joint angle and number of movements using a low-cost custom hand-held sensor. The sensor acts as an input device to play video games. We demonstrated the system’s functionality and provided preliminary observations on usage by children with brain injury, including joint motion and muscle activation.

  15. HOME BASED CARE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship of poor practice of Home Based. Care and hospital re-admission of PLWHA ... Therefore HBC Training is important for family members who are taking care of their relatives ..... Relationships of believed attitude of HBC among family care givers and Hospital re- admission of PLWHA. Hospital re-admission.

  16. Cost effectiveness of facility and home based HIV voluntary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Uganda, the main stay for provision of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) has been at health facilities. Home based VCT on the other hand, was initiated in the country to improve service coverage. Objective: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of facility- and ...

  17. Who are good home-based care volunteers? | Marincowitz | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics of volunteers who remained active in the home-based care project located in Tzaneen (Limpopo Province) and thereby assist the project leaders to improve the recruitment and quality of the service in the future. Methodology: Structured questionnaires were ...

  18. Understanding the agency of home-based care volunteers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volunteer motivations vary from altruism, to volunteering as a means to be recognised and increasing the chances of self-improvement. We propose that home-based-care volunteering may be viewed as a form of agency in response to a lack of recognition, support and acknowledgement for AIDS caregivers and their ...

  19. Home-based practices of complementary foods improvement are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items related to the early and current breastfeeding patterns and the mode of complementary feeding were recorded by interview of the mothers. Fortified cereals were defined as home-based improved flours by mixing “soumbala,” fishmeal, toasted groundnut, or several of these local foods with cereal. Soumbala is a ...

  20. The home as informal business location: Home-based business ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home-based businesses (HBBs) are often considered the most 'formal' of the informal business sector types, where a formal structure such as a house or shack provides some form of security for these businesses. Notwithstanding this structural 'security', HBBs are merely a reflection of broader urban economic and spatial ...

  1. Who are good home-based care volunteers?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a joint venture between a local NGO and public sector health workers. During the latter half of 1999, volun- teers were identified through a par- ticipatory process with communities in the area. Ninety-six (96) volun- teers were trained. They all attended one of the five-day introductory courses in home-based care. After.

  2. Medicare Telehealth Services and Nephrology: Policies for Eligibility and Payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frilling, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The criteria for Medicare payment of telehealth nephrology services, and all other Medicare telehealth services, are set forth in section 1834(m) of the Social Security Act. There are just over 80 professional physician or practitioner services that may be furnished via telehealth and paid under Medicare Part B, when an interactive audio and video telecommunication system that permits real-time communication between a beneficiary at the originating site and the physician or practitioner at the distant site substitutes for an in-person encounter. These services include 16 nephrology billing codes for furnishing ESRD services for monthly monitoring and assessment and two billing codes for chronic kidney disease education. In recent years, many mobile health devices and other web-based tools have been developed in support of monitoring, observation, and collaboration for people living with chronic disease. This article reviews the statutory and program guidance that governs Medicare telehealth services, defines payment policy terms (e.g., originating site and distant site), and explains payment policies when telehealth services are furnished. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Towards Patient-Centric Telehealth: a Journey into ICT Infrastructures and User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring

    Problem setting: The problem setting for this thesis is the telehealth domain. Telehealth is addressed from two perspectives: ICT infrastructures and personalized telehealth. ICT infrastructures are addressed on both the local level concerning the systems that are deployed in patients’ homes......, and on the national level concerning the transmission of data in end-to-end infrastructural scenarios. Personalized telehealth concerns the design of telehealth systems that are able to fit the everyday life of their patients. Problem and Research questions: The problem setting was formalized in a principal research...... guided the thesis’s work: • Which paradigms and techniques can be applied to satisfy the infrastructural requirements set forth by the Patient@home project? • How to model telehealth patients in an ICT infrastructure for the home setting? • How to understand and learn a telehealth patient’s everyday...

  4. A graphical representation model for telemedicine and telehealth center sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundim, Rosângela Simões; Chao, Wen Lung

    2011-04-01

    This study shows the creation of a graphical representation after the application of a questionnaire to evaluate the indicative factors of a sustainable telemedicine and telehealth center in São Paulo, Brazil. We categorized the factors into seven domain areas: institutional, functional, economic-financial, renewal, academic-scientific, partnerships, and social welfare, which were plotted into a graphical representation. The developed graph was shown to be useful when used in the same institution over a long period and complemented with secondary information from publications, archives, and administrative documents to support the numerical indicators. Its use may contribute toward monitoring the factors that define telemedicine and telehealth center sustainability. When systematically applied, it may also be useful for identifying the specific characteristics of the telemedicine and telehealth center, to support its organizational development.

  5. Leadership strategies for improved nursing synergy between informatics and telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    The goal of best practice, best possible health care worldwide is shared by nurses and all involved with eHealth today. The purpose of this paper is to characterize the similarities and differences between informatics and telehealth from a nursing perspective, and to advocate for leadership strategies that would bring the strengths of each group to a more synergistic, collaborative professional model for the benefit of both groups. After comparing telehealth and informatics nursing and looking for commonalities, suggestions are made for bridging the gap between the two groups. Potential strategies include identifying leaders, using conflict avoidance techniques, and pursuing coaching and mentoring opportunities across the gap to enhance the professional standing and contributions of both groups. An added consideration would be to have joint conferences wherein the strengths, challenges and knowledge repositories of informatics and telehealth could be mutually appreciated.

  6. A product-service system approach to telehealth application design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Vaquero, Paul; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Alcock, Jeffrey; Hutabarat, Windo; Turner, Chris

    2016-06-01

    A considerable proportion of current point-of-care devices do not offer a wide enough set of capabilities if they are to function in any telehealth system. There is a need for intermediate devices that lie between healthcare devices and service networks. The development of an application is suggested that allows for a smartphone to take the role of an intermediate device. This research seeks to identify the telehealth service requirements for long-term condition management using a product-service system approach. The use of product-service system has proven to be a suitable methodology for the design and development of telehealth smartphone applications. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Telehealth at UC Davis--a 20-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Thomas S; Dharmar, Madan; Katz-Bell, Jana; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Marcin, James P

    2013-05-01

    Telehealth at the University of California Health System began as a telefetal monitoring connection with a rural hospital in 1992 and evolved to become the Center for Health and Technology (CHT) in 2000. The Center supports the vision of the University of California Davis (UC Davis) Health System-a healthier world through bold innovation. The CHT focuses on the four pillars of the academic health center: clinical services, research and scholarly work, education, and public service. Since 1996, the Center has provided more than 33,000 telemedicine consultation (excluding teleradiology, telepathology, and phone consultations) in over 30 clinical specialties and at more than 90 locations across California. Research and continuous evaluation have played an integral role in shaping the telehealth program, as well as strategic collaborations and partnerships. In an effort to expand the field of telehealth the CHT provides telehealth training for health professionals, technical specialists, and administrators. Furthermore, it also plays an integral role in workforce development through the education of the next generation of community primary care physicians through Rural Programs In Medical Education (Rural PRIME) and continuing educational programs for working health professionals through videoconferencing and Web-based modalities. The Center is supported through a variety of funding sources, and its sustainability comes from a mix of fee-for-service payment, contracts, grants, gifts, and institutional funding. Together with key partners, UC Davis has educated and informed initiatives resulting in legislation and policies that advance telehealth. Looking toward the future, UC Davis is focused on technology-enabled healthcare and supporting synergy among electronic health records, health information exchange, mobile health, informatics, and telehealth.

  8. The effectiveness of telehealth care on caregiver burden, mastery of stress, and family function among family caregivers of heart failure patients: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Li-Chi; Chen, Wan-Chou; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Ho, Yi-Lwun

    2012-10-01

    Telehealth care was developed to provide home-based monitoring and support for patients with chronic disease. The positive effects on physical outcome have been reported; however, more evidence is required concerning the effects on family caregivers and family function for heart failure patients transitioning from the hospital to home. To evaluate the effectiveness of nursing-led transitional care combining discharge plans and telehealth care on family caregiver burden, stress mastery and family function in family caregivers of heart failure patients compared to those receiving traditional discharge planning only. This is a quasi-experimental study design. Sixty-three patients with heart failure were assessed for eligibility and invited to participate in either telehealth care or standard care in a medical centre from May to October 2010. Three families refused to participate in data collection. Thirty families who chose telehealth care after discharge from the hospital to home comprised the experimental group; the others families receiving discharge planning only comprised the comparison group. Telenursing specialist provided the necessary family nursing interventions by 24-h remote monitoring of patients' health condition and counselling by telephone, helping the family caregivers successfully transition from hospital to home. Data on caregiver burden, stress mastery and family function were collected before discharge from the hospital and one month later at home. Effects of group, time, and group×time interaction were analysed using Mixed Model in SPSS (17.0). Family caregivers in both groups had significantly lower burden, higher stress mastery, and better family function at one-month follow-up compared to before discharge. The total score of caregiver burden, stress mastery and family function was significantly improved for the family caregivers in the experimental group compared to the comparison group at posttest. Two subscales of family function

  9. On participatory design of home-based healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Kyng, Morten

    2013-01-01

    to reflect upon differences between a home-based PD process with non-workers, such as ours, and work-place projects, such as Utopia. Through this reflection, the paper contributes to a more general discussion on PD in non-work settings with weak users. Indeed, differences do exist between traditional PD...... projects in work settings, such as Utopia, and home-based PD with weak users especially in relation to knowledge about settings and how to reconcile differences in interests. The home as a place for (technology-assisted) treatment and PD must be carefully analyzed. Diverse interests and roles as well......Participatory design (PD) activities in private homes challenge how we relate to the PD process, compared to PD in professional settings. Grounded in a project related to chronic dizziness among older people, we identified four challenges when performing PD with ill, weak users in their private...

  10. Cloud Computing for Achieving Interoperability in Home-based Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The care of chronic disease has become the main challenge for healthcare institutions around the world. As the incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases continue to increase, it is a big challenge for traditional hospital-based healthcare to meet requirements of patients. To meet the growing needs of patients, moving the front desk of healthcare from hospital to home is essential. Home-based healthcare for chronic disease involves many different organizations and healthcare providers. Ther...

  11. Telehealth among US hospitals: several factors, including state reimbursement and licensure policies, influence adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Kvedar, Joseph; Bates, David W

    2014-02-01

    Telehealth is widely believed to hold great potential to improve access to, and increase the value of, health care. Gaining a better understanding of why some hospitals adopt telehealth technologies while others do not is critically important. We examined factors associated with telehealth adoption among US hospitals. Data from the Information Technology Supplement to the American Hospital Association's 2012 annual survey of acute care hospitals show that 42 percent of US hospitals have telehealth capabilities. Hospitals more likely to have telehealth capabilities are teaching hospitals, those equipped with additional advanced medical technology, those that are members of a larger system, and those that are nonprofit institutions. Rates of hospital telehealth adoption by state vary substantially and are associated with differences in state policy. Policies that promote private payer reimbursement for telehealth are associated with greater likelihood of telehealth adoption, while policies that require out-of-state providers to have a special license to provide telehealth services reduce the likelihood of adoption. Our findings suggest steps that policy makers can take to achieve greater adoption of telehealth by hospitals.

  12. Innovative models for providing clinical pharmacy services to remote locations using clinical video telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdew, Cassie; Erickson, Katie; Litke, Jessica

    2017-07-15

    The use of videoconferencing and other telehealth technologies to expand access to clinical pharmacy services at multiple Veterans Affairs (VA) clinics in rural areas of Alaska and the northwestern United States is described. Beginning in 2014, clinical pharmacy specialists at a regional VA Telehealth Hub based at Boise VA Medical Center in Idaho have provided telehealth services for 16 clinics. In one telehealth model, a pharmacist and other remotely located primary care team members (a medical provider, a medical support assistant, a social worker, and a psychologist) conduct telehealth visits with veterans located at VA clinics, with support provided by clinic-based nursing staff; this model has been used to improve medication management services for veterans in sparsely populated areas. In the second VA telehealth model, a remotely located pharmacist uses telehealth technology to participate in clinical encounters along with primary care team members located at the patient site; this model allows on-demand remote coverage in the event of planned or unplanned absences of clinic-based pharmacists. Since the Telehealth Hub was established, pharmacists have engaged in video encounters and provided other telehealth-based clinical services to more than 1,200 veterans with diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and other chronic conditions. Within the VA healthcare system, telehealth technology has been demonstrated to be a cost-effective and well-received means of providing clinical pharmacy services in rural areas. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  14. The decreasing cost of telemedicine and telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Gary C; Spaulding, Ashley O'Neal; Williams, Arthur R

    2011-11-01

    The teleoncology practice based at the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) in Kansas City, Kansas, is one of the longest running practices of its kind worldwide. The practice began in 1995 and connected an oncologist at KUMC with a rural medical center in Hays, Kansas. Fifteen years later, the practice continues to thrive at Hays Medical Center and has also expanded to include two additional sites within the state-the Northeast Kansas Center for Health and Wellness in Horton and Goodland Regional Medical Center in Goodland-that offer regularly scheduled teleoncology clinics. While the KUMC practice has witnessed an expansion in service sites throughout its history, the practice has seen a significant decrease in the costs associated with providing such services since its inception. The cost decrease can, in part, be attributed to an increase in the number of teleoncology visits conducted through the practice since it began. In Fiscal Year 1995 (FY 1995), 103 teleoncology visits resulted in a cost per visit of $812. Five years later, the FY 2000 $410 per visit cost for 121 visits was almost half the cost identified in the initial cost analysis. The FY 2003 cost per visit for 219 visits saw another decrease to $401, and the most recent FY 2005 cost analysis yielded another decrease to $251 per visit for 235 visits. The data reported below are likely to be the best now available to track time trends in the cost of providing telemedicine or telehealth consultations. The Conclusion and Policy Recommendations at the end of this article will focus on both the cost-time profile and some other challenges and lessons learned.

  15. Telehealth: Families Finding Ways to Connect in Rural Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    JFK Partners, at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, is currently implementing a study on the use of telehealth (receiving treatment or services using videoconferencing technology, such as Skype) and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and anxiety. The study is an exploratory grant from Health Resources and Services…

  16. TeleCITE: Telehealth--A Cochlear Implant Therapy Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stith, Joanna; Stredler-Brown, Arlene; Greenway, Pat; Kahn, Gary

    2012-01-01

    What might bring the efforts of a physician, a speech-language pathologist, a teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing, and a nurse together? The answer is the innovative use of telepractice to deliver high quality, family-centered early intervention to infants and toddlers with hearing loss. TeleCITE: Telehealth--A Cochlear Implant Therapy…

  17. Collaborative software development for a Brazilian telehealth program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Luiz M P; Harris, Marcelline R; Abbott, Patricia A; Novaes, Magdala A; Lopes, Maria H B M

    2014-01-01

    Telehealth services in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil are led by the Telehealth Center (RedeNUTES) and based on HealthNet 2.0 software. Among the tele-assistance services, health professionals have clinical discussions focused on second opinions. This paper reports the experience in a PhD study through mixed-methods, to evaluate the telehealth services, planning and modeling a new tool to improve a telehealth system. We described the nurse's role in each phase of this study. The method of User-Centered Design was explored in three phases as Identification of work process, User's perception and collaborative modeling, Observational usability study. The main frame was based on collaborative techniques as Collaborative Prototype Design Process, cognitive walkthrough, and thinking-aloud. The users also identified all usability problems identified by the evaluators. The methods were useful in identifying usability problems, and easy to employ using standard equipment and software thus a relatively low cost approach to usability testing.

  18. World Federation of occupational therapists' position statement on telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to state the World Federation of Occupational Therapists' (WFOT) position on the use of telehealth for the delivery of occupational therapy services. Telehealth is the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to deliver health-related services when the provider and client are in different physical locations. Additional terms used to describe this service delivery model include: tele-occupational therapy, telerehabilitation, teletherapy, telecare, telemedicine, and telepractice, among other terms. Telehealth may be used by occupational therapy practitioners for evaluation, intervention, monitoring, supervision, and consultation (between remote therapist, client, and/or local health-care provider) as permitted by jurisdictional, institutional, and professional regulations and policies governing the practice of occupational therapy. Occupational therapy services via telehealth should be appropriate to the individuals, groups and cultures served, and contextualized to the occupations and interests of clients. Important considerations related to licensure/registration, collaboration with local occupational therapists, client selection, consent to treat, professional liability insurance, confidentiality, personal and cultural attributes, provider competence/standards of care, reimbursement/payer guidelines, and authentic occupational therapy practice are discussed.

  19. World Federation of Occupational Therapists' Position Statement on Telehealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    World Federation of Occupational Therapists

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this document is to state the World Federation of Occupational Therapists’ (WFOT position on the use of telehealth for the delivery of occupational therapy services. Telehealth is the use of information and communication technologies (ICT to deliver health-related services when the provider and client are in different physical locations. Additional terms used to describe this service delivery model include: tele-occupational therapy, telerehabilitation, teletherapy, telecare, telemedicine, and telepractice, among other terms. Telehealth may be used by occupational therapy practitioners for evaluation, intervention, monitoring, supervision, and consultation (between remote therapist, client, and/or local health-care provider as permitted by jurisdictional, institutional, and professional regulations and policies governing the practice of occupational therapy.Occupational therapy services via telehealth should be appropriate to the individuals, groups and cultures served,and contextualized to the occupations and interests of clients. Important considerations related to licensure/registration, collaboration with local occupational therapists, client selection, consent to treat, professional liability insurance, confidentiality, personal and cultural attributes, provider competence/standards of care, reimbursement/payer guidelines, and authentic occupational therapy practice are discussed.

  20. Clinician Behaviors in Telehealth Care Delivery: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Beverly W.; Block, Derryl E.; Ciesla, James R.; McGowan, Beth Ann; Vozenilek, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Literature on telehealth care delivery often addresses clinical, cost, technological, system, and organizational impacts. Less is known about interpersonal behaviors such as communication patterns and therapeutic relationship-building, which may have workforce development considerations. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic…

  1. Telehealth Business: Boom Times, but Profits May Wait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Robert

    2017-04-01

    What we have here is irrational telehealth exuberance. Investors are plowing millions into startups. And even though millennials could be eager adopters, these are still early days for the industry. It may take years-and some regulatory changes-for profits to materialize.

  2. Telehealth Support of Managed Care for a Correctional System: The Open Architecture Telehealth Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Ellen S; Reynolds, H Neal; Baucom, Sharon; Lehman, Thomas M

    2017-07-06

    The intent was to evaluate time to match initial investment of a new, statewide correctional system telehealth program based upon cumulative savings by avoidance of transportation and custody-related costs. The setting was a statewide correctional system where prisoners received medical care through enhanced telemedicine technology supported by newly recruited specialty providers delivered through an open architecture system. The patients were incarcerated persons requiring nonemergent consultations in 10 specialties. A financial model was created to estimate transportation expenses, including vehicular use and custody staff, during the out of prison travel for traditional face-to-face care. Cost savings were then estimated by multiplying transportation expenses by the number of telehealth encounters (avoided cost) and summed cumulatively. Savings were mapped monthly. Private sector specialists were recruited, provided security clearance, trained in the use of the technology, and provided a secure site to provide services. Based on the financial model, 1.2 million dollars in savings, equaling the initial capital investment, were achieved at 32 months. The total number of patient telemedicine encounters increased from 2,365 (±98/month) to 3,748 during the first 32 months of operation (July 2013 through January 2016: ±117/month) with 89% of the established specialties performed by telemedicine technologies. It was initially estimated to require 48 months to achieve the investment savings, but savings were achieved in 32 months, demonstrating greater adoption than expected. While finances were quantifiable, enhanced public safety by avoidance of out of prison time is unquantifiable, but judged to be significant.

  3. Integrating telemedicine and telehealth: putting it all together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Ronald S; Lopez, Ana Maria; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Beinar, Sandra J; Holcomb, Michael; McNeely, Richard A; Latifi, Rifat; Barker, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Telemedicine and telehealth programs are inherently complex compared with their traditional on-site health care delivery counterparts. Relatively few organizations have developed sustainable, multi-specialty telemedicine programs, although single service programs, such as teleradiology and telepsychiatry programs, are common. A number of factors are barriers to the development of sustainable telemedicine and telehealth programs. First, starting programs is often challenging since relatively few organizations have, in house, a critical mass of individuals with the skill sets required to organize and manage a telemedicine program. Therefore, it is necessary to "boot strap" many of the start-up activities using available personnel. Another challenge is to assemble a management team that has time to champion telemedicine and telehealth while dealing with the broad range of issues that often confront telemedicine programs. Telemedicine programs housed within a single health care delivery system have advantages over programs that serve as umbrella telehealth organizations for multiple health care systems. Planning a telemedicine program can involve developing a shared vision among the participants, including the parent organizations, management, customers and the public. Developing shared visions can be a time-consuming, iterative process. Part of planning includes having the partnering organizations and their management teams reach a consensus on the initial program goals, priorities, strategies, and implementation plans. Staffing requirements of telemedicine and telehealth programs may be met by sharing existent resources, hiring additional personnel, or outsourcing activities. Business models, such as the Application Service Provider (ASP) model used by the Arizona Telemedicine Program, are designed to provide staffing flexibility by offering a combination of in-house and out-sourced services, depending on the needs of the individual participating health care

  4. Atrial Fibrillation Screening in Nonmetropolitan Areas Using a Telehealth Surveillance System With an Embedded Cloud-Computing Algorithm: Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Hsien; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Huang, Ching-Chang; Hung, Yu-Chien; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Ho, Yi-Lwun

    2017-09-26

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common form of arrhythmia that is associated with increased risk of stroke and mortality. Detecting AF before the first complication occurs is a recognized priority. No previous studies have examined the feasibility of undertaking AF screening using a telehealth surveillance system with an embedded cloud-computing algorithm; we address this issue in this study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of AF screening in nonmetropolitan areas using a telehealth surveillance system with an embedded cloud-computing algorithm. We conducted a prospective AF screening study in a nonmetropolitan area using a single-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) recorder. All ECG measurements were reviewed on the telehealth surveillance system and interpreted by the cloud-computing algorithm and a cardiologist. The process of AF screening was evaluated with a satisfaction questionnaire. Between March 11, 2016 and August 31, 2016, 967 ECGs were recorded from 922 residents in nonmetropolitan areas. A total of 22 (2.4%, 22/922) residents with AF were identified by the physician's ECG interpretation, and only 0.2% (2/967) of ECGs contained significant artifacts. The novel cloud-computing algorithm for AF detection had a sensitivity of 95.5% (95% CI 77.2%-99.9%) and specificity of 97.7% (95% CI 96.5%-98.5%). The overall satisfaction score for the process of AF screening was 92.1%. AF screening in nonmetropolitan areas using a telehealth surveillance system with an embedded cloud-computing algorithm is feasible.

  5. The organising vision for telehealth and telecare: discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Procter, Rob; Wherton, Joe; Sugarhood, Paul; Shaw, Sara

    2012-01-01

    To (1) map how different stakeholders understand telehealth and telecare technologies and (2) explore the implications for development and implementation of telehealth and telecare services. Discourse analysis. 68 publications representing diverse perspectives (academic, policy, service, commercial and lay) on telehealth and telecare plus field notes from 10 knowledge-sharing events. Following a familiarisation phase (browsing and informal interviews), we studied a systematic sample of texts in detail. Through repeated close reading, we identified assumptions, metaphors, storylines, scenarios, practices and rhetorical positions. We added successive findings to an emerging picture of the whole. Telehealth and telecare technologies featured prominently in texts on chronic illness and ageing. There was no coherent organising vision. Rather, four conflicting discourses were evident and engaged only minimally with one another's arguments. Modernist discourse presented a futuristic utopian vision in which assistive technologies, implemented at scale, would enable society to meet its moral obligations to older people by creating a safe 'smart' home environment where help was always at hand, while generating efficiency savings. Humanist discourse emphasised the uniqueness and moral worth of the individual and tailoring to personal and family context; it considered that technologies were only sometimes fit for purpose and could create as well as solve problems. Political economy discourse envisaged a techno-economic complex of powerful vested interests driving commodification of healthcare and diversion of public funds into private business. Change management discourse recognised the complicatedness of large-scale technology programmes and emphasised good project management and organisational processes. Introduction of telehealth and telecare is hampered because different stakeholders hold different assumptions, values and world views, 'talk past' each other and compete for

  6. Narrative as a Means of Understanding the Multi-Dimensional Benefits of Telehealth: An Exploration of Telehealth Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine Mary; Muir, Linda; McLean, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Telehealth is a wide range of health services delivered across distance through technology. In this technology-supported health world, sometimes, the client and his or her family can get lost as clinical consultations are counted for reporting purposes and new technologies are implemented. As a response to this situation and building on the…

  7. Hospital at home: home-based end of life care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Wee, Bee; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-01-01

    Background The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and patients with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end of life care at home. Objectives To determine if providing home-based end of life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients’ symptoms, quality of life, health service costs and care givers compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library) to October 2009, Ovid MED-LINE(R) 1950 to March 2011, EMBASE 1980 to October 2009, CINAHL 1982 to October 2009 and EconLit to October 2009. We checked the reference lists of articles identified for potentially relevant articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end of life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible we presented the data in narrative summary tables. Main results We included four trials in this review. Those receiving home-based end of life care were statistically significantly more likely to die at home compared with those receiving usual care (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi 2 = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I2 = 0% (three trials; N=652)). We detected no statistically significant differences for functional status (measured by the Barthel Index), psychological well-being or cognitive status, between patients receiving home-based end of life care compared with those receiving standard care (which

  8. Extending Agent Based Telehealth Platform with Activities of Daily Living Reasoning Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring; Hallenborg, Kasper; Demazeau, Yves

    2016-01-01

    it will influence his or her everyday live. Therefore we believe that a telehealth system shall adapt its behavior so that it will not be a burden for the patient/resident to use. To this aim we have extended an existing telehealth platform to reason about activities of daily living in a smart home scenario......In the future patients will have a more active role in strengthening and maintaining their own health. Telehealth can empower and motivate patients by giving them the chance to stay in their own homes instead of going to the hospital. A telehealth system is deployed in a patient’s home hence...

  9. The Church as a Bridge to Deliver Health Resources Via Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-25

    Obesity; Diet, Food, and Nutrition; Church; Healthcare Disparities; Minority Health; Mobile Health; Telehealth; Community-based Participatory Research; Primary Health Care; Weight Loss Programs; Health Behavior

  10. Telehealth and eHealth in nurse practitioner training: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Carolyn M; Kott, Karen; Schweickert, Patty A; Poston, Rebecca; Fowler, Christianne; Haney, Tina S

    2017-01-01

    Telehealth is becoming a vital process for providing access to cost-effective quality care to patients at a distance. As such, it is important for nurse practitioners, often the primary providers for rural and disadvantaged populations, to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to utilize telehealth technologies in practice. In reviewing the literature, very little information was found on programs that addressed nurse practitioner training in telehealth. This article provides an overview of both the topics and the techniques that have been utilized for training nurse practitioners and nurse practitioner students in the delivery of care utilizing telehealth. Specifically, this article focuses on topics including 1) defining telehealth, 2) telehealth etiquette, 3) interprofessional collaboration, 4) regulations, 5) reimbursement, 6) security/Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), 7) ethical practice in telehealth, and 8) satisfaction of patients and providers. A multimodal approach based on a review of the literature is presented for providing the training: 1) didactics, 2) simulations including standardized patient encounters, 3) practice immersions, and 4) telehealth projects. Studies found that training using the multimodal approach allowed the students to develop comfort, knowledge, and skills needed to embrace the utilization of telehealth in health care. PMID:28721113

  11. Use of telehealth for health care of Indigenous peoples with chronic conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Sarah; Mackean, Tamara; Grant, Julian; Hunter, Kate; Towers, Kurt; Ivers, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Telehealth may be a cost effective modality in healthcare delivery, but how well used or how appropriate it is for the care of Indigenous peoples is unclear. This review examines the evidence for telehealth in facilitating chronic conditions management with Indigenous peoples. Databases were systematically searched for qualitative or quantitative primary research studies that investigated telehealth use for chronic conditions management with Indigenous peoples worldwide. Evidence of effectiveness was by consumer health outcomes, evidence of acceptability was through consumer and user perception, and health service feasibility was evident by service impact. Data were assessed for quality and data extracted using pre-defined tools. Articles (n=32) examined effectiveness (n=11), critiqued telehealth from the perspectives of the client (n=10) and healthcare professionals (n=8), and examined feasibility (n=12). Studies reported Indigenous people tend to be satisfied with telehealth, but are sceptical about its cultural safety. Evidence for the effectiveness of telehealth from a western biomedical perspective was found. Telehealth is promising; however, a lack of robust studies in this review make tangible conclusions difficult. A better overall understanding of telehealth use with Indigenous peoples, including delivery of culturally competent health care, true consultation and cultural competency of the professionals involved, would be helpful. Telehealth may have the potential to improve health care for Indigenous people, however the modality needs to be culturally competent and the care received must be culturally safe.

  12. Home based Tactile Discrimination Training (TDT) reduces phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakolbinger, Robert; Diers, Martin; Hruby, Laura A; Sturma, Agnes; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2017-11-06

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) affects a high percentage of amputees. Since treatment options are limited, low quality of life and addiction to pain medication is frequent. New attempts, such as mirror therapy or electrical sensory discrimination training, make use of the brain's plasticity to alleviate this centrally derived pain. This pilot study assessed the question, whether home-based tactile discrimination training (TDT) leads to a stronger decrease in phantom limb pain levels, compared to a standard massage treatment. Controlled study. Outpatient. Amputees (upper/lower extremity) with PLP of VAS 4/10 or higher. Eight patients participated in the study. The treatment phase comprised two weeks (15min daily). Subjects were examined at baseline, after treatment, two weeks after and four weeks after completing the treatment. Pain was assessed with the West Haven Multidimensional Pain Inventory. There was a significantly stronger reduction in phantom limb pain in the treatment group receiving TDT. Phantom limb pain intensity ratings were significantly reduced at the end of therapy, two weeks after as well as four weeks after compared to pre-treatment. TDT seems to be an easy, cheap, time-effective and safe method to achieve sustained alleviation in PLP and also brings about a positive change in body image. Home-based TDT could achieve sustained reduction in PLP and should be considered as possible alternative to established treatment methods. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Stem cell homing-based tissue engineering using bioactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinxian; Sun, Binbin; Yi, Chengqing; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on repairing tissue and restoring tissue functions by employing three elements: scaffolds, cells and biochemical signals. In tissue engineering, bioactive material scaffolds have been used to cure tissue and organ defects with stem cell-based therapies being one of the best documented approaches. In the review, different biomaterials which are used in several methods to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds were explained and show good properties (biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties etc.) for cell migration and infiltration. Stem cell homing is a recruitment process for inducing the migration of the systemically transplanted cells, or host cells, to defect sites. The mechanisms and modes of stem cell homing-based tissue engineering can be divided into two types depending on the source of the stem cells: endogenous and exogenous. Exogenous stem cell-based bioactive scaffolds have the challenge of long-term culturing in vitro and for endogenous stem cells the biochemical signal homing recruitment mechanism is not clear yet. Although the stem cell homing-based bioactive scaffolds are attractive candidates for tissue defect therapies, based on in vitro studies and animal tests, there is still a long way before clinical application.

  14. Home-Based Psychoeducational Intervention for Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şengün İnan, Figen; Üstün, Besti

    2017-03-15

    It is important to manage psychological distress and improve the quality of life (QOL) in patients after breast cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based, psychoeducational program on distress, anxiety, depression, and QOL in breast cancer survivors. The study was a single-group pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design. The data were collected using the Distress Thermometer, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Turkish version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, short form. The home-based, individual, face-to-face psychoeducational program was structured according to breast cancer survivors' needs and the Neuman Systems Model. A total of 32 Turkish breast cancer survivors participated in this study. There were statistically significant differences in the mean scores for distress, anxiety, and depression in the breast cancer survivors over 4 measurements. The mean scores for all subscales of the QOL at 6 months postintervention were significantly higher than the mean scores at baseline. The results indicated that the psychoeducational program may be effective in reducing distress, anxiety, and depression and in improving the QOL in breast cancer survivors. Psychoeducational programs may be effective and should be considered as part of the survivorship care for breast cancer survivors.

  15. An overview of telehealth initiatives in Latin America/Uma visao panoramica das acoes de telessaude na America Latina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Fatima dos Santos, Alaneir; DAgostino, Marcelo; Bouskela, Mauricio Simon; Fernandez, Andres; Messina, Luiz Ary; Alves, Humberto Jose

    2014-01-01

    This article aimed to systematize the views on telehealth in Latin America and to present the experience of building an instrument for monitoring the development of telehealth initiatives based on the...

  16. Factors Affecting Quality of Life in Family Caregivers of Home-based Care Stroke persons

    OpenAIRE

    武政, 誠一; 出川, 瑞枝; 杉元, 雅晴; 嶋田, 智明

    2006-01-01

    在宅高齢脳卒中片麻痺者(要介護者)に対する家族介護者の介護負担感、Quality of Life(QOL)の現状を把握し、それに影響を及ぼす要因を明らかにする目的で検討を行った。対象は西宮、尼崎市内の訪問サービスを利用している65歳以上の日常生活に介護を必要とする在宅高齢脳卒中片麻痺者21名(男性12名、女性9名、年齢79.3±8.4歳)とその主介護者21名(男性3名、女性18名、年齢64.0±13.7歳)とし、身体的・精神的機能面およびQOLを中心とした実態調査を行った。その結果、介護負担感とADL自立度との間には関連はなかったが、介護者のQOLは要介護者のADL自立度と介護者の介護負担感によって影響を受けることが判明した。したがって介護者のQOLを向上させるには、要介護者のADL自立度の向上のためのリハビリテーションと介護負担感軽減のための社会的サポートの必要性が示唆された。 / The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors affecting the quality of life (QOL) of family ...

  17. Systematic review of the use of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) in home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes for patients with cardiovascular disease--protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Donnelly, Michael; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E

    2015-11-17

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), including myocardial infarction, heart failure, peripheral arterial disease and strokes, are highly prevalent conditions and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an effective form of secondary prevention for CVD but there is a lack of information regarding which specific behaviour change techniques (BCTs) are included in programmes that are associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. This systematic review will describe the BCTs which are utilised within home-based CR programmes that are effective at reducing a spectrum of CVD risk factors. The review will be reported in line with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidance. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of home-based CR initiated following a vascular event (myocardial infarction, heart failure, peripheral arterial disease and stroke patients) will be included. Articles will be identified through a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science and Cochrane Database guided by a medical librarian. Two review authors will independently screen articles retrieved from the search for eligibility and extract relevant data, identifying which specific BCTs are included in programmes that are associated with improvements in particular modifiable vascular risk factors. This review will be of value to clinicians and healthcare professionals working with cardiovascular patients by identifying specific BCTs which are used within effective home-based CR. It will also inform the future design and evaluation of complex health service interventions aimed at secondary prevention in CVD. PROSPERO registration CRD42015027036 .

  18. Florida TeleHealth Summit: “Telemedicine –It’s Here, It’s Now”

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Wainright Haas

    2015-01-01

    The Southeastern Telehealth Resource Center, Florida State University College of Medicine, and the Florida Partnership for TeleHealth invites participation in the 2nd Annual Florida TeleHealth Summit. The Summit will be held December 3-4, 2015 at the Alfond Inn, Winter Park, Florida. For further information about the Southeastern Telehealth Resource Center and the Summit, visit: http://www.setrc.us/

  19. Tablet PC Enabled Body Sensor System for Rural Telehealth Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitha V. Panicker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Telehealth systems benefit from the rapid growth of mobile communication technology for measuring physiological signals. Development and validation of a tablet PC enabled noninvasive body sensor system for rural telehealth application are discussed in this paper. This system includes real time continuous collection of physiological parameters (blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature and fall detection of a patient with the help of a body sensor unit and wireless transmission of the acquired information to a tablet PC handled by the medical staff in a Primary Health Center (PHC. Abnormal conditions are automatically identified and alert messages are given to the medical officer in real time. Clinical validation is performed in a real environment and found to be successful. Bland-Altman analysis is carried out to validate the wrist blood pressure sensor used. The system works well for all measurements.

  20. Measuring Knowledge, Acceptance, and Perceptions of Telehealth in an Interprofessional Curriculum for Student Nurse Practitioners, Occupational Therapists, and Physical Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ken; Steinheider, Brigitte; Isaacson, Mary; Shortridge, Ann; Bird, Stephanie; Crio, Carrie; Ross, Heather; Loving, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The use of telehealth in service delivery is both challenging and beneficial. This paper describes the results of a three semester-long interprofessional education program in team-based care using telehealth technology. The study assessed telehealth knowledge acquisition, practice in a structured environment with a simulated patient,…

  1. Telehealth is Face-to-Face Service Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    CASON, JANA

    2017-01-01

    The Commentary contests the increasingly outdated and narrow use of the terminology ?face-to-face? (often abbreviated as F2F) to connote clinical interactions in which both the client and the practitioner are physically present in the same room or space. An expanded definition is necessary because when delivered synchronously via videoconferencing, telehealth also provides face-to-face services (i.e., the practitioner and the client view each other?s faces). Terminology that uses face-to-face...

  2. Electrocardiogram signal quality measures for unsupervised telehealth environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, S J; Xie, Y; Chang, D; Basilakis, J; Lovell, N H

    2012-09-01

    The use of telehealth paradigms for the remote management of patients suffering from chronic conditions has become more commonplace with the advancement of Internet connectivity and enterprise software systems. To facilitate clinicians in managing large numbers of telehealth patients, and in digesting the vast array of data returned from the remote monitoring environment, decision support systems in various guises are often utilized. The success of decision support systems in interpreting patient conditions from physiological data is dependent largely on the quality of these recorded data. This paper outlines an algorithm to determine the quality of single-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings obtained from telehealth patients. Three hundred short ECG recordings were manually annotated to identify movement artifact, QRS locations and signal quality (discrete quality levels) by a panel of three experts, who then reconciled the annotation as a group to resolve any discrepancies. After applying a published algorithm to remove gross movement artifact, the proposed method was then applied to estimate the remaining ECG signal quality, using a Parzen window supervised statistical classifier model. The three-class classifier model, using a number of time-domain features and evaluated using cross validation, gave an accuracy in classifying signal quality of 78.7% (κ = 0.67) when using fully automated preprocessing algorithms to remove gross motion artifact and detect QRS locations. This is a similar level of accuracy to the reported human inter-scorer agreement when generating the gold standard annotation (accuracy = 70-89.3%, κ = 0.54-0.84). These results indicate that the assessment of the quality of single-lead ECG recordings, acquired in unsupervised telehealth environments, is entirely feasible and may help to promote the acceptance and utility of future decision support systems for remotely managing chronic disease conditions.

  3. Guidelines for Developing Telehealth Services and Troubleshooting Problems with Telehealth Technology When Coaching Parents to Conduct Functional Analyses and Functional Communication Training in Their Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John F; Schieltz, Kelly M; Suess, Alyssa N; Wacker, David P; Romani, Patrick W; Lindgren, Scott D; Kopelman, Todd G; Dalmau, Yaniz C Padilla

    2015-10-01

    The researchers in the project used telehealth to conduct functional analyses and functional communication training in homes of children diagnosed with autism who displayed problem behavior. Parents conducted all assessment and treatment procedures within their homes while receiving coaching from applied behavior analysts located approximately 200 miles away from them. In this article, the researchers summarize the technical systems they used to develop a telehealth service and the concerns and problems they have encountered using telehealth and provide some guidelines for how to troubleshoot those problems.

  4. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  5. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke can cause lasting brain damage. People who survive a stroke need to relearn skills they lost because of ... them relearn those skills. The effects of a stroke depend on which area of the brain was ...

  6. Home-based exercise training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Branislava

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The role of rehabilitation programmes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients is to lower dyspnoea, improve exercise tolerance and quality of life. Objective We have developed a short-course, home-based, rehabilitation programme of physical exercise for lower limb muscles, based on walking at patients’ fastest pace. The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of such a programme regarding the exercise tolerance, pulmonary functions and quality of life. Method Twenty-nine individuals with stable COPD (22 males, 7 females, with a mean age of 59.6±8.9 years participated in the study. Subjects were assessed before and after the 8-week rehabilitation programme using the six-minute walking test (6MWT, Borg breathlessness score, oxygen saturation, St. George’s Hospital Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and spirometry. Results The 6MWT distance improved significantly from 337 to 362 m, representing 8.3% (25 m improvement over baseline. SGRQ activity, impact and total scores improved significantly after the rehabilitation programme (p<0.01 and quality of life, too. Anxiety and depression scores were significantly lower than the baseline (p<0.01, as well as dyspnoea sensation (p<0.01. Pulmonary function improved after an eight-week exercise programme, too (p<0.01. Conclusion This short-term and simple home-based exercise programme improved health status in COPD. It also improved exercise tolerance, breathlessness sensation and quality of life in COPD patients.

  7. Midlife women's adherence to home-based walking during maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Joellen; Vassalo, Annemarie; Chandler, Peggy; McDevitt, Judith; Miller, Arlene Michaels

    2005-01-01

    Despite the many known benefits of physical activity, some women (27%) report no leisure-time physical activity in the prior month. Of those women who began an exercise program, the dropout rate was as high as 50% in the first 3-6 months. The challenge for researchers and clinicians is to identify those factors that influence not only adoption, but also maintenance, of physical activity. The purpose of this study was (a) to describe midlife women's maintenance of walking following the intervention phase of a 24-week, home-based walking program, and (b) to identify the effects of background characteristics, self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise, and adherence to walking during the intervention phase on retention and adherence to walking. There were Black and White women participants (N = 90) aged 40-65 years who completed a 24-week, home-based walking program. Self-efficacy for overcoming barriers to exercise, maximal aerobic fitness, and percentage of body fat were measured at baseline, 24 weeks, and 48 weeks. Adherence was measured with heart-rate monitors and an exercise log. Retention was 80% during maintenance. On average, the women who reported walking during maintenance adhered to 64% of the expected walks during that phase. Examination of the total number of walks and the number and sequence of weeks without a walk revealed dynamic patterns. The multiple regression model explained 40% of the variance in adherence during the maintenance phase. These results suggest that both self-efficacy for overcoming barriers and adherence during the intervention phase play a role in women's walking adherence. The findings reflect dynamic patterns of adopting and maintaining new behavior.

  8. Telehealth application on the rehabilitation of children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza N. dos Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To systematically review the literature on the telehealth initiatives in telerehabilitation practices in children and adolescents from zero to 18 years old. Data sources: Randomized and controlled clinical trials published in the past ten years (January 2002 to February 2012 in Medline/PubMed, Medline/BVS, PEDro and Cochrane Library databases. The descriptors "telemedicine", "rehabilitation" and "telehealth" were used in three different languages (English, Portuguese and Spanish. Data synthesis: From the 20 studies found in the literature, nine were included in this review. Most of the studies showed that telerehabilitation is able to produce better results in the treatment when compared to the traditional methods, providing less frequency of symptoms, better disease control, better quality of life and greater adherence to treatment. Conclusions: Telerehabilitation is a viable and effective strategy in the treatment of common diseases in children and adolescents. However, there are few studies on the subject in this age group. Although telehealth is already consolidated worldwide, there are no studies in Brazil that used the telerehabilitation in children and adolescents, which reinforces the need for more research and investments.

  9. Building a multicenter telehealth network to advance chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairat, Saif; Wijesinghe, Namal; Wolfson, Julian; Scott, Rob; Simkus, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The use of telehealth solutions has proved to improve clinical management of chronic diseases, expand access to healthcare services and clinicians, and reduce healthcare-related costs. The project aims at improving Heart Failure (HF) management through the utilization of a Telemedicine and Personal Health Records systems that will assist HF specialist in Colombo, Sri Lanka to monitor and consult with remote HF patients. A telehealth network will be built at an international site that connects five remote telehealth clinics to a central clinic at a major University Hospital in Sri Lanka where HF specialists are located. In this study, 200 HF patients will be recruited for nine months, 100 patients will be randomly selected for the treatment group and the other 100 will be selected for the control group. Pre, mid, and post study surveys will be conducted to assess the efficacy and satisfaction levels of patients with both care models. Moreover, clinical outcomes will be collected to evaluate the impact of the intervention on the treatment patients compared to control patients. The research aims at enhancing Heart Failure management through eliminating current health challenges and healthcare-related financial burdens.

  10. 77 FR 50549 - Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (Telehealth in the Parkinson's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (Telehealth in the Parkinson's... for information needed to improve the care and clinical outcomes of patients with Parkinson's disease... ``Telehealth in the Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC): The Key to the...

  11. Increasing Access to an ASD Imitation Intervention via a Telehealth Parent Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Allison L.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic research focused on developing and improving strategies for the dissemination and implementation of effective ASD services is essential. An innovative and promising area of research is the use of telehealth programs to train parents of children with ASD in intervention techniques. A hybrid telehealth program, combining self-directed…

  12. Pediatric Obesity Management in Rural Clinics in California and the Role of Telehealth in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Romano, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine health care provider needs related to pediatric obesity management in rural California and to explore strategies to improve care through telehealth. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of health care providers who treated children and adolescents at 41 rural clinics with existing telehealth connectivity. Results: Most of the…

  13. Intercontinental Telehealth Coaching of Therapists to Improve Verbalizations by Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaia, Ana; Stokes, Trevor F.; Mikiashvili, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of intercontinental telehealth coaching on the mastery of therapists' skills and improvements in verbalizations by children with autism, testing whether telehealth can be a solution for underserved communities in developing countries such as Georgia-Sakartvelo in Eastern Europe. Three therapists delivering and three…

  14. 75 FR 15496 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ...).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0481. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (CCHT). Type of Review: New collection. Abstract: Patients... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)) Activity Under OMB Review...

  15. Understanding heart failure; explaining telehealth - a hermeneutic systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; A'Court, Christine; Shaw, Sara

    2017-06-14

    Enthusiasts for telehealth extol its potential for supporting heart failure management. But randomised trials have been slow to recruit and produced conflicting findings; real-world roll-out has been slow. We sought to inform policy by making sense of a complex literature on heart failure and its remote management. Through database searching and citation tracking, we identified 7 systematic reviews of systematic reviews, 32 systematic reviews (including 17 meta-analyses and 8 qualitative reviews); six mega-trials and over 60 additional relevant empirical studies and commentaries. We synthesised these using Boell's hermeneutic methodology for systematic review, which emphasises the quest for understanding. Heart failure is a complex and serious condition with frequent co-morbidity and diverse manifestations including severe tiredness. Patients are often frightened, bewildered, socially isolated and variably able to self-manage. Remote monitoring technologies are many and varied; they create new forms of knowledge and new possibilities for care but require fundamental changes to clinical roles and service models and place substantial burdens on patients, carers and staff. The policy innovation of remote biomarker monitoring enabling timely adjustment of medication, mediated by "activated" patients, is based on a modernist vision of efficient, rational, technology-mediated and guideline-driven ("cold") care. It contrasts with relationship-based ("warm") care valued by some clinicians and by patients who are older, sicker and less technically savvy. Limited uptake of telehealth can be analysed in terms of key tensions: between tidy, "textbook" heart failure and the reality of multiple comorbidities; between basic and intensive telehealth; between activated, well-supported patients and vulnerable, unsupported ones; between "cold" and "warm" telehealth; and between fixed and agile care programmes. The limited adoption of telehealth for heart failure has complex clinical

  16. Overview of States' Use of Telehealth for the Delivery of Early Intervention (IDEA Part C) Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana; Behl, Diane; Ringwalt, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) services are designed to promote the development of skills and enhance the quality of life of infants and toddlers who have been identified as having a disability or developmental delay, enhance capacity of families to care for their child with special needs, reduce future educational costs, and promote independent living (NECTAC, 2011). EI services are regulated by Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA); however, personnel shortages, particularly in rural areas, limit access for children who qualify. Telehealth is an emerging delivery model demonstrating potential to deliver EI services effectively and efficiently, thereby improving access and ameliorating the impact of provider shortages in underserved areas. The use of a telehealth delivery model facilitates inter-disciplinary collaboration, coordinated care, and consultation with specialists not available within a local community. A survey sent by the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC) to IDEA Part C coordinators assessed their utilization of telehealth within states' IDEA Part C programs. Reimbursement for provider type and services and barriers to implement a telehealth service delivery model were identified. Representatives from 26 states and one jurisdiction responded to the NECTAC telehealth survey. Of these, 30% (n=9) indicated that they are either currently using telehealth as an adjunct service delivery model (n=6) or plan to incorporate telehealth within the next 1-2 years (n=3). Identified telehealth providers included developmental specialists, teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing (DHH), speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, behavior specialists, audiologists, and interpreters. Reimbursement was variable and included use of IDEA Part C funding, Medicaid, and private insurance. Expressed barriers and concerns for the implementation of telehealth as a delivery model within Part

  17. Research on the cultivation path of smart home-based care service mode in Internet+ vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Qingchao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Home-based care for the aged is an effective method to solve the problem of caring the aged in China. This thesis analyzes some problems existing in the development of current home-based care service for the aged in our country and the positive effects brought by Internet+ in home-based care service. It proposes a new service mode of care for the aged--Internet+ home-based care service, and explains the establishment of this system and the responsibilities of the participants. Also, it explores the path to realize the establishment of Internet+ home-based care service mode so as to promote the healthy development of home-based care service in China.

  18. Telehealth: seven strategies to successfully implement disruptive technology and transform health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamm, Lee H

    2014-02-01

    "Telehealth" refers to the use of electronic services to support a broad range of remote services, such as patient care, education, and monitoring. Telehealth must be integrated into traditional ambulatory and hospital-based practices if it is to achieve its full potential, including addressing the six domains of care quality defined by the Institute of Medicine: safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Telehealth is a disruptive technology that appears to threaten traditional health care delivery but has the potential to reform and transform the industry by reducing costs and increasing quality and patient satisfaction. This article outlines seven strategies critical to successful telehealth implementation: understanding patients' and providers' expectations, untethering telehealth from traditional revenue expectations, deconstructing the traditional health care encounter, being open to discovery, being mindful of the importance of space, redesigning care to improve value in health care, and being bold and visionary.

  19. The Process for the Formulation of the International Telehealth Position Statement for Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Jacobs

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT consists of 84 member organizations representing over 420,000 occupational therapists internationally (WFOT, 2014.  In 2014, WFOT published the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement on the use of telehealth in occupational therapy. The process for the formulation of the official document involved reviewing WFOT member organizations’ telehealth position statements and data collected from a survey sent to member organizations’ delegates in April 2014.  Qualitative data from 39 countries yielded factors to consider in five key areas:  licensure/registration requirements, the cost of technology, privacy and security, reimbursement/payment models, and other issues (e.g., need for collaboration/transfer of knowledge, client selection, provider competencies, standard of care.  The WFOT Telehealth Position Statement addressed each of these areas.  The collaborative effort resulting in the development of the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement serves as a model for other international organizations.

  20. The Process for the Formulation of the International Telehealth Position Statement for Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karen; Cason, Jana; McCullough, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) consists of 84 member organizations representing over 420,000 occupational therapists internationally (WFOT, 2014). In 2014, WFOT published the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement on the use of telehealth in occupational therapy. The process for the formulation of the official document involved reviewing WFOT member organizations' telehealth position statements and data collected from a survey sent to member organizations' delegates in April 2014. Qualitative data from 39 countries yielded factors to consider in five key areas: licensure/registration requirements, the cost of technology, privacy and security, reimbursement/payment models, and other issues (e.g., need for collaboration/transfer of knowledge, client selection, provider competencies, standard of care). The WFOT Telehealth Position Statement addressed each of these areas. The collaborative effort resulting in the development of the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement serves as a model for other international organizations.

  1. The Process for the Formulation of the International Telehealth Position Statement for Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    JACOBS, KAREN; CASON, JANA; MCCULLOUGH, ANN

    2015-01-01

    The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) consists of 84 member organizations representing over 420,000 occupational therapists internationally (WFOT, 2014). In 2014, WFOT published the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement on the use of telehealth in occupational therapy. The process for the formulation of the official document involved reviewing WFOT member organizations’ telehealth position statements and data collected from a survey sent to member organizations’ delegates in April 2014. Qualitative data from 39 countries yielded factors to consider in five key areas: licensure/registration requirements, the cost of technology, privacy and security, reimbursement/payment models, and other issues (e.g., need for collaboration/transfer of knowledge, client selection, provider competencies, standard of care). The WFOT Telehealth Position Statement addressed each of these areas. The collaborative effort resulting in the development of the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement serves as a model for other international organizations. PMID:27563380

  2. Cross Cultural Differences in Managers’ Support for Home-based Telework: A Theoretical Elaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Pascale; Dulk, Laura den

    2003-01-01

    Home-based telework is one of the arrangements organizations can introduce to facilitate a better balance between employees’ professional and private lives. This article focuses on the question of under what conditions managers grant a subordinate’s request to telework and what role national cultures play herein. By looking into managers’ willingness to delegate power and to trust home-based teleworkers we try to explain the slow adoption of home-based telework and the reported differences ac...

  3. Telehealth and eHealth in nurse practitioner training: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutledge CM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Carolyn M Rutledge,1 Karen Kott,2 Patty A Schweickert,3 Rebecca Poston,1 Christianne Fowler,1 Tina S Haney1 1College of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, 2College of Health Sciences, School of Physical Therapy, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, 3Department of Neuroradiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Telehealth is becoming a vital process for providing access to cost-effective quality care to patients at a distance. As such, it is important for nurse practitioners, often the primary providers for rural and disadvantaged populations, to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to utilize telehealth technologies in practice. In reviewing the literature, very little information was found on programs that addressed nurse practitioner training in telehealth. This article provides an overview of both the topics and the techniques that have been utilized for training nurse practitioners and nurse practitioner students in the delivery of care utilizing telehealth. Specifically, this article focuses on topics including 1 defining telehealth, 2 telehealth etiquette, 3 interprofessional collaboration, 4 regulations, 5 reimbursement, 6 security/Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA, 7 ethical practice in telehealth, and 8 satisfaction of patients and providers. A multimodal approach based on a review of the literature is presented for providing the training: 1 didactics, 2 simulations including standardized patient encounters, 3 practice immersions, and 4 telehealth projects. Studies found that training using the multimodal approach allowed the students to develop comfort, knowledge, and skills needed to embrace the utilization of telehealth in health care. Keywords: telehealth, nurse practitioner education, telemedicine, simulation, health care

  4. Automated Clinical Assessment from Smart home-based Behavior Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Prafulla Nath; Cook, Diane Joyce; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Smart home technologies offer potential benefits for assisting clinicians by automating health monitoring and well-being assessment. In this paper, we examine the actual benefits of smart home-based analysis by monitoring daily behaviour in the home and predicting standard clinical assessment scores of the residents. To accomplish this goal, we propose a Clinical Assessment using Activity Behavior (CAAB) approach to model a smart home resident’s daily behavior and predict the corresponding standard clinical assessment scores. CAAB uses statistical features that describe characteristics of a resident’s daily activity performance to train machine learning algorithms that predict the clinical assessment scores. We evaluate the performance of CAAB utilizing smart home sensor data collected from 18 smart homes over two years using prediction and classification-based experiments. In the prediction-based experiments, we obtain a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.72) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided cognitive assessment scores and a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.45) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided mobility scores. Similarly, for the classification-based experiments, we find CAAB has a classification accuracy of 72% while classifying cognitive assessment scores and 76% while classifying mobility scores. These prediction and classification results suggest that it is feasible to predict standard clinical scores using smart home sensor data and learning-based data analysis. PMID:26292348

  5. [Guided home-based vestibular rehabilitation assisted by audiovisual media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad Ruiz, Gabriel; Domínguez Pedroso, Mónica; Cruz de la Piedad, Eduardo; Solís Vázquez, Raquel; Samaniego Regalado, Beatriz; Rejas Ugena, Eladio

    2010-01-01

    To describe the creation and validation process of a new audiovisual support model for the design of guided home-based vestibular rehabilitation programs (GHVR), we introduce a prospective experimental study. 89 patients who underwent vestibular rehabilitation (VR) were evaluated throughout 2009. For the model design, we built a video library with VR exercises that can be combined using DVD creation software to tailor VR protocols. Treatment incidents, adherence, need to convert to a posturography-based program and variations in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) score and dynamic visual acuity (DVA) were assessed. A good response was found, not only with respect to adherence (5.6% abandonment), but also in the clinical parameters, with a mean DHI score variation of 33.14 points, and a decrease in lines lost in the DVA test from 4.24 to 1.52 lines at the end of the treatment. Our study results show the possibility of building an audiovisual aid for creating GHVR programs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a Chronic Disease Management Program for Stroke Survivors Using Intervention Mapping: The Stroke Coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Brodie M; Lear, Scott A; Barr, Susan I; Benavente, Oscar; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Silverberg, Noah D; Yao, Jennifer; Eng, Janice J

    2017-06-01

    To describe the systematic development of the Stroke Coach, a theory- and evidence-based intervention to improve control of lifestyle behavior risk factors in patients with stroke. Intervention development. Community. Individuals who have had a stroke. We used intervention mapping to guide the development of the Stroke Coach. Intervention mapping is a systematic process used for intervention development and composed of steps that progress from the integration of theory and evidence to the organization of realistic strategies to facilitate the development of a practical intervention supported by empirical evidence. Social cognitive theory was the underlying premise for behavior change, whereas control theory methods were directed toward sustaining the changes to ensure long-term health benefits. Practical evidence-based strategies were linked to behavioral determinants to improve stroke risk factor control. Not applicable. The Stroke Coach is a patient-centered, community-based, telehealth intervention to promote healthy lifestyles after stroke. Over 6 months, participants receive seven 30- to 60-minute telephone sessions with a lifestyle coach who provides education, facilitates motivation for lifestyle modification, and empowers participants to self-management their stroke risk factors. Participants also receive a self-management manual and a self-monitoring kit. Through the use of intervention mapping, we developed a theoretically sound and evidence-grounded intervention to improve risk factor control in patients with stroke. If empirical evaluation of the Stroke Coach produces positive results, the next step will be to develop an implementation intervention to ensure successful uptake and delivery of the program in community and outpatient settings. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Are people with chronic diseases interested in using telehealth? A cross-sectional postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Louisa; Thomas, Clare; Gregory, Alison; Yardley, Lucy; O'Cathain, Alicia; Montgomery, Alan A; Salisbury, Chris

    2014-05-08

    There is growing interest in telehealth-the use of technology to support the remote delivery of health care and promote self-management-as a potential alternative to face-to-face care for patients with chronic diseases. However, little is known about what precipitates interest in the use of telehealth among these patients. This survey forms part of a research program to develop and evaluate a telehealth intervention for patients with two exemplar chronic diseases: depression and raised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The survey was designed to explore the key factors that influence interest in using telehealth in these patient groups. Thirty-four general practices were recruited from two different regions within England. Practice records were searched for patients with (1) depression (aged 18+ years) or (2) 10-year risk of CVD ≥20% and at least one modifiable risk factor (aged 40-74 years). Within each general practice, 54 patients in each chronic disease group were randomly selected to receive a postal questionnaire. Questions assessed five key constructs: sociodemographics, health needs, difficulties accessing health care, technology-related factors (availability, confidence using technology, perceived benefits and drawbacks of telehealth), and satisfaction with prior use of telehealth. Respondents also rated their interest in using different technologies for telehealth (phone, email and Internet, or social media). Relationships between the key constructs and interest in using the three mediums of telehealth were examined using multivariable regression models. Of the 3329 patients who were sent a study questionnaire, 44.40% completed it (872/1740, 50.11% CVD risk; 606/1589, 38.14% depression). Overall, there was moderate interest in using phone-based (854/1423, 60.01%) and email/Internet-based (816/1425, 57.26%) telehealth, but very little interest in social media (243/1430, 16.99%). After adjusting for health needs, access difficulties, technology

  8. Task–Technology Fit of Video Telehealth for Nurses in an Outpatient Clinic Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Incorporating telehealth into outpatient care delivery supports management of consumer health between clinic visits. Task–technology fit is a framework for understanding how technology helps and/or hinders a person during work processes. Evaluating the task–technology fit of video telehealth for personnel working in a pediatric outpatient clinic and providing care between clinic visits ensures the information provided matches the information needed to support work processes. Materials and Methods: The workflow of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) care coordination provided via telephone and video telehealth was described and measured using a mixed-methods workflow analysis protocol that incorporated cognitive ethnography and time–motion study. Qualitative and quantitative results were merged and analyzed within the task–technology fit framework to determine the workflow fit of video telehealth for APRN care coordination. Results: Incorporating video telehealth into APRN care coordination workflow provided visual information unavailable during telephone interactions. Despite additional tasks and interactions needed to obtain the visual information, APRN workflow efficiency, as measured by time, was not significantly changed. Analyzed within the task–technology fit framework, the increased visual information afforded by video telehealth supported the assessment and diagnostic information needs of the APRN. Conclusions: Telehealth must provide the right information to the right clinician at the right time. Evaluating task–technology fit using a mixed-methods protocol ensured rigorous analysis of fit within work processes and identified workflows that benefit most from the technology. PMID:24841219

  9. Integrating telehealth in to 'business as usual': Is it really possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jury, Susan C; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2016-12-01

    The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, began offering web-based telehealth video consultation in 2011, with the principle being that telehealth should be integrated into 'business as usual'. In telehealth literature, key differences between telehealth and in-person consultations can make this hard to achieve, so an audit was performed that revealed many small gaps in the process.A total of 125 telehealth appointments were booked during the study period. Of these, 13% (n = 16) were rescheduled, cancelled or changed to face-to-face appointments, and up to two main issues were identified for the remaining appointments. Some 69% of the remaining 108 appointments (n = 75) were completed successfully, with 23% (n = 25) completely seamless end to end. Overall, 39 issues were administrative (40%), 34 technical (35%) and 24 scheduling (25%); nine (8%) required some minor troubleshooting.For long-term sustainability, integrating telehealth into business as usual needs to remain the target. Scheduling and technical glitches were the main barriers to seamless telehealth. Several issues have now been addressed with the introduction of an electronic medical record, and the development of standardised processes and staff training. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Ethical Considerations When Delivering Behavior Analytic Services for Problem Behavior via Telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Patrick W; Schieltz, Kelly M

    2017-11-01

    Delivery of healthcare services via telehealth has been growing in popularity, and work completed by behavior analytic researchers and practitioners have supported this trend. Behavior analysts at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital (UICH) developed a telehealth model of service delivery to build upon their already established in-clinic and in-home services. Results from their telehealth studies showed positive effects. Social functions were identified for most children, and problem behavior decreased by an average of 94.14%. Additionally, parent satisfaction was quite high, suggesting this mode of service delivery was acceptable to caregivers. Given the increasing empirical support for providing behavior analytic services via telehealth, careful consideration needs to be given to the numerous ethical issues involved in telehealth service delivery. The current article describes the telehealth service delivery model developed at UICH as well as the ethical issues considered at different points when delivering these telehealth services. Following these ethical considerations, implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  11. Home-Based Reinforcement: Behavioral Covariation between Academic Performance and Inappropriate Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Joseph C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes the effects of a home-based reinforcement program (designed to modify classroom behaviors) on the academic performance and behavior of three fourth-grade boys. Results demonstrated the effectiveness of home-based reinforcement intervention in improving the academic performance of underachieving children while simultaneously reducing…

  12. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  13. Employees' views on home-based, after-hours telephone triage by Dutch GP cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Ramona; van Exel, Job; de Bont, Antoinette

    2013-11-04

    Dutch out-of-hours (OOH) centers find it difficult to attract sufficient triage staff. They regard home-based triage as an option that might attract employees. Specially trained nurses are supposed to conduct triage by telephone from home for after-hours medical care. The central aim of this research is to investigate the views of employees of OOH centers in The Netherlands on home-based telephone triage in after-hours care. The study is a Q methodology study. Triage nurses, general practitioners (GPs) and managers of OOH centers ranked 36 opinion statements on home-based triage. We interviewed 10 participants to help develop and validate the statements for the Q sort, and 77 participants did the Q sort. We identified four views on home-based telephone triage. Two generally favor home-based triage, one highlights some concerns and conditions, and one opposes it out of concern for quality. The four views perceive different sources of credibility for nurse triagists working from home. Home-based telephone triage is a controversial issue among triage nurses, GPs and managers of OOH centers. By identifying consensus and dissension among GPs, triagists, managers and regulators, this study generates four perspectives on home-based triage. In addition, it reveals the conditions considered important for home-based triage.

  14. A home-based clothing manufacturing: the owner and the business

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Blignaut

    Department of Business Management, PU for CHE. INTRODUCTION. The recent revival of home-based businesses, ... Women in home-based enterprises have more control over their lives and are able to spend more time with ... small enterprises in the USA. Women own approxi- mately one third of all businesses, 50% of ...

  15. Entrepreneurial Checklist Tool for Beginning Farm and Home-Based Businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, A. R.; Nartea, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    Extension educators entertain frequent questions on beginning a farm or starting a home-based business. Retired, unemployed, and displaced workers consider starting a small farm or home-based business. Determining educational needs or individual business aptitude is time consuming. Lengthy and comprehensive skill-based checklists exist for…

  16. Influence of home-based care on the quality of life of people living ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home based care is seen as one of the strategies to enhance the quality of life of PLWHA. Therefore, the main purpose of the study was to ascertain the relationship between home-based care and quality of life of PLWHA in support groups in. Calabar South Local Government Area. A correlational design was utilized and a ...

  17. Resilient Systemics to Telehealth Support for Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; De Giacomo, Piero; L'Abate, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Reliably expanding our clinical practice and lowering our overhead with telepsychiatry, telepsychology, distance counseling and online therapy, requires resilient and antifragile system and tools. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include more reliable treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. The wise and proper use of technology is fundamental to create and boost outstanding social results. We present, as an example, the main steps to achieve application resilience and antifragility at system level, for diagnostic and therapeutic telepractice and telehealth support, devoted to psychiatry and psychology application. This article presents a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy treatment, supervision, training, and research forward, towards increased effectiveness application.

  18. Home telehealth and paediatric palliative care: clinician perceptions of what is stopping us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Natalie K; Young, Jeanine; Armfield, Nigel R; Herbert, Anthony; Smith, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    Advances in technology have made the use of telehealth in the home setting a feasible option for palliative care clinicians to provide clinical care and support. However, despite being widely available and accessible, telehealth has still not been widely adopted either in Australia or internationally. The study aim was to investigate the barriers, enablers and perceived usefulness for an established home telehealth program in paediatric palliative care from the perspective of clinicians. Semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were undertaken with palliative care clinicians in a tertiary paediatric hospital to identify attitudes to, satisfaction with, and perceived benefits and limitations of, home telehealth in palliative care. Iterative analysis was used to thematically analyse data and identify themes and core concepts from interviews. FOUR THEMES ARE REPORTED: managing relationships; expectations of clinicians; co-ordination, and the telehealth compromise. Core concepts that emerged from the data were the perceived ability to control clinical encounters in a virtual environment and the need to trust technology. These concepts help explain the telehealth compromise and low utilisation of the home telehealth program. Effective communication between caregivers and clinicians is recognised as a core value of palliative care. Home telehealth has the potential to provide a solution to inequity of access to care, facilitate peer support and maintain continuity of care with families. However, significant limitations and challenges may impede its use. The virtual space creates additional challenges for communication, which clinicians and families may not intuitively understand. For home telehealth to be integrated into routine care, greater understanding of the nature of communication in the virtual space is required.

  19. Population Health and Tailored Medical Care in the Home: the Roles of Home-Based Primary Care and Home-Based Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Christine S; Leff, Bruce

    2017-10-12

    With the growth of value-based care, payers and health systems have begun to appreciate the need to provide enhanced services to homebound adults. Recent studies have shown that home-based medical services for this high-cost, high-need population reduce costs and improve outcomes. Home-based medical care services have two flavors that are related to historical context and specialty background-home-based primary care (HBPC) and home-based palliative care (HBPalC). Although the type of services provided by HBPC and HBPalC (together termed "home-based medical care") overlap, HBPC tends to encompass longitudinal and preventive care, while HBPalC often provides services for shorter durations focused more on distress management and goals of care clarification. Given workforce constraints and growing demand, both HBPC and HBPalC will benefit from working together within a population health framework-where HBPC provides care to all patients who have trouble accessing traditional office practices and where HBPalC offers adjunctive care to patients with high symptom burden and those who need assistance with goals clarification. Policy changes that support provision of medical care in the home, population health strategies that tailor home-based medical care to the specific needs of the patients and their caregivers, and educational initiatives to assure basic palliative care competence for all home-based medical providers will improve access and reduce illness burden to this important and underrecognized population. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Implementing solutions to improve and expand telehealth adoption: participatory action research in four community healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Johanna; Coates, Elizabeth; Wessels, Bridgette; Mountain, Gail; Hawley, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    Adoption of telehealth has been slower than anticipated, and little is known about the service improvements that help to embed telehealth into routine practice or the role of frontline staff in improving adoption. This paper reports on participatory action research carried out in four community health settings using telehealth for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Chronic Heart Failure. To inform the action research, in-depth case studies of each telehealth service were conducted (May 2012-June 2013). Each service was then supported by researchers through two cycles of action research to implement changes to increase adoption of telehealth, completed over a seven month period (July 2013-April 2014). The action research was studied via observation of multi-stakeholder workshops, analysis of implementation plans, and focus groups. Action research participants included 57 staff and one patient, with between eight and 20 participants per site. The case study findings were identified as a key source of information for planning change, with sites addressing common challenges identified through this work. For example, refining referral criteria; standardizing how and when patients are monitored; improving data sharing; and establishing evaluation processes. Sites also focused on raising awareness of telehealth to increase adoption in other clinical teams and to help secure future financial investment for telehealth, which was required because of short-term funding arrangements. Specific solutions varied due to local infrastructures, resources, and opinion, as well as previous service developments. Local telehealth champions played an important role in engaging multiple stakeholders in the study. Action research enabled services to make planned changes to telehealth and share learning across multiple stakeholders about how and when to use telehealth. However, adoption was impeded by continual changes affecting telehealth and wider service provision

  1. Participatory design methods for the development of a clinical telehealth service for neonatal homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne Holm, Kristina; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    telehealth service for neonatal homecare. METHODS: The study adopted a participatory design approach to engage users in the development and design of a new telehealth service. Participatory design embraces qualitative research methods. Creative and technical workshops were conducted as part of the study...... regarding infant growth and well-being. CONCLUSION: Results obtained from the workshops and testing demonstrated the importance of involving users when developing new telehealth applications. The workshops helped identify the challenges associated with delivery of the service, and helped instruct the design...

  2. Participatory design methods for the development of a clinical telehealth service for neonatal homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    telehealth service for neonatal homecare. Methods: The study adopted a participatory design approach to engage users in the development and design of a new telehealth service. Participatory design embraces qualitative research methods. Creative and technical workshops were conducted as part of the study...... regarding infant growth and well-being. Conclusion: Results obtained from the workshops and testing demonstrated the importance of involving users when developing new telehealth applications. The workshops helped identify the challenges associated with delivery of the service, and helped instruct the design...

  3. The design, implementation, and operational management of a comprehensive quality management program to support national telehealth networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkins, Adam; Foster, Linda; Anderson, Carla; Goldschmidt, Leonard; Selvin, Gerald

    2013-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is a large integrated healthcare system with a mission to care for over 5.6 million Veteran patients annually. VHA, like other healthcare organizations, is challenged with providing access to care to those it serves when they live at a distance from a physical site of care. VHA has embraced telehealth as a way of delivering care at a distance and increase access to specialty care services. Since 2003 VHA has developed large national telehealth networks that provided care to 497,342 patients in fiscal year 2012, who received 1,429,424 episodes of care, and is recognized as a national leader in this field. To ensure the safety and effectiveness of its telehealth networks in their delivery of care VHA has implemented a dedicated quality management (QM) program for telehealth. QM data for telehealth are reviewed at 3-month intervals, and the procedures and processes in place to support telehealth in VHA are assessed biannually in an internal accreditation process called "Telehealth Conditions of Participation." This collegial, nonadversarial process has ensured that all designated telehealth programs meet minimal standards and disseminate best practice. As a result of VHA's QM program, telehealth services in VHA meet consistently high clinical outcomes and have received no adverse Joint Commission citations. The Joint Commission regularly assesses patients managed via telehealth under its tracer methodology reviews.

  4. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of a telehealth program--management of asthma with supportive telehealth of respiratory function in pregnancy (MASTERY©).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zairina, Elida; Abramson, Michael J; McDonald, Christine F; Li, Jonathan; Dharmasiri, Thanuja; Stewart, Kay; Walker, Susan P; Paul, Eldho; George, Johnson

    2015-07-31

    Telehealth has the potential to improve asthma management through regular monitoring of lung function and/or asthma symptoms by health professionals in conjunction with feedback to patients. Although the benefits of telehealth for improving asthma management have been extensively studied, the feasibility of telehealth for supporting asthma management in pregnant women has not been investigated. This study aims to evaluate the use of telehealth for remotely monitoring lung function and optimising asthma control during pregnancy. A randomised controlled trial comparing usual care with a telehealth program (MASTERY©) has been conducted. The intervention comprised a mobile application - Breathe-easy© supported by a Bluetooth-enabled handheld device (COPD-6®), which was used for self-monitoring of lung function (FEV1, FEV6) twice daily, and recording asthma symptoms and medication usage weekly; and a written asthma action plan (WAAP). The primary outcome measure is change in asthma control measured using the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ). Secondary outcomes include changes in mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mAQLQ) score, lung function, asthma-related health visits, days off work/study, and oral corticosteroid use. Outcome data were collected at baseline, 3 months and 6 months by a research assistant masked to group allocation. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were also collected post-partum. This is the first study to evaluate the application of telehealth to optimize asthma management in pregnant women. If effective, this telehealth program could improve asthma self-management by pregnant women which may reduce the maternal and fetal risks of poorly controlled asthma during pregnancy. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN 12613000800729 ) 17 July 2013.

  5. Are People With Chronic Diseases Interested in Using Telehealth? A Cross-Sectional Postal Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Clare; Gregory, Alison; Yardley, Lucy; O'Cathain, Alicia; Montgomery, Alan A; Salisbury, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in telehealth—the use of technology to support the remote delivery of health care and promote self-management—as a potential alternative to face-to-face care for patients with chronic diseases. However, little is known about what precipitates interest in the use of telehealth among these patients. Objective This survey forms part of a research program to develop and evaluate a telehealth intervention for patients with two exemplar chronic diseases: depression and raised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The survey was designed to explore the key factors that influence interest in using telehealth in these patient groups. Methods Thirty-four general practices were recruited from two different regions within England. Practice records were searched for patients with (1) depression (aged 18+ years) or (2) 10-year risk of CVD ≥20% and at least one modifiable risk factor (aged 40-74 years). Within each general practice, 54 patients in each chronic disease group were randomly selected to receive a postal questionnaire. Questions assessed five key constructs: sociodemographics, health needs, difficulties accessing health care, technology-related factors (availability, confidence using technology, perceived benefits and drawbacks of telehealth), and satisfaction with prior use of telehealth. Respondents also rated their interest in using different technologies for telehealth (phone, email and Internet, or social media). Relationships between the key constructs and interest in using the three mediums of telehealth were examined using multivariable regression models. Results Of the 3329 patients who were sent a study questionnaire, 44.40% completed it (872/1740, 50.11% CVD risk; 606/1589, 38.14% depression). Overall, there was moderate interest in using phone-based (854/1423, 60.01%) and email/Internet-based (816/1425, 57.26%) telehealth, but very little interest in social media (243/1430, 16.99%). After adjusting for health needs

  6. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge team is a great way to get active ... to Expect at the Hospital Key Questions to Ask Learn More About Stroke ...

  7. Stroke - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100218.htm Stroke - series—Part 1 To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Ischemic Stroke A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  8. Preventing stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke - prevention; CVA - prevention; Cerebral vascular accident - prevention; TIA - prevention; Transient ischemic attack - prevention ... something that increases your chance of having a stroke. You can't change some risk factors for ...

  9. Know Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Know Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... D. Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Photo courtesy of NIH/NINDS Welcome to this ...

  10. Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one, especially during the first year following the original stroke. The following factors increase the risk of having another stroke: High blood pressure (hypertension) Cigarette smoking Diabetes Having had a TIA (transient ischemic attack) Heart ...

  11. Motor Recovery and Cortical Reorganization After Mirror Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients : A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, Marian E.; Selles, Ruud W.; van der Geest, Jos N.; Eckhardt, Martine; Yavuzer, Gunes; Stam, Henk J.; Smits, Marion; Ribbers, Gerard M.; Bussmann, Johannes B. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate for any clinical effects of home-based mirror therapy and subsequent cortical reorganization in patients with chronic stroke with moderate upper extremity paresis. Methods. A total of 40 chronic stroke patients (mean time post. onset, 3.9 years) were randomly assigned to the

  12. Stroke Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease and Stroke email updates Enter email Submit Stroke A stroke happens when blood flow to the ... recovery Stroke recovery steps Stroke diagnosis View more Stroke resources Related information Heart-healthy eating Stress and ...

  13. Recovering after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke rehabilitation; Cerebrovascular accident - rehabilitation; Recovery from stroke; Stroke - recovery; CVA - recovery ... WHERE TO LIVE AFTER A STROKE Most people will need stroke ... after they leave the hospital. Stroke rehab will help you ...

  14. Social networking-based personal home telehealth system: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Huang

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: CDF presented in this paper extends the value of a home telehealth system from the provision of health care to enhancing older adults' interpersonal communication and social participation.

  15. Development of a bed-centered telehealth system based on a motion-sensing mattress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Liu, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The design concept of BCTS is to integrate telehealth functions into something that already exists in the home, namely the bed. Future extensions of the BCTS to include other telemonitoring functions are discussed.

  16. A Pilot Investigation of Speech Sound Disorder Intervention Delivered by Telehealth to School-Age Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Grogan-Johnson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a school-based telehealth service delivery model and reports outcomes made by school-age students with speech sound disorders in a rural Ohio school district. Speech therapy using computer-based speech sound intervention materials was provided either by live interactive videoconferencing (telehealth, or conventional side-by-side intervention.  Progress was measured using pre- and post-intervention scores on the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 (Goldman & Fristoe, 2002. Students in both service delivery models made significant improvements in speech sound production, with students in the telehealth condition demonstrating greater mastery of their Individual Education Plan (IEP goals. Live interactive videoconferencing thus appears to be a viable method for delivering intervention for speech sound disorders to children in a rural, public school setting. Keywords:  Telehealth, telerehabilitation, videoconferencing, speech sound disorder, speech therapy, speech-language pathology; E-Helper

  17. Telehealth etiquette in home healthcare: the key to a successful visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Tina; Kott, Karen; Fowler, Christianne

    2015-05-01

    The use of telehealth by home healthcare agencies is growing. It has been shown to reduce rehospitalizations by up to 62%, reduce costs, and increase efficiency. Due to the use of telehealth technology, new and unique rules of etiquette must be followed to make both the patient and clinician comfortable and satisfied with the process. Little literature exists regarding telehealth etiquette. This article explores the techniques and methods that home care clinicians should utilize to assure that the telehealth experience is positive and effective. After providing a less successful scenario, steps for success are outlined and a suggested successful conclusion is provided for the scenario. Home care agencies will benefit greatly from expanding their ability to visit patients in different ways. Simple steps need to be taken to assure successful visits that follow the rules for assuring patient comfort, autonomy, and protection.

  18. A pilot study of a telehealth intervention for persons with spinal cord dysfunction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Houlihan, B V; Jette, A; Friedman, R H; Paasche-Orlow, M; Ni, P; Wierbicky, J; Williams, K; Ducharme, S; Zazula, J; Cuevas, P; Rosenblum, D; Williams, S

    2013-01-01

    Single-blind randomized controlled trial of 6 months' duration. To evaluate the efficacy of a novel telehealth intervention, 'CareCall', on reducing pressure ulcers and depression and enhancing the use of appropriate health care...

  19. [Nursing contributions to the development of the Brazilian Telehealth Lactation Support Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Cláudia; Silva, Isília Aparecida; Soares, Alda Valéria Neves; Aragaki, Ilva Marico Mizumoto; Shimoda, Gilcéria Tochika; Zaniboni, Vanessa Forte; Padula, Camila Brolezzi; Muller, Fabiana Swain; Salve, Jeanine Maria; Daré, Sergio Junior; Wen, Chao Lung; Peres, Heloísa Helena Ciqueto; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2013-08-01

    The National Telehealth Program was founded by the Ministry of Health, in partnership with the Ministry of Education (Ministério da Educação - MEC) and the Ministry of Science and Technology (Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia - MCT), to support the development of family healthcare teams throughout the country. The São Paulo Telehealth Center has developed the Telehealth Lactation Support program, which provides primary healthcare professionals with information on diverse aspects of breastfeeding. This paper reports the development of the Lactation Support program and the nursing contributions. Project methodology included the formation of a multidisciplinary group of pediatricians, nurses, speech and language therapists, nutritionists, and dentists. Multimedia teaching resources were prepared for inclusion in the Cybertutor platform. Telehealth Lactation Support is an innovative and promising addition to continuing education for healthcare professionals and provides a framework for the development of other programs.

  20. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  1. Implementation of video telehealth to improve access to evidence-based psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jan A; Kauth, Michael R; Hudson, Sonora; Martin, Lindsey A; Ramsey, David J; Daily, Lawrence; Rader, John

    2015-06-01

    Increasing access to psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a primary focus of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system. Delivery of treatment via video telehealth can expand availability of treatment and be equally effective as in-person treatment. Despite VA efforts, barriers to establishing telehealth services remain, including both provider acceptance and organizational obstacles. Thus, development of specific strategies is needed to implement video telehealth services in complex healthcare systems, like the VA. This project was guided by the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework and used external facilitation to increase access to psychotherapy via video telehealth. The project was conducted at five VA Medical Centers and their associated community clinics across six states in the South Central United States. Over a 21-month period, 27 video telehealth clinics were established to provide greater access to evidence-based psychotherapies for PTSD. Examination of change scores showed that participating sites averaged a 3.2-fold increase in unique patients and a 6.5-fold increase in psychotherapy sessions via video telehealth for PTSD. Differences between participating and nonparticipating sites in both unique patients and encounters were significant (p=0.041 and p=0.009, respectively). Two groups emerged, separated by degree of engagement in the facilitation intervention. Facilitation was perceived as useful by providers. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study of external facilitation as an implementation strategy for telehealth. Our findings suggest that external facilitation is an effective and acceptable strategy to support providers as they establish clinics and make complex practice changes, such as implementing video telehealth to deliver psychotherapy.

  2. A comparison of telehealth programs between the USA and Brazil: a legal perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia LR; Silva E; Terra JCC

    2015-01-01

    Lara Rocha Garcia, Eliézer Silva, José Cláudio Cyrineu TerraHospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Telehealth has the potential to improve access and outcomes for patients and to reduce health care costs across a wide range of health conditions and situations. The wide adoption of telehealth requires, however, a strong legal and financial foundation. In this article, we compare the evolution of American...

  3. A Pilot Investigation of Speech Sound Disorder Intervention Delivered by Telehealth to School-Age Children

    OpenAIRE

    Sue Grogan-Johnson; Gabel, Rodney M.; Jacquelyn Taylor; Rowan, Lynne E.; Robin Alvares; Jason Schenker

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a school-based telehealth service delivery model and reports outcomes made by school-age students with speech sound disorders in a rural Ohio school district. Speech therapy using computer-based speech sound intervention materials was provided either by live interactive videoconferencing (telehealth), or conventional side-by-side intervention.  Progress was measured using pre- and post-intervention scores on the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 (Goldman &...

  4. Association of comorbidities with home care service utilization of patients with heart failure while receiving telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Jacelon, Cynthia S; Bigelow, Carol; Roche, Joan P; Marquard, Jenna L; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2013-01-01

    Comorbidities adversely impact heart failure (HF) outcomes. Telehealth can assist healthcare providers, especially nurses, in guiding their patients to follow the HF regimen. However, factors, including comorbidity patterns, that act in combination with telehealth to reduce home care nursing utilization are still unclear. The purpose of this article was to examine the association of the comorbidity characteristics of HF patients with nursing utilization along with withdrawal from telehealth service during an episode of tele-home care. A descriptive, correlational study design using retrospective chart review was used. The sample comprised Medicare patients admitted to a New England home care agency who had HF as a diagnosis and had used telehealth from 2008 to 2010. The electronic documentation at the home care agency served as the data source, which included Outcome and Assessment Information Set data of patients with HF. Logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze data. The sample consisted of 403 participants, of whom 70% were older than 75 years, 55% were female, and 94% were white. Comorbidities averaged 5.19 (SD, 1.92), ranging from 1 to 11, and nearly 40% of the participants had 5 or more comorbidities. The mean (SD) nursing contacts in the sample was 9.9 (4.7), ranging from 1 to 26, and 52 (12.7%) patients withdrew from telehealth service. For patients with HF on telehealth, comorbidity characteristics of anemia, anxiety, musculoskeletal, and depression were significantly associated with nursing utilization patterns, and renal failure, cancer, and depression comorbidities were significantly associated with withdrawal from telehealth service. Knowledge of the association of comorbidity characteristics with the home care service utilization patterns of patients with HF on telehealth can assist the home health nurse to develop a tailored care plan that attains optimal patient outcomes. Knowledge of such associations would also focus home

  5. Impact of telehealth on patient self-management of heart failure: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Jacelon, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the impact of telehealth interventions on individuals' self-care of heart failure (HF). Heart failure is a chronic illness that requires a complex treatment regimen over a long period. Historically, effective self-care has been difficult for this population. There is a need for innovative and effective approaches to improve individual self-care. Telehealth can potentially help individuals with HF follow the plan of care resulting in improved health outcomes and a better quality of life. A comprehensive computer-assisted literature search using the terms "(telemedicine OR telehealth) AND (self-care OR self-management) AND (heart failure)" was conducted using electronic databases of ASP, CINAHL, Cochrane reviews, ERIC, PubMed, PsychINFO, Social Sciences Abstracts Index, and Web of Science for studies published between 2000 and 2010 to find research that met the inclusion criteria. Fourteen studies were included in the review. Telehealth resulted in significant improvement of HF self-care behaviors of daily weighing, medication management, exercise adherence, fluid and alcohol restriction, salt restriction, or stress reduction in the telehealth intervention group in 5 studies. Participants reported improved HF self-care behaviors in 3 other studies with pretest-posttest design. Five others found no difference between the intervention and control groups. Content analysis of the data in the qualitative study revealed themes suggesting that telehealth can be effective in promoting self-care for individuals with HF. However, small sample size and inadequate measurement methods limit the generalizability of the findings of the studies included in this review. Although this review included several studies with flawed design issues, the available evidence supports the use of telehealth in enabling self-care of HF. Further exploration is needed to determine the effect of telehealth on HF self-care outcomes using studies with high

  6. Telehealth exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstorn, Jonathan C; Gant, Nicholas; Direito, Artur; Beckmann, Christina; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Despite proven effectiveness, participation in traditional supervised exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exCR) remains low. Telehealth interventions that use information and communication technologies to enable remote exCR programme delivery can overcome common access barriers while preserving clinical supervision and individualised exercise prescription. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the benefits of telehealth exCR on exercise capacity and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors compared with traditional exCR and usual care, among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed and PsycINFO were searched from inception through 31 May 2015 for randomised controlled trials comparing telehealth exCR with centre-based exCR or usual care among patients with CHD. Outcomes included maximal aerobic exercise capacity, modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and exercise adherence. 11 trials (n=1189) met eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Physical activity level was higher following telehealth exCR than after usual care. Compared with centre-based exCR, telehealth exCR was more effective for enhancing physical activity level, exercise adherence, diastolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Telehealth and centre-based exCR were comparably effective for improving maximal aerobic exercise capacity and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Telehealth exCR appears to be at least as effective as centre-based exCR for improving modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and functional capacity, and could enhance exCR utilisation by providing additional options for patients who cannot attend centre-based exCR. Telehealth exCR must now capitalise on technological advances to provide more comprehensive, responsive and interactive interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Participatory design methods for the development of a clinical telehealth service for neonatal homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garne Holm, Kristina; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Smith, Anthony C; Clemensen, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal homecare delivered during home visits by neonatal nurses is a common method for supporting families of preterm infants following discharge. Telehealth has been introduced for the provision of neonatal homecare, resulting in positive feedback from parents of preterm infants. While the benefits are beginning to be realised, widespread uptake of telehealth has been limited due to a range of logistical challenges. Understanding user requirements is important when planning and developing a clinical telehealth service. We therefore used participatory design to develop a clinical telehealth service for neonatal homecare. The study adopted a participatory design approach to engage users in the development and design of a new telehealth service. Participatory design embraces qualitative research methods. Creative and technical workshops were conducted as part of the study. Tests of the telehealth service were conducted in the neonatal unit. Participants in this study were former and current parents of preterm infants eligible for neonatal homecare, and clinical staff (medical and nursing) from the neonatal unit. Preterm infants accompanied their parents. Based on the results obtained during the workshops and subsequent testing, we developed an application (app), which was integrated into the medical record at the neonatal unit. The app was used to initiate videoconferences and chat messages between the family at home and the neonatal unit, and to share information regarding infant growth and well-being. Results obtained from the workshops and testing demonstrated the importance of involving users when developing new telehealth applications. The workshops helped identify the challenges associated with delivery of the service, and helped instruct the design of a new telehealth service for neonatal homecare based on the needs of parents and clinical staff.

  8. Conducting Functional Communication Training via Telehealth to Reduce the Problem Behavior of Young Children with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Wacker, David P.; Lee, John F.; Padilla Dalmau, Yaniz C.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kuhle, Jennifer; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Dyson, Shannon; Schieltz, Kelly M.; Waldron, Debra B.

    2012-01-01

    Functional communication training (FCT) was conducted by parents of 17 young children with autism spectrum disorders who displayed problem behavior. All procedures were conducted at regional clinics located an average of 15 miles from the families’ homes. Parents received coaching via telehealth from behavior consultants who were located an average of 222 miles from the regional clinics. Parents first conducted functional analyses with telehealth consultation (Wacker, Lee, et al., in press) a...

  9. An evaluation of the implementation of integrated community home-based care services in Vhembe District, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandi J Moetlo

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Community home-based caregivers are largely able to implement home-based care services but would need more support (training, financial, career structure, and health system to improve on their services.

  10. Designing clinically valuable telehealth resources: processes to develop a community-based palliative care prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieman, Jennifer Joy; Morgan, Deidre Diane; Swetenham, Kate; To, Timothy Hong Man; Currow, David Christopher

    2014-09-04

    Changing population demography and patterns of disease are increasing demands on the health system. Telehealth is seen as providing a mechanism to support community-based care, thus reducing pressure on hospital services and supporting consumer preferences for care in the home. This study examined the processes involved in developing a prototype telehealth intervention to support palliative care patients involved with a palliative care service living in the community. The challenges and considerations in developing the palliative care telehealth prototype were reviewed against the Center for eHealth Research (CeHRes) framework, a telehealth development model. The project activities to develop the prototype were specifically mapped against the model's first four phases: multidisciplinary project management, contextual inquiry, value specification, and design. This project has been developed as part of the Telehealth in the Home: Aged and Palliative Care in South Australia initiative. Significant issues were identified and subsequently addressed during concept and prototype development. The CeHRes approach highlighted the implicit diversity in views and opinions among participants and stakeholders and enabled issues to be considered, resolved, and incorporated during design through continuous engagement. The CeHRes model provided a mechanism that facilitated "better" solutions in the development of the palliative care prototype by addressing the inherent but potentially unrecognized differences in values and beliefs of participants. This collaboration enabled greater interaction and exchange among participants resulting in a more useful and clinically valuable telehealth prototype.

  11. Conceptualizing Telehealth in Nursing Practice: Advancing a Conceptual Model to Fill a Virtual Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Daniel A; Penner, Jamie L

    2016-03-01

    Increasingly nurses use various telehealth technologies to deliver health care services; however, there has been a lag in research and generation of empirical knowledge to support nursing practice in this expanding field. One challenge to generating knowledge is a gap in development of a comprehensive conceptual model or theoretical framework to illustrate relationships of concepts and phenomena inherent to adoption of a broad range of telehealth technologies to holistic nursing practice. A review of the literature revealed eight published conceptual models, theoretical frameworks, or similar entities applicable to nursing practice. Many of these models focus exclusively on use of telephones and four were generated from qualitative studies, but none comprehensively reflect complexities of bridging nursing process and elements of nursing practice into use of telehealth. The purpose of this article is to present a review of existing conceptual models and frameworks, discuss predominant themes and features of these models, and present a comprehensive conceptual model for telehealth nursing practice synthesized from this literature for consideration and further development. This conceptual model illustrates characteristics of, and relationships between, dimensions of telehealth practice to guide research and knowledge development in provision of holistic person-centered care delivery to individuals by nurses through telehealth technologies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Implementation of a pilot telehealth programme in community palliative care: A qualitative study of clinicians' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Aileen; Morgan, Deidre D; Swetenham, Kate; To, Timothy H M; Currow, David C; Tieman, Jennifer J

    2016-04-01

    Telehealth technologies are an emerging resource opening up the possibility of greater support if they have utility for patients, carers and clinicians. They may also help to meet health systems' imperatives for improved service delivery within current budgets. Clinicians' experiences and attitudes play a key role in the implementation of any innovation in service delivery. To explore clinicians' perspectives on and experiences of the utilisation of a pilot telehealth model and its integration into a specialist community palliative care programme. Focus groups and interviews generated data that were analysed through the lens of a realistic evaluation theoretical framework. The study was conducted in a metropolitan specialist palliative care service in South Australia. Participants (n = 10) were clinicians involved in the delivery of community specialist palliative care and the piloting of a telehealth programme. Service providers consider telehealth resources as a means to augment current service provision in a complementary way rather than as a replacement for face-to-face assessments. Introducing this technology, however, challenged the team to critically explore aspects of current service provision. The introduction of technologies also has the potential to alter the dynamic of relationships between patients and families and community palliative care clinicians. Implementation of a pilot telehealth programme in a specialist palliative community team needs to involve clinical staff in service redesign from the outset. Reliable IT infrastructure and technical support is critical for telehealth models to be effective and will aid uptake. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Recurrent Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose—The CHA2DS2VASc score and the Essen Stroke Risk Score are respectively used for risk stratification in patients with atrial fibrillation and in patients with cerebrovascular incidents. We aimed to test the ability of the 2 scores to predict stroke recurrence, death......, and cardiovascular events (stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or arterial thromboembolism) in a nationwide Danish cohort study, among patients with incident ischemic stroke and no atrial fibrillation. Methods—We conducted a registry-based study in patients with incident ischemic stroke...... and no atrial fibrillation. Patients were stratified according to the CHA2DS2VASc score and the Essen Stroke Risk Score and were followed up until stroke recurrence or death. We estimated stratified incidence rates and hazard ratios and calculated the cumulative risks. Results—42 182 patients with incident...

  14. Implementing telehealth to support medical practice in rural/remote regions: what are the conditions for success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duplantie Julie

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telehealth, as other information and communication technologies (ICTs introduced to support the delivery of health care services, is considered as a means to answer many of the imperatives currently challenging health care systems. In Canada, many telehealth projects are taking place, mostly targeting rural, remote or isolated populations. So far, various telehealth applications have been implemented and have shown promising outcomes. However, telehealth utilisation remains limited in many settings, despite increased availability of technology and telecommunication infrastructure. Methods A qualitative field study was conducted in four remote regions of Quebec (Canada to explore perceptions of physicians and managers regarding the impact of telehealth on clinical practice and the organisation of health care services, as well as the conditions for improving telehealth implementation. A total of 54 respondents were interviewed either individually or in small groups. Content analysis of interviews was performed and identified several effects of telehealth on remote medical practice as well as key conditions to ensure the success of telehealth implementation. Results According to physicians and managers, telehealth benefits include better access to specialised services in remote regions, improved continuity of care, and increased availability of information. Telehealth also improves physicians' practice by facilitating continuing medical education, contacts with peers, and access to a second opinion. At the hospital and health region levels, telehealth has the potential to support the development of regional reference centres, favour retention of local expertise, and save costs. Conditions for successful implementation of telehealth networks include the participation of clinicians in decision-making, the availability of dedicated human and material resources, and a planned diffusion strategy. Interviews with physicians and

  15. Effect of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozalevli, Sevgi; Karaali, Hayriye Kul; Ilgin, Duygu; Ucan, Eyup Sabri

    2010-02-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation program on the functional outcome parameters in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). A prospective study. Seventeen patients diagnosed with IPF. A home-based pulmonary rehabilitation program was carried out in 17 IPF patients for 12 weeks. Dyspnea severity during daily life activities (Medical Research Council Scale), pulmonary function (pulmonary function test), exercise capacity (6-minute walking test, 6MWD), and general health related quality of life (Medical Outcomes Short Form-36) were evaluated. A significant decrease in perceived dyspnea (p = 0.003) and leg fatigue (p Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation may reduce dyspnea and fatigue severities, and improve exercise capacity and health-related quality of life in patients with IPF. In the treatment of IPF patients, home-based pulmonary rehabilitation programs should be placed alongside the routine treatment options.

  16. Effect of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozalevli Sevgi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation program on the functional outcome parameters in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Design A prospective study. Patients Seventeen patients diagnosed with IPF. Methods A home-based pulmonary rehabilitation program was carried out in 17 IPF patients for 12 weeks. Dyspnea severity during daily life activities (Medical Research Council Scale, pulmonary function (pulmonary function test, exercise capacity (6-minute walking test, 6MWD, and general health related quality of life (Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 were evaluated. Results A significant decrease in perceived dyspnea (p = 0.003 and leg fatigue (p Conclusion Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation may reduce dyspnea and fatigue severities, and improve exercise capacity and health-related quality of life in patients with IPF. In the treatment of IPF patients, home-based pulmonary rehabilitation programs should be placed alongside the routine treatment options.

  17. How to start a home-based mobile app developer business

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Chad

    2014-01-01

    With the app market exploding, app designers will need a solid how-to guide to help them start their home-based business. This book will guide the reader through all the steps from design to marketing.

  18. Impact of Home-Based Management of malaria combined with other ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based interventions: what do we learn from Rwanda? ... Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of home-based management of malaria (HBM) strategy on time to treatment and reported presumed malaria morbidity in children ...

  19. Home-based exercise program in TSP/HAM individuals: a feasibility and effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, Lívia D; Araújo, Abelardo Q; Silva, Marcus Tt; Leite, Ana Claudia C; Azevedo, Mariana F; Chequer, Gisele L; Oliveira, Raquel Vc; Ferreira, Arthur S; Lima, Marco Antonio

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based exercise program in TSP/HAM individuals. Twenty-three TSP/HAM individuals divided in two groups according to Timed Up and Go (TUG) score (TSP/HAM.

  20. Who Receives Home-Based Perinatal Palliative Care: Experience from Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Korzeniewska-Eksterowicz; Łukasz Przysło; Bogna Kędzierska; Małgorzata Stolarska; Wojciech Młynarski

    2013-01-01

    Context. The current literature suggests that perinatal palliative care (PPC) programs should be comprehensive, initiated early, and integrative. So far there have been very few publications on the subject of home-based PC of newborns and neonates. Most publications focus on hospital-based care, mainly in the neonatal intensive care units. Objective. To describe the neonates and infants who received home-based palliative care in Lodz Region between 2005 and 2011. Methods. A retrospective rev...

  1. Economic Evidence for U.S. Asthma Self-Management Education and Home-Based Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Joy; Wilhelm, Natalie; Lewis, Lillianne; Herman, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The health and economic burden of asthma in the United States is substantial. Asthma self-management education (AS-ME) and home-based interventions for asthma can improve asthma control and prevent asthma exacerbations, and interest in health care-public health collaboration regarding asthma is increasing. However, outpatient AS-ME and home-based asthma intervention programs are not widely available; economic sustainability is a common concern. Thus, we conducted a narrative review of existin...

  2. Palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective: benefits and disadvantages

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston BM

    2014-01-01

    Bridget M Johnston Sue Ryder Care Centre for the Study of Supportive, Palliative, and End of Life Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK Abstract: This critical review paper explores the concept of palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective. The aim of the critical review was to scope information available from published and unpublished research on the current state of palliative home-based tec...

  3. Center forTelehealth and Cybermedicine Research, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: a model of a telehealth program within an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Migliorati, Margaret; Rodriguez, Adrian; Byun, Hannah W; Effertz, Glen; Duffy, Veronica; Monge, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    An overview of the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center was presented along with several other national and international programs as part of the of a symposium-workshop on telehealth, "Sustaining and Realizing the Promise of Telemedicine," held at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, May 18-19, 2012 and hosted by the University of Michigan Telemedicine Resource Center and its Director, Rashid Bashshur. This article describes our Center, its business plan, and a view to the future.

  4. Telehealth is Face-to-Face Service Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2017-01-01

    The Commentary contests the increasingly outdated and narrow use of the terminology 'face-to-face' (often abbreviated as F2F) to connote clinical interactions in which both the client and the practitioner are physically present in the same room or space. An expanded definition is necessary because when delivered synchronously via videoconferencing, telehealth also provides face-to-face services (i.e., the practitioner and the client view each other's faces). Terminology that uses face-to-face to connote only in-person care is limiting and perpetuates language that is out of line with progressive US regulatory language and broad interpretation within existing regulatory language. It is this author's hope that this commentary will raise awareness of the important policy implications associated with this seemingly minor distinction in terminology and impact the lingering misapplication of the term, face-to-face.

  5. Interactive home telehealth and burns: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Sean; Gomez, Jason; Meller, Benjamin; Schneider, Jeffery C; Cheney, Meredith; Nejad, Shamim; Schulz, John; Goverman, Jeremy

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to review our experience incorporating Interactive Home Telehealth (IHT) visits into follow-up burn care. A retrospective review of all burn patients participating in IHT encounters over the course of 15 months was performed. Connections were established through secure video conferencing and call-routing software. Patients connected with a personal computer or tablet and providers connected with a desktop computer with a high-definition web camera. In some cases, high-definition digital images were emailed to the provider prior to the virtual consultation. For each patient, the following was collected: (1) patient and injury demographics (diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management), (2) total number of encounters, (3) service for each encounter (burn, psychiatry, and rehabilitation), (4) length of visit, including travel distance and time saved and, (5) complications, including re-admissions and connectivity issues. 52 virtual encounters were performed with 31 patients during the first year of the pilot project from March 2015 to June 2016. Mean age of the participant was 44 years (range 18-83 years). Mean total burn surface area of the participant was 12% (range 1-80%). Average roundtrip travel distance saved was 188 miles (range 4-822 miles). Average round trip travel time saved was 201min (range 20-564min). There were no unplanned re-admissions and no complications. Five connectivity issues were reported, none of which prevented completion of the visit. Interactive Home Telehealth is a safe and feasible modality for delivering follow-up care to burn patients. Burn care providers benefit from the potential to improve outpatient clinic utilization. Patients benefit from improved access to multiple members of their specialized burn care team, as well as cost-reductions for patient travel expenses. Future studies are needed to ensure patient and provider satisfaction and to further validate the significance, cost-effectiveness and

  6. Overview of States' Use of Telehealth for the Delivery of Early Intervention (IDEA Part C Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cason

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early intervention (EI services are designed to promote the development of skills and enhance the quality of life of infants and toddlers who have been identified as having a disability or developmental delay, enhance capacity of families to care for their child with special needs, reduce future educational costs, and promote independent living (NECTAC 2011.  EI services are regulated by Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA; however, personnel shortages, particularly in rural areas, limit access for children who qualify.  Telehealth is an emerging delivery model demonstrating potential to deliver EI services effectively and efficiently, thereby improving access and ameliorating the impact of provider shortages in underserved areas. The use of a telehealth delivery model facilitates inter-disciplinary collaboration, coordinated care, and consultation with specialists not available within a local community.  Method:  A survey sent by the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC to IDEA Part C coordinators assessed their utilization of telehealth within states’ IDEA Part C programs.  Reimbursement for provider type and services and barriers to implement a telehealth service delivery model were identified.  Results:  Representatives from 26 states and one jurisdiction responded to the NECTAC telehealth survey.  Of these, 30% (n=9 indicated that they are either currently using telehealth as an adjunct service delivery model (n=6 or plan to incorporate telehealth within the next 1-2 years (n=3.  Identified telehealth providers included developmental specialists, teachers of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing (DHH, speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, behavior specialists, audiologists, and interpreters.  Reimbursement was variable and included use of IDEA Part C funding, Medicaid, and private insurance.  Expressed barriers and concerns for

  7. Cost-benefit analysis of telehealth in pre-hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James R; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffany; Alqusairi, Diaa; Kim, Junghyun; Jackson, Adria; Persse, David; Gonzalez, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Objective There has been very little use of telehealth in pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS), yet the potential exists for this technology to transform the current delivery model. In this study, we explore the costs and benefits of one large telehealth EMS initiative. Methods Using a case-control study design and both micro- and gross-costing data from the Houston Fire Department EMS electronic patient care record system, we conducted a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) comparing costs with potential savings associated with patients treated through a telehealth-enabled intervention. The intervention consisted of telehealth-based consultation between the 911 patient and an EMS physician, to evaluate and triage the necessity for patient transport to a hospital emergency department (ED). Patients with non-urgent, primary care-related conditions were then scheduled and transported by alternative means to an affiliated primary care clinic. We measured CBA as both total cost savings and cost per ED visit averted, in US Dollars ($USD). Results In total, 5570 patients were treated over the first full 12 months with a telehealth-enabled care model. We found a 6.7% absolute reduction in potentially medically unnecessary ED visits, and a 44-minute reduction in total ambulance back-in-service times. The average cost for a telehealth patient was $167, which was a statistically significantly $103 less than the control group ( p cost savings from the societal perspective, or $2468 cost savings per ED visit averted (benefit). Conclusion Patient care enabled by telehealth in a pre-hospital environment, is a more cost effective alternative compared to the traditional EMS 'treat and transport to ED' model.

  8. Interventional Radiology: Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AND REIMBURSEMENT Diseases and conditions Home Patient Center Stroke Stroke What is stroke? A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is ... reduced or cut off. Within minutes of a stroke, brain cells begin to die and cause the ...

  9. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Apr 26,2017 Ischemic stroke ... stroke. Let's Talk Numbers Updated Guidelines for Acute Ischemic Strokes Infographic : Attacking Brain Clots to Save Lives ...

  10. Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belagaje, Samir R

    2017-02-01

    Rehabilitation is an important aspect of the continuum of care in stroke. With advances in the acute treatment of stroke, more patients will survive stroke with varying degrees of disability. Research in the past decade has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stroke recovery and has led to the development of new treatment modalities. This article reviews and summarizes the key concepts related to poststroke recovery. Good data now exist by which one can predict recovery, especially motor recovery, very soon after stroke onset. Recent trials have not demonstrated a clear benefit associated with very early initiation of rehabilitative therapy after stroke in terms of improvement in poststroke outcomes. However, growing evidence suggests that shorter and more frequent sessions of therapy can be safely started in the first 24 to 48 hours after a stroke. The optimal amount or dose of therapy for stroke remains undetermined, as more intensive treatments have not been associated with better outcomes compared to standard intensities of therapy. Poststroke depression adversely affects recovery across a variety of measures and is an important target for therapy. Additionally, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to benefit motor recovery through pleiotropic mechanisms beyond their antidepressant effect. Other pharmacologic approaches also appear to have a benefit in stroke rehabilitation. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is essential to optimize poststroke outcomes. Rehabilitation is a process that uses three major principles of recovery: adaptation, restitution, and neuroplasticity. Based on these principles, multiple different approaches, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic, exist to enhance rehabilitation. In addition to neurologists, a variety of health care professionals are involved in stroke rehabilitation. Successful rehabilitation involves understanding the natural history of stroke recovery and a

  11. A Tele-health Follow-up Strategy for Tight Control of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurah, Annette De; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Axelsen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of patient-reported outcome (PRO) based tele-health follow-up for tight control of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the differences between tele-health follow-up performed by rheumatologists or rheumatology nurses. METHODS: A total of ...

  12. An Exploration of Intent to Use Telehealth at Home for Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Lin Uei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Telecare is defined as care practiced at a distance. It is an effective strategy for improving the self-health care management of home-patients with chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore the intent to use of telehealth patients. The correlation between the self-care behaviors, the intent to use of telehealth, and the effects on physiological indicators of patients with chronic disease at home were studied. A cross-sectional study design employing purposive sampling was selected. The structured questionnaire ‘Telecare Usage Intention Scale and Self-Care Behavior Scale’ were used, ‘HbA1c, glucose levels and monthly blood pressure measurements’ were analyzed in this thirteen month study. The self-care behaviors of the participants were positively correlated with their intent to use telehealth (p < 0.01. The results also indicated that HbA1c, glucose levels and frequency BP measurement of the participants improved significantly after using telecare (p < 0.005. The results indicated a strong intent to use telehealth and positive perception of telecare services by in-home patients with a chronic disease. Telehealth improves the self-care behavior of in-home chronic disease patients and enhances medical professionals’ ability to deliver quality and effective healthcare.

  13. Mixed Methods Approach for Measuring the Impact of Video Telehealth on Outpatient Clinic Triage Nurse Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G.; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-delivered telephone triage is a common component of outpatient clinic settings. Adding new communication technology to clinic triage has the potential to not only transform the triage process, but also alter triage workflow. Evaluating the impact of new technology on an existing workflow is paramount to maximizing efficiency of the delivery system. This study investigated triage nurse workflow before and after the implementation of video telehealth using a sequential mixed methods protocol that combined ethnography and time-motion study to provide a robust analysis of the implementation environment. Outpatient clinic triage using video telehealth required significantly more time than telephone triage, indicating a reduction in nurse efficiency. Despite the increased time needed to conduct video telehealth, nurses consistently rated it useful in providing triage. Interpretive analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data suggests the increased depth and breadth of data available during video triage alters the assessment triage nurses provide physicians. This in turn could impact the time physicians spend formulating a diagnosis and treatment plan. While the immediate impact of video telehealth is a reduction in triage nurse efficiency, what is unknown is the impact of video telehealth on physician and overall clinic efficiency. Future studies should address this area. PMID:24080753

  14. Developing a measure of engagement with telehealth systems: The mHealth Technology Engagement Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Alexis R; Bull, Tyler P; Malvey, Donna M; Szalma, James L

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Telehealth systems and mobile health (mHealth) devices allow for the exchange of both physical and mental healthcare data, as well as information from a patient to a practitioner, or care recipient to caregiver; but there has been little research on why users are motivated to engage with telehealth systems. Given this, we sought to create a measure that satisfactorily assesses human motivation to use telehealth devices. Methods 532 survey responses were used in an exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis, which tested and retested the feasibility of this new measure. Convergent and divergent validity analyses indicated that the mHealth Technology Engagement Index (mTEI) is a unique measure of motivation. Results The results indicated that autonomy, competence, relatedness, goal attainment, and goal setting underpin motivation to use telehealth systems. Discussion The mTEI shows promise in indexing human motivation to use telehealth technologies. We also discuss the importance of developing measurement tools based on theory and how practitioners can best utilize the mTEI.

  15. Internet-based telehealth assessment of language using the CELF-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Monique C; Theodoros, Deborah G; Russell, Trevor G; Cahill, Louise M

    2010-10-01

    Telehealth has the potential to improve children's access to speech-language pathology services. Validation of telehealth applications, including the assessment of childhood language disorders, is necessary for telehealth to become an accepted alternative mode of service provision. The aim of this study was to validate an Internet-based telehealth system for assessing childhood language disorders. Twenty-five children ages 5 to 9 years were assessed using the core language subtests of the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals--4th Edition (CELF-4; Semel, Wiig, & Secord, 2003). Each participant was simultaneously assessed online and face-to-face (FTF). Assessments were administered by either an online or an FTF speech-language pathologist (SLP), but were simultaneously rated by both SLPs. No significant difference was found between the online and FTF total raw scores and scaled scores for each subtest. Weighted kappas revealed very good agreement on the individual items, total raw scores, scaled scores, core language score, and severity level. Intra- and interrater reliability were determined for a sample of online ratings, with intraclass correlation analysis revealing very good agreement on all measures. The results of this study support the validity and reliability of scoring the core language subtests of the CELF-4 via telehealth.

  16. Telehealth distance education course in Latin America: analysis of an experience involving 15 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Alaneir de Fátima; Alves, Humberto José; Nogueira, Janaina Teixeira; Torres, Rosoália Mpraes; Melo, Maria do Carmo Barros

    2014-08-01

    Telehealth activities are already going on in many Latin American countries. This article aims to present and evaluate a distance learning telehealth training course in the region. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. A coordinating committee was formed, composed of medical school faculty from 15 countries, which defined the course's syllabus, teaching model, and mentoring structure. A questionnaire was prepared, using a Likert scale, in order to verify if the parameters of gender, age, professional category, postgraduate degree, and experience in distance education indicated any difference in relation to the course evaluation. The responses were analyzed by chi-squared test, considering as significant a value of pdistance education was statistically significant for the evaluation of the tutors. The results presented indicate an important concern on the part of the Latin American countries participating on the course in relation to telehealth training activities. Regarding course assessment, high approval rates in relation to tutoring, educational model, course content, and goals were noted, corroborating literature data. The experience of conducting a Latin American shared telehealth training course was indeed positive, contributing to the development of telehealth actions.

  17. The diffusion of telehealth in rural American Indian communities: a retrospective survey of key stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Elizabeth; Manson, Spero M; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Shore, Jay H

    2012-01-01

    Mental health issues are a serious concern for many American Indian Veterans, especially for post-traumatic stress disorder and related psychiatric conditions. Yet, acquiring mental health treatment can be a challenge in Native communities where specialized services are largely unavailable. Consequently, telehealth is increasingly being suggested as a way to expand healthcare access on or near reservation lands. In this study, we wanted to understand the factors affecting the diffusion of telehealth clinics that provided mental health care to rural, American Indian Veterans. We surveyed 39 key personnel and stakeholders who were involved in the decision-making process, technological infrastructure, and implementation of three clinics. Using Roger Everett's Diffusion Theory as a framework, we gathered information about specific tasks, factors hindering progress, and personal reactions to telehealth both before and after implementation. Many participants expressed initial concerns about using telehealth; however, most became positive over time. Factors that influenced participants' viewpoint largely included patient and staff feedback and witnessing the fulfillment of a community health need. The use of outside information to support the implementation of the clinics and personal champions also showed considerable influence in the clinics' success. The findings presented here address critical gaps in our understanding of telehealth diffusion and inform research strategies regarding the cultural issues and outcomes related to telemental health services. Information contained in this report serves as a long overdue guide for developing telemental health programs and policies among American Indians, specifically, and rural populations in general.

  18. Crossing the Chasm: From Adoption to Diffusion of a Telehealth Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sunyoung; Mathiassen, Lars; Gallivan, Michael

    Telehealth innovations promise to provide extensive medical benefits by increasing access to healthcare services and lowering costs at the same time. However, many telehealth initiatives fail to go beyond the status of prototype applications despite being considered technically viable and medically relevant. Based on a longitudinal investigation of a successful telehealth program, we identify a chasm between the initial adoption mode of the innovation as a prototype within a network of hospitals and the subsequent diffusion mode of the innovation as a commercialized product. Subsequently, we analyze how key actors negotiated the chasm to successfully diffuse the innovation beyond the initial hospital setting. In terms of research, the paper presents a longitudinal, empirical investigation of a successful telehealth innovation. Drawing on the metaphor of "crossing the chasm," we explain why many telehealth initiatives fail to go beyond prototype application status. In terms of practice, the paper provides lessons on how key actors can negotiate the chasm to transition from adoption mode to diffusion mode.

  19. Telehealth physician oversight over direct to consumer testing: doctors working with patients towards patient empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Rick

    2012-06-01

    Patient empowerment has increased the demand for direct to consumer (DTC) laboratory testing. Multiple professional societies and advocacy groups have raised concerns over how DTC laboratory testing is being offered to consumers without proper physician oversight. Physician telehealth services can properly oversee DTC laboratory testing in a safe and medically sound manner. Using telehealth protocols and standards established by professional health organizations and state regulators, physician telehealth oversight in DTC laboratory test ordering can be effective to increase patient access to healthcare services. With proper physician oversight in test interpretation, post-test counseling, and information collaboration, DTC laboratory testing can remain a reliable and convenient option for consumers. Working within the channel of distribution of most DTC laboratory testing, physician telehealth services can properly oversee DTC laboratory testing in a safe and medically sound manner to ensure that proper test interpretation, counseling, and information collaboration are achieved. Physician telehealth services can properly oversee DTC laboratory testing to ensure that proper test interpretation, counseling, and information collaboration are achieved.

  20. Effectiveness of a home-based exercise program on anthropometric and metabolic changes among school cooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Felippe Felix Mediano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scope of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric and metabolic changes after low intensity home-based exercise. In the school year of 2007, 95 school cooks in the city of Niteroi (State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: home-based exercise (n = 47 or control group (n = 48. The home-based exercise program was performed three times a week, during 40 minutes at moderate intensity. Anthropometric variables were collected at the baseline and after 4 and 8 months, whereas biochemical and individual food intake were measured at the baseline and after 8 months. Energy expenditure was evaluated only at the baseline. The home-based exercise group exhibited a greater weight loss (-0.9 vs. -0.2; p = 0.05 in comparison with controls during the follow-up and the same pattern was found for BMI (-0.1 vs. +0.1; p = 0.07, although without statistical significance. Exercise showed no effects on waist circumference, lipid profile and glucose. In conclusion, greater weight loss was observed in the group that performed low intensity home-based exercise and this strategy can assist in body weight control even without alterations in terms of lipids and glucose.

  1. Home-based exercise may not decrease the insulin resistance in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiao-Nan; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Korivi, Mallikarjuna; Wu, Ying-Tai

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the differences in exercise self-efficacy, compliance, and effectiveness of home-based exercise in individuals with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS). One hundred and ten individuals at risk for diabetes participated in this study. Subjects were categorized into individuals with MetS and individuals without MetS. Metabolic risk factors and exercise self-efficacy were evaluated for all subjects before and after 3 months of home-based exercise. Univariate analysis of variance was used to compare the effectiveness of a home-based exercise program between individuals with and without MetS. The home-based exercise program improved body mass index and lipid profile in individuals at risk for diabetes, regardless of MetS status at baseline. Individuals without MetS had higher exercise self-efficacy at baseline and performed greater exercise volume compared with individuals with MetS during the intervention. The increased exercise volume in individuals without MetS may contribute to their better control of insulin resistance than individuals with MetS. Furthermore, baseline exercise self-efficacy was correlated with exercise volume executed by subjects at home. We conclude that home-based exercise programs are beneficial for individuals at risk for diabetes. However, more intensive and/or supervised exercise intervention may be needed for those with MetS.

  2. Supervised and home-based exercise training for patients with intermittent claudication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxiong; Zhou, Shi; Bronks, Roger; Graham, John; Myers, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Home-based exercise training, applied as the primary treatment in patients with intermittent claudication, has produced inconsistent effects on walking capacity in previous published studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether a home-based exercise training program could maintain improved walking capacity and other functional variables achieved through a supervised exercise training program. The present design was a 48-week self-controlled study. The first 12-week period was a control stage in which no prescribed exercise program was provided, the second 12-week period was a supervised treadmill-walking training program and the following 24-week period was a home-based exercise program. Twenty-two subjects with intermittent claudication were recruited initially; 15 of them (14 men and one woman) completed the whole program. Walking capacity, peak oxygen uptake, walking economy and ankle-brachial index were measured at baseline and at 12, 24 and 48 weeks. There was no significant change in the measured variables after the control stage. The 12-week supervised treadmill-walking training program significantly increased pain-free walking time, maximal walking time and peak oxygen uptake. Walking economy was also significantly improved. These improvements were successfully maintained after 24 weeks of home-based training. The results indicated that 12 weeks of supervised treadmill-walking training followed by a home-based training program is an effective model of exercise rehabilitation for patients with intermittent claudication. PMID:22477417

  3. Performance Improvement Strategic Home Based Manufacturer Tahu And Tempe Groups Based In The District Of Jember

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istatuk Budi Yuswanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tahu dan tempe is a product of the soybean meal that has been known since long in Indonesia. Tahu is a Chinese food products in contrast to tempe an authentic Indonesian food . As tempe tahu also favored by the people of Indonesia because it has a taste that delicious nutritious and affordable price.Industries that produce tahu dan tempe are generally small-scale home-based businesses with the number of workers a little less than 2-6 people and investments that are not too large. The use of technology in small business home-based producer of tahu dan tempe quite simple and easy to learn so it can be run by anyone. The success of small business home-based manufacturers to survive and evolve toward more advanced by knowing their strengths weaknesses opportunities that can be taken by small business home-based and threat or better known as the SWOT Strength Weakness Opportunity Threath that can be retrieved strategies that affect the success and development of small business home-based manufacturer of tahu dan tempe.Constraints faced by small businesses and home-based manufacturers know that the soybean Tepe that include budget constraints limited access to banking limited human resources marketing only the scope of Jember and lack of good management. No group or cooperative does not have a good recording making it difficult to make financial reports manufacturing planning and operational supervision and finances into this industry employers group lemah.Pembentukan help solve problems and maximize its potential.

  4. Fatigue and Mood States in Nursing Home and Nonambulatory Home-Based Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Zilfah; Vaughn, Caila B; Sanai, Shaik Ahmed; Kavak, Katelyn S; Gupta, Sahil; Nadeem, Muhammad; Teter, Barbara E; Noyes, Katia; Zivadinov, Robert; Edwards, Keith; Coyle, Patricia K; Goodman, Andrew; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressively disabling condition of the central nervous system. We sought to evaluate and compare mood states in patients with MS with increased disability residing in nursing homes and those receiving home-based care. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the New York State Multiple Sclerosis Consortium to identify patients with MS using a Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score of 7.0 or greater. The nursing home group was compared with home-based care patients regarding self-reported levels of loneliness, pessimism, tension, panic, irritation, morbid thoughts, feelings of guilt, and fatigue using independent-samples t tests and χ 2 tests. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate risk-adjusted differences in mood states. Ninety-four of 924 patients with EDSS scores of at least 7.0 lived in a nursing home (10.2%). Nursing home patients were less likely to use disease-modifying therapy and had higher mean EDSS scores compared with home-based patients. However, nursing home patients were less likely than home-based patients to report fatigue (odds ratio [OR] for no fatigue, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.1-7.2), feeling tense (OR for no tension, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.7), and having feelings of pessimism (OR for no pessimism, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.8). The nursing home patients with MS were less likely to report fatigue, pessimism, and tension than those receiving home-based care. Further studies should examine ways of facilitating a greater degree of autonomy and decision-making control in MS patients receiving home-based care.

  5. The Relevance of Telehealth across the Digital Divide: The Transfer of Knowledge over Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ton AM Spil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the concept of relevance as an explanatory factor to the diffusion of IT-use, or, in this paper particularly, the use of Telehealth. Relevance is the net value of performance expectancy and effort expectancy and contains both micro-relevance (i.e. here-and-now and macro-relevance (i.e. actual goals. Following the case-study approach, two Telehealth situations were studied in Rwanda and The Netherlands. In the comparison, two more existing studies in Canada and Tanzania were included. The conclusion is that relevance is the explanatory factor, whereas particularly micro-relevance is crucial. Without the micro-relevant occasions that initiate use, there will be no use on longer term. In the cases studied the micro-relevance of knowledge-transfer was crucial. Furthermore distance determined Telehealth relevance. Practical conclusions to cases were drawn.

  6. Older adults' and case managers' initial impressions of community-based telehealth kiosks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L; Lingler, Jennifer H; Mecca, Laurel Person; Garlock, Laurie A; Schulz, Richard; Dick, Andrew W; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-10-01

    Community-based (multi-user) telehealth interventions may be beneficial for older adults, but there is little research regarding such interventions. As a first step in feasibility assessment, we used a qualitative descriptive approach to examine the acceptability and perceived value of community-based telehealth kiosks with regard to current health self-management practices of community-dwelling older adults. Participants included residents (n = 6) and community agency case managers (n = 3) of a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development-subsidized senior apartment building. Both positive impressions from and concerns of each group are presented. Findings helped guide plans for future telehealth kiosk implementation and training. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. A pilot exploration of speech sound disorder intervention delivered by telehealth to school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan-Johnson, Susan; Gabel, Rodney M; Taylor, Jacquelyn; Rowan, Lynne E; Alvares, Robin; Schenker, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a school-based telehealth service delivery model and reports outcomes made by school-age students with speech sound disorders in a rural Ohio school district. Speech therapy using computer-based speech sound intervention materials was provided either by live interactive videoconferencing (telehealth), or conventional side-by-side intervention. Progress was measured using pre- and post-intervention scores on the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 (Goldman & Fristoe, 2002). Students in both service delivery models made significant improvements in speech sound production, with students in the telehealth condition demonstrating greater mastery of their Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals. Live interactive videoconferencing thus appears to be a viable method for delivering intervention for speech sound disorders to children in a rural, public school setting.

  8. Conducting Functional Communication Training via Telehealth to Reduce the Problem Behavior of Young Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, David P; Lee, John F; Padilla Dalmau, Yaniz C; Kopelman, Todd G; Lindgren, Scott D; Kuhle, Jennifer; Pelzel, Kelly E; Dyson, Shannon; Schieltz, Kelly M; Waldron, Debra B

    2013-02-01

    Functional communication training (FCT) was conducted by parents of 17 young children with autism spectrum disorders who displayed problem behavior. All procedures were conducted at regional clinics located an average of 15 miles from the families' homes. Parents received coaching via telehealth from behavior consultants who were located an average of 222 miles from the regional clinics. Parents first conducted functional analyses with telehealth consultation (Wacker, Lee, et al., in press) and then conducted FCT that was matched to the identified function of problem behavior. Parent assistants located at the regional clinics received brief training in the procedures and supported the families during the clinic visits. FCT, conducted within a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design, reduced problem behavior by an average of 93.5%. Results suggested that FCT can be conducted by parents via telehealth when experienced applied behavior analysts provide consultation.

  9. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  10. Post stroke dementia and Post stroke depression

    OpenAIRE

    Trkanjec, Zlatko

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is the rapid loss of brain function due to disturbance in the blood supply to the brain causing predominantly motor and sensory symptoms. However, stroke can cause some other symptoms. Post stroke dementia and depression are probably the most important non-motor consequences of stroke. Post stroke dementia and depression are important and often overlooked symptoms following stroke. Treatment options for Post stroke dementia and depression are still limited, therefore diagnosis of Post ...

  11. A review of the efficacy and effectiveness of using telehealth for paediatric speech and language assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Olivia D; Armfield, Nigel R; Dodrill, Pamela; Smith, Anthony C

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the literature relating to the use of telehealth for paediatric speech and language assessment. Four databases, and relevant reference lists, were searched for articles published between January 2004 and July 2014. A total of 180 articles were identified, of which only five were relevant. All studies assessed efficacy using method comparison techniques; no studies assessed effectiveness. The method comparison studies investigated the validity and/or reliability of speech and language assessment via telehealth, when compared with face-to-face assessment. Studies varied in terms of participant group, assessment tools, statistical analysis and telehealth equipment. The papers reviewed presented some evidence that telehealth can be used to make valid assessments of oromotor function, speech intelligibility and language. Articulation screening via telehealth was found to be valid, but there was conflicting evidence about full articulation assessment. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was good for all speech and language tasks, with the exception of oromotor assessment, which also had reduced reliability when assessed face-to-face. There were discrepancies between the two modalities for individual oromotor tasks, judgement of individual speech sounds, detection of pluralisation, and discriminating between similar sounding words; these have the potential to be clinically important. Evidence regarding satisfaction was extremely limited, with only one study reporting parental satisfaction, and no studies reporting child or clinician satisfaction. Although there is limited evidence to support the validity and reliability of speech and language assessment via telehealth, it is probably not yet sufficient to influence clinical practice or policy development. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Telehealth for paediatric burn patients in rural areas: a retrospective audit of activity and cost savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Tania; Hendricks, Joyce; Twigg, Di; Wood, Fiona; Giles, Margaret

    2016-11-01

    Since 2005, the Western Australian paediatric burn unit has provided a state-wide clinical consultancy and support service for the assessment and management of acute and rehabilitative burn patients via its telehealth service. Since then, the use of this telehealth service has steadily increased as it has become imbedded in the model of care for paediatric burn patients. Primarily, the service involves acute and long term patient reviews conducted by the metropolitan-located burn unit in contact with health practitioners, advising patients and their families who reside outside the metropolitan area thereby avoiding unnecessary transfers and inpatient bed days. A further benefit of the paediatric burn service using telehealth is more efficient use of tertiary level burn unit beds, with only those patients meeting clinical criteria for admission being transferred. To conduct a retrospective audit of avoided transfers and bed days in 2005/06-2012/13 as a result of the use of the paediatric Burns Telehealth Service and estimate their cost savings in 2012/13. A retrospective chart audit identified activity, avoided unnecessary acute and scar review patient transfers, inpatient bed days and their associated avoided costs to the tertiary burn unit and patient travel funding. Over the period 2005/06-2012/13 the audit identified 4,905 avoided inpatient bed days, 364 avoided acute patient transfers and 1,763 avoided follow up review transfers for a total of 1,312 paediatric burn patients as a result of this telehealth service. This paper presents the derivation of these outcomes and an estimation of their cost savings in 2012/13 of AUD 1.89million. This study demonstrates avoided patient transfers, inpatient bed days and associated costs as the result of an integrated burns telehealth service. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. The telehealth divide: disparities in searching public health information online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeida, Mary; McNeal, Ramona S

    2007-08-01

    This article explores e government inequalities to searching Medicare and Medicaid information online. Telehealth, a branch of e government, can bring public health service and insurance information to the citizen. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services website, among others, has critical information for potential beneficiaries and recipients of services. Using Pew survey data and multivariate regression analysis we find people in most need of Medicare and Medicaid information online (the elderly and poor) are accessing it, and people with years of online experience are strong proponents of online searches. Despite being less likely to have broadband services, individuals in rural areas were not found to be less likely to search for information online. In conclusion, some disparities are narrowing as the elderly and poor in need of access to public health insurance are searching for it online. However, people without Internet access and experience (perhaps the oldest and poorest) remain disadvantaged with respect to accessing critical information that can link them to needed health care services.

  14. Employing the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework to capture user feedback in the design and testing stage of development of home-based arm rehabilitation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Manoj; Gallagher, Justin; Holt, Ray; Weightman, Andrew; O'Connor, Rory; Levesley, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a framework to ensure that key aspects of user feedback are identified in the design and testing stages of development of a home-based upper limb rehabilitation system. Seventeen stroke survivors with residual upper limb weakness, and seven healthcare professionals with expertise in stroke rehabilitation, were enrolled in the user-centered design process. Through semi-structured interviews, they provided feedback on the hardware, software and impact of a home-based rehabilitation device to facilitate self-managed arm exercise. Members of the multidisciplinary clinical and engineering research team, based on previous experience and existing literature in user-centred design, developed the topic list for the interviews. Meaningful concepts were extracted from participants' interviews based on existing ICF linking rules and matched to categories within the ICF Comprehensive Core Set for stroke. Most of the interview concepts (except personal factors) matched the existing ICF Comprehensive Core Set categories. Personal factors that emerged from interviews e.g. gender, age, interest, compliance, motivation, choice and convenience that might determine device usability are yet to be categorised within the ICF framework and hence could not be matched to a specific Core Set category.

  15. Telehealth forging ahead: overcoming barriers in licensure to improve access to care for service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Katie Ambrose; Martinez, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    The telehealth initiatives of the Department of Defense (DoD) and Veterans' Health Administration (VHA) continue to test the limits of technology to provide the best care to our service members, veterans and their families. The DoD and VHA have credentialing systems in place to allow clinical practice between facilities. New legislation in the form of the Servicemembers' Telemedicine and E-Health Portability (STEP) Act will potentially expand telehealth clinical services across state lines into the homes of our service members and veterans.

  16. Who does not participate in telehealth trials and why? A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alexis; Horspool, Kimberley A; Edwards, Louisa; Thomas, Clare L; Salisbury, Chris; Montgomery, Alan A; O'Cathain, Alicia

    2015-06-05

    Telehealth interventions use information and communication technology to provide clinical support. Some randomised controlled trials of telehealth report high patient decline rates. A large study was undertaken to determine which patients decline to participate in telehealth trials and their reasons for doing so. Two linked randomised controlled trials were undertaken, one for patients with depression and one for patients with raised cardiovascular disease risk (the Healthlines Study). The trials compared usual care with additional support delivered by the telephone and internet. Patients were recruited via their general practice and could return a form about why they were not participating. Of the patients invited, 82.9% (20,021/24,152) did not accept the study invite, either by returning a decline form (n = 7134) or by not responding (n = 12,887). In both trials patients registered at deprived general practices were less likely to accept the study invite. Decline forms were received from 29.5% (7134/24,152) of patients invited. There were four frequently reported types of reasons for declining. The most common was telehealth-related: 54.7% (3889/,7115) of decliners said they did not have access or the skills to use the internet and/or computers. This was more prevalent amongst older patients and patients registered at deprived general practices. The second was health need-related: 40.1% (n = 2852) of decliners reported that they did not need additional support for their health condition. The third was related to life circumstances: 27.2% (n = 1932) of decliners reported being too busy. The fourth was research-related: 15.3% (n = 1092) of decliners were not interested in the research. A large proportion of patients declining participation in these telehealth trials did so because they were unable to engage with telehealth or did not perceive a need for it. This has implications for engagement with telehealth in routine practice, as well as for trials, with a need

  17. The Opportunity Awaits to Lead Orthopaedic Telehealth Innovation: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongworawat, Montri D; Capistrant, Gary; Stephenson, John M

    2017-09-06

    Telehealth is a way to provide health-care services to a patient from a provider who is at another location. The most common methods include a live interactive visit with the patient, interpretation of imaging, and monitoring of patient progress. Principally, telehealth is a way of providing a service rather than a type of service. It is about patient care, not data care.Examples of orthopaedic applications include conducting patient examinations, interpreting imaging studies, and providing postoperative care. Teleconsultation has been shown to be cost-effective. Other examples in orthopaedic research include the application of telemedicine when measuring patient-reported outcomes. Especially in cases when the patient lives far away from the provider, telehealth reduces time, produces good patient satisfaction, and costs less than hands-on care. As in everyday life, consumers have learned to demand convenience, ease of use, choice, control, and direct access. The ubiquity of telecommunications, combined with consumer technology savviness, drives the demand for telehealth. Unfortunately, the nation's largest payer for health services is one of the most restrictive for telehealth coverage. Medicare's restrictions are mostly the work of the U.S. Congress under Part B law. Video visits are very narrowly covered. Another major policy barrier is that interstate telehealth requires multiple state licenses for the physician, who must be licensed in the jurisdiction of each patient as well as the provider's physical locations. As Medicare shifts toward capitated payment and other value-based methods, there are opportunities to remove such restrictions.Despite these challenges, some states have been proactive in implementing telehealth systems. Arkansas is one of these states, and being a rural state with 2 main population centers, specialty care is relatively sparse. Implemented in 2014, the hand trauma program has been a partnership between the University of Arkansas for

  18. Achieving greater consistency in telehealth project evaluations to improve organisational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Anthony; Gray, Kathleen; Borda, Ann; Poultney, Nathan; Basilakis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth pilot projects and trial implementations are numerous but are often not fully evaluated, preventing construction of a sound evidence base and so limiting their adoption. We describe the need for a generic Telehealth project evaluation framework, within which evaluation is undertaken based on existing health systems performance indicators, using appropriately chosen measures. We provide two case studies explaining how this approach could be applied, in Australian and Canadian settings. It is argued that this framework type of approach to evaluation offers better potential for incorporating the learnings from resultant evaluations into business decisions by "learning organisations", through alignment with organisational performance considerations.

  19. A Canadian, Multicentre, Randomized Clinical Trial of Home-Based Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Copd: Rationale and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Maltais

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary rehabilitation remains largely underused. Self-monitored, home-based rehabilitation is a promising approach to improving the availability of pulmonary rehabilitation.

  20. A Home-Based Educational Intervention Improves Patient Activation Measures and Diabetes Health Indicators among Zuni Indians

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shah, Vallabh O; Carroll, Casey; Mals, Ryan; Ghahate, Donica; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Colleran, Kathleen; Schrader, Ronald; Faber, Thomas; Burge, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    .... We describe a home-based educational intervention using Community Health Representatives (CHRs), leading to improvement in Patient Activation Measures scores and clinical indicators of diabetes control...

  1. The application of telemedicine in orthopedic surgery in singapore: a pilot study on a secure, mobile telehealth application and messaging platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daruwalla, Zubin Jimmy; Wong, Keng Lin; Thambiah, Joseph

    2014-06-05

    The application of telemedicine has been described for its use in medical training and education, management of stroke patients, urologic surgeries, pediatric laparoscopic surgeries, clinical outreach, and the field of orthopedics. However, the usefulness of a secure, mobile telehealth application, and messaging platform has not been well described. A pilot study was conducted to implement a health insurance portability and accountability act (HIPAA) compliant form of communication between doctors in an orthopedic clinical setting and determine their reactions to MyDoc, a secure, mobile telehealth application, and messaging platform. By replacing current methods of communication through various mobile applications and text messaging services with MyDoc over a six week period, we gained feedback and determined user satisfaction with this innovative system from questionnaires handed to the program director, program coordinator, one trauma consultant, all orthopedic residents, and six non-orthopedic residents at the National University Hospital in Singapore. Almost everyone who completed the questionnaire strongly agreed that MyDoc should replace current systems of peer to peer communication in the hospital. The majority also felt that the quality of images, videos, and sound were excellent. Almost everyone agreed that they could communicate easily with each other and would feel comfortable doing so routinely. The majority felt that virtual consults through MyDoc should be made available to inpatients as well as outpatients to potentially lessen clinic loads and provide a secure manner in which patients can communicate with their primary teams any time convenient to both. It was also agreed by most that the potential of telerounding had advantages, especially on weekends as a supplement to normal rounds. Potential uses of MyDoc in an orthopedic clinical setting include HIPAA-compliant peer to peer communication, clinical outreach in the setting of trauma, supervision

  2. Gender discrepancies in the HIV/AIDS Community Home-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender discrepancies in the HIV/AIDS Community Home-Based Care Programme in Kanye, Botswana. ... mainstreaming and analysis in all the institutions of social development, as well as poverty mitigation measures and education to surmount the effects of gender imbalances, gender inequality and gender inequity.

  3. Comparison of clinic-based versus home-based balance and agility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To compare clinic-based (CB) and home-based (HB) deliveries of a knee osteoarthritis (OA) exercise programme. Methods. Outcomes from a CB exercise study (N=6) utilising kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercises were compared with those from a HB KBA study (N=6). Both conditions trained 30 ...

  4. Home-based rehabilitation interventions for adults living with HIV: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) has been shown to improve the lives of people living with a wide range of chronic diseases in resource-rich settings. This may also be a particularly effective strategy in resource-poor settings, where access to institution-based rehabilitation is limited. This review aimed to summarise and ...

  5. Dutch home-based pre-reading intervention with children at familial risk of dyslexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Otterloo, S.G.; van der Leij, A.

    2009-01-01

    Children (5 and 6 years old, n = 30) at familial risk of dyslexia received a home-based intervention that focused on phoneme awareness and letter knowledge in the year prior to formal reading instruction. The children were compared to a no-training at-risk control group (n = 27), which was selected

  6. Patient Reported Outcomes in a New Home-Based Rehabilitation Programme for Prostate Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Brigitta R.; Grønbech Jørgensen, Martin; Frystyk, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The most optimal exercise plan for men with prostate cancer (PC) receiving androgen deprivation therapy needs to be identified. We plan to investigate a 12-week home-based health programme (exergaming) on physical function, fatigue and metabolic parameters in this group. In addition, our study...

  7. Perceptions of Personal Well-Being among Youth Accessing Residential or Intensive Home-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preyde, Michele; Watkins, Hanna; Ashbourne, Graham; Lazure, Kelly; Carter, Jeff; Penney, Randy; White, Sara; Frensch, Karen; Cameron, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of youth accessing residential treatment or intensive home-based treatment are varied. Understanding youth's perceptions of their well-being may inform service. The purpose of this report was to explore perceptions of youth's mental health, life satisfaction, and outlook for the future. Youth reported ongoing struggles with mental…

  8. Quality Improvement in Home-Based Child Care Settings: Research Resources to Inform Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sharmila; Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    This "Topic of Interest" provides a comprehensive list of research in the Research Connections collection that was published in 2005 or later addressing issues related to quality improvement specifically in home-based child care. The resources are grouped under the following headings: Overviews, Summaries, and Reviews of Quality…

  9. Employees' views on home-based, after-hours telephone triage by Dutch GP cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Backhaus (Ramona); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Background:__ Dutch out-of-hours (OOH) centers find it difficult to attract sufficient triage staff. They regard home-based triage as an option that might attract employees. Specially trained nurses are supposed to conduct triage by telephone from home for

  10. The provision of home-based palliative care for those with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enguidanos, Susan; Portanova, Jaclyn

    2014-03-01

    Although widely recognized as best practice for advanced heart failure patients, palliative care is underused by this population. The purpose of this brief review is to highlight recent findings related to home-based palliative care among patients with advanced heart failure. This review considers new models of home-based palliative care and reports recent evidence on the effectiveness, and burden of these models for patients with advanced heart failure and their caregivers. New models currently under investigation and gaps in current research are presented. New models integrating home-based palliative care and standard heart failure care have shown to be effective in reducing both physical and psychological symptoms in patients. Recent evidence suggests that home-based palliative care reduces hospitalizations and decrease the probability of 30-day re-admissions in patients with advanced heart failure; thus, potentially reducing costs of care and increasing likelihood of dying at home. However, caregiver burden for families of those with heart failure remains an issue. Research that addresses caregiver burden and the challenges of providing palliative care to patients with the uncertain disease trajectory seen in advanced heart failure require further research.

  11. Teaching Math Skills to At-Risk Students Using Home-Based Peer Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Kristin H.; Vollmer, Timothy R.

    2007-01-01

    Home-based peer tutoring was used to teach math skills to 4 girls with deficits in mathematics and histories of abuse or neglect. Girls living in the same home formed tutoring dyads, and each participant served as both the peer tutor and the tutee during the course of the study. At the initiation of the tutoring intervention, an expert tutor…

  12. Latino Parents Utilizing Home-Based Activities to Support Algebra-Readiness Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinar, Soledad Marie

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation involved a series of training sessions where parents from a Title I middle school participated in the learning and practice of Algebra Readiness skills. The project was based on a series of six weekly trainings for parents to learn home-based activities to increase their child's Algebra Readiness. I administered an initial…

  13. Home-based alcohol prevention program for parents and children: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mares, S.H.W.; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A.; Verdurmen, J.E.E.; Schulten, I.G.H.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based alcohol prevention program to delay initiation of alcohol use in children. Methods: In 2011, a total of 1349 sixth-grade children (M = 12.15, SD = 0.47) and their mothers who could read and write Dutch were recruited from primary schools in

  14. The social construction of identity in HIV/AIDS home-based care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home-based care volunteer (HBCV) identity and how it is shaped was the main focus of the study. Fifteen HBCVs were interviewed about their work and personal life stories and then interviewed reflectively using a narrative interviewing style. Specific attention was paid to contextual meta-narratives and social field ...

  15. Home-based care for people living with AIDS in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home-based care for people living with AIDS in Zimbabwe: voluntary caregivers' motivations and concerns. ... In Zimbabwe, improvement of voluntary caregiving programmes requires better integration with the national healthcare system at the clinic level as well as collaboration with NGOs, community leaders and church ...

  16. Gendered home-based care in South Africa: more trouble for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the experiences of informal caregivers of people living with HIV in two semi-rural communities in South Africa. Ethnographic methods were used to collect and analyse data on the gendered nature and consequences of home-based care from 21 primary caregivers and 20 volunteer caregivers as well ...

  17. socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... in home-based care variables were negatively correlated with socio-cultural variables. For example, there was a significant strong negative relationship between taboo for married man to cook with men cook and feed HIV patients (r =- 0.69, P=0.01). Conclusion: Full participation of males' in HIV home care ...

  18. Home based care practices by caregivers of under five children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Home treatment for childhood febrile illness is a common practice among caregivers in Nigeria as well as some other countries in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to assess the home based care practices of caregivers of under- five children with febrile illnesses as seen in the general paediatric ...

  19. The cost of home-based terminal care for people with AIDS in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To describe the costs of establishing and operating a home-based care (HBC) project providing palliative care for people with AIDS CPWA), and to project the full costs to the health care system of extending this care model. Design. Data were collected from seven sites participating in the Hospice Association of ...

  20. Caring for home-based care workers | de Saxe Zerden | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home-based care has emerged as a service delivery model to cope with the devastation caused by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where medical and traditional care infrastructures have been overwhelmed. In these communities homebased care workers provide critical services, which include physical, ...

  1. Cross Cultural Differences in Managers’ Support for Home-based Telework : A Theoretical Elaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Pascale; Dulk, Laura den

    2003-01-01

    Home-based telework is one of the arrangements organizations can introduce to facilitate a better balance between employees’ professional and private lives. This article focuses on the question of under what conditions managers grant a subordinate’s request to telework and what role national

  2. Impact of home-based exercise on quality of life of women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While medical treatments are available for primary dysmenorrhoea, exercise is accepted as an effective intervention. This study aimed to investigate the impact of home-based exercise on pain intensity and quality of life in women with primary dysmenorrhoea. Of 45 women with primary dysmenorrhoea included in the study, ...

  3. Home-based therapy for severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe acute malnutrition is a devastating condition afflicting children under 5 years in many developing countries, but concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper examines the development of home-based lipid-nutrient therapeutic foods for the treatment of acute malnutrition in sub-Saharan Afric...

  4. Home-based and institutional early childhood education and care services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukkink, R.; Blok, H.; Peterson, P.; Baker, E.; McGaw, B.

    2010-01-01

    Early-childhood education and care is oriented toward stimulating the development of young children in preparation for the primary-school period. The various programs can be divided into three types, according to the chosen manner of entry into the ecological system of the young child. Home-based

  5. Experiences of HIV/AIDS home-based caregivers in Vhembe district of the Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Mashau

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of HIV and AIDS home-based caregivers in the Vhembe district of Limpopo Province. A qualitative research design which was exploratory, descriptive and contextual was executed with a sample of purposively selected participants who provided home-based care to people living with HIV and AIDS in the Vhembe district of Limpopo Province. Data saturation occurred after in-depth interviews with fifteen participants. In-depth individual interviews and field notes were also used during data collection. The findings reveal that HIV/AIDS home-based caregivers express pain and despair when caring for HIV/AIDS patients. The theme was supported by the following categories and subcategories: problems related to stigma when caring for patients at their homes; stress, burnout, frustration and feelings of helplessness when caring for patients. Recommendations that are described focus on building a working relationship between the home-based caregivers, community and the family.

  6. Home-based Education Increases Knowledge, Communication and Living Donor Kidney Transplantations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.Y. Ismail (Sohal)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ A focus group approach was used to disclose transplant candidates’ view on patient-tailored interventions that could target modifiable hurdles to LDKT. A majority would appreciate an home-based educational intervention (chapter 2). Solving knowledge insufficiencies

  7. Beyond Self-Monitoring: Understanding Non-functional Aspects of Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2013-01-01

    -technical complexities in home-based healthcare technologies through three case studies of self-monitoring: 1) pre-eclampsia (i.e. pregnancy poisoning), 2) heart conditions, and 3) preventive care. Through the analysis seven themes emerged (people, resources, places, routines, knowledge, control and motivation) that can...

  8. Socio-cultural factors influencing male involvement in home-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate socio-cultural factors that influence male involvement in home-based HIV and AIDS care in Western Kenya. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting: Maseno division Western Kenya. Subjects: Two hundred and fourty eight (248) caregivers selected fromregistered support groups in ...

  9. An Overview of Home-Based Primary Care: Learning from the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sarah; Hostetter, Martha; McCarthy, Douglas

    2017-06-01

    ISSUE: Homebound and functionally limited individuals are often unable to access office-based primary care, leading to unmet needs and increased health care spending. GOAL: Show how home-based primary care affects outcomes and costs for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries with complex care needs. METHODS: Qualitative synthesis of expert perspectives and the experiences of six case-study sites. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Successful home-based primary care practices optimize care by: fielding interdisciplinary teams, incorporating behavioral care and social supports into primary care, responding rapidly to urgent and acute care needs, offering palliative care, and supporting family members and caregivers. Practices participating in Medicare's Independence at Home Demonstration saved $3,070 per beneficiary on average in the first year, primarily by reducing hospital use under this shared-savings program. The experience of a risk-based medical group that contracts with health plans and health systems to provide home-based care suggests similar potential to reduce health care spending under capitated or value-based payment arrangements. Making effective home-based primary care more widely available would require a better-prepared workforce, appropriate financial incentives to encourage more clinicians to provide house calls to their home-limited patients, and relevant quality measures to ensure that value-based payment is calibrated to meet the needs of patients and their families.

  10. Cancer Survivors’ Experience With Telehealth: A Systematic Review and Thematic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Grace; Marcu, Afrodita; Piano, Marianne; Grosvenor, Wendy; Mold, Freda; Maguire, Roma; Ream, Emma

    2017-01-01

    Background Net survival rates of cancer are increasing worldwide, placing a strain on health service provision. There is a drive to transfer the care of cancer survivors—individuals living with and beyond cancer—to the community and encourage them to play an active role in their own care. Telehealth, the use of technology in remote exchange of data and communication between patients and health care professionals (HCPs), is an important contributor to this evolving model of care. Telehealth interventions are “complex,” and understanding patient experiences of them is important in evaluating their impact. However, a wider view of patient experience is lacking as qualitative studies detailing cancer survivor engagement with telehealth are yet to be synthesized. Objective To systematically identify, appraise, and synthesize qualitative research evidence on the experiences of adult cancer survivors participating in telehealth interventions, to characterize the patient experience of telehealth interventions for this group. Methods Medline (PubMed), PsychINFO, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Professionals (CINAHL), Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched on August 14, 2015, and March 8, 2016, for English-language papers published between 2006 and 2016. Inclusion criteria were as follows: adult cancer survivors aged 18 years and over, cancer diagnosis, experience of participating in a telehealth intervention (defined as remote communication or remote monitoring with an HCP delivered by telephone, Internet, or hand-held or mobile technology), and reporting qualitative data including verbatim quotes. An adapted Critical Appraisal Skill Programme (CASP) checklist for qualitative research was used to assess paper quality. The results section of each included article was coded line by line, and all papers underwent inductive analysis, involving comparison, reexamination, and grouping of codes to develop descriptive themes

  11. Use of telehealth in the management of non-critical emergencies in rural or remote emergency departments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Marie; Malau-Aduli, Bunmi; Vangaveti, Venkat; Sabesan, Sabe; Ray, Robin A

    2017-01-01

    Background Telehealth has been used extensively in emergency departments to improve healthcare provision. However, its impact on the management of non-critical emergency presentations within rural and remote emergency department settings has not been adequately explored. The objective of this systematic review is to identify how telehealth has been used to assist in the management of non-critical presentations in rural and remote emergency departments and the outcomes. Methods Articles were identified through database searches of CINAHL, Cochrane, MEDLINE (OVID), Informit and SCOPUS, as well as the screening of relevant article reference and citation lists. To determine how telehealth can assist in the management of non-critical emergencies, information was extracted relating to telehealth programme model, the scope of service and participating health professionals. The outcomes of telehealth programmes were determined by analysing the uptake and usage of telehealth, the impact on altering a diagnosis or management plan as well as patient disposition including patient transfer, discharge, local hospital admission and rates of discharge against medical advice. Results Of the 2532 identified records, 15 were found to match the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Uptake and usage increased for telehealth programmes predominantly utilised by nursing staff with limited local medical support. Teleconsultation conservatively altered patient diagnosis or management in 18-66% of consultations. Although teleconsultation was associated with increased patient transfer rates, unnecessary transfers were reduced. Simultaneously, an increase in local hospital admission was noted and fewer patients were discharged home. Discharge against medical advice rates were low at 0.9-1.1%. Conclusion The most widely implemented hub-and-spoke telehealth model could be incorporated into existing referral frameworks. Telehealth programmes may assist in reducing unnecessary

  12. A systematic review of home-based childhood obesity prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showell, Nakiya N; Fawole, Oluwakemi; Segal, Jodi; Wilson, Renee F; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Bleich, Sara N; Wu, Yang; Lau, Brandyn; Wang, Youfa

    2013-07-01

    Childhood obesity is a global epidemic. Despite emerging research about the role of the family and home on obesity risk behaviors, the evidence base for the effectiveness of home-based interventions on obesity prevention remains uncertain. The objective was to systematically review the effectiveness of home-based interventions on weight, intermediate (eg, diet and physical activity [PA]), and clinical outcomes. We searched Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, CINAHL, clinicaltrials.gov, and the Cochrane Library from inception through August 11, 2012. We included experimental and natural experimental studies with ≥1-year follow-up reporting weight-related outcomes and targeting children at home. Two independent reviewers screened studies and extracted data. We graded the strength of the evidence supporting interventions targeting diet, PA, or both for obesity prevention. We identified 6 studies; 3 tested combined interventions (diet and PA), 1 used diet intervention, 1 combined intervention with primary care and consumer health informatics components, and 1 combined intervention with school and community components. Select combined interventions had beneficial effects on fruit/vegetable intake and sedentary behaviors. However, none of the 6 studies reported a significant effect on weight outcomes. Overall, the strength of evidence is low that combined home-based interventions effectively prevent obesity. The evidence is insufficient for conclusions about home-based diet interventions or interventions implemented at home in association with other settings. The strength of evidence is low to support the effectiveness of home-based child obesity prevention programs. Additional research is needed to test interventions in the home setting, particularly those incorporating parenting strategies and addressing environmental influences.

  13. Home-based specialized palliative care in patients with advanced cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordly, Mie; Vadstrup, Eva Soelberg; Sjøgren, Per; Kurita, Geana Paula

    2016-12-01

    Due to an urgent need for specialized palliative care (SPC) for patients with advanced cancer, an overview of available information on organization and outcomes of home-based SPC would be valuable. Our systematic review aims to give an overview of available information on the organization and outcomes of home-based SPC for patients with advanced cancer. Outcomes related to place of death, survival time, quality of life, performance status, and symptom management are included. A PICO process search strategy consisting of terms related to cancer, palliation, and home care was employed. The search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane from January 1, 2000, to January 27, 2015. A hand search of the reference lists of the included studies was also performed. A total of 5 articles (out of 2080 abstracts) were selected for analysis. Three additional studies were added by the hand search. Six observational and two interventional studies were evaluated. In all of these studies, the description of the SPC service was limited to the composition of the staff-no other organizational aspects were detailed. From 44 to 90% of the patients receiving home-based SPC died at home. Studies including survival and quality of life had divergent outcomes, and overall performance status did not improve. However, symptom control did improve over time. There is a lack of controlled clinical trials and organizational descriptions regarding home-based SPC for patients with advanced cancer, resulting in poor information and a lack of evidence. Generally, home-based SPC seems to have some positive effect on pain and dyspnea, but more high-quality studies are required.

  14. A Systematic Review of Home-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawole, Oluwakemi; Segal, Jodi; Wilson, Renee F.; Cheskin, Lawrence J.; Bleich, Sara N.; Wu, Yang; Lau, Brandyn; Wang, Youfa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Childhood obesity is a global epidemic. Despite emerging research about the role of the family and home on obesity risk behaviors, the evidence base for the effectiveness of home-based interventions on obesity prevention remains uncertain. The objective was to systematically review the effectiveness of home-based interventions on weight, intermediate (eg, diet and physical activity [PA]), and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, CINAHL, clinicaltrials.gov, and the Cochrane Library from inception through August 11, 2012. We included experimental and natural experimental studies with ≥1-year follow-up reporting weight-related outcomes and targeting children at home. Two independent reviewers screened studies and extracted data. We graded the strength of the evidence supporting interventions targeting diet, PA, or both for obesity prevention. RESULTS: We identified 6 studies; 3 tested combined interventions (diet and PA), 1 used diet intervention, 1 combined intervention with primary care and consumer health informatics components, and 1 combined intervention with school and community components. Select combined interventions had beneficial effects on fruit/vegetable intake and sedentary behaviors. However, none of the 6 studies reported a significant effect on weight outcomes. Overall, the strength of evidence is low that combined home-based interventions effectively prevent obesity. The evidence is insufficient for conclusions about home-based diet interventions or interventions implemented at home in association with other settings. CONCLUSIONS: The strength of evidence is low to support the effectiveness of home-based child obesity prevention programs. Additional research is needed to test interventions in the home setting, particularly those incorporating parenting strategies and addressing environmental influences. PMID:23753095

  15. Prospective study on cost-effectiveness of home-based motor assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, E; Mariscal, N; Solano, B; Becerra, V; Armesto, D; Calvo, S; Arribas, J; Seco, J; Martinez, A; Zorrilla, L; Heldman, D

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Treatment adjustments in Parkinson's disease (PD) are in part dependent on motor assessments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based motor monitoring plus standard in-office visits versus in-office visits alone in patients with advanced PD. Methods The procedures consisted of a prospective, one-year follow-up, randomized, case-control study. A total of 40 patients with advanced PD were randomized into two groups: 20 patients underwent home-based motor monitoring by using wireless motion sensor technology, while the other 20 patients had in-office visits. Motor and non-motor symptom severities, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and comorbidities were assessed every four months. Direct costs were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Both groups of PD patients were largely comparable in their clinical and demographic variables at baseline; however, there were more participants using levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel in the home-based motor monitoring group. There was a trend for lower Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale functional status (UPDRS II) scores in the patients monitored at home compared to the standard clinical follow-up ( p = 0.06). However, UPDRS parts I, III, IV and quality-adjusted life-years scores were similar between both groups. Home-based motor monitoring was cost-effective in terms of improvement of functional status, motor severity, and motor complications (UPDRS II, III; IV subscales), with an ICER/UPDRS ranging from €126.72 to €701.31, respectively. Discussion Home-based motor monitoring is a tool which collects cost-effective clinical information and helps augment health care for patients with advanced PD.

  16. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventing Stroke Deaths Progress Stalled Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... 4 states. 80% of strokes are preventable. Problem Stroke deaths have stopped declining. Strokes are common and ...

  17. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email updates Enter email Submit Heart Disease and Stroke Heart disease and stroke are important health issues ... Stroke risk factors View more Heart Disease and Stroke resources Related information Heart-healthy eating Stress and ...

  18. Stroke (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids With Special Needs Glasses and Contact Lenses Stroke KidsHealth > For Kids > Stroke Print A A A ... get help quickly. continue What Happens During a Stroke? A stroke usually happens suddenly, and a person ...

  19. Design, development and deployment of a hand/wrist exoskeleton for home-based rehabilitation after stroke - SCRIPT project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirabdollahian, F; Ates, Sedar; Basteris, A.; Cesario, A.; Buurke, Jaap; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Hofs, D.; Johansson, E.; Mountain, G.; Nasr, N.; Nijenhuis, S.M.; Prange, Grada Berendina; Rahman, N.; Sale, P.; Schätzlein, F.; van Schooten, B.; Stienen, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: this manuscript introduces the Supervised Care and Rehabilitation Involving Personal Tele-robotics (SCRIPT) project. The main goal is to demonstrate design and development steps involved in a complex intervention, while examining feasibility of using an instrumented orthotic device for

  20. Telemedicine, telehealth, and mobile health applications that work: opportunities and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Ronald S; Lopez, Ana Maria; Joseph, Bellal A; Erps, Kristine A; Holcomb, Michael; Barker, Gail P; Krupinski, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    There has been a spike in interest and use of telehealth, catalyzed recently by the anticipated implementation of the Affordable Care Act, which rewards efficiency in healthcare delivery. Advances in telehealth services are in many areas, including gap service coverage (eg, night-time radiology coverage), urgent services (eg, telestroke services and teleburn services), mandated services (eg, the delivery of health care services to prison inmates), and the proliferation of video-enabled multisite group chart rounds (eg, Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes programs). Progress has been made in confronting traditional barriers to the proliferation of telehealth. Reimbursement by third-party payers has been addressed in 19 states that passed parity legislation to guarantee payment for telehealth services. Medicare lags behind Medicaid, in some states, in reimbursement. Interstate medical licensure rules remain problematic. Mobile health is currently undergoing explosive growth and could be a disruptive innovation that will change the face of healthcare in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The relevance of Telehealth across the Digital Divide: The transfer of knowledge over distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; Schuring, R.W.; Michel-Verkerke, M.B.; Mugisha, Rueben; Michel-Verkerke, Margreet B.; Lagendijk, P.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of Relevance as an explanatory factor to the diffusion of ITuse, or, in this paper particularly, the use of Telehealth. Relevance is the net value of performance expectancy and effort expectancy and contains both micro-relevance (i.e. here-and-now) and macro-relevance

  2. Cost-effectiveness of telehealth interventions for chronic heart failure patients : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grustam, A.S.; Severens, J.L.; Nijnatten, J.; Koymans, R.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Evidence exists that telehealth interventions (e.g., telemonitoring, telediagnostics, telephone care) in disease management for chronic heart failure patients can improve medical outcomes, and we aim to give an overview of the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Methods: Based on

  3. Use of Telehealth for Research and Clinical Measures in Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michelle L.; Goehring, Jenny L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.; Diaz, Gina R.; Sanford, Todd; Harpster, Roger; Valente, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to compare clinical and research-based cochlear implant (CI) measures using telehealth versus traditional methods. Method: This prospective study used an ABA design (A = laboratory, B = remote site). All measures were made twice per visit for the purpose of assessing within-session variability. Twenty-nine adult…

  4. Steps to Offering Low Vision Rehabilitation Services through Clinical Video Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihirig, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth clinical applications, which allow medical professionals to use telecommunications technologies to provide services to individuals remotely, continue to expand in areas such as low vision rehabilitation, where evaluations are provided to patients who live in rural areas. As with face-to-face low vision rehabilitation, the goal of…

  5. Development of Standardized Clinical Training Cases for Diagnosis of Sexual Abuse using a Secure Telehealth Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasier, Lori D.; Thraen, Ioana; Kaplan, Rich; Goede, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The training of physicians, nurse examiners, social workers and other health professional on the evidentiary findings of sexual abuse in children is challenging. Our objective was to develop peer reviewed training cases for medical examiners of child sexual abuse, using a secure web based telehealth application (TeleCAM). Methods:…

  6. The Effect of Technology and Testing Environment on Speech Perception Using Telehealth with Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.; Valente, Daniel L.; McCreery, Ryan W.; Diaz, Gina R.; Sanford, Todd; Harpster, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors evaluated the effect of remote system and acoustic environment on speech perception via telehealth with cochlear implant recipients. Method: Speech perception was measured in quiet and in noise. Systems evaluated were Polycom visual concert (PVC) and a hybrid presentation system (HPS). Each system was evaluated…

  7. Factors affecting front line staff acceptance of telehealth technologies: a mixed-method systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Liz; Mountain, Gail; Wessels, Bridgette; Kelly, Ciara; Hawley, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To synthesize qualitative and quantitative evidence of front-line staff acceptance of the use of telehealth technologies for the management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Chronic Heart Failure. The implementation of telehealth at scale is a governmental priority in countries including the UK, USA and Canada, but little research has been conducted to analyse the impact of implementation on front-line nursing staff. Six relevant data bases were searched between 2000-2012. Mixed-method systematic review including all study designs. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination approach with thematic analysis and narrative synthesis of results. Fourteen studies met the review inclusion criteria; 2 quantitative surveys, 2 mixed-method studies and 10 using qualitative methods, including focus groups, interviews, document analysis and observations. Identified factors affecting staff acceptance centred on the negative impact of service change, staff-patient interaction, credibility and autonomy, and technical issues. Studies often contrasted staff and patient perspectives, and data about staff acceptance were collected as part of a wider study, rather than being the focus of data collection, meaning data about staff acceptance were limited. If telehealth is to be implemented, studies indicate that the lack of acceptance of this new way of working may be a key barrier. However, recommendations have not moved beyond barrier identification to recognizing solutions that might be implemented by front-line staff. Such solutions are imperative if future roll-out of telehealth technologies is to be successfully achieved. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Nature and Requirements of Work in University-Based Telehealth Units: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Telehealth units are one of many university administrative units created to foster innovation in universities over the last 40 years. Despite the proliferation of such units, few organizational studies have examined the work undertaken inside of these units. This qualitative study used a sequential two-part research design to understand the…

  9. Evaluation of telehealth service for patients with congestive heart failure in the north of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Golovner, Michal; Marcus, Ohad; Dayan, Mordechai; Sade, Zipi; Iktelat, Adel; Rothman, Johanna; Oppenheimer, Yoel

    2016-04-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the impact of a telehealth service on re-hospitalization of patients with congestive heart failure at New York Heart Association II-IV. The telehealth service for congestive heart failure patients was designed to follow the patients after their daily weighing and to provide a response in cases of non-compliance or deviation from baseline weight. A weighing scale was installed in the patient's house together with a communication module connected to the telemedicine control centre through a telephone line. The control centre is staffed by skilled nurses whose responses to patients are guided by programmed algorithm. Over a year, we evaluated the changes in the frequency of hospital admission and of primary care visits, and quality of life of 141 individuals who were eligible for the telehealth service for congestive heart failure. A decline was noted in the average number of hospitalizations per patient (from 4.7 to 2.6, p Failure Questionnaire). During the year of use in telehealth service for congestive heart failure parameters of hospitalization were improved, together with parameters of quality of life. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  10. Controversy clarified: an updated review of clinical psychology and tele-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perle, Jonathan G; Langsam, Leah C; Nierenberg, Barry

    2011-12-01

    One of the most controversial topics in the field of clinical psychology, online tele-health, or the integration of computers and the internet with therapeutic techniques, remains at the forefront of many debates. Despite potential interest, there are numerous factors that a psychologist must consider before integrating an online tele-health intervention into their own practice. This article outlines literature pertinent to the debate. The article begins with a brief history of the use of non-face-to-face interventions as well as the earliest recorded use of "tele-health" before discussing the modern benefits and risks associated with usage. Considerations for the psychologist as well as the client are detailed; incorporating ethical implications. The authors conclude that the utilization of tele-health interventions is an exponentially expanding field that should continue to be explored. Despite many well-conceived studies, a psychologist should educate themselves in all aspects of the new modes of intervention (e.g., ethical, legal, evidence-based treatments) before attempting to implement them into everyday practice. The article ends with a discussion on the acceptance among psychologists, as well as the outlook for the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Modeled Analysis of Telehealth Methods for Treating Pressure Ulcers after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Home telehealth can improve clinical outcomes for conditions that are common among patients with spinal cord injury (SCI. However, little is known about the costs and potential savings associated with its use. We developed clinical scenarios that describe common situations in treatment or prevention of pressure ulcers. We calculated the cost implications of using telehealth for each scenario and under a range of reasonable assumptions. Data were gathered primarily from US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA administrative records. For each scenario and treatment method, we multiplied probabilities, frequencies, and costs to determine the expected cost over the entire treatment period. We generated low-, medium-, and high-cost estimates based on reasonable ranges of costs and probabilities. Telehealth care was less expensive than standard care when low-cost technology was used but often more expensive when high-cost, interactive devices were installed in the patient’s home. Increased utilization of telehealth technology (particularly among rural veterans with SCI could reduce the incidence of stage III and stage IV ulcers, thereby improving veterans' health and quality of care without increasing costs. Future prospective studies of our present scenarios using patients with various healthcare challenges are recommended.

  12. 78 FR 76193 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... comments on the information collection required to obtain patient perspective on satisfaction with the CCHT... (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0481. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved...

  13. Telehealth: New Directions and Technology for Health Care Delivery in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas W.

    Advances in technology and health care delivery have included the use of telemedicine and telepsychology for crisis intervention, assessment, treatment, and education of patients. The use of telemedicine and telepsychology is examined for a variety of health care services to rural America. Telehealth has been considered a partial solution to the…

  14. 77 FR 13195 - Exempting In-Home Video Telehealth From Copayments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ...), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Clinical video telehealth uses real-time... the health care professional to make an examination requiring physical contact. However, in-home video... wound management, psychiatric or psychotherapeutic care, exercise plans, and medication management. The...

  15. 77 FR 13236 - Exempting In-Home Video Telehealth From Copayments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... established for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Clinical... physical contact. However, in-home video telehealth care is provided in a veteran's home, eliminating the..., exercise plans, and medication management. The clinician may also monitor patient self-care by reviewing...

  16. Case study: the use of telehealth technology in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    2012-11-01

    Self-care is a great concept and telehealth can give any patient with a long term condition the confidence to understand and manage their health better. Patients are usually surprised at how small the equipment is and how easy it is to use. Giving patients control provides peace of mind and enables nurses to work more efficiently and effectively.

  17. Communication Intervention for Young Children with Severe Neurodevelopmental Disabilities via Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simacek, Jessica; Dimian, Adele F.; McComas, Jennifer J.

    2017-01-01

    Young children with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and Rett syndrome often experience severe communication impairments. This study examined the efficacy of parent-implemented communication assessment and intervention with remote coaching via telehealth on the acquisition of early communication skills of three…

  18. EMG based FES for post-stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyus, Ceethal K.; Anjaly Cherian, V.; Nageswaran, Sharmila

    2017-11-01

    Annually, 15 million in world population experiences stroke. Nearly 9 million stroke survivors every year experience mild to severe disability. The loss of upper extremity function in stroke survivors still remains a major rehabilitation challenge. The proposed EMG Abstract—Annually, 15 million in world population experiences stroke. Nearly 9 million stroke survivors every year experience mild to severe disability. The loss of upper extremity function in stroke survivors still remains a major rehabilitation challenge. The proposed EMG based FES system can be used for effective upper limb motor re-education in post stroke upper limb rehabilitation. The governing feature of the designed system is its synchronous activation, in which the FES stimulation is dependent on the amplitude of the EMG signal acquired from the unaffected upper limb muscle of the hemiplegic patient. This proportionate operation eliminates the undesirable damage to the patient’s skin by generating stimulus in proportion to voluntary EMG signals. This feature overcomes the disadvantages of currently available manual motor re-education systems. This model can be used in home-based post stroke rehabilitation, to effectively improve the upper limb functions.

  19. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is an attractive alternative to no cardiac rehabilitation for elderly patients with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oerkild, Bodil; Frederiksen, Marianne; Hansen, Jorgen Fischer

    2012-01-01

    To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) with usual care (control group with no rehabilitation) in elderly patients who declined participation in centre-based CR.......To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) with usual care (control group with no rehabilitation) in elderly patients who declined participation in centre-based CR....

  20. Parental Perceptions of Child Care Quality in Centre-Based and Home-Based Settings: Associations with External Quality Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Joanne S.; Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how parental perceptions of child care quality were related to external quality ratings and considered how parental perceptions of quality varied according to child care context (home-based or centre-based settings). Parents of 179 4-year-old children who attended child care centres (n = 141) and home-based settings…

  1. The Role of Clinical and Geographic Factors in the Use of Hospital versus Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brual, Janette; Gravely, Shannon; Suskin, Neville; Stewart, Donna E.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is most often provided in a hospital setting. Home-based models of care have been developed to overcome geographic, among other, barriers in patients at a lower risk. This study assessed whether clinical and geographic factors were related to the use of either a hospital-based or a home-based program. Secondary analysis…

  2. Child Temperament and Home-Based Parent Involvement at Kindergarten Entry: Evidence from a Low-Income, Urban Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinjoo; O'Connor, Erin E.; McCormick, Meghan P.; McClowry, Sandee G.

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Home-based involvement--defined as the actions parents take to promote children's learning outside of school--is often the most efficient way for low-income parents to be involved with their children's education. However, there is limited research examining the factors predicting home-based involvement at kindergarten entry for…

  3. Associations of Caregiver Stress with Working Conditions, Caregiving Practices, and Child Behaviour in Home-Based Child Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura Backen; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Home-based child caregivers face unique stressors related to the nature of their work. One hundred and fifty-five home-based child care providers in Oregon, USA, participated in this cross-sectional correlational study. We investigated associations between indicators of caregiver stress and child care working conditions, the quality of caregiver…

  4. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity...... and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  5. Developing Next-Generation Telehealth Tools and Technologies: Patients, Systems, and Data Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P.; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehealth stakeholders, including patients, patient communities, research funders, researchers, healthcare services providers, professional societies, industry, healthcare management/economists, and healthcare policy makers. In the development, marketing, adoption, and implementation of these tools and technologies, communication, training, cultural sensitivity, and end-user customization are critical pieces to the process. Next-generation tools and technologies are vehicles toward personalized medicine, extending the telemedicine model to include cell phones and Internet-based telecommunications tools for remote and home health management with video assessment, remote bedside monitoring, and patient-specific care tools with event logs, patient electronic profile, and physician note-writing capability. Telehealth is ultimately a system of systems in scale and complexity. To cover the full spectrum of dynamic and evolving needs of end-users, we must appreciate system complexity as telehealth moves toward increasing functionality, integration, interoperability, outreach, and quality of service. Toward that end, our group addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are the high-impact topics? (2) What are the barriers to progress? and (3) What roles can the National Institutes of Health and its various institutes and centers play in fostering the future development of telehealth? PMID:20043711

  6. Developing next-generation telehealth tools and technologies: patients, systems, and data perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michael J; Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K

    2010-01-01

    The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehealth stakeholders, including patients, patient communities, research funders, researchers, healthcare services providers, professional societies, industry, healthcare management/economists, and healthcare policy makers. In the development, marketing, adoption, and implementation of these tools and technologies, communication, training, cultural sensitivity, and end-user customization are critical pieces to the process. Next-generation tools and technologies are vehicles toward personalized medicine, extending the telemedicine model to include cell phones and Internet-based telecommunications tools for remote and home health management with video assessment, remote bedside monitoring, and patient-specific care tools with event logs, patient electronic profile, and physician note-writing capability. Telehealth is ultimately a system of systems in scale and complexity. To cover the full spectrum of dynamic and evolving needs of end-users, we must appreciate system complexity as telehealth moves toward increasing functionality, integration, interoperability, outreach, and quality of service. Toward that end, our group addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are the high-impact topics? (2) What are the barriers to progress? and (3) What roles can the National Institutes of Health and its various institutes and centers play in fostering the future development of telehealth?

  7. Telehealth Measures Screening for Developmental Language Disorders in Spanish-Speaking Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark

    2016-09-01

    This is the second of two studies that described the use of telehealth language screening measures for use with young Spanish-speaking children. The purpose of this study was to describe the classification accuracy of individual telehealth language screening measures as well as the accuracy of combinations of measures used with Spanish-speaking toddler-age children from rural and underserved areas of the country. This study applied an asynchronous hybrid telehealth approach that implemented parent-structured play activities with a standard set of stimuli, and interaction with a My First Words e-book. These interactions were recorded with a mini camcorder. In addition, a traditional pen and paper parent questionnaire measure was collected. Sixty-two mostly Spanish-speaking preschool-age children and their parents participated. Twenty-two children had developmental language disorders (DLDs) and 40 had typical language development. Although several of the individual measures were significantly and strongly associated with standardized language scores, only reported vocabulary had classification accuracy values that were desirable for screening for DLDs. An improvement was observed when reported vocabulary was combined with a number of different words children produced during interactions with parents. This research provides additional evidence showing the effectiveness of a hybrid telehealth model in screening the language development of Spanish-speaking children. More specifically, reported vocabulary combined with number of different words produced by a child can provide informative and accurate diagnostic information when screening Spanish-speaking toddler-age children for DLDs. These findings replicate the first study in showing that hybrid telehealth approaches that combine the use of video technology and traditional pen and paper surveys yield strong results, and may be a viable screening alternative when face-to-face access to a bilingual provider is not

  8. Accuracy of Telehealth-Administered Measures to Screen Language in Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberson, Mark; Rodríguez, Barbara L; Zajacova, Anna

    2015-09-01

    There is a critical need for telehealth language screening measures for use with Spanish-speaking children because of the shortage of bilingual providers and the current lack of psychometrically sound measures that can be administered via telehealth. The purpose of the current study was to describe the classification accuracy of individual telehealth language screening measures as well as the accuracy of combinations of measures used with Spanish-speaking preschoolers from rural and underserved areas of the country. This study applied a hybrid telehealth approach that implemented synchronous videoconferencing, videocasting, and traditional pen and paper measures. Screening measures included a processing efficiency measure (Spanish nonword repetition [NWR]), language sampling, and a developmental language questionnaire. Eighty-two mostly Spanish-speaking preschool-age children and their parents participated. Thirty-four children had language impairment (LI), and 48 had typical language development. Although many of the individual measures were significantly associated with standardized language scores (r=0.27-0.55), not one of the measures had classification values of 0.8 or higher, which is recommended when screening for LI. However, when NWR scores were combined with language sample or parent survey measures, promising classification accuracy values that approached or were higher than 0.8 were obtained. This research provides preliminary evidence showing the effectiveness of a hybrid telehealth model in screening the language development of Spanish-speaking children. A processing efficiency measure, NWR, combined with a parent survey or language sample measure can provide informative and accurate diagnostic information when screening Spanish-speaking preschool-age children for LI.

  9. A systematic review of the use of telehealth in speech, language and hearing sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini-Avejonas, Daniela Regina; Rondon-Melo, Silmara; Amato, Cibelle Albuquerque de La Higuera; Samelli, Alessandra Giannella

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review to investigate the domain of speech-language and hearing sciences (SLHS) in telehealth. The databases used for the literature search were Web of Knowledge, Pubmed, Scopus, Embase and Scielo. The inclusion criteria consisted of papers published up to August 2014. Papers without peer-review evaluation, and those without abstracts or available full texts were excluded. A total of 103 papers were selected. The selected studies have focused primarily on hearing (32.1%), followed by speech (19.4%), language (16.5%), voice (8.7%), swallowing (5.8%), multiple areas (13.6%) and others (3.9%). The majority of the studies focused on assessment (36.9%) or intervention (36.9%). The use of telehealth in SLHS has been increasing in many countries, especially in the last 5 years. The country with the largest number of published studies was the United States of America (32.03%), followed by Australia (29.12%). The remaining studies were distributed in lower numbers among other countries. The advancement of information and communication technologies provides more favourable conditions for providing distance care in several areas. Most of studies concluded that the telehealth procedure had advantages over the non-telehealth alternative approach (85.5%); however, 13.6% reported that it was unclear whether the telehealth procedure had advantages. Some barriers still need to be overcome, such as technology, training, regulation, acceptance and recognition of the benefits of this practice by the public and professionals. The need for speech-language pathologists and audiologists to adapt to this new health care modality is evident. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Bauru School of Dentistry Tele-Health League: an educational strategy applied to research, teaching and extension among applications in tele-health

    Science.gov (United States)

    da SILVA, Andressa Sharllene Carneiro; RIZZANTE, Fabio Antonio Piola; PICOLINI, Mirela Machado; de CAMPOS, Karis; CORRÊA, Camila de Castro; FRANCO, Elen Caroline; PARDO-FANTON, Cássia de Souza; BLASCA, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; BERRETIN-FELIX, Giédre

    2011-01-01

    Tele-health is more than an innovative alternative; it is an excellent tool that enables access to health and education in health, making it possible to minimize distances, optimize time and reduce costs. Based on these advantages, some Brazilian Universities have used these actions in strategies of education, research and extension, aiming at the application of Tele-health in Brazil. In that way, the Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo (FOB-USP) has applied the use of information and communication technologies in health by means of a "Tele-Health League" (TL), in order to diagnose, prevent and treat diseases, in addition to educate the population and health services. Objective The present study aims to introduce the characteristics of the Tele-Health League of FOB-USP, as well as the development of its projects. Material and Methods The Tele-Health League consisted as a Diffusion Course approved by the Provost of Culture and Academic Extension of the University of São Paulo. It is composed as a large group enclosing professoriate coordinator, academician principal, contributing professors and league members, those, diversified between undergraduates students, graduated, health employees, technology and information areas. The participant members are evaluated by the presence frequency (minimum of 85%), and by the performance of tests and paperwork about the theoretical content provided. Results In four years of activities, the TLFOB-USP obtained a high satisfaction index (90%), an increased number of vacancies due to the interest to become a member, more commitment of the professors of the University and the accomplishment of association with other Brazilian leagues. It is emphasized that the approval percentage of the course results in approval from approximately half of its members. Also, it is important to identify and repair the causes related to the quitting of some members. Conclusions The results showed that the TLFOB-USP members, adjoining

  11. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke: Hope Through Research Questions and Answers About Stroke What is a stroke? A stroke occurs when blood flow to the ... need to function. What are the types of strokes? A stroke can occur in two ways. In ...

  12. The process flow and structure of an integrated stroke strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. van Bussel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the Canadian province of Alberta access and quality of stroke care were suboptimal, especially in remote areas. The government introduced the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy (APSS in 2005, an integrated strategy to improve access to stroke care, quality and efficiency which utilizes telehealth. Research question: What is the process flow and the structure of the care pathways of the APSS?Methodology: Information for this article was obtained using documentation, archival APSS records, interviews with experts, direct observation and participant observation.Results: The process flow is described. The APSS integrated evidence-based practice, multidisciplinary communication, and telestroke services. It includes regular quality evaluation and improvement.Conclusion: Access, efficiency and quality of care improved since the start of the APSS across many domains, through improvement of expertise and equipment in small hospitals, accessible consultation of stroke specialists using telestroke, enhancing preventive care, enhancing multidisciplinary collaboration, introducing uniform best practice protocols and bypass-protocols for the emergency medical services.Discussion: The APSS overcame substantial obstacles to decrease discrepancies and to deliver integrated higher quality care. Telestroke has proven itself to be safe and feasible. The APSS works efficiently, which is in line to other projects worldwide, and is, based on limited results, cost effective. Further research on cost-effectiveness is necessary.

  13. The process flow and structure of an integrated stroke strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. van Bussel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the Canadian province of Alberta access and quality of stroke care were suboptimal, especially in remote areas. The government introduced the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy (APSS in 2005, an integrated strategy to improve access to stroke care, quality and efficiency which utilizes telehealth. Research question: What is the process flow and the structure of the care pathways of the APSS? Methodology: Information for this article was obtained using documentation, archival APSS records, interviews with experts, direct observation and participant observation. Results: The process flow is described. The APSS integrated evidence-based practice, multidisciplinary communication, and telestroke services. It includes regular quality evaluation and improvement. Conclusion: Access, efficiency and quality of care improved since the start of the APSS across many domains, through improvement of expertise and equipment in small hospitals, accessible consultation of stroke specialists using telestroke, enhancing preventive care, enhancing multidisciplinary collaboration, introducing uniform best practice protocols and bypass-protocols for the emergency medical services. Discussion: The APSS overcame substantial obstacles to decrease discrepancies and to deliver integrated higher quality care. Telestroke has proven itself to be safe and feasible. The APSS works efficiently, which is in line to other projects worldwide, and is, based on limited results, cost effective. Further research on cost-effectiveness is necessary.

  14. Infectious Diseases Society of America Position Statement on Telehealth and Telemedicine as Applied to the Practice of Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Javeed; Herchline, Thomas; Kahlon, Summerpal; Moyer, Kay J; Scott, John D; Wood, Brian R; Young, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    The use of telehealth and telemedicine offers powerful tools for delivering clinical care, conducting medical research, and enhancing access to infectious diseases physicians. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has prepared a position statement to educate members on the use of telehealth and telemedicine technologies. The development of telehealth and telemedicine programs requires the consideration of several issues such as HIPAA, state and local licensure requirements, credentialing and privileging, scope of care, quality, and responsibility and liability. IDSA supports appropriate use of telehealth and telemedicine to provide timely, cost-effective specialty care to resource-limited populations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs.

  16. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke.......This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  17. Telehealth language assessments using consumer grade equipment in rural and urban settings: Feasible, reliable and well tolerated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Rebecca; Trembath, David; Hodge, Antoinette; Drevensek, Suzi; Lee, Sabrena; Silove, Natalie; Roberts, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Telehealth can be an effective way to provide speech pathology intervention to children with speech and language impairments. However, the provision of reliable and feasible standardised language assessments via telehealth to establish children's needs for intervention and to monitor progress has not yet been well established. Further, there is limited information about children's reactions to telehealth. This study aimed to examine the reliability and feasibility of conducting standardised language assessment with school-aged children with known or suspected language impairment via a telehealth application using consumer grade computer equipment within a public school setting. Method Twenty-three children (aged 8-12 years) participated. Each child was assessed using a standardised language assessment comprising six subtests. Two subtests were administered by a speech pathologist face-to-face (local clinician) and four subtests were administered via telehealth. All subtests were completed within a single visit to the clinic service, with a break between the face to face and telehealth sessions. The face-to-face clinician completed behaviour observation checklists in the telehealth and face to face conditions and provided feedback on the audio and video quality of the application from the child's point of view. Parent feedback about their child's experience was elicited via survey. Results There was strong inter-rater reliability in the telehealth and face-to-face conditions (correlation coefficients ranged from r = 0.96-1.0 across the subtests) and good agreement on all measures. Similar levels of attention, distractibility and anxiety were observed in the two conditions. Clinicians rated only one session of 23 as having poor audio quality and no sessions were rated as having poor visual quality. Parent and child reactions to the use of telehealth were largely positive and supportive of using telehealth to assess rural children. Discussion The

  18. Economic modelling of telehealth substitution of face-to-face specialist outpatient consultations for Queensland correctional facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Monica; Caffery, Liam J; Scuffham, Paul A; Smith, Anthony C

    2017-11-28

    Objective The provision of healthcare services to inmates in correctional facilities is costly and resource-intensive. This study aimed to estimate the costs of transporting prisoners from 11 Queensland correctional facilities to the Princess Alexandra Hospital Secure Unit (PAHSU) in Brisbane for non-urgent specialist outpatient consultations and identify the cost consequences that would result from the substitution of face-to-face visits with telehealth consultations.Methods A 12-month retrospective review of patient activity at the PAHSU was conducted to obtain the number of transfers per correctional facility. The total cost of transfers was calculated with estimates for transport vehicle costs and correctional staff escort wages, per diem and accommodation costs. A cost model was developed to estimate the potential cost savings from substituting face-to-face consultations with telehealth consultations. A sensitivity analysis on the cost variables was conducted. Costs are reported from a government funding perspective and presented in 2016 Australian dollars (A$).Results There were 3539 inmate appointments from July 2015 to June 2016 at the PAHSU, primarily for imaging, general practice, and orthopaedics. Telehealth may result in cost savings from negligible to A$969731, depending on the proportion, and travel distance, of face-to-face consultations substituted by telehealth. Wages of correctional staff were found to be the most sensitive variable.Conclusions Under the modelled conditions, telehealth may reduce the cost of providing specialist outpatient consultations to prisoners in Queensland correctional facilities. Telehealth may improve the timeliness of services to a traditionally underserved population.What is known about the topic? Specialist medical services are located in only a few metropolitan centres across Australia, which requires some populations to travel long distances to attend appointments. Some face-to-face specialist outpatient

  19. Effect of early progressive resistance training compared with home-based exercise after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Søballe, Kjeld

    /week). The IG trained with loads of 10 repetition maximum from week 1 to 10 after THR. Before surgery and after the intervention, performance was evaluated by leg extension power (primary outcome), isometric strength (hip abduction + flexion), sit-to-stand test (STS), stair test and 20 meter walking speed......Introduction Muscle strength and physical function deficits persist after total hip replacement (THR). Training effect evidence after THR is lacking. This study investigates the effect of supervised progressive resistance training in early post-THR rehabilitation on muscle strength and functional...... performance. Material and Method 73 THR patients with preoperative self-assessed disability (HOOS ADL score≤67) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG, home-based exercise 7 days/week) or an intervention group (IG, home-based exercise 5 days/week and resistance training of hip and thigh muscles 2 days...

  20. Twenty weeks of home-based interactive training of children with cerebral palsy improves functional abilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Greve, Line Z; Kliim-Due, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Home-based training is becoming ever more important with increasing demands on the public health systems. We investigated whether individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet improves functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy...... (CP). METHODS: Thirty four children with CP (aged 9-16; mean age 10.9 ± 2.4 years) (GMFCS I-II; MACS I-II) were included in this non-randomized controlled clinical training study. 12 children (aged 7-16; mean age: 11.3+/-0.9 years) were allocated to a control group in which measurements were performed...... home training of children with CP is an efficient way to deliver training, which can enable functional motor improvements and increased activity to perform daily activities. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN13188513 . Date of registration: 04/12/2014....

  1. Older persons' experiences of a home-based exercise program with behavioral change support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkkukangas, Marina; Sundler, Annelie J; Söderlund, Anne; Eriksson, Staffan; Johansson, Ann-Christin

    2017-12-01

    It is a challenge to promote exercise among older persons. Knowledge is needed regarding the maintenance of exercise aiming at preventing falls and promoting health and well-being in older persons. This descriptive study used a qualitative inductive approach to describe older persons' experiences of a fall-preventive, home-based exercise program with support for behavioral change. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 elderly persons aged 75 years or older, and a qualitative content analysis was performed. Four categories emerged: facilitators of performing exercise in everyday life, the importance of support, perceived gains from exercise, and the existential aspects of exercise. With support from physiotherapists (PTs), home-based exercise can be adapted to individual circumstances in a meaningful way. Including exercises in everyday life and daily routines could support the experience of being stronger, result in better physical functioning, and give hope for an extended active life in old age.

  2. Dyadic psychological intervention for patients with cancer and caregivers in home-based specialized palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Heymann-Horan, Annika B.; Puggaard, Louise B.; Nissen, Kathrine G.

    2017-01-01

    and psychological interventions offered according to need. Its main limitation was a lack of an intervention for other family members. Significance of Results:: Our results show that psychological intervention can be systematically integrated into SPC and that it appears feasible to provide dyadic needs......Objective:: Patients with incurable cancer and their informal caregivers have numerous psychological and psychosocial needs. Many of these patients wish to receive their care and die at home. Few home-based specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions systematically integrate psychological...... support. We present a psychological intervention for patient–caregiver dyads developed for an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT) of home-based SPC, known as Domus, as well as the results of an assessment of its acceptability and feasibility. Method:: The Domus model of SPC for patients...

  3. Home-based specialized palliative care in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordly, Mie; Vadstrup, Eva Soelberg; Sjøgren, Per

    2016-01-01

    on the organization and outcomes of home-based SPC for patients with advanced cancer. Outcomes related to place of death, survival time, quality of life, performance status, and symptom management are included. METHOD: A PICO process search strategy consisting of terms related to cancer, palliation, and home care......OBJECTIVE: Due to an urgent need for specialized palliative care (SPC) for patients with advanced cancer, an overview of available information on organization and outcomes of home-based SPC would be valuable. Our systematic review aims to give an overview of available information...... was employed. The search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane from January 1, 2000, to January 27, 2015. A hand search of the reference lists of the included studies was also performed. RESULTS: A total of 5 articles (out of 2080 abstracts) were selected for analysis. Three additional studies were...

  4. Overcoming the tyranny of distance: An audit of process and outcomes from a pilot telehealth spinal assessment clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Matthew; Orlando, Joseph F; Kumar, Saravana

    2017-09-01

    Introduction There is consistent evidence to indicate people living in rural and remote regions have limited access to healthcare and poorer health outcomes. One way to address this inequity is through innovative models of care such as telehealth. The aim of this pilot trial was to determine the feasibility, appropriateness and access to a telehealth clinic. In this pilot trial, the telehealth clinic outcomes are compared with the outreach clinic. Both models of care are commonly utilised means of providing healthcare to meet the needs of people living in rural and remote regions. Methods A prospective audit was conducted on a Spinal Assessment Clinic Telehealth pilot trial for patients with spinal disorders requiring non-urgent surgical consultation. Data were recorded from all consultations managed using videoconferencing technology between the Royal Adelaide Hospital and Port Augusta Community Health Service, South Australia between September 2013 and January 2014. Outcomes included analysis of process, service activity, clinical actions, safety and costs. Data were compared to a previous spinal assessment outreach clinic in the same area between August and December 2012. Results There were 25 consultations with 22 patients over the five-month telehealth pilot trial. Spinal disorders were predominantly of the lumbar region (88%); the majority of initial consultations (64%) were discharged to the general practitioner. There were three requests for further imaging, five for minor interventions and three for other specialist/surgical consultation. Patient follow-up post telehealth pilot trial revealed no adverse outcomes. The total cost of AUD$11,187 demonstrated a 23% reduction in favour of the spinal assessment telehealth pilot trial, with the greatest savings in travel costs. Discussion The telehealth model of care demonstrated the efficient management of patients with spinal disorders in rural regions requiring non-urgent surgical consultation at low costs with

  5. Clinics and home-based care organisations: an interface between theformal and informal health sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Adam Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    The article outlines the findings of a study designed to explore the working relationship between home-based caregivers and clinic nurses at locations in two informal settlements in Johannesburg, South Africa. By considering the views and experiences of both sponsored and unsponsored caregivers, the research focused on how degrees of informality affect this relationship. The nurse/caregiver relationship represents a primary interface between the formal and informal health sectors and is an important part of the country's primary healthcare system. Despite the attention given to linking home-based care (HBC) with the formal health system, very little research has examined the functionality of this link at the ground level. Through a number of qualitative, semi-structured interviews with nurses, home-based caregivers, and staff from the Department of Health, information was collected to better understand what systems are in place to facilitate the relationship between clinics and HBC organisations, and whether these systems are helping to create the desired results. Do the formal and informal health sectors complement and strengthen or do they distract and damage each other? By examining the influence of degrees of informality, the research also lends insight into how this distinction plays a role in healthcare provision. For instance, how does state support impact the link between the formal and informal health sectors and the ultimate quality of care? And what steps can be taken to improve the health system in this regard, as a whole? The findings point to a number of problems and challenges with integrating HBC into the formal health sector. Degrees of informality are found to have a profound impact on the work of home-based caregivers in some respects, but a surprising lack of impact in others. These issues need to be confronted in order to improve the existing system and, ultimately, health outcomes in South Africa.

  6. Using Child-Parent Psychotherapy in a Home-Based Program Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jennifer; Smith, Mae

    2015-01-01

    This article tells the story of a single mother, Maria, who has a history of trauma, and her 2-year-old daughter, Lina, as they learn, play, and heal together through the use of Child-Parent Psychotherapy, an evidenced-based, trauma-informed therapeutic intervention in a home-based program model. Through the power of play, Maria and Lina are able…

  7. The Effect of Home-based Daily Journal Writing in Korean Adolescents with Smartphone Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyuk; Seo, Min Jae; Choi, Tae Young

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits of smartphones, many adverse effects have emerged. However, to date, there was no particular approach to treat or prevent smartphone addiction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of a home-based daily journal of smartphone use (HDJ-S) in Korean adolescents. Three hundred thirty five middle school students participated in this study. The severity of smartphone addiction was measured using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale. The...

  8. Muscle Strength Enhancement Following Home-Based Virtual Cycling Training in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n = 13) or a…

  9. Home-based primary care practices in the United States: current state and quality improvement approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Bruce; Weston, Christine M; Garrigues, Sarah; Patel, Kanan; Ritchie, Christine

    2015-05-01

    To describe the characteristics of home-based primary care practices: staffing, administrative, population served, care practices, and quality of care challenges. Survey of home-based primary care practices. Home-based primary care practices in the United States. Members of the American Academy of Home Care Medicine and nonmember providers identified by surveyed members. A 58-item questionnaire that assessed practice characteristics, care provided by the practice, and how the quality of care that the practice provided was assessed. Survey response rate was 47.9%, representing 272 medical house calls practices. Mean average daily census was 457 patients (median 100 patients, range 1-30,972 patients). Eighty-eight percent of practices offered around-the-clock coverage for urgent concerns, 60% held regularly scheduled team meetings, 89% used an electronic medical record, and one-third used a defined quality improvement process. The following factors were associated with practices that used a defined quality improvement process: practice holds regularly scheduled team meetings to discuss specific patients (odds ratio (OR)=2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02-4.21), practice conducts surveys of patients (OR=8.53, 95% CI=4.07-17.88), and practice is involved in National Committee for Quality Assurance patient-centered medical home (OR=3.27, 95% CI=1.18-9.07). Ninety percent of practices would or might participate in quality improvement activities that would provide them timely feedback on patient and setting-appropriate quality indicators. There is a substantial heterogeneity of home-based primary care practice types. Most practices perform activities that lend themselves to robust quality improvement efforts, and nearly all indicated interest in a national registry to inform quality improvement. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Caring Relationships in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person’s genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses’ experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person’s position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology. PMID:23894261

  11. Home-based treadmill training improved seminal quality in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosety-Rodriguez, M; Rosety, J M; Fornieles, G; Rosety, M A; Diaz, A J; Rosety, I; Rodríguez-Pareja, A; Rosety, M; Ordonez, F J; Elosegui, S

    2014-11-01

    This was the first study conducted to determine the influence of home-based treadmill training on seminal quality in adults with type 2 diabetes. Sixty sedentary adults with type 2 diabetes volunteered for the current study. Thirty were randomly allocated to the intervention group and performed a a 14-week, home-based, treadmill training program, 3 sessions per week, consisting of a warm-up (10-15min), 40min treadmill exercise at a work intensity of 55-70% of peak heart rate (increasing by 2.5% each two weeks) measured during a maximal treadmill test, and cooling-down (5-10min). The control group included 30, age and BMI matched adults with type 2 diabetes who did not take part in any training program. Seminal quality analysis included semen volume, sperm concentration, motility and normal morphologic features. Furthermore, total antioxidant status (TAS) as well as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity were assessed in seminal plasma. This protocol was approved by an Institutional Ethics Committee. The home-based treadmill training significantly increased sperm concentration as well as percentages of total sperm motility and normal spermatozoa. Furthermore, TAS and GPX activity were increased after the completion of the training program. No significant changes in any of the measured variables were found in the control group. Home-based treadmill training improved seminal quality in adults with type 2 diabetes. A secondary finding was that seminal antioxidant defense system was significantly increased after being exercised. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematic review of outcomes from home-based primary care programs for homebound older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, Nathan; Nowaczynski, Mark; Sinha, Samir K

    2014-12-01

    To describe the effect of home-based primary care for homebound older adults on individual, caregiver, and systems outcomes. A systematic review of home-based primary care interventions for community-dwelling older adults (aged ≥65) using the Cochrane, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases from the earliest available date through March 15, 2014. Studies were included if the house calls visitor was the ongoing primary care provider and if the intervention measured emergency department visits, hospitalizations, hospital beds days of care, long-term care admissions, or long-term care bed days of care. Home-based primary care programs. Homebound community-dwelling older adults (N = 46,154). Emergency department visits, hospitalizations, hospital bed days of care, long-term care admissions, long-term care bed days of care, costs, program design, and individual and caregiver quality of life and satisfaction with care. Of 357 abstracts identified, nine met criteria for review. The nine interventions were all based in North America, with five emerging from the Veterans Affairs system. Eight of nine programs demonstrated substantial effects on at least one inclusion outcome, with seven programs affecting two outcomes. Six interventions shared three core program components: interprofessional care teams, regular interprofessional care meetings, and after-hours support. Specifically designed home-based primary care programs may substantially affect individual, caregiver and systems outcomes. Adherence to the core program components identified in this review could guide the development and spread of these programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Home-based enterprise in social housing: enhancing the quality of life of residents?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matsebe, G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available range of Home-based enterprises in social housing developments Gertrude Matsebe 4 activities which may change throughout the day as well as seasonally (ibid). All these changes can be made with minimal cost and inconvenience. Despite... the business (2-in-1 facility), which in the long run would be economically viable for the owner. In spite of the opportunities presented by HBEs, it was found that some residents were pessimistic about them. 3.2.2. Resistance The resistance...

  14. Wildcat wellness coaching feasibility trial: protocol for home-based health behavior mentoring in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, Brooke J; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Dzewaltowski, David A; Teeman, Colby S; Knutson, Cassandra K; Rosenkranz, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health problem, with one third of America's children classified as either overweight or obese. Obesity prevention and health promotion programs using components such as wellness coaching and home-based interventions have shown promise, but there is a lack of published research evaluating the impact of a combined home-based and wellness coaching intervention for obesity prevention and health promotion in young girls. The main objective of this study is to test the feasibility of such an intervention on metrics related to recruitment, intervention delivery, and health-related outcome assessments. The secondary outcome is to evaluate the possibility of change in health-related psychosocial, behavioral, and biomedical outcomes in our sample of participants. Forty girls who are overweight or obese (aged 8-13 years) will be recruited from a Midwestern college town. Participants will be recruited through posted flyers, newspaper advertisements, email, and social media. The volunteer convenience sample of girls will be randomized to one of two home-based wellness coaching interventions: a general health education condition or a healthy eating physical activity skills condition. Trained female wellness coaches will conduct weekly hour-long home visits for 12 consecutive weeks. Assessments will occur at baseline, post-intervention (3 months after baseline), and follow-up (6 months after baseline) and will include height, weight, waist circumference, body composition, pulmonary function, blood pressure, systemic inflammation, physical activity (Actical accelerometer), and self-reported survey measures (relevant to fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and quality of life). This study will evaluate the feasibility of home-based wellness coaching interventions for overweight and obese girls and secondarily assess the preliminary impact on health-related psychosocial, behavioral, and biomedical outcomes. Results will provide

  15. Balance training in individuals with Parkinson's disease: Therapist-supervised vs. home-based exercise programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atterbury, Elizabeth Maria; Welman, Karen Estelle

    2017-06-01

    Poor locomotion and balance in Parkinson's disease (PD) often diminishes independence. Accordingly, gait is considered one of the most relevant rehabilitation outcomes, and home-based balance exercises might be a viable mode of exercise delivery for individuals with PD. However, research on PD interventions rarely indicate best practices to deliver exercises. Therefore, this study endeavoured to compare the efficacy of a home-based and therapist-supervised balance programme on gait parameters, dynamic balance, balance confidence and motivation in individuals diagnosed with PD. An experimental study design, including a cluster randomized convenience sample, of 40 participants with idiopathic PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage I-III; age: 65.0±7.7years). Participants were divided into a therapist-supervised (n=24) and home-based group (n=16). Groups received either eight weeks of balance training with an exercise therapist or a DVD. Outcome measures include the instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go, Functional Gait Analysis (FGA), Activity-specific Balance confidence (ABC) scale and Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI). Both groups improved in stride length (pexercise therapist included somewhat more benefits after the intervention i.e. stride velocity and cadence in individuals with mild to moderate PD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Peer tutoring with or without home-based reinforcement, for reading remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, J; Bucher, B

    1980-01-01

    An operant-based corrective reading program was established to study effectiveness of peer tutoring in the school, for reading deficient children. Sixty-nine second to fourth grade students were matched on measures of initial reading ability and level of reading retardation, and randomly assigned to three groups: Peer Tutoring Only, Peer Tutoring with Home Based Reinforcement, and Control. SRA materials were used in training for the experimental groups, supplemented with additional reading materials. The program continued for 15 weeks, in seven public schools. Changes in oral reading accuracy and comprehansion were assessed. Both reading and comprehension were significantly increased by peer tutoring, relative to the control group. The addition of home-based reinforcement doubled this increase. The measured gain in oral reading, based upon standardized testing, was 0.19 years for the controls and 1.27 years for peer tutoring with home-based reinforcement. Internal measures of gain showed similar results, and comprehension gains were also comparable. A high rate of compliance with the tutoring program was maintained by the tutors. High ratings of satisfaction were obtained for the program, from all groups of participants. The feasibility of the program for application in the school system is discussed.

  17. Outpatient vs. home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes de Oliveira Júlio C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common cause of morbidity and mortality affecting a large number of individuals in both developed and developing countries and it represents a significant financial burden for patients, families and society. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR is a multidisciplinary program that integrates components of exercise training, education, nutritional support, psychological support and self-care, resulting in an improvement in dyspnea, fatigue and quality of life. Despite its proven effectiveness and the strong scientific recommendations for its routine use in the care of COPD, PR is generally underutilized and strategies for increasing access to PR are needed. Home-based self-monitored pulmonary rehabilitation is an alternative to outpatient rehabilitation. In the present study, patients with mild, moderate and severe COPD submitted to either an outpatient or at-home PR program for 12 weeks were analyzed. Methods Patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomized into three distinct groups: an outpatient group who performed all activities at the clinic, a home-based group who performed the activities at home and a control group. PR consisted of a combination of aerobic exercises and strengthening of upper and lower limbs 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Results There was a significant difference in the distance covered on the six-minute walk test (p Conclusion A home-based self-monitoring pulmonary rehabilitation program is as effective as outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation and is a valid alternative for the management of patients with COPD.

  18. Exercise adherence during home-based functional electrical stimulation cycling by individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbow, David R; Gorgey, Ashraf S; Ketchum, Jessica M; Moore, Jewel R; Hackett, Laurel A; Gater, David R

    2012-11-01

    The typically sedentary spinal cord injured population has limited physical activity options because of muscle paralysis, difficulties in transportation, and barriers to access rehabilitation/wellness facilities. It is important to investigate physical activity alternatives to increase physical activity levels and decrease the risk of inactivity-derived diseases. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a home-based functional electrical stimulation cycling program on exercise adherence of those with spinal cord injury. Seventeen Veterans with posttraumatic C4-T11 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A-C spinal cord injury participated in two 8-wk exercise periods of home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling. Exercise adherence and the effects of six factors thought to influence exercise adherence were studied during both exercise periods. Exercise adherence rates for exercise periods 1 and 2 were 71.7% and 62.9%, respectively. Age, history of exercise, and pain not associated with the exercise activity were determined to have significant impact on exercise adherence rates. Exercise adherence rates were well above the reported 35% in the able-bodied population, which provides evidence for the feasibility of a home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling program. Younger adults with a history of being physically active have the highest potential for exercise adherence.

  19. Home-Based Early Intervention and the Influence of Family Resources on Cognitive Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bann, Carla M; Wallander, Jan L; Do, Barbara; Thorsten, Vanessa; Pasha, Omrana; Biasini, Fred J; Bellad, Roopa; Goudar, Shivaprasad; Chomba, Elwyn; McClure, Elizabeth; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether early developmental intervention (EDI) can positively affect the trajectories of cognitive development among children from low-resource families. Longitudinal analyses were conducted of data from 293 children in the Brain Research to Ameliorate Impaired Neurodevelopment Home-based Intervention Trial, a randomized controlled trial of a home-based EDI program, to examine trajectories of Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Second Edition Mental Development Index (MDI) scores from 12 to 36 months of age among young children from high- and low-resource families in 3 low- to middle-resource countries. A 3-way interaction among family resources, intervention group, and age was statistically significant after controlling for maternal, child, and birth characteristics (Wald χ(2)(1) = 9.41, P = .002). Among children of families with high resources, both the intervention and control groups had significant increases in MDI scores over time (P home-based EDI during the first 3 years of life can substantially decrease the developmental gap between children from families with lower versus higher resources, even among children in low- to middle-resource countries. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. [Sociability networks: approaches based on home-based therapeutic care services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiles, Carmen Terezinha Leal; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Willrich, Janaína Quinzen; Antonacci, Milena Hohmann; Coimbra, Valéria Cristina Christello

    2013-07-01

    Home-based therapeutic services emerge in the context of psychiatric reform in Brazil, as a step forward in the policy of de-institutionalization, as well as being essential services to overcome custody practices, typical of the asylum model. These services provide spaces for care, welcome and decent housing for people whose family and social ties have been affected by internment in psychiatric hospitals. The article seeks to evaluate the sociability network of users of home-based therapeutic services in Alegrete in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, based on a case report. This study is part of the research on 'Networks that Rehabilitate'--evaluating innovative experiments in the composition of psychosocial care networks. Data from semi-structured interviews with the six workers of the service were used. It was observed that the service provides unique and innovative experience to find solutions that bring people with long periods of psychiatric hospitalization back together with their family, the community and city life, thereby eliminating the segregation to which they were subjected. Coaching residents and workers in the creation of home-based therapeutic care services reveals the potential to reintegrate mentally handicapped patients into society.

  1. National Survey of Emergency Physicians Concerning Home-Based Care Options as Alternatives to Emergency Department-Based Hospital Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Amy R; Crowley, Christopher; Killeen, James; Castillo, Edward M

    2017-11-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) in the United States play a prominent role in hospital admissions, especially for the growing population of older adults. Home-based care, rather than hospital admission from the ED, provides an important alternative, especially for older adults who have a greater risk of adverse events, such as hospital-acquired infections, falls, and delirium. The objective of the survey was to understand emergency physicians' (EPs) perspectives on home-based care alternatives to hospitalization from the ED. Specific goals included determining how often EPs ordered home-based care, what they perceive as the barriers and motivators for more extensive ordering of home-based care, and the specific conditions and response times most appropriate for such care. A group of 1200 EPs nationwide were e-mailed a six-question survey. Participant response was 57%. Of these, 55% reported ordering home-based care from the ED within the past year as an alternative to hospital admission or observation, with most doing so less than once per month. The most common barrier was an "unsafe or unstable home environment" (73%). Home-based care as a "better setting to care for low-acuity chronic or acute disease exacerbation" was the top motivator (79%). Medical conditions EPs most commonly considered for home-based care were cellulitis, urinary tract infection, diabetes, and community-acquired pneumonia. Results suggest that EPs recognize there is a benefit to providing home-based care as an alternative to hospitalization, provided they felt the home was safe and a process was in place for dispositioning the patient to this setting. Better understanding of when and why EPs use home-based care pathways from the ED may provide suggestions for ways to promote wider adoption. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hospital at home: home-based end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Straus, Sharon E; Wee, Bee

    2016-02-18

    The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and people with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end-of-life care at home. This is the fourth update of the original review. To determine if providing home-based end-of-life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients' symptoms, quality of life, health service costs, and caregivers, compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. We searched the following databases until April 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (from 1950), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1982), and EconLit (from 1969). We checked the reference lists of potentially relevant articles identified and handsearched palliative care publications, clinical trials registries, and a database of systematic reviews for related trials (PDQ-Evidence 2015). Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series, or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end-of-life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible, we reported the results from individual studies. We included four trials in this review and did not identify new studies from the search in April 2015. Home-based end-of-life care increased the likelihood of dying at home compared with usual care (risk ratio (RR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi(2) = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I(2) = 0%; 3 trials; N = 652; high quality evidence). Admission to hospital while receiving home-based end-of-life care varied between trials, and this was

  3. HIV/aids related home based care practices among primary health care workers in Ogun state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Amoran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS is fast becoming a chronic disease with the advent of antiretroviral drugs, therefore making home based care key in the management of chronically ill HIV/AIDS patient. The objective of this study was to determine the perception and practice of health care workers on HIV/AIDS related home based care in the health facilities in Ogun state, Nigeria. Methods This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to obtain a representative sample of the primary health care workers in Ogun state. An interviewer administered structured questionnaire was administered by trained health workers to elicit the required information. Result A total of 350 health care workers were interviewed, 70% of the respondents could adequately describe the components of home based care. Only 38.7% were aware of the National guideline on home based care practices and 17.1% believe that home based care will not significantly improve the prognosis of PLWAs. Few 19.1% had ever been trained or ever involved 16.6% in home based care practices. Only 20 [5.7%] are involved on a weekly basis, 16 [4.6%] monthly and 22 [6.3%] quarterly. Reasons given for non implementation of home based care are inadequate number of healthcare workers 45%, lack of political will 24.4%, lack of implementation by facility managers 14% and inadequate funds 16.6%. Factors that were significantly associated with the practice of home based care were perception of its relevance in improving prognosis [OR = 54.21, C.I = 23.22-129.52] and presence of a support group in the facility [OR = 4.80, C.I = 2.40-9.57]. There was however no statistically significant relationship between adequate knowledge of home based care [OR = 0.78, C.I = 0.39-1.54] and previous training on home based care (OR = 1.43, C.I = 0.66-3.06]. Conclusion The practice of home based care for HIV/AIDS among the study population is low

  4. Stroke awareness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the awareness of major stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors among the general population in Denmark. Early recognition of stroke warning signs and means of reducing stroke occurrence could improve the treatment and prevention of stroke....

  5. Multiple Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  6. Psychosocial health coaching for chronically ill in a telehealth context: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenneke Van Genugten

    2015-10-01

    The results show that the structured, partly automated approach can be used in a telehealth context by means of health coaches. MAY appeared to be a suitable tool for providing input for psychosocial care. HCs attitudes towards the structured approach were positive, which is crucial to the success of the implementation of MAY. Based on these results, we recommend to continue this approach as it may strengthen the wellbeing of patients (to be evaluated in future work. However, improvements are necessary. The tool should get a better fit in the current working procedures, and support the translation from recommendations to action. Further automation may facilitate this. In conclusion, this study shows that it is possible for HCs to implement structured psychosocial care in a telehealth program but that combining digitalized and human efforts in one structure is a challenge. The appreciation of the health coaches is an important first step in this process.

  7. Meeting the need for educational standards in the practice of telemedicine and telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, J

    2000-01-01

    The first telemedicine standard to be developed, documented and adopted widely was the radiology standard, which includes technical and image transmission standards as well as requirements and qualifications needed for teleradiology practice. But many other health professionals engaged either full time or part time in telemedicine and telehealth--for example, telepsychiatry, telepathology, teletriage and tele-ophthalmology--also need and use special skills and knowledge. At present, they acquire these skills on the job and their skills may not be recognized. There should be performance standards and telepractice guidelines for professionals operating in the fields of telemedicine and telehealth. Furthermore, there is a case for the development and implementation of education and training standards, enabling professionals who practise in the field to obtain suitable skills, knowledge and recognition for telepractice.

  8. Towards Resilient Telehealth Support for Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology: A Strategic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; De Giacomo, Piero; L'Abate, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Human beings have increasingly shown a willingness to adopt Internet, mHealth and telehealth applications as a part of managing their health. Recent technological advances in the use of the Internet and video technologies has greatly impacted the provision of psychotherapy and other clinical services as well as how the training of psychotherapists may be conducted. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. The major issue in such a development is whether online interventions will be structured or unstructured. The proper use of technology is fundamental to create and boost outstanding results. We present a strategic review and, as an example, the main steps to develop and achieve application resilience and antifragility at system level, for diagnostic and therapeutic telepractice and telehealth support. This article presents a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy treatment, supervision, training, and research forward, towards increased effectiveness application.

  9. Communication Intervention for Young Children with Severe Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Via Telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simacek, Jessica; Dimian, Adele F; McComas, Jennifer J

    2017-03-01

    Young children with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and Rett syndrome often experience severe communication impairments. This study examined the efficacy of parent-implemented communication assessment and intervention with remote coaching via telehealth on the acquisition of early communication skills of three young children with ASD (2) and Rett syndrome (1). Efficacy of the intervention was evaluated using single-case experimental designs. First, functional assessment was used to identify idiosyncratic/potentially communicative responses and contexts for each child. Next, parents implemented functional communication training (FCT). All of the children acquired the targeted communication responses. The findings support the efficacy of telehealth as a service delivery model to coach parents on intervention strategies for their children's early communication skills.

  10. The efficacy of early initiated, supervised, progressive resistance training compared to unsupervised, home-based exercise after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Bogh, Søren B; Kierkegaard, Signe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if supervised progressive resistance training was superior to home-based exercise in rehabilitation after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. DESIGN: Single blinded, randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Surgery, progressive resistance training and testing was carried out...

  11. Two Kinds of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Two Kinds of Stroke Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... are often a warning sign for future strokes. Stroke Can Affect Anyone Award-winning actress Julie Harris ...

  12. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and adapted from " ... it can cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic ...

  13. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  14. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... campaign for the U.S. Hispanic community. 1 Know Stroke A stroke occurs when the blood supply to ...

  15. Heuristic evaluation of a telehealth system from the Danish TeleCare North Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilholt, Pernille Heyckendorff; Jensen, Morten Hasselstrøm; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the usability of the design of the telehealth system, named Telekit, developed for the Danish TeleCare North Trial, early into the design process in order to assess potential problems and limitations which could hinder its successful implementation. Five experts, including one who pilot-tested the Telekit system, individually evaluated its usability and its compliance with Jakob Nielsen's ten usability heuristics for interaction design. Usability problems were categorised according to Rolf Molich's severity classification. The five experts identified a total of 152 problems in the Telekit system, each identifying 22-40 problems. 86 (57%) out of the 152 problems were identified only once. All heuristics were used, but the three most frequently used were: "Match between system and the real world" (32%), "Consistency and standards" (13%) and "Aesthetic and minimalist design" (13%). The most widely used classifications were: "Improvement" (40%) and "Minor problem" (43%). Heuristic evaluation was an effective method for uncovering and identifying problems with the system. The consistent finding of particular usability problems confirms that the development of a telehealth system should pay particular attention to user aspects. The most serious problem was the inability of the system to inform users of how to perform measurements correctly and to "speak the users' language". The problems found in the heuristic evaluation have led to several significant changes in the telehealth system. We suggest that heuristic evaluation always be followed by user tests to evaluate the design of telehealth systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of neurodevelopmental disabilities in underserved children using telehealth (INvesT): Clinical trial study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Angela Hein; Roizen, Nancy; Garvey, Matt; Bielefeld, Roger; Short, Elizabeth J

    2015-11-01

    Children living in poverty are at high risk for delays in development of language and behavior and they experience a discrepancy in diagnosis and access to intervention services. This gap is partially caused by barriers in access as well as traits that are specific to each child and family. The Identification of Neurodevelopmental Disabilities in Underserved Children using Telehealth (INvesT) trial is a novel intervention approach that was specifically designed to address these barriers. The INvesT trial has three primary aims: 1) to reduce the age of identification of neurodevelopmental disability for high-risk, low-income children. 2) To validate the INvesT protocol as a service delivery model that will decrease age of identifications of neurodevelopmental disability for high-risk, low-income children; and 3) to identify important child-specific factors, family-specific factors, and environmental factors that impact feasibility and success of the INvesT trial for high-risk, low-income children. The INvesT trial is an open-label, double-blinded, placebo-controlled multi-level study that includes telehealth risk assessment, telehealth screening, traditional full assessment, and follow through to enrollment in early intervention. The trial is conducted in partnership with an urban community health clinic that largely serves a low-income patient population. The results of the INvesT trial will provide evidence for the use of a telehealth service delivery model to improve access to care for neurodevelopmental disabilities for high-risk, low-income children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert Langabeer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  18. The Contradictions of Telehealth User Experience in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Lisa; Bower, Peter; Sanders, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    As the global burden of chronic disease rises, policy makers are showing a strong interest in adopting telehealth technologies for use in long term condition management, including COPD. However, there remain barriers to its implementation and sustained use. To date, there has been limited qualitative investigation into how users (both patients/carers and staff) perceive and experience the technology. We aimed to systematically review and synthesise the findings from qualitative studies that investigated user perspectives and experiences of telehealth in COPD management, in order to identify factors which may impact on uptake. Systematic review and meta-synthesis of published qualitative studies of user (patients, their carers and clinicians) experience of telehealth technologies for the management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. ASSIA, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, PsychInfo and Web of Knowledge databases were searched up to October 2014. Reference lists of included studies and reference lists of key papers were also searched. Quality appraisal was guided by an adapted version of the CASP qualitative appraisal tool. 705 references (after duplicates removed) were identified and 10 papers, relating to 7 studies were included in the review. Most authors of included studies had identified both positive and negative experiences of telehealth use in the management of COPD. Through a line of argument synthesis we were able to derive new insights from the data to identify three overarching themes that have the ability to either impede or promote positive user experience of telehealth in COPD: the influence on moral dilemmas of help seeking-(enables dependency or self-care); transforming interactions (increases risk or reassurance) and reconfiguration of 'work' practices (causes burden or empowerment). Findings from this meta-synthesis have implications for the future design and implementation of telehealth services. Future research needs to include potential users at

  19. Speech-language pathology telehealth in rural and remote schools: the experience of school executive and therapy assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairweather, Glenn C; Lincoln, Michelle A; Ramsden, Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties in accessing allied health services, especially in rural and remote areas, appear to be driving the use of telehealth services to children in schools. The objectives of this study were to investigate the experiences and views of school executive staff and therapy assistants regarding the feasibility and acceptability of a speech-language pathology telehealth program for children attending schools in rural and remote New South Wales, Australia. The program, called Come N See, provided therapy interventions remotely via low-bandwidth videoconferencing, with email follow-up. Over a 12-week period, children were offered therapy blocks of six fortnightly sessions, each lasting a maximum of 30 minutes. School executives (n=5) and therapy assistants (n=6) described factors that promoted or threatened the program's feasibility and acceptability, during semistructured interviews. Thematic content analysis with constant comparison was applied to the transcribed interviews to identify relationships in the data. Emergent themes related to (a) unmet speech pathology needs, (b) building relationships, (c) telehealth's advantages, (d) telehealth's disadvantages, (e) anxiety replaced by joy and confidence in growing skills, and (f) supports. School executive staff and therapy assistants verified that the delivery of the school-based telehealth service was feasible and acceptable. However, the participants saw significant opportunities to enhance this acceptability through building into the program stronger working relationships and supports for stakeholders. These findings are important for the future development of allied health telehealth programs that are sustainable as well as effective and fit the needs of all crucial stakeholders. The results have significant implications for speech pathology clinical practice relating to technology, program planning and teamwork within telehealth programs.

  20. Integrating home-based medication therapy management (MTM) services in a health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidt, Shannon; Holtan, Haley; Stender, Jennifer; Salvatore, Toni; Thompson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    To describe the integration of home-based Medication Therapy Management (MTM) into the ambulatory care infrastructure of a large urban health system and to discuss the outcomes of this service. Minnesota from September 2012 to December 2013. The health system has more than 50 primary care and specialty clinics. Eighteen credentialed MTM pharmacists are located in 16 different primary care and specialty settings, with the greatest number of pharmacists providing services in the internal medicine clinic. Home-based MTM was promoted throughout the clinics within the health system. Physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, and pharmacists could refer patients to receive MTM in their homes. A home visit had the components of a clinic-based visit and was documented in the electronic health record (EHR); however, providing the service in the home allowed for a more direct assessment of environmental factors affecting medication use. Number of home MTM referrals, reason for referral and type of referring provider, number and type of medication-related problems (MRPs). In the first 15 months, 74 home visits were provided to 53 patients. Sixty-six percent of the patients were referred from the Internal Medicine Clinic. Referrals were also received from the senior care, coordinated care, and psychiatry clinics. Approximately 50% of referrals were made by physicians. More referrals (23%) were made by pharmacists compared with advanced practice providers, who made 21% of referrals. The top 3 reasons for referral were: nonadherence, transportation barriers, and the need for medication reconciliation with a home care nurse. Patients had a median of 3 MRPs with the most common (40%) MRP related to compliance. Home-based MTM is feasibly delivered within the ambulatory care infrastructure of a health system with sufficient provider engagement as demonstrated by referrals to the service. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  1. Twenty weeks of home-based interactive training of children with cerebral palsy improves functional abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Greve, Line Z; Kliim-Due, Mette; Rasmussen, Betina; Bilde, P E; Nielsen, Jens B

    2015-05-10

    Home-based training is becoming ever more important with increasing demands on the public health systems. We investigated whether individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet improves functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Thirty four children with CP (aged 9-16; mean age 10.9 ± 2.4 years) (GMFCS I-II; MACS I-II) were included in this non-randomized controlled clinical training study. 12 children (aged 7-16; mean age: 11.3+/-0.9 years) were allocated to a control group in which measurements were performed with 20 weeks interval without any intervening training. Daily activities, functional abilities of upper- and lower limbs, and balance were evaluated before, immediately after training and 12 weeks after training. The training consisted of 30 min daily home-based training for 20 weeks delivered through the internet. The training group on average completed 17 min daily training for the 20 week period (total of 40 h of training). The training group showed significant improvements of daily activities (AMPS), upper limb function (AHA) and functional tests of lower limbs (sit to stand, lateral step up, half knee to standing) after 20 weeks of training. No difference was found between the test after 20 weeks of training and the test 12 weeks after training. No significance was reached for balance after training. No difference was found for any parameter for the control group. Interactive home training of children with CP is an efficient way to deliver training, which can enable functional motor improvements and increased activity to perform daily activities. ISRCTN13188513 . Date of registration: 04/12/2014.

  2. Effects of a home-based rehabilitation program in obese type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrunée, M; Antoine, D; Vergès, B; Robin, I; Casillas, J-M; Gremeaux, V

    2012-09-01

    To assess, in obese type 2 diabetics (T2D), the impact of a home-based effort training program and the barriers to physical activity (PA) practice. Twenty-three obese T2D patients (52.7 ± 8.2 years, BMI = 38.5 ± 7.6 kg/m(2)) were randomized to either a control group (CG), or an intervention group (IG) performing home-based cyclergometer training during 3 months, 30 min/day, with a monthly-supervised session. The initial and final measurements included: maximal graded effort test on cyclergometer, 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and 200-meter fast walk test (200mFWT), quadriceps maximal isometric strength, blood tests and quality of life assessment (SF- 36). A long-term assessment of the amount of physical activity (PA) and the barriers to PA practice was conducted using a questionnaire by phone call. Patients in the CG significantly improved the maximal power developed at the peak of the cyclergometer effort test (P quality of life. At a mean distance of 17 ± 6.4 months, the PA score remained low in the two groups. The main barriers to PA practice identified in both groups were the perception of a low exercise capacity and a poor tolerance to effort, lack of motivation, and the existence of pain associated to PA. This home-based intervention had a positive impact on biometrics and physical ability in the short term in obese T2D patients, but limited effects in the long term. The questionnaires completed at a distance suggest considering educational strategies to increase the motivation and compliance of these patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Outpatient vs. home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes de Oliveira, Júlio C; Studart Leitão Filho, Fernando S; Malosa Sampaio, Luciana M; Negrinho de Oliveira, Ana C; Hirata, Raquel Pastrello; Costa, Dirceu; Donner, Claudio F; de Oliveira, Luís Vf

    2010-12-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality affecting a large number of individuals in both developed and developing countries and it represents a significant financial burden for patients, families and society. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary program that integrates components of exercise training, education, nutritional support, psychological support and self-care, resulting in an improvement in dyspnea, fatigue and quality of life. Despite its proven effectiveness and the strong scientific recommendations for its routine use in the care of COPD, PR is generally underutilized and strategies for increasing access to PR are needed. Home-based self-monitored pulmonary rehabilitation is an alternative to outpatient rehabilitation. In the present study, patients with mild, moderate and severe COPD submitted to either an outpatient or at-home PR program for 12 weeks were analyzed. Patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomized into three distinct groups: an outpatient group who performed all activities at the clinic, a home-based group who performed the activities at home and a control group. PR consisted of a combination of aerobic exercises and strengthening of upper and lower limbs 3 times a week for 12 weeks. There was a significant difference in the distance covered on the six-minute walk test (p home groups after participating in the rehabilitation program compared to baseline. A home-based self-monitoring pulmonary rehabilitation program is as effective as outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation and is a valid alternative for the management of patients with COPD.

  4. Patient influence in home-based reablement for older persons: qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aud Moe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reablement services are rehabilitation for older people living at home, being person-centered in information, mapping and the goal-setting conversation. The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about conversation processes and patient influence in formulating the patients’ goals. There are two research questions: How do conversation theme, structure and processes appear in interactions aiming to decide goals of home-based reablement rehabilitation for the elderly? How professionals’ communication skills do influence on patients' participation in conversation about everyday life and goals of home-based reablement? Methods A qualitative field study explored eight cases of naturally occurring conversations between patients and healthcare professionals in a rehabilitation team. Patients were aged 67–90 years old. The reablement team consisted of an occupational therapist, physiotherapist, nurse and care workers. Data was collected by audio recording the conversations. Transcribed text was analyzed for conversational theme and communication patterns as they emerged within main themes. Results Patient participation differed with various professional leadership and communication in the information, mapping and goalsetting process. In the data material in its entirety, conversations consisted mainly of three parts where each part dealt with one of the three main topics. The first part was “Introduction to the program.” The main part of the talk was about mapping (“Varying patient participation when discussing everyday life”, while the last part was about goal setting (“Goals of rehabilitation”. Conclusions Home-based reablement requires communication skills to encourage user participation, and mapping of resources and needs, leading to the formulation of objectives. Professional health workers must master integrating two intentions: goal-oriented and person-centered communication that requires communication

  5. Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease* **

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Iván; Zenteno, Daniel; Manterola, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD). METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP), PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF). We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT. RESULTS: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years), of whom 18 (62.1%) were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%), and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%). The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks) in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks) in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD. PMID:25610503

  6. Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP, PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF. We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT. RESULTS: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years, of whom 18 (62.1% were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%, and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%. The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD.

  7. Home-based exercise for middle-aged Chinese at diabetic risk: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Tai; Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Chen, Chiao-Nan; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate short- (3 months) and long-term (9 months) effects of home-based exercise on adiponectin, exercise behavior and metabolic risk factors in middle-aged adults at diabetic risk. One hundred and thirty-five middle-aged adults (38 men, 97 women) with at least one diabetic risk factor were randomly assigned to either a home-based exercise group (Ex-group) or a usual care group (C-group). Outcome measures included plasma adiponectin, exercise self-efficacy, physical activity, and metabolic risk factors, as follows: insulin levels, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), physical fitness, and components of metabolic syndrome. This study was conducted in metropolitan Taipei from 2004 to 2005. The Ex-group had improvements in exercise self-efficacy (+2.5, p = 0.01), body mass index (BMI) (-0.6 kg/m2, p < 0.001) and flexibility (+2.4 cm, p < 0.001) at 3-month follow-up and maintained BMI and flexibility at 9-month follow-up. The Ex-group exhibited significantly increased physical activity while the C-group exhibited decreased physical activity at 9-month follow-up (p < 0.001). No intervention effect was found on adiponectin (p = 0.64) or other outcome measures over time. Home-based exercise did not improve adiponectin levels, but significantly improved exercise behavior, and certain metabolic risk factors, with the effects maintained for 9-months in subjects with type 2 diabetic risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Home-based malaria management in children by women: Evidence from a malaria endemic community in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Doreen Nkiru Eugene-Ezebilo; Eugene Ejike Ezebilo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the medicines and dosage that mothers who engage in home-based malaria management administer to children aged ≤ 5 years having signs and symptoms associated with malaria and to discuss the possibilities of designing an effective home-based malaria management strategy. Methods: The data were obtained from face-to-face semi-structured interviews conducted with mothers in the Ugbowo Community of Benin City, Nigeria who were selected using multi-stage systematic random s...

  9. Individualized, home-based interactive training of cerebral palsy children delivered through the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Peder E; Kliim-Due, Mette; Rasmussen, Betina

    2011-01-01

    The available health resources limit the amount of therapy that may be offered to children with cerebral palsy and the amount of training in each session may be insufficient to drive the neuroplastic changes, which are necessary for functional improvements to take place. The aim of this pilot study...... was to provide proof of concept that individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet may provide an efficient way of maintaining intensive training of children with cerebral palsy over prolonged periods....

  10. Home-based palliative care for adult cancer patients in Ibadan-a three year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoyeni, Ne; Soyannwo, Oa; Aikomo, Oo; Iken, Of

    2014-01-01

    Home-based palliative care is a recognised model of health service provision globally, but is just emerging in Nigeria. The aim of this study isto review the spectrum of adult cancer patients involved in home-based palliative care, the services provided, outcome and benefits. Records of all adult cancer patients seen on home-based palliative care between March 2009 and January 2013 by the hospice and palliative care unit, University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan were reviewed. Their biographical data, days on programme, diagnosis, stage of disease, major complaint, pain score, other symptoms, services offered, number of home visits, follow-up, and outcomes were extracted, reviewed, and analysed. The data were analysed using SPSS version 16.0. Sixty patients were enrolled during the study period: there were 20 (33.3%) males and 40 (66.7%) females out of a total of 787 patients. All of them reside within catchment area of the hospice. Breast and prostate cancer constitute 21.7% each, gastrointestinal 16.7%, liver 11.7%, and cervical cancer 10.0%. Homes were visited 1-23 times per person. Days on programme ranged from 9-1207 days (average: 286 days). Pain was reported by 52 (86.7%) with scores of 7 to10 in 26 (50.0%). Only eight (13.3%) were pain-free. Services offered included pain and other symptom control, counselling and training for carers at home, provision of funds and comfort packs, bereavement services. The cost of services was heavily subsidised by the Centre for Palliative Care, Nigeria (CPCN), a non-governmental organisation and UCH. Although all patients are now deceased, the compassionate care received at a subsidised cost was highly valued, as shown from the appreciative comments of relations and carers. Home-based palliative care provided at low cost was beneficial to patients and their families. More can be achieved through the training of more health professionals, increased funding, and increased public awareness of the services.

  11. Impact of distance on the network management capability of the home base firm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mykhaylenko, Alona; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    For many globally dispersed organizations the home base (HB) is historically the locus of integrative, coordinating and innovating efforts, important for the overall performance. The growing concerns about the offshoring strategies posing threats to the capabilities of the HB draw attention to how...... a HB can continuously sustain its centrality. The well-known challenges of distance in the distributed working arrangements may be regarded as a major threat to the network management capabilities (NMCs) of the HB. Therefore, this paper investigates what role does distance between the HB and its...

  12. Teaching Math Skills to At-risk Students Using Home-based Peer Tutoring

    OpenAIRE

    Mayfield, Kristin H; Vollmer, Timothy R

    2007-01-01

    Home-based peer tutoring was used to teach math skills to 4 girls with deficits in mathematics and histories of abuse or neglect. Girls living in the same home formed tutoring dyads, and each participant served as both the peer tutor and the tutee during the course of the study. At the initiation of the tutoring intervention, an expert tutor provided multiple 3-min tutoring sessions to the designated peer tutor on three or four mathematics skills. The peer tutor concurrently provided 3-min tu...

  13. Effects of home-based long-term care services on caregiver health according to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chun; Kao, Chi-Wen; Chiu, Yu-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ying; Tsai, Yu-Ting; Jian, Yi-Ting Zhang; Tzeng, Ya-Mei; Lin, Fu-Gong; Hwang, Shu-Ling; Li, Shan-Ru; Kao, Senyeong

    2017-10-23

    Caregiver health is a crucial public health concern due to the increasing number of elderly people with disabilities. Elderly caregivers are more likely to have poorer health and be a care recipient than younger caregivers. The Taiwan government offers home-based long-term care (LTC) services to provide formal care and decrease the burden of caregivers. This study examined the effects of home-based LTC services on caregiver health according to caregiver age. This cross-sectional study included a simple random sample of care recipients and their caregivers. The care recipients had used LTC services under the Ten-Year Long-Term Care Project (TLTCP) in Taiwan. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires from September 2012 to January 2013. The following variables were assessed for caregivers: health, sex, marital status, education level, relationship with care recipient, quality of relationship with care recipient, job, household monthly income, family income spent on caring for the care recipient (%) and caregiving period. Furthermore, the following factors were assessed for care recipients: age, sex, marital status, education level, living alone, number of family members living with the care recipient, quality of relationship with family and dependency level. The health of the caregivers and care recipients was measured using a self-rated question (self-rated health [SRH] was rated as very poor, poor, fair, good and very good). The study revealed that home nursing care was significantly associated with the health of caregivers aged 65 years or older; however, caregivers aged less than 65 who had used home nursing care, rehabilitation or respite care had poorer health than those who had not used these services. In addition, the following variables significantly improved the health of caregivers aged 65 years or older: caregiver employment, 20% or less of family income spent on caregiving than 81%-100% and higher care recipient health. The

  14. Client-nurse relationships in home-based palliative care: a critical analysis of power relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, Abram; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol

    2007-08-01

    To elicit an in-depth understanding of the sources of power and how power is exercised within client-nurse relationships in home-based palliative care. As in all social relations, power is present within client-nurse relationships. Although much research has focused on interpersonal relationships in nursing, the concept of power within the client-nurse relationship in palliative care settings has not been extensively investigated. Applying a critical lens, secondary qualitative data analysis was conducted. Seventeen nurse and 16 client transcripts from a primary study were selected for secondary data analysis. These 33 transcripts afforded theme saturation, which allowed for both commonalities and differences to be identified. Data analysis involved analytic coding. Study findings help make explicit the underlying power present in the context of home-based palliative care and how this power is used and potentially abused. In analysing the sources and exercise of power, the linkage between macro and micro levels of power is made explicit, as nurses functioned within a hierarchy of power. The findings suggest that educational/occupational status continues to be a source of power for nurses within the relationship. However, nurses also experience powerlessness within the home care context. For clients, being able to control one's own life is a source of power, but this power is over-shadowed by the powerlessness experienced in relationships with nurses. The exercise of power by clients and nurses creates experiences of both liberation and domination. Nurses who are willing to reflect on and change those disempowering aspects of the client-nurse relationship, including a harmful hierarchy, will ultimately be successful in the health promotion of clients in home-based palliative care. Additionally, it should be recognized that nurses work within a specific health system context and, therefore, their practice is influenced by policies and funding models implemented at

  15. Environmental aspects of health care in the Grampian NHS region and the place of telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Richard; Tait, Alex; Croft, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information about the composition of the carbon footprint of the NHS in the Grampian health region, and in Scotland generally, is not available at present. Based on the limited information available, our best guess is that travel emissions in Grampian are substantial, perhaps 49,000 tonnes CO2 per year. This is equivalent to 233 million km of car travel per year. A well-established telemedicine network in the Grampian region, which saves over 2000 patient journeys a year from community hospitals, avoids about 260,000 km travel per year, or about 59 tonnes CO2 per year. Therefore using telehealth as it has been used historically (primarily to facilitate hospital-to-hospital interactions) seems unlikely to have a major environmental impact – although of course there may be other good reasons for persevering with conventional telehealth. On the other hand, telehealth might be useful in reducing staff travel and to a lesser extent, visitor travel. It looks particularly promising for reducing outpatient travel, where substantial carbon savings might be made by reconfiguring the way that certain services are provided. PMID:20511579

  16. Telehealth for Expanding the Reach of Early Autism Training to Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A. Vismara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is consensus that parents should be involved in interventions designed for young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, parent participation alone does not ensure consistent, generalized gains in children’s development. Barriers such as costly intervention, time-intensive sessions, and family life may prevent parents from using the intervention at home. Telehealth integrates communication technologies to provide health-related services at a distance. A 12 one-hour per week parent intervention program was tested using telehealth delivery with nine families with ASD. The goal was to examine its feasibility and acceptance for promoting child learning throughout families’ daily play and caretaking interactions at home. Parents became skilled at using teachable moments to promote children’s spontaneous language and imitation skills and were pleased with the support and ease of telehealth learning. Preliminary results suggest the potential of technology for helping parents understand and use early intervention practices more often in their daily interactions with children.

  17. The Mental Workload Evaluation in Visualizing Telehealth Indicators on Three-Dimensional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Filho, Amadeu S; Novaes, Magdala A; Gomes, Alex S

    2017-10-27

    As Internet bandwidth has risen, resulting in an exponential increase in the amount of data, one of the challenges is to transform large amounts of unstructured health data into legible information through visualization techniques to facilitate the decision-making between the telehealth managers. Traditionally, data visualization has been two-dimensional (2D), but it is often difficult to visualize and interpret when making decisions with multidimensional data. Three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques are emerging to address this issue. This study aims to investigate and demonstrate the hypothesis that the use of 3D techniques for information visualization is more effective than some 2D visualization techniques. Hypothesis validation was performed with a usability methodology analyzing of the time, efficiency, effectiveness, and mental workload required in the execution of a task with a developed prototype. A random sample of telehealth professionals was used. Data were collected through observation and usability questionnaires, including the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) mental workload protocol. Data analysis was based on quantitative and qualitative approaches. The study showed that mental workload, despite the time of task execution and effectiveness of the prototype, with 3D technique was less than the 2D technique. The 3D technique required less mental effort than the 2D technique. The 3D environment supports the service manager to verify the telehealth quality of service toward the features provided by 3D environment, especially, its capability to identify trends, clusters of interest, and perform indicators comparison.

  18. Feasibility and effect of in-home physical exercise training delivered via telehealth before bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillot, Aurélie; Boissy, Patrick; Tousignant, Michel; Langlois, Marie-France

    2017-06-01

    Optimal physical activity (PA) interventions are needed to increase PA in individuals with severe obesity, and optimize the results of bariatric surgery (BS). The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and effect of Pre-Surgical Exercise Training (PreSET) delivered in-home via telehealth (TelePreSET) in subjects awaiting BS. Six women following the TelePreSET were compared to the women from a previous study (12 performing the PreSET in a gymnasium and 11 receiving usual care). In-home TelePreSET (12-weeks of endurance and strength training) was supervised twice weekly using videoconferencing. Physical fitness, quality of life, exercise beliefs, anthropometric measures and telehealth perception were assessed before and after 12-weeks. Satisfaction was evaluated with questionnaires at the end of the intervention. The TelePreSET participants attended 96% of the exercise sessions, and were very satisfied by the TelePreSET. The baseline telehealth perception score was high, and increased significantly after the intervention. The TelePreSET group significantly increased their physical fitness compared to the usual care group. No significant change was noted in other outcomes. The TelePreSET is feasible and seems effective to improve the physical fitness of women awaiting BS. Further studies are needed to confirm beneficial effects of this innovative mode of delivery.

  19. A comparison of characteristics of patients seen in a tertiary hospital diabetes telehealth service versus specialist face-to-face outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anish; Gray, Leonard C; Fatehi, Farhad; Darssan, Darsy; Bird, Dominique; Bennetts, Denise; Russell, Anthony W

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to describe patient-related characteristics of those attending the diabetes telehealth service delivered from a tertiary hospital and compare these with the characteristics of patients attending face-to-face visits at the same hospital's diabetes outpatient service. This analysis could inform diabetes telehealth service improvements. To our knowledge, there has been no prior evaluation of a diabetes telehealth service in Australia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted as part of the Australian National Diabetes Audit in May 2016 for all patients attending the diabetes telehealth service and diabetes outpatient service. The diabetes telehealth service was serving a greater proportion of females, indigenous people and patients with a longer mean duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in the diabetes telehealth service group had a higher average glycated haemoglobin of 9.1% (76 mmol/mol) vs 8.1% (65 mmol/mol) in the diabetes outpatient service group. The diabetes telehealth service had more people with initial visits; had higher self-reported smoking rates in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients; and had adequate access to allied health supports as recommended for diabetes management. Diabetes telehealth service patients had more complex diabetes as evidenced by a higher proportion of indigenous clients, higher glycated haemoglobin and longer mean duration of diabetes.

  20. Sex Disparities in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainty remains about whether stroke affects men and women similarly. We studied differences between men and women with regard to stroke severity and survival. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used the Danish Stroke Registry, with information on all hospital admissions for stroke in Denmark...... between 2003 and 2012 (N=79 617), and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Information was available on age, sex, marital status, stroke severity, stroke subtype, socioeconomic status, and cardiovascular risk profile. We studied only deaths due to the index stroke, with the assumption that death...... reported on death certificates as due to stroke was related to the index stroke if death occurred within the first week or month after stroke. Multivariate Cox regression analysis and multiple imputation were applied. Stroke was the cause of death for 4373 and 5512 of the 79 617 patients within 1 week (5...

  1. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  2. Who receives home-based perinatal palliative care: experience from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewska-Eksterowicz, Aleksandra; Przysło, Łukasz; Kędzierska, Bogna; Stolarska, Małgorzata; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The current literature suggests that perinatal palliative care (PPC) programs should be comprehensive, initiated early, and integrative. So far there have been very few publications on the subject of home-based PC of newborns and neonates. Most publications focus on hospital-based care, mainly in the neonatal intensive care units. To describe the neonates and infants who received home-based palliative care in Lodz Region between 2005 and 2011. A retrospective review of medical records. 53 neonates and infants were admitted to a home hospice in Lodz Region between 2005 and 2011. In general, they are a growing group of patients referred to palliative care. Congenital diseases (41%) were the primary diagnoses; out of 53 patients 16 died, 20 were discharged home, and 17 stayed under hospice care until 2011. The most common cause of death (56%) was cardiac insufficiency. Neurological symptoms (72%) and dysphagia (58%) were the most common clinical problems. The majority of children (45%) had a feeding tube inserted and were oxygen dependent (45%); 39 families received psychological care and 31 social supports. For terminally ill neonates and infants, perinatal palliative care is an option which improves the quality of their lives and provides the family with an opportunity to say goodbye.

  3. Who Receives Home-Based Perinatal Palliative Care: Experience from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Korzeniewska-Eksterowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. The current literature suggests that perinatal palliative care (PPC programs should be comprehensive, initiated early, and integrative. So far there have been very few publications on the subject of home-based PC of newborns and neonates. Most publications focus on hospital-based care, mainly in the neonatal intensive care units. Objective. To describe the neonates and infants who received home-based palliative care in Lodz Region between 2005 and 2011. Methods. A retrospective review of medical records. Results. 53 neonates and infants were admitted to a home hospice in Lodz Region between 2005 and 2011. In general, they are a growing group of patients referred to palliative care. Congenital diseases (41% were the primary diagnoses; out of 53 patients 16 died, 20 were discharged home, and 17 stayed under hospice care until 2011. The most common cause of death (56% was cardiac insufficiency. Neurological symptoms (72% and dysphagia (58% were the most common clinical problems. The majority of children (45% had a feeding tube inserted and were oxygen dependent (45%; 39 families received psychological care and 31 social supports. Conclusions. For terminally ill neonates and infants, perinatal palliative care is an option which improves the quality of their lives and provides the family with an opportunity to say goodbye.

  4. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  5. Lessons learned from the usability assessment of home-based telemedicine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnisarman, Sruthy Orozhiyathumana; Chalil Madathil, Kapil; Smith, Kevin; Ashok, Aparna; Welch, Brandon; McElligott, James T

    2017-01-01

    At-home telemedicine visits are quickly becoming an acceptable alternative for in-person patient visits. However, little work has been done to understand the usability of these home-based telemedicine solutions. It is critical for user acceptance and real-world applicability to evaluate available telemedicine solutions within the context-specific needs of the users of this technology. To address this need, this study evaluated the usability of four home-based telemedicine software platforms: Doxy.me, Vidyo, VSee, and Polycom. Using a within-subjects experimental design, twenty participants were asked to complete a telemedicine session involving several tasks using the four platforms. Upon completion of these tasks for each platform, participants completed the IBM computer system usability questionnaire (CSUQ) and the NASA Task Load Index test. Upon completing the tasks on all four platforms, the participants completed a final post-test subjective questionnaire ranking the platforms based on their preference. Of the twenty participants, 19 completed the study. Statistically significant differences among the telemedicine software platforms were found for task completion time, total workload, mental demand, effort, frustration, preference ranking and computer system usability scores. Usability problems with installation and account creation led to high mental demand and task completion time, suggesting the participants preferred a system without such requirements. Majority of the usability issues were identified at the telemedicine initiation phase. The findings from this study can be used by software developers to develop user-friendly telemedicine systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Home-based upper extremity rehabilitation support using a contactless ultrasonic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Henry; Biswas, Subir

    2017-07-01

    Home-based rehabilitation protocols have been shown to improve outcomes amongst individuals with limited upper-extremity (UE) functionality. While approaches employing both video conferencing technologies and gaming platforms have been successfully demonstrated for such applications, concerns regarding patient privacy and technological complexity may limit further adoption. As an alternative solution for assessing adherence to prescribed UE rehabilitation protocols, the Echolocation Activity Detector, a linear array of first-reflection ultrasonic distance sensors, is proposed herein. To demonstrate its utility for home-based rehabilitation, a controlled experiment exploring the ability of the system to distinguish between various parameters of UE motion, including motion plane, range, and speed, was conducted for five participants. Activity classification is accomplished using a quadratic support vector machine classifier using time-domain features which exploit the known geometric relationships between the patient and the device, along with the ideal kinematics of the activities of interest. Average classification accuracy for the five classes of UE motion considered herein exceeds 91%.

  7. Home-based rehabilitation in the postoperative treatment of flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartín-Fernández, M; Fernández-Bran, B; Couceiro-Otero, J

    To evaluate the results and complications of flexor tendon repair in which a home-based rehabilitation program was utilized without the assistance of a hand therapist during the first 4postoperative weeks. Between July 2009 and July 2014, a total of 21 digits in 15 patients were treated in our institution for complete laceration of the flexor tendons within the flexor pulley system (zone 1 and 2). Passive and active exercises performed by the patients themselves were started the morning after the operation. Data, as range-of-motion and complications, were collected 6months after the surgery. Fifteen digits had full recovery of flexion. One patient suffered a rupture in the fifth postoperative week. Ten of the 21 digits developed a flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint; in 5 the contracture was less or equal to 10° without impairment of function or aesthetics. Over recent decades, specialized hand therapy has been of great importance in the postoperative treatment of hand diseases. Unfortunately, these professionals are not always available in our area in the first days after surgery. With this protocol, the patient is in charge of carrying out the postoperative exercises, which could lead to a worse final result and a higher rate of complications. The home-based rehabilitation program yielded complete recovery of joint mobility in most cases with a low complication rate. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Convergence of Home-based Enterprises with Domestic Spaces: Evidence from Dhaka Neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Afrin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research inspects the utilization of domestic space management in marginalized slums of Bangladesh towards comprehending the contribution of urban poor women’s informal employment as a private initiative. The components that influence the physical association of “home-based enterprises” (HBEs spaces and its quality are assessed concerning the survival pattern of the low-income occupants. Further, the neighborhood and housing attributes, cultural and social, and the financial status of individuals living in slums are analyzed by in-depth interviews with questionnaires. A stratified random sampling method was used to choose 44 households in two notable neighborhoods in Dhaka City. Data was elicited through focus groups of inhabitants using qualitative research method. Thus, structured and open-ended interviews were conducted with household female members who are 18 years and above while participant observation at moderate level ensured the trustworthiness of the data. The differences observed quality and features of spaces in those settlements inhabited by the slum dwellers gave insight on the factors. The study discovered the prospect of women’s domestic spaces of home-based work in their dwelling spaces. Thereafter, the research recommends that future interferences should counter critically to the event of participation and strife contributing towards uplifting women’s situation inside a specific dwelling.

  9. Home-based vs supervised rehabilitation programs following knee surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Tecame, Andrea; D'Adamio, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Following knee surgery, rehabilitation can dramatically affect the postoperative course and the final outcomes of the procedure. We systematically reviewed the current literature comparing clinical outcomes of home-based and outpatient supervised rehabilitation protocols following knee surgery. We searched Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Google Scholar, The Cochrane Library and SPORTDiscus. The reference lists of the previously selected articles were then examined by hand. Only studies comparing clinical outcomes of patients who had undergone knee surgery followed by different rehabilitation programs were selected. Then the methodological quality of each article was evaluated using the Coleman methodology score (CMS), a 10-criterion scoring list assessing the methodological quality of the selected studies. Eighteen studies were evaluated in the present review. Three were retrospective studies. The remaining 15 studies were prospective randomized clinical trials. The supervised and home-based protocols did not show an overall significant difference in the outcomes achieved within the studies reviewed. The mean CMS was 77.2. The heterogeneity of the rehabilitation protocols used in the studies reviewed makes it difficult to draw definite conclusion on the subject. Supervision and location does not seem to directly determine the final outcomes. Numerous variables, including comorbidities and motivation, could influence the results and deserve to be accounted for in future investigations. Better designed studies are needed to show a clear superiority of one rehabilitation approach over another and its applicability to the various surgical procedures involving the knee.

  10. Environmental impact on young children's participation in home-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Erin C; Khetani, Mary A

    2017-04-01

    To test the effect of child, family, and environmental factors on young children's participation in home-based activities. Caregivers of young children were recruited using convenience and snowball sampling. Participants were 395 caregivers of children (222 males, 173 females) aged from 1 month to 5 years and 11 months. Demographic items and the home section of the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure were administered online, followed by completion of the daily activities, mobility, and social/cognitive domains of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer Adaptive Test by telephone interview. A structural equation model fitted the data well (comparative fit index=0.91) and explained 31.2% of the variance in perceived environmental support and 42.5% of the variance in home involvement. Functional limitations and performance had an indirect effect on young children's participation through their effect on perceived environmental support. Specifically, fewer functional limitations and higher task performance were associated with greater environmental support, which in turn predicted higher levels of home involvement. Results suggest the importance of a young child's functional abilities and task performance on caregiver perceptions of environmental support at home, and the impact of environmental support on a child's participation in home-based activities during the early childhood period. Results warrant replication with more diverse samples to evaluate model generalizability. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press.

  11. Home-based care for reducing morbidity and mortality in people infected with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Taryn; Busgeeth, Karishma

    2010-01-20

    Home-based care (HBC), to promote quality-of-life and limit hospital care, is used in many countries, especially where public health services are overburdened. This review assessed the effects of HBC on morbidity and mortality in those with HIV/AIDS. Randomised and controlled clinical trials of HBC including all forms of treatment, care and support offered in the home were included. A highly sensitive search strategy was used to search CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AIDSearch, CINAHL, PsycINFO/LIT. Risk of bias of all trials was assessed. All randomised and controlled clinical trials were included of HIV/AIDS positive individuals, adults and children, of any gender, and from any setting. Home-based care, provided by family, lay and/or professional people, including all forms of treatment, care and support offered in the HIV/AIDS positive person's home as compared to hospital or institutional based care Titles, abstracts and descriptor terms of the electronic search results were screened independently by two authors for relevance based on the types of participants, interventions, and study design. Full text articles were obtained of all selected abstracts and an eligibility form was used to determine final study selection. Data extraction and assessment of risk of bias were done independently. Narrative synthesis of results were done. Relevant effect measures and the 95% confidence intervals were reported. Ten studies randomised individuals and trial sizes varied from n=31 to n=549. One study randomised 392 households and enrolled a total of 509 persons with HIV and 1,521 HIV-negative household members. Two ongoing studies were identified. Intensive home-based nursing significantly improved self-reported knowledge of HIV and medications, self-reported adherence and difference in pharmacy drug refill (1 study). Another study, comparing proportion of participants with greater than 90% adherence, found statistically significant differences over time but no significant

  12. The impact of telehealth support for patients with diabetes or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on unscheduled secondary care utilisation: a service evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew CK Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Telehealth has been promoted as an adjunct to managing patients with long-term conditions. It has been used in various settings and for different disease groups. However, robust evidence for the efficacy of telehealth is currently lacking.Objectives To evaluate the impact of a telehealth service on emergency admissions and emergency department (ED attendances.Methods We evaluated a telehealth service providing supported self-management to patients that was implemented in Nottingham City. Two groups of patients (‘graduates’ of the Nottingham telehealth service and service ‘decliners’ were compared for two periods; 2009 (pre-service implementation and 2011. Eighty-nine pairs of graduates and decliners were identified who were matched for age and sex. The number and cost of emergency admissions and ED attendances for these patients were then collated and analysed.Results Graduates had significantly fewer emergency admissions and ED attendances compared with decliners in 2011. However, differences of a similar magnitude in emergency admissions and ED attendances were found in 2009. Telehealth service users were likely to be qualitatively different from decliners, reflecting a degree of self-selection. This suggests that decliners were more likely to have a  confounding reason for not engaging with telehealth, such as greater disease severity.Conclusions This service review found no evidence that the Nottingham telehealth service has had a significant impact on secondary care utilisation in the short term. Longer term follow up is needed to establish conclusively whether telehealth initiatives like the Nottingham telehealth service does lead to tangible patient benefits and provide value for money.

  13. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Tetzlaff, Kay; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel Fm; Disse, Bernd; Finnigan, Helen; Magnussen, Helgo; Calverley, Peter Ma

    2016-01-01

    The WISDOM study (NCT00975195) reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland-Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume in 1 second values recorded at home and in the clinic (mean difference of -0.05 L), which may be due to suboptimal patient effort in performing unsupervised recordings. However, this difference remained consistent over time. Overall, these data demonstrate that home-based and in-clinic spirometric measurements were equally valid and reliable for assessing lung function in patients with COPD, and suggest that home-based spirometry may be a useful tool to facilitate analysis of changes in lung function on a day-to-day basis.

  14. Toward a More Usable Home-Based Video Telemedicine System: A Heuristic Evaluation of the Clinician User Interfaces of Home-Based Video Telemedicine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnisarman, Sruthy; Narasimha, Shraddhaa; Chalil Madathil, Kapil; Welch, Brandon; Brinda, Fnu; Ashok, Aparna; McElligott, James

    2017-04-24

    Telemedicine is the use of technology to provide and support health care when distance separates the clinical service and the patient. Home-based telemedicine systems involve the use of such technology for medical support and care connecting the patient from the comfort of their homes with the clinician. In order for such a system to be used extensively, it is necessary to understand not only the issues faced by the patients in using them but also the clinician. The aim of this study was to conduct a heuristic evaluation of 4 telemedicine software platforms-Doxy.me, Polycom, Vidyo, and VSee-to assess possible problems and limitations that could affect the usability of the system from the clinician's perspective. It was found that 5 experts individually evaluated all four systems using Nielsen's list of heuristics, classifying the issues based on a severity rating scale. A total of 46 unique problems were identified by the experts. The heuristics most frequently violated were visibility of system status and Error prevention amounting to 24% (11/46 issues) each. Esthetic and minimalist design was second contributing to 13% (6/46 issues) of the total errors. Heuristic evaluation coupled with a severity rating scale was found to be an effective method for identifying problems with the systems. Prioritization of these problems based on the rating provides a good starting point for resolving the issues affecting these platforms. There is a need for better transparency and a more streamlined approach for how physicians use telemedicine systems. Visibility of the system status and speaking the users' language are keys for achieving this.

  15. Stroke: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when blood flow to your ... cells start dying. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  16. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  17. Stroke rehabilitation at home before and after discharge reduced disability and improved quality of life: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Østergaard, Ann; Kjær, Pia; Skerris, Anja; Skou, Christina; Christoffersen, Jane; Seest, Line Skou; Poulsen, Mai Bang; Rønholt, Finn; Overgaard, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate if home-based rehabilitation of inpatients improved outcome compared to standard care. Interventional, randomised, safety/efficacy open-label trial. University hospital stroke unit in collaboration with three municipalities. Seventy-one eligible stroke patients (41 women) with focal neurological deficits hospitalised in a stroke unit for more than three days and in need of rehabilitation. Thirty-eight patients were randomised to home-based rehabilitation during hospitalization and for up to four weeks after discharge to replace part of usual treatment and rehabilitation services. Thirty-three control patients received treatment and rehabilitation following usual guidelines for the treatment of stroke patients. Ninety days post-stroke the modified Rankin Scale score was the primary endpoint. Other outcome measures were the modified Barthel-100 Index, Motor Assessment Scale, CT-50 Cognitive Test, EuroQol-5D, Body Mass Index and treatment-associated economy. Thirty-one intervention and 30 control patients completed the study. Patients in the intervention group achieved better modified Rankin Scale score (Intervention median = 2, IQR = 2-3; Control median = 3, IQR = 2-4; P=0.04). EuroQol-5D quality of life median scores were improved in intervention patients (Intervention median = 0.77, IQR = 0.66-0.79; Control median = 0.66, IQR = 0.56 - 0.72; P=0.03). The total amount of home-based training in minutes highly correlated with mRS, Barthel, Motor Assessment Scale and EuroQol-5D™ scores (P-values ranging from Phome-based rehabilitation reduced disability and increased quality of life. Compared to standard care, home-based stroke rehabilitation was more cost-effective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Telehealth services in rural and remote Australia: a systematic review of models of care and factors influencing success and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Natalie K; Caffery, Liam J; Smith, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    With the escalating costs of health care, issues with recruitment and retention of health practitioners in rural areas, and poor economies of scale, the question of delivering people to services or services to people is a dilemma for health authorities around the world. People living in rural areas have poorer health outcomes compared to their urban counterparts, and the problem of how to provide health care and deliver services in rural locations is an ongoing challenge. Telehealth services can efficiently and effectively improve access to healthcare for people living in rural and remote areas of Australia. However, telehealth services are not mainstream or routinely available in many rural and remote locations. The barriers to integration of telehealth into mainstream practice have been well described, but not the factors that may influence the success and sustainability of a service. Our aim was to collate, review and synthesise the available literature regarding telehealth services in rural and remote locations of Australia, and to identify the factors associated with their sustained success. A systematic literature review of peer-reviewed and grey literature was undertaken. Electronic databases were searched for potentially relevant articles. Reference lists of retrieved articles and the grey literature were also searched. Searches identified 970 potentially eligible articles published between 1988 and 2015. Studies and manuscripts of any type were included if they described telehealth services (store-and-forward or real-time videoconferencing) to provide clinical service or education and training related to health care in rural or remote locations of Australia. Data were extracted according to pre-defined criteria and checked for completeness and accuracy by a second reviewer. Any disagreements were resolved with discussion with a third researcher. All articles were appraised for quality and levels of evidence. Data were collated and grouped into categories

  19. Experiences with tele-health follow-up in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raunsbæk Knudsen, Line; Thurah, Annette De; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to explore the experiences of a patient-reported outcome (PRO)-based tele-health follow-up from the perspective of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and their experiences of increasing their active role and responsibility for disease control in particular. METHODS......: Adopting a strategy of interpretive description, we conducted individual, semi-structured interviews with 15 RA patients participating in a tele-health follow-up. Participants were selected purposively and consecutive from both genders and with various ages, disease durations and disease severity....... The analysis was inductive with a constant comparative approach. First, we identified the main themes conveying the participants' experiences. Then, we constructed patient typologies to explain different perspectives on the tele-health follow-up. RESULTS: Five themes covered the participants' experiences: 'A...

  20. Home-based interval training increases endurance capacity in adults with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Camilla; Hedström, Magnus; Wadell, Karin; Dellborg, Mikael; Ahnfelt, Anders; Zetterström, Anna-Klara; Öhrn, Amanda; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-12-04

    The beneficial effects of exercise training in acquired heart failure and coronary artery disease are well known and have been implemented in current treatment guidelines. Knowledge on appropriate exercise training regimes for adults with congenital heart disease is limited, thus further studies are needed. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of home-based interval exercise training on maximal endurance capacity and peak exercise capacity. Randomized controlled trial. Twenty-six adults with complex congenital heart disease were recruited from specialized units for adult congenital heart disease. Patients were randomized to either an intervention group-12 weeks of home-based interval exercise training on a cycle ergometer (n = 16), or a control group (n = 10). The latter was instructed to maintain their habitual physical activities. An incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test and a constant work rate cardiopulmonary exercise test at 75% of peak workload were performed preintervention and postintervention. Twenty-three patients completed the protocol and were followed (intervention n = 13, control n = 10). Postintervention exercise time at constant work rate cardiopulmonary exercise test increased in the intervention group compared to controls (median[range] 12[-4 to 52]min vs 0[-4 to 5]min, P = .001). At incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test, peak VO2 increased 15% within the intervention group (P = .019) compared to 2% within the control group (P = .8). However, in comparison between the groups no difference was found (285[-200 to 535] ml/min vs 17[-380 to 306] ml/min, P = .10). In addition, peak workload at incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test increased in the intervention group compared to controls (20[-10 to 70]W vs 0[-20 to 15]W, P = .003). Home-based interval exercise training increased endurance capacity and peak exercise capacity in adults with complex congenital heart disease. Aerobic endurance might

  1. Important features of home-based support services for older Australians and their informal carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Nikki; Gill, Liz; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Cameron, Ian D; Patterson, Jan; Crotty, Maria; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2015-11-01

    In Australia, newly initiated, publicly subsidised 'Home-Care Packages' designed to assist older people (≥ 65 years of age) living in their own home must now be offered on a 'consumer-directed care' (CDC) basis by service providers. However, CDC models have largely developed in the absence of evidence on users' views and preferences. The aim of this study was to determine what features (attributes) of consumer-directed, home-based support services are important to older people and their informal carers to inform the design of a discrete choice experiment (DCE). Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted in December 2012-November 2013 with 17 older people receiving home-based support services and 10 informal carers from 5 providers located in South Australia and New South Wales. Salient service characteristics important to participants were determined using thematic and constant comparative analysis and formulated into attributes and attribute levels for presentation within a DCE. Initially, eight broad themes were identified: information and knowledge, choice and control, self-managed continuum, effective co-ordination, effective communication, responsiveness and flexibility, continuity and planning. Attributes were formulated for the DCE by combining overlapping themes such as effective communication and co-ordination, and the self-managed continuum and planning into single attributes. Six salient service features that characterise consumer preferences for the provision of home-based support service models were identified: choice of provider, choice of support worker, flexibility in care activities provided, contact with the service co-ordinator, managing the budget and saving unspent funds. Best practice indicates that qualitative research with individuals who represent the population of interest should guide attribute selection for a DCE and this is the first study to employ such methods in aged care service provision. Further development of

  2. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... after a Stroke Adapting the Home after a Stroke Caregiver Introduction What is Aphasia? Stroke Recovery Guides ...

  3. Economic evaluation of home-based telebehavioural health care compared to in-person treatment delivery for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounthavong, Mark; Pruitt, Larry D; Smolenski, Derek J; Gahm, Gregory A; Bansal, Aasthaa; Hansen, Ryan N

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Home-based telebehavioural healthcare improves access to mental health care for patients restricted by travel burden. However, there is limited evidence assessing the economic value of home-based telebehavioural health care compared to in-person care. We sought to compare the economic impact of home-based telebehavioural health care and in-person care for depression among current and former US service members. Methods We performed trial-based cost-minimisation and cost-utility analyses to assess the economic impact of home-based telebehavioural health care versus in-person behavioural care for depression. Our analyses focused on the payer perspective (Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs) at three months. We also performed a scenario analysis where all patients possessed video-conferencing technology that was approved by these agencies. The cost-utility analysis evaluated the impact of different depression categories on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the model assumptions. Results In the base case analysis the total direct cost of home-based telebehavioural health care was higher than in-person care (US$71,974 versus US$20,322). Assuming that patients possessed government-approved video-conferencing technology, home-based telebehavioural health care was less costly compared to in-person care (US$19,177 versus US$20,322). In one-way sensitivity analyses, the proportion of patients possessing personal computers was a major driver of direct costs. In the cost-utility analysis, home-based telebehavioural health care was dominant when patients possessed video-conferencing technology. Results from probabilistic sensitivity analyses did not differ substantially from base case results. Discussion Home-based telebehavioural health care is dependent on the cost of supplying video-conferencing technology to patients but offers the opportunity to

  4. The invisible homebound: setting quality-of-care standards for home-based primary and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Bruce; Carlson, Charlotte M; Saliba, Debra; Ritchie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Approximately four million adults in the United States are homebound, and many of them cannot access office-based primary care. Home-based medical care can improve outcomes and reduce health care costs, but this care operates in a quality measurement desert, having been largely left out of the national conversation on care quality. To address this shortcoming, two of the authors created the National Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care Network, an organization whose members include exemplary home-based medical practices, professional societies, and patient advocacy groups. This article describes the current status of home-based medical care in the United States and offers a brief narrative of a fictional homebound patient and the health events and fragmented care she faces. The article then describes the network's quality-of-care framework, which includes ten quality-of-care domains, thirty-two standards, and twenty quality indicators that are being tested in the field. The same two authors also developed a practice-based registry that will be used for quality-of-care benchmarking, practice-based quality improvement, performance reporting, and comparative effectiveness research. Together, these steps should help bring home-based medical care further into the mainstream of US health care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  5. Development of Quality Indicators to Address Abuse and Neglect in Home-Based Primary Care and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Orla C; Ritchie, Christine S; Fathi, Roya; Garrigues, Sarah K; Saliba, Debra; Leff, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    To develop candidate quality indicators (QIs) for the quality standard of "addressing abuse and neglect" in the setting of home-based medical care. Systematic literature review of both the peer-reviewed and gray literature. Home-based primary and palliative care practices. Homebound community-dwelling older adults. Articles were identified to inform the development of candidate indicators of the quality by which home-based primary and palliative care practices addressed abuse and neglect. The literature guided the development of patient-level QIs and practice-level quality standards. A technical expert panel (TEP) representing exemplary home-based primary care and palliative care providers then participated in a modified Delphi process to assess the validity and feasibility of each measure and identify candidate QIs suitable for testing in the field. The literature review yielded 4,371 titles and abstracts that were reviewed; 25 publications met final inclusion criteria and informed development of nine candidate QIs. The TEP rated all but one of the nine candidate indicators as having high validity and feasibility. Translating the complex problem of addressing abuse and neglect into QIs may ultimately serve to improve care delivered to vulnerable home-limited adults who receive home-based medical care. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Socioeconomic Differences in and Predictors of Home-Based Palliative Care Health Service Use in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaoli; Guerriere, Denise N; Zhao, Hongzhong; Coyte, Peter C

    2017-07-18

    The use of health services may vary across people with different socioeconomic statuses, and may be determined by many factors. The purposes of this study were (i) to examine the socioeconomic differences in the propensity and intensity of use for three main home-based health services, that is, home-based palliative care physician visits, nurse visits and personal support worker (PSW) hours; and (ii) to explore the determinants of the use of home-based palliative care services. A prospective cohort study was employed. A total of 181 caregivers were interviewed biweekly over the course of the palliative care trajectory, yielding a total of 994 interviews. The propensity and intensity of health service use were examined using logistic regression and negative binomial regression, respectively. The results demonstrated that both the propensity and intensity of home-based nurse and PSW visits fell with socioeconomic status. The use of home-based palliative care services was not concentrated in high socioeconomic status groups. The common predictors of health service use in the three service categories were patient age, the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) score and place of death. These findings may assist health service planners in the appropriate allocation of resources and service packages to meet the complex needs of palliative care populations.

  7. Barriers to Compliance in a Home-Based Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Program in Female High School Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill; Brooks, M Alison

    2016-02-01

    Supervised injury prevention programs can decrease injuries in female high school athletes. Research regarding home-based injury prevention programs is limited. To identify barriers to compliance with a home-based injury prevention program in rural Wisconsin female high school basketball players. Cross-sectional study including participants from 9 rural Wisconsin high schools. Participants were instructed in appropriate exercise form and DVD use in a group-based format. Participants were instructed to perform the home-based program 3 times per week for 8 weeks. Participants then completed a survey regarding their program compliance. Exercise instruction and surveys were completed in the participant's high school gymnasium. Female students in grades 9-12, who intended to play basketball, were invited to participate. Of the 175 eligible students, 66 enrolled in the study. The intervention consisted of a DVD-based injury prevention program. Our hypothesis--that compliance with a home-based injury prevention program would be low--was established prior to study commencement. Outcome measures consisted of self-reported responses by participants. Statistics are descriptive. Follow-up surveys were completed by 27 of 66 participants, with 50% reporting performing the injury prevention program 0-3 times per week. The reasons for low compliance included "I did not have time to do the program," followed by "I forgot to do the program." Wisconsin female high school basketball players demonstrated very low compliance with a home-based injury prevention program. This paper identifies barriers to compliance.

  8. Nursing professionals' experiences of the facilitators and barriers to the use of telehealth applications: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-08-03

    The aim of the study was to synthesise the best available research evidence on nursing professionals' experiences of the facilitators and barriers to the use of online telehealth services in nursing practice. Telehealth is used to deliver healthcare services and health-related information by means of information and communication technology (ICT). The systematic review of qualitative studies was conducted using thematic synthesis of previous studies. International electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL, Eric, Web of Science/Web of Knowledge and Scopus, and Finnish databases Medic and Ohtanen were searched in spring 2013. In addition, the search was complemented in fall 2015. Following critical appraisal, 25 studies from 1998 to fall 2015 were reviewed and the findings were synthesised. Both facilitators and barriers were grouped into five main categories which were related to nurses' skills and attitudes, nurses' work and operations, organisational factors, patients and technology. The highest number of facilitators and barriers was found in the category focusing on nurses' work and operations. Based on the findings, nurses' skills and attitudes are preventing factors in the implementation of telehealth. There is also a need to focus on patients' role in telehealth usage although the findings support positive adoption of ICT tools among patients. The findings call for further development of technological tools used in nursing practice and healthcare services. The change from traditional face-to-face nursing to the use of telehealth calls for local agreements and further discussions among professionals on how this change will be accepted and implemented into practice. In addition, organisations need to make sure that nurses have enough resources and support for telehealth use. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Stroke pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venketasubramanian, N

    2001-07-01

    Stroke pathways are task-orientated structured multidisciplinary care plans which detail essential steps and interventions during the period of care of a "typical" stroke patient. Pathway development and implementation are best achieved by an appointed champion leading a multidisciplinary team of health care workers and administrators, who will also be the end users of the pathway. Pathway development involves reviews of existing clinical practice guidelines and pathways, followed by documentation, interdigitation and prioritization of care requirements at different time points in the various spheres, taking into consideration local philosophies and practices. These spheres could include investigations, pharmacologic treatment, rehabilitative therapy, nursing measures, and patient education. This would result in evidence-based holistic quality care, wide support base, efficient service provision, reduced costs and length of stay, less practice variation, improved communication among disciplines, enhanced patient-staff relationship, ease of audit and research opportunities. Components of the pathway could include a patient summary sheet, multidisciplinary record of the various activities structured on a day-to-day basis, sign-off columns for staff responsible for performing those activity, variance sheet, and separate protocols for specific issues. Implementation requires training of users, pilot runs, feedback, regular revisions, monitoring of compliance, and analysis of variances. Widespread implementation of pathways may be hindered by lack of support, and concerns about increased time requirements and costs, stifling of innovation, restriction of application of clinical judgement, lack of applicability to all patients, misuse and legal issues. However, a well-designed pathway will ensure quality care in a cost-efficient manner, benefiting the patient, carer and the health care service.

  10. Exploring views on long term rehabilitation for people with stroke in a developing country: findings from focus group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors. PMID:24606911

  11. Home-based chronic care. An expanded integrative model for home health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Paula; Hennessey, Beth; Harrison, Gregory; Fagan, Martha; Norman, Barbara; Suter, W Newton

    2008-04-01

    The Chronic Care Model (CCM) developed by is an influential and accepted guide for the care of patients with chronic disease. Wagner acknowledges a current healthcare focus on acute care needs that often circumvents chronic care coordination. He identifies the need for a "division of labor" to assist the primary care physician with this neglected function. This article posits that the role of chronic care coordination assistance and disease management fits within the purview of home healthcare and should be central to home health chronic care delivery. An expanded Home-Based Chronic Care Model (HBCCM) is described that builds on Wagner's model and integrates salient theories from fields beyond medicine. The expanded model maximizes the potential for disease self-management success and is intended to provide a foundation for home health's integral role in chronic disease management.

  12. Evaluation of A Novel Information-Sharing Instrument for Home-Based Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Koichiro; Shimada, Masanari; Kadoya, Shinichi; Endo, Naoki; Ishiguro, Kaname; Takashima, Rumi; Amemiya, Yoko; Fujikawa, Yasunaga; Ikezaki, Tomoaki; Takeuchi, Miyako; Kitazawa, Hidenori; Iida, Hiroyuki; Koseki, Shiro; Morita, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Koji; Kashii, Tatsuhiko; Murakami, Nozomu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine the feasibility and usefulness of a novel region-based pathway: the Regional Referral Clinical Pathway for Home-Based Palliative Care. Method: This was a feasibility study to evaluate the frequency of variances and the perceived usefulness of pathway using in-depth interviews. All patients with cancer referred to the palliative care team between 2011 and 2013 and received home care services were enrolled. Result: A total of 44 patients were analyzed, and pathway was completed in all the patients. The target outcome was achieved in 61.4% while some variances occurred in 54.5%. Nine categories were identified as the usefulness of the pathway, such as reviewing and sharing information and promoting communication, education, motivation, and relationships. Conclusion: This novel pathway is feasible and seems to be useful. PMID:24814723

  13. Challenges and Strategies in Providing Home Based Primary Care for Refugees in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febles, C; Nies, M A; Fanning, K; Tavernier, S S

    2017-12-01

    The recent crisis in the Middle East has prompted the exodus of millions of refugees from the region who are at present seeking shelter across Europe and in the United States. Among the most immediate needs of refugees upon arrival in a host country is health care, and it is one of the most sustained interactions they experience. Home visits are a common form of primary care for refugees. The authors review the literature to identify themes related to challenges and strategies for providing home based primary care to refugees. The literature review was performed by searching cross-disciplinary databases utilizing Onesearch, but focusing primarily on results produced through CINAHL, EBSCOHOST, and Pub Med databases. To maximize the number of studies included, there was no time frame placed upon publication dates of articles within the search. A total of 55 articles were included in this paper.

  14. Teaching math skills to at-risk students using home-based peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Kristin H; Vollmer, Timothy R

    2007-01-01

    Home-based peer tutoring was used to teach math skills to 4 girls with deficits in mathematics and histories of abuse or neglect. Girls living in the same home formed tutoring dyads, and each participant served as both the peer tutor and the tutee during the course of the study. At the initiation of the tutoring intervention, an expert tutor provided multiple 3-min tutoring sessions to the designated peer tutor on three or four mathematics skills. The peer tutor concurrently provided 3-min tutoring sessions on the same skills to the tutee using a multiple baseline design. Results showed that participants improved their performance on all target skills. Additional interventions were implemented for some skills to improve accuracy further. Maintenance tests were also administered after 3 to 5 months of no practice on the skills. Results showed that tutors and tutees maintained their accuracy on 7 of the 12 skills assessed.

  15. Development and Evaluation of an Automated, Home-Based, Electronic Questionnaire for Detecting COPD Exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de B. Velazquez-Peña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration between patients and their medical and technical experts enabled the development of an automated questionnaire for the early detection of COPD exacerbations (AQCE. The questionnaire consisted of fourteen questions and was implemented on a computer system for use by patients at home in an un-supervised environment. Psychometric evaluation was conducted after a 6-month field trial. Fifty-two patients were involved in the development of the questionnaire. Reproducibility was studied using 19 patients (ICC = 0.94. Sixteen out of the 19 subjects started the 6 month-field trial with the computer application. Cronbach’s alpha of 0.81 was achieved. In the concurrent validity analysis, a correlation of 0.80 (p = 0.002 with the CCQ was reported. The results suggest that AQCE is a valid and reliable questionnaire, showing that an automated home-based electronic questionnaire may enable early detection of exacerbations of COPD.

  16. Home-based caregiving for people living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieh, Theresa M; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O

    2013-05-01

    Caregiving for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) reportedly affects the physical, mental, and socioeconomic well-being of family and volunteer caregivers. This study uses the PEN-3 cultural model to examine the positive, existential (unique), or negative roles and expectations that influence HIV and AIDS caregiving among home-based caregivers (HBCs) in Limpopo, South Africa. Data from 41 women who participated in four focus group discussions held in Limpopo provides a deeper understanding of culture in providing care and support to PLWHAs. Using the cultural empowerment domain of PEN-3, our analyses revealed the following themes: perceptions associated with HIV/AIDS caregiving, HBCs assuming the roles of family, and voicelessness of HBCs due to the lack of support. The findings highlight the resilience of HBCs in South Africa in responding to the stigmatized disease of HIV/AIDS in the context of cultural expectation of caring for the sick.

  17. Analyzing the Interprofessional Working of a Home-Based Primary Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Carrier, Tracy; Neysmith, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Increasingly, interprofessional teams are responsible for providing integrated health care services. Effective teams, however, are not the result of chance but require careful planning and ongoing attention to team processes. Based on a case study involving interviews, participant observation, and a survey, we identified key attributes for effective interprofessional working (IPW) within a home-based primary care (HBPC) setting. Recognizing the importance of a theoretical model that reflects the multidimensional nature of team effectiveness research, we employed the integrated team effectiveness model to analyze our findings. The results indicated that a shared vision, common goals, respect, and trust among team members – as well as processes for ongoing communication, effective leadership, and mechanisms for conflict resolution – are vital in the development of a high-functioning IPW team. The ambiguity and uncertainty surrounding the context of service provision (clients' homes), as well the negotiation of external relationships in the HBPC field, require further investigation.

  18. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-Compliant Ocular Telehealth Network for the Remote Diagnosis and Management of Diabetic Retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Garg, Seema [University of North Carolina; Fox, Karen [Delta Health Alliance; Chaum, Edward [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present the design and implementation of a regional ocular telehealth network for remote assessment and management of diabetic retinopathy (DR), including the design requirements, network topology, protocol design, system work flow, graphics user interfaces, and performance evaluation. The Telemedical Retinal Image Analysis and Diagnosis Network is a computer-aided, image analysis telehealth paradigm for the diagnosis of DR and other retinal diseases using fundus images acquired from primary care end users delivering care to underserved patient populations in the mid-South and southeastern United States.

  19. Bayesian Spatial NBDA for Diffusion Data with Home-Base Coordinates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenna F Nightingale

    Full Text Available Network-based diffusion analysis (NBDA is a statistical method that allows the researcher to identify and quantify a social influence on the spread of behaviour through a population. Hitherto, NBDA analyses have not directly modelled spatial population structure. Here we present a spatial extension of NBDA, applicable to diffusion data where the spatial locations of individuals in the population, or of their home bases or nest sites, are available. The method is based on the estimation of inter-individual associations (for association matrix construction from the mean inter-point distances as represented on a spatial point pattern of individuals, nests or home bases. We illustrate the method using a simulated dataset, and show how environmental covariates (such as that obtained from a satellite image, or from direct observations in the study area can also be included in the analysis. The analysis is conducted in a Bayesian framework, which has the advantage that prior knowledge of the rate at which the individuals acquire a given task can be incorporated into the analysis. This method is especially valuable for studies for which detailed spatially structured data, but no other association data, is available. Technological advances are making the collection of such data in the wild more feasible: for example, bio-logging facilitates the collection of a wide range of variables from animal populations in the wild. We provide an R package, spatialnbda, which is hosted on the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN. This package facilitates the construction of association matrices with the spatial x and y coordinates as the input arguments, and spatial NBDA analyses.

  20. Clinical impact of a home-based palliative care program: a hospice-private payer partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Christopher W; Tangeman, John C; Rudra, Carole B; Grant, Pei C; Luczkiewicz, Debra L; Mylotte, Kathleen M; Riemer, William D; Marien, Melanie J; Serehali, Amin M

    2014-11-01

    Outpatient programs have been traditionally offered in the U.S. under programs such as the Medicare Hospice Benefit. Recommendations now emphasize a blended model in which palliative care is offered concurrently with curative approaches at the onset of serious or life-limiting disease. The efficacy of nonhospice outpatient palliative care programs is not well understood. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical impact of a home-based palliative care program, Home Connections, implemented as a partnership between a not-for-profit hospice and two private insurers. This was a prospective, observational, database study of 499 Home Connections participants enrolled between July 1, 2008, and May 31, 2013. Measured outcomes were advance directive completion, site of death, symptom severity over time, program satisfaction, and hospice referral and average length of stay. Seventy-one percent of participants completed actionable advance directives after enrollment, and the site of death was home for 47% of those who died during or after participation in the program. Six of eight symptom domains (anxiety, appetite, dyspnea, well-being, depression, and nausea) showed improvement. Patients, caregivers, and physicians gave high program satisfaction scores (93%-96%). Home Connections participants who subsequently enrolled in hospice care had a longer average length of stay of 77.9 days compared with all other hospice referrals (average length of stay 56.5 days). A home-based palliative care program was developed between two local commercial payers and a not-for-profit hospice. Not only did this program improve symptom management, advance directive completion, and satisfaction, but it also facilitated the transition of patients into hospice care, when appropriate. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinic and Home-Based Behavioral Intervention for Obesity in Preschoolers: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Lori J; Spear Filigno, Stephanie; Bolling, Christopher; Ratcliff, Megan B; Kichler, Jessica C; Robson, Shannon M; Simon, Stacey L; McCullough, Mary Beth; Clifford, Lisa M; Odar Stough, Cathleen; Zion, Cynthia; Ittenbach, Richard F

    2018-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that an innovative skills-based behavioral family clinic and home-based intervention (LAUNCH) would reduce body mass index z score (BMIz) compared with motivational interviewing and to standard care in preschool-aged children with obesity. Randomized controlled trial with children between the ages of 2 and 5 years above the 95th percentile for body mass index for age and sex recruited from 27 pediatrician offices across 10 recruitment cycles between March 12, 2012 and June 8, 2015. Children were randomized to LAUNCH (an 18-session clinic and home-based behavioral intervention), motivational interviewing (delivered at the same frequency as LAUNCH), or standard care (no formal intervention). Weight and height were measured by assessors blinded to participant assignment. The primary outcome, BMIz at month 6 after adjusting for baseline BMIz, was tested separately comparing LAUNCH with motivational interviewing and LAUNCH with standard care using regression-based analysis of covariance models. A total of 151 of the 167 children randomized met intent-to-treat criteria and 92% completed the study. Children were 76% White and 57% female, with an average age of 55 months and BMI percentile of 98.57, with no demographic differences between the groups. LAUNCH participants demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in BMIz (mean = -0.32, SD = ±0.33) compared with motivational interviewing (mean = -0.05, SD = ±0.27), P behavioral skills-based intervention is necessary to reduce obesity. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01546727. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Individualized, home-based interactive training of cerebral palsy children delivered through the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Tue H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The available health resources limit the amount of therapy that may be offered to children with cerebral palsy and the amount of training in each session may be insufficient to drive the neuroplastic changes, which are necessary for functional improvements to take place. The aim of this pilot study was to provide proof of concept that individualized and supervised interactive home-based training delivered through the internet may provide an efficient way of maintaining intensive training of children with cerebral palsy over prolonged periods. Methods 9 children (aged 9-13 years with cerebral palsy were included in the study. Motor, perceptual and cognitive abilities were evaluated before and after 20 weeks of home-based training delivered through the internet. Results The children and their families reported great enthusiasm with the training system and all experienced subjective improvements in motor abilities and self-esteem. The children on average trained for 74 hours during a 20 week period equalling just over 30 minutes per day. Significant improvements in functional muscle strength measured as the frontal and lateral step-up and sit-to-stand tests were observed. Assessment of Motor and processing skills also showed significant increases. Endurance measured as the Bruce test showed a significant improvement, whereas there was no significant change in the 6 min walking test. Balance (Romberg was unchanged. Visual perceptual abilities increased significantly. Conclusions We conclude that it is feasible to deliver interactive training of children with cerebral palsy at home through the internet and thereby ensure more intensive and longer lasting training than what is normally offered to this group.

  3. Perceived acceptability of home-based couples voluntary HIV counseling and testing in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njau, B; Watt, M H; Ostermann, J; Manongi, R; Sikkema, K J

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that 5.6% of the Tanzanian population ages 15-49 are infected with HIV, but only 30% of adults have ever had an HIV test. Couples' testing has proven to increase testing coverage and introduce HIV prevention, but barriers include access to testing services and unequal gender dynamics in relationships. Innovative approaches are needed to address barriers to couple's testing and increase uptake of HIV testing. Using qualitative data collection methods, a formative study was conducted to assess the acceptability of a home-based couples counseling and testing (HBCCT) approach. Eligible study participants included married men and women, HIV-infected individuals, health care and home-based care providers, voluntary counseling and testing counselors, and community leaders. A total of 91 individuals participated in focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews conducted between September 2009 and January 2010 in rural settings in Northern Tanzania. An HBCCT intervention appears to be broadly acceptable among participants. Benefits of HBCCT were identified in terms of access, confidentiality, and strengthening the relationship. Fears of negative consequences from knowing one's HIV status, including stigma, blame, physical abuse, or divorce, remain a concern and a potential barrier to the successful provision of the intervention. Lessons for implementation highlighted the importance of appointments for home visits, building relationships of confidence and trust between counselors and clients, and assessing and responding to a couple's readiness to undergo HIV testing. HBCCT should addresses HIV stigma, emphasize confidentiality, and improve communication skills for disclosure and decision-making among couples.

  4. National Structural Survey of Veterans Affairs Home-Based Primary Care Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuza, Jurgis; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Olsan, Tobie; Cai, Xeuya; Dang, Stuti; Intrator, Orna; Li, Jiejin; Gao, Shan; Kinosian, Bruce; Edes, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    To describe the current structural and practice characteristics of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Home-Based Primary Care (HBPC) program. We designed a national survey and surveyed HBPC program directors on-line using REDCap. We received 236 surveys from 394 identified HBPC sites (60% response rate). HBPC site characteristics were quantified using closed-ended formats. HBPC program directors were most often registered nurses, and HBPC programs primarily served veterans with complex chronic illnesses that were at high risk of hospitalization and nursing home care. Primary care was delivered using interdisciplinary teams, with nurses, social workers, and registered dietitians as team members in more than 90% of the sites. Most often, nurse practitioners were the principal primary care providers (PCPs), typically working with nurse case managers. Nearly 60% of the sites reported dual PCPs involving VA and community-based physicians. Nearly all sites provided access to a core set of comprehensive services and programs (e.g., case management, supportive home health care). At the same time, there were variations according to site (e.g., size, location (urban, rural), use of non-VA hospitals, primary care models used). HBPC sites reflected the rationale and mission of HBPC by focusing on complex chronic illness of home-based veterans and providing comprehensive primary care using interdisciplinary teams. Our next series of studies will examine how HBPC site structural characteristics and care models are related to the processes and outcomes of care to determine whether there are best practice standards that define an optimal HBPC structure and care model or whether multiple approaches to HBPC better serve the needs of veterans. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Home-based vs inpatient education for children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapin, H; Hop, L; Ritchie, E; Jayabalan, R; Evans, M; Browne-Cooper, K; Peter, S; Vine, J; Jones, T W; Davis, E A

    2017-11-01

    Initial management of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) varies worldwide with sparse high quality evidence regarding the impact of different models of care. To compare the inpatient model of care with a hybrid home-based alternative, examining metabolic and psychosocial outcomes, diabetes knowledge, length of stay, and patient satisfaction. The study design was a randomized-controlled trial. Inclusion criteria were: newly diagnosed T1D, aged 3 to 16 years, living within approximately 1 hour of the hospital, English-speaking, access to transport, absence of significant medical or psychosocial comorbidity. Patients were randomized to standard care with a 5 to 6 day initial inpatient stay or discharge after 2 days for home-based management. All patients received practical skills training in the first 48 hours. The intervention group was visited twice/day by a nurse for 2 days to assist with injections, then a multi-disciplinary team made 3 home visits over 2 weeks to complete education. Patients were followed up for 12 months. Clinical outcomes included HbA1c, hypoglycemia, and diabetes-related readmissions. Surveys measured patient satisfaction, diabetes knowledge, family impact, and quality of life. Fifty patients were recruited, 25 to each group. There were no differences in medical or psychosocial outcomes or diabetes knowledge. Average length of admission was 1.9 days shorter for the intervention group. Families indicated that with hindsight, most would choose home- over hospital-based management. With adequate support, children newly diagnosed with T1D can be safely managed at home following practical skills training. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Pediatric stroke; Stroke im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Homburg/Saar (Germany); Reinhard, H. [Abt. fuer Allgemeine Paediatrie, Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin Homburg/Saar (Germany); Reith, W. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Homburg/Saar (Germany); Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, 66421, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    About 3% of cerebral infarcts occur in children and young individuals, and pediatric stroke is even less common. Cerebral infarcts in children have different etiologies compared to adults. The common causes are described, as well as sinus venous occlusions. Cerebral venoocclusive disease is an elusive, often underdiagnosed cause of acute neurologic deterioration. (orig.) [German] Circa 3% aller Schlaganfaelle treten im Kindesalter auf, bei juengeren Erwachsenen ist das Vorkommen eines Schlaganfalls sogar noch seltener. Zerebrale Infarkte im Kindesalter haben meist eine andere Aetiologie, verglichen mit der von Erwachsenen. Die unterschiedlichsten Ursachen werden diskutiert. Die Sinus-Venen-Thrombose ist ein Krankheitsbild, das haeufig nicht rechtzeitig diagnostiziert wird; dieses wird ebenfalls in diesem Artikel beschrieben. (orig.)

  7. Home-based malaria management in children by women: Evidence from a malaria endemic community in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Nkiru Eugene-Ezebilo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the medicines and dosage that mothers who engage in home-based malaria management administer to children aged ≤ 5 years having signs and symptoms associated with malaria and to discuss the possibilities of designing an effective home-based malaria management strategy. Methods: The data were obtained from face-to-face semi-structured interviews conducted with mothers in the Ugbowo Community of Benin City, Nigeria who were selected using multistage systematic random sampling technique. The data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis, arithmetic mean, simple percentages and bar chart. Results: Approximately 90% of the interviewees engaged in home-based malaria management and 10% patronized the hospital. Most of the interviewees who engaged in home-based malaria management administered medicines that stimulates the production of red blood cells and supplies vitamins to children having signs and symptoms of malaria, followed by painkillers and anti-malaria and cough medicine was the least. Of the anti-malaria medicines administered to children, almost 80% of the interviewees administered chloroquine to children, 15% quinine and 3% halfan. Approximately 60% of the interviewees had the correct knowledge of the dosage regime for chloroquine, 38% for quinine and 9% for halfan. Conclusions: Although home-based malaria management is important, it cannot serve as a substitute to the hospital. Some diseases have signs and symptoms that are similar to that of malaria which implies that administering anti-malaria medicines to a child without confirmatory tests might lead to irredeemable complications in that child. If the strategy is to make home-based malaria management effective and sustainable mothers, community health officials should be involved in designing the strategy. Simple rapid diagnostic test kits for malaria should be made available to community health officials and pharmacists so that confirmatory tests could be

  8. Telehealth and Telenursing Perception and Knowledge Among University Students of Nursing in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Katarzyna; Kozłowska, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Telehealth and telenursing are becoming the new reality in studying nursing. Little is known whether undergraduate nursing students receive adequate education on telenursing for patient care. The aim for this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitude of nursing students toward telenursing. Subjects and Methods: Students of nursing faculties from medical universities in Poland were invited to complete a survey about telehealth and telenursing. The survey was conducted utilizing a Web-based surveying platform (www.mini-ankiety.pl). Results: We surveyed 308 undergraduate students of nursing faculty—291 females (94%) and 17 males (6%)—from medical universities in Poland. There were 116 students in their first year (course) (38%) and 96 students each in the second and third years (31%). Most of the students (220 [71%]) in the study group were in the age range from 20 to 23 years. The accurate definition of telemedicine was identified by 251 (82%) respondents. The definition of telenursing was recognized properly by 230 (75%) respondents. Of the students, 207 (67%) would anticipate telenursing service implementation into the national healthcare system, and 214 (69.49%) would appreciate the addition of telenursing classes to the curriculum. Students from a few universities showed significantly higher willingness to introduce telenursing classes into nursing curriculum and the intention to use telenursing services in their future nursing practice. The difference among universities could be influenced by regional e-health initiatives. This study has shown the rise of trust in technology along with the increase in the year of nursing study. Conclusions: The current generation of university students of nursing seems to be well educated in medical informatics and technology use. They are better prepared for and open to information society membership, including the practice of telehealth. The advancement in university education has an influence on

  9. Telehealth Protocol to Prevent Readmission Among High-Risk Patients With Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Daniel; McCall, Janice D; Primack, Brian A

    2017-11-01

    Congestive heart failure is the leading cause of hospital readmissions. We aimed to assess adherence to and effectiveness of a telehealth protocol designed to prevent hospital admissions for congestive heart failure. We recruited a random sample of 50 patients with congestive heart failure (mean age 61 years) from a managed care organization. We developed a telehealth platform allowing for daily, real-time reporting of health status and video conferencing. We defined adherence as the percentage of days on which the patient completed the daily check-in protocol. To assess efficacy, we compared admission and readmission rates between the 6-month intervention period and the prior 6 months. Primary outcomes were admissions and readmissions due to congestive heart failure, and secondary outcomes were admissions and readmissions due to any cause. Forty-eight patients (96%) completed the protocol. Approximately half (46%) were at high risk for readmission according to standardized measures. Median 120-day adherence was 96% (interquartile range, 92%-98%), and adherence did not significantly differ across sex, race, age, living situation, depression, cognitive ability, or risk for readmission. Approximately equal proportions of patients were admitted for all causes during the 6-month intervention period versus the comparison period (37% vs 43%; P = .32). Half as many patients were admitted for congestive heart failure during the 6-month intervention period compared with the comparison period (12% vs 25%; P = .11). Adherence to this telehealth protocol was excellent and consistent, even among high-risk patients. Future research should test the protocol using a more rigorous randomized design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of care management and telehealth: a longitudinal analysis using medicare data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Laurence C; Macaulay, Dendy S; Sorg, Rachael A; Diener, Melissa D; Johnson, Scott J; Birnbaum, Howard G

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate mortality and healthcare utilization effects of an intervention that combined care management and telehealth, targeting individuals with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or diabetes mellitus. Retrospective matched cohort study. Northwest United States. High-cost Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries (N = 1,767) enrolled in two Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services demonstration participating clinics and a propensity-score matched control group. The Health Buddy Program, which integrates a content-driven telehealth system with care management. Mortality, inpatient admissions, hospital days, and emergency department (ED) visits during the 2-year study period were measured. Cox-proportional hazard models and negative binomial regression models were used to assess the relationship between the intervention and survival and utilization, controlling for demographic and health characteristics that were statistically different between groups after matching. At 2 years, participants offered the Health Buddy Program had 15% lower risk-adjusted all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.74-0.98; P = .03) and had reductions in the number of quarterly inpatient admissions from baseline to the study period that were 18% greater than those of matched controls during this same time period (-0.035 vs -0.003; difference-in-differences = -0.032, 95% CI = -0.054 to -0.010, P = .005). No relationship was found between the Health Buddy Program and ED use or number of hospital days for participants who were hospitalized. The Health Buddy Program was most strongly associated with fewer admissions for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and mortality for those with congestive heart failure. Care management coupled with content-driven telehealth technology has potential to improve health outcomes in high-cost Medicare beneficiaries. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation

  11. Ostomy telehealth for cancer survivors: Design of the Ostomy Self-management Training (OSMT) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Virginia; Ercolano, Elizabeth; McCorkle, Ruth; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher S; Tallman, Nancy J; Passero, Frank; Raza, Sabreen; Cidav, Zuleyha; Holcomb, Michael; Weinstein, Ronald S; Hornbrook, Mark C; Krouse, Robert S

    2018-01-01

    An ostomy adversely affects health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a diverse population of cancer survivors and their caregivers. Hit-or-miss ostomy care, nurse counseling, and community referral have been the primary modes of self-management education and support in the peri-operative setting. Few evidence-based, systematic ostomy self-management programs are available to ensure optimal post-operative care. This paper describes the study design of a telehealth-based Ostomy Self-management Training (OSMT) program for cancer survivors and their caregivers. The study is a three-year, randomized trial that tests the effectiveness of the OSMT program on survivor activation, self-efficacy, and HRQOL. The intervention integrates goal setting and problem-solving approaches to enhance survivor activation and self-efficacy to carry out ostomy care. The curriculum is delivered via four group sessions administered by trained ostomy certified nurses (WOCNs) and peer ostomates. An additional session is offered to caregivers to address their needs in relation to ostomy care. Telehealth approaches through videoconferencing are used to enhance program delivery to participants in three different geographic areas across two time zones. Participants join sessions via real-time videoconferencing from their homes. The OSMT program has high potential to make a positive impact on the unique physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of cancer survivors living with a permanent ostomy. The study design, process, and telehealth approach contributes to the success of future dissemination efforts of the intervention into diverse clinical and community settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of a "test in-train out" walking program versus supervised standard rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients: a feasibility and pilot randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoni, Anna M; Cavazza, Stefano; Ferraresi, Giovanni; Grassi, Guido; Felisatti, Michele; Lamberti, Nicola; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    The loss of normal ambulatory function after stroke, besides causing disability, leads to progressive deconditioning and exposes patients to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and recurrent stroke. Conventional rehabilitation is mainly limited to the subacute period after stroke. Effective, safe and sustainable interventions for patients and healthcare system, including the long-term, should be identified. To verify the feasibility, safety and preliminary efficacy of an original home-based rehabilitation model compared to a standard supervised program in chronic hemiplegic stroke survivors. Pilot, two-arm, parallel group, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Community-dwelling poststroke patient/Hospital. Twelve chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (age=66.5±11.9 years, males, N.=9). Participants were randomly assigned for a 10-week period to a structured home-based exercise program (N.=6) and a standard supervised group-setting program (N.=6). The feasibility outcomes included adherence to interventions, retention rate and safety. Satisfaction was also evaluated by the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. Efficacy was assessed by the 6-minute walk test, Timed Up and Go and Stair Climb tests. The impact on Quality-of-life was estimated using the physical activity domain of the Short Form-36 questionnaire. Operators' time consuming was also calculated. Adherence was 91% in the home-based exercise group and 92% in the standard supervised group. The retention rate was 100%, with no adverse events reported and high satisfaction scores for both interventions. 6-minute walk test and physical activity domain significantly increased in both groups (P=0.03). Timed Up and Go improved in both groups, significantly for the home-based exercise group (P=0.03) while Stair Climb remained stable. Time required to operators to implement the home-based exercise program was 15 hours vs. 30 hours for the standard supervised one. In a sample of hemiplegic chronic stroke patients

  13. Efficacy of home-based non-pharmacological interventions for treating depression: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhato, Kanokporn; Lotrakul, Manote; Dellow, Alan; Ittasakul, Pichai; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review and compare the efficacy of all available home-based non-pharmacological treatments of depression. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline, Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were searched since inceptions to 7 August 2016. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy of home-based non-pharmacological interventions with usual care of patients with depression were included in the review. Main outcomes Depression symptom scores and disease remission rates at the end of treatment. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review. Home-based non-pharmacological interventions were categorised as (1) home-based psychological intervention, (2) home-based exercise intervention, (3) combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention and (4) complementary medicine. Complementary medicine approaches were excluded from the meta-analysis due to heterogeneity. The standardised mean differences of post-treatment depression symptom scores between usual care groups and home-based psychological intervention, home-based exercise intervention and combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention were −0.57 (95% CI −0.84 to −0.31), −1.03 (95% CI −2.89 to 0.82) and −0.78 (95% CI −1.09 to −0.47), respectively. These results suggest that only home-based psychological intervention and combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention could significantly decrease depression scores. Compared with usual care groups, the disease remission rate was also significantly higher for home-based psychological intervention (pooled risk ratio=1.53; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.98) and combined home-based psychological intervention with exercise intervention (pooled risk ratio=3.47; 95% CI 2.11 to 5

  14. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Roisin R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Rodriguez-Roisin,1 Kay Tetzlaff,2,3 Henrik Watz,4 Emiel FM Wouters,5 Bernd Disse,2 Helen Finnigan,6 Helgo Magnussen,4 Peter MA Calverley7 1Respiratory Institute, Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital Clínic IDIBAPS-CIBERES, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim, Germany; 3Department of Sports Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 4Pulmonary Research Institute at Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Center North, German Center for Lung Research, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 6Department of Biostatistics and Data Sciences, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bracknell, UK; 7Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool, UK Abstract: The WISDOM study (NCT00975195 reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland–Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume

  16. Connected health: a review of technologies and strategies to improve patient care with telemedicine and telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvedar, Joseph; Coye, Molly Joel; Everett, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    With the advent of national health reform, millions more Americans are gaining access to a health care system that is struggling to provide high-quality care at reduced costs. The increasing adoption of electronic technologies is widely recognized as a key strategy for making health care more cost-effective. This article examines the concept of connected health as an overarching structure for telemedicine and telehealth, and it provides examples of its value to professionals as well as patients. Policy makers, academe, patient advocacy groups, and private-sector organizations need to create partnerships to rapidly test, evaluate, deploy, and pay for new care models that use telemedicine.

  17. Telehealth and Occupational Therapy: Integral to the Triple Aim of Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Programs and concepts included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 are expected to transform health care in the United States from a volume-based health system to a value-based health system with increased emphasis on prevention and health promotion. The Triple Aim, a framework set forth by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, focuses on improving the health care experience, the health of populations, and the affordability of care. This article describes telehealth as an integral component in achieving the Triple Aim of health care and discusses implications for occupational therapy practitioners. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  18. Ethical and legal challenges for health telematics in a global world: telehealth and the technological imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Eike-Henner W

    2011-02-01

    Telehealth is one of the more recent applications of ICT to health care. It promises to be both cost-effective and efficient. However, there lies a danger that focusing mainly on pragmatic considerations will ignore fundamental ethical issues with legal implications that could undermine its success. Implicated here are, among others, changes in the nature of the health care professional patient relationship and informed consent, etc. The position of health informatics professionals as well as hard- and software providers is also affected. A further complicating factor is outsourcing. This paper identifies relevant issues and outlines some of their implications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nursing care by telehealth: what is the influence of distance on communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ingrid de Almeida; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate the perception of nurses regarding interpersonal communication while providing care via telehealth. Qualitative research realized with seven nurses working in telehealth in Brazil, the sample was determined by data saturation. A questionnaire with open questions was applied and then content analysis of the dialogues was conducted, focusing on thematic analysis. Four categories emerged from the dialogues: Understanding the importance of communication; the interpersonal relationship interfering with communication; Communicating via technology; and Learning the communication process. The perception of nurses working in telehealth in Brazil is that technology has facilitated their professional practice; however, in relation to the communication process, they believe it is harder to communicate by telehealth, mainly due to difficulty in perceiving nonverbal signals. To overcome these difficulties, they agreed that interpersonal communication is a skill that must be acquired during their professional training. Avaliar a percepção do enfermeiro referente à Comunicação interpessoal no cuidado por telessaúde. Pesquisa qualitativa, realizada com sete enfermeiros que atuam em telessaúde no Brasil, com amostra determinada pela saturação de dados. Aplicou-se um questionário com perguntas abertas e foi realizada análise de conteúdo dos discursos, com enfoque na análise temática. Dos discursos emergiram quatro categorias: Entendendo a importância da comunicação; O relacionamento interpessoal interferindo na comunicação; Comunicando-se por meio da tecnologia; e Aprendendo o processo de comunicação. A percepção dos enfermeiros que atuam em telessaúde no Brasil é de que a tecnologia tem facilitado sua prática profissional; porém, em relação ao processo de comunicação, creem que seja mais difícil se comunicar pela telessaúde, principalmente devido à dificuldade de percepção de sinais não verbais. Para superar essas dificuldades, concordam

  20. Assessment of the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of a fourth-generation synchronous telehealth program for the management of chronic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Lwun; Yu, Jiun-Yu; Lin, Yen-Hung; Chen, Ying-Hsien; Huang, Ching-Chang; Hsu, Tse-Pin; Chuang, Pao-Yu; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2014-06-10

    Telehealth programs are a growing field in the care of patients. The evolution of information technology has resulted in telehealth becoming a fourth-generation synchronous program. However, long-term outcomes and cost-effectiveness analysis of fourth-generation telehealth programs have not been reported in patients with chronic cardiovascular diseases. We conducted this study to assess the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a fourth-generation synchronous telehealth program for patients with chronic cardiovascular diseases. We retrospectively analyzed 575 patients who had joined a telehealth program and compared them with 1178 patients matched for sex, age, and Charlson comorbidity index. The program included: (1) instant transmission of biometric data, (2) daily telephone interview, and (3) continuous decision-making support. Data on hospitalization, emergency department (ED) visits, and medical costs were collected from the hospital's database and were adjusted to the follow-up months. The mean age was 64.5 years (SD 16.0). The mean number of monthly ED visits (mean 0.06 SD 0.13 vs mean 0.09 SD 0.23, Pcosts of ED visits (mean US$20.90 SD 66.60 vs mean US$37.30 SD 126.20, Pcosts (mean US$587.60 SD 1497.80 vs mean US$1163.60 SD 3036.60, Pcosts per patient were US$224.80 per month. Multivariate analyses revealed that age, telehealth care, and Charlson index were the independent factors for ED visits, hospitalizations, and length of hospitalization. A bootstrap method revealed the dominant cost-effectiveness of telehealth care over usual care. Better cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes were noted with the use of a fourth-generation synchronous telehealth program in patients with chronic cardiovascular diseases. The intervention costs of this new generation of telehealth program do not increase the total costs for patient care.

  1. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heroes Among Us Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia) Updated:Nov 15,2016 Excerpted and adapted from "Swallowing Disorders After a Stroke," Stroke Connection Magazine July/August ...

  2. Cardioembolic Stroke and Postmyocardial Infarction Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Marius; Franke, Jennifer; Gafoor, Sameer; Sievert, Horst

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a rare but serious complication due to left ventricular thrombus formation and atrial fibrillation. Early revascularization of the culprit coronary lesion is essential. Treatment trends may affect the risk. Conversely, the greater use of antiplatelet agents to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke could increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of stroke after AMI has decreased significantly with more use of percutaneous coronary intervention and antithrombotic therapies in the acute setting, and statins, antihypertensive medications, and dual antiplatelet therapy as secondary prevention strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Economic evidence on integrated care for stroke patients; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanneke F.M.M. Tummers

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the high incidence of stroke worldwide and the large costs associated with the use of health care resources, it is important to define cost-effective and evidence-based services for stroke rehabilitation. The objective of this review was to assess the evidence on the relative cost or cost-effectiveness of all integrated care arrangements for stroke patients compared to usual care. Integrated care was defined as a multidisciplinary tool to improve the quality and efficiency of evidence based care and is used as a communication tool between professionals to manage and standardize the outcome-orientated care.   Methods: A systematic literature review of cost analyses and economic evaluations was performed. Study characteristics, study quality and results were summarized.  Results: Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria; six on early-supported discharge services, four on home-based rehabilitation, two on stroke units and three on stroke services. The follow-up per patient was generally short; 1 year or less. The comparators and the scope of included costs varied between studies. Conclusions: Six out of six studies provided evidence that the costs of early-supported discharge are less than for conventional care, at similar health outcomes. Home-based rehabilitation is unlikely to lead to cost-savings, but achieves better health outcomes. Care in stroke units is more expensive than conventional care, but leads to improved health outcomes. The cost-effectiveness studies on integrated stroke services suggest that they can reduce costs. For future research we recommend to focus on the moderate and severely affected patients, include stroke severity as variable, adopt a societal costing perspective and include long-term costs and effects.

  4. Economic evidence on integrated care for stroke patients; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanneke F.M.M. Tummers

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the high incidence of stroke worldwide and the large costs associated with the use of health care resources, it is important to define cost-effective and evidence-based services for stroke rehabilitation. The objective of this review was to assess the evidence on the relative cost or cost-effectiveness of all integrated care arrangements for stroke patients compared to usual care. Integrated care was defined as a multidisciplinary tool to improve the quality and efficiency of evidence based care and is used as a communication tool between professionals to manage and standardize the outcome-orientated care.  Methods: A systematic literature review of cost analyses and economic evaluations was performed. Study characteristics, study quality and results were summarized. Results: Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria; six on early-supported discharge services, four on home-based rehabilitation, two on stroke units and three on stroke services. The follow-up per patient was generally short; 1 year or less. The comparators and the scope of included costs varied between studies.Conclusions: Six out of six studies provided evidence that the costs of early-supported discharge are less than for conventional care, at similar health outcomes. Home-based rehabilitation is unlikely to lead to cost-savings, but achieves better health outcomes. Care in stroke units is more expensive than conventional care, but leads to improved health outcomes. The cost-effectiveness studies on integrated stroke services suggest that they can reduce costs. For future research we recommend to focus on the moderate and severely affected patients, include stroke severity as variable, adopt a societal costing perspective and include long-term costs and effects.

  5. Economic evidence on integrated care for stroke patients; a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Johanneke F M M; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2012-10-01

    Given the high incidence of stroke worldwide and the large costs associated with the use of health care resources, it is important to define cost-effective and evidence-based services for stroke rehabilitation. The objective of this review was to assess the evidence on the relative cost or cost-effectiveness of all integrated care arrangements for stroke patients compared to usual care. Integrated care was defined as a multidisciplinary tool to improve the quality and efficiency of evidence-based care and is used as a communication tool between professionals to manage and standardize the outcome-orientated care. A systematic literature review of cost analyses and economic evaluations was performed. Study characteristics, study quality and results were summarized. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria; six on early-supported discharge services, four on home-based rehabilitation, two on stroke units and three on stroke services. The follow-up per patient was generally short; one year or less. The comparators and the scope of included costs varied between studies. Six out of six studies provided evidence that the costs of early-supported discharge are less than for conventional care, at similar health outcomes. Home-based rehabilitation is unlikely to lead to cost-savings, but achieves better health outcomes. Care in stroke units is more expensive than conventional care, but leads to improved health outcomes. The cost-effectiveness studies on integrated stroke services suggest that they can reduce costs. For future research we recommend to focus on the moderate and severely affected patients, include stroke severity as variable, adopt a societal costing perspective and include long-term costs and effects.

  6. Changing clinical needs of people living with AIDS and receiving home based care in Malawi - the Bangwe Home Based Care Project 2003-2008 - a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondwe Norton

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home based care (HBC has been an important component of the response to the AIDS epidemic in Africa, and particularly so before antiretroviral therapy (ART became available. Has HBC become unnecessary now that ART is available in many African countries? One way to investigate this is to assess the changing need for comprehensive HBC as an ART programme becomes available. The Bangwe HBC programme in Malawi has been collecting data since 2003 before ART became available in 2005/6. Has the introduction of ART changed the clinical needs for HBC? Methods Information obtained at initial assessment and follow up visits of patients receiving HBC were combined to assess case severity, survival and the response to treatment. This information was used to assess trends in mortality and the incidence, duration and severity of common symptoms over a six year period in a defined urban population in Malawi. Results 1266 patients, of whom 1190 were followed up and of whom 652 (55% died, were studied. 282 (25% patients died within two months of being first seen with an improvement between 2003-2005 and 2006-2008 of reduced mortality from 28% to 20%. 341 (27% patients were unable to care for themselves on first assessment and 675 (53% had stage 4 AIDS disease. Most patients had a mix of symptoms at presentation. Self care increased somewhat over the six years although case severity as measured by WHO staging and nutritional status did not. 350 patients were on ART either started before or after initial assessment. There were significant barriers to accessing ART with 156 (51% of 304 stage 3 or 4 patients first assessed in 2007 or 2008 not receiving ART. Over the six year period new HBC cases reduced by 8% and follow up visits increased by 9% a year. Between 4 and 5 people sought HBC for the first time each week from an urban health centre catchment of 100,000, which required 37.3 follow up visits each week. Conclusions Since the availability of

  7. Home-based Palliative Care: A Strategy for Keeping Intensive Care Unit Beds Vacant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmatolah Heydari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases throughout the world is an undeniable phenomenon; 395,000 deaths occurred in Iran in 2014 and about 76% of them were related to chronic diseases.1 Cancer is one of the chronic diseases that are progressing rapidly. In Iran, cancer is known as the third cause of death. Adult morbidity rate of cancer in different regions of Iran is estimated 48-112 cases per million people among the females and 51-144 cases per million people among the males.2 Also, mortality rate related to cancer was about 53500 people in 2014.3 In fact, 13% of all deaths related to chronic diseases are caused by cancer1 and the majority of cancer patients expire in the intensive care units (ICU, whereas bed occupancy of ICUs is in crises, being about 100% in Iran. For each ICU bed, 4 people are applicants. In this situation, firstly, a number of patients do not have access to the ICU beds, and secondly, because of the need to ICU beds, the admitted patients in ICU wards are discharged earlier than the standard time for each disease. According to the head of the Intensive Care association, the shortage of ICU beds is about ten thousand in Iran, whereas setting up each ICU bed requires a high cost.4 In the current condition, due to the high cost and shortage of nurses in Iran, setting up of ICU beds is a challenge for the health system. WHO introduced home-based palliative care to improve the quality of life, quality of care, quality of death and patient satisfaction; decrease burnout in staffing and mortality in hospitals; reduce the cost, accept end of life as live days; neither accelerate death nor prolong life; consider all dimensions of human; help the patients to be active until the time of death; help the patient’s family to cope with the disease and loss of patient; and release the beds in hospitals.5 Although hospital beds are considered for healing the patients not a hospice for them, the majority of cancer patients die in

  8. CanSupport: a model for home-based palliative care delivery in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Alyssa; LaVigne, Anna W; Rajvanshi, Ambika; Mahato, Birbal; Mohan, Ravinder; Sharma, Reena; Grover, Surbhi

    2016-07-01

    According to the 2014 WHO Global Atlas of Palliative Care, there is insufficient access to palliative care services worldwide, with the majority of unmet need in low- and middle-income countries. In India, there are major disparities in access to palliative care, with the majority of services being offered by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) scattered throughout the country. The barriers to expanding palliative care services in India are common to many lower- and middle-income countries-a lack of financial resources, a paucity of trained staff, and a focus on curative rather than comfort care. In this paper, we describe a model of palliative care being used by CanSupport, a non-governmental organization based in Delhi that was formed in 1996. They offer home-based services provided by multidisciplinary teams consisting of a physician, nurse, and social worker who are trained in palliative care. Data on patient demographics, services provided, and outcomes were collected retrospectively for patients treated by CanSupport for the year 2009-2010. Sources include CanSupport's population data and direct discussions with CanSupport staff. During the year 2009-2010, CanSupport served 746 patients, with an average of 10 home visits per patient. Only 29% of patients were referred from hospitals or physicians, with the rest being self-referred or referred from CanSupport's help line. Pain scales were administered on each visit and 31% of patients received morphine. Of the 514 patient deaths, 76% occurred at home and a majority of families received bereavement counseling for up to 6 months. CanSupport has shown that a home-based care model can be successful in India and is desired by patients at the end of life or with chronic illness. Their model of care saves the patients the cost of a hospital visit while still providing evaluation by staff with training in palliative care. In addition, the multidisciplinary nature of the teams allows for symptom management and

  9. Predictors of caregiver burden across the home-based palliative care trajectory in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriere, Denise; Husain, Amna; Zagorski, Brandon; Marshall, Denise; Seow, Hsien; Brazil, Kevin; Kennedy, Julia; Burns, Sheri; Brooks, Heather; Coyte, Peter C

    2016-07-01

    Family caregivers of patients enrolled in home-based palliative care programmes provide unpaid care and assistance with daily activities to terminally ill family members. Caregivers often experience caregiver burden, which is an important predictor of anxiety and depression that can extend into bereavement. We conducted a longitudinal, prospective cohort study to comprehensively assess modifiable and non-modifiable patient and caregiver factors that account for caregiver burden over the palliative care trajectory. Caregivers (n = 327) of patients with malignant neoplasm were recruited from two dedicated home-based palliative care programmes in Southern Ontario, Canada from 1 July 2010 to 31 August 2012. Data were obtained from bi-weekly telephone interviews with caregivers from study admission until death, and from palliative care programme and home-care agency databases. Information collected comprised patient and caregiver demographics, utilisation of privately and publicly financed resources, patient clinical status and caregiver burden. The average age of the caregivers was 59.0 years (SD: 13.2), and almost 70% were female. Caregiver burden increased over time in a non-linear fashion from study admission to patient death. Increased monthly unpaid care-giving time costs, monthly public personal support worker costs, emergency department visits and low patient functional status were associated with higher caregiver burden. Greater use of hospice care was associated with lower burden. Female caregivers tended to report more burden compared to men as death approached, and burden was higher when patients were male. Low patient functional status was the strongest predictor of burden. Understanding the influence of modifiable and non-modifiable factors on the experience of burden over the palliative trajectory is essential for the development and targeting of programmes and policies to support family caregivers and reduce burden. Supporting caregivers can have

  10. Economic Evaluation of a Home-Based Age-Related Macular Degeneration Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, John S; Clemons, Traci; Regillo, Carl; Rayess, Nadim; Liffmann Kruger, Danielle; Rein, David

    2017-05-01

    Medicare recently approved coverage of home telemonitoring for early detection of incident choroidal neovascularization (CNV) among patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but no economic evaluation has yet assessed its cost-effectiveness and budgetary impact. To evaluate a home-based daily visual-field monitoring system using simulation methods and to apply the findings of the Home Monitoring of the Eye study to the US population at high risk for wet-form AMD. In this economic analysis, an evaluation of the potential cost, cost-effectiveness, and government budgetary impact of adoption of a home-based daily visual-field monitoring system among eligible Medicare patients was performed. Effectiveness and visual outcomes data from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 Home Monitoring of the Eye study, treatment data from the Wills Eye Hospital Treat & Extend study, and AMD progression data from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 1 were used to simulate the long-term effects of telemonitoring patients with CNV in one eye or large drusen and/or pigment abnormalities in both eyes. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analysis and an alternative scenario using the Treat & Extend study control group outcomes were used to examine uncertainty in these data and assumptions. Home telemonitoring of patients with AMD for early detection of CNV vs usual care. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, net present value of lifetime societal costs, and 10-year nominal government expenditures. Telemonitoring of patients with existing unilateral CNV or multiple bilateral risk factors for CNV (large drusen and retinal pigment abnormalities) incurs $907 (95% CI, -$6302 to $2809) in net lifetime societal costs, costs $1312 (95% CI, $222-$2848) per patient during 10 years from the federal government's perspective, and results in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $35 663 (95% CI, cost savings to $235 613) per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Home telemonitoring

  11. Outcomes of a Telehealth Intervention for Homebound Older Adults with Heart or Chronic Respiratory Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Zvi D.; Kenaley, Bonnie; McGinty, Jean; Bardelli, Ellen; Davitt, Joan; Ten Have, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Telehealth care is emerging as a viable intervention model to treat complex chronic conditions, such as heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to engage older adults in self-care disease management. Design and Methods: We report on a randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a multifaceted…

  12. Telehealth: Telecommunications Technology in Health Care and Health Education in Canada. New Technologies in Canadian Education Series. Paper 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervinskas, Jenny

    This examination of the use of telecommunications systems in the health care field in Canada notes that the use of such systems to assist in the delivery of health care at a distance is critical to the remote and isolated regions of the country. The report begins by reviewing the development of 'telemedicine' or 'telehealth' systems using various…

  13. Tracking the spatial diffusion of influenza and norovirus using telehealth data: a spatiotemporal analysis of syndromic data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, D.L.; Smith, G.E.; Regan, M.; Large, S.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telehealth systems have a large potential for informing public health authorities in an early stage of outbreaks of communicable disease. Influenza and norovirus are common viruses that cause significant respiratory and gastrointestinal disease worldwide. Data about these viruses are not

  14. Telehealth Delivery of Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Susan L.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Wolff, Brian; Reaven, Judy A.

    2016-01-01

    Youth with autism spectrum disorders frequently experience significant symptoms of anxiety. Empirically supported psychosocial interventions exist, yet access is limited, especially for families in rural areas. Telehealth (i.e. videoconferencing) has potential to reduce barriers to access to care; however, little is known about the feasibility or…

  15. The Efficacy of Telehealth-Delivered Speech and Language Intervention for Primary School-Age Children: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, Danielle; Skinner, Leisa; Hayman, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine if telehealth-delivered speech-language pathology interventions are as effective as traditional in-person delivery for primary school-age children with speech and/or language difficulties. A systematic review was conducted (in accordance with PRISMA guidelines) using five databases, two journals and reference lists. Titles and abstracts were screened for inclusion, with relevant studies reviewed in full-text. Initial searches identified 132 articles. Following exclusion of non-relevant studies, seven articles remained for inclusion. Results revealed both telehealth and in-person participants made significant and similar improvements when treatment effects were measured through five of the six outcome measures. Findings showed there is limited but promising evidence to support telehealth for delivering speech-language pathology intervention services to school-age children. Whilst this is encouraging, particularly for rural children where in-person services are limited, more rigorous study designs are required to support the efficacy of telehealth for this population.

  16. Evaluating the Feasibility of a Play-Based Telehealth Intervention Program for Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Anastasia; Zyga, Olena; Russ, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the feasibility and acceptability of telehealth for direct intervention in children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Children with PWS have social-cognitive challenges that are similar to children with ASD. However, developing behavioral interventions for individuals with PWS is faced with the significant challenge of enrolling…

  17. Evaluating the Treatment Fidelity of Parents Who Conduct In-Home Functional Communication Training with Coaching via Telehealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Alyssa N.; Romani, Patrick W.; Wacker, David P.; Dyson, Shannon M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Lee, John F.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Waldron, Debra B.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective, descriptive evaluation of the fidelity with which parents of three children with autism spectrum disorders conducted functional communication training (FCT) in their homes. All training was provided to the parents via telehealth by a behavior consultant in a tertiary-level hospital setting. FCT trials coached by the…

  18. Tracking the spatial diffusion of influenza and norovirus using telehealth data : A spatiotemporal analysis of syndromic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, Duncan L.; Smith, Gillian E.; Regan, Martyn; Large, Shirley; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Telehealth systems have a large potential for informing public health authorities in an early stage of outbreaks of communicable disease. Influenza and norovirus are common viruses that cause significant respiratory and gastrointestinal disease worldwide. Data about these viruses are not

  19. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke Table of Contents Introduction What ... Americans are protecting their most important asset—their brain. Are you? Stroke ranks as the fourth leading ...

  20. Stroke: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... approaches to stroke prevention for people with a history of small subcortical strokes. The trial was designed to compare: 1) aspirin alone vs. combined antiplatelet therapy (aspirin and clopidogrel), ...