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Sample records for home respiratory support

  1. [National respiration center support patients with tracheostomy tubes. Outpatient clinic for respiratory support in the home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisewall, Klara; Håkansson, Stefan; Oddby, Eva; Ek, Mats E; Jakobsson, Jan G

    2015-04-22

    It is now 60 years since the polio epidemic in Copenhagen and the first use of prolonged invasive positive pressure ventilation. After this pioneer work positive pressure ventilation rapidly became well established. Intubation/tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation are now standard in Intensive Care Units. In the late 1970 Gillis Andersson was the first in Sweden to discharge patients home with invasive mechanical ventilator support. His pioneer work included the development of a dedicated practical and technical support organization at National Respiration Centre at Danderyds Hospital. This unit developed skills in patient customized tracheostomy tube construction and home invasive ventilation supportive care. Tracheostomy tubes and home ventilators have since then developed rapidly. Some patients still need customized tracheostomy tubes, which the NRC supplies. The production is certified by the Swedish Medicinal Product Agency. Today invasive home ventilation is standard care. Invasive mechanical home ventilation when instituted as a life-saving therapy in, for example, progressive ALS patients is complex and resource-intensive. New aspects such as training and education in order to secure quality of care in the home environment is one of many challenges. When commencing invasive ventilation in patients with progressive neurological disease ethical considerations must also be acknowledged, e.g. aspects such as patients' perhaps changing wishes during the course of illness regarding cessation of life support.

  2. Respiratory Support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can be caused by inappropriate mechanical ventilation. This soft-cover review of the current practice of appropriate respiratory support is not controversia(it describes in an easily readable and concise fashio-n the development, physiological implications, mechanical and technological basis, safety aspects and careful ...

  3. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Preventing infections can help the respiratory home care patient stay as healthy as possible. Hand-washing is the single most important thing for patients and caregivers to perform on a routine basis. Use a liquid soap and lots of warm running water. Work up a good lather and scrub for at ...

  4. Respiratory health in home and leisure pursuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lawrence A; Kuschner, Ware G

    2012-12-01

    Many home-based and leisure activities can generate hazardous respirable exposures. Routine domestic activities and a variety of hobbies, avocations, and leisure pursuits have been associated with a spectrum of respiratory tract disorders. Indoor environments present a special risk for high-intensity exposures and adverse health effects. There are important knowledge gaps regarding the prevalence of specific health hazards within and across communities, exposure-response effects, population and individual susceptibilities, best management strategies, the adverse health effects of mixed exposures, and long-term clinical outcomes following exposures. The home environment presents special health risks that should be part of the health assessment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early home-supported discharge after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorne, P.; Jepsen, Birgitte G.; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    This report is a brief practical problem-based guide to support clinical management in the implementation of early home-supported discharge as an integrated part of stroke care. However, it is clear that skilled members of a multidisciplinary team are needed and they need to work in a coordinated...... benefit most are likely to have moderate stroke severity and may be able to cooperate with rehabilitation in the home setting. Staffing requirements will vary according to several factors. These will include (a) the severity and complexity of stroke impairments, (b) the current level of community support...

  6. Home ownership and support for government redistribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    André, S.C.H.; Dewilde, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the relationship between home ownership and support for redistribution in 24 European countries, integrating research on housing regimes and welfare attitudes. We improve upon earlier research by taking into account within-group heterogeneity of owners and tenants, by

  7. Spectrum of neonatal diseases requiring respiratory support in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In Nigeria, eighty two percent of the three leading causes of neonatal mortality may require respiratory support for their management, yet this is unavailable. Objective: To review the spectrum of respiratory disorders that were ventilated, their outcomes and the contribution of such support to survival. Methods: A ...

  8. Home telemonitoring of severe chronic respiratory insufficient and asthmatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Zamith

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available For 9 months we evaluated a portable device to transfer patient-clinician data by Internet: oximetry, ECG, clinical questionnaires and messages from the doctor. Fifty-one patients with severe chronic respiratory insufficiency (CRI were followed at the hospital Pulido Valente and Espirito Santo and 21 asthmatics (A were followed at the latter hospital. The use and acceptance of this device was evaluated through questionnaires soliciting patients’ and health professionals’ opinions. Patients with CRI followed in Lisbon were also asked about hospital admissions and quality of life compared with a nine month period before the monitoring programme.CRI patients found learning to use the system more difficult; the majority (80% reported problems with the equipment, qualified as rare/occasional in 62% of the cases. For 31 CRI patients followed in Lisbon, the use of the system was classified as correct in 12 patients, incorrect in 7 and reasonable in 12 patients. The first group had a reducded number and duration of hospital admissions and also improved quality of life. With this remote monitoring system 80% of CRI patients reported they were more/much more supported and 33 patients (75% would use this system in the future. 81% of asthmatic patients would also like to maintain this type of monitoring. The service was considered useful by the researchers. We concluded that home telemonitoring was a positive contribution to the management of chronic patients and raised awareness of it should be considered in the future. Resumo: Durante nove meses avaliámos umdispositivo portátil para transferência de dados pelaInternet entre doentes e profissionais de saúde: oximetria,ECG, respostas a questionários e mensagens. Foramincluídos 51 insuficientes respiratórioscrónicos (IRC graves acompanhados no Hospital de PulidoValente (Lisboa e no Hospital do Espírito Santo(Évora e 21 asmáticos deste último hospital. Autiliza

  9. Support for Children Who Are Educated at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Mary; Martin, Kerry; Downing, Dick; Harland, Jennie; Kendall, Sally; White, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Many thousands of children in the UK are educated at home, and the subject of support for the home-education community is debated. The National Foundation for Educational Research conducted research to examine the views of home educators about the support they receive from local authorities, other home-educating families, schools and other…

  10. Respiratory Support for Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkud, Yamini V; Hornik, Christoph P; Benjamin, Daniel K; Laughon, Matthew M; Clark, Reese H; Greenberg, Rachel G; Smith, P Brian

    2017-04-01

    To assess how neonatal intensive care units followed the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for use of dexamethasone in preterm infants by evaluating respiratory support at the time of dexamethasone administration. This is an observational study of infants discharged from one of 290 neonatal intensive care units from 2003 to 2010. The cohort included very low birth weight (dexamethasone. Significant respiratory support was defined as invasive respiratory support (conventional or high-frequency ventilation) with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) > 0.3. Of 81 292 infants; 7093 (9%) received dexamethasone. At the time that dexamethasone was initiated, 4604 (65%) of infants were on significant respiratory support. In accordance with the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations, a majority of infants were on significant respiratory support when receiving dexamethasone, yet a substantial number of infants still received dexamethasone on less than significant respiratory support. Further research on reducing dexamethasone use in premature infants is required to decrease the risk of neurodevelopmental impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Home Nutrition Support: Ethics and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karen; McGinnis, Carol

    2016-06-01

    Ethical dilemmas challenge providers on both sides of the hospital and clinic doors. In addition to establishing the nutrition care plan and guiding the client into the home setting with safe and effective parenteral or enteral nutrition therapy, procuring home nutrition support involves meeting documentation requirements and verifying that clients meet reimbursement criteria for home therapy based on third-party payer criteria. Providers have entered a realm for which training has been scarce and they face moral and ethical dilemmas involving serving as patient advocates, possibly stretching the truth to fit the clinical documentation to criteria vs maintaining professional integrity. Nutrition research and evidence-based practice have outpaced modifications to policies including Medicare's national and local coverage determinations, the bulk of which have not seen revisions in 32 years. This review elucidates clinical dilemmas and urges a political call to action to advocate for changes in current, outdated requirements for reimbursement. Given the current healthcare environment and trend toward expedited hospital stays, patients may be better served (and nourished) with revised guidelines. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Respiratory Support for Pharmacologically Induced Hypoxia in Neonatal Calves

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, C. G.; Quinn, C. T.; Nielsen, S. G.; Raidal, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Practical methods to provide respiratory support to bovine neonates in a field setting are poorly characterised. This study evaluated the response of healthy neonatal calves with pharmacologically induced respiratory suppression to nasal oxygen insufflation and to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivered via an off-the-shelf device. Ten calves were randomised to receive either nasal oxygen insufflation (Group 1, n = 5) or CPAP (Group 2, n = 5) as a first treatment after induction ...

  13. Implementation of respiratory protection measures: Visitors of residential care homes for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Diana T F; Yu, Doris S F; Ip, Margaret; Tang, Jennifer Y M

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the implementation of respiratory protection measures for and by visitors of residential care homes for the elderly in Hong Kong, a territory-wide cross-sectional survey was conducted. A total of 87 infection control officers, 1,763 health care workers, and 520 visitors from 87 homes completed the questionnaires. Rules on respiratory protection for visitors were found to vary across residential care homes for the elderly. Uncooperative visitors and inadequate resources were identified as major barriers in the implementation of such measures for visitors. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Home renovation, family history of atopy, and respiratory symptoms and asthma among children living in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Qian, Zhengmin Min; Wang, Jing; Trevathan, Edwin; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ren, Wan-Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Simckes, Maayan; Zelicoff, Alan

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the association of indoor air pollution with the respiratory health of children, we evaluated the associations of children's respiratory symptoms with asthma and recent home renovation. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a school recruitment sample of 31,049 children aged 2 to 14 years in 25 districts of 7 cities of northeast China in 2008-2009. The children's parents completed standardized questionnaires characterizing the children's histories of respiratory symptoms and illness, recent home renovation information, and other associated risk factors. The effects of home renovation in the past 2 years were significantly associated with cough, phlegm, current wheeze, doctor-diagnosed asthma, and current asthma. The associations we computed when combining the status of home renovation and family history of atopy were higher than were those predicted from the combination of the separate effects. However, the interactions between home renovation and family history of atopy on a multiplicative scale were not statistically significant (P>.05). Home renovation is associated with increases in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma in children. The effects of different renovation materials on child respiratory health should be studied further.

  15. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentayeb, Malek; Norback, Dan; Bednarek, Micha

    2015-01-01

    cough. Elderly subjects aged ≥80 years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were......Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven...... European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards...

  16. Epidemiology of Respiratory Pathogens among Elderly Nursing Home Residents with Acute Respiratory Infections in Corsica, France, 2013–2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Masse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The current study aims to describe the demographical and clinical characteristics of elderly nursing home (NH residents with acute respiratory infections (ARIs during four winter seasons (2013/2014–2016/2017, as well as the microbiological etiology of these infections. Methods. Seventeen NHs with at least one ARI resident in Corsica, France, were included. An ARI resident was defined as a resident developing a sudden onset of any constitutional symptoms in addition to any respiratory signs. Nasopharyngeal swabs from ARI residents were screened for the presence of 21 respiratory agents, including seasonal influenza viruses. Results. Of the 107 ARI residents enrolled from NHs, 61 (57% were positive for at least one of the 21 respiratory pathogens. Forty-one (38.3% of the 107 ARI residents had influenza: 38 (92% were positive for influenza A (100% A(H3N2 and three (8% for influenza B/Victoria. Axillary fever (≥38°C was significantly more common among patients infected with influenza A(H3N2. Conclusion. The circulation of seasonal respiratory viruses other than influenza A(H3N2 seems to be sporadic among elderly NH residents. Investigating the circulation of respiratory viruses in nonwinter seasons seems to be important in order to understand better the dynamic of their year-round circulation in NHs.

  17. Epidemiology of Respiratory Pathogens among Elderly Nursing Home Residents with Acute Respiratory Infections in Corsica, France, 2013–2017

    OpenAIRE

    Shirley Masse; Lisandru Capai; Alessandra Falchi

    2017-01-01

    Background. The current study aims to describe the demographical and clinical characteristics of elderly nursing home (NH) residents with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) during four winter seasons (2013/2014–2016/2017), as well as the microbiological etiology of these infections. Methods. Seventeen NHs with at least one ARI resident in Corsica, France, were included. An ARI resident was defined as a resident developing a sudden onset of any constitutional symptoms in addition to any respi...

  18. Carer preferences for home support services in later stage dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampanellou, Eleni; Chester, Helen; Davies, Linda; Davies, Sue; Giebel, Clarissa; Hughes, Jane; Challis, David; Clarkson, Paul

    2017-11-01

    To examine the relative importance of different home support attributes from the perspective of carers of people with later-stage dementia. Preferences from 100 carers, recruited through carers' organisations, were assessed with a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) survey, administered online and by paper questionnaire. Attributes were informed by an evidence synthesis and lay consultations. A conditional logit model was used to estimate preference weights for the attributes within a home support 'package'. The most preferred attributes were 'respite care, available regularly to fit your needs' (coefficient 1.29, p = home care provided regularly for as long as needed' (coefficient 0.93, p = home support interventions for dementia. Respite care, home care and training on managing difficulties provided at home are important components. Carers' preferences revealed the daily challenges of caring for individuals with later stage dementia and the need for tailored and specialised home support.

  19. 76 FR 70069 - Federal Home Loan Bank Community Support Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... AGENCY 12 CFR Part 1290 RIN 2590-AA38 Federal Home Loan Bank Community Support Amendments AGENCY: Federal... Agency (FHFA) is proposing to amend its community support regulation by requiring the Federal Home Loan... biennial community support statements containing their most recent CRA evaluations. Instead, the Banks...

  20. Pulmonary rehabilitation at home guided by telemonitoring and access to healthcare facilities for respiratory complications in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garuti, G; Bagatti, S; Verucchi, E; Massobrio, M; Spagnolatti, L; Vezzani, G; Lusuardi, M

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary complications are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in neuromuscular patients. Aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a home follow-up program combining telemonitoring and chest physiotherapy (CPT) in preventing acute respiratory episodes. Prospective observational study in a period of 24 months, and comparison with preintervention data of the same patients. Outpatients and community. Neuromuscular patients. Enrolment criteria were: reduced efficacy of cough, high family support, long home-to-hospital distance. Caregivers and patients had to register daily respiratory signs and symptoms. Each patient was equipped with a pulse oximeter with a modem for transmitting data to a remote control center, in charge of alerting the pulmonologist in case of sign and symptom deterioration. CPT interventions at home were planned after indication by the pulmonologist. The number of emergency room admissions or hospitalization following respiratory exacerbations were registered. Thirteen patients were enrolled. In the first year of monitoring, 18 alerts were transmitted to the pulmonologist, average 1.38±1.38 alert/patient. In the second year, the number of alerts were 5, average 0.38±0.65 alert/patient (Prespiratory therapists' interventions were conducted on 11 patients. In the first 12 months there were four episodes of hospitalisation, none in the following 12 months. In the year prior to the project, there were seven cases of hospitalisation and one case of emergency room admission. The combination of telemonitoring and CPT at home is feasible in the long-term for patients with neuromuscular disease. An apparent reduction of hospitalisation and emergency room admissions for respiratory complications can justify a randomized control trial to confirm efficacy and effectiveness.

  1. Minimally Invasive Surfactant Therapy and Noninvasive Respiratory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kribs, Angela

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) caused by surfactant deficiency is major cause for neonatal mortality and short- and long-term morbidity of preterm infants. Continuous positive airway pressure and other modes of noninvasive respiratory support and intubation and positive pressure ventilation with surfactant therapy are efficient therapies for RDS. Because continuous positive airway pressure can fail in severe surfactant deficiency, and because traditional surfactant therapy requires intubation and positive pressure ventilation, this entails a risk of lung injury. Several strategies to combine noninvasive respiratory therapy with minimally invasive surfactant therapy have been described. Available data suggest that those strategies may improve outcome of premature infants with RDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Comparison of home-based and outpatient, hospital-based, pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbois, J-M; Le Rouzic, O; Monge, E; Bart, F; Wallaert, B

    2013-02-01

    The comprehensive care and personalized pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) of patients with chronic respiratory disease is effective regardless of the place of performance. The objective of this prospective observational study was to compare two types of care in an outpatient rehabilitation center, versus a home-based PR. Two hundred and eighty-six patients were supported : 137 patients were included in outpatients (age : 61.2±10.8years, BMI: 28.7±7.1), 149 in home-based PR (age: 62.9±12years, BMI: 26.1±6.6). The choice between outpatient and home was a function of distance from the center and the patient's wishes. The outpatient care was done in groups of six, four times a week for 6weeks. At home she was single, once a week for 8weeks with continued physical activity independently of the other days a week depending on individual action plan. The therapeutic education programs and psycho-social support were identical in both structures. The assessment included assessment of exercise tolerance test in 6minutes stepper (TS6), anxiety and depression and quality of life. There were no incidents or accidents during the PR in the two structures. The exercise intolerance was significantly higher in patients TS6 home (332.9±154.8 versus 460.2±137.9 counts, Prespiratory unselected patients is as safe and effective at home or in outpatient center on exercise tolerance and quality of life. Home-based PR is an alternative to outpatient care as long as all activities, physical training, therapeutic education and psychosocial support, are achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation on the implementation of respiratory protection measures in old age homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Diana Tf; Yu, Doris; Ip, Margaret; Tang, Jennifer Ym

    2017-01-01

    Old age homes (OAHs) represent a vulnerable community for influenza outbreaks. Effective implementation of respiratory protection measures has been identified as an effective prevention measure to reduce mortality and morbidity caused by such outbreaks. Yet, relatively little is known about this aspect in these homes. This study evaluated the implementation of respiratory protection measures among infection control officers (ICOs) and health care workers (HCWs) in these homes in Hong Kong. A territory-wide, cross-sectional survey was conducted in 87 OAHs. A total of 87 ICOs and 1,763 HCWs (including nurses, health workers, care workers, allied HCWs and assistants) completed the questionnaires that evaluated the implementation at the organizational level and individual level, respectively. Generalized estimating equations with unstructured working correlation matrix were used to analyze the simultaneous influence of organizational and individual factors on the implementation. At the organizational level, all homes had a policy on respiratory protection and implementation of such measures was generally adequate. Basic resources such as paper towels/hand dryers and equipment disinfectants, however, were rated as most inadequate by HCWs. Training opportunities were also identified as grossly inadequate. Only less than half of the ICOs and HCWs participated in training on infection control either at the initiation of employment or on a regular basis. Twenty-five percent of HCWs even indicated that they had never participated in any infection control training. At the individual level, hand hygiene, among other protection measures, was found to be less well implemented by HCWs. In terms of the association of various organizational and individual characteristics, private homes and health workers rated significantly higher scores in the implementation of various domains in respiratory protection. Addressing the unmet training needs and promoting hand hygiene practice are

  4. Role adaptation of family caregivers for ventilator-dependent patients: transition from respiratory care ward to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Ting; Peng, Ji-Ming

    2010-06-01

    To explore the underlying theoretical framework for the role adaptation of family caregivers for ventilator-dependent patients after transferring from respiratory care ward to home. The number of ventilator-dependent patients has been increasing worldwide. Under Taiwan's National Health Insurance policy, if ventilator-dependent patients are stable, they should be transferred from an acute care hospital to a subacute unit or home. A qualitative design based on grounded theory was adopted for this study. One-on-one, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 family caregivers who were caretaking ventilator-dependent patients at their home two months after hospital discharge. Theoretical sampling was used until concepts emerging in data analysis were saturated. Analysis of audio-taped interview transcripts generated a process of role adaptation for family caregivers of a ventilator-dependent patient. The caregiver's transition to the care-giving role is a dynamic process with consequences that are impacted by level of support from the family, affective rewards from the patient, patient's health condition and a balanced life schedule for the caregiver. The results of this study can provide respiratory care professionals with skills to assess the needs of caregivers for ventilator-dependent patients and individualise interventions to caregivers' specific needs. The findings of this study contribute to nurses' understanding and promotion of role adaptation for family caregivers among ventilator-dependent patients.

  5. Pervasive Home Care - Technological support for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo

    2006-01-01

    approach that I outline in this dissertation. Furthermore I describe the results of the project contributing to three related scientific fields: home care technologies, telemedicine and computer supported cooperative work (CSCW). The main conclusion towards home care technologies is that the many visionary...... the need arises for moving treatment and care involving specialised knowledge from the hospital to the home. In this dissertation I use the term Home Care" for the multidisciplinary investigation of how this movement can be supported with technology enabling the expert to carry on a treatment in the home...... of the patient in collaboration with patient and home care clinicians. My main research method has been qualitative analysis of the empirical results generated during an experimental project using Participatory Design (PD) to investigate potential futures in the treatment of patients with diabetic foot ulcers...

  6. Predicting effectiveness of the Home-Start parenting support program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Hermanns, J.M.A.; Dekovic, M.; Reitz, E.

    2007-01-01

    The current study examines predictive effects of participant's characteristics, program characteristics, and their interaction, on changes in parenting behavior of mothers who participated in the Home-Start parenting support program. The results confirm previous findings that effects of

  7. Respiratory Support for Pharmacologically Induced Hypoxia in Neonatal Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Donnelly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Practical methods to provide respiratory support to bovine neonates in a field setting are poorly characterised. This study evaluated the response of healthy neonatal calves with pharmacologically induced respiratory suppression to nasal oxygen insufflation and to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP delivered via an off-the-shelf device. Ten calves were randomised to receive either nasal oxygen insufflation (Group 1, n=5 or CPAP (Group 2, n=5 as a first treatment after induction of respiratory depression by intravenous administration of xylazine, fentanyl, and diazepam. Calves received the alternate treatment after 10 minutes of breathing ambient air. Arterial blood gas samples were obtained prior to sedation, following sedation, following the first and second treatment, and after breathing ambient air before and after the second treatment. Oxygen insufflation significantly increased arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2 but was also associated with significant hypercapnia. When used as the first treatment, CPAP was associated with significantly decreased arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide but did not increase PaO2. These results suggest that the use of CPAP may represent a practical method for correction of hypercapnia associated with inadequate ventilation in a field setting, and further research is required to characterise the use of CPAP with increased inspired oxygen concentrations.

  8. Prolonged Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Je Ko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available When all conventional treatments for respiratory failure in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS have failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO can provide a chance of survival in these desperately ill patients. A 49-year-old male patient developed septic shock and progressive ARDS after liver abscess drainage. Venovenous ECMO was given due to refractory respiratory failure on postoperative day 6. Initially, two heparin-binding hollow-fiber microporous membrane oxygenators in parallel were used in the ECMO circuit. Twenty-two oxygenators were changed in the first 22 days of ECMO support because of plasma leak in the oxygenators. Each oxygenator had an average life of 48 hours. Thereafter, a single silicone membrane oxygenator was used in the ECMO circuit, which did not require change during the remaining 596 hours of ECMO. The patient's tidal volume was only 90 mL in the nadir and less than 300 mL for 26 days during the ECMO course. The patient required ECMO support for 48 days and survived despite complications, including septic shock, ARDS, acute renal failure, drug-induced leukopenia, and multiple internal bleeding. This patient received an unusually long duration of ECMO support. However, he survived, recovered well, and was in New York Heart Association functional class I-II, with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 81% of the predicted level 18 months later. In conclusion, ECMO can provide a chance of survival for patients with refractory ARDS. The reversibility of lung function is possible in ARDS patients regardless of the severity of lung dysfunction at the time of treatment.

  9. Current concepts in acute respiratory support for neonates and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca, Marjorie J; Uhing, Michael; Wakeham, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Current trends in mechanical respiratory support are evolving toward gentle approaches to avoid short- and long-term problems that are historically associated with mechanical ventilation. These ventilator-associated issues include the need for long-term sedation, muscle deconditioning, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This article will describe recent trends of ventilatory support in neonates and children: (1) utilization of volume ventilation in infants, (2) synchrony and improving patient-ventilator interaction specifically using neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA), and (3) use of noninvasive ventilation techniques. When applicable, their uses in the surgical newborn and pediatric patients are described. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Evaluation on the implementation of respiratory protection measures in old age homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee DT

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diana TF Lee,1 Doris Yu,1 Margaret Ip,2 Jennifer YM Tang3 1The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2Department of Microbiology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sha Tin, 3Sau Po Centre on Ageing, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong Purpose: Old age homes (OAHs represent a vulnerable community for influenza outbreaks. Effective implementation of respiratory protection measures has been identified as an effective prevention measure to reduce mortality and morbidity caused by such outbreaks. Yet, relatively little is known about this aspect in these homes. This study evaluated the implementation of respiratory protection measures among infection control officers (ICOs and health care workers (HCWs in these homes in Hong Kong.Patients and methods: A territory-wide, cross-sectional survey was conducted in 87 OAHs. A total of 87 ICOs and 1,763 HCWs (including nurses, health workers, care workers, allied HCWs and assistants completed the questionnaires that evaluated the implementation at the organizational level and individual level, respectively. Generalized estimating equations with unstructured working correlation matrix were used to analyze the simultaneous influence of organizational and individual factors on the implementation.Results: At the organizational level, all homes had a policy on respiratory protection and implementation of such measures was generally adequate. Basic resources such as paper towels/hand dryers and equipment disinfectants, however, were rated as most inadequate by HCWs. Training opportunities were also identified as grossly inadequate. Only less than half of the ICOs and HCWs participated in training on infection control either at the initiation of employment or on a regular basis. Twenty-five percent of HCWs even indicated that they had never participated in any infection control training. At the individual level, hand hygiene, among other

  11. Baby bottle steam sterilizers disinfect home nebulizers inoculated with bacterial respiratory pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Dana; Callan, Deborah A; Farrel, Patricia A; Egan, Marie E; Murray, Thomas S

    2013-09-01

    Contaminated nebulizers are a potential source of bacterial infection but no single method is universally accepted for disinfection. We hypothesized that baby-bottle steam sterilizers effectively disinfect home nebulizers. Home nebulizers were inoculated with the common CF respiratory pathogens methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, mucoid and non mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The nebulizers were swabbed for bacterial growth, treated with either the AVENT (Philips), the NUK Quick & Ready (Gerber) or DRY-POD (Camera Baby) baby bottle steam sterilizer and reswabbed for bacterial growth. All steam sterilizers were effective at disinfecting all home nebulizers. Viable bacteria were not recovered from any inoculated site after steam treatment, under any conditions tested. Steam treatment is an effective disinfection method. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether these results are applicable to the clinical setting. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Extracorporeal Respiratory Support With a Miniature Integrated Pediatric Pump-Lung Device in an Acute Ovine Respiratory Failure Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xufeng; Sanchez, Pablo G; Liu, Yang; Claire Watkins, A; Li, Tieluo; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory failure is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity all over the world. Therapeutic options to treat respiratory failure remain limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas transfer performance of a newly developed miniature portable integrated pediatric pump-lung device (PediPL) with small membrane surface for respiratory support in an acute ovine respiratory failure model. The respiratory failure was created in six adult sheep using intravenous anesthesia and reduced mechanical ventilation at 2 breaths/min. The PediPL device was surgically implanted and evaluated for respiratory support in a venovenous configuration between the right atrium and pulmonary artery. The hemodynamics and respiratory status of the animals during support with the device gas transfer performance of the PediPL were studied for 4 h. The animals exhibited respiratory failure 30 min after mechanical ventilation was reduced to 2 breaths/min, indicated by low oxygen partial pressure, low oxygen saturation, and elevated carbon dioxide in arterial blood. The failure was reversed by establishing respiratory support with the PediPL after 30 min. The rates of O2 transfer and CO2 removal of the PediPL were 86.8 and 139.1 mL/min, respectively. The results demonstrated that the PediPL (miniature integrated pump-oxygenator) has the potential to provide respiratory support as a novel treatment for both hypoxia and hypercarbia. The compact size of the PediPL could allow portability and potentially be used in many emergency settings to rescue patients suffering acute lung injury. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ethics and safety in home care: perspectives on home support workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Janet; Curry, Cherie Geering; Stevenson, Lynn; Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella

    2014-03-01

    Home support workers (HSWs) encounter unique safety issues in their provision of home care. These issues raise ethical concerns, affecting the care workers provide to seniors and other recipients. This paper is derived from a subproject of a larger Canada-wide study, Safety at Home: A Pan-Canadian Home Care Safety Study, released in June 2013 by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Semi-structured, face-to-face, audiotaped interviews were conducted with providers, clients and informal caregivers in British Columbia, Manitoba and New Brunswick to better understand their perceptions of patient safety in home care. Using the BC data only, we then compared our findings to findings of other BC studies focusing on safety in home care that were conducted over the past decade. Through our interviews and comparative analyses it became clear that HSWs experienced significant inequities in providing home care. Utilizing a model depicting concerns of and for HSWs developed by Craven and colleagues (2012), we were able to illustrate the physical, spatial, interpersonal and temporal concerns set in the context of system design that emphasized the ethical dilemmas of HSWs in home care. Our data suggested the necessity of adding a fifth domain, organizational (system design). In this paper, we issue a call for stronger advocacy for home care and improved collaboration and resource equity between institutional care and community care.

  14. Early home-supported discharge of stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Sørensen, J.

    2006-01-01

    : A systematic literature search for randomized trials (RCTs) on "early supported discharge" was closed in April 2005. RCTs on EHSD without information on (i) death or institution at follow-up, (ii) change in Barthél Index, (iii) length of hospital stay, (iv) intensity of home rehabilitation, or (v) baseline......OBJECTIVES: A comprehensive and systematic assessment (HTA) of early home-supported discharge by a multidisciplinary team that plans, coordinates, and delivers care at home (EHSD) was undertaken and the results were compared with that of conventional rehabilitation at stroke units. METHODS...... data are excluded. Seven RCTs on EHSD with 1,108 patients followed 3-12 months after discharge are selected for statistical meta-analysis of outcomes. The costs are calculated as a function of the average number of home training sessions. Economic evaluation is organized as a test of dominance (both...

  15. Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease* **

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Iván; Zenteno, Daniel; Manterola, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD). METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP), PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF). We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT. RESULTS: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years), of whom 18 (62.1%) were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%), and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%). The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks) in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks) in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD. PMID:25610503

  16. Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP, PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF. We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT. RESULTS: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years, of whom 18 (62.1% were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%, and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%. The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD.

  17. Advancing Home-School Relations through Parent Support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergnehr, Disa

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores a local initiative to develop parent support services through the school system. In focus are the discourse on home-school relations and parent support and the interplay between discourse and practical occurrences. Official documents, interviews and notes from municipal meetings and informal conversations were obtained…

  18. Needs for Psychosocial Support in Home Care Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotay, Carolyn Cook

    There is little research documenting the psychosocial support needs of hospice patients and their families. To assess hospice patients' and families' use of and perceptions of need for support, 77 patients and their families were interviewed during home care for terminal illness (Group 1), and 50 family members (84% spouses) were interviewed 1…

  19. Extracorporeal support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. Finney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygen (ECMO has been used for many years in patients with life-threatening hypoxaemia and/or hypercarbia. While early trials demonstrated that it was associated with poor outcomes and extensive haemorrhage, the technique has evolved. It now encompasses new technologies and understanding that the lung protective mechanical ventilation it can facilitate is inextricably linked to improving outcomes for patients. The positive results from the CESAR (Conventional ventilation or ECMO for Severe Adult Respiratory failure study and excellent outcomes in patients who suffered severe influenza A (H1N1/09 infection have established ECMO in the care of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Controversy remains as to at what point in the clinical pathway ECMO should be employed; as a rescue therapy or more pro-actively to enable and ensure high-quality lung protective mechanical ventilation. The primary aims of this article are to discuss: 1 the types of extracorporeal support available; 2 the rationale for its use; 3 the relationship with lung protective ventilation; and 4 the current evidence for its use.

  20. Chronic respiratory diseases and quality of life in elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Gomes-Belo, Joana; Papoila, Ana Luísa; Caires, Iolanda; Palmeiro, Teresa; Gaspar-Marques, João; Leiria-Pinto, Paula; Mendes, Ana Sofia; Paulo-Teixeira, João; Botelho, Maria Amália; Neuparth, Nuno

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have assessed the quality of life (QOL) related to chronic respiratory diseases in the elderly. In the framework of the geriatric study on the health effects of air quality in elderly care centers (GERIA) study, a questionnaire was completed by elderly subjects from 53 selected nursing homes. It included various sections in order to assess respiratory complaints, QOL (World Health Organization QOL (WHOQOL)-BREF), and the cognitive and depression status. The outcome variables were the presence of a score lower than 50 (Chronic bronchitis, frequent cough, current wheezing, asthma, and allergic rhinitis were considered as potential risk factors. The surveyed sample was (n = 887) 79% female, with a mean age of 84 years (SD: 7 years). In the multivariable analysis, a score of chronic bronchitis (OR: 2.89, CI: 1.34-6.23) and emphysema (OR: 3.89, CI: 1.27-11.88). In view of these findings, the presence of respiratory diseases seems to be an important risk factor for a low QOL among elderly nursing home residents. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    ) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus......Objective To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). Methods An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters...... was on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified with the EVS, by involving the physiotherapist, registered dietitian, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system. Outcome parameters were quality of life (by...

  2. Effectiveness of home respiratory polygraphy for the diagnosis of sleep apnoea and hypopnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa, Juan F; Corral, Jaime; Pereira, Ricardo; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Cabello, Marta; Hernández-Blasco, Luis; Monasterio, Carmen; Alonso, Alberto; Chiner, Eusebi; Rubio, Manuela; Garcia-Ledesma, Estefania; Cacelo, Laura; Carpizo, Rosario; Sacristan, Lirios; Salord, Neus; Carrera, Miguel; Sancho-Chust, José N; Embid, Cristina; Vázquez-Polo, Francisco-José; Negrín, Miguel A; Montserrat, Jose M

    2011-07-01

    Home respiratory polygraphy (HRP) may be a cost-effective alternative to polysomnography for the diagnosis of sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS), but stronger evidence is needed. Normally, patients transport HRP equipment from the hospital to home and back, which may create difficulties for some patients. To determine both the diagnostic efficacy and cost of HRP (with and without a transportation service moving the device and telematic transmission of data) in a large sample compared with in-hospital polysomnography. Patients suspected of having SAHS were included in a multicentre study (eight hospitals). They were assigned to home and hospital protocols in random order. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for manual respiratory polygraphy scoring protocol and different polysomnographic cut-off points. Diagnostic efficacies for several polysomnographic cut-off points were explored and costs for two equally effective alternatives were calculated. Of 366 randomised patients, 348 completed the protocol. The best receiver operating characteristic curve was obtained with a polysomnographic cut-off of the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI)≥5. The sensitive HRP AHI cut-off point (10) had a sensitivity of 87%, a specificity of 86% and a positive LR of 6.25. The cost of HRP was half that of polysomnography. Telematic transmission costs were similar if the patients' costs were taken in to account. HRP is an alternative to polysomnography in patients with suspected SAHS. Telematic procedures may help patients with limited mobility and those who live a long way from the sleep centre.

  3. Respiratory Illness and Allergy Related to Work and Home Environment among Commercial Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xi; Lindgren, Torsten; Wieslander, Gunilla; Janson, Christer; Norbäck, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study associations between work and home environment and prevalence and incidence of respiratory health and a history of atopy in a 3-y cohort of commercial pilots. A questionnaire was mailed in 1997 to all pilots in a Scandinavian airline company (N = 622); 577 (93%) participated. The same questionnaire was sent to the participants 3 years later, 436 participated (76%). There were questions on asthma, respiratory symptoms and infections, allergies, the cabin environment, psychosocial environment and the home environment. Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, calculating odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). The incidence of doctors’ diagnosed asthma and atopy were 2.4 and 16.6 per 1000 person years, respectively. Pilots changing type of flight during follow-up got more airway infections (OR = 11.27; 95% CI 2.39–53.14). Those reporting decreased work control (OR = 1.85; 95% CI 1.03–3.31 for 1 unit change) and those with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) at home (OR = 3.73; 95% CI 1.09–12.83) had a higher incidence of atopy during follow up. Dampness or mould at home was associated with a higher prevalence of asthma symptoms (OR = 3.55; 95% CI 1.43–8.82) and airway infections (OR = 3.12 95% CI 1.27–7.68). Window pane condensation in winter at home, reported at baseline, was associated with increased incidence of asthma symptoms (OR = 4.14; 95% CI 1.32–12.97) and pilots living in newer buildings at baseline had a higher incidence of airway infections (OR = 5.23; 95% CI 1.43–19.10). In conclusion, lack of work control and ETS at home can be a risk factors for development of allergic symptoms in pilots. Window pane condensation at home can be a risk factor for incidence of asthma symptoms. Dampness and mould at home can be a risk factor for prevalence of asthma symptoms and airway infections and living in newer buildings can be a risk factor for incidence of airway infections. PMID:27741314

  4. Air Quality and Acute Respiratory Illness in Biomass Fuel using homes in Bagamoyo, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nakai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory Diseases are public health concern worldwide. The diseases have been associated with air pollution especially indoor air pollution from biomass fuel burning in developing countries. However, researches on pollution levels and on association of respiratory diseases with biomass fuel pollution are limited. A study was therefore undertaken to characterize the levels of pollutants in biomass fuel using homes and examine the association between biomass fuel smoke exposure and Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI disease in Nianjema village in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Pollution was assessed by measuring PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations in kitchen, living room and outdoors. ARI prevalence was assessed by use of questionnaire which gathered health information for all family members under the study. Results showed that PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations were highest in the kitchen and lowest outdoors. Kitchen concentrations were highest in the kitchen located in the living room for all pollutants except CO. Family size didn’t have effect on the levels measured in kitchens. Overall ARI prevalence for cooks and children under age 5 making up the exposed group was 54.67% with odds ratio (OR of 5.5; 95% CI 3.6 to 8.5 when compared with unexposed men and non-regular women cooks. Results of this study suggest an association between respiratory diseases and exposure to domestic biomass fuel smoke, but further studies with improved design are needed to confirm the association.

  5. Early home-supported discharge of stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Sørensen, J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A comprehensive and systematic assessment (HTA) of early home-supported discharge by a multidisciplinary team that plans, coordinates, and delivers care at home (EHSD) was undertaken and the results were compared with that of conventional rehabilitation at stroke units. METHODS......: A systematic literature search for randomized trials (RCTs) on "early supported discharge" was closed in April 2005. RCTs on EHSD without information on (i) death or institution at follow-up, (ii) change in Barthél Index, (iii) length of hospital stay, (iv) intensity of home rehabilitation, or (v) baseline...... are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: EHSD is evidenced as a dominant health intervention. However, financial barriers between municipalities and health authorities have to be overcome. For qualitative reasons, a learning path of implementation is recommended where one stroke unit in a region initiates EHSD...

  6. Maternal smoking location at home and hospitalization for respiratory tract infections among children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Michiyo; Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-02

    We examined the effects of maternal smoking location at home on hospitalization for respiratory tract infections among young children in Japan. We used the large nationwide population-based longitudinal survey and restricted study participants to children born after 37 gestational weeks and singleton births (n = 43,851). We evaluated the associations among children between the ages of 6 and 18 months and between the ages of 18 and 30 months, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, both maternal outdoor and indoor smoking were associated with the elevated risk. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of maternal outdoor and indoor smoking (vs nonsmoking mothers) were 1.21 (1.01-1.44) and 1.18 (1.04-1.33), respectively, in children between the ages of 6 and 18 months. We thus encourage a smoke-free home policy to protect children from second- and third-hand smoke exposure.

  7. Vitamin E and respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Leka, Lynette S; Fine, Basil C; Dallal, Gerard E; Keusch, Gerald T; Singh, Maria Fiatarone; Hamer, Davidson H

    2004-08-18

    Respiratory tract infections are prevalent in elderly individuals, resulting in increased morbidity, mortality, and use of health care services. Vitamin E supplementation has been shown to improve immune response in elderly persons. However, the clinical importance of these findings has not been determined. To determine the effect of 1 year of vitamin E supplementation on respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted from April 1998 to August 2001 at 33 long-term care facilities in the Boston, Mass, area. A total of 617 persons aged at least 65 years and who met the study's eligibility criteria were enrolled; 451 (73%) completed the study. Vitamin E (200 IU) or placebo capsule administered daily; all participants received a capsule containing half the recommended daily allowance of essential vitamins and minerals. Incidence of respiratory tract infections, number of persons and number of days with respiratory tract infections (upper and lower), and number of new antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections among all participants randomized and those who completed the study. Vitamin E had no significant effect on incidence or number of days with infection for all, upper, or lower respiratory tract infections. However, fewer participants receiving vitamin E acquired 1 or more respiratory tract infections (60% vs 68%; risk ratio [RR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-1.00; P =.048 for all participants; and 65% vs 74%; RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.75-0.99; P =.04 for completing participants), or upper respiratory tract infections (44% vs 52%; RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.69-1.00; P =.05 for all participants; and 50% vs 62%; RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.96; P =.01 for completing participants). When common colds were analyzed in a post hoc subgroup analysis, the vitamin E group had a lower incidence of common cold (0.67 vs 0.81 per person-year; RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.68-1.01; P =.06 for all

  8. Strategies for Engaging Parents in Home Support of Reading Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The author asserts that "Children benefit when teachers and parents reinforce the same concepts and ideas. For this to happen, teachers and parents must have some knowledge of what happens in the classroom and what happens at home that support reading acquisition." In this article, the author describes several strategies that teachers can share…

  9. [Nutritional support in the home-based hospitalization setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, L; Planas, M; Pérez-Portabella, C; Vélez, C; San José, A

    2009-01-01

    The Hospital at Home (HAD) is a choice of care that enables own care in a hospital at home patient. Moreover, the nutritional support (NS) -enteral or parenteral nutrition- is usually indicated in patients with serious underlying disease, and/or frequently remain severely disabled. To analyze the characteristics of the patients, attended at home for specific questions of the NS that receive. descriptive and retrospective study of the patients attended by the Nutritional Support Unit (NSU), in the area of the HAD, from September 1, 2006 until August 31, 2007. At home, the realized procedure was: refill of gastrostomia or jejunostomia feeding tube in 158 cases; modification of the guideline of enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) in 53 cases; training of the skill of artificial nutrition in 14 cases. 39 visits were realized by complications -by infection or lead throught the estoma and by obstruction of the feeding tube-. Only in 3 patients (7.7%) the domiciliary assistance indicated the movement of the patient to the Emergency Unit. In our center, the infrastructure of the HAD has allowed to give answer to the needs of the patients who receive NS at home in our area of influence.

  10. Home Visiting Family Support Programs: Benefits of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Visiting Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The federally funded, locally administered Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program sponsors family support programs that are often called "home visiting" because they take place in the homes of at-risk families. These families often lack support, experience, and knowledge of basic parenting skills. Because children…

  11. Withdrawal of Ventilatory Support at Home on Hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Kenneth M

    2016-08-01

    When ventilatory support is withdrawn in an intensive care unit (ICU), the place of death for most patients is the hospital. However, the majority of terminally ill patients prefer to die at home. Few articles have addressed taking adult mechanically ventilated patients home from the ICU for withdrawal of ventilatory support (WVS). To determine the outcomes of a protocol-driven program of WVS in the home under hospice care. A retrospective chart review of 14 consecutive patients who had WVS at home. All subjects were mechanically ventilated ICU patients referred to hospice with a request for WVS to be performed in the patient's home. A protocol/checklist guided care. Medical records were reviewed to obtain demographic and medical information, particularly for duration of mechanical ventilation, the use of premedication, level of consciousness at the time of WVS, symptoms following WVS, pharmacologic measures used for symptom control after WVS, and survival time after WVS. At the time of WVS, five patients were awake or arousable and nine were stuporous or comatose. Ten patients required no medication before WVS; only four required medications for symptom control after WVS. Median survival after WVS was 18.15 hours. In all cases, symptomatic control was judged to be excellent. Successful WVS and a natural death at home is possible with logistic support from the hospice organization and the expertise of the hospice team, guided by a comprehensive protocol/checklist. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Validation of the Portuguese Severe Respiratory Insufficiency Questionnaire for home mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ribeiro

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and validate the professional translation and cultural adaptation of the Portuguese Severe Respiratory Insufficiency (SRI Questionnaire.The sample was composed of 93 patients (50 male patients, 53.8% with a mean age of 66.3 years. The most frequent diagnostic groups were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity hypoventilation syndrome and restrictive chest wall disorders.The patients were asked to fill in both the SRI and SF-36 questionnaires. Factor analysis of the SRI questionnaire was performed leading to an explained variance of 73%, and resulted in 13 components. When analyzing the reliability, we obtained values for Cronbach's alpha above 0.70 for most subscales with the reliability of the summary scale being even higher (0.84.This professional translation and cultural adaptation of the Portuguese SRI Questionnaire has good psychometric properties which are similar, not only to the original, but also to other translations. These characteristics make this questionnaire applicable to the Portuguese population receiving home mechanical ventilation for severe respiratory insufficiency. Keywords: Questionnaire, Portuguese, Home mechanical ventilation, Quality of life

  13. Comparison study of chest physiotherapy home training programmes on respiratory functions in patients with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeldan, Ipek; Gurses, H Nilgun; Yuksel, Husniye

    2008-08-01

    To compare the effects of home training programmes, threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise on spirometry and maximal pressures in patients with muscular dystrophy. Prospective blinded 12-week study. Cardiopulmonary department of university hospital. Twenty-three patients with muscular dystrophy (17 patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy and 6 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy) assigned to the threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise groups with alternate allocation. Spirometry, maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) and maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax) were measured before and after training. In the threshold inspiratory muscle training group threshold pressure load was determined as equal to 30% of weekly PImax measurement. In the breathing exercise group, patients performed deep and forceful diaphragmatic and segmental exercises. All patients performed exercises at home and once a week at hospital under supervision. The improvement of PImax in the threshold inspiratory muscle training group was more significant than the improvement observed in the breathing exercise group (P=0.05). PEmax increased significantly only in the breathing exercise group (P=0.01). Spirometry results did not change significantly in both groups after the training. We conclude that respiratory muscle strength is enhanced by training in the patients with muscular dystrophy who are ambulatory, but inspiratory and/or expiratory training effect is specific to the trained muscles. The techniques that improve the strength of respiratory muscles should be included in the physiotherapy management of patients with muscular dystrophy.

  14. Home-based respiratory rehabilitation in adult patients with moderate or severe persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renolleau-Courtois, Delphine; Lamouroux-Delay, Aurore; Delpierre, Stéphane; Badier, Monique; Lagier-Tessonnier, Françoise; Palot, Alain; Gouitaa, Marion; Tummino, Céline; Charpin, Denis; Molinari, Nicolas; Chanez, Pascal

    2014-06-01

    We assessed retrospectively the feasibility of a home-based respiratory rehabilitation (RR) program for asthmatics under optimal pharmacological treatment, as this type of care can reduce costs and offer a more patient-friendly approach for subjects with persistent asthma. Fifty-two patients with persistent asthma were recruited to the RR program (20 males, 32 females, 54 ± 11 (SD) years, forced expiratory volume in one second 71 ± 33% of predicted mean value, BMI 29.9 ± 7.9 kg/m(2)). This two-month protocol comprised education sessions, respiratory physiotherapy and an exercise training program at home and in groups supervised by an adapted physical activity instructor. Thirty-nine patients completed the whole RR program, i.e. 25% dropout. The dropout rate was significantly higher with respect to younger patients in employment. The number of exacerbations decreased significantly during the year following the program, regardless of whether the patients had dropped out (p asthma. Both functional and physiologic indices improved during the follow-up period.

  15. Ventilatory strategies and supportive care in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luks, Andrew M

    2013-11-01

    While antiviral therapy is an important component of care in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following influenza infection, it is not sufficient to ensure good outcomes, and additional measures are usually necessary. Patients usually receive high levels of supplemental oxygen to counteract the hypoxemia resulting from severe gas exchange abnormalities. Many patients also receive invasive mechanical ventilation for support for oxygenation, while in resource-poor settings, supplemental oxygen via face mask may be the only available intervention. Patients with ARDS receiving mechanical ventilation should receive lung-protective ventilation, whereby tidal volume is decreased to 6 ml/kg of their predicted weight and distending pressures are maintained ≤ 30 cm H2 O, as well as increased inspired oxygen concentrations and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to prevent atelectasis and support oxygenation. While these measures are sufficient in most patients, a minority develop refractory hypoxemia and may receive additional therapies, including prone positioning, inhaled vasodilators, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, recruitment maneuvers followed by high PEEP, and neuromuscular blockade, although recent data suggest that this last option may be warranted earlier in the clinical course before development of refractory hypoxemia. Application of these "rescue strategies" is complicated by the lack of guidance in the literature regarding implementation. While much attention is devoted to these strategies, clinicians must not lose sight of simple interventions that affect patient outcomes including head of bed elevation, prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism and gastrointestinal bleeding, judicious use of fluids in the post-resuscitative phase, and a protocol-based approach to sedation and spontaneous breathing trials. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  17. Home and workplace built environment supports for physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha, Deepti; Hipp, Aaron J; Marx, Christine; Yang, Lin; Tabak, Rachel; Dodson, Elizabeth A; Brownson, Ross C

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity has been associated with obesity and related chronic diseases. Understanding built environment (BE) influences on specific domains of physical activity (PA) around homes and workplaces is important for public health interventions to increase population PA. To examine the association of home and workplace BE features with PA occurring across specific life domains (work, leisure, and travel). Between 2012 and 2013, telephone interviews were conducted with participants in four Missouri metropolitan areas. Questions included sociodemographic characteristics, home and workplace supports for PA, and dietary behaviors. Data analysis was conducted in 2013; logistic regression was used to examine associations between BE features and domain-specific PA. In home neighborhoods, seven of 12 BE features (availability of fruits and vegetables, presence of shops and stores, bike facilities, recreation facilities, crime rate, seeing others active, and interesting things) were associated with leisure PA. The global average score of home neighborhood BE features was associated with greater odds of travel PA (AOR=1.99, 95% CI=1.46, 2.72); leisure PA (AOR=1.84, 95% CI=1.44, 2.34); and total PA (AOR=1.41, 95% CI=1.04, 1.92). Associations between workplace neighborhoods' BE features and workplace PA were small but in the expected direction. This study offers empirical evidence on BE supports for domain-specific PA. Findings suggest that diverse, attractive, and walkable neighborhoods around workplaces support walking, bicycling, and use of public transit. Public health practitioners, researchers, and worksite leaders could benefit by utilizing worksite domains and measures from this study for future BE assessments. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Smart home technologies for health and social care support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Kelly, Greg; Kernohan, W George; McCreight, Bernadette; Nugent, Christopher

    2008-10-08

    The integration of smart home technology to support health and social care is acquiring an increasing global significance. Provision is framed within the context of a rapidly changing population profile, which is impacting on the number of people requiring health and social care, workforce availability and the funding of healthcare systems. To explore the effectiveness of smart home technologies as an intervention for people with physical disability, cognitive impairment or learning disability, who are living at home, and to consider the impact on the individual's health status and on the financial resources of health care. We searched the following databases for primary studies: (a) the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Register, (b) the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), (The Cochrane Library, issue 1, 2007), and (c) bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (1980 to March 2007) and CINAHL (1982 to March 2007). We also searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE). We searched the electronic databases using a strategy developed by the EPOC Trials Search Co-ordinator. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series analyses (ITS). Participants included adults over the age of 18, living in their home in a community setting. Participants with a physical disability, dementia or a learning disability were included. The included interventions were social alarms, electronic assistive devices, telecare social alert platforms, environmental control systems, automated home environments and 'ubiquitous homes'. Outcome measures included any objective measure that records an impact on a participant's quality of life, healthcare professional workload, economic outcomes, costs to healthcare provider or costs to participant. We included measures of service satisfaction

  19. Reported respiratory symptoms and adverse home conditions after 9/11 among residents living near the World Trade Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Bowers, James; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reported damage, dust, and odors in homes near the World Trade Center (WTC) after September 11, 2001, were related to increased rates of respiratory symptoms among residents and if multiple sources of exposure were associated with greater health risk. We mailed questionnaires to homes within 1.5 km of the WTC site (affected area) and in upper Manhattan (control area). Surveys asked about respiratory symptoms, unplanned medical visits, physician diagnoses, medication use, and conditions in the home after 9/11. Adverse home conditions were associated with new-onset (i.e., began after 9/11) and persistent (i.e., remained 1 year after 9/11) upper and lower respiratory symptoms in the affected area (Cumulative Incidence Ratios [CIRs] 1.20-1.71). Residents reporting longer duration of dust/odors or multiple sources of exposure had greater risk for symptoms compared to those reporting shorter duration and fewer sources. These data suggest that WTC-related contamination in the home after 9/11 was associated with new and persistent respiratory symptoms among residents living near the site. While we cannot eliminate potential biases related to self-reported data, we took strategies to minimize their impact, and the observed effects are biologically plausible.

  20. Telemedicine Support Groups for Home Parenteral Nutrition Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Thompson, Noreen; Wright, Shawna; Stone, Kathaleen; Adams, Natasia; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Smith, Carol E

    2017-12-01

    Patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN), a life-sustaining intravenous (IV) infusion that provides nourishment and hydration to patients with short gut or inflammatory bowel diseases, are often isolated and not in visual contact with peers or health providers. One completed clinical trial (Clinical Trials.gov NCT0190028) and 1 ongoing clinical trial (Clinical Trials.gov NCT02987569) are evaluating a mobile videoconferencing-delivered support group intervention for patients on HPN and their caregivers. This home-based telemedicine intervention uses encrypted tablet-based videoconferencing to connect multiple families in real time. The twice-daily IV regimen is challenging for patients who may experience infusion catheter-related bloodstream infections, difficulties with fatigue, loss of sleep, depressive disorders, and worry over the potential life-threatening side effects and the expenses of this therapy. Using secure telemedicine, the facilitated support group intervention aims to enhance HPN home care, daily functioning, and quality of life. The authors provide the rationale for the telemedicine approach with HPN users and caregivers. They provide "how-to" information about the content and process of the facilitated support group sessions via secure videoconferencing. They share lessons learned from the ongoing evaluation of the telemedicine approach.

  1. Systematic review: Effective home support in dementia care, components and impacts - Stage 2, effectiveness of home support interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Paul; Hughes, Jane; Roe, Brenda; Giebel, Clarissa M; Jolley, David; Poland, Fiona; Abendstern, Michele; Chester, Helen; Challis, David

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explicate the outcomes of home support interventions for older people with dementia and/or their carers to inform clinical practice, policy and research. Most people with dementia receive support at home. However, components and effectiveness of home support interventions have been little explored. Systematic review with narrative summary. Electronic searches of published studies in English using PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsychINFO, CINAHL, Applied Social Science Index and CSA Social Services Abstracts. Databases and sources were searched from inception to April 2014 with no date restrictions to locate studies. The PRISMA statement was followed and established systematic review methods used. Using 14 components of care for people with dementia and their carers, identified previously, data across studies were synthesized. Interventions were grouped and described and effectiveness ratings applied. Qualitative studies were synthesized using key themes. Seventy studies (four qualitative) were included. Most were directed to carers and of high quality. Seven interventions for carers and two for people with dementia were identified, covering 81% of studies. Those relating to daily living, cognitive training and physical activity for people with dementia were absent. Measures of effectiveness were influenced mainly by the intensity (duration and frequency) of interventions. Those containing education, social support and behaviour management appeared most effective. These interventions reflect emergent patterns of home support. Research is required to identify effective interventions linked to the stage of dementia, which can be applied as part of routine clinical care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections among adults in relation to the home environment in multi-family buildings in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Engvall, Karin; Smedje, Greta; Norbäck, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections in the home environment were studied by a questionnaire survey. Totally 5775 occupants (≥ 18 years old) from a stratified random sample of multi-family buildings in Sweden participated (46%). 51.0% had rhinitis in the last 3 months (current rhinitis); 11.5% doctor diagnosed asthma; 46.4% respiratory infections in the last 3 months and 11.9% antibiotic medication for respiratory infections in the last 12 months. Associations between home environment and health were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, controlling for gender, age and smoking and mutual adjustment. Buildings constructed during 1960-1975 were risk factors for day time breathlessness (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.03-2.29). And those constructed during 1976-1985 had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.12-1.84) and respiratory infections (OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.21-1.78). Cities with higher population density had more current rhinitis (p = 0.008) and respiratory infections (pold. Odor at home was a risk factor for doctor diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.08-2.06) and current asthma (OR = 1.52, 95%CI 1.03-2.24). Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was a risk factor for current asthma (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.09-2.16). Window panel condensation was a risk factor for antibiotic medication for respiratory infections (OR = 1.41, 95%CI 1.10-1.82). In conclusion, rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections were related to a number of factors in the home environment. Certain building years (1961-1985), building dampness, window panel condensation and odor in the dwelling may be risk factors.

  3. Allergy and respiratory health effects of dampness and dampness-related agents in schools and homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, G; Høst, Arne; Doekes, G

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the health effects of school-related indoor dampness and microbial exposures. In this study we investigated dampness and dampness-related agents in both homes and schools and their association with allergy and respiratory health effects in 330 Danish pupils. Classroom dampness...... was identified based on technical inspection and bedroom dampness on parents' self-report. Classroom and bedroom dust was analysed for seven microbial components. Skin-prick-testing determined atopic sensitisation. Lung function was expressed as z-scores for forced expiratory volume in one second (zFEV1...... ), forced vital capacity (zFVC) and the ratio zFEV1 /zFVC using GLI-2012-prediction-equations. The parents reported children's allergies, airway symptoms and doctor-diagnosed asthma. High classroom dampness, but not bedroom dampness, was negatively associated with zFEV1 (β-coef. -0.71; 95%CI -1.17 - -0...

  4. Evidence from SINPHONIE project: Impact of home environmental exposures on respiratory health among school-age children in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Lin, Shao; Lawrence, Wayne R; Lin, Ziqiang; Gurzau, Eugen; Csobod, Eva; Neamtiu, Iulia A

    2017-11-22

    Exposure to indoor air pollutants at home was found to be associated with respiratory diseases. As lifestyle changes with rapid economic growth in Romania, the aim of our study is to describe the characteristics of Romanian homes and their impact on children's respiratory health. Self-reported information on respiratory symptoms was collected from 280 Romanian elementary school students in 2011, and the symptoms were categorized into allergy, asthma-like, and flu-like symptoms. Home characteristics and demographic information were collected from questionnaires answered by parents. The association between home characteristics and respiratory health was assessed through multivariate logistic regression controlling for school indoor exposure. As compared to U.S. households, Romanian homes have a higher percentage of smokers, limited use of indoor climate control, and higher use of iron stoves. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was associated with both asthma and allergy symptoms. Additional risk factors identified for allergy symptoms include living in apartments, near pesticide sprayed areas, and the use of incense sticks. The significantly higher risk of flu-like symptoms was associated with mold and dampness issues, the use of air conditioner, gas heater/iron stove in children's bedroom. Our findings suggest that an increase in respiratory symptoms among Romanian school-age children can be partly related to their environmental exposure at home. Since most of the identified risk factors are preventable, our results provide critical information and evidence for policymakers, to develop target intervention and education strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Primary Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Srinivas; Singh, Jayesh; Khant, Chiragkumar; Kumar Dash, Swarup; Oleti, Tejo Pratap; Joy, Percy; Kabra, Nandkishor S

    2018-01-23

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the standard noninvasive respiratory support for newborns with respiratory distress. Evidence for high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative mode of respiratory support is inconclusive. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether HFNC is not inferior to nCPAP in reducing the need for higher respiratory support in the first 72 h of life when applied as a noninvasive respiratory support mode for preterm neonates with respiratory distress. Preterm infants (gestation ≥28 weeks and birth weight ≥1,000 g) with respiratory distress were randomized to either HFNC or nCPAP in a non-inferiority trial. Failure of the support mode in the first 72 h after birth was the primary outcome. Infants failing HFNC were rescued either with nCPAP or mechanical ventilation, and those failing nCPAP received mechanical ventilation. During the study period, 139 and 133 infants were randomized to the nCPAP and HFNC groups, respectively. The study was stopped after an interim analysis showed a significant difference (p respiratory distress (SAS score >5). When comparing HFNC to nCPAP as a primary noninvasive respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress, HFNC is inferior to nCPAP in avoiding the need for a higher mode of respiratory support in the first 72 h of life. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Validation of the Portuguese Severe Respiratory Insufficiency Questionnaire for home mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, C; Ferreira, D; Conde, S; Oliveira, P; Windisch, W

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate the professional translation and cultural adaptation of the Portuguese Severe Respiratory Insufficiency (SRI) Questionnaire. The sample was composed of 93 patients (50 male patients, 53.8%) with a mean age of 66.3 years. The most frequent diagnostic groups were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity hypoventilation syndrome and restrictive chest wall disorders. The patients were asked to fill in both the SRI and SF-36 questionnaires. Factor analysis of the SRI questionnaire was performed leading to an explained variance of 73%, and resulted in 13 components. When analyzing the reliability, we obtained values for Cronbach's alpha above 0.70 for most subscales with the reliability of the summary scale being even higher (0.84). This professional translation and cultural adaptation of the Portuguese SRI Questionnaire has good psychometric properties which are similar, not only to the original, but also to other translations. These characteristics make this questionnaire applicable to the Portuguese population receiving home mechanical ventilation for severe respiratory insufficiency. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Early home-supported discharge of stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Sørensen, J.

    2006-01-01

    : A systematic literature search for randomized trials (RCTs) on "early supported discharge" was closed in April 2005. RCTs on EHSD without information on (i) death or institution at follow-up, (ii) change in Barthél Index, (iii) length of hospital stay, (iv) intensity of home rehabilitation, or (v) baseline...... data are excluded. Seven RCTs on EHSD with 1,108 patients followed 3-12 months after discharge are selected for statistical meta-analysis of outcomes. The costs are calculated as a function of the average number of home training sessions. Economic evaluation is organized as a test of dominance (both...... for dissemination of new experience to the other stroke units....

  8. Synchronized mechanical ventilation for respiratory support in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, Anne; Murthy, Vadivelam; Milner, Anthony D; Rossor, Thomas E; Sundaresan, Adesh

    2016-08-19

    During synchronised mechanical ventilation, positive airway pressure and spontaneous inspiration coincide. If synchronous ventilation is provoked, adequate gas exchange should be achieved at lower peak airway pressures, potentially reducing baro/volutrauma, air leak and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Synchronous ventilation can potentially be achieved by manipulation of rate and inspiratory time during conventional ventilation and employment of patient-triggered ventilation. To compare the efficacy of:(i) synchronised mechanical ventilation, delivered as high-frequency positive pressure ventilation (HFPPV) or patient-triggered ventilation (assist control ventilation (ACV) and synchronous intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV)), with conventional ventilation or high-frequency oscillation (HFO);(ii) different types of triggered ventilation (ACV, SIMV, pressure-regulated volume control ventilation (PRVCV), SIMV with pressure support (PS) and pressure support ventilation (PSV)). We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 5), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to June 5 2016), EMBASE (1980 to June 5 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to June 5 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials comparing synchronised ventilation delivered as HFPPV to CMV, or ACV/SIMV to CMV or HFO in neonates. Randomised trials comparing different triggered ventilation modes (ACV, SIMV, SIMV plus PS, PRVCV and PSV) in neonates. Data were collected regarding clinical outcomes including mortality, air leaks (pneumothorax or pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE)), severe intraventricular haemorrhage (grades 3 and 4), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (oxygen dependency beyond 28 days), moderate/severe BPD (oxygen/respiratory

  9. Enriching Patient-Centered Medical Homes Through Peer Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Fisher, Edwin B

    2015-08-01

    Peer supporters are recognized by various designations-community health workers, promotores de salud, lay health advisers-and are community members who work for pay or as volunteers in association with health care systems or nonprofit community organizations and often share ethnicity, language, and socioeconomic status with the mentees that they serve. Although emerging evidence demonstrates the efficacy of peer support at the community level, the adoption and implementation of this resource into patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) is still under development. To accelerate that integration, this article addresses three major elements of peer support interventions: the functions and features of peer support, a framework and programmatic strategies for implementation, and fiscal models that would support the sustained viability of peer support programs within PCMHs. Key functions of peer support include assistance in daily management of health-related behaviors, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and longitudinal or ongoing support. An organizational model of innovation implementation provides a useful framework for determining how to implement and evaluate peer support programs in PCMHs. Programmatic strategies that can be useful in developing peer support programs within PCMHs include peer coaching or mentoring, group self-management training, and programs designed around the telephone and information technology. Fiscal models for peer support programs include linkages with hospital or health care systems, service- or community-based nonprofit organizations, and partnerships between health care systems and community groups. Peer support promises to enrich PCMHs by activating patients in their self-care, providing culturally sensitive outreach, and opening the way for partnerships with community-based organizations. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  10. Vocabulary development at home: A multimedia elaborated picture supporting parent-toddler interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremmen, M.C.; Molenaar, I.; Teepe, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Some children enter elementary school with large vocabulary delays, which negatively influence their later school performance. A rich home language environment can support vocabulary development through frequent high-quality parent-toddler interaction. Elaborated picture home activities can support

  11. Hospital to home paediatric enteral nutrition--parents need support.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shortall, C

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the provision of education and support to parents of children on home enteral nutrition (HEN), current dietetic support available and perceived challenges facing parents and carers. From the 39 responses (13%), 29 (83%, n = 35) parents suggested services for HEN need improvement. 29 (74%, n = 39) parents wanted more structured follow up and 22 (56%) would like one person to co-ordinate HEN, education and discharge. 7 parents (18%) reported a need for further education of health care professionals (HCP). Hospital dietitians were the most common HCPs reported to provide support to patients following discharge. Specialist paediatric HEN dietetic services working in a dedicated HEN team, who would provide accurate training and education and liaise with both parents and community care services post discharge should be in place. This would facilitate transfer to community care, reduce hospital re-admissions, outpatient department attendances and costs.

  12. Football supporters' perceptions of their role in the home advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Sandy; Wakelin, Delia; Lewis, Matthew

    2005-04-01

    Football fans' views on their role in the home advantage were obtained by placing links to an internet questionnaire on supporters' websites. Altogether, 461 fans from clubs which had been promoted, relegated or unchanged in the past season of the English football leagues rated crowd support as significantly more influential than familiarity, travel, territoriality and referee bias in contributing to the home advantage. Fans felt responsible for inspiring their team to victory, took credit for distracting opponents, and believed that they could influence officials into making decisions in their team's favour. However, they did not accept personal blame for poor results. No effects for gender, age or the team's outcome in the promotion/relegation battle emerged, though season ticket holders were more extreme in their feelings of responsibility overall. Furthermore, it was suggested that mechanisms such as the perception of being superior to rivals can encourage fans to retain their allegiance to their teams, even when outcomes are disappointing. Indeed, affiliation may become so incorporated into self-identity that supporters may not have the option of abandoning their team, but instead perceive a reciprocal relationship in which both they and the team are expected to do their best to achieve success.

  13. 45 CFR 233.53 - Support and maintenance assistance (including home energy assistance) in AFDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Support and maintenance assistance (including home... § 233.53 Support and maintenance assistance (including home energy assistance) in AFDC. (a) General. At State option, certain support and maintenance assistance (including home energy assistance) may be...

  14. Study on the factors determining home death of patients during home care: a historical cohort study at a home care support clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Seiji; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Associations between markedly low activities of daily living (ADL) at the start of home visit care and patient home death were analyzed using data from a home care support clinic in Japan that has a low rate of home deaths. The study was a historical cohort study. It involved patients who began to receive home visit care from a home visit care support clinic between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2011. Using home death as a dependent variable and presence/absence of markedly low ADL and other parameters (cancer, the patient's desire for home death, etc.) as independent variables, the adjusted hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Markedly low ADL were associated with home death even after adjustment for factors that influence home death (adjusted hazard ratio 4.40; 95% CI 2.37-8.16). Cancer and the patient's desire for home death were statistically significant factors involved in home death. In a subgroup analysis according to the presence/absence of cancer, the association between markedly low ADL and home death was stronger in the cancer-free group (adjusted hazard ratio 10.78; 95% CI 2.89-40.26) than in the cancer group (adjusted hazard ratio 5.58; 95% CI2.39-13.05). Patients' desire for home death could be fulfilled if home care support clinics provide home visit services to not only terminal-stage cancer patients, but also bedridden cancer-free patients. We must establish systems for older adults to remain at home during the terminal period of their lives. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Intelligent decision support system for home energy retrofit adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Duah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-established benefits of home energy retrofits (HER, its adoption has faced huge challenges. Though homeowners typically depend on energy practitioners for HER advice, previous work by the researchers has identified the inadequateness of such information as a barrier. Using an earlier developed information model, an energy retrofit intelligent decision support system (ERIDSS, that integrates expert knowledge with quantitative information to provide homeowners with accurate information for decision-making, was developed. This paper identifies the key components of the proposed ERIDSS, develops rules for relevant energy retrofit expert knowledge to be employed in the knowledge-based system of the proposed ERIDSS, develops the ERIDSS for decision-making for home energy retrofits, and demonstrates the application of the ERIDSS using a pilot system on two test homes. The quantitative information was obtained from published sources and the U.S. Department of Energy’s cost database, and the expert knowledge was obtained through the application of the modified Delphi technique and job shadowing of energy auditors and retrofit contractors. The research contributes to improving the adoption of energy retrofits by homeowners, assisting industry practitioners with the corroboration of knowledge/information they provide to homeowners in order to reduce homeowner bias, providing a good understanding of available implicit domain knowledge through the development of six knowledge-based modules, and the development of a system and approach that may be replicated in other domains.

  16. Decision support at home (DS@HOME – system architectures and requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marschollek Michael

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic change with its consequences of an aging society and an increase in the demand for care in the home environment has triggered intensive research activities in sensor devices and smart home technologies. While many advanced technologies are already available, there is still a lack of decision support systems (DSS for the interpretation of data generated in home environments. The aim of the research for this paper is to present the state-of-the-art in DSS for these data, to define characteristic properties of such systems, and to define the requirements for successful home care DSS implementations. Methods A literature review was performed along with the analysis of cross-references. Characteristic properties are proposed and requirements are derived from the available body of literature. Results 79 papers were identified and analyzed, of which 20 describe implementations of decision components. Most authors mention server-based decision support components, but only few papers provide details about the system architecture or the knowledge base. A list of requirements derived from the analysis is presented. Among the primary drawbacks of current systems are the missing integration of DSS in current health information system architectures including interfaces, the missing agreement among developers with regard to the formalization and customization of medical knowledge and a lack of intelligent algorithms to interpret data from multiple sources including clinical application systems. Conclusions Future research needs to address these issues in order to provide useful information – and not only large amounts of data – for both the patient and the caregiver. Furthermore, there is a need for outcome studies allowing for identifying successful implementation concepts.

  17. Long-Term Respiratory Support for Children and Adolescents in Austria: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S; Van Egmond-Fröhlich, A; Hofer, N; Pfleger, A; Rath, R; Schwarz, R; Kurz, H; Waibel, V; Kenzian, H; Kommer, E; Wadlegger, F; Stelzl, W; Keck, B; Grigorow, I; Kerbl, R; Sauseng, W; Frischer, T; Eber, E; Bernert, G

    2016-01-01

    Population-based data on pediatric patients on long-term respiratory support (LTRS) in Austria are lacking. This study aimed to record the pediatric departments active in this field, as well as number and characteristics of patients on LTRS. A national cross-sectional study was carried out by means of questionnaires sent to all pediatric departments in Austria. All departments answered to the questionnaires. On June 1st, 2013, the reference day for this study, 12 of the 41 pediatric departments in Austria were active in the field. At this time, these centers were caring for 143 patients, 111 (77.6%) of them under 18 years, which corresponds to a prevalence of 7.4 per 100 000. The patients suffered from neuromuscular disorders (44%), other neurological disorders (18.9%), disorders of respiratory drive (9.1%), obstructive sleep apnea (8.4%), thoracal and spinal diseases (8.4%), pulmonary disorders (4.9%) and other diseases (6.3%). Continuous positive airway pressure was used in 6.3%, non-invasive ventilation in 60.1% and invasive ventilation in 33.6% of the patients, respectively. LTRS was performed at home in 92.3%. LTRS represents a common management strategy in children and adolescents with a variety of disorders. Census reports such as this one provide the basis for appropriate planning of resource allocation. The age distribution of our patients shows the need for structured transition into adult care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  19. Association between secondhand smoking in the home and respiratory morbidity in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaud, Cecília Helena de Siqueira; Castanheira, Ana Barbara de Couto; Costa, Priscila

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the prevalence of secondhand smoking in the home and its association with morbidity and hospitalization from respiratory causes in preschool children. This is a cross-sectional study conducted in five early childhood education centers at a public university in São Paulo. Sample size calculation was performed and the participants were randomly determined. Data were collected through questionnaires completed by family members or caregivers of 215 children. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for the statistical analysis, using a 0.05 significance level. The prevalence of secondhand smoke in the household was 15.3%. Bivariate analysis revealed that secondhand smoke in the household was associated with the occurrence of rapid breathing, subdiaphragmatic retractions in the past three months, and treated ear infections/otitis. A low prevalence of secondhand smoking in the home was found. Secondhand smoke was associated with a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and morbidity. Identificar a prevalência de tabagismo passivo em domicílio e verificar sua associação com morbidades e hospitalização por causas respiratórias em crianças pré-escolares. Trata-se de estudo transversal conduzido em cinco centros de educação infantil de uma universidade pública de São Paulo. Foi realizado cálculo de tamanho amostral, e a seleção dos participantes foi feita por sorteio. Os dados foram coletados por meio de questionários preenchidos pelos familiares ou cuidadores de 215 crianças. Na análise estatística foram empregados os testes Qui-quadrado e t-Student, considerando-se um nível de significância de 0,05. A prevalência de tabagismo passivo em domicílio foi de 15,3%. Verificou-se na análise bivariada que o tabagismo passivo em domicílio esteve associado à ocorrência de respiração rápida, retração subdiafragmática nos últimos três meses, e otite tratada. Verificou-se uma baixa prevalência de tabagismo passivo domiciliar. O

  20. Personal Support Worker (PSW)-supported home hemodialysis: A paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierratos, Andreas; Tremblay, Melanie; Kandasamy, Gokulan; Woodward, Graham; Blake, Peter; Graham, Janet; Hebert, Marc; Harvey, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Despite improving clinical outcomes associated with the use of home hemodialysis (HD), its utilization is low in most countries. The inability or unwillingness of patients and their families to participate in their own treatment is one of the most important barriers to the adoption of home HD. We hypothesized that paid helper-delivered home HD supported by public funds would be successful and welcomed by patients and be delivered at an affordable cost. We conducted a pilot project to dialyze six patients at home using Personal Support Workers (PSW) and resolve regulatory, organizational and financial constraints. cWe provided publically-funded PSW-supported home HD to six patients. We describe the administrative structure of the pilot project allowing scalability and turnkey operation in the province of Ontario. Regulatory and insurance concerns were resolved and patients and staff were enthusiastic. The projected total dialysis cost, when economies of scale are met, are expected to be lower than the cost of in-center HD. A second phase of the project is currently under way including 8 hospitals and 67 patients. If equally successful, it may have significant implications for the delivery of care for End Stage Renal Disease in Ontario and similar jurisdictions. It promises to increase the utilization of home dialysis possibly at a lower cost than in-center HD. This would be particularly important in providing dialysis in underserviced and geographically hard to access areas. © 2016 The Authors Hemodialysis International published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Hemodialysis.

  1. Rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections among adults in relation to the home environment in multi-family buildings in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Risk factors for rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections in the home environment were studied by a questionnaire survey. Totally 5775 occupants (≥ 18 years old from a stratified random sample of multi-family buildings in Sweden participated (46%. 51.0% had rhinitis in the last 3 months (current rhinitis; 11.5% doctor diagnosed asthma; 46.4% respiratory infections in the last 3 months and 11.9% antibiotic medication for respiratory infections in the last 12 months. Associations between home environment and health were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, controlling for gender, age and smoking and mutual adjustment. Buildings constructed during 1960-1975 were risk factors for day time breathlessness (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.03-2.29. And those constructed during 1976-1985 had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.12-1.84 and respiratory infections (OR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.21-1.78. Cities with higher population density had more current rhinitis (p = 0.008 and respiratory infections (p<0.001. Rented apartments had more current rhinitis (OR = 1.23, 95%CI 1.07-1.40, wheeze (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.02-1.41, day time breathlessness (OR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.04-1.66 and respiratory infections (OR = 1.13, 95%CI 1.01-1.26. Living in colder parts of the country was a risk factor for wheeze (p = 0.03 and night time breathlessness (p = 0.002. Building dampness was a risk factor for wheeze (OR = 1.42, 95%CI 1.08-1.86 and day time breathlessness (OR = 1.57, 95%CI 1.09-2.27. Building dampness was a risk factor for health among those below 66 years old. Odor at home was a risk factor for doctor diagnosed asthma (OR = 1.49, 95%CI 1.08-2.06 and current asthma (OR = 1.52, 95%CI 1.03-2.24. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS was a risk factor for current asthma (OR = 1.53, 95%CI 1.09-2.16. Window panel condensation was a risk factor for antibiotic medication for respiratory infections (OR = 1.41, 95%CI 1.10-1.82. In conclusion, rhinitis, asthma and respiratory infections were

  2. [The trial of the domiciliary nutrition support team in which a home medical care office offers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hisaki; Kamei, Miwa; Yamada, Akiko; Toshima, Kazue; Morita, Hideki; Kodama, Naoto; Okabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2010-12-01

    The function of home care support by a medical office is to offer the best medical care for the patient. It is essential that the medical office is capable of taking a call 24-hour a day and 365-day a year from a patient who needs help at home. Our medical office was specialized in home care treatment. Furthermore, we offer a home rehabilitation or a home nutrition education to the patient. On the other hand, a nutritional support is important as well as medical supports. To offer a high quality medical care at home, we created a nutrient support system in our hospital, and formed an at-home nutrition support team(at-home NST). The team is consisted of a medical staff and dietitian, a physical therapist and a speech therapist. As a result of the at-home NST, We improved the followings: (1) we were able to collect a nutritional data basis including a patient 's height and weight, (2) we made a good use of patient's eating habit at home during the medical treatment, and (3) we could make a good use of medical service to a home care patient by managing the information accumulated by nutritional surveillance. In multidisciplinary collaboration, at-home NST can grasp a versatility status of the patient positively. We continue to offer a medical care that is demanded from a home care patient because the activity of the at-home NST raises a quality of medical service we provide.

  3. Vocabulary Development at Home: A Multimedia Elaborated Picture Supporting Parent-Toddler Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremmen, M. C.; Molenaar, I.; Teepe, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Some children enter elementary school with large vocabulary delays, which negatively influence their later school performance. A rich home language environment can support vocabulary development through frequent high-quality parent-toddler interaction. Elaborated picture home activities can support this rich home language environment. This study…

  4. A Support Group for Home-Quarantined College Students Exposed to SARS: Learning from Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Peter J. D.; Chang, Shih-Hua; Yu, Yen-Yen

    2005-01-01

    This article is an initial description of a meaningful and valuable clinical experience in interacting with SARS home-quarantined college students in a support group in Taiwan. Information about SARS and home quarantine, the tasks of the Counseling Centers and group work after the SARS outbreak, the support group for home-quarantined members, the…

  5. Cleaning and disinfection in home care: A comparison of 2 commercial products with potentially different consequences for respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Nancy; Markkanen, Pia; Beato-Melendez, Christian; Mohamed, Hagir; Gore, Rebecca; Galligan, Catherine; Sama, Susan; Quinn, Margaret

    2017-11-20

    Home care aides perform personal care and homemaking services in client homes, including cleaning and disinfection (C&D). Although C&D are performed to remove soil and dust, they are increasingly performed for infection prevention. Many C&D products contain respiratory irritants. The objective of this study was to evaluate 2 commercial products for C&D effectiveness on common household surfaces in seniors' homes. Two C&D visits were conducted in 46 seniors' homes. One visit applied a bleach-containing cleaning product and the other applied an environmentally preferable product. Before and after C&D, the study team performed organic soil bioluminometer measurements on surfaces and collected cotton swab and wipe samples for total bacteria count, Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium difficile identification. Both products removed microorganisms from tested surfaces. S aureus was found in 7 households, 1 strain of which was methicillin-resistant. Both products removed S aureus from all surfaces. Bleach-containing products removed somewhat more soil than environmentally preferable products, although results were statistically significant for only 1 surface. The study showed similar, not identical, C&D performance for 2 cleaning products with potentially different consequences for respiratory health. Additional research is needed to develop robust recommendations for safe, effective C&D in home care. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acceptance of home support and integrated care among advanced COPD patients who live outside large medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damps-Konstańska, Iwona; Werachowska, Lidia; Krakowiak, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Cynowska, Bogumiła; Górecka, Dorota; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Kozielski, Jerzy; Jassem, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Poor self-management constitutes a risk factor for COPD deterioration. Patients from rural areas located at a considerable distance from large medical centers frequently need home-support in advanced stages of the disease. Integrated care has been proposed as a comprehensive model for appropriate treatment, coordination and holistic support. The aim of the study was to assess whether home visits provided by trained assistants are needed and accepted by advanced COPD patients living in rural areas a to evaluate whether an individual short educational program can actually improve such patients' knowledge of COPD and inhaler use. Thirty patients with severe or very severe but stable COPD participated in one-month home-assistance interventions twice a week. The total value ≥70 of SGRQ (St George's Respiratory Questionnaire) was recorded in 18 (60%) patients. At the beginning of the study, the patients' knowledge of COPD and inhalation techniques was highly unsatisfactory. Significant improvement in all items (p=0.00) was obtained after the intervention. The risk for poor self-management was high. All patients had at least one 'factor' that indicated the need for home-support. A total of 240 visits (100%) were completed. Patients expressed high acceptance for home-based support delivered by medical assistants twice a week for one month. No patients opposed this kind of care and most of them expressed interest in receiving it in the future. The results suggest a compelling need for home care and demonstrate full acceptance of this kind of support on the part of advanced COPD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patients' expectations of coming home with Very Early Supported Discharge and home rehabilitation after stroke - an interview study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nordin, Åsa; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Axelsson, Åsa B

    2015-01-01

    An Early Supported Discharge (ESD) and rehabilitation from a coordinated team in the home environment is recommended in several high-income countries for patients with mild to moderate symptoms after stroke...

  8. Comparison between tube compensation and pressure support ventilation techniques on respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, C; Hoshi, K; Wagatsuma, T; Ejima, Y; Hasegawa, R; Matsukawa, S

    2003-08-01

    In the intubated patient, the presence of an endotracheal tube increases the work of breathing during spontaneous breathing. The tube compensation technique was developed as a new ventilator mode that can compensate for that additional the work of breathing. We investigated the respiratory parameters during the pressure support ventilation 0, 5, 10 cmH2O and tube compensation 100% modes of the Puritan Bennett 840 ventilator in ten postoperative patients who had undergone radical surgery for oesophageal cancer. Measurements were performed just before extubation. The tidal volume, respiratory rate and other respiratory parameters were measured with a Ventrak respiratory monitor, and the duty ratio, mean inspiratory flow, and rapid shallow breathing index were calculated. In particular, we performed a comparison between pressure support ventilation 5 cmH2O and tube compensation 100%, because pressure support ventilation 5 cmH2O is the usual ventilating mode before the extubation in our intensive care unit. The tidal volume of pressure support ventilation 10 cmH2O was significantly larger and the respiratory rate was significantly lower than the other three modes. There was no significant difference in the minute volume, tidal volume, and respiratory rate between pressure support ventilation 5 cmH2O and tube compensation 100%. The duty ratio of pressure support ventilation 10 cmH2O was significantly smaller than the other three modes. There was no significant difference in the duty ratio and rapid shallow breathing index between pressure support ventilation 5 cmH2O and tube compensation 100%. It was concluded that the assist levels of pressure support ventilation 5 cmH2O and tube compensation 100% were almost equal for clinical purposes.

  9. Pervasive healthcare in the home Supporting patient motivation and engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Currently, care and rehabilitation practices move, to a greater extent, out of hospitals and into private homes. This accelerating trend challenges healthcare systems and their patients. Heterogeneous settings such as private homes together with the diverse nature of the inhabitants and their con......Currently, care and rehabilitation practices move, to a greater extent, out of hospitals and into private homes. This accelerating trend challenges healthcare systems and their patients. Heterogeneous settings such as private homes together with the diverse nature of the inhabitants...... and their conditions create both technical and usability constraints and possibilities that can inform development of home-based care and rehabilitation applications. This workshop likes to investigate and discuss challenges, requirements and possibilities related to home-based healthcare applications, seen from...... environments such as private homes? Or, how can User Driven Innovation (UDI) and Participatory Design (PD) be used to create systems that are aesthetically and functionally accepted by persons subject to homebased healthcare and rehabilitation?...

  10. Living with Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  11. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  12. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Christensen, Annette Gøgsig; Hansen, Birthe Stenbæk; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Møller, Tina Kreinfeldt Skovgaard

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus was on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified with the EVS, by involving the physiotherapist, registered dietitian, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system. Outcome parameters were quality of life (by means of EuroQol-5D-3L), physical performance (30-seconds chair stand), nutritional status (weight and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (participants from home-care), and mortality. Respectively, 55 (46 from 2 home-care clusters) and 40 (18 from 1 home-care cluster) were identified with the EVS and comprised the intervention and control group. A difference after 11 wk in quality of life (0.758 [0.222] versus 0.534 [0.355], P = 0.001), 30-seconds chair stand (47% versus 17% improved, P = 0.005) and oral care (1.1 [0.3] versus 1.3 [0.5], P = 0.021) was observed. There was a almost significant difference in mortality (2% versus 13%, P = 0.079). Multidisciplinary nutritional support in older adults in nursing home and home-care could have a positive effect on quality of life, muscle strength, and oral care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea in Down syndrome: Benefits of surgery and noninvasive respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudoignon, Benjamin; Amaddeo, Alessandro; Frapin, Annick; Thierry, Briac; de Sanctis, Livio; Arroyo, Jorge Olmo; Khirani, Sonia; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2017-08-01

    Children with Down syndrome are at increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of the study was to describe the management of OSA in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A retrospective analysis of sleep studies and consequent management was performed for all consecutive Down syndrome patients evaluated between September 2013 and April 2016. The data of 57 patients were analyzed: 51/53 had an interpretable overnight polygraphy and 4 the recording of nocturnal gas exchange. Mean age at baseline sleep study was 6.2 ± 5.9 years. Eighteen patients (32%) had prior upper airway surgery. Mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 14 ± 16 events/hr with 41 of the 51 (80%) patients having OSA with an AHI >1 event/hr and 20 patients (39%) having an AHI ≥10 events/hr. Consequently, eight patients (14%) had upper airway surgery. OSA improved in all patients except two who needed noninvasive respiratory support. Nineteen (33%) patients required noninvasive respiratory support. Mean age at noninvasive respiratory support initiation was 7 ± 7 years. On 11 patients with objective adherence data available, mean compliance at 2 ± 1 years of treatment was excellent with an average use per night of 8 hr46 ± 3 hr59 and 9 patients using the noninvasive respiratory support >4 hr/night. Noninvasive respiratory support was associated with an improvement of nocturnal gas exchange. The prevalence of OSA is high in Down syndrome. Upper airway surgery is not always able to correct OSA. Noninvasive respiratory support represents then an effective treatment for OSA and good compliance may be achieved in a majority of patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effectiveness of the Home-Start Parenting Support Program: Behavioral outcomes for parents and children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Hermanns, J.M.A.; Deković, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined effectiveness of Home-Start, a program designed to support parents with young children. The aims were (a) to examine whether Home-Start improved maternal well-being and (b) to examine whether Home-Start led to changes in the behavior of mothers or children. Self-reported and

  15. Positive and negative spillover from work to home : The role of organizational culture and supportive arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sok, J.; Blomme, R.J.; Tromp, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    For today's managers, striking a sound work-home balance is an important matter. In this paper we investigate the relationship between organizational culture and work-to-home spillover. Two types of organizational culture, supportive and innovative, were compared with regard to work-to-home

  16. Social Support Is a Primary Influence on Home Fruit, 100% Juice, and Vegetable Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Baranowski, Tom; Watson, Kathy; Missaghian, Mariam; Broadfoot, Alison; Cullen, Karen; Nicklas, Theresa; Fisher, Jennifer; Baranowski, Janice; O’Donnell, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Children tend to eat more fruit and vegetables when more are available in the home. We proposed and tested a model that predicts the availability at home (hereinafter termed “home availability”) of fruit, 100% juice, and vegetables, using new measures of frequency of food shopping, purchase, and comparative purchase outcome expectancies (ie, the perceived benefits and costs of purchasing fruit and vegetables), home food pantry management practices, family social support for purchasing fruit a...

  17. How does traditional home-gardens support ethnomedicinal values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 6 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Sedation Management in Children Supported on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, James B; Sweberg, Todd; Asaro, Lisa A; Kirby, Aileen; Wypij, David; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Curley, Martha A Q

    2017-10-01

    To describe sedation management in children supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory failure. Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from a multicenter randomized trial of sedation (Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure). Twenty-one U.S. PICUs. One thousand two hundred fifty-five children, 2 weeks to 17 years old, with moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Sedation managed per usual care or Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol. Sixty-one Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure patients (5%) with moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome were supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, including 29 managed per Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol. Most extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients received neuromuscular blockade (46%) or were heavily sedated with State Behavioral Scale scores -3/-2 (34%) by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation day 3. Median opioid and benzodiazepine doses on the day of cannulation, 0.15 mg/kg/hr (3.7 mg/kg/d) and 0.11 mg/kg/hr (2.8 mg/kg/d), increased by 36% and 58%, respectively, by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation day 3. In the 41 patients successfully decannulated prior to study discharge, patients were receiving 0.40 mg/kg/hr opioids (9.7 mg/kg/d) and 0.39 mg/kg/hr benzodiazepines (9.4 mg/kg/d) at decannulation, an increase from cannulation of 108% and 192%, respectively (both p withdrawal than moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome patients managed without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support (p managed per Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol, usual care extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients received more opioids during the study period (mean cumulative dose of 183.0 vs 89.8 mg/kg; p = 0.02), over 6

  19. CESAR: conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugford Miranda

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 350 adults develop severe, but potentially reversible respiratory failure in the UK annually. Current management uses intermittent positive pressure ventilation, but barotrauma, volutrauma and oxygen toxicity can prevent lung recovery. An alternative treatment, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, uses cardio-pulmonary bypass technology to temporarily provide gas exchange, allowing ventilator settings to be reduced. While extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is proven to result in improved outcome when compared to conventional ventilation in neonates with severe respiratory failure, there is currently no good evidence from randomised controlled trials to compare these managements for important clinical outcomes in adults, although evidence from case series is promising. Methods/Design The aim of the randomised controlled trial of Conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure (CESAR is to assess whether, for patients with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation will increase the rate of survival without severe disability ('confined to bed' and 'unable to wash or dress' by six months post-randomisation, and be cost effective from the viewpoints of the NHS and society, compared to conventional ventilatory support. Following assent from a relative, adults (18–65 years with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure (Murray score ≥ 3.0 or hypercapnea with pH Discussion Analysis will be based on intention to treat. A concurrent economic evaluation will also be performed to compare the costs and outcomes of both treatments.

  20. Revisiting the Definition of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Effect of Changing Panoply of Respiratory Support for Preterm Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Tetsuya; Lee, Shoo K; Yang, Junmin; Lee, David; Daspal, Sibasis; Dunn, Michael; Shah, Prakesh S

    2017-03-01

    Several definitions of bronchopulmonary dysplasia are clinically used; however, their validity remains uncertain considering ongoing changes in the panoply of respiratory support treatment strategies used within neonatal units. To identify the optimal definition of bronchopulmonary dysplasia that best predicts respiratory and neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. Retrospective cohort study at tertiary neonatal intensive care units. Preterm infants born at less than 29 weeks' gestation between 2010 and 2011 who were admitted to neonatal intensive care units participating in the Canadian Neonatal Network and completed follow-up assessments in a Canadian Neonatal Follow-Up Network clinic at 18 to 21 months. Various traditional bronchopulmonary dysplasia criteria based on respiratory status at different postmenstrual ages. Serious respiratory morbidity, neurosensory impairment at 18 to 21 months of age, and a composite outcome of respiratory or neurosensory morbidity or death after discharge. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% CIs were calculated. Of 1914 eligible survivors, 1503 were assessed (mean gestational age was 26.3 weeks; 68% were white, 9% were black, and 23% were other race/ethnicity), 88 had serious respiratory morbidity, 257 infants had neurosensory impairment, and 12 infants died after discharge. Definitions using oxygen requirement alone as the criterion at various postmenstrual ages were less predictive compared with those using the criterion of oxygen/respiratory support (RS) (receiving supplemental oxygen and/or positive-pressure RS); among those, oxygen/RS at 36 weeks had the highest AOR and area under the curve (AUC) for all outcomes. Further analyses of oxygen/RS at each week between 34 and 44 weeks' postmenstrual age indicated that the predictive ability for serious respiratory morbidity increased from 34 weeks (AOR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.9-3.4, AUC, 0.721) to 40 weeks (AOR, 6.1; 95% CI, 3.4-11.0; AUC, 0.799). For serious neurosensory

  1. Nutritional support among cancer patients enrolled in palliative home care services

    OpenAIRE

    Orrevall, Ylva

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional problems are common in palliative cancer care. Little is known about nutritional problems and nutritional support in home care. AIMS: The primary aim of this thesis was to investigate experiences of nutritional problems and home nutritional support, with a special focus on home parenteral nutrition (HPN), from the perspectives of cancer patients and their family members. Further aims were to investigate the prevalence of nutritional risk and use of nutritional su...

  2. Peer educator vs. respiratory therapist support: which form of support better maintains health and functional outcomes following pulmonary rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eric Y; Jennings, Cally A; Rodgers, Wendy M; Selzler, Anne-Marie; Simmonds, Lindsay G; Hamir, Rashida; Stickland, Michael K

    2014-04-01

    This study examined if ongoing support delivered by telephone following pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) assisted chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to maintain health outcomes. Phase one (n=79) compared post-rehabilitation telephone-based support delivered by peers compared to usual care (UC). The second phase (n=168) compared post-rehabilitation support from peer educators, respiratory therapists (RT), or UC. Primary outcome variables were St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score and the six minute walk test (6MWT). Measures were obtained at baseline, immediately following PR, and six-months post PR. Six-month follow-up data for phase one was collected for 66 COPD patients (n=35 peer support, n=31 UC) and 142 for phase two (n=42 peer support, n=52 RT support, n=48 UC). Per-protocol and intention to treat (ITT) analysis in both phases found no significant group by time differences for SGRQ or 6MWT. Providing peer or RT support via telephone following PR was not more effective than UC for maintaining health outcomes. There are concerns with using peers to provide ongoing support to COPD patients. Additionally, COPD patients require a higher level of care than telephone support can provide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vocabulary development at home: A multimedia elaborated picture supporting parent-toddler interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremmen, M.C.; Molenaar, I.; Teepe, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Some children enter elementary school with large vocabulary delays, which negatively influence their later school performance.A rich home language environment can support vocabulary development through frequent high-quality parent–toddler interaction. Elaborated picture home activities can support

  4. Relationships of Assertiveness, Depression, and Social Support Among Older Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of assertiveness, depression, and social support among nursing home residents. The sample included 50 older nursing home residents (mean age=75 years; 75% female; 92% Caucasian). There was a significant correlation between assertiveness and depression (r=-.33), but the correlations between social support and…

  5. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  6. Intergenerational support shaping residential trajectories : Young people leaving home in a gentrifying city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochstenbach, C.; Boterman, W.R.

    2017-01-01

    Parental support, in both financial and non-financial ways, is important in explaining the residential trajectories of young people leaving home. For instance, the influence of parental support on the ability to leave home or enter homeownership is well established. This study adds a dimension by

  7. "We Only Own the Hours": Discontinuity of Care in the British Columbia Home Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Zena; McLaren, Arlene Tigar; Cohen, Marcy; Ostry, Aleck

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the concept of continuity of care to examine the implications of health-system restructuring for workers and staff in the BC home support system. Home support primarily serves frail seniors living in poverty and has the potential to provide assistance with tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as offer social…

  8. Information persistence services designed to support home care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocha, Nelson Pacheco; Queirós, Alexandra; Augusto, Filipe; Rodríguez, Yosvany Llerena; Cardoso, Carlos; Grade, José Miguel; Quintas, João

    2015-01-01

    Due to the challenges faced by health and social care systems, in particular those related to actual demographic trends, home care emerges as a potentially cost-effective solution to answer the needs...

  9. Online estimation of respiratory mechanics in non-invasive pressure support ventilation: a bench model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueeny, Qestra; Tassaux, Didier; Vignaux, Laurence; Jolliet, Philippe; Schindhelm, Klaus; Redmond, Stephen; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    An online algorithm for determining respiratory mechanics in patients using non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in pressure support mode was developed and embedded in a ventilator system. Based on multiple linear regression (MLR) of respiratory data, the algorithm was tested on a patient bench model under conditions with and without leak and simulating a variety of mechanics. Bland-Altman analysis indicates reliable measures of compliance across the clinical range of interest (± 11-18% limits of agreement). Resistance measures showed large quantitative errors (30-50%), however, it was still possible to qualitatively distinguish between normal and obstructive resistances. This outcome provides clinically significant information for ventilator titration and patient management.

  10. Social support is a primary influence on home fruit, 100% juice, and vegetable availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Tom; Watson, Kathy; Missaghian, Mariam; Broadfoot, Alison; Cullen, Karen; Nicklas, Theresa; Fisher, Jennifer; Baranowski, Janice; O'Donnell, Sharon

    2008-07-01

    Children tend to eat more fruit and vegetables when more are available in the home. We proposed and tested a model that predicts the availability at home (hereinafter termed "home availability") of fruit, 100% juice, and vegetables, using new measures of frequency of food shopping, purchase, and comparative purchase outcome expectancies (ie, the perceived benefits and costs of purchasing fruit and vegetables), home food pantry management practices, family social support for purchasing fruit and vegetables, food shopping practices, and body mass index (BMI). Participants (N=98) were recruited in 2004 in front of grocery stores and completed two telephone interviews. Cross-sectional hierarchical regression was employed with backward deletion of nonsignificant variables. Despite many statistically significant bivariate correlations between the new variables and home fruit, 100% juice, and vegetable availability, social support was the primary predictor of home fruit availability in multivariate regression. BMI and home 100% juice pantry management were the primary predictors of home 100% juice availability. Social support, BMI, and shopping practices were the primary predictors of home vegetable availability. Social support for purchasing fruit, 100% juice, and vegetables was an important, consistent predictor of home availability. These findings need to be replicated in larger samples.

  11. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and respiratory ), social workers, personal care aides, home medical equipment suppliers, and most importantly, informal caregivers (e.g., ... also available to help with home assessment. Assistive Technology to improve home safety can also be an ...

  12. Supporting home care for the dying: an evaluation of healthcare professionals' perspectives of an individually tailored hospice at home service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Barbara A; Baldry, Catherine R; Groves, Karen E; Whelan, Alison; Sephton, Janice; Gaunt, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    To explore health care professionals' perspective of hospice at home service that has different components, individually tailored to meet the needs of patients. Over 50% of adults diagnosed with a terminal illness and the majority of people who have cancer, prefer to be cared for and to die in their own home. Despite this, most deaths occur in hospital. Increasing the options available for patients, including their place of care and death is central to current UK policy initiatives. Hospice at home services aim to support patients to remain at home, yet there are wide variations in the design of services and delivery. A hospice at home service was developed to provide various components (accompanied transfer home, crisis intervention and hospice aides) that could be tailored to meet the individual needs of patients. An evaluation study. Data were collected from 75 health care professionals. District nurses participated in one focus group (13) and 31 completed an electronic survey. Palliative care specialist nurses participated in a focus group (9). One hospital discharge co-ordinator and two general practitioners participated in semi-structured interviews and a further 19 general practitioners completed the electronic survey. Health care professionals reported the impact and value of each of the components of the service, as helping to support patients to remain at home, by individually tailoring care. They also positively reported that support for family carers appeared to enable them to continue coping, rapid access to the service was suggested to contribute to faster hospital discharges and the crisis intervention service was identified as helping patients remain in their own home, where they wanted to be. Health care professionals perceived that the additional individualised support provided by this service contributed to enabling patients to continue be cared for and to die at home in their place of choice. This service offers various components of a hospice

  13. Low-Income Children, Adolescents, and Caregivers Facing Respiratory Problems: Support Needs and Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Miriam; Evans, Joshua; Letourneau, Nicole; Masuda, Jeffrey; Almond, Amanda; Edey, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    Burdens of poverty are often compounded by respiratory problems. This study aimed to identify the support needs and intervention preferences for low-income families facing this challenge. Interviews were conducted in two Canadian provinces with low-income children/adolescents (n=32) diagnosed with respiratory health problems and their parents or family caregiver (n=37). These vulnerable children and parents described non-supportive interactions with some health service providers and inadequate information. They reported isolation and support deficits, exacerbated by limited resources and health restrictions. Children/adolescents felt isolated and excluded and wanted to connect with peers. Group or dyadic level support, delivered by peers and health professionals, was desired. The importance of logistics to enhance accessibility and appeal of group or dyadic support interventions was clearly identified. The findings of this study reveal that low-income children and their families encounter challenges to accessing support and to utilizing support resources. Partnerships with low-income children/adolescents and family caregivers in provision of education and social support can combat isolation and ignorance. Reducing inequities for this high risk population could be achieved by providing support from experienced peers, in combination with health professional guidance, and knowledge about pulmonary health. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Supporting Rural Families in Their Homes: The Amish Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Nadine

    1994-01-01

    Presents information from interviews for Amish Study, study undertaken to understand, from rural family's perspective, experience of having received in-home family services. Describes barriers to service found by rural families and presents two cases from Amish Study. Considers need for outreach to rural families. (NB)

  15. Implementation of a Complex Intervention to Support Leadership Development in Nursing Homes: A Multimethod Participatory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dewar, J.D.; Barrie, K.; Sharp, C.; Meyer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Leadership is key to quality improvement in nursing homes. This article reports on the initial analysis of the transformational My Home Life Leadership Support program for nursing home managers being implemented in Scotland. It analyses learning from a multimethod participatory descriptive study. Contribution analysis theory informed the evaluation. Evidence-Based Practice, Relationship-Centered Care, Appreciative Inquiry, and Caring Conversations informed the intervention to develop transfor...

  16. [Current State of Medical Support by Nurses to Guide Cancer Patients to at Home Death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, Mitsuru; Hoshina, Kaori; Tsuda, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the palliative care support in home-based settings for patients with end-stage cancer. Fifty patients who died at home were analyzed. MSC nurses listened to the patients and informal caregivers for their preferences for place of death. Home death was selected by 30%of participants prior to the environment adjustment support and by 68% after. The period leading up to home care that started with the adjustment assistance by MSC was 5 days(median). Nurse support by the MSC is intended to promote decision making regarding the place of end-of-life care. The dialogue between the hospital and local medical institutions is accelerating the period until the start of home care.

  17. Family carers providing support to a person dying in the home setting: A narrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Sara M; King, Claire; Turner, Mary; Payne, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    This study is based on people dying at home relying on the care of unpaid family carers. There is growing recognition of the central role that family carers play and the burdens that they bear, but knowledge gaps remain around how to best support them. The aim of this study is to review the literature relating to the perspectives of family carers providing support to a person dying at home. A narrative literature review was chosen to provide an overview and synthesis of findings. The following search terms were used: caregiver, carer, 'terminal care', 'supportive care', 'end of life care', 'palliative care', 'domiciliary care' AND home AND death OR dying. During April-May 2013, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Pubmed, Cochrane Reviews and Citation Indexes were searched. Inclusion criteria were as follows: English language, empirical studies and literature reviews, adult carers, perspectives of family carers, articles focusing on family carers providing end-of-life care in the home and those published between 2000 and 2013. A total of 28 studies were included. The overarching themes were family carers' views on the impact of the home as a setting for end-of-life care, support that made a home death possible, family carer's views on deficits and gaps in support and transformations to the social and emotional space of the home. Many studies focus on the support needs of people caring for a dying family member at home, but few studies have considered how the home space is affected. Given the increasing tendency for home deaths, greater understanding of the interplay of factors affecting family carers may help improve community services. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of combining Home-Start and Triple P parenting support in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallegange, E.S.; Hermanns, J.M.A.; Oort, F.J.

    The effects of Home-Start compared to Home-Start extended with Triple P group training were studied. The underlying theoretical models of change of both programs complement each other and therefore it was assumed that combined support leads to increased positive outcomes. Outcomes related to

  19. [Dementia in nursing home. Which support for the families?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likaj, V

    2010-09-01

    In caring for old people with dementia, we observe that family solidarity remains strong, which allows to delay nursing home admission. Emphasis is put on the disease altering the sense of security among old people and their families. Spontaneous attempts from caregivers in order to counterbalance often lead to a lack of energy available for change when entering a nursing home, as they have put a lot into making up for the affected sense of security of the failing relative. A complex story has then emerged from a real relationship between the caregivers and the disease, and this has to be taken into account in the helping process as much as the utter exhaustion of the family.

  20. Short-term effects of noisy pressure support ventilation in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter M; Güldner, Andreas; Huhle, Robert; Beda, Alessandro; Bluth, Thomas; Schreiter, Dierk; Ragaller, Max; Gottschlich, Birgit; Kiss, Thomas; Jaber, Samir; Pelosi, Paolo; Koch, Thea; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2013-10-31

    This study aims at comparing the very short-term effects of conventional and noisy (variable) pressure support ventilation (PSV) in mechanically ventilated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Thirteen mechanically ventilated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure were enrolled in this monocentric, randomized crossover study. Patients were mechanically ventilated with conventional and noisy PSV, for one hour each, in random sequence. Pressure support was titrated to reach tidal volumes approximately 8 mL/kg in both modes. The level of positive end-expiratory pressure and fraction of inspired oxygen were kept unchanged in both modes. The coefficient of variation of pressure support during noisy PSV was set at 30%. Gas exchange, hemodynamics, lung functional parameters, distribution of ventilation by electrical impedance tomography, breathing patterns and patient-ventilator synchrony were analyzed. Noisy PSV was not associated with any adverse event, and was well tolerated by all patients. Gas exchange, hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics and spatial distribution of ventilation did not differ significantly between conventional and noisy PSV. Noisy PSV increased the variability of tidal volume (24.4 ± 7.8% vs. 13.7 ± 9.1%, P ventilator synchrony, at comparable levels of gas exchange. ClinicialTrials.gov, NCT00786292.

  1. Family functioning, health and social support assessed by aged home care clients and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautsalo, Katja; Rantanen, Anja; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe aged home care clients' and their family members' experiences of their family functioning, family health and social support received. An additional purpose was to determine which factors are connected with social support. Increasing life expectancy and ageing of the population require consideration of the adequacy of home care services and the role of family members as care providers. The older population is a very heterogeneous group because of their variable needs and several disabilities. To ensure the quality of home care, experimental information is needed from clients and their family members. A survey design with convenience sampling. The home care client and a family member of his/her answered a questionnaire together, including background questions, the Family Functioning, Health and Social Support instrument and an open question about support received from home care. Statistical methods were used to describe quantitative data, and content analysis was used in analysing the replies to the open question. Family health was noted as good, and family functioning and overall social support fairly good. An older person's higher basic education, higher age of the family member, better family health and male gender were connected with better social support received. The relationship of the older person and the family member as well as the duration of home care service use had an effect on social support received. The content analysis raised expectations related to time, planning of service, organisational factors and caring practise. Home care clients' and families' needs for support vary, and therefore, the assessment of needs, care planning and updating are important. The variable support needs of older people and their family members require flexible and adaptable home services. Cooperation between all participants involved in care would promote the well-being of the older person and the entire family. © 2012 Blackwell

  2. The role of the home environment in dementia care and support: Systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soilemezi, Dia; Drahota, Amy; Crossland, John; Stores, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Background The domestic home is the preferred site for care provision for people with dementia and their families, therefore creating a dementia and caring friendly home environment is crucial. This systematic review synthesised qualitative studies to explore the role of the home environment and identify potential barriers and facilitators in home dementia care and support to inform future practice and research. Methods A systematic search in 12 databases identified international qualitative literature on perceptions and experiences of community-dwelling people with dementia, family and formal carers regarding the role of the home environment and ways to tackle daily challenges. Results Forty qualitative studies were included and analysed using thematic synthesis. The main three themes were: 'home as a paradox', 'there is no magic formula' and 'adapting the physical space, objects and behaviour'. Findings indicate that home is an important setting and is likely to change significantly responding to the changing nature of dementia. Themes were later validated by family carers of people with dementia. Conclusions The home environment is an important setting for care and needs to remain flexible to accommodate changes and challenges. Family carers and people with dementia implement and often improvise, various environmental strategies. Continuous and tailor-made support at home is required.

  3. People with dementia and carer preferences for home support services in early-stage dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Helen; Clarkson, Paul; Davies, Linda; Sutcliffe, Caroline; Davies, Sue; Feast, Alexandra; Hughes, Jane; Challis, David

    2016-11-16

    To examine people with dementia and carer preferences for home support attributes in early-stage dementia, building on the paucity of evidence in this area. Preferences from 44 people with dementia and 103 carers, recruited through memory clinics and an online questionnaire, were assessed with a Discrete Choice Experiment survey, with attributes informed by an evidence synthesis and lay consultation. A conditional logit model was used to estimate preference weights for the attributes within a home support 'package'. The most preferred attributes were support with personal feelings and concerns, provided by a trained counsellor at home (coefficient 0.67, p = home (coefficient 0.59, p = Support with personal feelings, information and social engagement are important components. Additionally, knowledge of preferences of people with dementia and their carers can identify other attributes that may be important to effectiveness in 'living well' but for which there remains limited evidence.

  4. Technology Solutions to Support Care Continuity in Home Care: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn W; Russell, David; Onorato, Nicole; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2017-09-01

    Elevated hospital readmission rates from home care are an indicator of poor care quality, and rates are particularly high for patients with heart failure. Readmissions may be avoided by optimizing continuity of care. To explore perceptions among home care clinicians of the barriers they face and the information they need to improve care continuity for patients with heart failure. Focus groups were conducted with teams of home care clinicians at a large certified home healthcare agency in the Northeastern United states. In total, there were 61 participants across 6 focus groups. Three overarching themes emerged: continuity of care and communication on care transitions, maintaining continuity of care during a home care episode (with subthemes tracking signs and symptoms and patient teaching), and health information technology (HIT) characteristics to support communication and care continuity. Our study highlights areas of improvement for HIT solutions that could support care delivery for patients with heart failure in a home care setting. Home care agencies planning to introduce technology can use these findings to assess if and how potential systems can support nurses to provide continuity of care across healthcare organizations and home care visits.

  5. IL-2 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms are associated with respiratory tract infection and may modulate the effect of vitamin E on lower respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin E supplementation has been suggested as a potential strategy to prevent respiratory infections (RI) in the elderly. Previously, we showed that vitamin E reduced RI in some but not all nursing home residents. The efficacy of vitamin E supplementation may depend on individual factors including...

  6. [Recommendations for respiratory support in the newborn (iii). Surfactant and nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Salinas, F; Elorza Fernández, D; Gutiérrez Laso, A; Moreno Hernando, J; Bustos Lozano, G; Gresa Muñoz, M; López de Heredia Goya, J; Aguar Carrascosa, M; Miracle Echegoyen, X; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Serrano, M M; Concheiro Guisan, A; Carrasco Carrasco, C; Comuñas Gómez, J J; Moral Pumarega, M T; Sánchez Torres, A M; Franco, M L

    2015-11-01

    The recommendations included in this document will be part a series of updated reviews of the literature on respiratory support in the newborn infant. These recommendations are structured into twelve modules, and in this work module 7 is presented. Each module is the result of a consensus process including all members of the Surfactant and Respiratory Group of the Spanish Society of Neonatology. They represent a summary of the published papers on each specific topic, and of the clinical experience of each one of the members of the group. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  8. How Is Respiratory Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  9. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  10. Google Home: Experience, Support and Re-Experience of Social Home Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    2006-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence research is about ubiquitous computing and about social and intelligent properties of computer-supported environments. These properties aim at providing inhabitants or visitors of ambient intelligence environments with support in their activities. Activities include interactions

  11. Google Home: Experience, Support and Re-Experience of Social Home Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    2008-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence research is about ubiquitous computing and about social and intelligent properties of computer-supported environments. These properties aim at providing inhabitants or visitors of ambient intelligence environments with support in their activities. Activities include interactions

  12. Chronic kidney disease and support provided by home care services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydede, Sema K; Komenda, Paul; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Levin, Adeera

    2014-07-18

    Chronic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), are growing in incidence and prevalence, in part due to an aging population. Support provided through home care services may be useful in attaining a more efficient and higher quality care for CKD patients. A systematic review was performed to identify studies examining home care interventions among adult CKD patients incorporating all outcomes. Studies examining home care services as an alternative to acute, post-acute or hospice care and those for long-term maintenance in patients' homes were included. Studies with only a home training intervention and those without an applied research component were excluded. Seventeen studies (10 cohort, 4 non-comparative, 2 cross-sectional, 1 randomized) examined the support provided by home care services in 15,058 CKD patients. Fourteen studies included peritoneal dialysis (PD), two incorporated hemodialysis (HD) and one included both PD and HD patients in their treatment groups. Sixteen studies focused on the dialysis phase of care in their study samples and one study included information from both the dialysis and pre-dialysis phases of care. Study settings included nine single hospital/dialysis centers and three regional/metropolitan areas and five were at the national level. Studies primarily focused on nurse assisted home care patients and mostly examined PD related clinical outcomes. In PD studies with comparators, peritonitis risks and technique survival rates were similar across home care assisted patients and comparators. The risk of mortality, however, was higher for home care assisted PD patients. While most studies adjusted for age and comorbidities, information about multidimensional prognostic indices that take into account physical, psychological, cognitive, functional and social factors among CKD patients was not easily available. Most studies focused on nurse assisted home care patients on dialysis. The majority were single site studies incorporating

  13. [Quasi-experimental evaluation of a nutritional educational intervention among home support assistants for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberger-Gateau, P; Helmer, C; Ouret, S; Gendron, B

    2006-06-01

    The French National Program on Nutrition and Health has defined two specific objectives targeting older persons: (i) to improve their status in calcium and vitamin D and (ii) to prevent undernutrition. Home help provides support in activities of daily living, including meals, to dependent persons. The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a nutritional education intervention on knowledge and practices among home support assistants for the elderly. Three facilities providing home support in Gironde (France) selected 132 home support assistants to follow an education program and 134 controls. Nutrition training was conducted in the intervention group by a dietician during two half-day sessions in May-June 2004. A non randomized controlled trial design was used for evaluation. Nutritional knowledge (20 questions) and practice (5 questions) of home support assistants were assessed by questionnaire before (April 2004) and after (September 2004) the training period in each group. Satisfaction of the intervention group was also assessed. The intervention group included 101 participants and the control group 106 persons who answered both questionnaires before and after the education program. The intervention group was significantly younger (p educated (p = 0.01) and had less often participated to previous nutrition training (p intervention for their mean scores of knowledge or practices. The intervention group significantly improved its knowledge score (mean gain 2.5 points, p nutritional education was very significant (p intervention in multivariate analyses. Satisfaction of trained home support assistants was very high. An education program of home support assistants for elderly persons can improve their nutritional knowledge, but this study cannot conclude that the intervention was efficient to improve the nutritional status of older persons.

  14. Unlocking the black box: supporting practices to become patient-centered medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Katie; Phillips, Kathryn E; Van Borkulo, Nicole; Daniel, Donna M; Johnson, Karin E; Wagner, Edward H; Sugarman, Jonathan R

    2014-11-01

    Despite widespread interest in supporting primary care transformation, few evidence-based strategies for technical assistance exist. The Safety Net Medical Home Initiative (SNMHI) sought to develop a replicable and sustainable model for Patient-centered Medical Home practice transformation. This paper describes the multimodal technical assistance approach used by the SNMHI and the participating practices' assessment of its value and helpfulness in supporting their transformation. Components of the technical assistance framework included: (1) individual site-level coaching provided by local medical home facilitators and supplemented by expert consultation; (2) regional and national learning communities of participating practices that included in-person meetings and field trips; (3) data monitoring and feedback including longitudinal feedback on medical home implementation as measured by the Patient-centered Medical Home-A; (4) written implementation guides, tools, and webinars relating to each of the 8 Change Concepts for Practice Transformation; and (5) small grant funds to support infrastructure and staff development. Overall, practices found the technical assistance helpful and most valued in-person, peer-to-peer-learning opportunities. Practices receiving technical assistance from membership organizations with which they belonged before the SNMHI scored higher on measures of medical home implementation than practices working with organizations with whom they had no prior relationship. There is an important role for both local and national organizations to provide nonduplicative, mutually reinforcing support for primary care transformation. How (in-person, between-peers) and by whom technical assistance is provided may be important to consider.

  15. National review of use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as respiratory support in thoracic surgery excluding lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinieri, Philippe; Peillon, Christophe; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Veber, Benoît; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Melki, Jean; Baste, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory support is increasingly used in intensive care units (ICU), but rarely during thoracic surgical procedures outside the transplantation setting. ECMO can be an alternative to cardiopulmonary bypass for major trachea-bronchial surgery and single-lung procedures without in-field ventilation. Our aim was to evaluate the intraoperative use of ECMO as respiratory support in thoracic surgery: benefits, indications and complications. This was a multicentre retrospective study (questionnaire) of use of ECMO as respiratory support during the thoracic surgical procedure. Lung transplantation and lung resection for tumour invading the great vessels and/or the left atrium were excluded, because they concern respiratory and circulatory support. From March 2009 to September 2012, 17 of the 34 centres in France applied ECMO within veno-venous (VV) (n=20) or veno-arterial (VA) (n=16) indications in 36 patients. Ten VA ECMO were performed with peripheral cannulation and 6 with central cannulation; all VV ECMO were achieved through peripheral cannulation. Group 1 (total respiratory support) was composed of 28 patients without mechanical ventilation, involving 23 tracheo-bronchial and 5 single-lung procedures. Group 2 (partial respiratory support) was made up of 5 patients with respiratory insufficiency. Group 3 was made up of 3 patients who underwent thoracic surgery in a setting of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with preoperative ECMO. Mortality at 30 days in Groups 1, 2 and 3 was 7, 40 and 67%, respectively (PECMO was weaned intraoperatively or within 24 h in 75% of patients. In Group 2, ECMO was weaned in ICU over several days. In Group 1, 2 patients with VA support were converted to VV support for chronic respiratory indications. Bleeding was the major complication with 17% of patients requiring return to theatre for haemostasis. There were two cannulation-related complications (6%). VV or VA ECMO is a

  16. Home Enteral Nutrition therapy: Difficulties, satisfactions and support needs of caregivers assisting older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukic P, Nikolina; Gagliardi, Cristina; Fagnani, Donata; Venturini, Claudia; Orlandoni, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to comprehend and describe the views, experiences and adaptations of caregivers who assist older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition. The objective was to gather empirical evidence to improve the delivery of Home Enteral Nutrition for old patients taking into account the caregivers' support needs. A qualitative methodology with focus groups as data collection method was used to collect the testimonies of 30 informal and formal caregivers of older patients treated with Home Enteral Nutrition by the Clinical Nutrition Service of INRCA (Ancona) during 2014. Quantitative methodology was used to collect socio-demographic data. Partially modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist" was used to identify training needs. The constant comparison method was used to code and categorize data and to develop themes of focus groups. Simple descriptive statistics were used to summarize questionnaires. Five main themes were identified from focus groups: acceptance of the therapy, skill acquisition process, need for psychological and practical support at home from healthcare professionals, lifestyle adaptation, affirmation of life and family. All caregivers testified the initial fear and refusal to manage the nutrition pump and the therapy. They expressed the need to be trained gradually, starting during a patient's hospitalization, and continuing in the community. With reference to their overall QoL, it emerged that informal caregivers suffered mostly from the reduction of their free time while formal caregivers suffered social isolation and psychological burden. For both groups the monthly home visit was the most important element of the HEN service. Informal caregivers highlighted the importance of having their loved ones at home. Unsatisfied training needs were identified by the modified Silver's "Home Enteral Nutrition Caregiver Task Checklist". This qualitative study underlined the challenges and adaptations of

  17. Digital Divide: How Do Home Internet Access and Parental Support Affect Student Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between home Internet access/parental support and student outcomes. Survey data were collected from 1,576 middle school students in China. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, independent-samples T-test, and regression analysis. Results indicate that students who had home Internet access reported higher scores than those without home Internet on all three dimensions: Computer and Internet self-efficacy, Attitudes towards technology and Developmental outcomes. Home Internet access and parental support were significantly positively associated with technology self-efficacy, interest in technology, perceived importance of the Internet, and perceived impact of the Internet on learning. Findings from this study have significant implications for research and practice on how to narrow down the digital divide.

  18. Home-based care: barriers and facilitators to expanded personal support worker roles in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Margaret; Patterson, Erin; Killackey, Tieghan; Raffaghello, Julia; Rowe, Alissa; Tourangeau, Ann E

    2017-01-01

    To accommodate the increasing demand for home care in Ontario, Canada, some care tasks traditionally performed by regulated health professionals are being transferred to personal support workers (PSW). However, this expansion of PSW roles is not uniform across the province. Between December 2014 and April 2015, barriers and facilitators to expansion of PSW roles in home care were explored in a series of 13 focus groups. Home care staff identified seven categories of factors affecting the expansion of PSW roles in home care including: communication and documentation; organization and structures of care; attitudes and perceptions of the expanding PSW role; adequate staffing; education, training and support; PSW role clarity and variation in practices, policies, and procedures. Addressing barriers and promoting facilitators at the funder and employer levels will enable the provision of safe, effective, and equitable care by PSWs.

  19. Strategies for Organizational Change from Group Homes to Individualized Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to…

  20. Outcomes of biventricular mechanical support patients discharged to home to await heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaser, Julie W; Rourke, Darlene; Vandenbogaart, Elizabeth; Chaker, Tamara; Nsair, Ali; Cheng, Richard; Fonarow, Gregg; Livingston, Nancy; Howell, Elan; Huie, Newman; Baas, Arnold S; Deng, Mario; Hickey, Ann; Shemin, Richard J; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-01-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices has grown rapidly in recent years for patients with end-stage heart failure. A significant proportion of patients require both left- and right-sided support with biventricular assist devices (BiVADs) as a bridge to transplantation. Traditionally, these patients have waited in the hospital until they receive a transplant. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical course of BiVAD patients discharged to home to await heart transplantation. Between November 2009 and July 2011, 24 adult patients underwent Thoratec paracorporeal BiVAD placement at the University of California Los Angeles, all with an Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support score 1 or 2. The disposition, complications, and rehospitalizations of these subjects were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen of the 24 patients were successfully discharged to home, with a mean time of 60 ± 27 days from BiVAD implantation to discharge. Ninety-three percent (13/14) of the patients sent home went on to be transplanted. Eleven of the 14 (79%) came in from home to receive their transplant. The mean time from BiVAD implantation to transplantation was 100 ± 65 days. Of the 14 patients discharged to home, there were 18 readmissions in 8 patients. In this small single-center review, we found that complex medical patients with BiVADs can be discharged to home and can await a heart transplant from home under the close management of multidisciplinary acute care and outpatient teams.

  1. Home care aides' voices from the field: job experiences of personal support specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Alison; Butler, Sandra S; Fishwick, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    In response to a rapidly aging population that is living longer with more chronic health needs, increased recruitment and successful retention of home care aides is essential. Insight into the job experiences of Personal Support Specialists is provided through the qualitative findings from a mixed-method mail survey (n = 131). Workers described reasons why they do their jobs (feeling rewarded, valuing helping, and being energized by home care work) as well as the challenges they face providing home care (low wages, along with a lack of benefits, respect, and recognition). Both short- and long-term recommendations are formulated based on workers' narrative responses.

  2. Identity-supportive nursing of patients with dementia in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Drageset, Ingrid Marie Saga; Normann, Hans Ketil; Elstad, Ingunn

    2015-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript version. Published version available at http://www.idunn.no/nsf This article aims to explore how nursing can support a sense of continuity and identity in patients with advanced dementia disease, living in nursing homes. Fourteen carers and managers in two nursing homes in northern Norway were interviewed. The analysis and discussion are based on the theoretical concepts of identity, continuity and person-centred nursing. This study concludes that a...

  3. Home medication support for childhood cancer: family-centered design and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kathleen E; Biggins, Colleen; Blasko, Deb; Christiansen, Steven M; Fischer, Shira H; Keuker, Christopher; Klugman, Robert; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2014-11-01

    Errors in the use of medications at home by children with cancer are common, and interventions to support correct use are needed. We sought to (1) engage stakeholders in the design and development of an intervention to prevent errors in home medication use, and (2) evaluate the acceptability and usefulness of the intervention. We convened a multidisciplinary team of parents, clinicians, technology experts, and researchers to develop an intervention using a two-step user-centered design process. First, parents and oncologists provided input on the design. Second, a parent panel and two oncology nurses refined draft materials. In a feasibility study, we used questionnaires to assess usefulness and acceptability. Medication error rates were assessed via monthly telephone interviews with parents. We successfully partnered with parents, clinicians, and IT experts to develop Home Medication Support (HoMeS), a family-centered Web-based intervention. HoMeS includes a medication calendar with decision support, a communication tool, adverse effect information, a metric conversion chart, and other information. The 15 families in the feasibility study gave HoMeS high ratings for acceptability and usefulness. Half recorded information on the calendar to indicate to other caregivers that doses were given; 34% brought it to the clinic to communicate with their clinician about home medication use. There was no change in the rate of medication errors in this feasibility study. We created and tested a stakeholder-designed, Web-based intervention to support home chemotherapy use, which parents rated highly. This tool may prevent serious medication errors in a larger study. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. [Variation in inspiratory gas flow in pressure support ventilation. The effect on respiratory mechanics and respiratory work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydow, M; Thies, K; Engel, J; Golisch, W; Buscher, H; Zinserling, J; Burchardi, H

    1996-11-01

    During pressure support ventilation (PSV), the timing of the breathing cycle is mainly controlled by the patient. Therefore, the delivered flow pattern during PSV might be better synchronised with the patient's demands than during volume-assisted ventilation. In several modern ventilators, inspiration is terminated when the inspiratory flow decreases to 25% of the initial peak value. However, this timing algorithm might cause premature inspiration termination if the initial peak flow is high. This could result not only in an increased risk of dyssynchronization between the patient and the ventilator, but also in reduced ventilatory support. On the other hand, a decreased peak flow might inappropriately increase the patient's inspiratory effort. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of the variation of the initial peak-flow rate during PSV on respiratory pattern and mechanical work of breathing. Six patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and six patients with no or minor nonobstructive lung pathology (control) were studied during PSV with different inspiratory flow rates by variations of the pressurisation time (Evita I, Drägerwerke, Lübeck, Germany). During the study period all patients were in stable circulatory conditions and in the weaning phase. Patients were studied in a 45 degrees semirecumbent position. Using the medium pressurization time (l s) during PSV the inspiratory pressure was individually adjusted to obtain a tidal volume of about 8 ml/kg body weight. Thereafter, measurements were performed during five pressurization times (ventilator. Between each measurement steady-state was attained. Positive end-exspiratory pressure (PEEP) and FIO2 were maintained at prestudy levels and remained constant during the study period. Informed consent was obtained from each patient or his next of kin. The study protocol was approved by the ethics committee of our medical faculty. Gas flow was measured at the proximal end of the

  5. Professional and home-made face masks reduce exposure to respiratory infections among the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne van der Sande

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Governments are preparing for a potential influenza pandemic. Therefore they need data to assess the possible impact of interventions. Face-masks worn by the general population could be an accessible and affordable intervention, if effective when worn under routine circumstances. METHODOLOGY: We assessed transmission reduction potential provided by personal respirators, surgical masks and home-made masks when worn during a variety of activities by healthy volunteers and a simulated patient. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All types of masks reduced aerosol exposure, relatively stable over time, unaffected by duration of wear or type of activity, but with a high degree of individual variation. Personal respirators were more efficient than surgical masks, which were more efficient than home-made masks. Regardless of mask type, children were less well protected. Outward protection (mask wearing by a mechanical head was less effective than inward protection (mask wearing by healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Any type of general mask use is likely to decrease viral exposure and infection risk on a population level, in spite of imperfect fit and imperfect adherence, personal respirators providing most protection. Masks worn by patients may not offer as great a degree of protection against aerosol transmission.

  6. Professional and home-made face masks reduce exposure to respiratory infections among the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sande, Marianne; Teunis, Peter; Sabel, Rob

    2008-07-09

    Governments are preparing for a potential influenza pandemic. Therefore they need data to assess the possible impact of interventions. Face-masks worn by the general population could be an accessible and affordable intervention, if effective when worn under routine circumstances. We assessed transmission reduction potential provided by personal respirators, surgical masks and home-made masks when worn during a variety of activities by healthy volunteers and a simulated patient. All types of masks reduced aerosol exposure, relatively stable over time, unaffected by duration of wear or type of activity, but with a high degree of individual variation. Personal respirators were more efficient than surgical masks, which were more efficient than home-made masks. Regardless of mask type, children were less well protected. Outward protection (mask wearing by a mechanical head) was less effective than inward protection (mask wearing by healthy volunteers). Any type of general mask use is likely to decrease viral exposure and infection risk on a population level, in spite of imperfect fit and imperfect adherence, personal respirators providing most protection. Masks worn by patients may not offer as great a degree of protection against aerosol transmission.

  7. Strategies for organizational change from group homes to individualized supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to transform. Although the approach taken by each organization was unique, there were also some common strategies, which included generating commitment to common values and mission, a turn or return to authentic person-centered planning, shifting power and control, using community supports and relationships, moving away from facility-based settings, and nurturing staff engagement. Ultimately, organizational change is an ongoing process that requires organizational perseverance and commitment.

  8. Parents Supporting Learning: A Non-Intensive Intervention Supporting Literacy and Numeracy in the Home Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Frank; Cohrssen, Caroline; Tayler, Collette

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, emphasis in early childhood education policy is placed on the importance of the role of the family as a child's first educator, and finding effective ways to raise the effectiveness of parents in supporting children's learning, development and well-being. International studies demonstrate that the home learning environment (HLE)…

  9. The effect of a "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention in a home care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald; Godin, Lori

    2015-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of a unique "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention for community-dwelling elderly individuals in a home care program. A combined propensity-based covariate-matching procedure was used to pair each individual who received the intervention ("treatment" condition, nT = 930) to a similar individual who did not receive the intervention ("control" condition, nC1 = 930) from among a large pool of potential control individuals (nC0 = 4656). The intervention consisted of regularly scheduled telephone calls from a surveillance nurse to proactively assess the individual's well-being, care plan status, use of and need for services (home support, adult day program, physiotherapy, etc.) and home environment (e.g., informal caregiver support). Treatment and control conditions were compared with respect to four service utilization outcomes: (1) rate of survival in the community before institutionalization in an assisted living or nursing home facility or death, (2) rate of emergency room registrations, (3) rate of acute care hospitalizations, and (4) rate of days in hospital, during home care enrollment. Results indicated a beneficial effect of the surveillance nurse intervention on reducing rate of service utilization by increasing the duration of the home care episode. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of high noninvasive respiratory support pressures in preterm neonates: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binmanee, Abdulaziz; El Helou, Salhab; Shivananda, Sandesh; Fusch, Christoph; Mukerji, Amit

    2017-12-01

    To describe the incidence, indications and clinical outcomes following high pressures on noninvasive respiratory support (NRS) in preterm neonates. Retrospective cohort study of all neonates with BW high noninvasive respiratory support (NRS), defined as mean airway pressure ≥10 cm H2O for at least 12 continuous hours using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and/or nasal high-frequency ventilation (NIHFV). Clinical and physiological outcomes following high NRS were ascertained. Median (IQR) and percentages were used to describe continuous and categorical data, respectively. There were 131 instances of high NRS use in 70 of 315 eligible infants. Most common indication was post-extubation, observed in 37% (49/131) of high NRS instances. Intubation was avoided in 71% (93/131) of instances in the first 7 days following high NRS initiation. There were no physiological perturbations in heart rate, blood pressure or oxygen requirement. Furthermore, there were no instances of lung hyperinflation, pneumothoraces or spontaneous intestinal perforation following high NRS. The use of high NRS pressure was followed by avoidance of intubation in the majority of cases without adverse effects. Further research on high NRS use including its indications, clinical outcomes and safety profile is warranted.

  11. Association between indoor fungi in Delhi homes and sensitization in children with respiratory allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rashmi; Gaur, Shailendra N; Singh, Ved P; Singh, Anand B

    2012-04-01

    Indoor fungi are potential sensitizing agents in children and their detection and quantification in indoor air are important in the diagnosis and environmental management of fungal allergies. The objective of this investigation was to assess the prevalence of fungal allergies in children in Delhi and to study the association between mold counts in the homes of children and their sensitization to respective fungal extracts. Fungal concentrations and seasonality were studied at two-week intervals for one year using Andersen Volumetric and Burkard Slide samplers. Sensitization to fungi frequently encountered in patients' homes was assessed by Skin Prick Tests (SPTs). Total fungal specific IgE was measured by ELISA in the sera of patients positive to fungal extracts. Skin Prick Tests revealed that 39.3% (33/84) of patients were markedly positive (2 + and above) to one or the other fungal allergens. Raised serum IgE to predominant indoor fungal species was observed in patients with marked SPT results. Highest marked skin reactivity (2 + and above) was obtained with Alternaria alternata allergens in 17.9% of the children, which was followed by the response to fungal antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium citrinum (15.5%). Exposure to high fungal counts of some dominant fungi (Penicillium, A. nidulans and A. fumigatus) was found associated with increased fungal sensitization in the patients. Total serum IgE level was revealed to be significantly linked with the intensity of skin reactions, as well as with skin index (r(2) = 0.052; P allergies were connected with higher prevalence of skin sensitization.

  12. Supporting home hospice family caregivers: Insights from different perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Cloyes, Kristin G; Xu, Jiayun; Bellury, Lanell; Berry, Patricia H; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2017-05-03

    Our intention was to describe and compare the perspectives of national hospice thought leaders, hospice nurses, and former family caregivers on factors that promote or threaten family caregiver perceptions of support. Nationally recognized hospice thought leaders (n = 11), hospice nurses (n = 13), and former family caregivers (n = 14) participated. Interviews and focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed. Data were coded inductively, and codes were hierarchically grouped by topic. Emergent categories were summarized descriptively and compared across groups. Four categories linked responses from the three participant groups (95%, 366/384 codes): (1) essentials of skilled communication (30.6%), (2) importance of building authentic relationships (28%), (3) value of expert teaching (22.4%), and (4) critical role of teamwork (18.3%). The thought leaders emphasized communication (44.6%), caregivers stressed expert teaching (51%), and nurses highlighted teamwork (35.8%). Nurses discussed teamwork significantly more than caregivers (z = 2.2786), thought leaders discussed communication more than caregivers (z = 2.8551), and caregivers discussed expert teaching more than thought leaders ( z = 2.1693) and nurses (z = 2.4718; all values of p schism of family-centered hospice care as a clinical ideal to one where hospice team members can fully support and empower family caregivers as a hospice team member.

  13. Leaving home, family support and intergenerational ties in Italy: Some regional differences

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Santarelli; Francesco Cottone

    2009-01-01

    In Italy conditions at leaving home are characterized by high age at exit, high proximity with parents and widespread intergenerational support, showing important regional differences. According to the "familistic" approach such conditions spread from strong intergenerational ties. Proximity and support are considered proxies of ties' strength so that different regional proximity and support correspond to different ties' intensities. The study aims at analyzing similaritie...

  14. An indoor air filtration study in homes of elderly: cardiovascular and respiratory effects of exposure to particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to particulate air pollution increases respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly, possibly through inflammation and vascular dysfunction. Methods We examined potential beneficial effects of indoor air filtration in the homes of elderly, including people taking vasoactive drugs. Forty-eight nonsmoking subjects (51 to 81 years) in 27 homes were included in this randomized, double-blind, crossover intervention study with consecutive two-week periods with or without the inclusion of a high-efficiency particle air filter in re-circulating custom built units in their living room and bedroom. We measured blood pressure, microvascular and lung function and collected blood samples for hematological, inflammation, monocyte surface and lung cell damage markers before and at day 2, 7 and 14 during each exposure scenario. Results The particle filters reduced the median concentration of PM2.5 from approximately 8 to 4 μg/m3 and the particle number concentration from 7669 to 5352 particles/cm3. No statistically significant effects of filtration as category were observed on microvascular and lung function or the biomarkers of systemic inflammation among all subjects, or in the subgroups taking (n = 11) or not taking vasoactive drugs (n = 37). However, the filtration efficacy was variable and microvascular function was within 2 days significantly increased with the actual PM2.5 decrease in the bedroom, especially among 25 subjects not taking any drugs. Conclusion Substantial exposure contrasts in the bedroom and no confounding by drugs appear required for improved microvascular function by air filtration, whereas no other beneficial effect was found in this elderly population. PMID:24373585

  15. Supporting the information domains of fall-risk management in home care via health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhuwail, Dari; Koru, Güneş; Mills, Mary Etta

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, home care clinicians often start the episode of care devoid of relevant fall-risk information. By collecting and analyzing qualitative data from 30 clinicians in one home health agency, this case study aimed to understand how the currently adopted information technology solutions supported the clinicians' fall-risk management (FRM) information domains, and explored opportunities to adopt other solutions to better support FRM. The currently adopted electronic health record system and fall-reporting application served only some information domains with a limited capacity. Substantial improvement in addressing the FRM information domains is possible by effectively modifying the existing solutions and purposefully adopting new solutions.

  16. Personalized Medication Management: Towards a Design of Individualized Support for Elderly Citizens at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo; Olsen, Jesper Wolff

    2012-01-01

    purpose to help them to manage their medications and recall challenges. We confirm that a considerable number of older adults integrate their medication treatments into their daily life routines, and that the lack of knowledge, caregiver's support, medicine outside the home, forgetting medication intake......Several technologies have been developed to support people's medication management, including pillboxes, specialized software applications, reminders and paper-based medication lists. Several of these technologies were discovered in older adults' homes during user studies carried out with the main...... towards the design of a personalized medication management system. We further describe our initial stage in a participatory design process as part of the ongoing Lev Vel Consortium....

  17. Predicting mortality in patients treated differently: updating and external validation of a prediction model for nursing home residents with dementia and lower respiratory infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymans, Martijn W; Mehr, David R; Kruse, Robin L; Lane, Patricia; Kowall, Neil W; Volicer, Ladislav; van der Steen, Jenny T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a model that was previously developed to predict 14-day mortality for nursing home residents with dementia and lower respiratory tract infection who received antibiotics could be applied to residents who were not treated with antibiotics. Specifically, in this same data set, to update the model using recalibration methods; and subsequently examine the historical, geographical, methodological and spectrum transportability through external validation of the updated model. Design 1 cohort study was used to develop the prediction model, and 4 cohort studies from 2 countries were used for the external validation of the model. Setting Nursing homes in the Netherlands and the USA. Participants 157 untreated residents were included in the development of the model; 239 untreated residents were included in the external validation cohorts. Outcome Model performance was evaluated by assessing discrimination: area under the receiver operating characteristic curves; and calibration: Hosmer and Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistics and calibration graphs. Further, reclassification tables allowed for a comparison of patient classifications between models. Results The original prediction model applied to the untreated residents, who were sicker, showed excellent discrimination but poor calibration, underestimating mortality. Adjusting the intercept improved calibration. Recalibrating the slope did not substantially improve the performance of the model. Applying the updated model to the other 4 data sets resulted in acceptable discrimination. Calibration was inadequate only in one data set that differed substantially from the other data sets in case-mix. Adjusting the intercept for this population again improved calibration. Conclusions The discriminative performance of the model seems robust for differences between settings. To improve calibration, we recommend adjusting the intercept when applying the model in settings where different mortality rates

  18. Use of Respiratory Support in the Biphase Ventilation Airway Mode in the Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Koval

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP (also known as DuoPAP, BiLevel, BiVent, PCV+, SPAP is a mode of ventilation with cycling variations between two continuous positive airway pressure levels. It is a mixture of pressure controlled ventilation and spontaneous breathing, which is unrestricted in each phase of the respiratory cycle. The volume displacement caused by the difference between Phigh and Plow airway pressure level. The phase time ratio (PTR — the BIPAP frequency is calculated as the ratio between the durations of the two pressure phases, a PTR greater than 1:1 is called APRV (airway pressure release ventilation. In patients with ARDS maintained spontaneous breathing with BIPAP resulted in lower venous admixture and better arterial blood oxygenation as compared with A/C. Only a few studies with BIPAP have been performed in newborn and infants until now. We studied the use of BIPAP in newborn (body mass > 3kg and randomised 40 patients with respiratory failure for ventilation with BIPAP (n=20 or conventional mechanical ventilatory support (assist-control A/C — synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV (n=20. The Pediatric Risk of Mortality score (PRISM were collected for each patient. Fentanyl, diazepam, GABA were used as sedatives and adjusted in accordance with the Cook scale. We compared ventilatory parameters, information pertaining to pulmonary function and oxygen delivery, cardiac output, additional descriptors of organ system functions, duration and complications of ventilation and number and dosages of sedatives administered. All the patients that we intended to ventilate with BIPAP were successfully ventilated, we can conclude that biphasic ventilatory support suitable mode of ventilation for newborn with a decreased need of analgetics and sedatives than A/C. Finally, BIPAP is an a effective safe, and easy to use for personal mode of mechanical ventilatory support in newborn. 

  19. Leaving home, family support and intergenerational ties in Italy: Some regional differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Santarelli

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In Italy conditions at leaving home are characterized by high age at exit, high proximity with parents and widespread intergenerational support, showing important regional differences. According to the "familistic" approach such conditions spread from strong intergenerational ties. Proximity and support are considered proxies of ties' strength so that different regional proximity and support correspond to different ties' intensities. The study aims at analyzing similarities and differences about parent-child ties, proximity and support in selected Italian regions, Liguria, Umbria, Sicily and Sardinia. Results show important differences among regions with respect to proximity and support, suggesting different intensity of intergenerational ties.

  20. The Efficacy of Telemedicine-Supported Discharge Within an In Home Model of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenup, Edwin P; McCusker, Melissa; Potts, Boyd A; Bryett, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    To determine if mobile videoconferencing technology can facilitate the discharge of low-acuity patients receiving in-home care without compromising short-term health outcomes. A 6-month trial commenced in July 2015 with 345 patients considered unsuited to Criteria Led Discharge (CLD) receiving in-home care included as participants. Nurses providing clinical support to patients in their homes were supplied with a tablet computer (Apple iPad) with Internet connectivity (Telstra 4G Network) and videoconferencing software (Cisco Jabber for Telepresence). Device usage data combined with hospital admission records were collected to determine (a) instances where a telemedicine-facilitated discharge occurred and (b) if the accepted measure of short-term health outcomes (readmission within 28 days) was adversely affected by this alternative method. Telemedicine technology facilitated the discharge of 10.1% (n = 35) of patients considered unsuitable for CLD from the Hospital in the Home model during the trial period. Statistically insignificant differences in rates of readmission between patients discharged in person versus those participating in the telemedicine-supported model suggest that the clinical standards of the service have been maintained. The results of evaluating telemedicine support for nurses providing low-acuity in-home care indicate that patients may be discharged remotely while maintaining the existing clinical standards of the service.

  1. Home support workers perceptions of family members of their older clients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; Byrne, Kerry; Tong, Catherine; Martin-Matthews, Anne

    2015-12-12

    Health care discourse is replete with references to building partnerships between formal and informal care systems of support, particularly in community and home based health care. Little work has been done to examine the relationship between home health care workers and family caregivers of older clients. The purpose of this study is to examine home support workers' (HSWs) perceptions of their interactions with their clients' family members. The goal of this research is to improve client care and better connect formal and informal care systems. A qualitative study, using in-depth interviews was conducted with 118 home support workers in British Columbia, Canada. Framework analysis was used and a number of strategies were employed to ensure rigor including: memo writing and analysis meetings. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and sent to a professional transcription agency. Nvivo 10 software was used to manage the data. Interactions between HSWs and family members are characterized in terms both of complementary labour (family members providing informational and instrumental support to HSWs), and disrupted labour (family members creating emotion work and additional instrumental work for HSWs). Two factors, the care plan and empathic awareness, further impact the relationship between HSWs and family caregivers. HSWs and family members work to support one another instrumentally and emotionally through interdependent interactions and empathic awareness. Organizational Care Plans that are too rigid or limited in their scope are key factors constraining interactions.

  2. Efficacy of emergent percutaneous cardiopulmonary support in cardiac or respiratory failure: fight or flight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Sung Ho; Lee, Young Tak; Sung, Kiick; Min, Sunkyung; Kim, Wook Sung; Park, Pyo Won; Ha, Yi-Kyung

    2009-08-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early outcome and conducted this study to determine the predictive factors for percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) weaning and hospital discharge. From January 2004 to December 2006, 92 patients diagnosed as cardiac or respiratory failure underwent PCPS using the Capiox emergent bypass system (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan). The mean+/-S.D. age was 56+/-18 (range, 14-85) years and 59 (64%) were male. The mean duration of PCPS was 90.9+/-126.0 h and that of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was 51.1+/-27.8 min. The rate of weaning was 59/92 (64%) and the rate of survival to discharge was 39/92 (42%). The results indicated that the etiologic disease (myocarditis) and the cause of PCPS (cardiopulmonary arrest) are significantly correlated with weaning, whereas cardiopulmonary arrest and a shorter CPR duration (75 years) have similar rates of weaning and survival compared with younger patients. PCPS provides an acceptable survival rate and outcome in patients with cardiac or respiratory failure. Prompt application and selection of patients with a specific disease (myocarditis) provides good results. It is also effective in elderly patients, providing hospital survival similar to that for younger patients.

  3. Do we need randomized clinical trials in extracorporeal respiratory support? Yes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Alain; Pesenti, Antonio; Brodie, Daniel

    2017-09-15

    Extracorporeal respiratory support, also known as extracorporeal gas exchange, may be used to rescue the most severe forms of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure with high blood flow venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Alternatively, lower flow extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal might be applied to reduce the intensity of mechanical ventilation in patients with less severe forms of the disease. However, critical reading of the results of the randomized trials and case series published to date reveals major methodological biases. Older trials are not relevant anymore since the ECMO circuitry was not heparin-coated leading to severe hemorrhagic complications due to high levels of anticoagulation, and because extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and control group patients did not receive lung-protective ventilation. Alternatively, in the more recent CESAR trial, many patients randomized to the ECMO arm did not receive ECMO and no standardized protocol for lung-protective mechanical ventilation existed in the control group. Since these techniques are costly and associated with potentially serious adverse events, there is an urgent need for high-quality data, for which the cornerstone remains randomized controlled trials.

  4. [Psychological effects of alcohol misuse on the professional home caregivers in support with elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Alba; Varescon, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Very little research is made on professional home caregivers in support of seniors, especially those dealing with alcohol misuse. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between professional home caregivers and seniors with alcohol misuse, in terms of job satisfaction, professional life and emotional exhaustion. 99 professional home caregivers completed a professional data questionnaire (ESVP) and an inventory of professional burnout (MBI). Demographic and professional data, as well as dimensions of professional life satisfaction and professional exhaustion questionnaires were analyzed. Out of the 99 participants, 36 professional home caregivers reported difficulties dealing with alcohol misuse in seniors. The mean age of the home caregivers was 35 years old and half of them did not receive any training for support. The majority of them qualified the relationship with the aged as "distant and nonexistent". In contrast, most of them were satisfied with regard to the relationship with the relatives of the subjects, and were almost as many to call it "cordial" as well as "cold distant, non-existent". Job satisfaction was positively correlated with the satisfaction of the relationship with the relatives. Emotional exhaustion was negatively correlated with their job satisfaction in the support of the subjects. This study is, to our knowledge, the first one to highlight the importance for professional home caregivers to have good relationships with the relatives of seniors with alcohol misuse. Research in this area is scarce, despite the development of home care for the elderly, whatever their pathologies, and at the early start of a French ministerial plan on society's adaptation to ageing.

  5. Impact of Home Language and Literacy Support on English-Chinese Biliteracy Acquisition among Chinese Heritage Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chan; Koda, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Studies on monolingual children have shown that home language and literacy support is crucial in children's early literacy acquisition. However, such support has not been examined as thoroughly among bilingual children, including heritage speakers. This study investigated the effect of home language and literacy support on important precursors of…

  6. The effect of a leadership support programme on care home managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Sarah; Ryan, Assumpta

    2018-01-29

    To explore the effect of the My Home Life 12-month leadership support programme on care home managers' leadership skills and professional development, and their relationships with staff, residents and relatives. A qualitative study of 15 care home managers was undertaken, using focus groups to explore the study's aims and objectives. Data were analysed using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. The leadership support programme enabled managers to develop their leadership skills, which had a positive effect for them and for their relationships with staff, residents and relatives. Conclusion Participation in the programme enabled managers to make real practice development improvements with meaningful effect for residents. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  7. The use of supportive communication when responding to older people's emotional distress in home care - An observational study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hafskjold, L; Sundling, V; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Responding to older people's distress by acknowledging or encouraging further discussion of emotions is central to supportive, person-centred communication, and may enhance home care outcomes...

  8. The evolving role of the personal support worker in home care in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Margaret; Patterson, Erin; Kelly, Shawna; Tourangeau, Ann E

    2018-03-01

    To meet increasing demand for home care, the role of personal support workers (PSWs) is shifting from providing primarily personal and supportive care to include care activities previously provided by regulated health professionals (RHPs). Much of the research examining this shift focuses on specialty programmes, with few studies investigating the daily care being provided by PSWs, frequency of care activities being provided by PSWs, and characteristics of the population receiving more complex tasks. Between January and April 2015, a review of 517 home-care service user charts was undertaken in Ontario, Canada, to: (1) describe the range of tasks being performed by PSWs in home care, (2) identify tasks transferred by RHPs to PSWs, and (3) examine characteristics of service users receiving transferred care. Findings indicate that normally, PSWs provide personal and supportive care commensurate with their training. However, in approximately one quarter of care plans reviewed, PSWs also completed more complex care activities transferred to them by RHPs. Service users receiving transferred care were older and had higher levels of cognitive and functional impairment. Although there is potential for the expansion of home-care services through increased utilisation of PSWs, healthcare leadership must ensure that the right provider is being utilised at the right time and in the right place to ensure safe and effective quality care. Thus, several actions are recommended: PSW core competencies be clearly articulated, processes used to transfer care activities from RHPs to PSWs be standardised and a team-based approach to the delivery of home-care services be considered. Utilisation of a team-based model can help establish positive relationships among home-care providers, provide increased support for PSWs, allow for easier scheduling of initial training and ensure regular reassessments of PSW competence among PSWs providing added skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Support at the end of life in care homes by nursing assistants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croyère, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    In nursing homes, the nursing assistant supports patients at the end of life, notably as they move into palliative care. This involves team work to relieve pain, limit treatments considered disproportionate and improve comfort. Relations with the residents and their families are particularly important in this context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementation of Positive Behavior Support with a Sibling Set in a Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Michelle A.; Clarke, Shelley; Fox, Lise; Dunlap, Glen

    2008-01-01

    This study provides a demonstration of the process of positive behavior support (PBS) within a home setting to address the challenging behavior of a sibling set within family routines. Although a growing data base is demonstrating the feasibility and effectiveness of conducting functional behavioral assessment and implementing assessment-based…

  11. 42 CFR 414.330 - Payment for home dialysis equipment, supplies, and support services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...'s established rulemaking procedures. Effective Date Note: At 75 FR 49202, Aug. 12, 2010, § 414.330... support services. 414.330 Section 414.330 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... HEALTH SERVICES Determination of Reasonable Charges Under the ESRD Program § 414.330 Payment for home...

  12. Reading Strategies to Support Home-to-School Connections Used by Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Socorro

    2016-01-01

    This particularistic qualitative case study design examined reading strategies, approaches, and resources teachers of ELL (English Language Learner) students in kindergarten through third grade use to support reading development and promote the home to school connection regarding literacy proficiency. The purpose of this study was to examine…

  13. Supporting Young Children's Learning with Technology at Home and in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Lydia; Stephen, Christine; McPake, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    We describe two empirical investigations of three- and four-year-old children's uses of technology, one conducted in family homes and the other in preschool settings, with the aim of comparing the ways in which children's learning with technology is supported in these different settings. The studies conceptualise learning within a sociocultural…

  14. A study on development of a home health care support information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Horio, H; Nakazawa, K; Ishikawa, K; Tashiro, Y; Matsumura, K; Aso, S; Hosaka, H

    1998-01-01

    As the need for home health care has been increasing with the rising number of the elderly in Japan, the application of medical informatics to home health care delivery is considered to be useful. Therefore, development of a home health care support information system was planned. The system can collect patient's PHD (Personal Health Data) such as data of ECG, complaints, etc. at patient's home and can send the PHD to medical facilities. We designed and constructed two subsystems on a trial basis. One subsystem has function of gathering, recording and transmitting vital signs of the aged such as ECG, physical activity rate, oxygen saturation rate in arterial blood. Another subsystem can collect and send image data of the old people at their home. Experiments for trial use of the system was conducted and it was recognized that the PHD can be smoothly collected and recorded at home of the elderly and can be sent to the medical facilities with good success by using the system.

  15. Integration of Multisensor Hybrid Reasoners to Support Personal Autonomy in the Smart Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Valero

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The deployment of the Ambient Intelligence (AmI paradigm requires designing and integrating user-centered smart environments to assist people in their daily life activities. This research paper details an integration and validation of multiple heterogeneous sensors with hybrid reasoners that support decision making in order to monitor personal and environmental data at a smart home in a private way. The results innovate on knowledge-based platforms, distributed sensors, connected objects, accessibility and authentication methods to promote independent living for elderly people. TALISMAN+, the AmI framework deployed, integrates four subsystems in the smart home: (i a mobile biomedical telemonitoring platform to provide elderly patients with continuous disease management; (ii an integration middleware that allows context capture from heterogeneous sensors to program environment´s reaction; (iii a vision system for intelligent monitoring of daily activities in the home; and (iv an ontologies-based integrated reasoning platform to trigger local actions and manage private information in the smart home. The framework was integrated in two real running environments, the UPM Accessible Digital Home and MetalTIC house, and successfully validated by five experts in home care, elderly people and personal autonomy.

  16. Integration of multisensor hybrid reasoners to support personal autonomy in the smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Miguel Ángel; Bravo, José; Chamizo, Juan Manuel García; López-de-Ipiña, Diego

    2014-09-17

    The deployment of the Ambient Intelligence (AmI) paradigm requires designing and integrating user-centered smart environments to assist people in their daily life activities. This research paper details an integration and validation of multiple heterogeneous sensors with hybrid reasoners that support decision making in order to monitor personal and environmental data at a smart home in a private way. The results innovate on knowledge-based platforms, distributed sensors, connected objects, accessibility and authentication methods to promote independent living for elderly people. TALISMAN+, the AmI framework deployed, integrates four subsystems in the smart home: (i) a mobile biomedical telemonitoring platform to provide elderly patients with continuous disease management; (ii) an integration middleware that allows context capture from heterogeneous sensors to program environment's reaction; (iii) a vision system for intelligent monitoring of daily activities in the home; and (iv) an ontologies-based integrated reasoning platform to trigger local actions and manage private information in the smart home. The framework was integrated in two real running environments, the UPM Accessible Digital Home and MetalTIC house, and successfully validated by five experts in home care, elderly people and personal autonomy.

  17. A neonatal early discharge and home support programme: shifting care into the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, I D; Henderson-Smart, D J

    1995-02-01

    The Neonatal Early Discharge and Family Support Programme (NEDP) was an initiative aimed at providing extended care for families whose infants had required neonatal special care, thereby allowing earlier discharge. Two groups of families were examined; one before and one after the instigation of the NEDP. Hospital and community service usage and psychosocial effects were examined. Families who received support were able to be discharged earlier and rooming-in was unnecessary as support was provided at home. Visits to family doctors for mothercraft issues were less frequent. Transport of babies from the Level 3 nursery to other nurseries in order to be closer to home was also provided by the nursing team, saving on ambulance costs and freeing their time for emergencies. There was no increase in maternal anxiety and infants were less difficult in the patient group. NEDP and family support programme is a worthwhile extension of neonatal intensive care.

  18. Older persons' experiences of a home-based exercise program with behavioral change support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkkukangas, Marina; Sundler, Annelie J; Söderlund, Anne; Eriksson, Staffan; Johansson, Ann-Christin

    2017-12-01

    It is a challenge to promote exercise among older persons. Knowledge is needed regarding the maintenance of exercise aiming at preventing falls and promoting health and well-being in older persons. This descriptive study used a qualitative inductive approach to describe older persons' experiences of a fall-preventive, home-based exercise program with support for behavioral change. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 elderly persons aged 75 years or older, and a qualitative content analysis was performed. Four categories emerged: facilitators of performing exercise in everyday life, the importance of support, perceived gains from exercise, and the existential aspects of exercise. With support from physiotherapists (PTs), home-based exercise can be adapted to individual circumstances in a meaningful way. Including exercises in everyday life and daily routines could support the experience of being stronger, result in better physical functioning, and give hope for an extended active life in old age.

  19. Home enteral nutrition NICE guidelines and nutrition support in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2010-01-01

    The Home Enteral Nutrition team provides support to patients who are being fed via enteral feeding tube in the community. The use of the recently developed policy in combination with the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline on nutrition support will change the way care is provided to patients and enhance service delivery. However, there are difficulties in the implementation of policies and guidelines which often militate against the delivery of high standard of care.\\u...

  20. [Support at home for a patient with cancer of the jaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Monique

    2015-09-01

    Home care presents specific difficulties. The support of Ms. C, suffering from a malignant tumour of the lower jaw illustrates a difficult care context due to a painful and poorly-healing wound, low self-esteem and communication difficulties. Maintaining the right distance and providing professional support are therefore essential in order to give high quality care to this patient. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. The development of integration mobile-based home care support systems: MDS-HC as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Fang-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Yin; Chang, Polun; Chiehwen, Ed Hsu

    2008-11-06

    The MDS-HC (Minimum Data Set for Home Care Assessment Instrument) has been an effective home care evaluation instrument. However it was not yet accepted in Taiwan because it is too long for our over-burdened home care nurses. We developed integrated mobile-based home care support system using MDS-HC. The results showed that an integration mobile-based system can increase efficiency and reduce manual work.

  2. Admission into a Nursing Home. Delay or prevention with the use of a complete support network?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihl, Ralf; Cujai, Nadine; Krah, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    Becoming older in Germany often leads to admission into a nursing home. The aim of this study was to investigate if a complete support network (CSN) can contribute to preventing admission into a nursing home. Organizational and financial prerequisites of a CSN were documented. In this study 32 patients with psychiatric disorders diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases 10 (ICD 10, 16 as F00 dementia in Alzheimer disease and 16 as F31-33 bipolar affective disorder, depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorder) were observed over a period of 2 years. The intervention consisted of participation in a defined CSN, which was developed by the Alexian Research Centre in Krefeld (ARCK). A cooperation of all persons and institutions involved in the care of elderly patients with psychiatric disorders was initiated. An individualized help plan was compiled for each patient. The primary outcome was admittance to a nursing home or remaining at home. The duration of staying at home was measured in days. User satisfaction was assessed with a 5‑step Likert scale questionnaire. The steering process and the financial efforts necessary to run the CSN were descriptively evaluated. At the end of the observation period 28 out of 32 patients were not admitted to a nursing home. During the observational period one patient dropped out, one died and two were admitted to a nursing home. User satisfaction achieved a median score of 5 (very satisfied). No additional funding was necessary to run the CSN. The CSN can prevent admission to a nursing home without needing additional funding and the whole process can be guided by the patient.

  3. Severe hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: exploring the limits of extracorporeal respiratory support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Brescovici Nunes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Veno-venous extracorporeal oxygenation for respiratory support has emerged as a rescue alternative for patients with hypoxemia. However, in some patients with more severe lung injury, extracorporeal support fails to restore arterial oxygenation. Based on four clinical vignettes, the aims of this article were to describe the pathophysiology of this concerning problem and to discuss possibilities for hypoxemia resolution. METHODS: Considering the main reasons and rationale for hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, some possible bedside solutions must be considered: 1 optimization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow; 2 identification of recirculation and cannula repositioning if necessary; 3 optimization of residual lung function and consideration of blood transfusion; 4 diagnosis of oxygenator dysfunction and consideration of its replacement; and finally 5 optimization of the ratio of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow to cardiac output, based on the reduction of cardiac output. CONCLUSION: Therefore, based on the pathophysiology of hypoxemia during veno-venous extracorporeal oxygenation support, we propose a stepwise approach to help guide specific interventions.

  4. Supporting patients self-managing respiratory health: a qualitative study on the impact of the Breathe Easy voluntary group network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Ferhana; Merritt, Rowena

    2018-01-01

    Self-management strategies are designed to improve lung and respiratory health through structured self-management plans with regular practitioner reviews. Strategies have not, however, focused upon how patient support groups and advocacy networks can help with the management of these conditions; therefore, it is unknown what impact they may have on patient self-management. A qualitative study was designed to help understand what impact the British Lung Foundation's Breathe Easy (BE) groups have on patients managing their lung and respiratory conditions. A semistructured telephone interview schedule was developed to study the network. Topics covered included: perceptions about the BE groups; current referrals systems and integration pathways; benefits of attending the BE groups; and integration of the BE groups into the respiratory pathway. Key themes explored included: shared patient experience and peer support; patient self-management and self-education; attendance of healthcare professionals; and the impact of integrating BE groups into the respiratory pathway. BE networks were shown to support self-care initiatives for people attending the groups, and members expressed a social and educational benefit. BE networks were working with the local National Health Service to become an integral part of the respiratory pathway, yet there was evidence of resistance from the health service in incorporating the networks.

  5. Workers' experiences of crises in the delivery of home support services to older clients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; Byrne, Kerry; Beck, Christina; Martin-Matthews, Anne

    2013-02-01

    In the provision of care to older clients, home support workers regularly confront, avert, and manage crises. Semistructured interviews were conducted to explore the nature, type, and management of crises from the perspective of home support workers (N = 118) of older persons in British Columbia, Canada. The delivery of home health care occurs within a context of unpredictability related to scheduling, time constraints, variability of client need, and changing work environments. These events are experienced by 91% of home support workers and range from a serious medical incident (e.g., fall, death) to an interpersonal dilemma (e.g., client refusal of service, argument between worker and family member). Home support workers use a variety of strategies to manage these incidents. The analysis of crises enables us to better understand how agency and care policies may be more responsive to circumstances that challenge care work in home health settings.

  6. Evaluation of Initial Respiratory Support Strategies in VLBW Neonates with RDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjeh, Seyyed Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad Kazem; Khoshnood Shariati, Maryam; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has brought about a significant change in care and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates. The present study was designed and conducted to evaluate different strategies of initial respiratory support (IRS) in VLBW neonates hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This prospective study was conducted over three years (March 21, 2011 to March 20, 2014). Each eligible VLBW baby with RDS diagnosis received a specific IRS, including room air (RA), oxygen therapy (O2 RX), n.CPAP, NIPPV, MV ± SURF, based on clinical evaluation; then, the next strategies were selected based on the disease progression. Obtained data was entered in SPSS and the groups were compared for disease consequences or death. Then, contributing factors to the failure of NIV strategies, and the need for endotracheal mechanical ventilation (eMV) were determined. In total, 499 neonates were included in the study. The mean birth weight was 1,125 ± 254 g and the gestational age was 29.2 ± 2.5 weeks. The IRS included: RA = 43, O2.RX = 60, n.CPAP/NIPPV = 219, INSURE = 83 and MV ± SURF = 177. In terms of the need for IRS upgrading during hospitalization, neonates not on mechanical ventilation (64.5%) were divided into three groups. In 45.3% of cases, the IRS did not change (Never upgrading); in 24.5% of cases, the level of IRS increased but there was no need for eMV in the first three days of life (Specific); in 24.8% of cases, there was need for eMV within the first three days of life (Absolute) and during hospitalization (after the first three days of life) 5.3% of cases were in need of eMV (General). In terms of correlation between the effective variables in IRS upgrading, univariable analyses showed that low gestational age, low birth weight, multiple pregnancy, maternal disease, low one-minute Apgar score, and need for surfactant therapy had significant correlation, and multivariable analysis showed that

  7. Job Satisfaction: Insights from Home Support Care Workers in Three Canadian Jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotoglou, Dimitra; Fancey, Pamela; Keefe, Janice; Martin-Matthews, Anne

    2017-03-01

    This mixed-methods study identified the personal and workplace characteristics that drive the job satisfaction of home support workers (HSWs) providing assistance to elderly clients. Data were based on a standardized measure of job satisfaction, along with in-depth qualitative interviews with 176 home support workers from three Canadian provincial jurisdictions (British Columbia, n = 108; Ontario, n = 28; Nova Scotia, n = 40). We anticipated that variability in demographic profiles between the three groups of workers and different job descriptions would be associated with differences in perceived job satisfaction. This was not the case. Results from the qualitative analysis highlight key areas that contributed to job satisfaction. These are job (scheduling, travel, and safety), economic (income security), and organizational (communication, support, and respect) factors. Given these findings, we recommend improvements to workplace communication, increased travel time allowance between clients, and wage parity with equivalent positions in long-term care facilities.

  8. [Creating a good relationship between hospital and clinic for the support of end-of-life home care patients-usefulness of questionnaires to indicate the capacity of home care-supporting clinics for palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Kato, Toshihiko; Shimizu, Kazuko; Chiba, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Motoko; Iwadare, Midori

    2012-12-01

    We have been practicing palliative care for terminal cancer patients at outpatient sections, patient wards, by home care, and by visiting nursing stations for the last 4 years. After the establishment of our palliative care unit in June 2011, it became difficult for us to provide sufficient home care support by ourselves, because of the increasing number of the patients and their widespread locations. It is therefore necessary to cooperate with regional medical clinics in order to support the patients who need home care even after their condition deteriorates. To determine the extent to which the home care-supporting clinics perform palliative care, we used an original questionnaire. Twenty-five clinics agreed to the publication of their names as our cooperating clinics. The number of patients who received palliative care at home from home care clinics after visiting our hospital increased from 8% to 14%, and the rate of patients who died at home also increased from 10% to 13%. Information about cooperating with home care clinics is very important and the improvement of palliative care skills necessary for home care doctors to continue their support for End-Of-Life cancer patients. Furthermore, the hospital should offer a strict and timely backup when the condition of patients treated at home suddenly deteriorates.

  9. Associations between presence of handwashing stations and soap in the home and diarrhoea and respiratory illness, in children less than five years old in rural western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, K B; Feikin, D R; Bigogo, G M; Aol, G; Audi, A; Cohen, A L; Shah, M M; Yu, J; Breiman, R F; Ram, P K

    2014-04-01

    We tested whether soap presence in the home or a designated handwashing station was associated with diarrhoea and respiratory illness in Kenya. In April 2009, we observed presence of a handwashing station and soap in households participating in a longitudinal health surveillance system in rural Kenya. Diarrhoea and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in children soap in the home and a handwashing station. Among 2547 children, prevalence of diarrhoea and ARI was 2.3 and 11.4 days per 100 child-days, respectively. Soap was observed in 97% of households. Children in households with soap had 1.3 fewer days of diarrhoea/100 child-days (95% CI -2.6, -0.1) than children in households without soap. ARI prevalence was not associated with presence of soap. A handwashing station was identified in 1.4% of households and was not associated with a difference in diarrhoea or ARI prevalence. Soap presence in the home was significantly associated with reduced diarrhoea, but not ARI, in children in rural western Kenya. Whereas most households had soap in the home, almost none had a designated handwashing station, which may prevent handwashing at key times of hand contamination. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.J.; Hert-Picciotto, I.; Dostal, M.; Keller, J.A.; Nozicka, J.; Kotesovec, F.; Dejmek, J.; Loomis, D.; Sram, R.J. [University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Public Health Science

    2006-07-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how indoor pollution from tobacco and home heating may adversely affect respiratory health in young children. A total of 452 children born 1994-1996 in two districts in the Czech Republic participated. Lower respiratory illness (LRI) diagnoses occurred more frequently in children from homes heated by coal (vs. other energy sources or distant furnaces; rate ratio (RR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.97). Maternal prenatal smoking and other adult smokers also increased LRI rates (respectively: RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-2.01; and RR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.65). Cooking fuels (primarily electricity, natural gas, or propane) were not associated with LRI incidence. For children never breast-fed, coal home heating and mother's smoking conferred substantially greater risks: RR = 2.77 (95% CI, 1.45-5.27) and RR = 2.52 (95% CI, 1.31-4.85), respectively. This maternal smoking and coal home heating increased risk for LRI in the first 3 years of life, particularly in children not breast-fed.

  11. Emotional and instrumental support influencing male caregivers for people with dementia living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Midori; Kimura, Hiromi; Ogomori, Koji; Ogata, Kumiko

    2017-05-01

    Object: To clarify the emotional and instrumental support influencing male caregivers for people with dementia living at home. Patients/Materials and Methods: The subjects were 298 male caregivers. Nursing care burden was assessed using the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale. Ability to cope with care problems was assessed using the Nursing Care Problems Coping Scale for Male Caregivers for People with Dementia Living at Home (NCSM). Emotional support was assessed using the Emotional Support Network Scale. Instrumental support was assessed using the question "Do you have someone to help when you have a problem with nursing care?". Results: There was a significant correlation (P instrumental support for male caregivers was more than three times more likely to be obtained from within the family than outside it. With families becoming smaller, it is becoming more important for communities and society in general to provide emotional and instrumental support for male caregivers. Male caregivers need support from someone with whom they feel comfortable. It is particularly necessary to consider how to support male caregivers who use the "Emotional avoidance" coping style.

  12. The Effect of Mothers' Social Support and Life Changes on the Stimulation of Their Children in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, John M.; Earp, Jo Anne

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between mothers' life changes, social support, and the preschool home environment of their children was analyzed three years after all study children were discharged from a neonatal intensive care unit. Regardless of number of life changes, mothers reporting more social support provided a more stimulating home environment.…

  13. Changes in parenting and child behavior after the home-start family support program: A 10 year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aar, J.V.; Asscher, J.J.; Zijlstra, B.J.H.; Deković, M.; Hoffenaar, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Home-Start is a parenting support program in which mothers experiencing difficulties in family life and parenting, receive weekly support at home from a volunteer. The present study extends the work of Hermanns et al. (2013), by examining self-reported and observed parenting and child

  14. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Haeson Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions.Description of integrated practice: An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues.Early results: The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased.Conclusion: Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients.

  15. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients' health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Fraser Health's case manager-general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients.

  16. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Haeson Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice: An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results: The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased. Conclusion: Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients.

  17. Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A fiery feminist piece that argues that Indian women are all homeless; animals have homes but Indian women have none, because they have to depend on the mercy of their "keepers"; therefore, Indian women live a life worse than animals.

  18. [Home palliative care for a terminal stage cancer patient--a view point of autonomy support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiwa, Takashi

    2008-12-01

    To recuperate from terminal stage cancer at one's dear old home is like a patient spending his time all day long with the family. Therefore, it is necessary for a patient to know his state of well being, and to comprehend how to cope with the expected change in cancer stages. In other words, the patient has to make his own decision as to what he wants to be cared for in the homecare environment, and he should provide information to the family and to caregivers. The author expresses such kind of a relationship as autonomy support, and it is an important viewpoint of home palliative care. Moreover, the idea of autonomy support was effective as well as relieving a severe pain of the disease from the patient. In our case for example, we experienced not only the amount of narcotic usage to control pain has decreased but the increase in narcotic amount at the near death period has also declined. In addition, we compared a home palliative care to a home recuperation of the senior citizen. As a result, the followings were emphasized: 1) In order to improve in the quality of home palliative care, it is important to catch the difference in subtle changes between the cancer patient and the senior citizen. 2) To note the problem of the sense of loss related to the welfare tools introduction. In this article, the problem of the cancer end stage caring was compared with the senior citizen homecare, and found that an autonomous support is clearly important.

  19. LHC@home is ready to support HiLumi LHC: take part!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Recently relaunched, the LHC@home volunteer computing project is now ready to support the HiLumi LHC project, the design phase of the planned upgrade of the LHC that will increase its luminosity by a factor of 5 to 10 beyond its original design value. HiLumi will need massive simulations to test the beam dynamics. Whether you are at home or at work, you can help experts design the future LHC by connecting your computer to LHC@home. Go for it!   LHC@home is aimed at involving the public in real science. If you have a computer that is connected to the Internet, you can join the large team of volunteers who are already supporting its two main projects: Test4Theory, which runs computer simulations of high-energy particle collisions, and SixTrack, which is aimed at optimizing the LHC performance by performing beam dynamics simulations. In both cases, the software is designed to run only when your computer is idle and causes no disruption to your normal activities. To the simulations run by the Six...

  20. Fertility Treatment Is Associated with Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Respiratory Support in Late Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Erica T; Sundheimer, Lauren W; Spades, Carla; Quant, Cara; Simmons, Charles F; Pisarska, Margareta D

    2017-08-01

    Late preterm infants are at risk for short-term morbidities. We report that late preterm singletons conceived with fertility treatment have increased risk for admission to the neonatal intensive care unit and respiratory support compared with spontaneously conceived infants. Fertility treatment may be a risk factor to consider in managing late preterm infants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  2. Respiratory support strategies for the preterm newborn – National survey 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Rocha

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory support strategies for the preterm newborn have been the subject of intense research. Aim: To survey neonatal respiratory support practices in Portugal and to determine whether they reflect evidence from randomised trials. Methods: Questionnaires were given out to 31 Portuguese neonatal units to determine the types of ventilators, modes of ventilation, lung function monitoring, use of exogenous surfactant, oxygen saturation levels used and the prevalence of chronic lung disease in the preterm newborn. Results: There was a 94% response rate. Draeger babylog was the most frequently used ventilator in neonates. Twelve (41% units prefer to use early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP whenever possible. Triggered ventilation is the choice of invasive ventilation in 24 (83% units (SIMV, SIPPV, PSV; four (14% units have high frequency oscillation ventilation. SIMV is the most frequent (n = 13, 45% weaning mode. Exogenous surfactant is used as prophylactic in 12 (41% units. All units use lung function measurements to aid choice of ventilator settings and five (17% units monitor PaCO2 (transcutaneous = 3; capnometry = 2. Seventeen (59% units allow oxygen saturation levels from 90% to 95% in infants with respiratory distress syndrome and 15 (52% levels from 85% to 90% in infants with chronic lung disease. Prevalence of chronic lung disease of prematurity ranged from 0% to 75% (median: 10. Conclusions: Many respiratory strategies for extremely low birth weight infants reflect the result of large randomised trials. More effective methods may be required to encourage the use of early NCPAP preferably with binasal prongs, the use of SIPPV as the main weaning mode, the use of volume targeted ventilation and a more judicious use of exogenous surfactant in order to ensure evidence–based practice. Resumo: Introdução: As estratégias de suporte ventilatório utilizadas no recém-nascido têm sido

  3. Patterns of depression among adolescent mothers: Resilience related to father support and home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Kotake, Chie; Raskin, Maryna; Bumgarner, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The negative consequences of maternal depression are a major public health concern, both for mothers and for their children. Despite the high prevalence of depression among adolescent mothers, little is known about the patterns of adolescent mothers' depression in the early parenting years. The present study examined mothers' depression during the first 2 years following childbirth in a sample of 428 young mothers (20 or younger at first childbirth) who were participants in a randomized controlled trial of a home visiting parenting support program. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-reported Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Mothers were classified into groups based on whether their depressive symptoms were below or above the cutoff for clinically significant symptomatology. Depression groups (stable nondepressed, stable depressed, remitted depression) were associated with variations in mothers' satisfaction with support from the baby's father and enrollment in the home visiting program. Maternal depression was more likely to remit when mothers were satisfied with father support; assignment to the home visiting program was associated with mothers remaining mentally healthy. Results have clinical and policy implications for prevention and intervention programs. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The Falls In Care Home study: a feasibility randomized controlled trial of the use of a risk assessment and decision support tool to prevent falls in care homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gemma M; Armstrong, Sarah; Gordon, Adam L; Gladman, John; Robertson, Kate; Ward, Marie; Conroy, Simon; Arnold, Gail; Darby, Janet; Frowd, Nadia; Williams, Wynne; Knowles, Sue; Logan, Pip A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of implementing and evaluating the Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention. Design: Two-centre, cluster feasibility randomized controlled trial and process evaluation. Setting: Purposive sample of six diverse old age/learning disability, long stay care homes in Nottinghamshire, UK. Subjects: Residents aged over 50 years, who had fallen at least once in the past year, not bed-bound, hoist-dependent or terminally ill. Interventions: Intervention homes (n = 3) received Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention training and support. Control homes (n = 3) received usual care. Outcomes: Recruitment, attrition, baseline and six-month outcome completion, contamination and intervention fidelity, compliance, tolerability, acceptance and impact. Results: A total of 81 of 145 (56%) care homes expressed participatory interest. Six of 22 letter respondent homes (27%) participated. The expected resident recruitment target was achieved by 76% (52/68). Ten (19%) residents did not complete follow-up (seven died, three moved). In intervention homes 36/114 (32%) staff attended training. Two of three (75%) care homes received protocol compliant training. Staff valued the training, but advised greater management involvement to improve intervention implementation. Fall risks were assessed, actioned and recorded in care records. Of 115 recorded falls, 533/570 (93%) of details were complete. Six-month resident fall rates were 1.9 and 4.0 per year for intervention and control homes, respectively. Conclusions: The Guide to Action Care Home is implementable under trial conditions. Recruitment and follow-up rates indicate that a definitive trial can be completed. Falls (primary outcome) can be ascertained reliably from care records. PMID:26385358

  5. CanSupport: a model for home-based palliative care delivery in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Alyssa; LaVigne, Anna W; Rajvanshi, Ambika; Mahato, Birbal; Mohan, Ravinder; Sharma, Reena; Grover, Surbhi

    2016-07-01

    According to the 2014 WHO Global Atlas of Palliative Care, there is insufficient access to palliative care services worldwide, with the majority of unmet need in low- and middle-income countries. In India, there are major disparities in access to palliative care, with the majority of services being offered by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) scattered throughout the country. The barriers to expanding palliative care services in India are common to many lower- and middle-income countries-a lack of financial resources, a paucity of trained staff, and a focus on curative rather than comfort care. In this paper, we describe a model of palliative care being used by CanSupport, a non-governmental organization based in Delhi that was formed in 1996. They offer home-based services provided by multidisciplinary teams consisting of a physician, nurse, and social worker who are trained in palliative care. Data on patient demographics, services provided, and outcomes were collected retrospectively for patients treated by CanSupport for the year 2009-2010. Sources include CanSupport's population data and direct discussions with CanSupport staff. During the year 2009-2010, CanSupport served 746 patients, with an average of 10 home visits per patient. Only 29% of patients were referred from hospitals or physicians, with the rest being self-referred or referred from CanSupport's help line. Pain scales were administered on each visit and 31% of patients received morphine. Of the 514 patient deaths, 76% occurred at home and a majority of families received bereavement counseling for up to 6 months. CanSupport has shown that a home-based care model can be successful in India and is desired by patients at the end of life or with chronic illness. Their model of care saves the patients the cost of a hospital visit while still providing evaluation by staff with training in palliative care. In addition, the multidisciplinary nature of the teams allows for symptom management and

  6. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist compared to other forms of triggered ventilation for neonatal respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas E; Hunt, Katie A; Shetty, Sandeep; Greenough, Anne

    2017-10-27

    Effective synchronisation of infant respiratory effort with mechanical ventilation may allow adequate gas exchange to occur at lower peak airway pressures, potentially reducing barotrauma and volutrauma and development of air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. During neurally adjusted ventilatory assist ventilation (NAVA), respiratory support is initiated upon detection of an electrical signal from the diaphragm muscle, and pressure is provided in proportion to and synchronous with electrical activity of the diaphragm (EADi). Compared to other modes of triggered ventilation, this may provide advantages in improving synchrony. Primary• To determine whether NAVA, when used as a primary or rescue mode of ventilation, results in reduced rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death among term and preterm newborn infants compared to other forms of triggered ventilation• To assess the safety of NAVA by determining whether it leads to greater risk of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), periventricular leukomalacia, or air leaks when compared to other forms of triggered ventilation Secondary• To determine whether benefits of NAVA differ by gestational age (term or preterm)• To determine whether outcomes of cross-over trials performed during the first two weeks of life include peak pressure requirements, episodes of hypocarbia or hypercarbia, oxygenation index, and the work of breathing SEARCH METHODS: We performed searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cohrane Library; MEDLINE via Ovid SP (January 1966 to March 2017); Embase via Ovid SP (January 1980 to March 2017); the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) via EBSCO host (1982 to March 2017); and the Web of Science (1985 to 2017). We searched abstracts from annual meetings of the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) (2000 to 2016); meetings of the European Society of Pediatric Research (published in Pediatric Research); and meetings of the

  7. A Systematic Review of the Economic Evidence for Home Support Interventions in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Paul; Davies, Linda; Jasper, Rowan; Loynes, Niklas; Challis, David

    2017-09-01

    Recent evidence signals the need for effective forms of home support to people with dementia and their carers. The cost-effectiveness evidence of different approaches to support is scant. To appraise economic evidence on the cost-effectiveness of home support interventions for dementia to inform future evaluation. A systematic literature review of full and partial economic evaluations was performed using the British National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database supplemented by additional references. Study characteristics and findings, including incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, when available, were summarized narratively. Study quality was appraised using the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database critical appraisal criteria and independent ratings, agreed by two reviewers. Studies were located on a permutation matrix describing their mix of incremental costs/effects to aid decision making. Of the 151 articles retrieved, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria: 8 concerning support to people with dementia and 6 to carers. Five studies were incremental cost-utility analyses, seven were cost-effectiveness analyses, and two were cost consequences analyses. Five studies expressed incremental cost-effectiveness ratios as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (£6,696-£207,942 per quality-adjusted life-year). In four studies, interventions were dominant over usual care. Two interventions were more costly but more beneficial and were favorable against current acceptability thresholds. Occupational therapy, home-based exercise, and a carers' coping intervention emerged as cost-effective approaches for which there was better evidence. These interventions used environmental modifications, behavior management, physical activity, and emotional support as active components. More robust evidence is needed to judge the value of these and other interventions across the dementia care pathway. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and

  8. Technology support to a telehealth in the home service: Qualitative observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alan; Wade, Victoria; Morris, Greg; Pech, Joanne; Rechter, Stuart; Kidd, Michael; Carati, Colin

    2016-07-01

    The Flinders University Telehealth in the Home (FTH) trial was an action research initiative that introduced and evaluated the impact of telehealth services on palliative care patients living in the community, home-based rehabilitation services for the elderly, and services to the elderly in residential aged care. The aim of this study was to understand the issues encountered during the provision of technology services that supported this trial. A mixed methods approach was undertaken to analyse the roles of information and communication technology (ICT) and clinical staff in design, technology management and training. The data sources were staff observations and documents including job logs, meetings, emails and technology descriptions. Use of consumer technology for telehealth required customisation of applications and services. Clinicians played a key role in definition of applications and the embedding of workflow into applications. Usability of applications was key to their subsequent use. Management of design creep and technology services, coupled with support and training for clinicians were important to maintenance of a telehealth service. In the setting described, an iterative approach to the development of telehealth services to the home using consumer technologies was needed. The efficient management of consumer devices in multiple settings will become critical as telehealth services grow in scale. Effective collaboration between clinical and technical stakeholders and further workforce education in telehealth can be key enablers for the transition of face-to-face care to a telehealth mode of delivery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Implementation of a Complex Intervention to Support Leadership Development in Nursing Homes: A Multimethod Participatory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Belinda; Barrie, Karen; Sharp, Cathy; Meyer, Julienne

    2017-04-01

    Leadership is key to quality improvement in nursing homes. This article reports on the initial analysis of the transformational My Home Life Leadership Support program for nursing home managers being implemented in Scotland. It analyses learning from a multimethod participatory descriptive study. Contribution analysis theory informed the evaluation. Evidence-Based Practice, Relationship-Centered Care, Appreciative Inquiry, and Caring Conversations informed the intervention to develop transformational leadership. Data generation methods included baseline and postintervention questionnaires to describe culture change within the study population, together with more in-depth qualitative data generated from group discussions throughout the leadership support program. Qualitative data analysis was an iterative collaborative process with participants to generate themes about the impact of the program on themselves and their practice. Data showed positive changes in managers' perceptions of their self-awareness, leadership communication and relationship skills, and development of positive cultures. This model offers lessons for those interested in ways to approach the emotional, educational, and cultural dynamics of change in other human service contexts.

  10. A Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome extranet: supporting local communication and information dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kealey Cathy M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to explore the use and perceptions of a local Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS Extranet and its potential to support future information and communication applications. The SARS Extranet was a single, managed electronic and limited access system to manage local, provincial and other SARS control information. Methods During July, 2003, a web-based and paper-based survey was conducted with 53 SARS Steering Committee members in Hamilton. It assessed the use and perceptions of the Extranet that had been built to support the committee during the SARS outbreak. Before distribution, the survey was user-tested based on a think-aloud protocol, and revisions were made. Quantitative and qualitative questions were asked related to frequency of use of the Extranet, perceived overall usefulness of the resource, rationale for use, potential barriers, strengths and limitations, and potential future uses of the Extranet. Results The response rate was 69.4% (n = 34. Of all respondents, 30 (88.2% reported that they had visited the site, and rated it highly overall (mean = 4.0; 1 = low to 5 = high. However, the site was rated 3.4 compared with other communications strategies used during the outbreak. Almost half of all respondents (44.1% visited the site at least once every few days. The two most common reasons the 30 respondents visited the Extranet were to access SARS Steering Committee minutes (63.3% and to access Hamilton medical advisories (53.3%. The most commonly cited potential future uses for the Extranet were the sending of private emails to public health experts (63.3%, and surveillance (63.3%. No one encountered personal barriers in his or her use of the site, but several mentioned that time and duplication of email information were challenges. Conclusion Despite higher rankings of various communication strategies during the SARS outbreak, such as email, meetings, teleconferences, and other web

  11. Important features of home-based support services for older Australians and their informal carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Nikki; Gill, Liz; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Cameron, Ian D; Patterson, Jan; Crotty, Maria; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2015-11-01

    In Australia, newly initiated, publicly subsidised 'Home-Care Packages' designed to assist older people (≥ 65 years of age) living in their own home must now be offered on a 'consumer-directed care' (CDC) basis by service providers. However, CDC models have largely developed in the absence of evidence on users' views and preferences. The aim of this study was to determine what features (attributes) of consumer-directed, home-based support services are important to older people and their informal carers to inform the design of a discrete choice experiment (DCE). Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted in December 2012-November 2013 with 17 older people receiving home-based support services and 10 informal carers from 5 providers located in South Australia and New South Wales. Salient service characteristics important to participants were determined using thematic and constant comparative analysis and formulated into attributes and attribute levels for presentation within a DCE. Initially, eight broad themes were identified: information and knowledge, choice and control, self-managed continuum, effective co-ordination, effective communication, responsiveness and flexibility, continuity and planning. Attributes were formulated for the DCE by combining overlapping themes such as effective communication and co-ordination, and the self-managed continuum and planning into single attributes. Six salient service features that characterise consumer preferences for the provision of home-based support service models were identified: choice of provider, choice of support worker, flexibility in care activities provided, contact with the service co-ordinator, managing the budget and saving unspent funds. Best practice indicates that qualitative research with individuals who represent the population of interest should guide attribute selection for a DCE and this is the first study to employ such methods in aged care service provision. Further development of

  12. A protocol for a systematic review of effective home support to people with dementia and their carers: components and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Paul; Giebel, Clarissa M; Larbey, Matthew; Roe, Brenda; Challis, David; Hughes, Jane; Jolley, David; Poland, Fiona; Russell, Ian

    2016-01-01

    To review the evidence for home support approaches directed at tertiary prevention; ameliorating difficulties and enhancing well-being. With population ageing dementia represents a significant care challenge with 60% of people with dementia living at home. However, little is known about existing forms of home support and their relative effectiveness. A two-stage design: First, an overview of systematic reviews of psychosocial interventions for dementia to identify their components; second, a systematic review of the effectiveness of home support interventions to older people with dementia/their carers. We will search electronic databases using specific search terms with additional searches of other known studies. Data will be extracted by two reviewers according to pre-determined categories. An initial synthesis will elicit components of interventions from stage 1 and operationalize them in terms of specific techniques. These will then be used in synthesis of data in stage 2, to determine the extent to which each home support intervention relies on these components and distill evidence concerning outcomes. Studies from stage 2 are expected to be methodologically diverse; if so, a narrative approach to synthesis will be taken. Study findings will be explored with Patient, Public and Carer Involvement groups. The review seeks to develop a theory of home support: how and why interventions may work; in what contexts; and for whom. We will identify effective home support approaches, informing policy-makers and establishing how they might be experienced by people with dementia and their carers. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. AAL@MEO: Interactive Digital-TV to Support Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Vitor Simões; Martins, Ana Isabel; Queirós, Alexandra; Silva, Anabela G; Rocha, Nelson Pacheco

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of the AAL@MEO, an application to aggregate technological solutions supporting home care. This application is intended to be integrated in the MEO service, which is a Portuguese commercial service of Internet Protocol TV. The use of a TV set at home as the central interaction and communication system is advantageous for elderly users that do not have a close relationship with technological advances but are used to control their TV set. The results of the evaluation of the AAL@MEO show that elderly users are willing for new services and have a milder rejection towards the interaction with the TV set. However, the interaction mechanisms based on a remote control with multiple functions need further developments.

  14. An open platform to support home healthcare services using interactive TV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Carlos; Anido, Luis; Fernandez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an open platform to support the development and deployment of healthcare services at home using the TV as the main gateway. Unlike previous systems based on proprietary and closed solutions, our proposal is completely open allowing the easy integration of new services or the integration with external platforms. This is possible thanks to the use of a PC-based Set Top Box called Home Theater Personal (HTPC) that can be easily connected to the TV and Internet. This solution is not tight to particular Software and Hardware providers. It allows an easy integration of different telemedicine devices through Bluetooth and USB standard protocols. Additionally, any software developer/provider can include new services and healthcare modules through a simple to use add/on platform.

  15. [Return of the sick at home: importance of the level of dependency and family support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Pinto Elsa Maria Esteves; Martins, Rosa Maria Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Although aging is not synonymous with illness and dependency, the process enhances the progressive limitation of the capabilities of the individual to meet daily living activities with autonomy, leading to greater need for informal and / or formal support. To identify the functional independence of the participants and their relation to the socio demographic, clinical, housing and social support variables;to assess the difficulties of informal caregivers in care when returning home. We opted for a triangulated methodology (quantitative and qualitative) following a descriptive-correlational path, using for this purpose a non-probabilistic sample of convenience consisting of 50 patients admitted in the Centro Hospitalar Tondela - Viseu, EPE, and their informal caregivers. The measuring instruments used were the Barthel Index and a semi-structured interview. The participants are mostly male, with an average age of 73.7 years, married, residing in rural areas. Their qualifications are the 1st cycle of basic education (four years of Primary School) and have a predominance of cerebrovascular diseases. They show moderate dependence at discharge, preferably returning to their own home. Functional independence is significantly influenced by age, educational attainment, place of residence after admission, housing adaptation and formal support. The informal caregiveris mainly the female spouse and daughters, presenting as main difficulties, employment, lack of support andtechnical assistance, the existence of architectural barriers and caregiver overload. The inexistent of the caregiver's profile, their absence or inability to care was predictive of institutionalization.

  16. Nursing diagnoses in patients having mechanical ventilation support in a respiratory intensive care unit in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Şebnem Çinar; Eşer, Ismet; Güler, Elem Kocaçal; Khorshid, Leyla

    2011-10-01

    This research was carried out to find out the nursing diagnoses in patients who have mechanical ventilation support in a respiratory intensive care unit. The study was conducted with 51 evaluations of critically ill adult patients who underwent invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation therapy in 2008. Data collection was based on Gordon's 11 Functional Health Patterns, and nursing diagnoses were determined according to North American Nursing Diagnosis Association-International (NANDA-I) Taxonomy II. The nursing diagnoses were determined by two researchers separately. The consistency between the nursing diagnoses defined by the two researchers was evaluated by using Cohen's kappa (κ). Forty men (78.4%) and 11 women (21.6%) whose mean ages were 70.19 (SD = 8.96) years were included in the study. Nineteen subgroups of nursing diagnoses about safety/protection domain, and 15 subgroups about activity/rest domain were seen at different rates in the patients. There was a statistically significant difference between mechanical ventilation via tracheostomy or endotracheal tube and decreased cardiac output (d.f. = 1, χ(2) = 4.760, P = 0.029). The relationship between the length of time under mechanical ventilation and impaired physical mobility was considerably significant (d.f. = 3, χ(2) = 24.459, P = 0.000). It was found out that there was a high degree of agreement (96.8%) between the nursing diagnoses defined by the two researchers separately (κ = 0.936, SE = 0.08). © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Kreinfeldt Skovgaard Møller, Tina; Boll Hansen, Eigil; Keiding, Hans

    2014-08-28

    Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss or poor nutrition. Hence a structured and multidisciplinary approach, focusing on the nutritional risk factors and involving e.g. dieticians, occupational therapists, and physiotherapist, may be necessary to achieve benefits. Up till now a few studies have been done evaluating the cost-effectiveness of nutritional support among undernourished older adults and none of these have used such a multidisciplinary approach. An 11 week cluster randomized trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care, identified by screening with the Eating validation Scheme. Before start of the study there will be performed a train-the-trainer intervention involving educated nutrition coordinators.In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy will receive multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus will be on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified by screening, by involving physiotherapist, registered dietician, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system.The primary outcome parameter will be change in quality of life (by means of Euroquol-5D-3L). Secondary outcomes will be: physical performance (chair stand), nutritional status (weight, Body Mass Index and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (for participants from home-care), use of social services and mortality.An economic evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary

  18. Using Robots at Home to Support Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Garrett, Jeff; Jepsen, Nicola; Li Ogilvie, Vickie; Ahn, Ho Seok; Robinson, Hayley; Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Rouse, Paul; Pillai, Avinesh; MacDonald, Bruce

    2018-02-13

    Socially assistive robots are being developed for patients to help manage chronic health conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adherence to medication and availability of rehabilitation are suboptimal in this patient group, which increases the risk of hospitalization. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a robot delivering telehealth care to increase adherence to medication and home rehabilitation, improve quality of life, and reduce hospital readmission compared with a standard care control group. At discharge from hospital for a COPD admission, 60 patients were randomized to receive a robot at home for 4 months or to a control group. Number of hospitalization days for respiratory admissions over the 4-month study period was the primary outcome. Medication adherence, frequency of rehabilitation exercise, and quality of life were also assessed. Implementation interviews as well as benefit-cost analysis were conducted. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analyses showed no significant differences in the number of respiratory-related hospitalizations between groups. The intervention group was more adherent to their long-acting inhalers (mean number of prescribed puffs taken per day=48.5%) than the control group (mean 29.5%, P=.03, d=0.68) assessed via electronic recording. Self-reported adherence was also higher in the intervention group after controlling for covariates (P=.04). The intervention group increased their rehabilitation exercise frequency compared with the control group (mean difference -4.53, 95% CI -7.16 to -1.92). There were no significant differences in quality of life. Of the 25 patients who had the robot, 19 had favorable attitudes. This pilot study suggests that a homecare robot can improve adherence to medication and increase exercise. Further research is needed with a larger sample size to further investigate effects on hospitalizations after improvements are made to the robots. The robots could be

  19. Parents' Responses to a Kindergarten-Classroom Lending-Library Component Designed to Support Shared Reading at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Lori E.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Yu, SeonYeong; Favazza, Paddy C.; Mouzourou, Chryso; van Luling, Lisa; Park, Hyejin

    2016-01-01

    Teachers often recommend that families engage their children in shared book reading to support literacy learning at home. When teachers purposefully provide families with home literacy activities there are benefits for everyone involved. The purpose of this article is to report the findings of a study that examined parental participation and…

  20. Walk-in homes for people living with cancer and their family members: A new Dutch communication and support approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Visser; R. den Hollander; A. van den Brom

    2015-01-01

    Dutch walk-in homes are a meeting place for people suffering from cancer and for their loved ones. A study was performed in order to assess to what extent the offered complementary activities and the psycho-social support in these houses are, as well as whether or not these homes are present,

  1. Influences of Duration of Inspiratory Effort, Respiratory Mechanics, and Ventilator Type on Asynchrony With Pressure Support and Proportional Assist Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Renata S; Sales, Raquel P; Melo, Luíz H de P; Marinho, Liégina S; Bastos, Vasco Pd; Nogueira, Andréa da Nc; Ferreira, Juliana C; Holanda, Marcelo A

    2017-05-01

    Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is often associated with patient-ventilator asynchrony. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) offers inspiratory assistance proportional to patient effort, minimizing patient-ventilator asynchrony. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of respiratory mechanics and patient effort on patient-ventilator asynchrony during PSV and PAV plus (PAV+). We used a mechanical lung simulator and studied 3 respiratory mechanics profiles (normal, obstructive, and restrictive), with variations in the duration of inspiratory effort: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 s. The Auto-Trak system was studied in ventilators when available. Outcome measures included inspiratory trigger delay, expiratory trigger asynchrony, and tidal volume (VT). Inspiratory trigger delay was greater in the obstructive respiratory mechanics profile and greatest with a effort of 2.0 s (160 ms); cycling asynchrony, particularly delayed cycling, was common in the obstructive profile, whereas the restrictive profile was associated with premature cycling. In comparison with PSV, PAV+ improved patient-ventilator synchrony, with a shorter triggering delay (28 ms vs 116 ms) and no cycling asynchrony in the restrictive profile. VT was lower with PAV+ than with PSV (630 mL vs 837 mL), as it was with the single-limb circuit ventilator (570 mL vs 837 mL). PAV+ mode was associated with longer cycling delays than were the other ventilation modes, especially for the obstructive profile and higher effort values. Auto-Trak eliminated automatic triggering. Mechanical ventilation asynchrony was influenced by effort, respiratory mechanics, ventilator type, and ventilation mode. In PSV mode, delayed cycling was associated with shorter effort in obstructive respiratory mechanics profiles, whereas premature cycling was more common with longer effort and a restrictive profile. PAV+ prevented premature cycling but not delayed cycling, especially in obstructive respiratory mechanics profiles

  2. Treating Dehydration at Home Avoids Healthcare Costs Associated With Emergency Department Visits and Hospital Readmissions for Adult Patients Receiving Home Parenteral Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Denise; Roberts, Scott; Corrigan, Mandy L; Hamilton, Cindy; Steiger, Ezra; Kirby, Donald F

    2017-06-01

    Administration of home parenteral support (HPS) has proven to be cost-effective over hospital care. Avoiding hospital readmissions became more of a focus for healthcare institutions in 2012 with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. In 2010, our service developed a protocol to treat dehydration at home for HPS patients by ordering additional intravenous fluids to be kept on hand and to focus patient education on the symptoms of dehydration. A retrospective analysis was completed through a clinical management database to identify HPS patients with dehydration. The hospital finance department and homecare pharmacy were utilized to determine potential cost avoidance. In 2009, 64 episodes (77%) of dehydration were successfully treated at home versus 6 emergency department (ED) visits (7.5%) and 13 readmissions (15.5%). In 2010, we successfully treated 170 episodes (84.5%) at home, with 9 episodes (4.5%) requiring ED visits and 22 hospital readmissions (11%). The number of dehydration episodes per patient was significantly higher in 2010 ( P home in 2010 versus 2009. Our protocol helped educate and provide the resources required to resolve dehydration at home when early signs were recognized. By reducing ED visits and hospital readmissions, healthcare costs were avoided by a factor of 29 when home treatment was successful.

  3. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in Trauma Versus Nontrauma Patients with Noninfectious Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Soo; Ha, Sang Ook; Han, Sang Jin; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Ki-Suck; Park, Sunghoon

    2017-05-01

    The utility of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) of noninfectious origin remains unclear. Data on patients with ARDS of noninfectious origin who underwent ECMO were reviewed retrospectively. We compared the pre-ECMO characteristics and hospital outcomes of patients with traumatic and nontraumatic ARDS. In total, 23 patients (trauma, n = 9; nontrauma, n = 14) were included in the study. The mean patient age was 42 years, there were three females, and the mean pre-ECMO Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (SAPS) II was 60.0 (49.0-71.0). The hemoglobin level was lower and the prothrombin time (PT) more prolonged, prior to initiation of ECMO, in traumatic compared with nontraumatic ARDS patients. During the first 48 h of ECMO support, the coagulation parameters did not differ between the two groups, but the platelet counts, PT, and activated partial thromboplastin time indicated that coagulopathy was developing in all patients. The hospital and 28-day mortality rates were 21.7 and 13.0%, respectively, and serious neurological outcomes (cerebral performance category [CPC] of three points or more) developed in 26.1% of all patients; however, the extent of such outcomes did not differ between traumatic and nontraumatic ARDS patients. Upon multivariate analysis, the pre-ECMO SAPS II tended to be associated with composite events (i.e., hospital death and/or a CPC of three points or more) (P = 0.051). Additionally, a history of hypertension and an elevated pre-ECMO SAPS II were significant risk factors for serious neurological outcomes among hospital survivors (n = 18). In conclusion, ECMO support can be associated with favorable outcomes in patients with ARDS of noninfectious origin, irrespective of whether the ARDS is associated with trauma. The pre-ECMO SAPS II and a history of hypertension may be independent risk factors for poor outcomes. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and

  4. Home enteral nutrition NICE guidelines and nutrition support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2010-03-01

    The Home Enteral Nutrition team provides support to patients who are being fed via enteral feeding tube in the community. The use of the recently developed policy in combination with the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline on nutrition support will change the way care is provided to patients and enhance service delivery. However, there are difficulties in the implementation of policies and guidelines which often militate against the delivery of high standard of care. This paper was an attempt to apply the Kotter's eight-step change management model in the implementation of the HEN team policy and NICE guideline on nutrition support through training of district nurses, liaison with colleagues and carrying out a clinical audit. The clinical audit was aimed at institutionalizing the new approach for the delivery of quality care. The Kotter's model recognized the urgency needed and it enabled the building of coalitions that is essential in meeting the desired standard in today's NHS.

  5. The use of supportive communication when responding to older people's emotional distress in home care - An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Responding to older people's distress by acknowledging or encouraging further discussion of emotions is central to supportive, person-centred communication, and may enhance home care outcomes and thereby promote healthy aging. This observational study describes nursing staff's responses

  6. Peer supporter experiences of home visits for people with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Han Ju Lee,1 Linda Moneyham,2 Hee Sun Kang,3 Kyung Sun Kim41Department of Nursing, Sangmyung University, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea; 2School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 3Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea; 4Gyeonggi Branch, Korean Alliance to Defeat AIDS, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do, South KoreaPurpose: This study's purpose was to explore the experiences of peer supporters regarding their work in a home visit program for people with HIV infection.Patients and methods: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted using focus groups. Participants were 12 HIV-positive peer supporters conducting home visits with people living with HIV/AIDS in South Korea. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.Results: Six major themes emerged: feeling a sense of belonging; concern about financial support; facing HIV-related stigma and fear of disclosure; reaching out and acting as a bridge of hope; feeling burnout; and need for quality education. The study findings indicate that although peer supporters experience several positive aspects in the role, such as feelings of belonging, they also experience issues that make it difficult to be successful in the role, including the position's instability, work-related stress, and concerns about the quality of their continuing education.Conclusion: The findings suggest that to maintain a stable and effective peer supporter program, such positions require financial support, training in how to prevent and manage stress associated with the role, and a well-developed program of education and training.Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, qualitative research, workplace experience

  7. Derivation and validation of the Personal Support Algorithm: an evidence-based framework to inform allocation of personal support services in home and community care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ling Joanna Sinn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personal support services enable many individuals to stay in their homes, but there are no standard ways to classify need for functional support in home and community care settings. The goal of this project was to develop an evidence-based clinical tool to inform service planning while allowing for flexibility in care coordinator judgment in response to patient and family circumstances. Methods The sample included 128,169 Ontario home care patients assessed in 2013 and 25,800 Ontario community support clients assessed between 2014 and 2016. Independent variables were drawn from the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care and interRAI Community Health Assessment that are standardised, comprehensive, and fully compatible clinical assessments. Clinical expertise and regression analyses identified candidate variables that were entered into decision tree models. The primary dependent variable was the weekly hours of personal support calculated based on the record of billed services. Results The Personal Support Algorithm classified need for personal support into six groups with a 32-fold difference in average billed hours of personal support services between the highest and lowest group. The algorithm explained 30.8% of the variability in billed personal support services. Care coordinators and managers reported that the guidelines based on the algorithm classification were consistent with their clinical judgment and current practice. Conclusions The Personal Support Algorithm provides a structured yet flexible decision-support framework that may facilitate a more transparent and equitable approach to the allocation of personal support services.

  8. Derivation and validation of the Personal Support Algorithm: an evidence-based framework to inform allocation of personal support services in home and community care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Chi-Ling Joanna; Jones, Aaron; McMullan, Janet Legge; Ackerman, Nancy; Curtin-Telegdi, Nancy; Eckel, Leslie; Hirdes, John P

    2017-11-25

    Personal support services enable many individuals to stay in their homes, but there are no standard ways to classify need for functional support in home and community care settings. The goal of this project was to develop an evidence-based clinical tool to inform service planning while allowing for flexibility in care coordinator judgment in response to patient and family circumstances. The sample included 128,169 Ontario home care patients assessed in 2013 and 25,800 Ontario community support clients assessed between 2014 and 2016. Independent variables were drawn from the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care and interRAI Community Health Assessment that are standardised, comprehensive, and fully compatible clinical assessments. Clinical expertise and regression analyses identified candidate variables that were entered into decision tree models. The primary dependent variable was the weekly hours of personal support calculated based on the record of billed services. The Personal Support Algorithm classified need for personal support into six groups with a 32-fold difference in average billed hours of personal support services between the highest and lowest group. The algorithm explained 30.8% of the variability in billed personal support services. Care coordinators and managers reported that the guidelines based on the algorithm classification were consistent with their clinical judgment and current practice. The Personal Support Algorithm provides a structured yet flexible decision-support framework that may facilitate a more transparent and equitable approach to the allocation of personal support services.

  9. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies and Severe Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Sun Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Administering extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO to critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome has substantially increased over the last decade, however administering ECMO to patients with hematologic malignancies may carry a particularly high risk. Here, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO at the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary referral hospital between March 2010 and April 2015. Results: A total of 15 patients (9 men; median age 45 years with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure received ECMO therapy during the study period. The median values of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Murray Lung Injury Score, and Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction Score were 29, 3.3, and -2, respectively. Seven patients received venovenous ECMO, whereas 8 patients received venoarterial ECMO. The median ECMO duration was 2 days. Successful weaning of ECMO was achieved in 3 patients. Hemorrhage complications developed in 4 patients (1 pulmonary hemorrhage, 1 intracranial hemorrhage, and 2 cases of gastrointestinal bleeding. The longest period of patient survival was 59 days after ECMO initiation. No significant differences in survival were noted between venovenous and venoarterial ECMO groups (10.0 vs. 10.5 days; p = 0.56. Conclusions: Patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure demonstrate poor outcomes after ECMO treatment. Careful and appropriate selection of candidates for ECMO in these patients is necessary.

  10. A personalised mobile-based home monitoring system for heart failure: The SUPPORT-HF Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Velardo, Carmelo; Chantler, Tracey; Shah, Syed Ahmar; Paton, Chris; Khorshidi, Reza; Tarassenko, Lionel; Rahimi, Kazem

    2015-10-01

    Despite their potential for improving health outcomes, mobile-based home monitoring systems for heart failure have not yet been taken up widely by the patients and providers. To design and iteratively move towards a personalised mobile health monitoring system for patients living with heart failure, according to their health care and usability needs. We present an iterative approach to refining a remote health monitoring system that is based on interactions between different actors (patients, clinicians, social scientists and engineers) and supports the collection of quantitative and qualitative information about user experience and engagement. Patients were provided with tablet computers and commercially available sensing devices (a blood pressure monitor, a set of weighing scales, and a pulse oximeter) in order to complete physiological measurements at home, answer symptom-specific questionnaires, review their personal readings, view educational material on heart failure self-management, and communicate with their health professionals. The system supported unobtrusive remote software upgrades via an application distribution channel and the activation or deactivation of functional components by health professionals during run-time operation. We report early findings from the application of this approach in a cohort of 26 heart failure patients (mean age 72±15 years), their caregivers and healthcare professionals who participated in the SUPPORT-HF (Seamless User-centred Proactive Provision Of Risk-stratified Treatment for Heart Failure) study over a one-year study period (mean patient follow-up duration=270±62 days). The approach employed in this study led to several system upgrades dealing in particular with patient requirements for better communication with the development team and personalised self-monitoring interfaces. Engagement with the system was constantly high throughout the study and during the last week of the evaluation, 23 patients (88%) used the

  11. Early extracorporeal life support as rescue for Wegener granulomatosis with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Mark; Charles, Anthony G

    2011-12-01

    The study's objective was to report a case and review the literature on the use of extracorporeal life support in the face of severe pulmonary hemorrhage for acute respiratory distress syndrome. This study is a single case report of a pediatric patient who was successfully managed on venovenous extracorporeal life support for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with acute pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to Wegener disease. Extracorporeal life support can be used successfully in selected patients with respiratory failure with pulmonary hemorrhage. The cautious use of anticoagulation should be balanced with the risk of bleeding, mindful of the need for other measures to mitigate severe bleeding if this should occur.

  12. Nursing people at home is a special skill that requires support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Rosemary

    2012-02-01

    Nursing people at home has always been a special skill. It is very different from nursing people in hospital beds, or in clinical type settings outside of hospital, such as GP surgeries and health centres. The real point at which care changes fundamentally is when it crosses the patient's doorstep. To provide high quality nursing care to people in their own homes requires particular skills, knowledge and approaches - and the development of these has been seriously neglected in recent years. These are the basic tenets of the new report from the Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI) (2011), which was launched at the House of Lords in November 2011. The evidence for the report was gathered throughout the first year of the QNI's Right Nurse, Right Skills campaign, which was supported by BJCN. As part of the campaign, both nurses and members of the public were invited to leave stories and comments on a special webpage, and hundreds of people did so. The nurses talked about the replacement of registered nurses with health-care assistants, and the influx of inexperienced nurses who were not given the support they needed to develop community skills. Patients and carers spoke of their experiences of care - most of the time, these were good or excellent. However, too often, care was delivered by nurses or assistants who lacked the right skills to prevent harm or deliver care properly. The results were sometimes discomfort, sometimes unnecessary suffering, and occasionally very serious.

  13. Strategies to support spirituality in health care communication: a home hospice cancer caregiver case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reblin, Maija; Otis-Green, Shirley; Ellington, Lee; Clayton, Margaret F

    2014-12-01

    Although there is growing recognition of the importance of integrating spirituality within health care, there is little evidence to guide clinicians in how to best communicate with patients and family about their spiritual or existential concerns. Using an audio-recorded home hospice nurse visit immediately following the death of a patient as a case-study, we identify spiritually-sensitive communication strategies. The nurse incorporates spirituality in her support of the family by 1) creating space to allow for the expression of emotions and spiritual beliefs and 2) encouraging meaning-based coping, including emphasizing the caregivers' strengths and reframing negative experiences. Hospice provides an excellent venue for modeling successful examples of spiritual communication. Health care professionals can learn these techniques to support patients and families in their own holistic practice. All health care professionals benefit from proficiency in spiritual communication skills. Attention to spiritual concerns ultimately improves care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Effectiveness and experiences of families and support workers participating in peer-led parenting support programs delivered as home visiting programs: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Ailsa; Watts, Robin; Hegney, Desley; Walker, Roz

    2016-10-01

    Designing child and family health services to meet the diverse needs of contemporary families is intended to minimize impacts of early disadvantage and subsequent lifelong health and social issues. Innovative programs to engage families with child and family support services have led to interest in the potential value of peer-led home visiting from parents in local communities. There is a range of benefits and challenges identified in a limited number of studies associated with home visiting peer support. The objective of the review is to identify: INCLUSION CRITERIA PARTICIPANTS: Families/parents with one or more children aged zero to four years, peer support workers and their supervisors. Peer-led home visiting parenting support programs that use volunteer or paraprofessional home visitors from the local community compared to standard community maternal-child care. The phenomenon of interest will be the relationships between participants in the program. Quantitative studies: randomized control trials (RCTs). Qualitative studies: grounded theory and qualitative descriptive studies. Parental attitudes and beliefs, coping skills and confidence in parenting, parental stress, compliance with child health checks/links with primary healthcare services, satisfaction with peer support and services and the nature of the relationship between parents and home visitors. The search strategy will include both published and unpublished studies. Seven journal databases and five other sources will be searched. Only studies published in the English language from 2000 to 2015 will be considered. Studies were assessed by two independent reviewers using standardized critical appraisal tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) and the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI) as appropriate. Both quantitative and qualitative data were independently extracted by two reviewers

  15. Home-based Self-care: Understanding and Designing Pervasive Technology to Support Care Management Work at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    management and preventive self-monitoring to further study people’s perspectives on self-care both for health and illness. Second, we combine our initial studies with three additional studies of self-care practices: self-monitoring of pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and heart patients as well as home...

  16. Comparison of automated and static pulse respiratory mechanics during supported ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh R; Taylor, Susan; Bersten, Andrew D

    2012-06-01

    To compare respiratory mechanics estimated by the (pulse) technique in spontaneously breathing patients during proportional assist ventilation (PAV) with load-adjustable gain factor (PAV+) mode with those measured using the flow-interruption technique during controlled ventilation. Observational study of 21 haemodynamically stable post-cardiac surgery patients with routine weaning from mechanical ventilation (Puritan-Bennett 840 ventilator) in the intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Bland-Altman and linear correlation of respiratory system compliance and inspiratory resistance estimated during PAV+ (C(pulse) and R(pulse)) with that measured during controlled mechanical ventilation (C(int) and Rint). C(pulse) overestimated C(int) (67.4 [SD, 27.7] v 51.6 [SD, 9.7] mL/cmH(2)O; P = 0.02), although the correlation between C(int) and C(pulse) was strong. Using the Bland-Altman method, the bias and limits of agreement were outside a clinically useful range. R(pulse) underestimated Rint (9.3 [SD, 3.0] v 11.5 [SD, 3.0] cmH(2)O/L/s; P = 0.02), with a weak positive correlation. Although the bias calculated by the Bland-Altman method was small, the limits of agreement were too large to be clinically useful. Based on these data, respiratory mechanics estimated from the (pulse) technique are too inaccurate to be clinically useful.

  17. Economic evaluation of the differential benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; So, Ching; Chau, June; Law, Antony Kwan Pui; Tam, Stanley Ku Fu; McGhee, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    home visits and telephone calls are two often used approaches in transitional care, but their differential economic effects are unknown. to examine the differential economic benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support. cost-effectiveness analysis conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial (RCT). patients discharged from medical units randomly assigned to control (control, N = 210), home visits with calls (home, N = 196) and calls only (call, N = 204). cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted from the societal perspective comparing monetary benefits and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. the home arm was less costly but less effective at 28 days and was dominating (less costly and more effective) at 84 days. The call arm was dominating at both 28 and 84 days. The incremental QALY for the home arm was -0.0002/0.0008 (28/84 days), and the call arm was 0.0022/0.0104 (28/84 days). When the three groups were compared, the call arm had a higher probability being cost-effective at 84 days but not at 28 days (home: 53%, call: 35% (28 days) versus home: 22%, call: 73% (84 days)) measuring against the NICE threshold of £20,000. the original RCT showed that the bundled intervention involving home visits and calls was more effective than calls only in the reduction of hospital readmissions. This study adds a cost perspective to inform policymakers that both home visits and calls only are cost-effective for transitional care support, but calls only have a higher chance of being cost-effective for a sustained period after intervention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  18. Home-based upper extremity rehabilitation support using a contactless ultrasonic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Henry; Biswas, Subir

    2017-07-01

    Home-based rehabilitation protocols have been shown to improve outcomes amongst individuals with limited upper-extremity (UE) functionality. While approaches employing both video conferencing technologies and gaming platforms have been successfully demonstrated for such applications, concerns regarding patient privacy and technological complexity may limit further adoption. As an alternative solution for assessing adherence to prescribed UE rehabilitation protocols, the Echolocation Activity Detector, a linear array of first-reflection ultrasonic distance sensors, is proposed herein. To demonstrate its utility for home-based rehabilitation, a controlled experiment exploring the ability of the system to distinguish between various parameters of UE motion, including motion plane, range, and speed, was conducted for five participants. Activity classification is accomplished using a quadratic support vector machine classifier using time-domain features which exploit the known geometric relationships between the patient and the device, along with the ideal kinematics of the activities of interest. Average classification accuracy for the five classes of UE motion considered herein exceeds 91%.

  19. An evaluation of a specialist multiagency home support service for older people with dementia using qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothera, Ian; Jones, Rob; Harwood, Rowan; Avery, Anthony J; Fisher, Kate; James, Veronica; Shaw, Ian; Waite, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Standard home care support for people with dementia has been criticised in statutory inspection reports, and may lead to unnecessary crises, hospital or care home admissions. To establish whether a specialist multiagency home care service for older people with dementia delivered better quality care than standard services, and how any improvements were achieved. Qualitative study, using semi-structured interviews, focus groups and small group interviews. Two demographically similar areas in Nottingham, one served by a specialist home care team, the other by standard services. Twenty-seven service users, 18 family carers, 17 home care workers, 20 health/social care professionals, across both services. The specialist service demonstrated greater flexibility and responsiveness to the particular needs and circumstances of service users and family carers, who were encouraged to participate in routine decision-making and activities. By sharing responsibilities, the specialist service helped reduce carer stress and prevent crises. These outcomes depended on the configuration of the service, including multidisciplinary health and social services input, careworker autonomy and independence, continuous reassessment of clients' circumstances and preferences and the capacity to develop long-term relationships, through careworker continuity. The standard service, which used a task-orientated approach, lacked these characteristics. This study provides evidence of the benefits of a specialist multiagency home support service over standard home care, in the opinion of service users, carers and careworkers, and defines the operational model that achieves this. Findings confirm best practice recommendations, based on models of dementia care which emphasise respect for 'personhood'.

  20. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  1. Support System of Health Professionals as Observed in the Project of Home Care For the Child With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronseth, Evangeline; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Data acquired in personal interviews administered to physicians and nurses who participated in the first year of the Home Care for the Child with Cancer project provided descriptions of individual sources of social support. The results reveal a range of supportive mechanisms and networks within varied institutional contexts. (Author)

  2. Determinants of the intention for using a lumbar support among home care workers with recurrent low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, P.D.D.M.; Poppel, M.N.M. van; Bierma - Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    In most effectiveness studies on lumbar supports for patients with low back pain, insufficient data are reported about adherence. In a secondary preventive RCT, we found beneficial effects and a good adherence among home care workers with low back pain. To target the use of lumbar supports on those

  3. [Analyses of the activities of home care supporting clinics in Tokyo from the standpoint of place of death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Chihiro; Hanabusa, Hiroo; Akiyama, Akiko

    2013-12-01

    We examined the activities of home care supporting clinics (HCSC) in Tokyo, Japan, from the standpoint of the place of death. The number of HCSCs in Tokyo was 1,246 in 2010. Fifteen HCSCs cared for > or = 50 patients who died at home in a year. In contrast, the 19 HCSCs in the top 10 percentile for the number of patients (> or = 176) did not have any patients who died at home. Their patients died at hospitals or facilities. These results suggest that the activities of HCSCs in Tokyo are diverse.

  4. Knowledge engineering as a support for building an actor profile ontology for integrating Home-Care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Karina; Valls, Aida; Riaño, David

    2008-01-01

    One of the tasks towards the definition of a knowledge model for home care is the definition of the different roles of the users involved in the system. The roles determine the actions and services that can or must be performed by each type of user. In this paper the experience of building an ontology to represent the home-care users and their associated information is presented, in a proposal for a standard model of a Home-Care support system to the European Community.

  5. Automated Rotational Percussion Bed and Bronchoscopy Improves Respiratory Mechanics and Oxygenation in ARDS Patients Supported with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nirmal S; Wille, Keith M; Bellot, S Christopher; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used to provide "lung rest" through the use of low tidal volume (6 ml/kg) and ultralow tidal volume (respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Low and ultralow tidal volume ventilation can result in low dynamic respiratory compliance and potentially increased retention of airway secretions. We present our experience using automated rotational percussion beds (ARPBs) and bronchoscopy in four ARDS patients to manage increased pulmonary secretions. These beds performed automated side-to-side tilt maneuver and intermittent chest wall percussion. Their use resulted in substantial reduction in peak and plateau pressures in two patients on volume control ventilation, while the driving pressures (inspiratory pressure) to attain the desired tidal volumes in patients on pressure control ventilation also decreased. In addition, mean partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio (109 pre-ARPB vs. 157 post-ARPB), positive end-expiratory pressure (10 cm H2O vs. 8 cm H2O), and FiO2 (0.88 vs. 0.52) improved after initiation of ARPB. The improvements in the respiratory mechanics and oxygenation helped us to initiate early ECMO weaning. Based on our experience, the use of chest physiotherapy, frequent body repositioning, and bronchoscopy may be helpful in the management of pulmonary secretions in patients supported with ECMO.

  6. Learning, support and communication for staff in care homes: outcomes of reflective debriefing groups in two care homes to enhance end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, Jo

    2014-06-01

    Nursing care homes are increasingly the place where frail older people die. However, training in end-of-life care is not statutory. To develop strategies to promote quality end-of-life care in nursing care homes. Action research was used to work collaboratively with the managers and staff in two nursing care homes to develop end-of-life care. There were three overarching phases: an exploratory phase, feedback/planning of actions and a summative evaluation. Two main actions were inductively derived. One of the actions, reflective debriefing groups following a resident's death, is reported. Ten reflective debriefing groups, led by the researcher (a specialist palliative care nurse), were undertaken. The groups facilitated learning at three different levels (being taught, developing understanding and critical thinking) and enabled staff to feel supported and valued. The use of reflective debriefing groups is a useful mechanism to support experience-based learning about death/dying in care homes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Incorporating INTERACT II Clinical Decision Support Tools into Nursing Home Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Steven M.; Sharkey, Siobhan S.; Hudak, Sandra; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    A substantial reduction in hospitalization rates has been associated with the implementation of the Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) quality improvement intervention using the accompanying paper-based clinical practice tools (INTERACT II). There is significant potential to further increase the impact of INTERACT by integrating INTERACT II tools into nursing home (NH) health information technology (HIT) via standalone or integrated clinical decision support (CDS) systems. This article highlights the process of translating INTERACT II tools from paper to NH HIT. The authors believe that widespread dissemination and integration of INTERACT II CDS tools into various NH HIT products could lead to sustainable improvement in resident and clinician process and outcome measures, including enhanced interclinician communication and a reduction in potentially avoidable hospitalizations. PMID:22267955

  8. Telemedicine support to patients with chronic diseases for better long-term control at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Rudel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Authors in many scientific publications suggest that the telemonitoring of health parameters is a useful tool for supporting patients with long-term conditions staying at home and their self-management of the disease. Those patients are likely to benefit from timely and adequate response to deteriorated conditions detected by the telemedicine system. Almost all of the studies state that telemedicine provided as telemonitoring can be an effective add-on tool in the hands of patients and medical experts for the self-management of patients with, for example, heart failure or diabetes. In this paper the principles of patient telemonitoring are presented as applied within a telemedicine service provided by the Centre for Telehealth (CEZAR at the General Hospital Slovenj Gradec (Slovenia. The centre supports patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and/or with chronic congestive heart failure. The service was set-up in 2014 as part of a European project called UNITED4HEALTH. Since then over 550 patients from the Carinthia and Saleška regions (Slovenia have been receiving telemedicine support for more than two years. The clinical outcomes of the telemedicine service published elsewhere prove that the selected telemedicine service model is adequate and the implemented technological solution is acceptable for all service users: the patients and the clinicians.

  9. A Semantic Approach with Decision Support for Safety Service in Smart Home Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoci; Yi, Jianjun; Zhu, Xiaomin; Chen, Shaoli

    2016-08-03

    Research on smart homes (SHs) has increased significantly in recent years because of the convenience provided by having an assisted living environment. The functions of SHs as mentioned in previous studies, particularly safety services, are seldom discussed or mentioned. Thus, this study proposes a semantic approach with decision support for safety service in SH management. The focus of this contribution is to explore a context awareness and reasoning approach for risk recognition in SH that enables the proper decision support for flexible safety service provision. The framework of SH based on a wireless sensor network is described from the perspective of neighbourhood management. This approach is based on the integration of semantic knowledge in which a reasoner can make decisions about risk recognition and safety service. We present a management ontology for a SH and relevant monitoring contextual information, which considers its suitability in a pervasive computing environment and is service-oriented. We also propose a rule-based reasoning method to provide decision support through reasoning techniques and context-awareness. A system prototype is developed to evaluate the feasibility, time response and extendibility of the approach. The evaluation of our approach shows that it is more effective in daily risk event recognition. The decisions for service provision are shown to be accurate.

  10. Evaluation of a Decision Support System for Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Nonlinear Analysis of Respiratory Signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Kaimakamis

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is a common sleep disorder requiring the time/money consuming polysomnography for diagnosis. Alternative methods for initial evaluation are sought. Our aim was the prediction of Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI in patients potentially suffering from OSA based on nonlinear analysis of respiratory biosignals during sleep, a method that is related to the pathophysiology of the disorder.Patients referred to a Sleep Unit (135 underwent full polysomnography. Three nonlinear indices (Largest Lyapunov Exponent, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and Approximate Entropy extracted from two biosignals (airflow from a nasal cannula, thoracic movement and one linear derived from Oxygen saturation provided input to a data mining application with contemporary classification algorithms for the creation of predictive models for AHI.A linear regression model presented a correlation coefficient of 0.77 in predicting AHI. With a cutoff value of AHI = 8, the sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 71.4% in discrimination between patients and normal subjects. The decision tree for the discrimination between patients and normal had sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 60%, respectively. Certain obtained nonlinear values correlated significantly with commonly accepted physiological parameters of people suffering from OSA.We developed a predictive model for the presence/severity of OSA using a simple linear equation and additional decision trees with nonlinear features extracted from 3 respiratory recordings. The accuracy of the methodology is high and the findings provide insight to the underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome.Reliable predictions of OSA are possible using linear and nonlinear indices from only 3 respiratory signals during sleep. The proposed models could lead to a better study of the pathophysiology of OSA and facilitate initial evaluation/follow up of suspected patients OSA utilizing a practical low cost methodology

  11. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-05-23

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers' 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients' homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants' strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues' and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future.

  12. Social Support Is a Primary Influence on Home Fruit, 100% Juice, and Vegetable Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children tend to eat more fruit and vegetables when more are available in the home. We proposed and tested a model that predicts the availability at home (hereinafter termed "home availability") of fruit, 100% juice, and vegetables, using new measures of frequency of food shopping, purchase, and com...

  13. Maternal Involvement in the Home Literacy Environment: Supporting Literacy Skills in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesJardin, Jean L.; Ambrose, Sophie E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the home literacy environment in a group of mothers and their early-school-age children with cochlear implants (N = 16). The goals of this investigation are to (a) describe the characteristics of the home literacy environment and (b) study the relationships between home literacy factors and children's reading skills. Mothers…

  14. Patients' experiences of care and support at home after a family member's participation in an intervention during palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norinder, Maria; Goliath, Ida; Alvariza, Anette

    2017-06-01

    Patients who receive palliative home care are in need of support from family members, who take on great responsibility related to caregiving but who often feel unprepared for this task. Increasing numbers of interventions aimed at supporting family members in palliative care have been described and evaluated. It is not known whether and how these interventions actually affect the care or support provided to a patient, even though it has been suggested that family members would be likely to provide better care and support and thus allow for positive experiences for patients. However, this has not been studied from the perspective of the patients themselves. The objective of our study was to explore patients' experiences of care and support at home after family members' participation in a psychoeducational intervention during palliative care. Our study took a qualitative approach, and interviews were conducted with 11 patients whose family members had participated in a psychoeducational intervention during palliative home care. The interviews were analyzed employing interpretive description. Patients' experiences were represented by three themes: "safe at home," "facilitated and more honest communication," and "feeling like a unit of care." Patients felt that their needs were better met and that family members became more confident at home without risking their own health. Patients felt relieved when family members were given the opportunity to talk and reflect with others and hoped that the intervention would contribute to more honest communications between themselves and their family members. Further, it was of great importance to patients that family members receive attention from and be confirmed and supported by healthcare professionals. Our findings show how an intervention targeted at family members during palliative home care also benefits the patients.

  15. Policy Measures to Support Palliative Care at Home: A Cross-Country Case Comparison in Three European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetens, Arno; Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; Aubry, Régis; Radbruch, Lukas; Cohen, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    The proportion of people in need of palliative care worldwide is rising, and the majority wish to receive this care at home. Many countries have created policy measures to support palliative care at home. To list and compare existing policy measures designed to support palliative care at home in addition to available primary care services in Belgium, France, and Germany. A cross-country case comparison based on expert consultation, governmental policy documents, and relevant scientific literature. All three countries have policy measures that allow informal caregivers to adapt their working patterns or take leave of absence to provide care without losing employee rights; however, only Belgium offers specific paid palliative care leave. All three countries offer various allowances to people who are dying at home and their caregivers. Cost-reductions for out-of-pocket expenses are available, based on the level of care dependency in Germany and on prognosis in Belgium, but are not provided in France. Mobile home support teams exist in all three countries and are free of charge for patients and caregivers; but only in Belgium and Germany, there are specialist multidisciplinary palliative home care teams. Belgium and Germany provide respite care for palliative patients. European countries with similar contextual characteristics offer comparable policy measures to support palliative care at home in addition to the available primary care services. However, important differences exist in the criteria for access and the extent of what is offered. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Perceived needs for support among care home staff providing end of life care for people with dementia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrevala, T; Samsi, K; Rose, C; Adenrele, C; Barnes, C; Manthorpe, J

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current exploratory study was to investigate the impact on care home staff when working with people with dementia at the end of life and to explore how they cope with this aspect of their work. With UK policy encouraging death in the place of residence, rather than hospital, more people with dementia are dying in care homes. A qualitative approach was employed; 20 care home staff working in five English care homes were interviewed. Thematic Analysis was used to analyse the data. Care home staff found the external demands on them and difficulties associated with interacting with people with dementia sometimes challenging, stressful and anxiety-provoking, particularly as residents approached end of life. Emotional aspects of caring for dying residents were sometimes heightened by close attachments with residents and their families. Staff were able to recognise these unmet needs and identified a need for further training and emotional support to manage these stressors. This study revealed rich and complex understandings of the practice dimensions of caring for people with dementia at the end of life and the impact these have on staff. There is a need to develop effective psychosocial interventions that focus on emotional support for care home staff. There will be challenges in providing this in employment settings that are generally low paid, low status, have high turnover and are reliant on temporary or migrant staff, where training is not rewarded, mandatory or culturally valued. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Impact of clinical decision support on receipt of antibiotic prescriptions for acute bronchitis and upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, J Mac; Zimmerman, Frederick J; Rodriguez, Hector P

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are commonly recognized as non-indicated for acute bronchitis and upper respiratory tract infection (URI), yet their widespread use persists. Clinical decision support in the form of electronic warnings is hypothesized to prevent non-indicated prescriptions. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of clinical decision support on a common type of non-indicated prescription. Using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 2006 to 2010, ambulatory visits with a primary diagnosis of acute bronchitis or URI and orders for antibiotic prescriptions were identified. Visits were classified on the basis of clinician report of decision-support use. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the effect of decision support on likelihood of antibiotic prescription receipt, controlling for patient, provider, and practice characteristics. Clinician use of decision support increased sharply between 2006 (16% of visits) and 2010 (55%). Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis and URI increased from ∼35% of visits in 2006 to ∼45% by 2010. Use of decision support was associated with a 19% lower likelihood of receiving an antibiotic prescription, controlling for patient, provider, and practice characteristics. In spite of the increased use of decision-support systems and the relatively fewer non-indicated antibiotic prescriptions resulting from the use of decision support, a secular upward trend in non-indicated antibiotic prescribing offset these improvements. The overall effect of decision support suggests an important role for technology in reducing non-indicated prescriptions. Decision support alone may not be sufficient to eliminate non-indicated prescriptions given secular trends. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Partial ventilatory support modalities in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome-a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M McMullen

    Full Text Available The efficacy of partial ventilatory support modes that allow spontaneous breathing in patients with acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is unclear. The objective of this scoping review was to assess the effects of partial ventilatory support on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and both hospital and intensive care unit (ICU lengths of stay (LOS for patients with ALI and ARDS; the secondary objective was to describe physiologic effects on hemodynamics, respiratory system and other organ function.MEDLINE (1966-2009, Cochrane, and EmBase (1980-2009 databases were searched using common ventilator modes as keywords and reference lists from retrieved manuscripts hand searched for additional studies. Two researchers independently reviewed and graded the studies using a modified Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine grading system. Studies in adult ALI/ARDS patients were included for primary objectives and pre-clinical studies for supporting evidence.Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified, in addition to six prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study, one case control study, 41 clinical physiologic studies and 28 pre-clinical studies. No study was powered to assess mortality, one RCT showed shorter ICU length of stay, and the other demonstrated more ventilator free days. Beneficial effects of preserved spontaneous breathing were mainly physiological effects demonstrated as improvement of gas exchange, hemodynamics and non-pulmonary organ perfusion and function.The use of partial ventilatory support modalities is often feasible in patients with ALI/ARDS, and may be associated with short-term physiological benefits without appreciable impact on clinically important outcomes.

  19. Help is just a phone call away: after-hours support for palliative care patients wishing to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird-Bower, Debbie; Roach, Julie; Andrews, Morven; Onslow, Fiona; Curnin, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour support for palliative patients is the gold standard of health care in Australia. However, in the state of Tasmania after-hours telephone support was spatially fragmented and inequitable. In 2014, hospice@HOME, a pilot programme introduced in Tasmania in that year, implemented a state-wide after-hours palliative care support service--1800HOSPICE--offering 24-hour support, 7 days a week for palliative patients, caregivers and the public. Six months of after-hours call logs in combination with additional patient data, were analysed to evaluate the use and wider implications of a state-wide after-hours palliative care support number. Family and caregivers mainly used the after-hours support to request changes to support services (25.1%), report changes in patients' overall condition (23.6%) and request acute medical assistance (16.2%). Through the use of the after-hours services by all individuals involved in the care, end-of-life patients were able to reduce ambulance contact and emergency department admission, and thereby increase their likelihood of dying at home (for patients whose preference was to die at home). Overall, 24-hour palliative care telephone support was found to be a valuable tool for all individuals involved in the care of end-of-life patients.

  20. Home Away Home: Better Understanding of the Role of Social Support in Predicting Cross-Cultural Adjustment among International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yoko; Hosoda, Megumi

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined international students' adjustment problems, yet, these studies have not explored the mechanisms through which social support operates in the context of stressful events in predicting cross-cultural adjustment among international students. Using Barrera's (1988) models of social support, the present study…

  1. Supporting activity engagement by family carers at home: maintenance of agency and personhood in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pat Yin Fan; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; Coleman, Peter

    2017-12-01

    An explorative paper to describe how family carers, through the caregiving journey, reaffirm and promote the agency of people with dementia. Agency is an important concept in dementia care and is crucial to the promotion of wellbeing and the delivery of person-centred care. This article is based on one of the key findings of a study that explored family carers' experiences of engaging their relatives in daily activities in domestic settings. Following research governance and ethical approval, 30 in-depth interviews (initial and follow-up) were carried out with 15 resident-carers of people with dementia who were recruited via local community mental health teams. Then five focus groups were conducted with 21 participants accessed through carers support groups. Interviews and focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed using a grounded theory method. Findings showed the process in which family carers encouraged and sustained a sense of autonomy and control (agency) in their relative's daily activities. Key strategies used by carers included: being non-judgemental; facilitating a sense of worth; taking calculated risks; maintaining the continuity of their relative's identity; enhancing a sense of connection with their relative's role and identity using enjoyable activities; preventing inactivity and attending to the bodily source of the agency. Lack of support for carers could ultimately pose a risk to the maintenance of the agency of people with dementia. This study provides a deeper insight into the process used by home carers to support the agency of people with dementia. This is essential if practitioners are to identify and develop more realistic intervention strategies and to work in effective partnership with family carers. The implications for the creation of dementia-friendly communities are discussed.

  2. Supporting Heart Failure Patient Transitions From Acute to Community Care With Home Telemonitoring Technology: A Protocol for a Provincial Randomized Controlled Trial (TEC4Home).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-18

    Seniors with chronic diseases such as heart failure have complex care needs. They are vulnerable to their condition deteriorating and, without timely intervention, may require multiple emergency department visits and/or repeated hospitalizations. Upon discharge, the transition from the emergency department to home can be a vulnerable time for recovering patients with disruptions in the continuity of care. Remote monitoring of heart failure patients using home telemonitoring, coupled with clear communication protocols between health care professionals, can be effective in increasing the safety and quality of care for seniors with heart failure discharged from the emergency department. The aim of the Telehealth for Emergency-Community Continuity of Care Connectivity via Home Telemonitoring (TEC4Home) study is to generate evidence through a programmatic evaluation and a clinical trial to determine how home telemonitoring may improve care and increase patient safety during the transition of care and determine how it is best implemented to support patients with heart failure within this context. This 4-year project consists of 3 studies to comprehensively evaluate the outcomes and effectiveness of TEC4Home. Study 1 is a feasibility study with 90 patients recruited from 2 emergency department sites to test implementation and evaluation procedures. Findings from the feasibility study will be used to refine protocols for the larger trial. Study 2 is a cluster randomized controlled trial that will include 30 emergency department sites and 900 patients across British Columbia. The primary outcome of the randomized controlled trial will be emergency department revisits and hospital readmission rates. Secondary outcomes include health care resource utilization/costs, communication between members of the care team, and patient quality of life. Study 3 will run concurrently to study 2 and test the effectiveness of predictive analytic software to detect patient deterioration

  3. Effects of Web-Based Support on Early Head Start Home Visitors' Use of Evidence-Based Intervention Decision Making and Growth in Children's Expressive Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzhardt, Jay; Greenwood, Charles R.; Walker, Dale; Anderson, Rawni; Howard, Waylon; Carta, Judith J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated Early Head Start home visitors' use of evidence-based practices and the efficacy of a web-based system to support these practices. Home visitors learned to use 3 evidence-based practices: (a) frequent assessment of children's early communication for screening and progress monitoring, (b) 2 home-based language-promoting…

  4. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2014-01-01

    -care, identified by screening with the Eating validation Scheme. Before start of the study there will be performed a train-the-trainer intervention involving educated nutrition coordinators.In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy will receive...... in both the control and intervention groups, participants in the intervention group and the involved multidisciplinary team will be performed. CONCLUSION: In this study we will evaluate in a randomized controlled trial whether multidisciplinary nutritional support is cost-effective, in undernourished......BACKGROUND: Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss...

  5. Cross Cultural Differences in Managers’ Support for Home-based Telework: A Theoretical Elaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Pascale; Dulk, Laura den

    2003-01-01

    Home-based telework is one of the arrangements organizations can introduce to facilitate a better balance between employees’ professional and private lives. This article focuses on the question of under what conditions managers grant a subordinate’s request to telework and what role national cultures play herein. By looking into managers’ willingness to delegate power and to trust home-based teleworkers we try to explain the slow adoption of home-based telework and the reported differences ac...

  6. The use of supportive communication when responding to older people’s emotional distress in home care: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Responding to older people’s distress by acknowledging or encouraging further discussion of emotions is central to supportive, person-centred communication, and may enhance home care outcomes and thereby promote healthy aging. This observational study describes nursing staff’s responses

  7. Young People's Reading: The Importance of the Home Environment and Family Support. More Findings from Our National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christina; Hawkins, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents additional information from the 2009 survey of young people's reading and writing; for more information see the full report "Young People's Reading and Writing Today", to be published July 2010. This paper explores the types of resources young people have at home that support literacy and how this differs according to…

  8. Outcomes of Home-Support Consultation on the Maintenance of Bicycle-Riding Skills for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jennifer L.; Pitchford, E. Andrew; Hauck, Janet L.; Ketcheson, Leah R.; Ulrich, Dale A.

    2016-01-01

    Bicycle riding is a functional motor skill that increases physical activity opportunities, social interaction, and independence. However, bicycle riding is difficult for youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to learn. This study examined the effectiveness of home-support consultation (HSC) on increasing the maintenance of independent bicycle…

  9. A National Study of Community Living: Impact of Type of Residence and Hours of In-Home Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Rah Kyung; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of community participation and level of assistance needed to perform domestic and safety skills for individuals with severe disabilities who live successfully in the community, based on type of residence and hours of in-home support provided. Participants included residential specialists from small community…

  10. Determinants of the intention for using a lumbar support among home care workers with recurrent low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D.D.M. Roelofs; M.N. van Poppel (Mireille); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); W. van Mechelen (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn most effectiveness studies on lumbar supports for patients with low back pain, insufficient data are reported about adherence. In a secondary preventive RCT, we found beneficial effects and a good adherence among home care workers with low back pain. To target the use of lumbar

  11. Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Sandberg, Jonas; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth; Christiansen, Mats; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-07-01

    Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person's health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Inter-generational ties, financial transfers and home-ownership support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Clara H.; Smits, Annika W.M.

    Home-ownership is transmitted between generations. Parental gifts form one of the mechanisms through which the intergenerational transmission of home-ownership takes place. Using the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study, we investigated the influence of parental and children's resources and other

  13. Oral English Language Proficiency and Reading Mastery: The Role of Home Language and School Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Natalia; Kibler, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of 21,409 participants of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten cohort focused on home and school factors sought to understand the level of reading mastery that children experienced throughout elementary school and Grade 8 by relating home language use, timing of oral English language proficiency, and the provision of…

  14. Coaching via Electronic Performance Feedback to Support Home Visitors' Use of Caregiver Coaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick Oborn, Kellie M.; Johnson, LeAnne D.

    2015-01-01

    Recommended practices for Part C early childhood special education home visitors encourage use of caregiver coaching strategies to enhance learning opportunities within the natural routines of infants and toddlers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a multicomponent professional development intervention on home visitors' use…

  15. Human Metapneumovirus Infection and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Alina; McLaren, Rodney; Saunders, Paul; Karakash, Scarlett; Minkoff, Howard

    2017-09-01

    Human metapneumovirus has recently been recognized as an important cause of severe respiratory viral infections and of viral infections in patients admitted to intensive care units. Little is known about the course of this infection in pregnancy. A late-preterm primigravid woman was admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently diagnosed with human metapneumovirus. Because of worsening maternal respiratory status, she was intubated and a primary cesarean delivery was performed. The patient's respiratory status continued to decline postpartum, and she ultimately required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She was treated supportively until her respiratory status improved, at which time she was extubated and weaned off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and subsequently discharged home. Human metapneumovirus can lead to severe respiratory illness during pregnancy.

  16. Hyperinflation using pressure support ventilation improves secretion clearance and respiratory mechanics in ventilated patients with pulmonary infection: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Daniela Aires; Zin, Walter Araujo; Guimaraes, Fernando Silva

    2009-01-01

    Is ventilator-induced hyperinflation in sidelying more effective than sidelying alone in removing secretions and improving respiratory mechanics in ventilated patients with pulmonary infection? Randomised crossover trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. 30 mechanically ventilated patients with pulmonary infection in an adult intensive care unit. The experimental intervention was 30 minutes of ventilator-induced hyperinflation using pressure support ventilation in sidelying; the control intervention was 30 minutes of sidelying. Participants received both interventions on the same day, with a five-hour washout period between them. Secretion clearance was measured as sputum volume retrieved during the intervention. Respiratory mechanics were measured as static compliance and total resistance of the respiratory system before and after the intervention. The experimental intervention cleared 1.3 ml (95% CI 0.5 to 2.2) more secretions than the control. After ventilator-induced hyperinflation in sidelying, respiratory compliance had increased 4.7 ml/cmH(2)O (95% CI 2.6 to 6.8) more than in sidelying alone. There was no difference in total resistance of the respiratory system between the interventions (mean difference 0.3 cmH(2)O/l/s, 95% CI -0.8 to 1.3). The application of hyperinflation using pressure support ventilation in mechanically ventilated patients with pulmonary infection improves secretion clearance and increases static compliance of the respiratory system.

  17. Beware of Data Gaps in Home Care Research: The Streetlight Effect and Its Implications for Policy Making on Long-Term Services and Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Deborah D; DeLiema, Marguerite; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2015-10-01

    Policy initiatives increasingly seek greater use of home- and community-based services for older persons and those with chronic care needs, yet large gaps persist in our knowledge of home care, an indispensable component of long-term services and supports. Unrecognized data gaps, including the scope of home care provided by private hire and nonmedical providers, can distort knowledge and poorly inform long-term services and supports policy. The purpose of this article is to examine these gaps by describing the universe of formal home care services and provider types in relationship to major national sources. Findings reveal four distinct home care sectors and that the majority of formal home care is provided in the sectors that are understudied. We discuss the policy implications of data gaps and conclude with recommendations on where to expand and refine home care research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Home Care for Life-Supported Persons in France: The Regional Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Allen I.; Faure, Eveline A. M.

    1986-01-01

    France provides a model for the public-private-voluntary sector interaction with ventilator-dependent patients. The French regional associations are home ventilator care systems that have met the multiple needs of those concerned. (Author/CL)

  19. Predicting respiratory tumor motion with multi-dimensional adaptive filters and support vector regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, Nadeem; Wiersma, Rodney; Mao Weihua; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States); Shanker, Piyush; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Widrow, Bernard [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)], E-mail: nriaz@stanford.edu

    2009-10-07

    Intra-fraction tumor tracking methods can improve radiation delivery during radiotherapy sessions. Image acquisition for tumor tracking and subsequent adjustment of the treatment beam with gating or beam tracking introduces time latency and necessitates predicting the future position of the tumor. This study evaluates the use of multi-dimensional linear adaptive filters and support vector regression to predict the motion of lung tumors tracked at 30 Hz. We expand on the prior work of other groups who have looked at adaptive filters by using a general framework of a multiple-input single-output (MISO) adaptive system that uses multiple correlated signals to predict the motion of a tumor. We compare the performance of these two novel methods to conventional methods like linear regression and single-input, single-output adaptive filters. At 400 ms latency the average root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) for the 14 treatment sessions studied using no prediction, linear regression, single-output adaptive filter, MISO and support vector regression are 2.58, 1.60, 1.58, 1.71 and 1.26 mm, respectively. At 1 s, the RMSEs are 4.40, 2.61, 3.34, 2.66 and 1.93 mm, respectively. We find that support vector regression most accurately predicts the future tumor position of the methods studied and can provide a RMSE of less than 2 mm at 1 s latency. Also, a multi-dimensional adaptive filter framework provides improved performance over single-dimension adaptive filters. Work is underway to combine these two frameworks to improve performance.

  20. Loss of occlusal support affects the decline in activities of daily living in elderly people receiving home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkai, Sae; Kikutani, Takeshi; Suzuki, Ryo; Tamura, Fumiyo; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether the absence of occlusal support would lead to a decline in the activities of daily living (ADL) in elderly people receiving home care. The subjects of this study were 322 elderly individual aged 65 and older who were receiving home care during a one-year observation period. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the change in the total score of the Barthel Index (BI) during the prospective cohort study period (the dependent variable): the maintained/improved activities of daily living group, in which the score was unchanged or improved, and the worsened activities of daily living group, in which the score decreased. The relationship between occlusal status (the presence or absence of occlusal support) at the baseline measurement and each BI score change was evaluated in the slightly, moderately and totally dependent ADL subgroups. The number of subjects in the maintained/improved and the worsened ADL groups was 152 and 170, respectively. The baseline characteristics of cognitive function and occlusal support were significantly different between the maintained/improved and the worsened ADL groups (p support may be an important factor in the decline of ADL in elderly people receiving home care, especially slightly dependent people. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Functional Description of CymA, an Electron Transfer Hub Supporting Anaerobic Respiratory Flexibility in Shewanella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marritt, Sophie; Lowe, Thomas G.; Bye, Jordan; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Cheesman, Myles R.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-06-15

    CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases. Essential for the anaerobic respiratory flexibility of shewanellae, CymA transfers electrons from menaquinol to various dedicated systems for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors including fumarate and insoluble minerals of Fe(III). Spectroscopic characterization of CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 identifies three low-spin His/His coordinated c-hemes and a single high-spin c-heme with His/H{sub 2}O coordination lying adjacent to the quinol binding site. At pH 7, binding of the menaquinol analogue, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, does not alter the mid-point potentials of the high-spin (ca. {approx}240 mV) and low-spin (ca. {approx}110, {approx}190 and {approx}265 mV) hemes that appear biased to transfer electrons from the high- to low-spin centres following quinol oxidation. CymA is reduced with menadiol (E{sub m} = {approx} 80 mV) in the presence of NADH (E{sub m} = {approx} 320 mV) and an NADH:menadione oxidoreductase, but not by menadiol alone. In cytoplasmic membranes reduction of CymA may then require the thermodynamic driving force from NADH, formate or H{sub 2} oxidation as the redox poise of the menaquinol pool in isolation is insufficient. Spectroscopic studies suggest that CymA requires a nonheme cofactor for quinol oxidation and that the reduced enzyme forms a 1:1 complex with its redox partner Fcc{sub 3}. The implications for CymA supporting the respiratory flexibility of shewanellae are discussed.

  2. Different Techniques of Respiratory Support Do Not Significantly Affect Gas Exchange during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Piglet Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Marc R; Maurer, Miriam; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Waitz, Markus; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    There are no evidence-based recommendations on the use of different techniques of respiratory support and chest compressions (CC) during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We studied the short-term effects of different ventilatory support strategies along with CC representing clinical practice on gas exchange [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2)], hemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation. We hypothesized that in newborn piglets with cardiac arrest, use of a T-piece resuscitator (TPR) providing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves gas exchange as measured by SaO2 during CPR as compared to using a self-inflating bag (SIB) without PEEP. Furthermore, we explored the effects of a mechanical ventilator without synchrony to CC. Thirty newborn piglets with asystole were randomized into three groups and resuscitated for 20 min [fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.21 for 10 min and 1.0 thereafter]. Group 1 received ventilation using a TPR [peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min] with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 2 received ventilation using a SIB (PIP of 20 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min) with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 3 received ventilation using a mechanical ventilator (PIP/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min). CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We found no significant differences in SaO2 between the three groups. However, there was a trend toward a higher SaO2 [TPR: 28.0% (22.3-40.0); SIB: 23.7% (13.4-52.3); ventilator: 44.1% (39.2-54.3); median (interquartile range)] and a lower PaCO2 [TPR: 95.6 mm Hg (82.1-113.6); SIB: 100.8 mm Hg (83.0-108.0); ventilator: 74.1 mm Hg (68.5-83.1); median (interquartile range)] in the mechanical ventilator group. We found no significant effect on gas exchange using different respiratory support strategies

  3. IL-2 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms are associated with respiratory tract infection and may modulate the effect of vitamin E on lower respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisle, Sarah E; Hamer, Davidson H; Leka, Lynette S; Dallal, Gerard E; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Fine, Basil C; Jacques, Paul F; Ordovas, Jose M; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2010-07-01

    Vitamin E supplementation may be a potential strategy to prevent respiratory tract infections (RIs) in the elderly. The efficacy of vitamin E supplementation may depend on individual factors including specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at immunoregulatory genes. We examined whether the effect of vitamin E on RIs in the elderly was dependent on genetic backgrounds as indicated by SNPs at cytokine genes. We used data and DNA from a previous vitamin E intervention study (200 IU vitamin E or a placebo daily for 1 y) in elderly nursing home residents to examine vitamin E-gene interactions for incidence of RI. We determined the genotypes of common SNPs at IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma in 500 participants. We used negative binomial regression to analyze the association between genotype and incidence of infection. The effect of vitamin E on lower RI depended on sex and the SNP at IL-10 -819G-->A (P = 0.03 for interaction for lower RI). Furthermore, we observed that subjects with the least prevalent genotypes at IL-2 -330A-->C (P = 0.02 for upper RI), IL-10 -819G-->A (P = 0.08 for upper RI), and IL-10 -1082C-->T (P vitamin E supplementation. Studies that evaluate the effect of vitamin E on RIs should consider both genetic factors and sex because our results suggest that both may have a significant bearing on the efficacy of vitamin E. Furthermore, common SNPs at cytokine genes may contribute to the individual risk of RIs in the elderly. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00758914.

  4. Computerised clinical decision support systems to improve medication safety in long-term care homes: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Marasinghe, Keshini Madara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Computerised clinical decision support systems (CCDSS) are used to improve the quality of care in various healthcare settings. This systematic review evaluated the impact of CCDSS on improving medication safety in long-term care homes (LTC). Medication safety in older populations is an important health concern as inappropriate medication use can elevate the risk of potentially severe outcomes (ie, adverse drug reactions, ADR). With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LT...

  5. Youth dietary intake and weight status: healthful neighborhood food environments enhance the protective role of supportive family home environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Forsyth, Ann; Bauer, Katherine W; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate individual and joint associations of the home environment and the neighborhood built environment with adolescent dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n=2682; 53.2% girls; mean age14.4 years) participating in the EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) study completed height and weight measurements and surveys in Minnesota middle and high schools. Neighborhood variables were measured using Geographic Information Systems data. Multiple regressions of BMI z-score, fruit and vegetable intake, and fast food consumption were fit including home and neighborhood environmental variables as predictors and also including their interactions to test for effect modification. Supportive family environments (i.e., higher family functioning, frequent family meals, and parent modeling of healthful eating) were associated with higher adolescent fruit and vegetable intake, lower fast food consumption, and lower BMI z-score. Associations between the built environment and adolescent outcomes were fewer. Interaction results, although not all consistent, indicated that the relationship between a supportive family environment and adolescent fruit and vegetable intake and BMI was enhanced when the neighborhood was supportive of healthful behavior. Public health interventions that simultaneously improve both the home environment and the neighborhood environment of adolescents may have a greater impact on adolescent obesity prevention than interventions that address one of these environments alone. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The impact of an educational intervention on home support workers' ability to detect early pressure ulcer damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Mairead; Moore, Zena; Patton, Declan; O'Connor, Tom; Nugent, Linda

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the impact of an educational intervention on home support workers' ability to detect early pressure ulcer damage. A repeated measure design was employed to quantify the effectiveness of an educational intervention, consisting of one pre-test and two post-tests. Education was provided to home support workers and this was followed by an assessment of their ability to correctly classify 20 photographs detailing varying stages of skin damage severity. At the baseline (pre-education), 58% of the photographs were classified correctly. At post-test 1, 55% of the photographs were classified correctly. In post-test 2 this increased to 58%, achieving the original baseline scores. There was a moderate negative relationship between pre-training and post-test 2 scores (r=-0.44; n=27; p=0.02). The educational intervention has been shown not to have a statistically significantly positive effect on home support workers' ability to detect early pressure ulcer damage. The moderate negative relationship between pre-training and post-test 2 scores concur with the aforementioned qualitative findings, and similarly indicate behaviour associated with individuals experiencing difficulty comprehending new health terms.

  7. Supporting depressed mothers at home: their views on an innovative relationship-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Chris; Fowler, Cathrine; McMahon, Cathy; Kowalenko, Nick

    2012-04-01

    This study explored the responses of a group of 111 mothers who experienced distress and/or depression in the early months after childbirth and who received an innovative home visiting service until their child's first birthday. The current study reports a thematic content analysis of the qualitative questionnaire responses returned by the mothers after completing the intervention. The mothers valued the home visiting program for its capacity to increase their parenting confidence and to enhance their bond to their infants. They attributed this to the reassurance provided by the program and the skills and qualities of the home visitors. Their responses complement the benefits identified in quantitative analysis of the program and demonstrate its impact from participants' viewpoint.

  8. [Support of the family with schizophrenia in case of home hospice care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Kayo; Watanabe, Miyako; Kawagoe, Koh

    2013-08-01

    There are various types of families of terminally-ill cancer patients, and care for the family should therefore be individualized. In cases where the primary caregivers have schizophrenia, caring for the patients at home might cause a serious burden to a family. From this aspect, two patients who were cared for by family with schizophrenia were reviewed. Four important factors were obtained. First, assessment of psychiatric conditions of the family collaborating with the psychiatrist or public health nurse; second, confirmation of the patients'/family's wills concerning living through death at home; third, death education given to a family; and fourth, efficient collaboration with social services by an other organization. It was considered that these factors would constitute a model for providing home hospice care to a family with schizophrenia.

  9. Overview of systematic reviews: Effective home support in dementia care, components and impacts-Stage 1, psychosocial interventions for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Paul; Hughes, Jane; Xie, Chengqiu; Larbey, Matthew; Roe, Brenda; Giebel, Clarissa M; Jolley, David; Challis, David

    2017-12-01

    To synthesize evidence to identify the components of effective psychosocial interventions in dementia care to inform clinical practice, policy and research. With population ageing, dementia represents a significant care challenge with 60% of people with dementia living at home. Overview of systematic reviews with narrative summary. Electronic searches of published systematic reviews in English using Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE and EPPI-Centre, between September 2013 - April 2014. Systematic reviews were appraised against Cochrane Collaboration levels of effectiveness. Components of psychosocial interventions were identified with their theoretical rationale. Findings were explored with a Patient, Public and Carer Involvement group. Thirty-six systematic reviews were included. From interventions, 14 components were identified, nine for people with dementia and five for carers, mostly undertaken in nursing/care homes. For people with dementia, there was evidence of effectiveness for cognitive stimulation and cognitive training, but less evidence for sensory stimulation, reminiscence, staff education, behavioural therapy and ADL training. For carers, there was evidence of effectiveness for education and training, psychotherapy and counselling. There was a lack of definitive evidence of effectiveness for most psychosocial interventions. Further studies with stronger methodology or replication of existing studies would strengthen the evidence base. Few interventions were undertaken with people with dementia and their carers living at home. Further work will investigate the extent to which components identified here are present in models of home support for people with dementia and carers and their effectiveness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Interventions to support people with dementia and their caregivers during the transition from home care to nursing home care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian; Lautenschläger, Sindy; Meyer, Gabriele; Stephan, Astrid

    2017-06-01

    During the transition of people with dementia from home to nursing home family caregivers often feel burdened. We aimed to 1) identify interventions which support people with dementia and their caregivers in the transition from home care to nursing home care, 2) synthesize the evidence for efficacy of these interventions, and 3) examine whether the identified interventions have been systematically developed, evaluated and implemented according to the Medical Research Council guidance on complex interventions. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was conducted according to the recommendations specified in the Cochrane Handbook for Intervention Reviews. The review protocol was registered in PROSPERO (2015: CRD42015019839). Reporting follows the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: the PRISMA statement. MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, CINAHL, OTseeker, and PEDro, were searched. Other sources included Google Scholar, and ALOIS. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of the articles. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer and verified independently by another. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used for critical appraisal. Development and evaluation of the identified interventions were assessed, taking the Medical Research Council guidance into account. Review findings were synthesized narratively. The search yielded 1278 records. Five studies were included, all conducted in the United States (4 RCTs and 1 cRCT with a total of 695 participants). The psychosocial interventions were individual and family counseling via telephone or ad hoc all of which addressed only informal caregivers. The intervention components, content and mode of delivery differed widely with inconsistent results. Significant intervention effects were found for the reduction of caregivers' depressive symptoms, burden, feeling of guilt, emotional distress, overload, and interactions with staff. Other outcomes, i.e. stress, placement

  11. Early discharge with home support of gavage feeding for stable preterm infants who have not established full oral feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Carmel T; Makrides, Maria; McPhee, Andrew J

    2015-07-08

    Early discharge of stable preterm infants still requiring gavage feeds offers the benefits of uniting families sooner and reducing healthcare and family costs compared with discharge home when on full sucking feeds. Potential disadvantages of early discharge include increased care burden for the family and risk of complications related to gavage feeding. To determine the effects of a policy of early discharge of stable preterm infants with home support of gavage feeding compared with a policy of discharge of such infants when they have reached full sucking feeds.We planned subgroup analyses to determine whether safety and efficacy outcomes are altered by the type of support received (outpatient visits vs home support) or by the maturity of the infants discharged (gestational age ≤ 28 weeks at birth or birth weight ≤ 1000 grams). We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, together with searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to March 2015), EMBASE (1980 to March 2015) and MEDLINE (1950 to March 2015). We found no new trials. We included all randomised and quasi-randomised trials among infants born at home with gavage feeds and healthcare support versus later discharge home when full sucking feeds were attained. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We conducted study authors for additional information. We performed data analysis in accordance with the standards of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We included in the review data from one quasi-randomised trial with 88 infants from 75 families. Infants in the early discharge programme with home gavage feeding had a mean hospital stay that was 9.3 days shorter (mean difference (MD) -9.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) -18.49 to -0.11) than that of infants in the control group. Infants in the early discharge programme also

  12. Optimization of home treatment in haemophilia: effects of transmural support by a haemophilia nurse on adherence and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, J; Raat, H; Peters, M; Scholten, M; Beijlevelt, M; Oostenbrink, R; Leebeek, F W G; Moll, H A; Cnossen, M H

    2016-11-01

    Transmural support by a haemophilia nurse may improve treatment and may empower parents and patients. To measure the effect of structured home visits by a haemophilia nurse in (parents of) patient on aspects of prophylactic home treatment. A multicentre intervention study in two paediatric haemophilia treatment centres was performed. Primary outcome measures were: adherence to prescribed treatment, health-related quality of life and behavioural scores. Secondary outcome measures were: total clotting factor consumption, self-efficacy and number of joint bleeds. Over a period of 22 months (median, IQR 21-23), four to seven home visits in 46 patients (mean age 9.4 ± 4.2 years) were made. No difference in adherence to prescribed treatment was seen after the home visits when compared to baseline measurements. Both the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) scales on 'Role functioning - Emotional/Behavioural' (P = 0.02, d = 0.53) and 'Parental Time Impact' (P = 0.04, d = 0.33) were reduced after intervention. The disease-specific Haemo-QoL questionnaire showed improvement in domains: 'Family' (P = 0.04, d = -0.14), 'Friends' (P = 0.03, d = -0.29) and 'Perceived support' (P = 0.03, d = -0.37). Significant improvement was observed with regard to domain 'Communication' of the VERITAS-Pro scale (P = 0.03, d = -0.28). After a period of transmural care by a haemophilia nurse, significant but small positive effects were demonstrated with regard to communication and increase of perceived support between parents and haemophilia treatment centre. No improvement was observed in other outcome measures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. 75 FR 16463 - Federal Home Loan Bank Members Selected for Community Support Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Community State Bank Paton Iowa. The First National Bank of Primghar...... Primghar Iowa. Bank Iowa Red Oak.... Association. First State Bank of Red Wing (The)....... Red Wing Minnesota. HomeTown Bank Redwood Falls.... First State Bank of De Queen De Queen Arkansas. Bank of Fayetteville (The) Fayetteville Arkansas...

  14. Latino Parents Utilizing Home-Based Activities to Support Algebra-Readiness Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinar, Soledad Marie

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation involved a series of training sessions where parents from a Title I middle school participated in the learning and practice of Algebra Readiness skills. The project was based on a series of six weekly trainings for parents to learn home-based activities to increase their child's Algebra Readiness. I administered an initial…

  15. Food for talk: Photo frames to support social connectedness for elderly people in a nursing home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, Margaretha Catharina Maria; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Norros, L.; Koskinen, H.; Salo, S.; Savioja, P.

    2009-01-01

    Social connectedness is crucial to someone’s well-being. A case study is conducted to test whether the social connectedness of elderly people living in a nursing home and their family and friends can be improved through a photo frame. A SIM-based photo frame is used to keep the elderly people

  16. Cross Cultural Differences in Managers’ Support for Home-based Telework : A Theoretical Elaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Pascale; Dulk, Laura den

    2003-01-01

    Home-based telework is one of the arrangements organizations can introduce to facilitate a better balance between employees’ professional and private lives. This article focuses on the question of under what conditions managers grant a subordinate’s request to telework and what role national

  17. [A consideration of the support for terminal care at the private skilled nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arao, Yuki; Sasabe, Mayako; Yamada, Yukari; Motoyama, Yuki; Morita, Katsuko; Kawazoe, Masahiro; Ono, Yoshiharu

    2009-12-01

    The increase in the number of residents in elderly care facilities has developed into a growing demand for home-based terminal care rather than treatments at medical institutions. Like many others, the Active Life Toyonaka (private skilled nursing home) has received more requests from its residents for adequate terminal care. It is unfortunate, however, that quite a few residents are obliged to be hospitalized for medical reasons that result in death. The purpose of our study is to determine what a terminal care should be like in a private skilled nursing home. The study has been conducted with the focuse on the successful case of a 90-year-old male resident diagnosed as having prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Our study has concluded that the crucial factors for a better terminal care should go as follows: (1) Having good coordination with medical institutions, (2) Reporting every change in residents' condition and administering an immediate treatment for alleviating pains of the residents, (3) Providing the residents with comfortable life of less restraint on activities in home-based care, (4) Sharing the same information among the staff of all divisions who is in charge of residents (doctors, nurses, caregivers, etc.) and (5) Establishing relationships of mutual trust with residents and their families. Nurses, especially, need to play important roles as coordinators among all the personnel concerned.

  18. Home-School Differences in Beliefs, Support, and Control during Public Pre-kindergarten and their Link to Children's Kindergarten Readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Barbarin, Oscar A.; Downer, Jason; Odom, Erica; Head, Darlene

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of home-school match in child-rearing beliefs and socialization practices (control and support) and their relation to ethnicity and readiness skills of children (n=310) making the transition from publicly sponsored pre-k to kindergarten. Home-school match was operationalized both as a continuous absolute measure and as categories of match or mismatch. Overall, home-school match was more prevalent than mismatch. However, the results corroborate previous ethno...

  19. Unmet needs, quality of life and support networks of people with dementia living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Castillo, Claudia; Woods, Bob; Galboda, Kumari; Oomman, Sabu; Olojugba, Charles; Orrell, Martin

    2010-11-12

    There is lack of evidence about the unmet needs of people with dementia (PWD) living at home and the predictors of high levels of unmet needs. The main aim of this study was to identify the relationship between unmet needs, social networks and quality of life of PWD living at home. One hundred and fifty two community dwelling PWD and 128 carers were interviewed about PWD's needs, social networks, quality of life and other functional and psychological factors. All the interviews with PWD were carried out at their homes. Interviews with carers were undertaken either at PWD's home, their own home or at the health centre. Whenever possible, PWD and carers were interviewed separately. The data collection took place between November 2005 and July 2007. The majority of participants (129, 84.9%) were recruited from National Health Services (NHS) and the rest (23, 15.1%) were recruited from other organisations such as social services and voluntary organizations in the UK. The most frequent unmet needs for PWD were daytime activities (77, 50.7%), company (60, 39.5%), and help with psychological distress (47, 30.9%). Higher number of behavioural and psychological symptoms, low-community involvement social networks, having a younger carer and higher carer's anxiety were found to be predictors of higher unmet needs in PWD. Social networks and behavioural and psychological symptoms had an indirect effect on PWD's self-rated quality of life through unmet needs. Interventions aiming to reduce unmet needs, through the treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms and the involvement of PWD in the community, would potentially improve PWD's quality of life.

  20. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  1. Technical-Induced Hemolysis in Patients with Respiratory Failure Supported with Veno-Venous ECMO - Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lehle

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence and risk factors for technical-induced hemolysis in adults supported with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vvECMO and to analyze the effect of hemolytic episodes on outcome. This was a retrospective, single-center study that included 318 adult patients (Regensburg ECMO Registry, 2009-2014 with acute respiratory failure treated with different modern miniaturized ECMO systems. Free plasma hemoglobin (fHb was used as indicator for hemolysis. Throughout a cumulative support duration of 4,142 days on ECMO only 1.7% of the fHb levels were above a critical value of 500 mg/l. A grave rise in fHb indicated pumphead thrombosis (n = 8, while acute oxygenator thrombosis (n = 15 did not affect fHb. Replacement of the pumphead normalized fHb within two days. Neither pump or cannula type nor duration on the first system was associated with hemolysis. Multiple trauma, need for kidney replacement therapy, increased daily red blood cell transfusion requirements, and high blood flow (3.0-4.5 L/min through small-sized cannulas significantly resulted in augmented blood cell trauma. Survivors were characterized by lower peak levels of fHb [90 (60, 142 mg/l] in comparison to non-survivors [148 (91, 256 mg/l, p≤0.001]. In conclusion, marked hemolysis is not common in vvECMO with modern devices. Clinically obvious hemolysis often is caused by pumphead thrombosis. High flow velocity through small cannulas may also cause technical-induced hemolysis. In patients who developed lung failure due to trauma, fHb was elevated independantly of ECMO. In our cohort, the occurance of hemolysis was associated with increased mortality.

  2. Quality in Australian after-hours doctor home visits: exploring the clinical, professional and security supports available to involved practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifediora, Chris Onyebuchi

    2017-04-01

    The after-hours house call (AHHC) services in Australia has gained huge popularity in recent years, but it is not clear how well supported the involved doctors feel regarding the clinical, professional and security aspects of their work. It is important that this knowledge gap is filled given that appropriate support helps engender quality in health service delivery. This is a questionnaire-based electronic survey involving a sample frame of all 300 doctors participating in AHHC through the National Home Doctor Service. National Home Doctor Service is Australia's largest AHHC service provider. A total of 168 valid responses (56.0%) were received. Overall, the mean support levels were mild to moderate, ranging from 2.4 to 2.8 out of 4.0 for all three parameters. Specifically, 65.3% of the respondents felt well-supported on clinical issues, 64.7% on professional issues and 43.2% on security issues. Australian-trained doctors were less likely to feel well supported on all aspects [Clinical: odds ratio (OR) 0.38, confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 0.90; Professional: OR 0.30, CI 0.13 to 0.72; and Security: OR 0.22; CI 0.09 to 0.53] compared with overseas-trained ones. Unsurprisingly, doctors who adopted protective measures felt significantly better supported regarding security (OR 2.75; CI 1.31 to 5.78). There is room for improvement regarding support on AHHC in Australia, and concerned Surgeries should ensure that where available these supports are appropriately utilized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. How to support patients who are crying in palliative home care: an interview study from the nurses' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydé, Kerstin; Hjelm, Katarina

    2016-09-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore how nurses can support patients who are crying in a palliative home care context. In palliative care the nurse has a central role in the team whose duty it is to create a sense of security and trust, as well as to give comfort and support the patients. The nurse's responsibility is to identify different needs of the patients for support and develop a relationship with them. Patients may express their pain, anxiety, fear and suffering by crying. No studies have been found which focus on how nurses can support patients who are crying in different ways and crying for different reasons. A qualitative explorative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews were held with eight nurses aged 32-63 years (Median 40) working in Swedish palliative home care. The data were analysed using Qualitative Content analysis. Findings It was reported that the nurse should meet and confirm the patient during different types of crying episodes and should also be able to alternate between being close and physically touching the in such close contact with the patients, the nurse can provide emotional support by showing empathy, merely being present and letting the patients cry as much as they want. When the crying finally stops, the nurse can support the person by speaking with them, showing sensitivity, humility and respect for the patient's wishes. A few examples of the patients' need for information or practical support emerged. The nurse can emotionally support the person who is crying by just being present, confirming, showing empathy, offering a chance to talk and showing respect for their individual needs and the different ways they may cry.

  4. Dying at home: a qualitative study of family carers' views of support provided by GPs community staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamark, David; Blake, Susan; Brearley, Sarah G; Milligan, Christine; Thomas, Carol; Turner, Mary; Wang, Xu; Payne, Sheila

    2014-12-01

    Dying at home is the preference of many patients with life-limiting illness. This is often not achieved and a key factor is the availability of willing and able family carers. To elicit family carers' views about the community support that made death at home possible. Qualitative study in East Devon, North Lancashire, and Cumbria. Participants were bereaved family carers who had provided care at the end of life for patients dying at home. Semi-structured interviews were conducted 6-24 months after the death. Fifty-nine bereaved family carers were interviewed (54% response rate; 69% female). Two-thirds of the patients died from cancer with median time of home care being 5 months and for non-cancer patients the median time for home care was 30 months. An overarching theme was of continuity of care that divided into personal, organisational, and informational continuity. Large numbers and changes in care staff diluted personal continuity and failure of the GPs to visit was viewed negatively. Family carers had low expectations of informational continuity, finding information often did not transfer between secondary and primary care and other care agencies. Organisational continuity when present provided comfort and reassurance, and a sense of control. The requirement for continuity in delivering complex end-of-life care has long been acknowledged. Family carers in this study suggested that minimising the number of carers involved in care, increasing or ensuring personal continuity, and maximising the informational and organisational aspects of care could lead to a more positive experience. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  5. Home-School Differences in Beliefs, Support, and Control during Public Pre-Kindergarten and Their Link to Children's Kindergarten Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarin, Oscar A.; Downer, Jason; Odom, Erica; Head, Darlene

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of home-school match in childrearing beliefs and socialization practices (control and support) and their relation to ethnicity and readiness skills of children (n = 310) making the transition from publicly sponsored Pre-k to kindergarten. Home-school match was operationalized both as a continuous absolute measure…

  6. How nonprofit organizations can develop comprehensive in-home support services by utilizing various funding streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeranz, W; Rosenberg, S

    1985-01-01

    Home-chore service delivery can provide nonprofit organizations with opportunities for service, employment, training, and economic development. This article describes the ways that such organizations can fund and develop home-chore programs. It examines the five major funding sources and the opportunities for combining program funds to promote comprehensive care. It then discusses issues to consider in competing for contract bids with proprietary providers. Marketing strategies are outlined for each funding source, including which services to offer and how to project a favorable agency image. This section places special emphasis on ways to tap the often overlooked but largest potential client population, the private pay sector. Finally, there are guidelines and projections for preparing budgets.

  7. Mini-Split Heat Pump Evaluation and Zero Energy Ready Home Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herk, Anastasia [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    IBACOS worked with builder Imagine Homes to evaluate the performance of an occupied new construction test house following construction of the house in the hot, humid climate of San Antonio, Texas. The project measures the effectiveness of a space conditioning strategy using a multihead mini-split heat pump (MSHP) system in a reduced-load home to achieve acceptable comfort levels (temperature and humidity) and energy performance. IBACOS collected long-term data and analyzed the energy consumption and comfort conditions of the occupied house after one year of operation. Although measured results indicate that the test system provides comfort both inside and outside the ASHRAE Standard 55-2010 range, the occupants of the house claimed both adequate comfort and appreciation of the ease of use and flexibility of the installed MSHP system. IBACOS also assisted the builder to evaluate design and specification changes necessary to comply with Zero Energy Ready Home, but the builder chose to not move forward with it because of concerns about the 'solar ready' requirements of the program.

  8. Mini-Split Heat Pump Evaluation and Zero Energy Ready Home Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herk, Anastasia [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This project was created from a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building America research team IBACOS, Inc. and Imagine Homes, a production homebuilder of high-performance homes in San Antonio, Texas—a hot-humid climate. The primary purpose was to evaluate the performance of a multihead mini-split heat pump (MSHP) space-conditioning system, which consists of ducted and ductless indoor units, in maintaining uniform comfort in an occupied test house. The research team evaluated the MSHP space-conditioning strategy for its effectiveness in achieving uniform temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels throughout the test house and for overall constructability and cost. This evaluation was based on data that were collected from short-term tests and monitoring during 1 year of occupancy, as well as from builder and occupant feedback. Design considerations for integrating an MSHP system into the builder’s full range of production home designs were also explored, with a focus on minimizing the cost and complexity of the system design while meeting the thermal loads of the house and providing occupant comfort according to ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-2010 (ASHRAE 2010a).

  9. The benefits of phone support and home visits: an evaluation of the City of Kingston's Breastfeeding Support Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffield, Karen

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the City of Kingston Breastfeeding Support Service that was performed in 2006. The evaluation utilised a mail-out questionnaire designed to investigate mothers' breastfeeding expectations, experiences, issues and support received, in addition to their experience of using the Service. Seventy-seven percent of mothers contacted the service for support due primarily to problems with positioning and attachment, nipple pain or mastitis. Other reasons were also cited, reflecting that it takes time and experience for women to learn to breastfeed and to develop an understanding of their lactation. The study found that on discharge from the hospital, 59% of mothers were fully breastfeeding; this figure decreased to 32% at the time of contacting the service, but increased to 42% two weeks after contacting the service. Satisfaction with both the model of service and the support received was very high. Mothers were able to feel more comfortable with their breastfeeding (75%), to breastfeed for longer (59%) and with more confidence (71%) and greater knowledge (68%) about breastfeeding and lactation. The majority of mothers (96%) reported they would contact the service again if they needed further breastfeeding advice and support.

  10. Do nursing homes for older people have the support they need to provide end-of-life care? A mixed methods enquiry in England

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Jane E; Kumar, Arun; Froggatt, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Nursing homes are a common site of death, but older residents receive variable quality of end-of-life care. We used a mixed methods design to identify external influences on the quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes. Two qualitative case studies were conducted and a postal survey of 180 nursing homes surrounding the case study sites. In the case studies, qualitative interviews were held with seven members of nursing home staff and 10 external staff. Problems in accessing support for en...

  11. Evaluation of the ability of standardized supports to improve public health response to syndromic surveillance for respiratory diseases in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Rivera

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite widespread implementation of syndromic surveillance systems within public health agencies, previous studies of the implementation and use of these systems have indicated that the functions and responses taken in response to syndromic surveillance data vary widely according to local context and preferences. The objective of the Syndromic Surveillance Evaluation Study was to develop and implement standardized supports in local public health agencies in Ontario, Canada, and evaluate the ability of these supports to affect actions taken as part of public health communicable disease control programs. Methods Local public health agencies (LPHA in Ontario, which used syndromic surveillance based on emergency department visits for respiratory disease, were recruited and randomly allocated to the study intervention or control group. The intervention group health agencies received standardized supports in terms of a standardized aberrant event detection algorithm and a response protocol dictating steps to investigate and assess the public health significance of syndromic surveillance alerts. The control group continued with their pre-existing syndromic surveillance infrastructure and processes. Outcomes were assessed using logbooks, which collected quantitative and qualitative information about alerts received, investigation steps taken, and public health responses. The study was conducted prospectively for 15 months (October 2013 to February 2015. Results Fifteen LPHAs participated in the study (n = 9 intervention group, n = 6 control group. A total of 1,969 syndromic surveillance alerts were received by all LPHAs. Variations in the types and amount of responses varied by LPHA, in particularly differences were noted by the size of the health unit. Smaller health units had more challenges to both detect and mount a response to any alerts. LPHAs in the control group were more likely to declare alerts to have public

  12. Supporting family carers in home-based end-of-life care: using participatory action research to develop a training programme for support workers and volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Glenys; Hardy, Beth; Ewing, Gail; Kennedy, Sheila; Seymour, Jane

    2017-08-02

    Family carers are crucial in enabling dying people to stay at home, but are often not prepared for their caring role, receiving little support from formal health and social care services. It is increasingly likely that any help or support family carers receive will be provided by a third sector organisation on either a voluntary basis or by untrained carer support workers. To produce a training programme designed to equip carer support workers and volunteers with the basic skills and knowledge needed to support family carers. Participatory action research, a collaborative form of working in which those who are affected by an issue take a lead role in the research, was used. Bereaved carers acting as research partners, support workers and representatives of third sector organisations took an active part in designing, developing, piloting and refining the programme in a number of interlinked stages. During development, the programme was piloted on four occasions and evaluated by 36 trainees and 3 trainers. The outcome of the project is an innovative, 1-day training programme, offering an introduction to supporting family carers who are looking after someone approaching the end of life. The use of participatory action research methods enabled the development of a programme that addresses support needs identified by bereaved carers and training needs identified by carer support workers.The finished programme includes all the materials necessary to run a training day for support workers and volunteers: facilitator's notes, trainee workbook, slides, promotional poster and pre-course reading for trainees. Knowledge of issues involved in end-of-life and palliative care is not required, although some experience in delivering training is advisable. The programme evaluated well during development, but further research is required to examine the transfer of learning into the workplace. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  13. Multifactorial and functional mobility assessment tools for fall risk among older adults in community, home-support, long-term and acute care settings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott, Vicky; Votova, Kristine; Scanlan, Andria; Close, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Objective: to conduct a systematic review of published studies that test the validity and reliability of fall-risk assessment tools for use among older adults in community, home-support, long-term and acute care settings. Methods...

  14. Factors associated with rehospitalizations of very low birthweight infants: impact of a transition home support and education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohr, Betty R; Yatchmink, Yvette E; Burke, Robert T; Stephens, Bonnie E; Cavanaugh, Ellen C; Alksninis, Barbara; Nye, Julie H; Bacani, Deborah; McCourt, Maureen F; Collins, Amy M; Tucker, Richard

    2012-07-01

    To determine the effects of a transition-home education and support program, BPD, and health insurance type on VLBW infant rehospitalizations at 3 and 7 months corrected age. It was hypothesized that the transition-home program would be associated with decreased rehospitalizations between Phase 1 and 2, and public health insurance and BPD would be associated with increased rehospitalizations. 274 infants with birth weight Infants with public insurance had twice as many rehospitalizations by 3 months (28% versus 11%; p=0.018) in Phase 1. In regression analyses the intervention effects did not achieve significance for the cohort at 3 months (OR=0.63; CI=0.33 to 1.20) or 7 months (OR=0.61; CI=0.33 to 1.13). BPD and public insurance did not reach significance in the models whereas siblings were significantly associated with increased odds of rehospitalization. In subgroup analyses for infants on pubic health insurance the intervention significantly decreased the odds of rehospitalization between Phase 1 and 2(OR=0.43; CI=0.19 to 0.96) at 3 months. Our findings suggest that a transition-home program may be beneficial to reduce the rehospitalization rate for VLBW infants, and infants on public insurance may derive greater benefit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intention of use of long-term care facilities and home support services by Chinese-Canadian family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel W L

    2008-01-01

    One common myth about ethno-cultural minority family caregivers is that they do not use formal services. This study examined the intention of using home support and long-term care facilities by a random sample of 339 Chinese-Canadian family caregivers, using a modified version of the Andersen-Newman service utilization model. Filial piety, caregiving burden, care receivers, and health conditions are the common predictors identified. Filial obligation is most likely manifested through facilitating the care receivers to make use of the services needed, particularly for caregivers who reported a high level of caregiving burden.

  16. Periodic limb movements of sleep: empirical and theoretical evidence supporting objective at-home monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marilyn Moro,1 Balaji Goparaju,1 Jelina Castillo,1 Yvonne Alameddine,1 Matt T Bianchi1,2 1Neurology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Introduction: Periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity. However, most people with PLMS are either asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms. Therefore, predicting elevated PLMS in the absence of restless legs syndrome remains an important clinical challenge.Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of demographic data, subjective symptoms, and objective polysomnography (PSG findings in a clinical cohort with or without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA from our laboratory (n=443 with OSA, n=209 without OSA. Correlation analysis and regression modeling were performed to determine predictors of periodic limb movement index (PLMI. Markov decision analysis with TreeAge software compared strategies to detect PLMS: in-laboratory PSG, at-home testing, and a clinical prediction tool based on the regression analysis.Results: Elevated PLMI values (>15 per hour were observed in >25% of patients. PLMI values in No-OSA patients correlated with age, sex, self-reported nocturnal leg jerks, restless legs syndrome symptoms, and hypertension. In OSA patients, PLMI correlated only with age and self-reported psychiatric medications. Regression models indicated only a modest predictive value of demographics, symptoms, and clinical history. Decision modeling suggests that at-home testing is favored as the pretest probability of PLMS increases, given plausible assumptions regarding PLMS morbidity, costs, and assumed benefits of pharmacological therapy.Conclusion: Although elevated PLMI values were commonly observed, routinely acquired clinical information had only weak predictive utility. As the clinical importance of elevated PLMI continues to evolve, it is likely that objective measures such as PSG or

  17. An Integrative Review of Interventions to Support Parents When Managing Their Child's Pain at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Roses; McKeever, Stephen; Wiseman, Theresa; Twycross, Alison

    2017-11-21

    To identify interventions aimed at helping parents manage their child's pain at home and to establish which aspects of interventions were effective. Integrative narrative review. MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsychINFO, PsychArticles, AMED, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge databases were searched in 2016. This narrative synthesis followed Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Economic and Social Research Council guidance. Reasons attributed to intervention success were analyzed using content analysis. From 2,534 papers, 17 were included. A majority were randomized controlled trials (n = 13) and most addressed postoperative pain (n = 15). A range of interventions were found that directly targeted parents, including child-parent interactions and health care professional-parent interactions, as well as complex interventions. Three studies were successful in reducing child pain at home and seven in increasing appropriate analgesic drug administration. Analysis of reasons attributed to interventions success revealed characteristics of interventions, components of parental pain management, and key features of research that aid researchers in designing and evaluating interventions. Risk of bias was present because of inadequate randomization, lack of a control group, and underpowered studies. Nurses should be aware that targeting parents directly is the most effective way of reducing child pain at home. Nurses need to advocate for effective analgesics for their child patients because the ineffectiveness of many interventions was attributed to inadequate analgesic drugs. Once this is achieved, success in increasing analgesic drug administration is most likely reached via parent-targeted interventions and those targeting health care professional-parent interactions. Successful interventions will be tailored to the child and adequately powered. Including a measure of sedation will ensure sedation is not mistaken for analgesic effectiveness. Interventions should address

  18. Hawai'i's "Going Home Plus" project: a new option to support community living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Christy M; Johnson, Jean; Silverman, Madi; Ozaki, Rebecca; Koller, Lillian

    2009-08-01

    The Going Home Plus project facilitates the transition of individuals from hospitals, nursing facilities, and intermediate care facilities for the mentally retarded (ICF-MRs) into community settings. The project is a collaborative effort between the State of Hawai'i Department of Human Services (DHS), the University of Hawai'i Center on Disability Studies and their community partners to help elderly and younger persons with disabilities who have been living in an institution for at least six months and express a choice for community living. The project, which provides services such as transition coordination and telemedicine, strives to become a valuable resource for institutionalized patients, their families, and medical professionals.

  19. IL-2 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms are associated with respiratory tract infection and may modulate the effect of vitamin E on lower respiratory tract infections in elderly nursing home residents1234

    OpenAIRE

    Belisle, Sarah E.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Leka, Lynette S.; Dallal, Gerard E; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Fine, Basil C; Jacques, Paul F.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vitamin E supplementation may be a potential strategy to prevent respiratory tract infections (RIs) in the elderly. The efficacy of vitamin E supplementation may depend on individual factors including specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at immunoregulatory genes.

  20. Provider Opinions and Experiences Regarding Development of a Social Support Assessment to Inform Hospital Discharge: The Going Home Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrea; Papke, Todd; Davisson, Erica; Spooner, Kara; Gassman, Laura

    Despite over three decades of research linking social support and optimal health outcomes, social support is not systematically assessed or addressed during clinical care. This study sought input from health care providers to inform the design of an intervention intended to facilitate assessment of social support in a way that could aid in anticipatory planning during the process of hospital discharge. Using a purposive sampling strategy, data were collected from providers in two acute care settings serving rural patients, one academic and one community based. Opinions about what an assessment of social support would seek to accomplish, what is currently done and by whom, and the preferred format for delivery were elicited during a series of individual and group interviews. During phase two, feasibility was assessed with three inpatient nurses over 3 clinical days. Field notes were analyzed throughout the project using rapid data analysis techniques. Health care providers endorsed the creation of an assessment and stated that target users would include all members of the discharge team (e.g., clinical nurses, case managers, discharge coordinators, hospitalists, and specialty care). They identified the need for a patient-family resource (vs. a traditional provider-facing assessment). Participants stated that, although both the information collected and the interview process would meet a need to increase patient engagement in inpatient settings, competing clinical demands would require a tool that was easily completed by patients and family and seen as directly informing clinical activities. To this end, although focusing on the eventual development of an electronic tool seemed valuable, a hard-copy resource was considered more feasible for patient use at the present time. The preliminary test of the resulting hard-copy "Going Home Toolkit" demonstrated potential feasibility and usefulness during clinical practice. There is need for not only assessing patients

  1. The impact of perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity on mental health among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this study. Structural equation modeling using LISREL 8.71 was performed to assess the effects of stress, support, and physical activity on mental health. The findings indicate that perceived stress predicted higher levels of depression, social support predicted lower levels of loneliness and fatigue, and physical activity predicted lower levels of fatigue among older adults. Social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health, except depression. In conclusion, the relative impacts of perceived stress, social support, and physical activity on types of mental health (e.g., fatigue, loneliness, and depression) were different. Furthermore, stress had direct and indirect effects on each construct of mental health (e.g., fatigue, loneliness, and depression).

  2. Effects of Home-Based Supportive Care on Improvements in Physical Function and Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Stroke: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yi-Chieh; Lin, Mei-Feng; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Shyu, Meei-Ling; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Chang, Hsiu-Ju

    2017-08-01

    To examine the effects of home-based supportive care on improvements in physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. Seven electronic databases (eg, MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAL, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ProQuest, and Google Scholar) and 4 Chinese databases (eg, WANFANG MED ONLINE, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, China Academic Journals Full-text Database, and National Central Library) were fully searched for all relevant articles up to June 25, 2016. Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of home-based supportive care on physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke were included. Finally, 16 articles in Chinese (n=4) and English (n=12) met the inclusion criteria. Data on patient characteristics, study characteristics, intervention details, and outcome were extracted. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Home-based supportive care had a small size effect on physical function (Hedges' g=.17; 95% confidence interval, .09-.26) and a moderate size effect on depressive symptoms (Hedges' g=-.44; 95% confidence interval, -.83 to -.05) in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The moderator analysis revealed that some components of study participants and intervention programs improved the effects on physical function and depressive symptoms; however, no significant moderators were further identified to have superiorly improved physical function and depressive symptoms. Regular performance of home-based supportive interventions should be considered for inclusion as routine care for managing and improving physical function and depressive symptoms in home-dwelling patients after stroke. The present findings provide further evidence with which to design appropriate supportive interventions for home-dwelling stroke survivors. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  3. Lumbar supports to prevent recurrent low back pain among home care workers: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Pepijn D. D. M.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; van Poppel, Mireille N. M.; Jellema, Petra; Willemsen, Sten P.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van Mechelen, Willem; Koes, Bart W.

    2007-01-01

    People use lumbar supports to prevent low back pain. Secondary analyses from primary preventive studies suggest benefit among workers with previous low back pain, but definitive studies on the effectiveness of supports for the secondary prevention of low back pain are lacking. To determine the

  4. Support at Work and Home: The Path to Satisfaction through Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Zivnuska, Suzanne; Whitten, Dwayne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines social support (from both coworkers and partners) and its path to satisfaction through work-family balance. This study fills a gap by explaining how support impacts satisfaction in the same domain, across domains, and how it crosses over to impact the partner's domain. Using a matched dataset of 270 job incumbents and their…

  5. Evaluating the Impact of Information Technology Tools to Support the Asthma Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiz, L Adriana; Robbins-Milne, Laura; Krause, M Christine; Peretz, Patricia J; Rausch, John C

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of information technology tools on the outcomes of children with asthma in the medical home. A registry was established for children aged 4 to 18 years with an ICD-9 code for asthma. Changes to the electronic health record included modifications to notes, care plans, and orders. A retrospective analysis of emergency department and in-patient utilization for a cohort of patients was conducted from July 2009 through June 2013. Of the study population (n = 1217), 65% had a classification of asthma severity and 63% were risk-stratified. Seventy percent had a control assessment at least once. Care plan use increased from 5% to 22% and enrollment in care coordination increased from 0.1% to 4%. After 3 years, there was a reduction of emergency department and inpatient admissions for asthma (P technology tools was associated with improved asthma outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Do nursing homes for older people have the support they need to provide end-of-life care? A mixed methods enquiry in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Jane E; Kumar, Arun; Froggatt, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    Nursing homes are a common site of death, but older residents receive variable quality of end-of-life care. We used a mixed methods design to identify external influences on the quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes. Two qualitative case studies were conducted and a postal survey of 180 nursing homes surrounding the case study sites. In the case studies, qualitative interviews were held with seven members of nursing home staff and 10 external staff. Problems in accessing support for end-of-life care reported in the survey included variable support by general practitioners (GPs), reluctance among GPs to prescribe appropriate medication, lack of support from other agencies, lack of out of hours support, cost of syringe drivers and lack of access to training. Most care homes were implementing a care pathway. Those that were not rated their end-of-life care as in need of improvement or as average. The case studies suggest that critical factors in improving end-of-life care in nursing homes include developing clinical leadership, developing relationships with GPs, the support of 'key' external advocates and leverage of additional resources by adoption of care pathway tools.

  7. Ventilatory support in children with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimensberger, Peter C; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2015-06-01

    To describe the recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference for mechanical ventilation management of pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Consensus Conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. The Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference experts developed and voted on a total of 27 recommendations focused on the optimal mechanical ventilation approach of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Topics included ventilator mode, tidal volume delivery, inspiratory plateau pressure, high-frequency ventilation, cuffed endotracheal tubes, and gas exchange goals. When experimental data were lacking, a modified Delphi approach emphasizing the strong professional agreement was used. There were 17 recommendations with strong agreement and 10 recommendations with weak agreement. There were no recommendations with equipoise or disagreement. There was weak agreement on recommendations concerning approach to tidal volume and inspiratory pressure limitation (88% to 72% agreement, respectively), whereas strong agreement could be achieved for accepting permissive hypercapnia. Using positive end-expiratory pressure levels greater than 15 cm H2O in severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, under the condition that the markers of oxygen delivery, respiratory system compliance, and hemodynamics are closely monitored as positive end-expiratory pressure is increased, is strongly recommended. The concept of exploring the effects of careful recruitment maneuvers during conventional ventilation met an agreement level of 88%, whereas the use of recruitment maneuvers during rescue high-frequency oscillatory ventilation is highly recommended (strong agreement). The Consensus Conference developed pediatric-specific recommendations regarding mechanical ventilation of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as well as future research priorities. These recommendations are

  8. Halfway Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandham, Jessica L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pros and cons of Alaska's unique Family Partnership Charter School, which oversees distribution of public funding to home-schooling families, offers support to help home-schooling parents meet district standards on their own terms, and monitors required purchase of teacher time and expenditures. A sidebar describes an Alaskan…

  9. Comparison between two different modes of non-invasive ventilatory support in preterm newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome mild to moderate: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ciuffini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite of improved survival of premature infants, the incidence of long term pulmonary complications, mostly associated with ventilation-induced lung injury, remains high. Non invasive ventilation (NIV is able to reduce the adverse effects of mechanical ventilation. Although nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP is an effective mode of NIV, traumatic nasal complications and intolerance of the nasal interface are common. Recently high flow nasal cannula (HFNC is emerging as a better tolerated form of NIV, allowing better access to the baby’s face, which may improve nursing, feeding and bonding. HFNC may be effective in the treatment of some neonatal respiratory conditions while being more user-friendly for care-givers than conventional NCPAP. Limited evidence is available to support the specific role, efficacy and safety of HFNC in newborns and to demonstrate efficacy compared with NCPAP; some studies suggest a potential role for HFNC in respiratory care of the neonate as a distinct non invasive ventilatory support. We present the preliminary data of a randomized clinical trial; the aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of HFNC compared to NCPAP in preterm newborns with mild to moderate respiratory distress syndrome (RDS.

  10. Clinical pharmacists supporting patients with diabetes and/or hyperlipidemia in a military medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetro, Ashely; Rossetto, Janel; Bahlawan, Nahed; Ryan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of clinical pharmacists embedded in primary care at a military facility by reviewing laboratory assessments following pharmacist management of referred patients with diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Electronic medical records of patients who were referred to clinical pharmacists for control of diabetes and/or hyperlipidemia were reviewed for those with at least two encounters during a 6-month period with baseline and follow-up laboratory assessments. As appropriate to patient diagnoses, glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TGs), and body mass index (BMI) were included in assessments. Paired t tests were used to determine the statistical significance of mean changes between the beginning and end of the 6-month period. In the cohort of patients with diabetes (n = 46), mean A1C decrease over 6 months was 0.9 points (P = 0.004). In the cohort of patients with hyperlipidemia (n = 15), mean LDL-C decrease was 20 mg/dL (P = 0.004). Changes in mean LDL-C, TGs, and BMIs were observed in each group but were not statistically significant. Although small sample sizes limited statistical power in this analysis, results suggest that referral of ambulatory patients to a clinical pharmacist in a military medical home for diabetes and/or hyperlipidemia improved care management.

  11. Low cost home automation system: a support to the ecological electricity generation in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmer Alejandro Parada Prieto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Context/Objective: In Colombia, consumption of residential electricity accounts for about 40% of the national demand; therefore, alternatives to reduce this consumption are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a home automation prototype to control the illumination of a household and to foster the efficient use of energy. Method: The system consists of independent control modules and an information manager module; the control module regulates the luminaires using a microcontroller and a presence sensor, and exchanges data by means of a radio frequency transceiver; the manager module allows the access to the control modules from a Web interface. The prototype was implemented in a household located in the city of San José de Cúcuta, Colombia, during a 60 days period. Results: The operation of the system diminished the total electricity consumption by 3,75 %, with a z-score of -1,93 that was obtained from the statistical analysis. Conclusions: We concluded that the prototype is inexpensive in comparison to similar technologies available in the national and international markets, and it reduces the waste of electrical energy due to the consumption habits of the residents in the case study.

  12. Patient-centered Medical Home Capability and Clinical Performance in HRSA-supported Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leiyu; Lock, Diana C.; Lee, De-Chih; Lebrun-Harris, Lydie A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Chidambaran, Preeta; Nocon, Robert S.; Zhu, Jinsheng; Sripipatana, Alek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the relationship between Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) model adoption in health centers (HCs) and clinical performance measures and to determine if adoption of PCMH characteristics is associated with better clinical performance. Research Design Data came from the Health Resources and Services Administration’s 2009 Uniform Data System and the 2009 Commonwealth Fund National Survey of Federally Qualified Health Centers. Clinical performance measures included 2 process measures (childhood immunization and cervical cancer screening) and 2 outcome measures (hypertension control and diabetes control). Total and subscale PCMH scores were regressed on the clinical performance measures, adjusting for patient, provider, financial, and institutional characteristics. Results The findings showed different directional relationships, with some PCMH domains (care management, test/referral tracking, quality improvement, and external coordination) showing little or no effect on outcome measures of interest, 1 domain (access/communication) associated with improved outcomes, and 1 domain (patient tracking/registry) associated with worse outcomes. Conclusions This study is among the first to examine the association between PCMH transformation and clinical performance in HCs, providing an understanding of the impact of PCMH adoption within safety-net settings. The mixed results highlight the importance of examining relationships between specific PCMH domains and specific clinical quality measures, in addition to analyzing overall PCMH scores which could yield distorted findings. PMID:25793267

  13. The influence of environment in palliative care: supporting or hindering experiences of 'at-homeness'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Birgit H; Edvardsson, David

    2007-12-01

    Florence Nightingale stated that the art of nursing is to provide an environment in which the patient is in the best position for nature to act upon, and Martha Rogers, in turn, emphasized that one part in nursing is to pattern the environment into a place where healing conditions are optimal. This paper presents a preliminary conceptual framework that describes the influence of environment in palliative care. Based on previously published studies, a conceptual framework describing the influence of environments in palliative care was developed consisting of an atmosphere of hospitality; an atmosphere of safety; and, an atmosphere of 'everydayness'. The framework describes that the atmosphere is created in the meeting between the person's needs/expectations and the environment, an atmosphere that can influence experiential outcomes of 'at-homeness' or homelessness in the palliative care setting. In conclusion, this preliminary conceptual framework may contribute to nursing practice by providing a conceptual basis for actively reflecting on and evaluating the atmosphere in palliative care settings.

  14. Formal and informal support of family caregivers managing medications for patients who receive end-of-life care at home: a cross-sectional survey of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Brian T; Berman, Rebecca; Lau, Denys T

    2014-10-01

    Managing medications is a complex responsibility of family caregivers caring for end-of-life patients. This study characterizes caregivers with and without formal/informal support managing medications for patients who receive end-of-life care at home. To explore factors related to caregivers' support with managing medications for end-of-life home hospice patients. A convenience-sampled, cross-sectional telephone survey. Computer-assisted telephone interviews were administered to 120 caregivers managing medications, who were referred by five Chicago-based home hospice services. We measured caregivers' additional formal (paid) and informal (unpaid) support with managing medications, and caregiver/patient socio-demographic, relational, and health characteristics. While 47 (39%) had no additional support with managing medications, 27 (22.5%) had formal support, 37 (31%) informal, and 9 (7.5%) both. Seven caregivers (19%) with formal and 13 (31%) with informal support reported disagreements concerning treatment plans. Caregivers lacking formal support tended to be racial/ethnic minorities, live with the patient in their home, or report greater emotional burden. Caregivers with formal support tended to report higher education/income, lower mutuality, or care for a patient with over 6 months' hospice enrollment. Caregivers lacking informal support tended to be spousal caregivers, live with the patient, or have experience caring for another dying person. Our study suggests that high proportions of caregivers may not have support managing medications for patients receiving hospice care at home. More research should examine whether the observed variations in obtaining support indicate disparities or unmet needs among caregivers. Disagreement about treatment with formal/informal support also warrants further investigation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Seniors at Risk: The Association between the Six-Month Use of Publicly Funded Home Support Services and Quality of Life and Use of Health Services for Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, M.; Browne, G.; Weir, R.; Gafni, A.; Roberts, J.; Henderson, S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the baseline characteristics and changes in health status and cost of use of health services associated with use of publicly funded home support services. The analysis includes 122 people 75 years of age or more who were eligible for home support services. Over a 6-month period, one third of the sample used home support…

  16. [Recommendations for respiratory support in the newborn (IV). High frequency ventilation, ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Salinas, Félix; Elorza Fernández, Dolores; Gutiérrez Laso, Antonio; Moreno Hernando, Julio; Bustos Lozano, Gerardo; Gresa Muñoz, Manuel; Miracle Echegoyen, Xavier

    2017-11-01

    The recommendations included in this document will be part a series of updated reviews of the literature on respiratory support in the newborn infant. These recommendations are structured into 12 modules, and in this work module 8 is presented. Each module is the result of a consensus process amongst all members of the Surfactant and Respiratory Group of the Spanish Society of Neonatology. They represent a summary of the published papers on each specific topic, as well as the clinical experience of each one of the members of the group. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Research-Supported Intervention and Discretion among Frontline Workers Implementing Home Visitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Cathleen E.; Trott, Elise M.; Fettes, Danielle; Gunderson, Lara; Green, Amy E.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We examine how frontline workers and supervisors delivering a research-supported intervention (RSI) to reduce child neglect negotiated system-related challenges, the pragmatics of RSI implementation, and their professional identities and relationships with clients. Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews, small group…

  18. Effect of home blood pressure telemonitoring with self-care support on uncontrolled systolic hypertension in diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alexander G; Irvine, M Jane; McIsaac, Warren J; Tisler, Andras; Rossos, Peter G; Easty, Anthony; Feig, Denice S; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2012-07-01

    Lowering blood pressure reduces cardiovascular risk, yet hypertension is poorly controlled in diabetic patients. In a pilot study we demonstrated that a home blood pressure telemonitoring system, which provided self-care messages on the smartphone of hypertensive diabetic patients immediately after each reading, improved blood pressure control. Messages were based on care paths defined by running averages of transmitted readings. The present study tests the system's effectiveness in a randomized, controlled trial in diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension. Of 244 subjects screened for eligibility, 110 (45%) were randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 55) or control (n = 55) group, and 105 (95.5%) completed the 1-year outcome visit. In the intention-to-treat analysis, mean daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure, the primary end point, decreased significantly only in the intervention group by 9.1 ± 15.6 mmHg (SD; P blood pressure telemonitoring combined with automated self-care support reduced the blood pressure of diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension and improved hypertension control. Home blood pressure monitoring alone had no effect on blood pressure. Promoting patient self-care may have negative psychological effects.

  19. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  20. The moderating effect of social support on the relationship between physical health and suicidal thoughts among Chinese rural elderly: A nursing home sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Yang, Yang; Wu, Menglian; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yaoyao; Xie, Hui; Li, Hongkai; Li, Yuqin; Wang, Kefang; Zhang, Jie; Jia, Jihui; Su, Yonggang

    2018-01-23

    Suicide rate is relatively high among Chinese rural elderly. While there has been some exciting work on reporting and preventing suicide among community-dwelling elderly, only a few published studies have addressed the issues of rural nursing homes in China. This study aimed to investigate the relationship among perceived social support, physical health, and suicidal thoughts of the elderly living in Chinese rural nursing homes. It also examined the moderating effects of social support on the path from physical health to suicidal thoughts of the rural institutional elderly in China. This study investigated 205 participants aged 60 years and above in Chinese rural nursing homes. Participants' suicidal thoughts, perceived social support, and physical health were assessed. This study conducted descriptive analysis, Student's t-test, and Pearson's chi-square test to test how physical health and social support predicted suicidal thoughts, as well as the moderating effects of family's, friends', and others' social support on physical health and suicidal thoughts. Both physical health and perceived social support were significantly related to suicidal thoughts. Perceived social support from family, friends, and significant others moderated the relationship between physical health and suicidal thoughts. Findings of this study suggested that increasing social support and improving physical health would be effective in both suicide prevention and intervention for the residents in Chinese rural nursing homes. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  1. Enabling a family caregiver-led assessment of support needs in home-based palliative care: Potential translation into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar; Toye, Chris; Deas, Kathleen; Howting, Denise; Ewing, Gail; Grande, Gunn; Stajduhar, Kelli

    2015-12-01

    Systematic assessment of family caregivers' support needs and integrating these into service planning according to evidence-based research are vital to improving caregivers' outcomes and their capacity to provide care at end of life. To describe the experience with and feedback of nurses on implementing a systematic assessment of support needs with family caregivers in home-based palliative care, using the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool. This study was conducted during 2012-2014 in Silver Chain Hospice Care Service in Western Australia. This article reports on one part of a three-part evaluation of a stepped wedge cluster trial. Forty-four nurses who trialled the intervention with 233 family caregivers gave their feedback via surveys with closed- and open-ended questions (70.5% response rate). Analyses of quantitative and qualitative data were undertaken. The feedback of nurses was overwhelmingly positive in terms of perceived benefits in comparison to standard practice both from the family caregiver and service provider perspectives. Using the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool was described by nurses as providing guidance, focus and structure to facilitate discussion with family caregivers and as identifying needs and service responses that would not otherwise have been undertaken in a timely manner. Our study has successfully addressed the call for alternatives to the professional assessment paradigm using the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool approach as a caregiver-led intervention facilitated by health professionals. Integrating the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool in existing practice is fundamental to achieving better caregiver outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. [Medical care support intervention to the patient and family who has chosen a terminal care at home - an influence of satisfactory experience on the culture of terminal care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mariko; Kouketsu, Nobuko; Ozaki, Mitsuyo; Tomita, Ikue; Hong, Youngjae; Miura, Hisayuki; Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2010-12-01

    The National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan implemented a home medical care support system for aged patients in April 2009. In this study, we report a case of terminal care system where a medical care intervention was carried out by a close coordination of visiting nurses and other staffs with a "at-home terminal care" brochure on hand, and we discussed how this system was brought forward satisfactory and how it affected this culture.

  3. The microbiota of the respiratory tract: gatekeeper to respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wing Ho; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-05-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts as a gatekeeper that provides resistance to colonization by respiratory pathogens. The respiratory microbiota might also be involved in the maturation and maintenance of homeostasis of respiratory physiology and immunity. The ecological and environmental factors that direct the development of microbial communities in the respiratory tract and how these communities affect respiratory health are the focus of current research. Concurrently, the functions of the microbiome of the upper and lower respiratory tract in the physiology of the human host are being studied in detail. In this Review, we will discuss the epidemiological, biological and functional evidence that support the physiological role of the respiratory microbiota in the maintenance of human health.

  4. Fusing the boundaries between home and child care to support children's scientific learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Marilyn

    1996-06-01

    Parent involvement in early childhood education is highly valued by staff and families alike. However, limited research is available to guide professionals in how best to involve families in the early childhood programs developed for their children. This article reports on a study which investigated the impact of a science teaching and learning program on families of children attending an Australian Child Care Centre. Particular reference is made to the level of scientific support families gave to their children.

  5. Taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in intestinal failure patients dependent on home parenteral support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F; Petersen, Anne H

    2017-01-01

    , and prior CRBSI incidence. The prior CRBSI incidence in the study population was 2.4 episodes/1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days [95% Poisson confidence limits (CLs): 2.12, 2.71 episodes/1000 CVC days]. The maximum treatment period was 2 y or until occurrence of a CRBSI or right-censoring because......Background: In patients with intestinal failure who are receiving home parenteral support (HPS), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) inflict health impairment and high costs.Objective: This study investigates the efficacy and safety of the antimicrobial catheter lock solution.......02).Conclusions: In patients with intestinal failure who are life dependent on HPS, the taurolidine-citrate-heparin catheter lock demonstrates a clinically substantial and cost-beneficial reduction of CRBSI occurrence in a high-risk population compared with heparin. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials...

  6. ERMHAN: A Context-Aware Service Platform to Support Continuous Care Networks for Home-Based Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Paganelli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous care models for chronic diseases pose several technology-oriented challenges for home-based continuous care, where assistance services rely on a close collaboration among different stakeholders such as health operators, patient relatives, and social community members. Here we describe Emilia Romagna Mobile Health Assistance Network (ERMHAN a multichannel context-aware service platform designed to support care networks in cooperating and sharing information with the goal of improving patient quality of life. In order to meet extensibility and flexibility requirements, this platform has been developed through ontology-based context-aware computing and a service oriented approach. We also provide some preliminary results of performance analysis and user survey activity.

  7. ERMHAN: A Context-Aware Service Platform to Support Continuous Care Networks for Home-Based Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Federica; Spinicci, Emilio; Giuli, Dino

    2008-01-01

    Continuous care models for chronic diseases pose several technology-oriented challenges for home-based continuous care, where assistance services rely on a close collaboration among different stakeholders such as health operators, patient relatives, and social community members. Here we describe Emilia Romagna Mobile Health Assistance Network (ERMHAN) a multichannel context-aware service platform designed to support care networks in cooperating and sharing information with the goal of improving patient quality of life. In order to meet extensibility and flexibility requirements, this platform has been developed through ontology-based context-aware computing and a service oriented approach. We also provide some preliminary results of performance analysis and user survey activity. PMID:18695739

  8. The efficacy of unsupervised home?based exercise regimens in comparison to supervised laboratory?based exercise training upon cardio?respiratory health facets

    OpenAIRE

    Blackwell, James; Atherton, Philip J.; Smith, Kenneth; Doleman, Brett; Williams, John P.; Lund, Jonathan N.; Phillips, Bethan E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Supervised high?intensity interval training (HIIT) can rapidly improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). However, the effectiveness of time?efficient unsupervised home?based interventions is unknown. Eighteen volunteers completed either: laboratory?HIIT (L?HIIT); home?HIIT (H?HIIT) or home?isometric hand?grip training (H?IHGT). CRF improved significantly in L?HIIT and H?HIIT groups, with blood pressure improvements in the H?IHGT group only. H?HIIT offers a practical, time?efficient ex...

  9. A randomized, controlled study to evaluate the role of an in-home asthma disease management program provided by respiratory therapists in improving outcomes and reducing the cost of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelledy, David C; Legrand, Terry S; Gardner, Donna D; Peters, Jay I

    2009-03-01

    Asthma management programs (AMP) may reduce costs and improve outcomes in patients with moderate to severe asthma. However, it is not known which personnel are best able to deliver such interventions and what settings are most effective. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an in-home AMP provided by respiratory therapists (RTs) to an AMP provided by nurses (RNs) and to usual care (UC) provided in physician offices or clinics. Subjects (age 18-64) who had been admitted to the emergency department (ED) or hospital for acute asthma exacerbation were randomized to three groups: AMP-RT, AMP-RN or UC. The AMP groups received five (5) weekly home visits to provide assessment and instruction; the UC group was instructed to return to their physician for routine follow-up. Outcomes assessed at 6 months included hospitalizations, in patient days, hospitalization cost, ED visits and cost, clinic visits, pulmonary function, symptoms, health related quality of life (HRQOL), asthma episode self-management score (AESM), environmental assessment, and patient satisfaction (PS). Variables were compared using ANOVA with a Neuman-Keuls follow-up for multiple comparisons using an intent-to-treat approach. Upon enrollment, (n = 159) there were no differences (p > .05) between groups for age, gender, pulmonary function or HRQOL (SF-36 and St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire - SGRQ). At 6 months, both AMP groups (AMP-RN n = 54; AMP-RT n = 46) had significantly fewer (p management program can be effectively delivered by respiratory therapists and may reduce hospitalizations, in-patient days, cost and improve measures of HRQOL and PS in a population prone to asthma exacerbation.

  10. [Progress of introduction of artificial respirator at home--the knowledge I have gained from a 19 year-old patient requiring a home respiratory management care and through the friendship with his family members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Tomomi; Shibano, Nobuko; Nakamura, Hiroko; Miyahara, Shigeyoshi; Imamura, Takaki; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2002-12-01

    The patient developed right cerebellar hemorrhage at the age of 15 and spent four years at hospital. The patient and the family members had a strong wish to bring the patient back home and the patient was admitted to the hospital to undergo guidance about home medical care. The patient had paralysis of right upper and lower extremities and generalized strong ataxic motion and was under gastric feeding and had underwent tracheotomy to cope with hypoventilation, which required use of an artificial respirator at night hours. Since the patient was still as young as 19, we want to have the patient "go home" as they wanted. Fortunately, the mother who had to play key roles was still young and the parents worked at home. It didn't take long for them to master the techniques though they had various anxieties. It is considered important in the guidance on home medical care to what degrees the caregivers accept the condition of the patient and can imagine the long lasting care at home. We provided assistance while repeatedly interviewing with the patient and family members considering the significance to confirm their willingness and psychological condition. As a result, the patient was discharged from the hospital in two months. Now, two years have passed, and the patient is still cared at home and the possibility of the patient is sought for. The progress is reported here in this article.

  11. Adherencia de planes caseros de terapia respiratoria en pacientes con enfermedades crónicas del programa de atención domiciliaria, Cali, 2014 / Adherence to home respiratory therapy plans among patients with chronic diseases from the home care program, Cali, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisbed Naranjo-Rojas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Objetivo: Determinar la adherencia de los planes caseros de terapia respiratoria en pacientes con enfermedades crónicas de un programa de atención domiciliaria, cuyos tratamientos incluyen prácticas de terapias respiratorias en la ciudad de Santiago de Cali – Colombia. Metodología: Se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo y de corte transversal. La población de estudio correspondió a 83 adultos entre 45 y 85 años con patologías crónicas, no alterara las funciones cognitivas, pertenecientes al programa de terapia respiratoria de la ips sisanar. Se diseñó una encuesta dirigida al paciente y cuidadores primarios. Resultados: El comportamiento entre las variables analizadas no fue paralelo, en ambas variables bien sea por factores como el tipo de afiliación, caso que correspondería al Plan casero Vs sgsss, mientras que el segundo de ellos presenta un comportamiento que refleja una diferencia en el número de sesiones realizadas por mes y las actividades registradas en el plan casero. Discusión: Este estudio encontró que los planes caseros muestran que la adherencia es efectiva pero depende del alto grado del manejo que se dé inicialmente desde los Sistemas de Seguridad Social al que pertenezcan los pacientes y al cumplimiento de las actividades. / Abstract Objective: to assess the adherence to home respiratory therapy plans in patients with chronic diseases from a home care program whose treatments include respiratory therapy practice in the city of Santiago de Cali, Colombia. This study focused mainly on the patients affiliated to the home care program of the SISANAR health care providing institution. Methodology: an observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. The studied population consisted of 83 adults aged 45 to 85 with chronic pathologies which did not alter cognitive functions. These patients were part of the respiratory therapy program of the SISANAR health care providing institution

  12. The role of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool in palliative home care: A qualitative study of practitioners' perspectives of its impact and mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Gail; Austin, Lynn; Grande, Gunn

    2016-04-01

    The importance of supporting family carers is well recognised in healthcare policy. The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool is an evidence-based, comprehensive measure of carer support needs to facilitate carer support in palliative home care. To examine practitioner perspectives of the role of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool intervention in palliative home care to identify its impact and mechanisms of action. Qualitative - practitioner accounts of implementation (interviews, focus groups, reflective audio diaries) plus researcher field notes. A total of 29 staff members from two hospice home-care services - contrasting geographical locations, different service sizes and staff composition. A thematic analysis was conducted. Existing approaches to identification of carer needs were informal and unstructured. Practitioners expressed some concerns, pre-implementation, about negative impacts of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool on carers and expectations raised about support available. In contrast, post-implementation, the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool provided positive impacts when used as part of a carer-led assessment and support process: it made support needs visible, legitimised support for carers and opened up different conversations with carers. The mechanisms of action that enabled the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool to make a difference were creating space for the separate needs of carers, providing an opportunity for carers to express support needs and responding to carers' self-defined priorities. The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool delivered benefits through a change in practice to an identifiable, separate assessment process for carers, facilitated by practitioners but carer-led. Used routinely with all carers, the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool has the potential to normalise carer assessment and support, facilitate delivery of carer-identified support and enable effective targeting of resources. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Can specially trained community care workers effectively support patients and their families in the home setting at the end of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Roslyn G; Harkin, Damian; Poulos, Christopher J; Cole, Andrew; MacLeod, Rod

    2017-11-21

    Surveys indicate that many Australians would prefer to die at home, but relatively few do. Recognising that patients and their families may not have the support they need to enable end-of-life care at home, a consortium of care providers developed, and received funding to trial, the Palliative Care Home Support Program (PCHSP) across seven health districts in New South Wales, Australia. The programme aimed to supplement end-of-life care in the home provided by existing multidisciplinary community palliative care teams, with specialist supportive community care workers (CCWs). An evaluation of the service was undertaken, focussing on the self-reported impact of the service on family carers (FCs), with triangulation of findings from community palliative care teams and CCWs. Service evaluation data were obtained through postal surveys and/or qualitative interviews with FCs, community palliative care teams and CCWs. FCs also reported the experience of their loved one based on 10 items drawn from the Quality of Death and Dying Questionnaire (QODD). Thematic analysis of surveys and interviews found that the support provided by CCWs was valued by FCs for: enabling choice (i.e. to realise end-of-life care in the home); providing practical assistance ("hands-on"); and for emotional support and reassurance. This was corroborated by community palliative care teams and CCWs. Responses by FCs on the QODD items indicated that in the last week of life, effective control of symptoms was occurring and quality of life was being maintained. This study suggests that satisfactory outcomes for patients and their families who wish to have end-of-life care in the home can be enabled with the additional support of specially trained CCWs. A notable benefit of the PCHSP model, which provided specific palliative care vocational training to an existing community care workforce, was a relatively rapid increase in the palliative care workforce across the state. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Home Discharge and Out-of-Hospital Follow-Up of Total Artificial Heart Patients Supported by a Portable Driver System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To enhance ambulation and facilitate hospital discharge of total artificial heart (TAH)–supported patients, we adapted a mobile ventricular assistance device (VAD) driver (Excor) for TAH use and report on the performance of Excor-driven TAH patients discharged home. Ten patients stabilized on a TAH, driven by the CSS (“Circulatory Support System”), were progressively switched over to the Excor in hospital over 14 days as a pilot, with daily hemodynamics and laboratory parameters measured. Twenty-two stable TAH patients were subsequently placed on the Excor, trained, and discharged home. Clinical and hemodynamic parameters were followed. All pilot study patients were clinically stable on the Excor, with no decrease in TAH output noted (6.3 + 0.3 L/min [day 1] vs. 5.8 + 0.2 L/min [day 14], p = 0.174), with a trend suggesting improvement of both hepatic and renal function. Twenty-two TAH patients were subsequently successfully discharged home on the portable driver and were supported out of hospital for up to 598 days (range, 2–598; mean = 179 ± 140 days), remaining ambulatory, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I or II, and free of readmission for 88.5% of the time of support. TAH patients may be effectively and safely supported by a mobile drive system. As such, the utility of the TAH may be extended to support patients beyond the hospital, at home, with overall ambulatory freedom. PMID:24577369

  15. Managing respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Sarah; Restrick, Louise; Stern, Myra

    2017-02-01

    The diverse and evolving role of a psychologist within a respiratory multidisciplinary team (MDT) is described, providing a working model for service provision. The rationale for appointing a psychologist within a respiratory MDT is presented first, citing relevant policy and research and outlining the wider psychosocial impact of respiratory disease. This is followed by an insight into the psychologist's role by highlighting important areas, including key therapy themes and the challenge of patient engagement. The way in which the psychologist supports the collective aims and aspirations of respiratory colleagues to provide a more holistic package of care is illustrated throughout.

  16. Home-made continuous positive airways pressure device may reduce mortality in neonates with respiratory distress in low-resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Subhashchandra; Mhatre, Sameer; Borhade, Anushree; Khan, Danish

    2014-10-01

    To study the effectiveness of locally assembled low-cost version for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivery. Babies with respiratory distress from two contiguous periods, one with CPAP therapy and the other without, were compared for following parameters: birth weight, gestational age, severity of respiratory distress, as assessed by Silverman-Anderson retraction score (SARS), maximum SARS, days taken for score to become 0, duration of oxygen therapy, hospital stay and the outcome. The profile of subjects was comparable in two groups. Severity of respiratory distress (SARS) was significantly higher in post-CPAP group. Time taken for SARS to become 0 and number of deaths were significantly lower, and the duration of oxygen administration and hospital stay were significantly higher in post-CPAP group. The cost of an individual disposable CPAP unit was ∼Rs 160 (USD 3). A low-cost and locally assembled CPAP delivery system may reduce neonatal mortality among babies with respiratory distress. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Association between social support and health-related quality of life among Chinese rural elders in nursing homes: the mediating role of resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menglian; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Dan; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yaoyao; Xie, Hui; Jia, Jihui; Su, Yonggang; Li, Yuqin

    2017-11-09

    This study aims to confirm the relationship between social support and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among rural Chinese elders in nursing homes, and to examine the mediating role of resilience in the impact of social support on HRQOL. A cross-sectional survey of 205 elders aged 60 and above was conducted in five rural public nursing homes. Sociodemographic characteristics, the SF-36 questionnaire, and information about social support and resilience were collected. The researchers administered the questionnaires to the participants in a face-to-face setting. Descriptive analysis and a correlation matrix were used to indicate characteristics of the participants and bivariate correlations, respectively. The mediation analyses, composed of regression analysis and PROCESS analysis, were preformed to test both direct and indirect effects of social support on HRQOL, namely the mediating role of resilience. Social support was positively related to HRQOL (β = 0.303, p social support and HRQOL was confirmed (a*b bootstrapped 95% confidence interval = [0.098, 0.257]), which revealed that social support had an indirect effect on HRQOL through resilience. Resilience partially mediates the relationship between social support and HRQOL. The mediation model provides a better understanding of how social support and resilience work together to affect HRQOL, and it could guide the interventions in health care for promoting HRQOL among Chinese rural elders in nursing homes.

  18. The Third-Person Effect in Family Power Relationship: Gender Differences and Supporting Behaviors in Digit Home Related Self-Other Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the social/family-embedded third-person effect, an island-wide survey was conducted to test the hypotheses. The statistic results mostly support the contextualized arguments: Gender differences are found around the understanding and use of family digital technologies, whereas women with more power and resources at home tend to have some significant first-person perceptual disparity. For men, the perceived discrepancy between the impacts of digital home on themselves and on other people leads to the supportive behavior, but it is not the case for women.

  19. Organizational Justice and Perceived Organizational Support: Impact on Negative Work-Home Interference and Well-being Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Babic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that negative work-home interference (NegWHI impacts upon several work attitudes and behaviors. In the interests of both organizational effectiveness and employee well-being, it is important to identify concepts related to NegWHI and investigate their effects on well-being outcomes. This study examines the mediating role of (1 perceived organizational support (POS in the relationship between organizational justice (OJ and NegWHI; and (2 NegWHI in the relationships between POS and four well-being outcomes. A total of 509 employees of a Belgian hospital were surveyed. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling and the bootstrapping method. Results showed that POS partially mediates the relationships between distributive and passive procedural justice and NegWHI, and fully mediates the relationship between the other justice dimensions and NegWHI. NegWHI partially mediates the relationships between POS and both job satisfaction and intention to quit, and fully mediates the relationship between POS and job strain. Furthermore, POS is positively related to job engagement. This study showed that organizations can help employees to better manage their work and family lives and reduce the impact of NegWHI by enhancing employees’ feeling that they are supported by their organization. In order to increase POS, organizations need to promote justice in the workplace.

  20. Out-of-home eating frequency, causal attribution of obesity and support to healthy eating policies from a cross-European survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura D'Addezio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relation between the increased out-of-home food consumption and the rising of overweight and obesity prevalence rates has been widely assessed, and the a key role played by the catering sector in ensuring healthy food choices has been recognised. Governments’ healthy eating policies have a wide range of action, influencing consumer behavior, and the socioeconomic and  food environments, with specific actions for the catering sector. Information on the public support for these policies could help policy makers in planning decisions. This study aims to investigate the relationship of out-of-home eating frequency with beliefs about obesity causes, support to healthy eating policies, and with socio-demographic factors.Methods: Data on 3003 individuals from Belgium, Denmark, Italy, Poland and United Kingdom, of both sexes, aged ≥16 years, were employed, from the European survey on policy preferences (Eatwell. Data were analysed through Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis.Results: Out-of-home eating varied with gender, age, marital status, education, BMI, and by country. Convenience food consumption was positively associated with obesity attribution to genetics, and inversely associated with attribution to lack of willpower. Attributions of obesity to lack of time, and to lack of self-control were associated with increased likelihood to consume fast-food and ready-prepared food respectively. Out-of-home eating people expressed higher support for information-based prevention, and actions aimed at healthier out-of-home eating, and lower support for restrictions and regulations of the food supply environment.Conclusion: Future research on out-of-home food consumers and their support towards public interventions for the catering sector, could have important implications for effective strategies to promote healthy eating.

  1. The effects on smokers of Boston's smoke-free bar ordinance: a longitudinal analysis of changes in compliance, patronage, policy support, and smoking at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Lois; Garrett, Catherine A; Skeer, Margie; Siegel, Michael; Connolly, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    We prospectively examined effects of the implementation of a smoking ban in bars on Boston, Massachusetts, smokers. A representative sample of Massachusetts smokers was interviewed before and after the smoking ban was implemented in Boston. Participants were adult smokers living in Boston (n = 83) and in 203 other Massachusetts cities and towns that did not adopt smoking bans in bars prior to July 2004 (n = 903). The outcome measures were changes in reports of smoking in bars, frequency of bar patronage, support for smoke-free bars, smoking at home, and exposure to secondhand smoke at home based on town of residence. Compared to changes over the same time period among smokers in towns where smoking in bars was permitted, smokers in Boston were significantly less likely to observe smoking and less likely to decrease their bar patronage after the smoking ban was implemented. Changes in support for smoke-free bars, smoking patterns at home, and exposure to secondhand smoke at home did not differ between the groups. Expectations about noncompliance, declines in patronage, and displacement of smoking to the home as a consequence of extending smoking restrictions to bars are not supported by the data.

  2. Utilisation of home-based physician, nurse and personal support worker services within a palliative care programme in Ontario, Canada: trends over 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuolu; Laporte, Audrey; Guerriere, Denise N; Coyte, Peter C

    2017-05-01

    With health system restructuring in Canada and a general preference by care recipients and their families to receive palliative care at home, attention to home-based palliative care continues to increase. A multidisciplinary team of health professionals is the most common delivery model for home-based palliative care in Canada. However, little is known about the changing temporal trends in the propensity and intensity of home-based palliative care. The purpose of this study was to assess the propensity to use home-based palliative care services, and once used, the intensity of that use for three main service categories: physician visits, nurse visits and care by personal support workers (PSWs) over the last decade. Three prospective cohort data sets were used to track changes in service use over the period 2005 to 2015. Service use for each category was assessed using a two-part model, and a Heckit regression was performed to assess the presence of selectivity bias. Service propensity was modelled using multivariate logistic regression analysis and service intensity was modelled using log-transformed ordinary least squares regression analysis. Both the propensity and intensity to use home-based physician visits and PSWs increased over the last decade, while service propensity and the intensity of nurse visits decreased. Meanwhile, there was a general tendency for service propensity and intensity to increase as the end of life approached. These findings demonstrate temporal changes towards increased use of home-based palliative care, and a shift to substitute care away from nursing to less expensive forms of care, specifically PSWs. These findings may provide a general idea of the types of services that are used more intensely and require more resources from multidisciplinary teams, as increased use of home-based palliative care has placed dramatic pressures on the budgets of local home and community care organisations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparison of effects between home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only for transitional discharge support: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chow, Susan Ka Yee; Chan, Tony Moon Fai; Tam, Stanley Kui Fu

    2014-01-01

    home visits and telephone calls are two often used approaches in transitional care but their differential effects are unknown. to examine the overall effects of a transitional care programme for discharged medical patients and the differential effects of telephone calls only. randomised controlled trial. a regional hospital in Hong Kong. patients discharged from medical units fitting the inclusion criteria (n = 610) were randomly assigned to: control ('control', n = 210), home visits with calls ('home', n = 196) and calls only ('call', n = 204). the home groups received alternative home visits and calls and the call groups calls only for 4 weeks. The control group received two placebo calls. The nurse case manager was supported by nursing students in delivering the interventions. the home visit group (after 4 weeks 10.7%, after 12 weeks 21.4%) and the call group (11.8, 20.6%) had lower readmission rates than the control group (17.6, 25.7%). Significance differences were detected in intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis for the home and intervention group (home and call combined) at 4 weeks. In the per-protocol analysis (PPA) results, significant differences were found in all groups at 4 weeks. There was significant improvement in quality of life, self-efficacy and satisfaction in both ITT and PPA for the study groups. this study has found that bundled interventions involving both home visits and calls are more effective in reducing readmissions. Many of the transitional care programmes use all-qualified nurses, and this study reveals that a mixed skills model seems to bring about positive effects as well.

  4. Economic and health consequences of non-invasive respiratory support in newborn infants: a difference-in-difference analysis using data from the Norwegian patient registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Inger Cathrine; Solevåg, Anne Lee

    2014-11-01

    Newborn infants with respiratory failure are often treated with intubation and mechanical ventilation for prolonged periods of time. Our objective was to evaluate whether increasing use of non-invasive respiratory support in newborn infants can improve patient health and reduce costs. We utilized a natural experiment that took place in October 2008 when a large neonatal intensive care unit in Norway moved into a new hospital building with new medical equipment. A change in respiratory support towards increasing use of nasal biphasic positive airway pressure (n-BiPAP) instead of invasive mechanical ventilation treatment followed the acquisition of the new equipment. We used a difference-in-difference method and data from the Norwegian National Patient Registry to assess morbidity, mortality, number of hospital days and hospital costs in our unit following this change. We stratified the results according to gestational age groups. We found a reduction in morbidity including bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and intraventricular hemorrhage. No change in mortality was found. We found a reduction in number of hospital days and hospital costs for preterm infants with gestational age <28 weeks and for term infants with diagnoses affecting respiration. We conclude that increasing use of n-BiPAP may improve health and reduce costs. However, more research is needed to establish best practice. Comparing hospitals where treatment practices change to hospitals where the same change does not occur may be a useful way to evaluate the efficacy of such a change, especially when hospitals can be studied over time.

  5. The efficacy of unsupervised home-based exercise regimens in comparison to supervised laboratory-based exercise training upon cardio-respiratory health facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, James; Atherton, Philip J; Smith, Kenneth; Doleman, Brett; Williams, John P; Lund, Jonathan N; Phillips, Bethan E

    2017-09-01

    Supervised high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can rapidly improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). However, the effectiveness of time-efficient unsupervised home-based interventions is unknown. Eighteen volunteers completed either: laboratory-HIIT (L-HIIT); home-HIIT (H-HIIT) or home-isometric hand-grip training (H-IHGT). CRF improved significantly in L-HIIT and H-HIIT groups, with blood pressure improvements in the H-IHGT group only. H-HIIT offers a practical, time-efficient exercise mode to improve CRF, away from the laboratory environment. H-IHGT potentially provides a viable alternative to modify blood pressure in those unable to participate in whole-body exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  6. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Development and pilot evaluation of a home-based palliative care training and support package for young children in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, Sara Naomi; Richter, Linda; Stein, Alan; Campbell, Laura; Marston, Joan

    2016-04-09

    The leading cause of death among young children in southern Africa is complications due to HIV infection and, in South Africa, over a third of all deaths of children younger than five are associated with HIV infection. There is a great and urgent need for children's palliative care in Africa, whether HIV-related or not. It is often not possible for sick children and their carers to attend clinics and hospitals cannot accommodate children for long periods of time. As a result children are often cared for in their own homes where caregivers require support to provide informed and sensitive care to reduce children's suffering. Home-care places a heavy burden on families, communities and home- and community-based care workers. This project involved the development and pilot evaluation of a training and support package to guide home and community-based care workers to help caregivers of seriously ill young children at home in southern Africa. A number of research methods were used, including a cross-sectional survey of content experts using the Delphi technique, participatory action research with photo elicitation and qualitative thematic analysis. Because the palliative care needs of these children are complex, the package focuses on delivering 9 key messages essential to improving the quality of care provided for young children. Once the key messages were developed, culturally relevant stories were constructed to enhance the understanding, retention and enactment of the messages. The various research methods used, including literature reviews, the Delphi technique and photo-elicitation ensured that the content included in the package was medically sound and culturally relevant, acceptable, feasible, and comprehensive. The end product is a home-based paediatric palliative care training and support package in English designed to help train community workers who are in a position to support families to care for very sick young children at home as well as to support

  8. Evaluation of a support worker role, within a nurse delegation and supervision model, for provision of medicines support for older people living at home: the Workforce Innovation for Safe and Effective (WISE) Medicines Care study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cik Yin; Beanland, Christine; Goeman, Dianne; Johnson, Ann; Thorn, Juliet; Koch, Susan; Elliott, Rohan A

    2015-10-06

    Support with managing medicines at home is a common reason for older people to receive community nursing services. With population ageing and projected nurse shortages, reliance on nurses may not be sustainable. We developed and tested a new workforce model: 'Workforce Innovation for Safe and Effective (WISE) Medicines Care', which enabled nurses to delegate medicines support home visits for low-risk clients to support workers (known as community care aides [CCAs]). Primary study aims were to assess whether the model increased the number of medicines support home visits conducted by CCAs, explore nurses', CCAs' and consumers' experiences with the CCAs' expanded role, and identify enablers and barriers to delegation of medicines support. A prospective before-after mixed-methods study was conducted within a community nursing service that employed a small number of CCAs. The CCAs' main role prior to the WISE Medicines Care model was personal care, with a very limited role in medicines support. CCAs received training in medicines support, and nurses received training in assessment, delegation and supervision. Home visit data over two three-month periods were compared. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with purposive samples of nurses (n = 27), CCAs (n = 7) and consumers (n = 28). Medicines support visits by CCAs increased from 43/16,863 (0.25 %) to 714/21,552 (3.3 %) (p Nurses reported mostly positive experiences, and high levels of trust and confidence in CCAs. They reported that delegating to CCAs sometimes eliminated the need for duplicate nurse and CCA visits (for people requiring personal care plus medicines support) and enabled them to visit people with more complex needs. CCAs enjoyed their expanded role and were accepted by clients and/or carers. Nurses and CCAs reported effective communication when medicine-related problems occurred. No medication incidents involving CCAs were reported. Barriers to implementation included the limited

  9. 'I am stronger, I'm no longer afraid…', an evaluation of a home-visiting mentor mother support programme for abused women in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosman, Gert-Jan; Lo Fo Wong, Sylvie H; Römkens, Renée; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to investigate which factors make a mentor mother support programme for abused women successful. We used semi-structured interviews with abused women and focus group discussions with the mentor mothers to evaluate their experiences and needs within a mentor support programme (MeMoSA). Fourteen abused women were interviewed 6 months after the support programme ended. Mentor mothers participated in two focus group discussions. Abused women emphasised that nonjudgmental listening, equivalence, involvement and bonding are important factors for successful support. Mentor mothers described that empathy, availability, persistence and advocacy fitted the needs of women best to empower them and help them to cope with their violent situation at home. A safe place to meet each other was also an important factor. A good relationship, tailored support provided by home visiting, advocacy and safety are required to effectively help abused women. MeMoSA, a home-visiting support programme, is a promising valuable new support programme in primary care for abused women. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Building dampness and mold in European homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey ECRHS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, D; Zock, J-P; Plana, E; Heinrich, J; Tischer, C; Jacobsen Bertelsen, R; Sunyer, J; Künzli, N; Villani, S; Olivieri, M; Verlato, G; Soon, A; Schlünssen, V; Gunnbjörnsdottir, M I; Jarvis, D

    2017-09-01

    We studied dampness and mold in homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status (SES) across Europe, for 7127 homes in 22 centers. A subsample of 3118 homes was inspected. Multilevel analysis was applied, including age, gender, center, SES, climate, and building factors. Self-reported water damage (10%), damp spots (21%), and mold (16%) in past year were similar as observed data (19% dampness and 14% mold). Ambient temperature was associated with self-reported water damage (OR=1.63 per 10°C; 95% CI 1.02-2.63), damp spots (OR=2.95; 95% CI 1.98-4.39), and mold (OR=2.28; 95% CI 1.04-4.67). Precipitation was associated with water damage (OR=1.12 per 100 mm; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) and damp spots (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.20). Ambient relative air humidity was not associated with indoor dampness and mold. Older buildings had more dampness and mold (Pbuilding age can be risk factors for dampness and mold in homes in Europe. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. PalliPA: How can general practices support caregivers of patients at their end of life in a home-care setting? A study protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermann, K.; Boelter, R.; Engeser, P.; Szecsenyi, J.; Campbell, S.M.; Peters-Klimm, F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The care of patients with a life-threatening, progressive and far advanced illness in a home-care setting requires appropriate individual care and requires the active support of family caregivers. General practice teams are usually the primary care givers and first contact and are best

  12. The SKI*HI Model: A Comprehensive Model for Identification, Language Facilitation, and Family Support for Hearing Handicapped Children Through Home Management, Ages Birth to Six. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas C.; Watkins, Susan

    The SKI HI program, a home intervention model for hearing impaired infants and their families, is described. An overview of the program is provided, followed by separate sections on administrative, direct service, and support service topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): child identification and processing (statewide hearing screening model,…

  13. The moderating role of decision authority and coworker- and supervisor support on the impact of job demands in nursing homes: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, B.M.; de Jonge, J.; Smit, D.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Pot, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Healthcare workers in nursing homes are faced with high job demands that can have a detrimental impact on job-related outcomes, such as job satisfaction. Job resources may have a buffering role on this relationship. The Demand-Control-Support (DCS) Model offers a theoretical framework to

  14. A multi-faceted tailored strategy to implement an electronic clinical decision support system for pressure ulcer prevention in nursing homes: A two-armed randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeckman, D.; Clays, E.; Hecke, A. Van; Vanderwee, K.; Schoonhoven, L.; Verhaeghe, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail older people admitted to nursing homes are at risk of a range of adverse outcomes, including pressure ulcers. Clinical decision support systems are believed to have the potential to improve care and to change the behaviour of healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVES: To determine

  15. Organisation, regulations, preparation and logistics of parenteral nutrition in hospitals and homes; the role of the nutrition support team - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, S C; Kester, L; Meier, R; Radziwill, R; Schwab, D; Thul, P

    2009-11-18

    PN (parenteral nutrition) should be standardised to ensure quality and to reduce complications, and it should be carried out in consultation with a specialised nutrition support team whenever possible. Interdisciplinary nutrition support teams should be established in all hospitals because effectiveness and efficiency in the implementation of PN are increased. The tasks of the team include improvements of quality of care as well as enhancing the benefit to cost ratio. Therapeutic decisions must be taken by attending physicians, who should collaborate with the nutrition support team. "All-in-One" bags are generally preferred for PN in hospitals and may be industrially manufactured, industrially manufactured with the necessity to add micronutrients, or be prepared "on-demand" within or outside the hospital according to a standardised or individual composition and under consideration of sterile and aseptic conditions. A standardised procedure should be established for introduction and advancement of enteral or oral nutrition. Home PN may be indicated if the expected duration of when PN exceeds 4 weeks. Home PN is a well established method for providing long-term PN, which should be indicated by the attending physician and be reviewed by the nutrition support team. The care of home PN patients should be standardised whenever possible. The indication for home PN should be regularly reviewed during the course of PN.

  16. Organisation, regulations, preparation and logistics of parenteral nutrition in hospitals and homes; the role of the nutrition support team – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kester, L.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available PN (parenteral nutrition should be standardised to ensure quality and to reduce complications, and it should be carried out in consultation with a specialised nutrition support team whenever possible. Interdisciplinary nutrition support teams should be established in all hospitals because effectiveness and efficiency in the implementation of PN are increased. The tasks of the team include improvements of quality of care as well as enhancing the benefit to cost ratio. Therapeutic decisions must be taken by attending physicians, who should collaborate with the nutrition support team. “All-in-One” bags are generally preferred for PN in hospitals and may be industrially manufactured, industrially manufactured with the necessity to add micronutrients, or be prepared “on-demand” within or outside the hospital according to a standardised or individual composition and under consideration of sterile and aseptic conditions. A standardised procedure should be established for introduction and advancement of enteral or oral nutrition. Home PN may be indicated if the expected duration of when PN exceeds 4 weeks. Home PN is a well established method for providing long-term PN, which should be indicated by the attending physician and be reviewed by the nutrition support team. The care of home PN patients should be standardised whenever possible. The indication for home PN should be regularly reviewed during the course of PN.

  17. Web-based ehealth to support counseling in routine well-child Care: Pilot study of e-health4uth home safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E.J. van Scholing-van Beelen (Mirjam); I. Vogel (Ineke); T.M.J. Beirens (Tinneke); G. Kloek (Gitte); P. den Hertog (Paul); M.D. van der Veen (Monique Désirée); H. Raat (Hein)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Providing safety education to parents of young children is important in the prevention of unintentional injuries in or around the home. We developed a Web-based, tailored safety advice module to support face-to-face counseling in the setting of preventive youth health care

  18. The IVAIRE project--a randomized controlled study of the impact of ventilation on indoor air quality and the respiratory symptoms of asthmatic children in single family homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, P; Aubin, D; Gingras, V; Daigneault, P; Ducharme, F; Gauvin, D; Fugler, D; Leclerc, J-M; Won, D; Courteau, M; Gingras, S; Héroux, M-È; Yang, W; Schleibinger, H

    2015-12-01

    A randomized controlled trial was carried out to measure the impact of an intervention on ventilation, indoor air contaminants, and asthma symptoms of children. Eighty-three asthmatic children living in low-ventilated homes were followed over 2 years. Several environmental parameters were measured during the summer, fall, and winter. The children were randomized after Year 1 (43 Intervention; 40 Control). The intervention included the installation of either a Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) or Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV). During the fall and winter seasons, there was a significant increase in the mean ventilation rate in the homes of the intervention group. A statistically significant reduction in mean formaldehyde, airborne mold spores, toluene, styrene, limonene, and α-pinene concentrations was observed in the intervention group. There was no significant group difference in change in the number of days with symptoms per 14 days. However, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of children who experienced any wheezing (≥1 episode) and those with ≥4 episodes in the 12-month period in the intervention group. This study indicates that improved ventilation reduces air contaminants and may prevent wheezing. Due to lack of power, a bigger study is needed. Positive findings from this study include the fact that, upon recruitment, most of the single family homes with asthmatic children were already equipped with a mechanical ventilation system and had relatively good indoor air quality. However, the 8-h indoor guideline for formaldehyde (50 μg/m3) was frequently exceeded and the ventilation rates were low in most of the homes, even those with a ventilation system. Both ERVs and HRVs were equally effective at increasing air exchange rates above 0.30 ACH and at preventing formaldehyde concentrations from exceeding the 50 μg/m3 guideline during the fall and winter seasons. Furthermore, the ERVs were effective at preventing excessively low relative

  19. An ethnographic study of strategies to support discussions with family members on end-of-life care for people with advanced dementia in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Geena; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Davis, Sarah; Kupeli, Nuriye; Harrington, Jane; Leavey, Gerard; Nazareth, Irwin; Jones, Louise; Moore, Kirsten J

    2016-07-07

    Most people with advanced dementia die in nursing homes where families may have to make decisions as death approaches. Discussions about end-of-life care between families and nursing home staff are uncommon, despite a range of potential benefits. In this study we aimed to examine practices relating to end-of-life discussions with family members of people with advanced dementia residing in nursing homes and to explore strategies for improving practice. An ethnographic study in two nursing homes where the Compassion Intervention was delivered. The Compassion Intervention provides a model of end-of-life care engaging an Interdisciplinary Care Leader to promote integrated care, educate staff, support holistic assessments and discuss end of life with families. We used a framework approach, undertaking a thematic analysis of fieldwork notes and observations recorded in a reflective diary kept by the Interdisciplinary Care Leader, and data from in-depth interviews with 23 informants: family members, GPs, nursing home staff, and external healthcare professionals. Four major themes described strategies for improving practice: (i) educating families and staff about dementia progression and end-of-life care; (ii) appreciating the greater value of in-depth end-of-life discussions compared with simple documentation of care preferences; (iii) providing time and space for sensitive discussions; and (iv) having an independent healthcare professional or team with responsibility for end-of-life discussions. The Interdisciplinary Care Leader role offers a promising method for supporting and improving end-of-life care discussions between families of people with advanced dementia and nursing home staff. These strategies warrant further evaluation in nursing home settings.

  20. Descriptive study of carers' support, encouragement and modelling of healthy lifestyle behaviours in residential out-of-home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rachael; Skouteris, Helen; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Jones, Amanda D; Gallant, David; Omerogullari, Stella; Miller, Robyn; Hardy, Louise L

    2015-12-01

    Given the high prevalence of overweight/obesity among young people in residential out-of-home care (OOHC), and as their carers are in loco parentis, this research aimed: 1) to examine the healthy lifestyle cognitions and behaviours of residential carers; and 2) to describe resources needed to improve diet and/or physical activity outcomes for residents. Cross-sectional data were collected from 243 residential carers. Measures included: demographics; knowledge of dietary/physical activity recommendations; self-reported encouragement/importance of health behaviours; physical activity/screen time (at work); unit 'healthiness'; and necessary resources for creating a healthy environment. Staff placed importance on the residents eating well and being physically active. However, examination of carer knowledge found significant gaps in staff education. Three key priority areas were identified to help build a healthy food and activity environment in residential OOHC: funding, professional development and policy. Carer knowledge of healthy lifestyles can be improved and they need to be well resourced to ensure children in public care settings live in a healthy environment. These findings may inform the development of ongoing professional development to improve carers' health literacy, as well as policy to support dietary/activity guidelines for the OOHC sector. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  1. "Pharming out" support: a promising approach to integrating clinical pharmacists into established primary care medical home practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunisholz, Kimberly D; Olson, Jeff; Anderson, Jonathan W; Hays, Emily; Tilbury, Peggy M; Winter, Bradley; Rickard, Josh; Hamilton, Sharon; Parkin, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Objective Embedding clinical pharmacists into ambulatory care settings needs to be assessed in the context of established medical home models. Methods A retrospective, observational study examined the effectiveness of the Intermountain Healthcare Collaborative Pharmacist Support Services (CPSS) program from 2012-2015 among adult patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM) and/or high blood pressure (HBP). Patients who attended this program were considered the intervention (CPSS) cohort. These patients were matched using propensity scores with a reference group (no-CPSS cohort) to determine the effect of achieving disease management goals and time to achievement. Results A total of 17,684 patients had an in-person office visit with their provider and 359 received CPSS (the matched no-CPSS cohort included 999 patients). CPSS patients were 93% more likely to achieve a blood pressure goal < 140/90 mmHg, 57% more likely to achieve HbA1c values < 8%, and 87% more likely to achieve both disease management goals compared with the reference group. Time to goal achievement demonstrated increasing separation between the study cohorts across the entire study period ( P < .001), and specifically, at 180 days post-intervention (HBP: 48% vs 27% P < .001 and DM: 39% vs 30%, P < .05). Conclusions CPSS participation is associated with significant improvement in achievement of disease management goals, time to achievement, and increased ambulatory encounters compared with the matched no-CPSS cohort.

  2. Hospice assist at home: does the integration of hospice care in primary healthcare support patients to die in their preferred location - A retrospective cross-sectional evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Everlien; Zweers, Daniëlle; Valkenburg, Anna Ch; Uyttewaal, Allegonda; Teunissen, Saskia Ccm

    2016-06-01

    A majority of patients prefer to die at home. Specialist palliative care aims to improve quality of life. Hospice assist at home is a Dutch model of general/specialised palliative care within primary care, collaboratively built by general practitioners and a hospice. The aims of this study are to explore whether hospice assist at home service enables patients at hometo express end-of-life preferences and die in their preferred location. In addition, this study provides insight into symptomburden, stability and early referral. A retrospective cross-sectional evaluation study was performed (December 2014-March 2015), using hospice assist at home patient records and documentation. Primary outcome includes congruence between preferred and actual place of death. Secondary outcomes include symptom burden, (in)stability and early identification. Between June 2012 and December 2014, 130 hospice assist at home patients, living at home with a life expectancy home, a collaboration between general practitioners, district nurses, trained volunteers and a hospice team, facilitates (1) general practitioner-initiated consultation by Nurse Consultant Hospice, (2) fortnightly interdisciplinary consultations and (3) 24/7 hospice backup for patients, caregivers and professionals. A total of 130 patients (62 (48%) men; mean age, 72 years) were enrolled, of whom 107/130 (82%) died and 5 dropped out. Preferred place of death was known for 101/107 (94%) patients of whom 91% patients died at their preferred place of death. Hospice assist at home service supports patients to die in their preferred place of death. Shared responsibility of proactive care in primary care collaboration enabled patients to express preferences. Hospice care should focus on local teamwork, to contribute to shared responsibilities in providing optimal palliative care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Prevalence of frailty among community dwelling older adults in receipt of low level home support: a cross-sectional analysis of the North Dublin Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sara; O'Brien, Irene; Smuts, Karla; O'Sullivan, Maria; Warters, Austin

    2017-06-07

    There is increasing demand for formal government funded home help services to support community-dwelling older people in Ireland, yet limited information exists on the health profiles of this group, especially regarding frailty. Our aim was to profile a large cohort of adults in receipt of low level home help and to determine the prevalence of frailty. A total 1312 older adults, (≥ 65 years) in receipt of low level home help (home-help users was a mean age of 82.1 (SD 7.3) years, predominantly female (70.6%) and over half (69.2%) lived alone. The prevalence of frailty in this population was 41.5%, with subjects primarily considered mildly (23.2%) or moderately frail (14.5%) by the CFS. A further 38.4% were classed as vulnerable. The degree of frailty did not differ significantly across the younger categories aged 65-84 years. However, in the oldest age groups, namely 90-94 and >95 years, moderate frailty was significantly higher relative to the younger groups (21% and 34%, p Home help hours significantly correlated with frailty (rs = 0.371, p home help hours, non-self-caring and communication difficulty, all of which significantly contributed to the model, with a r squared value of 0.508. A high prevalence of frailty (41.5%) was documented in this population which associated with higher home help utilisation. Frailty was associated with greater functional dependency, but not strongly with chronological age, until after 90 years. These findings highlight opportunities for developing intervention strategies targeted at ageing in place among home help users.

  4. Comparative Study between Sequential Automatic and Manual Home Respiratory Polygraphy Scoring Using a Three-Channel Device: Impact of the Manual Editing of Events to Identify Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. According to current guidelines, autoscoring of respiratory events in respiratory polygraphy requires manual scoring. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between automatic analysis and manual scoring to identify patients with suspected OSA. Methods. This retrospective study analyzed 791 records from respiratory polygraphy (RP performed at home. The association grade between automatic scoring and manual scoring was evaluated using Kappa coefficient and the agreement using Bland and Altman test and intraclass correlation coefficient (CCI. To determine the accuracy in the identification of AHI≥30 eV/h, the ROC curve analysis was used. Results. The population analyzed consisted of 493 male (62.3% and 298 female patients, with an average age of 54.7±14.20 years and BMI of 32.7±8.21 kg/m2. There was no significant difference between automatic and manual apnea/hypopnea indexes (aAHI, mAHI: aAHI 17.25 (SD: 17.42 versus mAHI 21.20±7.96 (p; NS. The agreement between mAHI and aAHI to AHI≥30 was 94%, with a Kappa coefficient of 0.83 (p<0.001 and a CCI of 0.83. The AUC-ROC, sensitivity, and specificity were 0.99 (CI 95%: 0.98-0.99, p<0.001, 86% (CI 95%: 78.7–91.4, and 97% (CI 95%: 96–98.3, respectively. Conclusions. We observed good agreement between automatic scoring and sequential manual scoring to identify subjects with AHI≥30 eV/h.

  5. Short Blue Light Pulses (30 Min) in the Morning Support a Sleep-Advancing Protocol in a Home Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerdink, Moniek; Walbeek, Thijs J; Beersma, Domien G M; Hommes, Vanja; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2016-10-01

    light treatment (F1,13 = 17.1, p blue light condition (F1,10 = 9.8, p blue light was able to compensate for the sleep integrity reduction and to a large extent for the performance decrement that was observed in the amber light condition, both probably as a consequence of the advancing sleep schedule. This study shows that blue light therapy in the morning, applied in a home setting, supports a sleep advancing protocol by phase advancing the circadian rhythm as well as sleep timing. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  7. Chest compression with a higher level of pressure support ventilation: effects on secretion removal, hemodynamics, and respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner da Silva Naue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of chest compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation, in comparison with that of aspiration alone, in removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics, and improving respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This was a randomized crossover clinical trial involving patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h in the ICU of the Porto Alegre Hospital de Clínicas, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were randomized to receive aspiration alone (control group or compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation (intervention group. We measured hemodynamic parameters, respiratory mechanics parameters, and the amount of secretions collected. RESULTS: We included 34 patients. The mean age was 64.2 ± 14.6 years. In comparison with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher median amount of secretions collected (1.9 g vs. 2.3 g; p = 0.004, a greater increase in mean expiratory tidal volume (16 ± 69 mL vs. 56 ± 69 mL; p = 0.018, and a greater increase in mean dynamic compliance (0.1 ± 4.9 cmH2O vs. 2.8 ± 4.5 cmH2O; p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, chest compression accompanied by an increase in pressure support significantly increased the amount of secretions removed, the expiratory tidal volume, and dynamic compliance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT01155648 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/

  8. Effects of non-invasive pressure support ventilation (NI-PSV) on ventilation and respiratory effort in very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nabeel; Claure, Nelson; Alegria, Ximena; D'Ugard, Carmen; Organero, Roberto; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2007-08-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is used to provide support to non-intubated infants, but it often fails. Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a mode of synchronized ventilation that can supplement the spontaneous breathing effort, but it is unknown if it is effective in non-intubated very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. To compare the acute physiological effects of non-invasive PSV (NI-PSV) versus NCPAP on tidal volume (V(T)), minute ventilation (V(E)), gas exchange, breathing effort, and chest wall distortion in VLBW infants. Stable preterm infants of birth weight less 1,250 g were studied during consecutive 2 hr periods of NCPAP and NI-PSV in random sequence. VT, V(E), and thoraco-abdominal synchrony were measured using respiratory inductance plethysmography. Breathing effort was measured by esophageal manometry. Gas exchange was measured by pulse oximetry and transcutaneous PCO2. Fifteen infants of birth weight (mean +/- SD) 808 +/- 201 g and 25.9 +/- 1.8 weeks gestational age were studied while on NCPAP 5.3 +/- 0.6 cm H2O and on NI-PSV with 7.9 +/- 1.3 cm H2O above NCPAP of pressure support. There were no differences in VT, V(E), PCO2 or hypoxemia episodes. Peak and minute inspiratory effort were significantly reduced in NI-PSV mode as compared to NCPAP. There was a significant reduction in indices of chest wall asynchrony in NI-PSV mode. When compared to NCPAP, NI-PSV did not increase minute ventilation, but it effectively unloaded the patient's respiratory pump as indicated by a lower inspiratory effort and reduced chest wall distortion. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Chest compression with a higher level of pressure support ventilation: effects on secretion removal, hemodynamics, and respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naue, Wagner da Silva; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Vieira, Silvia Regina Rios

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of chest compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation, in comparison with that of aspiration alone, in removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics, and improving respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. This was a randomized crossover clinical trial involving patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h in the ICU of the Porto Alegre Hospital de Clínicas, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were randomized to receive aspiration alone (control group) or compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation (intervention group). We measured hemodynamic parameters, respiratory mechanics parameters, and the amount of secretions collected. We included 34 patients. The mean age was 64.2 ± 14.6 years. In comparison with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher median amount of secretions collected (1.9 g vs. 2.3 g; p = 0.004), a greater increase in mean expiratory tidal volume (16 ± 69 mL vs. 56 ± 69 mL; p = 0.018), and a greater increase in mean dynamic compliance (0.1 ± 4.9 cmH2O vs. 2.8 ± 4.5 cmH2O; p = 0.005). In this sample, chest compression accompanied by an increase in pressure support significantly increased the amount of secretions removed, the expiratory tidal volume, and dynamic compliance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT01155648 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/]).

  10. Choosing to live with home dialysis-patients' experiences and potential for telemedicine support: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rygh Ellen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines the patients' need for information and guidance in the selection of dialysis modality, and in establishing and practicing home dialysis. The study focuses on patients' experiences living with home dialysis, how they master the treatment, and their views on how to optimize communication with health services and the potential of telemedicine. Methods We used an inductive research strategy and conducted semi-structured interviews with eleven patients established in home dialysis. Our focus was the patients' experiences with home dialysis, and our theoretical reference was patients' empowerment through telemedicine solutions. Three informants had home haemodialysis (HHD; eight had peritoneal dialysis (PD, of which three had automated peritoneal dialysis (APD; and five had continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD. The material comprises all PD-patients in the catchment area capable of being interviewed, and all known HHD-users in Norway at that time. Results All of the interviewees were satisfied with their choice of home dialysis, and many experienced a normalization of daily life, less dominated by disease. They exhibited considerable self-management skills and did not perceive themselves as ill, but still required very close contact with the hospital staff for communication and follow-up. When choosing a dialysis modality, other patients' experiences were often more influential than advice from specialists. Information concerning the possibility of having HHD, including knowledge of how to access it, was not easily available. Especially those with dialysis machines, both APD and HHD, saw a potential for telemedicine solutions. Conclusions As home dialysis may contribute to a normalization of life less dominated by disease, the treatment should be organized so that the potential for home dialysis can be fully exploited. Pre-dialysis information should be unbiased and include access to other patients

  11. Choosing to live with home dialysis-patients' experiences and potential for telemedicine support: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygh, Ellen; Arild, Eli; Johnsen, Elin; Rumpsfeld, Markus

    2012-03-19

    This study examines the patients' need for information and guidance in the selection of dialysis modality, and in establishing and practicing home dialysis. The study focuses on patients' experiences living with home dialysis, how they master the treatment, and their views on how to optimize communication with health services and the potential of telemedicine. We used an inductive research strategy and conducted semi-structured interviews with eleven patients established in home dialysis. Our focus was the patients' experiences with home dialysis, and our theoretical reference was patients' empowerment through telemedicine solutions. Three informants had home haemodialysis (HHD); eight had peritoneal dialysis (PD), of which three had automated peritoneal dialysis (APD); and five had continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material comprises all PD-patients in the catchment area capable of being interviewed, and all known HHD-users in Norway at that time. All of the interviewees were satisfied with their choice of home dialysis, and many experienced a normalization of daily life, less dominated by disease. They exhibited considerable self-management skills and did not perceive themselves as ill, but still required very close contact with the hospital staff for communication and follow-up. When choosing a dialysis modality, other patients' experiences were often more influential than advice from specialists. Information concerning the possibility of having HHD, including knowledge of how to access it, was not easily available. Especially those with dialysis machines, both APD and HHD, saw a potential for telemedicine solutions. As home dialysis may contribute to a normalization of life less dominated by disease, the treatment should be organized so that the potential for home dialysis can be fully exploited. Pre-dialysis information should be unbiased and include access to other patients' experiences. Telemedicine may potentially facilitate a

  12. The Moderating Role of Perceived Social Support on the Relationship between Physical Functional Impairment and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Nursing Home Elderly in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Y. C. L. Kwok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With reference to the stress-buffering model, this study aimed to examine the moderating role of perceived social support (including institutional peer support and family support on the relationship between physical functional impairment, as a source of stress, and depressive symptoms among Chinese nursing home elderly in Hong Kong. The study used a cross-sectional survey method and convenience sampling. The subjects were recruited from two private nursing homes. A total of 187 elderly (54 males and 133 females participated in the survey. Interviews were conducted by experienced research assistants. The Geriatric Depression Scale was used to assess depressive symptoms of each participant. Pearson correlational analyses showed that females reported more depressive symptoms than their male counterparts, and a positive relationship was found between education level and depressive symptoms. Perceived institutional peer support was negatively correlated, while physical functional impairment was positively correlated with depressive symptoms. However, there was no significant correlation between perceived family support and depressive symptoms. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that physical functional impairment and perceived institutional peer support were significant predictors of elderly depressive symptoms, while perceived family support was not a significant predictor, after statistically controlling for the influence of gender and education level. Perceived institutional peer support, but not perceived family support, was found to moderate the negative impact of physical functional impairment on elderly depressive symptoms. The theoretical and practical implications of this study were then discussed.

  13. Optimum support by high-flow nasal cannula in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: effects of increasing flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Tommaso; Alban, Laura; Turrini, Cecilia; Cambiaghi, Barbara; Carlesso, Eleonora; Taccone, Paolo; Bottino, Nicola; Lissoni, Alfredo; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo Alberto; Gattinoni, Luciano; Pesenti, Antonio; Grasselli, Giacomo

    2017-10-01

    Limited data exist on the correlation between higher flow rates of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) and its physiologic effects in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF). We assessed the effects of HFNC delivered at increasing flow rate on inspiratory effort, work of breathing, minute ventilation, lung volumes, dynamic compliance and oxygenation in AHRF patients. A prospective randomized cross-over study was performed in non-intubated patients with patients AHRF and a PaO2/FiO2 (arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio of ≤300 mmHg. A standard non-occlusive facial mask and HFNC at different flow rates (30, 45 and 60 l/min) were randomly applied, while maintaining constant FiO2 (20 min/step). At the end of each phase, we measured arterial blood gases, inspiratory effort, based on swings in esophageal pressure (ΔPes) and on the esophageal pressure-time product (PTPPes), and lung volume, by electrical impedance tomography. Seventeen patients with AHRF were enrolled in the study. At increasing flow rate, HFNC reduced ΔPes (p flow rate also progressively reduced minute ventilation (p flow rates was better described by exponential fitting, while ΔEELV, V T/ΔPes and oxygenation improved linearly. In this cohort of patients with AHRF, an increasing HFNC flow rate progressively decreased inspiratory effort and improved lung aeration, dynamic compliance and oxygenation. Most of the effect on inspiratory workload and CO2 clearance was already obtained at the lowest flow rate.

  14. Effect of Home Blood Pressure Telemonitoring With Self-Care Support on Uncontrolled Systolic Hypertension in Diabetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Logan, Alexander G; Irvine, M Jane; McIsaac, Warren J; Tisler, Andras; Rossos, Peter G; Easty, Anthony; Feig, Denice S; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    .... In a pilot study we demonstrated that a home blood pressure telemonitoring system, which provided self-care messages on the smartphone of hypertensive diabetic patients immediately after each reading...

  15. Supporting parents of premature infants transitioning from the NICU to home: A pilot randomized control trial of a smartphone application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F. Garfield

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: A smartphone application used by parents of VLBW infants during the transition home from the NICU can improve parenting self-efficacy, discharge preparedness, and LOS with improved benefits based on usage.

  16. Choosing to live with home dialysis-patients' experiences and potential for telemedicine support: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Rygh Ellen; Arild Eli; Johnsen Elin; Rumpsfeld Markus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This study examines the patients' need for information and guidance in the selection of dialysis modality, and in establishing and practicing home dialysis. The study focuses on patients' experiences living with home dialysis, how they master the treatment, and their views on how to optimize communication with health services and the potential of telemedicine. Methods We used an inductive research strategy and conducted semi-structured interviews with eleven patients estab...

  17. Telemonitorização domiciliária de insuficientes respiratórios crónicos graves e de doentes asmáticos Home telemonitoring of severe chronic respiratory insufficient and asthmatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Zamith

    2009-05-01

    at the hospital Pulido Valente and Espirito Santo and 21 asthmatics (A were followed at the latter hospital. The use and acceptance of this device was evaluated through questionnaires soliciting patients’ and health professionals opinions. Patients with CRI followed in Lisbon were also asked about hospital admissions and quality of life compared with a nine month period before the monitoring programme. CRI patients found learning to use the system more difficult; the majority (80% reported problems with the equipment, qualified as rare/occasional in 62% of the cases. For 31 CRI patients followed in Lisbon, the use of the system was classified as correct in 12 patients, incorrect in 7 and reasonable in 12 patients. The first group had a reducded number and duration of hospital admissions and also improved quality of life. With this remote monitoring system 80% of CRI patients reported they were more/much more supported and 33 patients (75% would use this system in the future. 81% of asthmatic patients would also like to maintain this type of monitoring. The service was considered useful by the researchers. We concluded that home telemonitoring was a positive contribution to the management of chronic patients and raised awareness of it should be considered in the future.

  18. Home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prick, Anna-Eva; de Lange, Jacomine; Scherder, Erik; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2011-11-25

    Dementia affects the mood of people with dementia but also of their caregivers. In the coming years, the number of people with dementia will increase worldwide and most of them will continue to live in the community as long as possible. Home-based psychosocial interventions reducing the depressive symptoms of both people with dementia and their caregivers in their own home are highly needed. This manuscript describes the design of a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) of the effects of a home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers. The aim is to randomly assign 156 dyads (caregiver and dementia diagnosed person) to an intervention group or a comparison group. The experimental group receives a home programme in which exercise and support for the people with dementia and their caregivers are combined and integrated. The comparison group receives a minimal intervention. Primary outcomes are physical health (people with dementia) and mood (people with dementia and caregivers). In addition, to get more insight in the working components of the intervention and the impact of the intervention on the relationship of the dyads a qualitative sub-study is carried out. This study aims to contribute to an evidence-based treatment to reduce depressive symptoms among people with dementia and their caregivers independently living in the community. The study has been registered at the Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR), which is connected to the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the WHO. NTR1802.

  19. The effectiveness of a life style modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring in control of hypertension: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tin Tin; Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Nahar, Azmi Mohamed; Azizan, Nurul Ain; Hairi, Farizah Mohd; Thangiah, Nithiah; Dahlui, Maznah; Bulgiba, Awang; Murray, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Death rates due to hypertension in low and middle income countries are higher compared to high income countries. The present study is designed to combine life style modification and home blood pressure monitoring for control of hypertension in the context of low and middle income countries. The study is a two armed, parallel group, un-blinded, cluster randomized controlled trial undertaken within lower income areas in Kuala Lumpur. Two housing complexes will be assigned to the intervention group and the other two housing complexes will be allocated in the control group. Based on power analysis, 320 participants will be recruited. The participants in the intervention group (n = 160) will undergo three main components in the intervention which are the peer support for home blood pressure monitoring, face to face health coaching on healthy diet and demonstration and training for indoor home based exercise activities while the control group will receive a pamphlet containing information on hypertension. The primary outcomes are systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Secondary outcome measures include practice of self-blood pressure monitoring, dietary intake, level of physical activity and physical fitness. The present study will evaluate the effect of lifestyle modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control, during a 6 month intervention period. Moreover, the study aims to assess whether these effects can be sustainable more than six months after the intervention has ended.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of different approaches to home support for people in later stage dementia: a protocol for an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Helen; Clarkson, Paul; Hughes, Jane; Russell, Ian; Beresford, Joan; Davies, Linda; Jolley, David; Peconi, Julie; Poland, Fiona; Roberts, Chris; Sutcliffe, Caroline; Challis, David

    2017-07-01

    Dementia is a major health problem with a growing number of people affected by the condition, both directly and indirectly through caring for someone with dementia. Many live at home but little is known about the range and intensity of the support they receive. Previous studies have mainly reported on discrete services within a single geographical area. This paper presents a protocol for study of different services across several sites in England. The aim is to explore the presence, effects, and cost-effectiveness of approaches to home support for people in later stage dementia and their carers. This is a prospective observational study employing mixed methods. At least 300 participants (people with dementia and their carers) from geographical areas with demonstrably different ranges of services available for people with dementia will be selected. Within each area, participants will be recruited from a range of services. Participants will be interviewed on two occasions and data will be collected on their characteristics and circumstances, quality of life, carer health and burden, and informal and formal support for the person with dementia. The structured interviews will also collect qualitative data to explore the perceptions of older people and carers. This national study will explore the components of appropriate and effective home support for people with late stage dementia and their carers. It aims to inform commissioners and service providers across health and social care.

  1. Respiratory support withdrawal in intensive care units: families, physicians and nurses views on two hypothetical clinical scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumis, Renata R L; Deheinzelin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that dying patients' physical and emotional suffering is inadequately treated in intensive care units. Although there are recommendations regarding decisions to forgo life-sustaining therapy, deciding on withdrawal of life support is difficult, and it is also difficult to decide who should participate in this decision. We distributed a self-administered questionnaire in 13 adult intensive care units (ICUs) assessing the attitudes of physicians and nurses regarding end-of-life decisions. Family members from a medical-surgical ICU in a tertiary cancer hospital were also invited to participate. Questions were related to two hypothetical clinical scenarios, one with a competent patient and the other with an incompetent patient, asking whether the ventilator treatment should be withdrawn and about who should make this decision. Physicians (155) and nurses (204) of 12 ICUs agreed to take part in this study, along with 300 family members. The vast majority of families (78.6%), physicians (74.8%) and nurses (75%) want to discuss end-of-life decisions with competent patients. Most of the physicians and nurses desire family involvement in end-of-life decisions. Physicians are more likely to propose withdrawal of the ventilator with competent patients than with incompetent patients (74.8% × 60.7%, P = 0.028). When the patient was incompetent, physicians (34.8%) were significantly less prone than nurses (23.0%) and families (14.7%) to propose decisions regarding withdrawal of the ventilator support (P families recommended limiting life-support therapy with terminally ill patients and favored family participation. In decisions concerning an incompetent patient, physicians were more likely to maintain the therapy.

  2. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  3. Clinical evaluation of a novel adaptive algorithm for automated control of oxygen therapy in preterm infants on non-invasive respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plottier, Gemma K; Wheeler, Kevin I; Ali, Sanoj K M; Fathabadi, Omid Sadeghi; Jayakar, Rohan; Gale, Timothy J; Dargaville, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of a novel rapidly responsive proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm for automated oxygen control in preterm infants with respiratory insufficiency. Interventional study of a 4-hour period of automated oxygen control compared with combined data from two flanking periods of manual control (4 hours each). Neonatal intensive care unit. Preterm infants (n=20) on non-invasive respiratory support and supplemental oxygen, with oxygen saturation (SpO2) target range 90%-94% (manual control) and 91%-95% (automated control). Median gestation at birth 27.5 weeks (IQR 26-30 weeks), postnatal age 8.0 (1.8-34) days. Automated oxygen control using a standalone device, receiving SpO2 input from a standard oximeter and computing alterations to oxygen concentration that were actuated with a modified blender. The PID algorithm was enhanced to avoid iatrogenic hyperoxaemia and adapt to the severity of lung dysfunction. Proportion of time in the SpO2 target range, or above target range when in air. Automated oxygen control resulted in more time in the target range or above in air (manual 56 (48-63)% vs automated 81 (76-90)%, pManual changes to oxygen therapy were infrequent during automated control (0.24/hour vs 2.3/hour during manual control), and oxygen requirements were unchanged (automated control period 27%, manual 27% and 26%, p>0.05). The novel PID algorithm was very effective for automated oxygen control in preterm infants, and deserves further investigation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Loneliness, loss, and social support among cognitively intact older people with cancer, living in nursing homes – a mixed-methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drageset J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jorunn Drageset,1,2 Geir Egil Eide,2,3 Elin Dysvik,4 Bodil Furnes,4 Solveig Hauge51Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway; 2Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 3Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 4Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 5Faculty of Health and Social Studies and Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Telemark University College, Porsgrunn, NorwayBackground: Loneliness is a significant psychosocial effect following a cancer diagnosis and may prevent people from engaging in social activities, thus creating difficulties in interpersonal relationships. This study investigated loneliness and social support among cognitively intact nursing home residents with cancer by using a quantitatively driven mixed-methods design with sequential supplementary qualitative components.Methods: The quantitative component consisted of face-to-face interviews of 60 nursing home residents (≥65 years using the one-item Loneliness Scale and the Social Provisions Scale. The supplementary psychosocial component consisted of qualitative research interviews about experiences related to loneliness with nine respondents.Results: The quantitative results indicated that reassurance of worth was associated with loneliness. The experience of loneliness was identified by the following: loneliness that was dominated by a feeling of inner pain, feeling of loss, and feeling small. Loneliness was alleviated by the following: being engaged in activities, being in contact with other people, and occupying oneself.Conclusion: Enhancing the lives of nursing home residents with cancer requires attending to the residents’ experience of loneliness and social relationships in a targeted and individualized manner. This might require screening all nursing home residents

  5. The COMmunity of Practice And Safety Support (COMPASS) Total Worker Health™ study among home care workers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ryan; Elliot, Diane; Hess, Jennifer; Thompson, Sharon; Luther, Kristy; Wipfli, Brad; Wright, Robert; Buckmaster, Annie Mancini

    2014-10-27

    Home care workers are a high-risk group for injury and illness. Their unique work structure presents challenges to delivering a program to enhance their health and safety. No randomized controlled trials have assessed the impact of a Total Worker Health™ program designed for their needs. The COMPASS (COMmunity of Practice And Safety Support) study is a cluster randomized trial being implemented among Oregon's unionized home care workers. Partnering with the Oregon Home Care Commission allowed recruiting 10 pairs of home care worker groups with 8 participants per group (n = 160) for balanced randomization of groups to intervention and control conditions. Physiologic and survey evaluation of all participants will be at enrollment, 6 months and 12 months. Primary outcomes are to increase health promoting (for example, healthy nutrition and regular physical activity) and health protecting (that is, safety) behaviors. In addition to assessing outcomes adjusted for the hierarchical design, mediation analyses will be used to deconstruct and confirm the program's theoretical underpinnings and intervention processes. Intervention groups will participate in a series of monthly 2-hour meetings designed as ritualized, scripted peer-led sessions to increase knowledge, practice skills and build support for healthy actions. Self-monitoring and individual and team level goals are included to augment change. Because generalizability, reach and achieving dissemination are priorities, following initial wave findings, a second wave of COMPASS groups will be recruited and enrolled with tailoring of the program to align with existing Home Care Commission educational offerings. Outcomes, process and mediation of those tailored groups will be compared with the original wave's findings. The COMPASS trial will assess a novel program to enhance the safety and health of a vulnerable, rapidly expanding group of isolated caregivers, whose critical work allows independent living of frail

  6. Aiming to be a breastfeeding mother in a neonatal intensive care unit and at home: a thematic analysis of peer-support group discussion in social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niela-Vilén, Hannakaisa; Axelin, Anna; Melender, Hanna-Leena; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants are usually breastfed less than full-term infants, and successful breastfeeding requires a supportive environment and special efforts from their mothers. A breastfeeding peer-support group, utilising social media, was developed for these mothers in order to support them in this challenge. Mothers were able to discuss breastfeeding and share experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants based on the postings in peer-support group discussions in social media. The actively participating mothers (n = 22) had given birth social media postings (n = 305) were analysed using thematic analysis. A description of the process of breastfeeding a preterm infant from the point of view of a mother was created. The process consisted of three main themes: the breastfeeding paradox in hospital, the 'reality check' of breastfeeding at home and the breastfeeding experience as part of being a mother. The mothers encountered paradoxical elements in the support received in hospital; discharge was promoted at the expense of breastfeeding and pumping breast milk was emphasised over breastfeeding. After the infant's discharge, the over-optimistic expectations of mothers often met with reality - mothers did not have the knowledge or skills to manage breastfeeding at home. Successful breastfeeding was an empowering experience for the mothers, whereas unsuccessful breastfeeding induced feelings of disappointment. Therefore, the mothers of preterm infants need evidence-based breastfeeding counselling and systematic support in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and at home. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Web-Based eHealth to Support Counseling in Routine Well-Child Care: Pilot Study of E-health4Uth Home Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beelen, Mirjam Elisabeth Johanna; Vogel, Ineke; Beirens, Tinneke Monique Jozef; Kloek, Gitte Caroline; den Hertog, Paul; van der Veen, Monique Désirée; Raat, Hein

    2013-02-11

    Providing safety education to parents of young children is important in the prevention of unintentional injuries in or around the home. We developed a Web-based, tailored safety advice module to support face-to-face counseling in the setting of preventive youth health care (E-health4Uth home safety) in order to improve the provision of safety information for parents of young children. This pilot study evaluated a Web-based, tailored safety advice module (E-health4Uth home safety) and evaluated the use of E-health4Uth home safety to support counseling in routine well-child care visits. From a preventive youth health care center, 312 parents with a child aged 10-31 months were assigned to the E-health4Uth home safety condition or to the care-as-usual condition (provision of a generic safety information leaflet). All parents completed a questionnaire either via the Internet or paper-and-pencil, and parents in the E-health4Uth condition received tailored home safety advice either online or by a print that was mailed to their home. This tailored home safety advice was used to discuss the safety of their home during the next scheduled well-child visit. Parents in the care-as-usual condition received a generic safety information leaflet during the well-child visit. Mean age of the parents was 32.5 years (SD 5.4), 87.8% (274/312) of participants were mothers; mean age of the children was 16.9 months (SD 5.1). In the E-health4Uth condition, 38.4% (61/159) completed the online version of the questionnaire (allowing Web-based tailored safety advice), 61.6% (98/159) preferred to complete the questionnaire via paper (allowing only a hardcopy of the advice to be sent by regular mail). Parents in the E-health4Uth condition evaluated the Web-based, tailored safety advice (n=61) as easy to use (mean 4.5, SD 0.7), pleasant (mean 4.0, SD 0.9), reliable (mean 4.6, SD 0.6), understandable (mean 4.6, SD 0.5), relevant (mean 4.2, SD 0.9), and useful (mean 4.3, SD 0.8). After the well

  8. Swedish District Nurses' experiences on the use of information and communication technology for supporting people with serious chronic illness living at home--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Carina; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this case study was to describe two District Nurses' (DN) experiences of using information and communication technology (ICT) to communicate with chronically ill people in their homes. An electronic messaging program via computers and mobile phones with an Internet connection was used, enabling DNs and the ill people to exchange messages to and from anywhere. The program comprised different virtual rooms, and communication was via text messages. The DNs in this study used the program two to four times each week from November 2003 to March 2004. Semi-structured interviews were performed before, during and after the implementation of the new technology and were analysed using thematic content analysis. The results showed that the DNs felt that the technology increased accessibility to nursing care through a more direct communication with the ill person meaning that a more trusting relationship could be created. The DNs also experienced that the use of ICT saved working time. This study indicates that the use of ICT for communication allowed the DN to better support a chronically ill person at home leading to improved home nursing care. This method of communication cannot replace physical presence, but can be seen as a complement to nursing care at home.

  9. Loneliness, loss, and social support among cognitively intact older people with cancer, living in nursing homes--a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Jorunn; Eide, Geir Egil; Dysvik, Elin; Furnes, Bodil; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Loneliness is a significant psychosocial effect following a cancer diagnosis and may prevent people from engaging in social activities, thus creating difficulties in interpersonal relationships. This study investigated loneliness and social support among cognitively intact nursing home residents with cancer by using a quantitatively driven mixed-methods design with sequential supplementary qualitative components. The quantitative component consisted of face-to-face interviews of 60 nursing home residents (≥65 years) using the one-item Loneliness Scale and the Social Provisions Scale. The supplementary psychosocial component consisted of qualitative research interviews about experiences related to loneliness with nine respondents. The quantitative results indicated that reassurance of worth was associated with loneliness. The experience of loneliness was identified by the following: loneliness that was dominated by a feeling of inner pain, feeling of loss, and feeling small. Loneliness was alleviated by the following: being engaged in activities, being in contact with other people, and occupying oneself. Enhancing the lives of nursing home residents with cancer requires attending to the residents' experience of loneliness and social relationships in a targeted and individualized manner. This might require screening all nursing home residents for early detection of loneliness. Revealing factors that may contribute to or reduce loneliness improves the ability to enhance people's lives.

  10. Loneliness, loss, and social support among cognitively intact older people with cancer, living in nursing homes – a mixed-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drageset, Jorunn; Eide, Geir Egil; Dysvik, Elin; Furnes, Bodil; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Background Loneliness is a significant psychosocial effect following a cancer diagnosis and may prevent people from engaging in social activities, thus creating difficulties in interpersonal relationships. This study investigated loneliness and social support among cognitively intact nursing home residents with cancer by using a quantitatively driven mixed-methods design with sequential supplementary qualitative components. Methods The quantitative component consisted of face-to-face interviews of 60 nursing home residents (≥65 years) using the one-item Loneliness Scale and the Social Provisions Scale. The supplementary psychosocial component consisted of qualitative research interviews about experiences related to loneliness with nine respondents. Results The quantitative results indicated that reassurance of worth was associated with loneliness. The experience of loneliness was identified by the following: loneliness that was dominated by a feeling of inner pain, feeling of loss, and feeling small. Loneliness was alleviated by the following: being engaged in activities, being in contact with other people, and occupying oneself. Conclusion Enhancing the lives of nursing home residents with cancer requires attending to the residents’ experience of loneliness and social relationships in a targeted and individualized manner. This might require screening all nursing home residents for early detection of loneliness. Revealing factors that may contribute to or reduce loneliness improves the ability to enhance people’s lives. PMID:26451093

  11. Health and social support services in older adults recently discharged from hospital: service utilisation and costs and exploration of the impact of a home-exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, I; Howard, K; O'Rourke, S; Ferreira, M L; Lord, S R; Close, J C T; Vogler, C; Dean, C M; Cumming, R G; Sherrington, C

    2016-04-18

    Admission to hospital can lead to persistent deterioration in physical functioning, particularly for the more vulnerable older population. As a result of this physical deterioration, older people who have been recently discharged from hospital may be particularly high users of health and social support services. Quantify usage and costs of services in older adults after hospitalisation and explore the impact of a home-exercise intervention on service usage. The present study was a secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial (ACTRN12607000563460). The trial involved 340 participants aged 60 years and over with recent hospitalisation. Service use and costs were compared between intervention (12 months of home-exercise prescribed in 10 visits from a physiotherapist) and control groups. 33 % of participants were re-admitted to hospital, 100 % consulted a General Medical Practitioner and 63 % used social services. 56 % of costs were associated with hospital admission and 22 % with social services. There was reduction in General Medical Practitioner services provided in the home in the intervention group (IRR 0.23, CI 0.1 to 0.545, p home-based exercise program was evident on service use or costs. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12607000563460 >TrialSearch.

  12. Structures, processes and outcomes of the Aussie Heart Guide Program: A nurse mentor supported, home based cardiac rehabilitation program for rural patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohmader, Terence J; Lin, Frances; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has a number of benefits for patients, yet participation in it is sub-optimal, especially in regional Australia. Innovative models of cardiac rehabilitation are needed to improve participation. Providing nurse mentors to support patients transitioning from hospital to home represents a new model of service delivery in Australia. To explore the impact of a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program in assisting patients to recover from Acute Coronary Syndrome and meeting the expectations of nurse mentors delivering the program. This case study was underpinned by the structure, process and outcomes model and occurred in three Australian hospitals 2008-2011. Thirteen patients recovering from acute coronary syndrome were interviewed by telephone and seven nurse mentors completed a survey after completing the program. Mentor perceptions concerning the structures of the home-based CR program included the timely recruitment of patients, mentor training to operationalise the program, commitment to development of the mentor role, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills about cognitive behavioural therapy and patient centred care. Processes included the therapeutic relationship between mentors and patients, suitability of the program and the promotion of healthier lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes identified that patients were satisfied with the program's audiovisual resources, and the level of support and guidance provided by their nurse mentors. Mentors believed that the program was easy to use in terms of its delivery. Patients believed the program assisted their recovery and were satisfied with the information, guidance and support received from mentors. There were positive signs that the program influenced patients' decisions to change unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes highlighted both rewards and barriers associated with mentoring patients in their homes by telephone. Experience gained from developing a therapeutic relationship with

  13. An app with remote support achieves better adherence to home exercise programs than paper handouts in people with musculoskeletal conditions: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Tara E; Harvey, Lisa A; Avdalis, Christos; Chen, Lydia W; Jeyalingam, Sayanthinie; Pratt, Carin A; Tatum, Holly J; Bowden, Jocelyn L; Lucas, Barbara R

    2017-07-01

    Do people with musculoskeletal conditions better adhere to their home exercise programs when these are provided to them on an app with remote support compared to paper handouts? Randomised, parallel-group trial with intention-to-treat analysis. Eighty participants with upper or lower limb musculoskeletal conditions were recruited to the trial. Each participant was prescribed a 4-week home exercise program by a physiotherapist at a tertiary teaching hospital in Australia. Participants were randomly assigned via a computer-generated concealed block randomisation procedure to either intervention (n=40) or control (n=40) groups. Participants in the intervention group received their home exercise programs on an app linked to the freely available website www.physiotherapyexercises.com. They also received supplementary phone calls and motivational text messages. Participants in the control group received their home exercise programs as a paper handout. Blinded assessors collected outcome measures at baseline and 4 weeks. The primary outcome was self-reported exercise adherence. There were five secondary outcomes, which captured functional performance, disability, patient satisfaction, perceptions of treatment effectiveness, and different aspects of adherence. Outcomes were available on 77 participants. The mean between-group difference for self-reported exercise adherence at 4 weeks was 1.3/11 points (95% CI 0.2 to 2.3), favouring the intervention group. The mean between-group difference for function was 0.9/11 points (95% CI 0.1 to 1.7) on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale, also favouring the intervention group. There were no significant between-group differences for the remaining outcomes. People with musculoskeletal conditions adhere better to their home exercise programs when the programs are provided on an app with remote support compared to paper handouts; however, the clinical importance of this added adherence is unclear. ACTRN12616000066482. [Lambert TE

  14. Nurse Preparation and Organizational Support for Supervision of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Nursing Homes: A Qualitative Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Elena O.; Young, Heather M.; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Shannon, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing supervision of the routine daily care (e.g., grooming, feeding, and toileting) that is delegated to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) is critical to nursing home service delivery. The conditions under which the supervisory role is organized and operationalized at the work-unit level, taking into account workloads, registered…

  15. A feasibility study of UMTS mobile phones for supporting nurses doing home visits to patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo; Clemensen, Jane; Ejskjær, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We tested the feasibility of Universal Mobile Telephone System (UMTS) mobile phones for video consultations in the home. Five patients with diabetic foot ulcers were included in the study. Each of them was offered three video consultations instead of visits to the hospital outpatient clinic...

  16. Providing High-Quality Support Services to Home-Based Child Care: A Conceptual Model and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromer, Juliet; Korfmacher, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Home-based child care accounts for a significant proportion of nonparental child care arrangements for young children in the United States. Yet the early care and education field lacks clear models or pathways for how to improve quality in these settings. The conceptual model presented here articulates the components of…

  17. Evaluation of the current landscape of respiratory nurse specialists in the UK: planning for the future needs of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Janelle; Prigmore, Sam; Hodson, Matt; Stonham, Carol; Long, Hannah; Bellhouse, Sarah; Fletcher, Monica; Edwards, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The National Health Service currently faces significant challenges and must optimise effective workforce planning and management. There are increasing concerns regarding poor workforce planning for respiratory medicine; a greater understanding of the role of respiratory nurse specialists will inform better workforce planning and management. This was a survey study. Two surveys were administered: an organisational-level survey and an individual respiratory nurse survey. There were 148 and 457 respondents to the organisational and individual nurse survey, respectively. Four main themes are presented: (1) breadth of service provided; (2) patient care; (3) work environment; and (4) succession planning. The majority of work conducted by respiratory nurse specialists relates to patient care outside the secondary care setting including supporting self-management in the home, supporting patients on home oxygen, providing hospital-at-home services and facilitating early discharge from acute care environments. Yet, most respiratory nursing teams are employed by secondary care trusts and located within acute environments. There was evidence of multidisciplinary working, although integrated care was not prominent in the free-text responses. High workload was reported with one-quarter of nursing teams short-staffed. Respiratory nurses reported working unpaid extra hours and a lack of administrative support that often took them away from providing direct patient care. Nearly half of the present sample either plan to retire or are eligible for retirement within 10 years. This survey report provides a current snapshot of the respiratory nurse specialist workforce in the UK. This workforce is an ageing population; the results from this survey can be used to inform succession planning and to ensure a viable respiratory nurse specialist workforce in future.

  18. Supporting Parents of Premature Infants Transitioning from the NICU to Home: A Pilot Randomized Control Trial of a Smartphone Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Craig F; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Hyung Nam; Rutsohn, Joshua; Kahn, Janine Yasmin; Mustanski, Brian; Mohr, David C

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether parents of Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transitioning home with the NICU-2-Home smartphone application have greater parenting self-efficacy, are better prepared for discharge and have shorter length of stay (LOS) than control parents. A four-week pilot randomized controlled trial during the transition home with 90 VLBW parents randomized to usual care (n=44) or usual care plus NICU-2-Home (n=46), a smartphone application designed for VLBW parents. Parenting Sense of Competence Scale (PSOC) was assessed at baseline, day after discharge, and two weeks post-discharge. Preparedness for discharge and length of stay (LOS) were secondary outcomes. Analyses by usage were also included. While parents of VLBW infants in the intervention group did not show an improvement in PSOC during the transition when compared directly to controls, after accounting for actual mean app usage, PSOC improved 7% (2.71 points/time greater; 95%CI = 1.45, 6.27) for intervention versus controls. Compared to controls, above-average users increased their PSOC score by 14% (6.84 points/time; 95%CL = 5.02, 8.67), average users by 11% (4.58 points/time; 95%CL = 2.89, 6.27) and below-average users by 6% (2.41 points/time; 95%CL = 0.04, 4.79). Moderate evidence showed LOS was shorter for above-average users compared to the control group (β = 12.2. SE = 6.9, p = 0.085). A smartphone application used by parents of VLBW infants during the transition home from the NICU can improve parenting self-efficacy, discharge preparedness, and LOS with improved benefits based on usage.

  19. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  20. Nurse mentor perceptions in the delivery of a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program to support patients living in rural areas: An interpretive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohmader, Terence J; Lin, Frances; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2017-05-01

    Home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs improve health outcomes for people diagnosed with heart disease. Mentoring of patients by nurses trained in CR has been proposed as an innovative model of cardiac care. Little is known however, about the experience of mentors facilitating such programs and adapting to this new role. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore nurse mentor perceptions of their role in the delivery of a home-based CR program for rural patients unable to attend a hospital or outpatient CR program. Seven nurses mentored patients by telephone providing patients with education, psychosocial support and lifestyle advice during their recovery. An open-ended survey was administered to mentors by email and findings revealed mentors perceived their role to be integral to the success of the program. Nurses were satisfied with the development of their new role as patient mentors. They believed their collaborative skills, knowledge and experience in coronary care, timely support and guidance of patients during their recovery and use of innovative audiovisual resources improved the health outcomes of patients not able to attend traditional programs. Cardiac nurses in this study perceived that they were able to successfully transition from their normal work practices in hospital to mentoring patients in their homes. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Human metapneumovirus: a new respiratory pathogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 4. Human metapneumovirus: a new respiratory ... Human metapneumovirus is a recently recognized pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in children as well as elderly and immunocompromised adults. The virus belongs to the family ...

  2. An outbreak of Streptococcus pneumoniae in an Italian nursing home.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Papalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide; pneumonia occurs sporadically in most cases, but rare outbreaks have been reported. We  describe an outbreak occurred in a 21-guests nursing home for elders in Aosta (Italy; outbreak occurred in april 2014 over a 2 weeks period, resulting in 12 out 20 guests affected (all with high fever and respiratory symptoms, two deaths (at home, nine patients referred  to Hospital Emergency Room, and eight admissions. Urinary streptococcus antigen was positive in seven out of eight patient tested. None of the nursing home guests were vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniaeThe Hospital Medical Direction and Public Health Service gave support and adopted strategies to contain the outbreak spread.We underline the need for pneumococcal vaccination in nursing homes/ Long-term care facilities; accurate check of hygiene behaviours in those setting is also mandatory.   

  3. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs ... The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn ...

  4. THE ROLE OF REGIONAL CENTERS AND UNIVERSITY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL IN DEVELOPMENT OF HOME MECHANICAL VENTILATION NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rsovac Snezana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Application of home mechanical ventilators represents the future in the treatment of children with chronic respiratory insufficiency. In this way patients are treated in the home environment, they have full support from their families, they are protected against nosocomial infections and their condition is monitored by medical staff. The role of regional centers is very important in the future development of the home mechanical ventilation network. Doctors in these centers under the full support of the University Children's Hospital physicians can assist and monitor the treatment of children on the household respirators.

  5. Home telemonitoring or structured telephone support programmes after recent discharge in patients with heart failure: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandor, A; Thokala, P; Gomersall, T; Baalbaki, H; Stevens, J W; Wang, J; Wong, R; Brennan, A; Fitzgerald, P

    2013-08-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) strategies have the potential to deliver specialised care and management to patients with heart failure (HF). To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home telemonitoring (TM) or structured telephone support (STS) strategies compared with usual care for adult patients who have been recently discharged (within 28 days) from acute care after a recent exacerbation of HF. Fourteen electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library) and research registers were searched to January 2012, supplemented by hand-searching relevant articles and contact with experts. The review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or observational cohort studies with a contemporaneous control group that included the following RM interventions: (1) TM (including cardiovascular implanted monitoring devices) with medical support provided during office hours or 24/7; (2) STS programmes delivered by human-to-human contact (HH) or human-to-machine interface (HM). A systematic review and network meta-analysis (where appropriate) of the clinical evidence was carried out using standard methods. A Markov model was developed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different RM packages compared with usual care for recently discharged HF patients. TM 24/7 or using cardiovascular monitoring devices was not considered in the economic model because of the lack of data and/or unsuitability for the UK setting. Given the heterogeneity in the components of usual care and RM interventions, the cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a set of costing scenarios designed to reflect the different configurations of usual care and RM in the UK. The literature searches identified 3060 citations. Six RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were added to the 15 trials identified from the previous systematic reviews giving a total of 21 RCTs included in the systematic review. No trials of cardiovascular implanted monitoring devices or

  6. Home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prick Anna-Eva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dementia affects the mood of people with dementia but also of their caregivers. In the coming years, the number of people with dementia will increase worldwide and most of them will continue to live in the community as long as possible. Home-based psychosocial interventions reducing the depressive symptoms of both people with dementia and their caregivers in their own home are highly needed. Methods/Design This manuscript describes the design of a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT of the effects of a home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers. The aim is to randomly assign 156 dyads (caregiver and dementia diagnosed person to an intervention group or a comparison group. The experimental group receives a home programme in which exercise and support for the people with dementia and their caregivers are combined and integrated. The comparison group receives a minimal intervention. Primary outcomes are physical health (people with dementia and mood (people with dementia and caregivers. In addition, to get more insight in the working components of the intervention and the impact of the intervention on the relationship of the dyads a qualitative sub-study is carried out. Discussion This study aims to contribute to an evidence-based treatment to reduce depressive symptoms among people with dementia and their caregivers independently living in the community. Trial Registration The study has been registered at the Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR, which is connected to the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the WHO. Trial number: NTR1802.

  7. Comparison of Perceived Social Support and Life Expectancy in the Elderly Resident and Non-Resident of Nursing Homes in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    k Barzegar Bafrooei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Elderly is regarded as a critical period of human life, which  the related issues and needs in this period are socially necessitated to be taken into consideration. Studies have shown that living with other family members produces positive effects on the physical and mental health of the elderly. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the perceived social support and life expectancy in both groups of the elderly residents and non-residents of nursing homes in Yazd. Methods: In this descriptive study, the population consisted of all elderly residents and non-residents of nursing homes in Yazd, among which 117 patients were selected as the study sample via convenience sampling method. In order to measure the study variables, the social support and life expectancy questionnaires were utilized, and the study data were analyzed applying descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and factor analysis of variance. Results: The study results demonstrated a significant direct relationship between the two variables of social support and life expectancy (P<0/01 within elderly residents and non-residents. Furthermore, a significant difference was observed between the scores of social support and life expectancy in regard with  elderly residents and non-residents, elderly men and women, as well as the elderly in the different sub-categories of marital status (P<0/01. Conclusion: The study results revealed that the elderly’s families and children are recommended to possibly take care of them in their own homes in order to promote the elderly’s social and mental health.

  8. Adolescent fruit and vegetable intake: influence of family support and moderation by home availability of relationships with afrocentric values and taste preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Noia, Jennifer; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2013-06-01

    Economically disadvantaged African-American adolescents have fruit and vegetable (F/V) intakes that are less than optimal. To facilitate intervention planning to address low F/V intake in this population, an understanding of determinants of youths' intake is needed. The influence of determinants consistently supported by evidence (ie, home F/V availability, F/V taste preferences, and parental modeling/intake) and variables hypothesized to influence intake in the targeted population (ie, family support for F/V consumption and Afrocentric values) were examined. Participants were African-American adolescents recruited in 2011 through summer camps serving low-income youths (N=93). Youths completed a cross-sectional survey. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was used to examine whether availability directly influenced (ie, explained variations in) intake and whether it moderated (ie, affected the direction and/or strength of) the relationships between the other hypothesized determinants and intake. The dependent variable was intake of five or more daily servings of F/V estimated with the Block 7-item food frequency questionnaire. Family support was directly related to intake (odds ratio=1.062; 95% CI 1.007 to 1.120; P=0.026). The relationships between F/V intake and taste preferences and Afrocentric values were moderated by (ie, differed based on) home F/V availability. When availability was high, taste preferences (odds ratio=1.081; 95% CI 1.007 to 1.161; P=0.032) and Afrocentric values (OR=2.504; 95% CI 1.303 to 4.811; P=0.006) had positive influences on intake. To enhance intervention effectiveness, more research is warranted on approaches for increasing home F/V availability and family support for F/V consumption in the targeted population. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Youth dietary intake and weight status: Healthful neighborhood food environments enhance the protective role of supportive family home environments

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Jerica M.; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Bauer, Katherine W.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Forsyth, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate individual and joint associations of the home environment and the neighborhood built environment with adolescent dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n = 2682; 53.2% girls; mean age14. 4 years) participating in the EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) study completed height and weight measurements and surveys in Minnesota middle and high schools. Neighborhood variables were...

  10. What is the evidence to support home environmental adaptation in Parkinson's disease? A call for multidisciplinary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Boonrod, Nonglak; Sringean, Jirada; Calne, Susan M; Hattori, Nobutaka; Hayashi, Akito

    2015-10-01

    "Home" is where one has a sense of belonging and feels secure, but it can also be a risky place for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients need assistance making adjustments to their physical environment to maintain appropriate care and provide a safe environment. This relationship is called the "person-environmental fit" (P-E fit). While most PD patients remain in their own homes, little is known about the specific challenges that PD patients and their caregivers encounter in the routine activities of daily living. The aim of our study was to identify the existing evidence on the issue of housing environmental adaptation in PD by performing a systematic review with a proposal of development strategies to integrate a multidisciplinary team into a home environmental research. MEDLINE, and life science journals were searched by querying appropriate key words, but revealed very few publications in this area. However, early evidence suggested that PD patients do not enjoy an adequate P-E fit in their own homes and face more functional limitations compared to matched controls. We concluded that we need to develop research-based evaluation strategies that can provide us with a theoretical and conceptual basis as well as tools for analysis of the P-E fit for PD patients and caregivers. We recommend that individual members of the multidisciplinary team including patients, caregivers, physicians, rehabilitation specialists, and social workers use a team approach to identify the key indicators and solutions for the development of PD-specific solutions for improving the P-E fit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of a computerized decision support system on care planning for pressure ulcers and malnutrition in nursing homes: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Mariann; Ehnfors, Margareta; Svensson, Elisabeth; Hansen, Linda M; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Nursing documentation is essential for facilitating the flow of information to guarantee continuity, quality and safety in care. High-quality nursing documentation is frequently lacking; the implementation of computerized decision support systems is expected to improve clinical practice and nursing documentation. The present study aimed at investigate the effects of a computerized decision support system and an educational program as intervention strategies for improved nursing documentation practice on pressure ulcers and malnutrition in nursing homes. An intervention study with two intervention groups and one control group was used. Fifteen nursing homes in southern Norway were included. A convenience sample of electronic healthcare records from 46 units was included. Inclusion criteria were records with presence of pressure ulcers and/or malnutrition. The residents were assessed before and after an intervention of a computerized decision support system in the electronic healthcare records. Data were collected through a review of 150 records before (2007) and 141 records after the intervention (2009). The nurses in intervention group 1 were offered educational sessions and were trained to use the computerized decision support system, which they used for eight months in 2008 and 2009. The nurses in intervention group 2 were offered the same educational program but did not use the computerized decision support system. The nurses in the control group were not subject to any intervention. The resident records were examined for the completeness and comprehensiveness of the documentation of pressure ulcers and malnutrition with three data collection forms and the data were analyzed with non-parametric statistics. The implementation of the computerized decision support system and the educational program resulted in a more complete and comprehensive documentation of pressure ulcer- and malnutrition-related nursing assessments and nursing interventions. This study

  12. Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard J; Birkner, Jeffrey S

    2012-12-01

    Respiratory protection is used as a method of protecting individuals from inhaling harmful airborne contaminants and in some cases to supply them with breathable air in oxygen-deficient environments. This article focuses on the use and types of personal respiratory protection (respirators) worn by individuals at workplaces where airborne hazardous contaminants may exist. Respirators are increasingly also being used in nonindustrial settings such as health care facilities, as concerns regarding infectious epidemics and terrorist threats grow. Pulmonologists and other clinicians should understand fundamental issues regarding respiratory protection against airborne contaminants and the use of respirators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The moderating role of decision authority and coworker- and supervisor support on the impact of job demands in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Bernadette M; de Jonge, Jan; Smit, Dieneke; Depla, Marja F I A; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2012-07-01

    Healthcare workers in nursing homes are faced with high job demands that can have a detrimental impact on job-related outcomes, such as job satisfaction. Job resources may have a buffering role on this relationship. The Demand-Control-Support (DCS) Model offers a theoretical framework to study how specific job resources can buffer the adverse effects of high demands, and can even activate positive consequences of high demands. The present study tests the moderating (i.e. buffering and activating) effects of decision authority and coworker- and supervisor support that are assumed by the hypotheses of the DCS Model. A national cross-sectional survey was conducted with an anonymous questionnaire. One hundred and thirty six living arrangements that provide nursing home care for people with dementia in the Netherlands. Fifteen healthcare workers per living arrangement. In total, 1147 people filled out the questionnaires (59% response rate). Hierarchical multilevel regression analyses were conducted to test the assumption that the effect of job demands on the dependent variables is buffered or activated the most when both decision authority and social support are high. This moderation is statistically represented by three-way interactions (i.e. demands×authority×support), while lower-order effects are taken into account (i.e. two-way interactions). The hypotheses are supported when three-way interaction effects are found in the expected direction. The dependent variables studied are job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and personal accomplishment. The proposed buffering and activation hypotheses of the DCS Model were not supported in our study. Three-way interaction effects were found for emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment, though not in the expected direction. In addition, two-way interaction effects were found for job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Decision authority was found to buffer the adverse effect of job demands and to activate

  14. Associations Between Home Death and the Use and Type of Care at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Rebecca; Asada, Yukiko; Burge, Frederick; Lawson, Beverley

    2018-01-01

    Despite wishes for and benefits of home deaths, a discrepancy between preferred and actual location of death persists. Provision of home care may be an effective policy response to support home deaths. Using the population-based mortality follow-back study conducted in Nova Scotia, we investigated the associations between home death and formal care at home and between home death and the type of formal care at home. We found (1) the use of formal care at home at the end of life was associated with home death and (2) the use of formal home support services at home was associated with home death among those whose symptoms were well managed.

  15. Education and credentialing in respiratory care: where are we and where should we be headed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelledy, David C; Wiezalis, Carl P

    2005-09-01

    Respiratory care is indeed at a crossroads. The profession will continue to develop by advancing the education and credentialing needed to function as physician extenders-true cardiopulmonary physician's assistants. As such, the respiratory therapist of the future will focus on patient assessment,care plan development, protocol administration, disease management and rehabilitation, and patient and family education, including tobacco education and smoking cessation. Respiratory therapists, through primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention activities, can positively affect peoples'quality of life. This advanced level professional will work in the intensive-and acute-care settings, applying sophisticated cardiopulmonary technologies, as well in clinics, physician offices, home care, long-term and rehabilitation facilities, industry, educational institutions, and research facilities. The alternative to this advanced practice is for the profession to remain a task-oriented technical field, focused on procedures and the technical aspects of oxygen and aerosol therapy, mechanical ventilatory support, and related diagnostic and monitoring techniques. Although there is a dignified and important role for the provision of the technical aspects of respiratory care, the authors believe that the future role of the respiratory specialist is that of physician extender. Higher-order performance will result in higher-order contributions to health care. This role will require increased numbers of baccalaureate and graduate degree programs in respiratory care and increased numbers of respiratory therapists who hold higher degrees,including the master's degree in respiratory care and doctoral degrees in related fields. Community colleges, 4-year colleges, and universities should be encouraged to develop effective articulation agreements and mechanisms to offer the bachelor of science degree in respiratory care to the community college student. Professional associations and

  16. Respiratory Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated with workers, and other areas (more often, rural areas) will be in need of respiratory therapists’ ... workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. ...

  17. [Study of influences of social support and social networks on participation in periodic health examination of the elderly at home comparison of three regions with different social backgrounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Yuu; Kishi, Reiko; Ecuchi, Teruko; Miyake, Hirotsugu; Sasatani, Harumi; Maeda, Nobuo; Horikawa, Naoko

    2006-02-01

    Periodic health examination are presumed to be important with respect to the well-being of aged individuals. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between elderly at home accepting periodic health examination and their social support and social networks. The survey was performed targeting so-called young elderly persons living at home in 3 regions in Hokkaido Prefecture, a large city (Sapporo), an ex-coalmining town (Yuubari) and a small farming town (Takasu). The study populations were asked about social support and social networks, and the Mantel-Haenszel method was applied to analyze the data. 1) Both males and females who received periodic health examination within the last one year (participants) were members of various groups, such as neighborhood societies, clubs for the elderly and so on, and were more interested in public magazines and political issues than those who had never received periodic health examination (non-participants). Elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were those who were interested in elections, who had a hobby, and who thought that life was worthwhile. 2) Both elderly males and females who accepted periodic health examination were those who had friends, and elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were those who had close relatives and who lived in a friendly neighborhood. 3) Elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were more likely to both receive and supply instrumental and emotional support in interaction with others.

  18. Effective public involvement in the HoST-D Programme for dementia home care support: From proposal and design to methods of data collection (innovative practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Clarissa; Roe, Brenda; Hodgson, Anthony; Britt, David; Clarkson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Public involvement is an important element in health and social care research. However, it is little evaluated in research. This paper discusses the utility and impact of public involvement of carers and people with dementia in a five-year programme on effective home support in dementia, from proposal and design to methods of data collection, and provides a useful guide for future research on how to effectively involve the public. The Home SupporT in Dementia (HoST-D) Programme comprises two elements of public involvement, a small reference group and a virtual lay advisory group. Involving carers and people with dementia is based on the six key values of involvement - respect, support, transparency, responsiveness, fairness of opportunity, and accountability. Carers and people with dementia gave opinions on study information, methods of data collection, an economic model, case vignettes, and a memory aid booklet, which were all taken into account. Public involvement has provided benefits to the programme whilst being considerate of the time constraints and geographical locations of members.

  19. Mobile Anwendungssysteme zur Unterstützung ambulanter Pflegedienstleistungen: Anforderungsanalyse und Einsatzpotenziale / Mobile application systems for home nursing services support: requirements analysis and usage potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory nursing services increasingly gain significance due to immediate implications of demographic developments. However, portable application systems have only been established sporadically in home nursing environments unlike in the comparable domain of technical field service. This paper identifies a new mobile usage scenario by matching healthcare requirements with state-of-the-art concepts. Potentials concerning the support of the actual nursing care processes can be concluded on that basis. The results are of relevance not only to patients and nurses but also to various providers of healthcare and IT solutions.

  20. eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. Objective The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. Methods A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. Results The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. Conclusions This paper describes the health care professionals

  1. How home HIV testing and counselling with follow-up support achieves high testing coverage and linkage to treatment and prevention: a qualitative analysis from Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma C Ware

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The successes of HIV treatment scale-up and the availability of new prevention tools have raised hopes that the epidemic can finally be controlled and ended. Reduction in HIV incidence and control of the epidemic requires high testing rates at population levels, followed by linkage to treatment or prevention. As effective linkage strategies are identified, it becomes important to understand how these strategies work. We use qualitative data from The Linkages Study, a recent community intervention trial of community-based testing with linkage interventions in sub-Saharan Africa, to show how lay counsellor home HIV testing and counselling (home HTC with follow-up support leads to linkage to clinic-based HIV treatment and medical male circumcision services. Methods: We conducted 99 semi-structured individual interviews with study participants and three focus groups with 16 lay counsellors in Kabwohe, Sheema District, Uganda. The participant sample included both HIV+ men and women (N=47 and HIV-uncircumcised men (N=52. Interview and focus group audio-recordings were translated and transcribed. Each transcript was summarized. The summaries were analyzed inductively to identify emergent themes. Thematic concepts were grouped to develop general constructs and framing propositional statements. Results: Trial participants expressed interest in linking to clinic-based services at testing, but faced obstacles that eroded their initial enthusiasm. Follow-up support by lay counsellors intervened to restore interest and inspire action. Together, home HTC and follow-up support improved morale, created a desire to reciprocate, and provided reassurance that services were trustworthy. In different ways, these functions built links to the health service system. They worked to strengthen individuals’ general sense of capability, while making the idea of accessing services more manageable and familiar, thus reducing linkage barriers. Conclusions

  2. Effects of a Home-Based and Volunteer-Administered Physical Training, Nutritional, and Social Support Program on Malnutrition and Frailty in Older Persons: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Eva; Dorner, Thomas Ernst; Haider, Sandra; Kapan, Ali; Lackinger, Christian; Schindler, Karin

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a home-based and volunteer-administered physical training and nutritional intervention program compared with social support intervention on nutritional and frailty status in prefrail and frail community-dwelling older persons. This was a randomized controlled trial in which community-dwelling persons (mean age = 83 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to the physical training and nutritional intervention group (PTN, n = 39) and the social support group (SoSu, n = 41). The study was conducted by trained lay nonprofessionals. The community-dwelling older persons in both groups were visited twice a week by trained nonprofessional volunteers (buddies) in Vienna, Austria. Eighty prefrail and frail adults aged 65 years or older. In the PTN group, both the buddies and older persons performed 6 strength exercises within a circuit training session and discussed nutrition-related aspects. The active control group (SoSu) had the opportunity to perform cognitive training in addition to the social contact. Outcome measures as nutritional (Mini Nutritional Assessment long form [MNA-LF]) and frailty status (Frailty Instrument for Primary Care of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe [SHARE-FI]) were obtained at baseline and after 12 weeks. Significant improvements in the MNA-LF score (1.54 points, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-2.56; P = .004) and the SHARE-FI score (-0.71 discrete factor score values, 95% CI -1.07, -0.35; P home-based physical training, nutritional, and social support intervention conducted by nonprofessionals is feasible and can help to tackle malnutrition and frailty in older persons living at home. Furthermore, social support alone also can result in improvement. In particular, older adults with impaired nutritional status at baseline can benefit more from the intervention. Such a home visit program might also have the potential to prevent future health risks and could

  3. How home HIV testing and counselling with follow-up support achieves high testing coverage and linkage to treatment and prevention: a qualitative analysis from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Norma C; Wyatt, Monique A; Asiimwe, Stephen; Turyamureeba, Bosco; Tumwesigye, Elioda; van Rooyen, Heidi; Barnabas, Ruanne V; Celum, Connie L

    2016-01-01

    The successes of HIV treatment scale-up and the availability of new prevention tools have raised hopes that the epidemic can finally be controlled and ended. Reduction in HIV incidence and control of the epidemic requires high testing rates at population levels, followed by linkage to treatment or prevention. As effective linkage strategies are identified, it becomes important to understand how these strategies work. We use qualitative data from The Linkages Study, a recent community intervention trial of community-based testing with linkage interventions in sub-Saharan Africa, to show how lay counsellor home HIV testing and counselling (home HTC) with follow-up support leads to linkage to clinic-based HIV treatment and medical male circumcision services. We conducted 99 semi-structured individual interviews with study participants and three focus groups with 16 lay counsellors in Kabwohe, Sheema District, Uganda. The participant sample included both HIV+ men and women (N=47) and HIV-uncircumcised men (N=52). Interview and focus group audio-recordings were translated and transcribed. Each transcript was summarized. The summaries were analyzed inductively to identify emergent themes. Thematic concepts were grouped to develop general constructs and framing propositional statements. Trial participants expressed interest in linking to clinic-based services at testing, but faced obstacles that eroded their initial enthusiasm. Follow-up support by lay counsellors intervened to restore interest and inspire action. Together, home HTC and follow-up support improved morale, created a desire to reciprocate, and provided reassurance that services were trustworthy. In different ways, these functions built links to the health service system. They worked to strengthen individuals' general sense of capability, while making the idea of accessing services more manageable and familiar, thus reducing linkage barriers. Home HTC with follow-up support leads to linkage by building

  4. User Experience, Actual Use, and Effectiveness of an Information Communication Technology-Supported Home Exercise Program for Pre-Frail Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker-van Weering, Marit; Jansen-Kosterink, Stephanie; Frazer, Sanne; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the use and user experience of an Information Communication Technology-supported home exercise program when offered for independent use to pre-frail older adults. Our secondary aim was to explore whether the program improved quality of life and health status compared to a control group. A cohort multiple randomized controlled trail is being performed. Physically pre-frail older adults (65-75 years) living independently at home were included and randomly assigned to a control group or an intervention group. The intervention group received a home exercise program (strength, balance, and flexibility exercises) for a minimal duration of 12 weeks. The control group received usual care. Primary outcomes were: use of the intervention (frequency and duration), adherence to a 3-day exercise protocol and user experience [System Usability Scale (SUS); rating 1-10]. Secondary outcomes were quality of life measured with the SF12 (Physical Component Scale and Mental Component Scale) and health status (EQ-5D), assessed before the study starts and after 12 weeks of exercising. Thirty-seven independently living older adults participated in the study. Sixteen participants were allocated to the intervention group and 21 to the control group. The average score on the SUS was 84.2 (±13.3), almost reaching an excellent score. Participants rated the intervention with an 8.5. Eighty percent of the participants finished the 12 week exercise protocol. The adherence to the 3-day exercise protocol was 68%. Participants in the intervention group trained on average 2.2 times (±1.3) each week. The mean duration of login for each exercise session was 24 min. The Mental Component Scale of the SF12 was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the control group. A trend was seen in the change over time in the health status between groups. This study provides evidence that a home-based exercise program is easy to use and

  5. User Experience, Actual Use, and Effectiveness of an Information Communication Technology-Supported Home Exercise Program for Pre-Frail Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Dekker-van Weering

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe main objective of this study was to investigate the use and user experience of an Information Communication Technology-supported home exercise program when offered for independent use to pre-frail older adults. Our secondary aim was to explore whether the program improved quality of life and health status compared to a control group.MethodsA cohort multiple randomized controlled trail is being performed. Physically pre-frail older adults (65–75 years living independently at home were included and randomly assigned to a control group or an intervention group. The intervention group received a home exercise program (strength, balance, and flexibility exercises for a minimal duration of 12 weeks. The control group received usual care. Primary outcomes were: use of the intervention (frequency and duration, adherence to a 3-day exercise protocol and user experience [System Usability Scale (SUS; rating 1–10]. Secondary outcomes were quality of life measured with the SF12 (Physical Component Scale and Mental Component Scale and health status (EQ-5D, assessed before the study starts and after 12 weeks of exercising.ResultsThirty-seven independently living older adults participated in the study. Sixteen participants were allocated to the intervention group and 21 to the control group. The average score on the SUS was 84.2 (±13.3, almost reaching an excellent score. Participants rated the intervention with an 8.5. Eighty percent of the participants finished the 12 week exercise protocol. The adherence to the 3-day exercise protocol was 68%. Participants in the intervention group trained on average 2.2 times (±1.3 each week. The mean duration of login for each exercise session was 24 min. The Mental Component Scale of the SF12 was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the control group. A trend was seen in the change over time in the health status between groups.ConclusionsThis study provides evidence that a

  6. ventilatory support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinfu Betemariam, Gebreyesus Hagos. Abstract. Background: Mechanical Ventilation is a supportive measure for patients who are in respiratory failure. Objective: Designed to identify the commonest pathology responsible for admission to the unit for mechanical respiratory support. Method: A prospective case study ...

  7. Paediatric respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual "home". Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  8. Living 'a life like ours': support workers' accounts of substitute decision-making in residential care homes for adults with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, M C; Clare, I C H; Holland, A J

    2010-02-01

    In England and Wales, the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) provides a new legal framework to regulate substitute decision-making relating to the welfare of adults who lack the capacity to make one or more autonomous decisions about their care and support. Any substitute decision made on behalf of an adult lacking capacity must be in his/her 'best interests'. However, the value of adopting established principles and procedures for substitute decision-making in practice is uncertain, and little is known about the legal or ethical dynamics of social care support, including the day-to-day residential support provided to adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Methods This paper reports a qualitative, grounded theory analysis of 21 interviews with support workers working in residential care homes for adults with ID, and observations of care practices. Results In contrast to the narrow legal responsibilities placed upon them, it is argued that support workers interpret substitute decision-making within a broad moral account of their care role, orientating their support towards helping residents to live 'a life like ours'. In so doing, support workers describe how they draw on their own values and life experiences to shape the substitute decisions that they make on behalf of residents. Conclusions Support workers' accounts reveal clear discrepancies between the legal regulation of substitute decision-making and the ways that these support workers make sense of their work. Such discrepancies have implications both for the implementation of the MCA, and for the role of support workers' values in the conceptualisation and delivery of 'good' care.

  9. XML technologies for the Omaha System: a data model, a Java tool and several case studies supporting home healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorini, Pierpaolo; Tarquinio, Antonietta; di Orio, Ferdinando

    2009-03-01

    The eXtensible markup language (XML) is a metalanguage which is useful to represent and exchange data between heterogeneous systems. XML may enable healthcare practitioners to document, monitor, evaluate, and archive medical information and services into distributed computer environments. Therefore, the most recent proposals on electronic health records (EHRs) are usually based on XML documents. Since none of the existing nomenclatures were specifically developed for use in automated clinical information systems, but were adapted to such use, numerous current EHRs are organized as a sequence of events, each represented through codes taken from international classification systems. In nursing, a hierarchically organized problem-solving approach is followed, which hardly couples with the sequential organization of such EHRs. Therefore, the paper presents an XML data model for the Omaha System taxonomy, which is one of the most important international nomenclatures used in the home healthcare nursing context. Such a data model represents the formal definition of EHRs specifically developed for nursing practice. Furthermore, the paper delineates a Java application prototype which is able to manage such documents, shows the possibility to transform such documents into readable web pages, and reports several case studies, one currently managed by the home care service of a Health Center in Central Italy.

  10. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn ... skills needed for optimal postoperative recovery. The kit supports the entire surgical ... on the operation, home skills such as emptying and changing a pouch, ...

  11. The Emotional Literacy Support Assistant (ELSA) Programme: Parental Perceptions of Its Impact in School and at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Lucy; Claridge, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The Emotional Literacy Support Assistant (ELSA) programme is an example of an individualised intervention to support pupils experiencing a range of social and emotional needs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore parents' constructions of several aspects of the programme: its aims and how these are achieved; its impact on children,…

  12. Knowledge management in dementia care networks: a qualitative analysis of successful information and support strategies for people with dementia living at home and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, S; Laporte Uribe, F; Roes, M; Hoffmann, W; Thyrian, J R; Wolf-Ostermann, K; Holle, B

    2016-02-01

    Stakeholders involved in community dementia support services often work on their own and without coordination with other services. These circumstances can result in a lack of information and support for people with dementia and their family caregivers at home. To increase the coordination between existing support services, so-called 'Dementia Care Networks' (DCNs) have been established. Most of the tasks that are performed in DCNs are based on communication strategies. Therefore, knowledge management (KM) is a key process in these networks. However, few studies have focused on this topic. This study attempted to evaluate KM strategies in DCNs across Germany as part of the DemNet-D study. A qualitative interview study design was used. Qualitative data were collected during single and group interviews with key persons associated with thirteen DCNs. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed, and a structured content analysis was conducted. The framework for the analysis was derived from a KM model. Information dissemination strategies for people with dementia and their informal caregivers based on actively established contacts appear to be more successful than passive strategies. General practitioners often play a key role as external gatekeepers in initiating contact between a network and a person affected by dementia. In this context, case managers can help integrate external stakeholders, such as general practitioners or pharmacists, into DCNs using different KM strategies. The systematic development of common objectives under an agency-neutral leadership seems to be an important aspect of successful KM within DCNs. The findings reported here can help DCNs optimize their KM strategies for generating tailored information and support services for people with dementia living at home and their family caregivers. In particular, the identified potential knowledge distribution barriers and facilitators will be of practical use to DCN stakeholders. Copyright © 2015 The

  13. Protecting Home Health Care Workers: A Challenge to Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaul, Kathleen; Phillips, Sally; Gershon, Robyn; Lipscomb, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The home health care sector is a critical element in a pandemic influenza emergency response. Roughly 85% of the 1.5 million workers delivering in-home care to 7.6 million clients are low-wage paraprofessionals, mostly women, and disproportionately members of racial and ethnic minorities. Home health care workers' ability and willingness to respond during a pandemic depends on appropriate communication, training, and adequate protections, including influenza vaccination and respiratory protection. Preparedness planning should also include support for child care and transportation and help home health care workers protect their income and access to health care. We summarize findings from a national stakeholder meeting, which highlighted the need to integrate home health care employers, workers, community advocates, and labor unions into the planning process. PMID:19461108

  14. Patient-ventilator asynchronies: may the respiratory mechanics play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Annalisa; Pisani, Lara; Ceriana, Piero; Malovini, Alberto; Nava, Stefano

    2013-03-25

    The mechanisms leading to patient/ventilator asynchrony has never been systematically assessed. We studied the possible association between asynchrony and respiratory mechanics in patients ready to be enrolled for a home non-invasive ventilatory program. Secondarily, we looked for possible differences in the amount of asynchronies between obstructive and restrictive patients and a possible role of asynchrony in influencing the tolerance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV). The respiratory pattern and mechanics of 69 consecutive patients with chronic respiratory failure were recorded during spontaneous breathing. After that patients underwent non-invasive ventilation for 60 minutes with a "dedicated" NIV platform in a pressure support mode during the day. In the last 15 minutes of this period, asynchrony events were detected and classified as ineffective effort (IE), double triggering (DT) and auto-triggering (AT). The overall number of asynchronies was not influenced by any variable of respiratory mechanics or by the underlying pathologies (that is, obstructive vs restrictive patients). There was a high prevalence of asynchrony events (58% of patients). IEs were the most frequent asynchronous events (45% of patients) and were associated with a higher level of pressure support. A high incidence of asynchrony events and IE were associated with a poor tolerance of NIV. Our study suggests that in non-invasively ventilated patients for a chronic respiratory failure, the incidence of patient-ventilator asynchronies was relatively high, but did not correlate with any parameters of respiratory mechanics or underlying disease.

  15. Clinical impact of pharmacogenetic profiling with a clinical decision support tool in polypharmacy home health patients: A prospective pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lindsay S; Henderson, John C; Neradilek, Moni B; Moyer, Nicolas A; Ashcraft, Kristine C; Thirumaran, Ranjit K

    2017-01-01

    In polypharmacy patients under home health management, pharmacogenetic testing coupled with guidance from a clinical decision support tool (CDST) on reducing drug, gene, and cumulative interaction risk may provide valuable insights in prescription drug treatment, reducing re-hospitalization and emergency department (ED) visits. We assessed the clinical impact of pharmacogenetic profiling integrating binary and cumulative drug and gene interaction warnings on home health polypharmacy patients. This prospective, open-label, randomized controlled trial was conducted at one hospital-based home health agency between February 2015 and February 2016. Recruitment came from patient referrals to home health at hospital discharge. Eligible patients were aged 50 years and older and taking or initiating treatment with medications with potential or significant drug-gene-based interactions. Subjects (n = 110) were randomized to pharmacogenetic profiling (n = 57). The study pharmacist reviewed drug-drug, drug-gene, and cumulative drug and/or gene interactions using the YouScript® CDST to provide drug therapy recommendations to clinicians. The control group (n = 53) received treatment as usual including pharmacist guided medication management using a standard drug information resource. The primary outcome measure was the number of re-hospitalizations and ED visits at 30 and 60 days after discharge from the hospital. The mean number of re-hospitalizations per patient in the tested vs. untested group was 0.25 vs. 0.38 at 30 days (relative risk (RR), 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32-1.28; P = 0.21) and 0.33 vs. 0.70 at 60 days following enrollment (RR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.82; P = 0.007). The mean number of ED visits per patient in the tested vs. untested group was 0.25 vs. 0.40 at 30 days (RR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31-1.21; P = 0.16) and 0.39 vs. 0.66 at 60 days (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-0.99; P = 0.045). Differences in composite outcomes at 60 days (exploratory endpoints) were also

  16. Respiratory Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin R. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Mechanics by Theodore Wilson is a slim paperback volume (64 pages) describing three aspects of the way the lungs work: 1) pressure?volume relationships with regard to the lungs, 2) chest wall and muscles with regard to how the respiratory pump works, and 3) gas flow and transport. Relevant details about the author are missing, which I think is a loss. He is Emeritus Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics and this background and his expertise was a perfect fit for the inv...

  17. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  18. Use of home telemonitoring to support multidisciplinary care of heart failure patients in Finland: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Anna-Leena; Leppänen, Juha; Kaijanranta, Hannu; Kulju, Minna; Heliö, Tiina; van Gils, Mark; Lähteenmäki, Jaakko

    2014-12-11

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from frequent and repeated hospitalizations, causing a substantial economic burden on society. Hospitalizations can be reduced considerably by better compliance with self-care. Home telemonitoring has the potential to boost patients' compliance with self-care, although the results are still contradictory. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in order to study whether the multidisciplinary care of heart failure patients promoted with telemonitoring leads to decreased HF-related hospitalization. HF patients were eligible whose left ventricular ejection fraction was lower than 35%, NYHA functional class ≥2, and who needed regular follow-up. Patients in the telemonitoring group (n=47) measured their body weight, blood pressure, and pulse and answered symptom-related questions on a weekly basis, reporting their values to the heart failure nurse using a mobile phone app. The heart failure nurse followed the status of patients weekly and if necessary contacted the patient. The primary outcome was the number of HF-related hospital days. Control patients (n=47) received multidisciplinary treatment according to standard practices. Patients' clinical status, use of health care resources, adherence, and user experience from the patients' and the health care professionals' perspective were studied. Adherence, calculated as a proportion of weekly submitted self-measurements, was close to 90%. No difference was found in the number of HF-related hospital days (incidence rate ratio [IRR]=0.812, P=.351), which was the primary outcome. The intervention group used more health care resources: they paid an increased number of visits to the nurse (IRR=1.73, Ppatients (IRR=3.82, Ppatient-induced contacts). There were no statistically significant differences in patients' clinical health status or in their self-care behavior. The technology received excellent feedback from the patient and professional side with a high adherence rate throughout the

  19. Early home-based group education to support informed decision-making among patients with end-stage renal disease: a multi-centre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Emma K; Gregoor, Peter J H Smak; Nette, Robert W; van den Dorpel, Marinus A; van Kooij, Anthony; Zietse, Robert; Zuidema, Willij C; Timman, Reinier; Busschbach, Jan J; Weimar, Willem

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to test the effectiveness of early home-based group education on knowledge and communication about renal replacement therapy (RRT). We conducted a randomized controlled trial using a cross-over design among 80 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Between T0 and T1 (weeks 1-4) Group 1 received the intervention and Group 2 received standard care. Between T1 and T2 (weeks 5-8) Group 1 received standard care and Group 2 received the intervention. The intervention was a group education session on RRT options held in the patient's home given by social workers. Patients invited members from their social network to attend. Self-report questionnaires were used at T0, T1 and T2 to measure patients' knowledge and communication, and concepts from the Theory of Planned Behaviour such as attitude. Comparable questionnaires were completed pre-post intervention by 229 attendees. Primary RRT was registered up to 2 years post-intervention. Multilevel linear modelling was used to analyse patient data and paired t-tests for attendee data. Statistically significant increases in the primary targets knowledge and communication were found among patients and attendees after receiving the intervention. The intervention also had a significant effect in increasing positive attitude toward living donation and haemodialysis. Of the 80 participants, 49 underwent RRT during follow-up. Of these, 34 underwent a living donor kidney transplant, of which 22 were pre-emptive. Early home-based group education supports informed decision-making regarding primary RRT for ESRD patients and their social networks and may remove barriers to pre-emptive transplantation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethical issues arising from a research, technology and development project to support frail older people and their family carers at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lennart; Hanson, Elizabeth Jane

    2003-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of the application of the key ethical issues which arose in an EU-funded research, technology and development project, Assisting Carers using Telematics Interventions to meet Older Persons' Needs (ACTION). The primary aim of the ACTION project was to support frail older people and their family carers in their own homes across England, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Sweden and Portugal via the use of user-friendly information and communication technology. Ethical guidelines were developed in the project and used as a tool to enable the multidisciplinary project team to increase their awareness of ethical issues in their everyday work, and to act as a useful ethical framework for regular team discussions at international and local meetings across the partner countries. A range of ethical issues arose during the field-study phases of the project when the ACTION services were introduced into a number of families' own homes. It can be argued that these ethical issues reflect factors relating both to the application of research into practice, as well as those relating more directly to the use of new technology by families and care professionals. Key issues centre upon the ethical concepts of autonomy, independence, quality of life, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice, and more specifically, on ethical issues of security, privacy and confidentiality, increased expectations, and withdrawal of the service. This paper is intended to facilitate dialogue and debate in the area of enabling (assistive) technology in home care for older people and their families.

  1. Respiratory function of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and caregiver distress level: a correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagnini Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a rare, fatal neurodegenerative disorder with no curative treatment characterized by degeneration of motor neurons involving a progressive impairment of motor and respiratory functions. Most patients die of ventilator respiratory failure. Caregivers have a great influence on the patient”s quality of life as well as on the quality of care. Home influence of the caregiver on patient care is notable. To date, no study has investigated how psychological issues of caregivers would influence respiratory variables of ALS patients. The study aimed at finding out if there is a relationship between the respiratory function of ALS patients and the level of distress of their caregivers. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate respiratory issues (PCF and FVC and the perception of social support of ALS patients. Caregivers filled questionnaires about trait anxiety, depression, and burden of care. Forty ALS patients and their caregivers were recruited. Results FVC and PCF were positively related to patient perception of social support and negatively related to caregiver anxiety, depression, and burden. Discussion The distress of ALS caregivers is related to patient respiratory issues. The first and more intuitive explanation emphasizes the impact that the patient’s clinical condition has with respect to the caregiver. However, it is possible to hypothesize that if caregivers feel psychologically better, their patient’s quality of life improves and that a condition of greater well-being and relaxation could also increase ventilatory capacity. Furthermore, care management could be carried out more easily by caregivers who pay more attention to the patient's respiratory needs. Conclusion Patient perception of social support and caregiver distress are related to respiratory issues in ALS.

  2. Integrating community health workers into a patient-centered medical home to support disease self-management among Vietnamese Americans: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerstrom, Ashley; Bui, Tap; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Price-Haywood, Eboni G

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) and community health workers (CHWs) improve chronic disease management. There are few models for integrating CHWs into PCMHs in order to enhance disease self-management support among diverse populations. In this article, we describe how a community-based nonprofit agency, a PCMH, and academic partners collaborated to develop and implement the Patient Resource and Education Program (PREP). We employed CHWs as PCMH care team members to provide health education and support to Vietnamese American patients with uncontrolled diabetes and/or hypertension. We began by conducting focus groups to assess patient knowledge, desire for support, and availability of community resources. Based on findings, we developed PREP with CHW guidance on cultural tailoring of educational materials and methods. CHWs received training in core competencies related to self-management support principles and conducted the 4-month intervention for PCMH patients. Throughout the program, we conducted process evaluation through structured team meetings and patient satisfaction surveys. We describe successes and challenges associated with PREP delivery including patient recruitment, structuring/documenting visits, and establishing effective care team integration, work flow, and communication. Strategies for mitigating these issues are presented, and we make recommendations for other PCMHs seeking to integrate CHWs into care teams. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. Home Health Compare: Find a Home Health Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page could not be loaded. The Medicare.gov Home page currently does not fully support browsers with " ... widget - Select to show Back to top Footer Home A federal government website managed and paid for ...

  4. Involving service users in the development of the Support at Home: Interventions to Enhance Life in Dementia Carer Supporter Programme for family carers of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnell, Karen J; Selwood, Amber; Sullivan, Theresa; Charlesworth, Georgina M; Poland, Fiona; Orrell, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Involving service users in research can be an effective way of improving the practicalities and acceptability of interventions for target end users. The current paper presented two consensus methods, not commonly used in consultation with service users, to develop a peer support intervention for family carers of people with dementia (SHIELD Carer Supporter Programme). Study 1 was a modified Delphi process combined with a consensus conference to explore details of the intervention from the carer and volunteer perspective. Study 2 was an anonymous reader consultation to develop informed consent documents for the intervention trial. Median scores were used to measure and establish consensus. Open-ended responses were thematically analysed. Study 1: twenty-five delegates participated (eight were current/former carers) in the first round Delphi questionnaire, with 21 attending the conference. Five completed the Round 2 questionnaire. Study 2: six family carers and 11 people with dementia took part in the consultation. Study 1: the role of the peer supporters was developed in terms of relational and practical aspects of the intervention. Study 2: changes were made to the documents, reflecting service user input, but the effectiveness of this less discursive type of service user involvement was unclear. Study 1 methods allowed for service users to contribute significantly and meaningfully, but maybe limiting some design innovation. Study 2 took a more traditional and less collaborative approach. This has implications for balancing the needs of the research with meaningful service user involvement in research. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Home and Away: The Use of Institutional and Non-Institutional Technologies to Support Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the usage of institutional and non-institutional technologies to support learning and teaching in UK higher education. Previous work on disruptive technology and disruptive innovation has argued that users prefer simple and convenient technologies, and often repurpose technologies from designers' intentions; this paper…

  6. Effects of Propofol on Respiratory Drive and Patient-ventilator Synchrony during Pressure Support Ventilation in Postoperative Patients: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Liu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Propofol inhibits respiratory drive and deteriorates patient-ventilator synchrony to the extent that varies with the depth of sedation. Propofol has less effect on breathing pattern and has no effect on VT and gas exchange in postoperative patients with PSV.

  7. A measure for quantifying the impact of housing quality on respiratory health: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keall Michael D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Damp and mould in homes have been established as risk factors for respiratory health. There is a need for a relatively straightforward assessment of the home that quantifies this risk. Methods Using data from 891 New Zealand houses, the utility of a Respiratory Hazard Index quantifying key attributes related to damp and mould was tested by studying its associations with self-reported respiratory symptoms. Results A dose–response relationship was found whereby each unit increase in the Respiratory Hazard Index was associated with an 11% increase in the odds of at least one episode of wheezing/whistling in the chest over the last 12 months (relative odds of 1.11 with a 95% CI 1.04%–1.20%. An 11% increase in the odds of an asthma attack over the last 12 months was estimated (relative odds of 1.11 with a 95% CI 1.01%–1.22%. These estimates were adjusted for household crowding levels, age, sex and smoking status. There was suggestive evidence of more steeply increasing odds of respiratory symptoms with increasing levels of the Respiratory Hazard Index for children aged under 7. In the worst performing houses according to the Index, a 33% reduction in the number of people experiencing respiratory symptoms (relative risk 0.67 with 95% CI 0.53 to 0.85 could be expected if people were housed in the best performing houses. Conclusions This study showed that increased evidence of housing conditions supporting dampness and mould was associated with increased odds of respiratory symptoms. A valid housing assessment tool can provide a rational basis for investment in improved housing quality to improve respiratory health.

  8. Practice Leadership at the Front Line in Supporting People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour: A Qualitative Study of Registered Managers of Community-based, Staffed Group homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Roy; McGill, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The front-line management role in services for people with intellectual disabilities remains rather under-researched. The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of registered managers in services for adults with intellectual disability who exhibit challenging behaviour. Interviews, primarily focussed upon staff practice, were conducted with 19 managers of staffed group homes in SE England. Transcripts were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Five groups of themes emerged: monitoring staff performance, supporting new ways of working, shaping staff performance, influence of external and employing agencies, and importance of participants' personal values and experiences. The themes identified contribute to a conceptual framework for thinking about front-line management/practice leadership. The limitations, and potential implications, of the findings are discussed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Application of the A.S.P.E.N. clinical guideline for nutrition support of hospitalized adult patients with obesity: a case study of home parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Phyllis Ann; Piccolo, Korinne; Compher, Charlene

    2014-02-01

    An A.S.P.E.N. clinical guideline addressing the nutrition support of hospitalized adult patients with obesity was recently published in the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Among the patient presentations for which this guideline might be used is those who have a gastrointestinal complication after bariatric surgery. A case study is discussed of a 43-year-old woman with a long history of severe obesity who had a bowel obstruction approximately 2 weeks after her laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy surgery. The patient's treatment plan for bowel rest and home parenteral nutrition was based on the A.S.P.E.N. clinical guideline for patients with obesity. She tolerated the course well and resumed the expected diet advancement and weight loss patterns expected of her weight-loss surgery.

  10. The Design of New Technology Supporting Wellbeing, Independence and Social Participation, for Older Adults Domiciled in Residential Homes and/or Assisted Living Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Cahill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify and validate the requirements for new technology supporting wellness, independence and social participation for older people domiciled in residential homes and/or assisted-living communities. Method: This research adopts a stakeholder evaluation approach to requirements elicitation and user interface design. Specifically, the study design combines several qualitative human–machine interaction (HMI design frameworks/methods, including realist ethnography, scenario-based design, persona-based design, and participatory design. Findings: New technology should reflect positive values around ageing and link to psychosocial models of successful ageing, and biopsychosocial models of health and wellbeing. Resident autonomy, wellness and social participation cannot be conceptualized outside an understanding of the relationships older adults have with others. The design remit for this technology is to enable a resident experience that is similar to living at home. New technologies should facilitate wellness and communication/connection, and not simply risk assessment. New technology provides an opportunity to bridge existing information gaps between care planning, care assessments and daily care. Overall this technology needs to be intuitive and uphold the resident’s dignity and rights. Person-to-person interaction is central to care delivery. The introduction of new technology should enhance this interaction, and not threaten it. Conclusions: Future assisted-living (AL technology should be premised by biopsychosocial models of wellness and support relationships between older adults and members of the personal and professional community. New assisted-living technology affords the possibility for improved social relationships, enhanced wellbeing, better quality of care, and independence. Such technologies require careful consideration in relation to adapting to age/condition and managing issues

  11. PalliPA: How can general practices support caregivers of patients at their end of life in a home-care setting? A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Katja

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of patients with a life-threatening, progressive and far advanced illness in a home-care setting requires appropriate individual care and requires the active support of family caregivers. General practice teams are usually the primary care givers and first contact and are best placed to offer support to family caregivers and to recognise and respond to the burden of care giving on family members. The aim of this project is to develop a best practice model for engaging with and supporting family caregivers. Findings The project is framed as an exploratory trial for a subsequent implementation study, covering phases 0, I and II of the MRC (Medical Research Council framework for development, design and evaluation of complex interventions. The project is a multi-method procedure and has two phases. In the first phase, which has already been completed, we used a reflective practice procedure where general practice teams were asked about how they currently deal with family caregivers. In the second phase, a participatory action research approach aims to improve identification and response to when support is necessary for family caregivers. Ten participating general practice teams each enrol 40 eligible patients and their family caregiver, to identify structures and tools feasible for use in their practice. Standardised self-reported questionnaires (Burden Scale for Family Caregivers and Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 Palliative are being applied at study inclusion (prior to or during the implementation period and after 6 and 12 months to explore implementation effects. Qualitative assessment of general practice teams’ experiences will be triangulated with the quantitative evaluation of the implementation. Discussion This two-step approach, which is appropriate to primary palliative care in the German health care context, will enable general practice teams to develop feasible, acceptable and successful strategies

  12. Needs assessment for home-based care and the strengthening of social support networks: the role of community care workers in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshabela, Mosa; Sips, Ilona; Barten, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Community care workers (CCWs) in rural South Africa provide medical, personal, household, educational, and social care services to their clients. However, little understanding exists on how provision of services is approached within a household, taking into account available social support networks. The aim of this study was to generate an understanding of the processes that underpin the provision of care by CCWs in rural households and their engagement with clients, primary caregivers (PCGs), and other members of the social support network. We analysed in-depth interviews conducted in a triad of participants involved in a home-based care (HBC) encounter - 32 clients, 32 PCGs, and 17 CCWs. For each triad, a purposefully selected CCW was linked with a purposefully selected client and the corresponding PCG using maximum variation sampling. Three coders used an inductive content analysis method to describe participants' references to the nuances of processes followed by CCWs in servicing HBC clients. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The results suggest that, by intuition and prior knowledge, CCWs treated each household uniquely, depending on the clients' care needs, cooperation, availability of a social network, and the reliability and resilience of the social support system for the client. Four distinct processes took place in rural households: needs assessment for care, rationing of care, appraisal of care, and reinforcement of a social support system. However, there was no particular order or sequence established for these processes, and caregivers followed no prescribed or shared standards. CCWs bring a basket of services to a household, but engage in a constant, dynamic, and cyclical process of weighing needs against services provided. The service package is uniquely crafted and tailored for each household, depending on the absorptive capacity of the social support network available to the client, and preferences of the clients remain

  13. Needs assessment for home-based care and the strengthening of social support networks: the role of community care workers in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosa Moshabela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community care workers (CCWs in rural South Africa provide medical, personal, household, educational, and social care services to their clients. However, little understanding exists on how provision of services is approached within a household, taking into account available social support networks. Objective: The aim of this study was to generate an understanding of the processes that underpin the provision of care by CCWs in rural households and their engagement with clients, primary caregivers (PCGs, and other members of the social support network. Design: We analysed in-depth interviews conducted in a triad of participants involved in a home-based care (HBC encounter – 32 clients, 32 PCGs, and 17 CCWs. For each triad, a purposefully selected CCW was linked with a purposefully selected client and the corresponding PCG using maximum variation sampling. Three coders used an inductive content analysis method to describe participants’ references to the nuances of processes followed by CCWs in servicing HBC clients. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Findings: The results suggest that, by intuition and prior knowledge, CCWs treated each household uniquely, depending on the clients’ care needs, cooperation, availability of a social network, and the reliability and resilience of the social support system for the client. Four distinct processes took place in rural households: needs assessment for care, rationing of care, appraisal of care, and reinforcement of a social support system. However, there was no particular order or sequence established for these processes, and caregivers followed no prescribed or shared standards. Conclusions: CCWs bring a basket of services to a household, but engage in a constant, dynamic, and cyclical process of weighing needs against services provided. The service package is uniquely crafted and tailored for each household, depending on the absorptive capacity of the social

  14. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and ...

  15. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation ...

  16. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía Ostomy Home Skills Program Adult Ostomy Pediatric Ostomy Programa de Destrezas para manejo Doméstico de Ostomía The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with ...

  17. Respiratory transfusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  18. Respiratory effects of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Orianne; Despreaux, Thomas; Perros, Frédéric; Lau, Edmund; Andujar, Pascal; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Descatha, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated solvent that has been used widely around the world in the twentieth century for metal degreasing and dry cleaning. Although TCE displays general toxicity and is classified as a human carcinogen, the association between TCE exposure and respiratory disorders are conflicting. In this review we aimed to systematically evaluate the current evidence for the respiratory effects of TCE exposure and the implications for the practicing clinician. There is limited evidence of an increased risk of lung cancer associated with TCE exposure based on animal and human data. However, the effect of other chlorinated solvents and mixed solvent exposure should be further investigated. Limited data are available to support an association between TCE exposure and respiratory tract disorders such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or rhinitis. The most consistent data is the association of TCE with autoimmune and vascular diseases such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Although recent data are reassuring regarding the absence of an increased lung cancer risk with TCE exposure, clinicians should be aware of other potential respiratory effects of TCE. In particular, occupational exposure to TCE has been linked to less common conditions such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Using integrated bio-physiotherapy informatics in home health-care settings: A qualitative analysis of a point-of-care decision support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canally, Culum; Doherty, Sean; Doran, Diane M; Goubran, Rafik A

    2015-06-01

    The growing need to gain efficiencies within a home care setting has prompted home care practitioners to focus on health informatics to address the needs of an aging clientele. The remote and heterogeneous nature of the home care environment necessitates the use of non-intrusive client monitoring and a portable, point-of-care graphical user interface. Using a grounded theory approach, this article examines the simulated use of a graphical user interface by practitioners in a home care setting to explore the salient features of monitoring the activity of home care clients. The results demonstrate the need for simple, interactive displays that can provide large amounts of geographical and temporal data relating to patient activity. Additional emerging themes from interviews indicate that home care professionals would use a graphical user interface of this type for patient education and goal setting as well as to assist in the decision-making process of home care practitioners. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. A pilot study: dose adaptation of capecitabine using mobile phone toxicity monitoring - supporting patients in their homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Andrew; Love, Sharon B; Larsen, Mark; Shanyinde, Milensu; Waters, Rachel; Grainger, Lisa; Shearwood, Vanessa; Brooks, Claire; Gibson, Oliver; Young, Annie M; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-10-01

    Real-time symptom monitoring using a mobile phone is potentially advantageous for patients receiving oral chemotherapy. We therefore conducted a pilot study of patient dose adaptation using mobile phone monitoring of specific symptoms to investigate relative dose intensity of capecitabine, level of toxicity and perceived supportive care. Patients with breast or colorectal cancer receiving capecitabine completed a symptom, temperature and dose diary twice a day using a mobile phone application. This information was encrypted and automatically transmitted in real time to a secure server, with moderate levels of toxicity automatically prompting self-care symptom management messages on the screen of the patient's mobile phone or in severe cases, a call from a specialist nurse to advise on care according to an agreed protocol. Patients (n = 26) completed the mobile phone diary on 92.6 % of occasions. Twelve patients had a maximum toxicity grade of 3 (46.2 %). The average dose intensity for all patients as a percentage of standard dose was 90 %. In eight patients, the dose of capecitabine was reduced, and in eight patients, the dose of capecitabine was increased. Patients and healthcare professionals involved felt reassured by the novel monitoring system, in particular, during out of hours. It is possible to optimise the individual dose of oral chemotherapy safely including dose increase and to manage chemotherapy side effects effectively using real-time mobile phone monitoring of toxicity parameters entered by the patient.

  1. Do physical environmental changes make a difference? Supporting person-centered care at mealtimes in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Habib; Hung, Lillian; Rust, Tiana; Wu, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    Purpose Drawing on therapeutic physical environmental design principles and Kitwood's theoretical view of person-centered care, this study examined the impact of environmental renovations in dining spaces of a long-term care facility on residents' mealtime experience and staff practice in two care units. Method The research design involved pre- and post-renovation ethnographic observations in the dining spaces of the care units and a post-renovation staff survey. The objective physical environmental features pre- and post-renovations were assessed with a newly developed tool titled Dining Environment Audit Protocol. We collected observational data from 10 residents and survey responses from 17 care aides and nurses. Findings Based on a systematic analysis of observational data and staff survey responses, five themes were identified: (a) autonomy and personal control, (b) comfort of homelike environment, (c) conducive to social interaction, (d) increased personal support, and (e) effective teamwork. Implications Although the physical environment can play an influential role in enhancing the dining experience of residents, the variability in staff practices reveals the complexity of mealtime environment and points to the necessity of a systemic approach to foster meaningful culture change.

  2. Evaluation of clinical rules in a standalone pharmacy based clinical decision support system for hospitalized and nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Hugo A J M; Mestres Gonzalvo, Carlota; Cardenas, Jenny; Derijks, Hieronymus J; Janknegt, Rob; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M; Winkens, Bjorn; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-06-01

    To improve the current standalone pharmacy clinical decision support system (CDSS) by identifying and quantifying the benefits and limitations of the system. Alerts and handling of the executed clinical rules were extracted from the CDSS from the period September 2011 to December 2011. The number of executed clinical rule alerts, number of actions on alerts, and the reason why alerts were classified as not relevant were analyzed. The alerts where considered clinically relevant when the pharmacist needed to contact the physician. The 4065 alerts have been separated into: 1137 (28.0%) new alerts, 2797 (68.8%) repeat alerts and 131 (3.2%) double alerts. When the alerts were analyzed, only 3.6% were considered clinically relevant. Reasons why alerts were considered as not to be relevant were: (a) the dosage was correct or already adjusted, (b) the drug was (temporarily) stopped and (c) the monitored laboratory value or drug dosage had already reverted to be within the reference limits. The reasons for no action were linked to three categorical limitations of the used system: 'algorithm alert criteria', 'CDSS optimization', and 'data delivery'. This study highlighted a number of ways in which the CDSS could be improved. These different aspects have been identified as important for developing an efficient CDSS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crying in solitude or with someone for support and consolation--experiences from family members in palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydé, Kerstin; Strang, Peter; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Crying has not been studied from the perspective of family members of patients in palliative care. The aim of this study was to explore the significance of family members crying in a palliative care context with special reference to factors that influence crying. Interviews were carried out with 14 family members of patients admitted to palliative care. A hermeneutic approach according to Gadamer was used. Three main categories emerged. (1) Before the start of crying, some prerequisites for crying had to be fulfilled, such as an allowing attitude and courage, time, feeling secure, honesty, and trusting relationships. These prerequisites did not cause crying themselves; rather crying emerged when triggering factors occurred. (2) Triggers for crying were circumstances that created uncertainty and turbulence (bad news), exhaustion due to lack of own time, and sympathy from others. (3) Family members tried to do the best possible by adopting or hiding their crying, to ease the patient's burden and to create a positive counterbalance to suffering and grief. As an interpretation of the whole, crying could be expressed as being shared with someone for support and consolation or escape to solitude for integrity and respite. As a conclusion, crying may be an efficient strategy for family members in palliative care to express their suffering and to gain new energy to continue.

  4. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Trauma and EMS Cancer and Research Health Information Technology Scope of Practice Pediatric Issues Other Federal Legislative ... The Ostomy Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the ...

  5. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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    Full Text Available ... Medical Student Core Curriculum ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Surgical Skills Curriculum Cancer Education Cancer Education ... Home Skills Kit supports patients with educational and simulation materials to learn and practice the skills needed ...

  6. Home, Smart Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj; Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The article places focus on how smart technologies integrated in a one family- home and particular the window offer unique challenges and opportunities for designing buildings with the best possible environments for people and nature. Toward an interdisciplinary approach, we address the interaction...... between daylight defined in technical terms and daylight defined in aesthetic, architectural terms. Through field-tests of a Danish carbon-neutral home and an analysis of five key design parameters, we explore the contradictions and potentials in smart buildings, using the smart window as example of how...... to the energy design is central. The study illuminates an approach of the design of smart houses as living organisms by connecting technology with the needs of the occupants with the power and beauty of daylight....

  7. A novel Respiratory Health Score (RHS supports a role of acute lung damage and pig breed in the course of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach Gerald F

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial lung infections are a major cause of economic losses in the pig industry; they are responsible for approximately 50% of the antibiotics used in pigs and, therefore, also present an increasing concern to consumer protection agencies. In response to this changing market we investigated the feasibility of an old approach aimed at the breeding selection of more resistant pigs. As a first step in this direction we applied a new respiratory health score system to study the susceptibility of four different pig breeding lines (German Landrace, Piétrain, Hampshire, Large White towards the respiratory tract pathogen Actinobacillus (A. pleuropneumoniae. Results A controlled experimental aerosol infection with an A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 7 isolate was performed using 106 weaning pigs of defined breeding lines from the breeds German Landrace, Piétrain, Hamphire, and Large White. Pigs were clinically assessed on days 4 and 20 post infection following a novel scoring system, the Respiratory Health Score (RHS, which combines clinical, sonographic and radiographic examination results. The ranking on day 4 was significantly correlated with the ranking based on the pathomorphological Lung Lesion Score (LLS; Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient of 0.86 [p Conclusion These results demonstrate that the RHS obtained from live pigs shows a highly significant correlation to the lung lesion score considered as a "gold standard". The correlation of the ranking at days 4 and 20 post infection implies that the course of disease is highly dependent on the acute lung damage. The different severity of signs among the tested pig breeding lines clearly suggests a genetic difference in the susceptibility of pigs to A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  8. Ambiguities: residents' experience of 'nursing home as my home'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrem, Sigrid; Vinsnes, Anne G; Harkless, Gene E; Paulsen, Bård; Seim, Arnfinn

    2013-09-01

    Residential care in nursing homes continues to be necessary for those individuals who are no longer able to live at home. Uncovering what nursing home residents' view as quality of care in nursing homes will help further understanding of how best to provide