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Sample records for holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

  1. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis.

  2. Antenatal and postnatal radiologic diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaralage, Sahan P.S. [Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Griffith University, School of Medicine, Southport, Queensland (Australia); Farnaghi, Soheil [Caboolture Hospital, Caboolture, Queensland (Australia); Dulhunty, Joel M.; Kothari, Alka [Redcliffe Hospital, Redcliffe, Queensland (Australia); The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Herston, Queensland (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency results in impaired activation of enzymes implicated in glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism. Antenatal imaging and postnatal imaging are useful in making the diagnosis. Untreated holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is fatal, while antenatal and postnatal biotin supplementation is associated with good clinical outcomes. Although biochemical assays are required for definitive diagnosis, certain radiologic features assist in the diagnosis of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. To review evidence regarding radiologic diagnostic features of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the antenatal and postnatal period. A systematic review of all published cases of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency identified by a search of Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science. A total of 75 patients with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency were identified from the systematic review, which screened 687 manuscripts. Most patients with imaging (19/22, 86%) had abnormal findings, the most common being subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly and intraventricular hemorrhage. Although the radiologic features of subependymal cysts, ventriculomegaly, intraventricular hemorrhage and intrauterine growth restriction may be found in the setting of other pathologies, these findings should prompt consideration of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in at-risk children. (orig.)

  3. Holocarboxylase Synthetase 1 Physically Interacts with Histone H3 in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin required by all organisms, but only synthesized by plants and some bacterial and fungal species. As a cofactor, biotin is responsible for carbon dioxide transfer in all biotin-dependent carboxylases, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase, methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, and pyruvate carboxylase. Adding biotin to carboxylases is catalyzed by the enzyme holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS. Biotin is also involved in gene regulation, and there is some indication that histones can be biotinylated in humans. Histone proteins and most histone modifications are highly conserved among eukaryotes. HCS1 is the only functional biotin ligase in Arabidopsis and has a high homology with human HCS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HCS1 also biotinylates histone proteins in Arabidopsis. A comparison of the catalytic domain of HCS proteins was performed among eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and archaea, and this domain is highly conserved across the selected organisms. Biotinylated histones could not be identified in vivo by using avidin precipitation or two-dimensional gel analysis. However, HCS1 physically interacts with Arabidopsis histone H3 in vitro, indicating the possibility of the role of this enzyme in the regulation of gene expression.

  4. Holocarboxylase Synthetase: A Moonlighting Transcriptional Coregulator of Gene Expression and a Cytosolic Regulator of Biotin Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Del-Río, Alfonso; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Gravel, Roy A

    2017-08-21

    The vitamin biotin is an essential nutrient for the metabolism and survival of all organisms owing to its function as a cofactor of enzymes collectively known as biotin-dependent carboxylases. These enzymes use covalently attached biotin as a vector to transfer a carboxyl group between donor and acceptor molecules during carboxylation reactions. In human cells, biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze key reactions in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and amino acid catabolism. Biotin is attached to apocarboxylases by a biotin ligase: holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) in mammalian cells and BirA in microbes. Despite their evolutionary distance, these proteins share structural and sequence similarities, underscoring their importance across all life forms. However, beyond its role in metabolism, HCS participates in the regulation of biotin utilization and acts as a nuclear transcriptional coregulator of gene expression. In this review, we discuss the function of HCS and biotin in metabolism and human disease, a putative role for the enzyme in histone biotinylation, and its participation as a nuclear factor in chromatin dynamics. We suggest that HCS be classified as a moonlighting protein, with two biotin-dependent cytosolic metabolic roles and a distinct biotin-independent nuclear coregulatory function.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with severe glutathione synthetase deficiency also develop recurrent bacterial infections. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency ...

  6. Glutathione synthetase deficiency associated with antenatal cerebral bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüggemann, L. W.; Groenendaal, F.; Ristoff, E.; Larsson, A.; Duran, M.; van Lier, J. A. C.; Dorland, L.; Berger, R.; de Koning, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a newborn with glutathione synthetase deficiency and intracranial haemorrhages. Because the latter are rare in term newborns a possible relationship with glutathione synthetase deficiency will be discussed

  7. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  8. Effects of Biotin Deficiency on Biotinylated Proteins and Biotin-Related Genes in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Masahiro; Aoyama, Yuki; Shimada, Ryoko; Sawamura, Hiromi; Ebara, Shuhei; Negoro, Munetaka; Fukui, Toru; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a cofactor for biotin-dependent carboxylases. The biochemical and physiological roles of biotin in brain regions have not yet been investigated sufficiently in vivo. Thus, in order to clarify the function of biotin in the brain, we herein examined biotin contents, biotinylated protein expression (e.g. holocarboxylases), and biotin-related gene expression in the brain of biotin-deficient rats. Three-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into a control group, biotin-deficient group, and pair-fed group. Rats were fed experimental diets from 3 wk old for 8 wk, and the cortex, hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus, and cerebellum were then collected. In the biotin-deficient group, the maintenance of total biotin and holocarboxylases, increases in the bound form of biotin and biotinidase activity, and the expression of an unknown biotinylated protein were observed in the cortex. In other regions, total and free biotin contents decreased, holocarboxylase expression was maintained, and bound biotin and biotinidase activity remained unchanged. Biotin-related gene (pyruvate carboxylase, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter, holocarboxylase synthetase, and biotinidase) expression in the cortex and hippocampus also remained unchanged among the dietary groups. These results suggest that biotin may be related to cortex functions by binding protein, and the effects of a biotin deficiency and the importance of biotin differ among the different brain regions.

  9. High cerebral guanidinoacetate and variable creatine concentrations in argininosuccinate synthetase and lyase deficiency : Implications for treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, F. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Verhoeven, N. M.; Soorani-Lunsing, R. J.; Jakobs, C.; Sijens, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral creatine and guanidinoacetate and blood and urine metabolites were studied in four patients with argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) or argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency receiving large doses of arginine. Urine and blood metabolites varied largely. Cerebral guanidinoacetate was

  10. The glutathione-deficient, cadmium-sensitive mutant, cad2-1, of Arabidopsis thaliana is deficient in gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, C S; May, M J; Howden, R; Rolls, B

    1998-10-01

    This paper reports that the glutathione (GSH)-deficient mutant, cad2-1, of Arabidopsis is deficient in the first enzyme in the pathway of GSH biosynthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS). The mutant accumulates a substrate of GCS, cysteine, and is deficient in the product, gamma-glutamylcysteine. In vitro enzyme assays showed that the cad2-1 mutant has 40% of wild-type levels of GCS activity but is unchanged in the activity of the second enzyme in the pathway, GSH synthetase. The CAD2 locus maps to chromosome 4 and is tightly linked to a gene, GSHA, identified by a previously isolated cDNA. A genomic clone of GSHA complements both the phenotypic and biochemical deficiencies of the cad2-1 mutant. The nucleotide sequence of the gene has been determined and, in the mutant, this gene contains a 6 bp deletion within an exon. These data demonstrate that the CAD2 gene encodes GCS. The cad2-1 mutation is close to the conserved cysteine which is believed to bind the substrate glutamate and the specific inhibitor L-buthionine-[S,R] sulfoximine (BSO). Both root growth and GCS activity of the cad2-1 mutant was less sensitive than the wild-type to inhibition by BSO, indicating that the mutation may alter the affinity of the inhibitor binding site.

  11. Deficiency of cardiac Acyl-CoA synthetase-1 induces diastolic dysfunction, but pathologic hypertrophy is reversed by rapamycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, David S; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Pascual, Florencia

    2014-01-01

    In mice with temporally-induced cardiac-specific deficiency of acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (Acsl1(H-/-)), the heart is unable to oxidize long-chain fatty acids and relies primarily on glucose for energy. These metabolic changes result in the development of both a spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy...... of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and phospholamban showed no difference between genotypes. To determine the role of mTOR in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, we treated Acsl1(H-/-) mice with rapamycin. Six to eight week old Acsl1(H-/-) mice and their littermate controls were given i.......p. tamoxifen to eliminate cardiac Acsl1, then concomitantly treated for 10weeks with i.p. rapamycin or vehicle alone. Rapamycin completely blocked the enhanced ventricular S6K phosphorylation and cardiac hypertrophy and attenuated the expression of hypertrophy-associated fetal genes, including α-skeletal actin...

  12. Highly variable clinical phenotype of carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 deficiency in one family: an effect of allelic variation in gene expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaus, V; Vermeulen, T; Minassian, B

    2009-01-01

    report two patients from one family with highly divergent clinical course, one presenting neonatally with a fatal form and the other at age 45 with benign diet-responsive disease. The patients are compound heterozygous for two mutations of the CPS1 gene, c.3558 + 1G > C and c.4101 + 2T > C...... of mRNA from the allele with the c.3558 + 1G > C mutation, whereas in the adult-onset case the two types of clones are equal, indicating skewed expression towards the c.4101 + 2T > C allele in the neonatal case. Although we are yet to understand the mechanism of this differential expression, our work...... suggests that allelic imbalance may explain clinical variability in CPS1 deficiency in some families....

  13. Degenerative knee joint disease in mice lacking 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase 2 (Papss2) activity: a putative model of human PAPSS2 deficiency-associated arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford-Hutchinson, Alice F; Ali, Zenobia; Seerattan, Ruth A; Cooper, David M L; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Salo, Paul T; Jirik, Frank R

    2005-05-01

    Murine brachymorphism (bm) results from an autosomal recessive mutation of the Papss2 gene that encodes 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase 2, one of the principal enzymes required for the sulfation of extracellular matrix molecules in cartilage and other tissues. A spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia has been identified in Pakistani kindred having a mutation of PAPSS2. In addition to skeletal malformations that include short stature evident at birth due to limb shortening, brachydactyly, and kyphoscoliosis, affected individuals demonstrate premature onset degenerative joint disease. We investigated whether loss of Papss2 activity would similarly lead to degenerative joint disease in mice. Mice carrying the bm mutation on a C57BL/6 background were obtained from the Jackson Laboratory. Limbs were analyzed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histology. At 12 months of age both male and female bm mice exhibited severe degenerative knee joint disease, with cartilage damage being primarily evident in the patello-femoral and medial compartments. Control 12-14-month-old C57BL/6 mice, in contrast, only occasionally demonstrated minimal cartilage damage. muCT imaging of bm limbs revealed shortened diaphyses associated with flared metaphyses in the proximal elements of both fore and hind limbs. Additionally, the bm hind limbs demonstrated extensive structural alterations, characterized by distortion of the patello-femoral groove, and prominent bowing of both tibia and fibula. The bm mutant, which develops severe articular cartilage lesions of the knee joint by approximately 12 months of age, represents a novel example of murine degenerative joint disease, possibly representing a model of human PAPSS2 deficiency-associated arthrosis.

  14. Leigh-Like Syndrome Due to Homoplasmic m.8993T>G Variant with Hypocitrullinemia and Unusual Biochemical Features Suggestive of Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (MCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Lewis, B; Mock, D M; Said, H M; Tarailo-Graovac, M; Mattman, A; van Karnebeek, C D; Thorburn, D R; Rodenburg, R J; Christodoulou, J

    2017-01-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS), or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, is a genetically heterogeneous, relentlessly progressive, devastating neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in infancy or early childhood. A diagnosis of Leigh-like syndrome may be considered in individuals who do not fulfil the stringent diagnostic criteria but have features resembling Leigh syndrome.We describe a unique presentation of Leigh-like syndrome in a 3-year-old boy with elevated 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5-OH) on newborn screening (NBS). Subsequent persistent plasma elevations of C5-OH and propionylcarnitine (C3) as well as fluctuating urinary markers were suggestive of multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD). Normal enzymology and mutational analysis of genes encoding holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) and biotinidase (BTD) excluded MCD. Biotin uptake studies were normal excluding biotin transporter deficiency. His clinical features at 13 months of age comprised psychomotor delay, central hypotonia, myopathy, failure to thrive, hypocitrullinemia, recurrent episodes of decompensation with metabolic keto-lactic acidosis and an episode of hyperammonemia. Biotin treatment from 13 months of age was associated with increased patient activity, alertness, and attainment of new developmental milestones, despite lack of biochemical improvements. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis failed to identify any other variants which could likely contribute to the observed phenotype, apart from the homoplasmic (100%) m.8993T>G variant initially detected by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing.Hypocitrullinemia has been reported in patients with the m.8993T>G variant and other mitochondrial disorders. However, persistent plasma elevations of C3 and C5-OH have previously only been reported in one other patient with this homoplasmic mutation. We suggest considering the m.8993T>G variant early in the diagnostic evaluation of MCD-like biochemical disturbances, particularly when associated with

  15. Decreased Red Cell Uroporphyrinogen I Synthetase Activity in Intermittent Acute Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. James; Meyer, Urs A.; Felsher, Bertram F.; Redeker, Allan G.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1972-01-01

    Intermittent acute porphyria has recently been distinguished biochemically from other genetic hepatic porphyrias by the observation of diminished hepatic uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity and increased δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase activity. Since deficient uroporphyrinogen I synthetase may be reflected in nonhepatic tissues, we have assayed this enzyme in red cell hemolysates from nonporphyric subjects and from patients with genetic hepatic porphyria. Only patients with intermittent acute porphyria had decreased erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity which was approximately 50% of normal. The apparent Km of partially purified uroporphyrinogen I synthetase was 6 × 10−6m in both nonporphyrics and patients with intermittent acute porphyria. These data provide further evidence for a primary mutation affecting uroporphyrinogen I synthetase in intermittent acute porphyria. Further-more, results of assay of red cell uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity in a large family with intermittent acute porphyria suggest that this test may be a reliable indicator of the heterozygous state. PMID:5056653

  16. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  17. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie; Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Møller, Inge Skrumsager

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude...

  18. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Glutamine synthetase is essential in early mouse embryogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; Lamers, Wouter H.; van Roon, Maria A.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner, and functions to remove ammonia or glutamate. Furthermore, it is the only enzyme that can synthesize glutamine de novo. Since congenital deficiency of GS has not been reported, we investigated its role

  20. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  1. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Hanne Cecilie

    fertilizer requirement. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) has been a major topic in plant nitrogen research for decades due to its central role in plant N metabolism. The cytosolic version of this enzyme (GS1) plays an important role in relation to primary N assimilation as well as in relation to N...

  2. Functions of Glutamine Synthetase Isoforms in the Nitrogen Metabolism of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao

    ;2 which encode different isoforms of the key N-assimilatory enzyme cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1). In the single knockout mutant gln1;2 and in the double knockout mutant gln1;1:gln1;2, seed germination and seedling establishment were distinctly impaired. The negative effect of Gln1;2 deficiency...

  3. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Been, W.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a

  4. Biotin dependency due to a defect in biotin transport

    OpenAIRE

    Mardach, Rebecca; Zempleni, Janos; Wolf, Barry; Cannon, Martin J.; Jennings, Michael L.; Cress, Sally; Boylan, Jane; Roth, Susan; Cederbaum, Stephen; Mock, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a 3-year-old boy with biotin dependency not caused by biotinidase, holocarboxylase synthetase, or nutritional biotin deficiency. We sought to define the mechanism of his biotin dependency. The child became acutely encephalopathic at age 18 months. Urinary organic acids indicated deficiency of several biotin-dependent carboxylases. Symptoms improved rapidly following biotin supplementation. Serum biotinidase activity and Biotinidase gene sequence were normal. Activities of biotin-d...

  5. [Methionine sulfoximine and phosphinothricin--glutamine synthetase inhibitors and activators and their herbicidal activity (A review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneeva, Z G; Solov'eva, N A; Sidel'nikova, L I

    2003-01-01

    Derivatives of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) and phosphinothrycin (PPT), which are analogues of glutamate, exhibit selective herbicidal activity. This effect is accounted for by impairments of nitrogen metabolism, resulting from inhibition of its key enzyme in plants, glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2). Inhibition of the enzyme causes ammoniac nitrogen to accumulate and terminates the synthesis of glutamine. Changes in the content of these two metabolites (excess ammonium and glutamine deficiency) act in a concert to cause plant death. However, low concentrations of MSO, PPT, and their metabolites produce an opposite effect: glutamine synthetase is activated, with concomitant stimulation of plant growth and productivity. The mechanisms whereby MSO and PPT affect glutamine synthetase activity are discussed in the context of nitrogen metabolism in plants.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase superactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and PRPP also play a key role in recycling purines from the breakdown of DNA and RNA, ... of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: Gout Educational Resources (4 links) Disease InfoSearch: Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase superactivity ...

  7. Growth factors regulate glutamine synthetase activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khaled

    2012-07-10

    Jul 10, 2012 ... medium; NB, nutrient broth medium; NF, nitrogen fixation medium; SDS-PAGE, sodium dodecyl sulfate ... compounds, such as amino acids, as their sole source of nitrogen. In each case, substitution of ammonia by .... polymyxa producing glutamine synthetase. Different protein patterns of the total cellular ...

  8. Mutational switching of a yeast tRNA synthetase into a mammalian-like synthetase cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Ewalt, Karla L; Schimmel, Paul

    2002-12-03

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. A link was recently established between protein biosynthesis and cytokine signal transduction. Human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase can be split into two fragments, each of which has a distinct cytokine function. This activity is specific to the human enzyme. It is absent in the enzymes from lower organisms such as bacteria and yeast. Here, yeast tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which lacks cytokine activity, was used as a model to explore how a human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase during evolution acquired novel functions beyond aminoacylation. We found that a rationally designed mutant yeast TyrRS(ELR) gained cytokine function. The mutant yeast enzyme gained this function without sacrifice of aminoacylation activity. Therefore, relatively simple alteration of a basic structural motif imparts cytokine activity to a tRNA synthetase while preserving its canonical function. Further work established that mutational switching of a yeast protein to a mammalian-like cytokine was specific to this synthetase and not to just any yeast ortholog of a mammalian cytokine.

  9. Epilepsy in glioblastoma multiforme: correlation with glutamine synthetase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Anna; Marconi, Silvia; Pollo, Bianca; Tomassini, Alessia; Lovato, Laura; Maderna, Emanuela; Maier, Klaus; Schwartz, Andreas; Rizzuto, Nicolò; Padovani, Alessandro; Bonetti, Bruno

    2009-07-01

    The hypothesis addressed by this study is that a glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency in neoplastic astrocytes is a possible molecular basis associated with seizure generation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Quantitative Western blot analysis of GS was performed in 20 individuals operated for malignant glioma. The levels of GS in patients with GBM and epilepsy were significantly lower (range 0.04-1.15; mean 0.35 +/- 0.36; median 0.25) than in non-epileptic GBM individuals (range 0.78-3.97; mean 1.64 +/- 0.99; median 1.25; P = 0.002). No relationship has been found between histological features (i.e. necrosis, gliosis, stroma, inflammatory cells, giant cells, and haemosiderine) and GS expression or epilepsy. Even though the epileptogenesis in glioma is multifactorial, it is conceivable that a down-regulation of GS may have an important pro-epileptogenic role in GBM, through the slowing of glutamate-glutamine cycle. This study suggests that seizures in GBM are coupled with a highly localized enzyme deficiency. The manipulation of GS activity might constitute a novel principle for inhibiting seizures in patients with glioma epilepsy.

  10. USING RECOMBINANT HUMAN CARBAMOYL PHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE 1 (CPS1) FOR STUDYING THIS ENZYME'S FUNCTION, REGULATION, PATHOLOGY AND STRUCTURE

    OpenAIRE

    DÍEZ FERNÁNDEZ, CARMEN

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1), a 1462-residue mitochondrial enzyme, catalyzes the entry of ammonia into the urea cycle, which converts ammonia, the neurotoxic waste product of protein catabolism, into barely toxic urea. The urea cycle inborn error and rare disease CPS1 deficiency (CPS1D) is inherited with mendelian autosomal recessive inheritance, being due to CPS1 gene mutations (>200 mutations reported), and causing life-threatening hyperammonemia. We have produced recomb...

  11. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Characterization of cereulide synthetase, a toxin-producing macromolecular machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A Alonzo

    Full Text Available Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride.

  13. Spinach Leaf Acetyl-Coenzyme a Synthetase: Purification and Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carolyn A. Zeiher; Douglas D. Randall

    1991-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase was purified 364-fold from leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) using ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion exchange, dye-ligand, and gel permeation chromatography...

  14. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  15. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  16. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  18. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  19. Chromosomal location of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1983-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli with a partially defective phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (ribosephosphate pyrophosphokinase) has been characterized genetically. The genetic lesion causing the altered phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, prs, was mapped at 26 min on the linkage map by con...

  20. Evolutionary divergence of chloroplast FAD synthetase proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arilla-Luna Sonia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetases (FADSs - a group of bifunctional enzymes that carry out the dual functions of riboflavin phosphorylation to produce flavin mononucleotide (FMN and its subsequent adenylation to generate FAD in most prokaryotes - were studied in plants in terms of sequence, structure and evolutionary history. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics methods we have found that FADS enzymes localized to the chloroplasts, which we term as plant-like FADS proteins, are distributed across a variety of green plant lineages and constitute a divergent protein family clearly of cyanobacterial origin. The C-terminal module of these enzymes does not contain the typical riboflavin kinase active site sequence, while the N-terminal module is broadly conserved. These results agree with a previous work reported by Sandoval et al. in 2008. Furthermore, our observations and preliminary experimental results indicate that the C-terminus of plant-like FADS proteins may contain a catalytic activity, but different to that of their prokaryotic counterparts. In fact, homology models predict that plant-specific conserved residues constitute a distinct active site in the C-terminus. Conclusions A structure-based sequence alignment and an in-depth evolutionary survey of FADS proteins, thought to be crucial in plant metabolism, are reported, which will be essential for the correct annotation of plant genomes and further structural and functional studies. This work is a contribution to our understanding of the evolutionary history of plant-like FADS enzymes, which constitute a new family of FADS proteins whose C-terminal module might be involved in a distinct catalytic activity.

  1. Evolutionary divergence of chloroplast FAD synthetase proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetases (FADSs) - a group of bifunctional enzymes that carry out the dual functions of riboflavin phosphorylation to produce flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and its subsequent adenylation to generate FAD in most prokaryotes - were studied in plants in terms of sequence, structure and evolutionary history. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics methods we have found that FADS enzymes localized to the chloroplasts, which we term as plant-like FADS proteins, are distributed across a variety of green plant lineages and constitute a divergent protein family clearly of cyanobacterial origin. The C-terminal module of these enzymes does not contain the typical riboflavin kinase active site sequence, while the N-terminal module is broadly conserved. These results agree with a previous work reported by Sandoval et al. in 2008. Furthermore, our observations and preliminary experimental results indicate that the C-terminus of plant-like FADS proteins may contain a catalytic activity, but different to that of their prokaryotic counterparts. In fact, homology models predict that plant-specific conserved residues constitute a distinct active site in the C-terminus. Conclusions A structure-based sequence alignment and an in-depth evolutionary survey of FADS proteins, thought to be crucial in plant metabolism, are reported, which will be essential for the correct annotation of plant genomes and further structural and functional studies. This work is a contribution to our understanding of the evolutionary history of plant-like FADS enzymes, which constitute a new family of FADS proteins whose C-terminal module might be involved in a distinct catalytic activity. PMID:20955574

  2. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cánovas Francisco M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1 and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2. Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types.

  3. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  4. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  5. Binding of Divalent Magnesium by Escherichia coli Phosphoribosyl Diphosphate Synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates MgATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-d-ribosyl a-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, a,ß-methylene ATP and (+)-1-a,2-a...

  6. Restoration Of Glutamine Synthetase Activity, Nitric Oxide Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Propolis has been proposed to be protective on neurodegenerative disorders. To understand the neuroprotective effects of honeybee propolis, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, nitric oxide (NO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were studied in different brain ...

  7. Inhibition by propionyl-coenzyme A of N-acetylglutamate synthetase in rat liver mitochondria. A possible explanation for hyperammonemia in propionic and methylmalonic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coude, F X; Sweetman, L; Nyhan, W L

    1979-01-01

    In the search for the mechanism by which hyperammonemia complicates propionic and methylmalonic acidemia the effects of a series of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) derivatives were studied on the activity of N-acetylglutamate synthetase in rat liver mitochondria using acetyl-CoA as substrate. Propionyl-CoA was found to be a competitive inhibitor. The inhibition constant of 0.71 mM is in the range of concentrations of propionate found in the serum of patients with propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. Propionyl-CoA was also found to be a substrate for N-acetylglutamate synthetase, forming N-propionylglutamate. This compound was a weak activator of rat liver carbamoylphosphate synthetase; the activation constant was 1.1 mM as compared with 0.12 mM for N-acetylglutamate. A decreased level of N-acetylglutamate in liver mitochondria that would follow inhibition of N-acetylglutamate synthetase by propionyl-CoA would be expected to lead to hyperammonemia. Methylmalonyl-CoA, tiglyl-CoA, and isovaleryl-CoA at a concentration of 3 mM caused 30-70% inhibition of N-acetylglutamate synthetase. 3the latter two compounds are readily detoxified by the formation of N-acylglycine conjugates in liver, which may prevent large accumulations and could explain why hyperammonemia is not characteristic of patients with beta-ketothiolase deficiency or isovaleric acidemia in whom these compounds would be expected to be elevated. PMID:500823

  8. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  9. Fatty acid transport protein 4 is the principal very long chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase in skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhenzhen; Moulson, Casey L; Pei, Zhengtong; Miner, Jeffrey H; Watkins, Paul A

    2007-07-13

    Fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4) is a fatty acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially activates very long chain fatty acid substrates, such as C24:0, to their CoA derivatives. To gain better insight into the physiological functions of FATP4, we established dermal fibroblast cell lines from FATP4-deficient wrinkle-free mice and wild type (w.t.) mice. FATP4 -/- fibroblasts had no detectable FATP4 protein by Western blot. Compared with w.t. fibroblasts, cells lacking FATP4 had an 83% decrease in C24:0 activation. Peroxisomal degradation of C24:0 was reduced by 58%, and rates of C24:0 incorporation into major phospholipid species (54-64% decrease), triacylglycerol (64% decrease), and cholesterol esters (58% decrease) were significantly diminished. Because these lipid metabolic processes take place in different subcellular organelles, we used immunofluorescence and Western blotting of subcellular fractions to investigate the distribution of FATP4 protein and measured enzyme activity in fractions from w.t. and FATP4 -/- fibroblasts. FATP4 protein and acyl-CoA synthetase activity localized to multiple organelles, including mitochondria, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, and the mitochondria-associated membrane fraction. We conclude that in murine skin fibroblasts, FATP4 is the major enzyme producing very long chain fatty acid-CoA for lipid metabolic pathways. Although FATP4 deficiency primarily affected very long chain fatty acid metabolism, mutant fibroblasts also showed reduced uptake of a fluorescent long chain fatty acid and reduced levels of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. FATP4-deficient cells also contained abnormal neutral lipid droplets. These additional defects indicate that metabolic abnormalities in these cells are not limited to very long chain fatty acids.

  10. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    , stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib....... Kinetic analysis of the mutant PRib-PP synthetase revealed an apparent Km for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate of 1.0 mM and 240 μM respectively, compared to 60 μM and 45 μM respectively for the wild-type enzyme. ADP, which inhibits the wild-type enzyme at a concentration of 0.5 mM ribose 5-phosphate...

  11. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Havrylenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS, and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  12. A stochastic modeling of isotope exchange reactions in glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmiruk, N. V.; Boronovskiy, S. E.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    The model presented in this work allows simulation of isotopic exchange reactions at chemical equilibrium catalyzed by a glutamine synthetase. To simulate the functioning of the enzyme the algorithm based on the stochastic approach was applied. The dependence of exchange rates for 14C and 32P on metabolite concentration was estimated. The simulation results confirmed the hypothesis of the ascertained validity for preferred order random binding mechanism. Corresponding values of K0.5 were also obtained.

  13. Crystal structure of carbapenam synthetase (CarA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew T; Gerratana, Barbara; Stapon, Anthony; Townsend, Craig A; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2003-10-17

    Carbapenam synthetase (CarA) is an ATP/Mg2+-dependent enzyme that catalyzes formation of the beta-lactam ring in (5R)-carbapenem-3-carboxylic acid biosynthesis. CarA is homologous to beta-lactam synthetase (beta-LS), which is involved in clavulanic acid biosynthesis. The catalytic cycles of CarA and beta-LS mediate substrate adenylation followed by beta-lactamization via a tetrahedral intermediate or transition state. Another member of this family of ATP/Mg2+-dependent enzymes, asparagine synthetase (AS-B), catalyzes intermolecular, rather than intramolecular, amide bond formation in asparagine biosynthesis. The crystal structures of apo-CarA and CarA complexed with the substrate (2S,5S)-5-carboxymethylproline (CMPr), ATP analog alpha,beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMP-CPP), and a single Mg2+ ion have been determined. CarA forms a tetramer. Each monomer resembles beta-LS and AS-B in overall fold, but key differences are observed. The N-terminal domain lacks the glutaminase active site found in AS-B, and an extended loop region not observed in beta-LS or AS-B is present. Comparison of the C-terminal synthetase active site to that in beta-LS reveals that the ATP binding site is highly conserved. By contrast, variations in the substrate binding pocket reflect the different substrates of the two enzymes. The Mg2+ coordination is also different. Several key residues in the active site are conserved between CarA and beta-LS, supporting proposed roles in beta-lactam formation. These data provide further insight into the structures of this class of enzymes and suggest that CarA might be a versatile target for protein engineering experiments aimed at developing improved production methods and new carbapenem antibiotics.

  14. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakso Kati

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1 and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains.

  15. ß-Lysine discrimination by lysyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilreath, Marla S; Roy, Hervé; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    Elongation factor P is modified with (R)-ß-lysine by the lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) paralog PoxA. PoxA specificity is orthogonal to LysRS, despite their high similarity. To investigate a- and ß-lysine recognition by LysRS and PoxA, amino acid replacements were made in the LysRS active site gui...

  16. Fatty Acid Synthetase of Spinacia oleracea Leaves 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakata, Takashi; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular organization of fatty acid synthetase system in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var. Viroflay) leaves was examined by a procedure similar to that employed for the safflower system (Carthamus tinctorius var. UC-1). The crude extract contained all the component activities (acetyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, β-ketoacyl-ACP synthetase, β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase, and enoyl-ACP reductase [I]) involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, but enoyl-ACP reductase (II) present in safflower seeds extract could not be detected spectrophotometrically. By polyethylene glycol fractionation followed by several chromatographic procedures, i.e. Sephadex G-200, hydroxyapatite, and blue-agarose, the component enzymes were clearly separated from one another. Properties of β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrase, and enoyl-ACP reductase (I) from spinach were compared with the same enzymes in safflower seeds and Escherichia coli. From these results, it was concluded that the fatty acid synthetase system of spinach leaves, as well as that of safflower seeds, was nonassociated and similar to the Escherichia coli system. PMID:16662382

  17. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard, E-mail: r.giege@ibmc.u-strasbg.fr; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude [Département ‘Machineries Traductionnelles’, Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, CNRS, IBMC, 15 Rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France)

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  18. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  19. The eucaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex: suggestions for its structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from eucaryotic cells generally are isolated as high molecular weight complexes comprised of multiple synthetase activities, and often containing other components as well. A model is proposed for the synthetase complex in which hydrophobic extensions on the proteins serve to maintain them in their high molecular weight form, but are not needed for catalytic activity. The structural similarity of these enzymes to certain membrane-bound proteins, and its implications for synthetase localization and function in vivo, are discussed. PMID:6746733

  20. Selective inhibition of type 2 fatty acid synthetase by the antibiotic thiolactomycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Ikuo; Kawaguchi, Akihiko; Yamada, Mitsuhiro (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1984-03-01

    The antibiotic thiolactomycin inhibits the fatty acid synthesis from both (1-/sup 14/C)-acetate and (2/sup 14/C) malonyl-CoA of spinach leaves, developing castor bean endosperms and avocado mesocarp. On the other hand, fatty acid synthetases of Brevibacterium ammoniagenes and Corynebacterium glutamicum are much less sensitive to this antibiotic. As Hayashi et al. have indicated in their paper that thiolactomycin inhibits fatty acid synthetase of Escherichia coli but has little effect on the synthetases of yeast and rat liver, thiolactomycin is suggested to be a selective inhibitor of type 2 fatty acid synthetases.

  1. Modulating plant primary amino acid metabolism as a necrotrophic virulence strategy: the immune-regulatory role of asparagine synthetase in Botrytis cinerea-tomato interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Hamed; De Vleesschauwer, David; Aziz, Aziz; Höfte, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of the "gray mold" disease on a broad range of hosts. As an archetypal necrotroph, B. cinerea has evolved multiple virulence strategies for inducing cell death in its host. Moreover, progress of B. cinerea colonization is commonly associated with induction of senescence in the host tissue, even in non-invaded regions. In a recent study, we showed that abscisic acid deficiency in the sitiens tomato mutant culminates in an anti-senescence defense mechanism which effectively contributes to resistance against B. cinerea infection. Conversely, in susceptible wild-type tomato a strong induction of senescence could be observed following B. cinerea infection. Building upon this earlier work, we here discuss the immune-regulatory role of a key senescence-associated protein, asparagine synthetase. We found that infection of wild-type tomato leads to a strong transcriptional upregulation of asparagine synthetase, followed by a severe depletion of asparagine titers. In contrast, resistant sitiens plants displayed a strong induction of asparagine throughout the course of infection. We hypothesize that rapid activation of asparagine synthetase in susceptible tomato may play a dual role in promoting Botrytis cinerea pathogenesis by providing a rich source of N for the pathogen, on the one hand, and facilitating pathogen-induced host senescence, on the other.

  2. Vectorial acylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fat1p and fatty acyl-CoA synthetase are interacting components of a fatty acid import complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Zhiying; Tong, Fumin; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fat1p and fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (FACS) are hypothesized to couple import and activation of exogenous fatty acids by a process called vectorial acylation. Molecular genetic and biochemical studies were used to define further the functional and physical interactions...... the growth defect in the faa1Delta fat1Delta strain indicating some essential functions of Fat1p cannot be performed by Faa4p. Chromosomally encoded FAA1 and FAT1 are not able to suppress the growth deficiencies of the fat1Delta faa1Delta and faa1Delta faa4Delta strains, respectively, indicating Faa1p...

  3. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  4. Pristinamycin I biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis: molecular characterization of the first two structural peptide synthetase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Blanc, V; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Lorenzon, S; Famechon, A; Bamas-Jacques, N; Crouzet, J; Thibaut, D

    1997-01-01

    Two genes involved in the biosynthesis of the depsipeptide antibiotics pristinamycins I (PI) produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis were cloned and sequenced. The 1.7-kb snbA gene encodes a 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase, and the 7.7-kb snbC gene encodes PI synthetase 2, responsible for incorporating L-threonine and L-aminobutyric acid in the PI macrocycle. snbA and snbC, which encode the two first structural enzymes of PI synthesis, are not contiguous. Both genes are located in PI-specific transcriptional units, as disruption of one gene or the other led to PI-deficient strains producing normal levels of the polyunsaturated macrolactone antibiotic pristinamycin II, also produced by S. pristinaespiralis. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the SnbA protein is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily and that the SnbC protein contains two amino acid-incorporating modules and a C-terminal epimerization domain. A model for the initiation of PI synthesis analogous to the established model of initiation of fatty acid synthesis is proposed. PMID:9006024

  5. Structural analysis of FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Milagros

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family – a group of bifunctional enzymes that catalyse riboflavin phosphorylation and FMN adenylylation within a single polypeptide chain- was analysed in terms of sequence and structure. Results Sequences of nearly 800 prokaryotic species were aligned. Those related with bifunctional FAD synthetase activities showed conservation of several consensus regions and highly conserved residues. A 3D model for the FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes (CaFADS was generated. This model confirms that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are related to nucleotydyltransferases and riboflavin kinases, respectively. Models for the interaction of CaFADS with its substrates were also produced, allowing location of all the protein substrates in their putative binding pockets. These include two independent flavin binding sites for each CaFADS activity. Conclusion For the first time, the putative presence of a flavin binding site for the adenylylation activity, independent from that related with the phosphorylation activity, is shown. Additionally, these models suggest the functional relevance of some residues putatively involved in the catalytic processes. Their relevant roles were analysed by site-directed mutagenesis. A role was confirmed for H28, H31, S164 and T165 in the stabilisation of the P groups and the adenine moiety of ATP and, the P of FMN for the adenylylation. Similarly, T208, N210 and E268 appear critical for accommodation of the P groups of ATP and the ribityl end of RF in the active site for the phosphorylation process. Finally, the C-terminal domain was shown to catalyse the phosphorylation process on its own, but no reaction at all was observed with the individually expressed N-terminal domain.

  6. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  7. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Diodato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of mtDNA translation have been reported. This paper reviews the current knowledge of mutations affecting mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNAs synthetases and their role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the different clinical presentations.

  8. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...... groups of rats. These changes may partly explain the demonstrated training-induced increase in glucose tolerance. None of the findings could be ascribed to differences in foold intake or body weight....

  9. Primer Dependent and Independent Forms of Soluble Starch Synthetase from Developing Barley Endosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreis, M.

    1980-01-01

    The activity of soluble starch synthetase (ADP-glucose: agr-1,4-glucan agr-4-glucosyltransferase) in the non-purified extract from 16 day-old Bomi barley endosperms (Hordeum vulgare L.) was low and the reaction was non-linear when plotted against protein concentration. Starch synthetase was purif...

  10. An archaeal tRNA-synthetase complex that enhances aminoacylation under extreme conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Hausmann, Corinne D

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an integral role in protein synthesis, functioning to attach the correct amino acid with its cognate tRNA molecule. AaRSs are known to associate into higher-order multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complexes (MSC) involved in archaeal and eukaryotic translation...

  11. Uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase activity in red blood cells of lead-exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Waseef, A.

    1982-01-01

    Lead-exposed (n . 26) and control (n . 12) subjects were investigated for their blood lead concentration erythrocyte 5-amino-laevulinic acid dehydratase (5-ALAD) and erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen-I-synthetase (URO-I-S) activity; 5-amino-laevulinic acid (5-ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) were used as substrates in the synthetase assay. In the lead workers erythrocyte 5-ALA dehydratase was grossly inhibited but with PBG as substrate the synthetase activity was not significantly different from the control group. With 5-ALA as substrate the synthetase assay showed marked inhibition. Addition of zinc (0.1 mmol/l) and dithiotheritol (0.5 mmol/l) brought the activities of both the dehydratase and synthetase (using 5-ALA as substrate) back into the ranges seen in the control group. With porphobilinogen as substrate higher concentrations of zinc caused inhibition of the synthetase, whilst reduction of added zinc to 0.01 mmol/l resulted in stimulation of the synthetase. A good correlation (r . 0.87) was obtained in synthetase assay when PBG and 5-aminolaevulinate (with added zinc and dithiothreitol) were used as substrates. With these additions 5-ALA may be used as a substrate in the URO-I-S assay in the investigation of latent cases of acute intermittent porphyria.

  12. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases in Translation and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Močibob

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a long time seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRSs stood as an archetypal, canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS, exhibiting only basic tRNA aminoacylation activity and with no moonlighting functions beyond protein biosynthesis. The picture has changed substantially in recent years after the discovery that SerRSs play an important role in antibiotic production and resistance and act as a regulatory factor in vascular development, as well as after the discovery of mitochondrial morphogenesis factor homologous to SerRS in insects. In this review we summarize the recent research results from our laboratory, which advance the understanding of seryl-tRNA synthetases and further paint the dynamic picture of unexpected SerRS activities. SerRS from archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus was shown to interact with the large ribosomal subunit and it was postulated to contribute to a more efficient translation by the"tRNA channeling" hypothesis. Discovery of the atypical SerRS in a small number of methanogenic archaea led to the discovery of a new family of enzymes in numerous bacteria - amino acid:[carrier protein] ligases (aa:CP ligases. These SerRS homologues resigned tRNA aminoacylation activity, and instead adopted carrier proteins as the acceptors of activated amino acids. The crystal structure of the aa:CP ligase complex with the carrier protein revealed that the interactions between two macromolecules are incomparable to tRNA binding by the aaRS and consequently represent a true evolutionary invention. Kinetic investigations of SerRSs and the accuracy of amino acid selection revealed that SerRSs possess pre-transfer proofreading activity, challenging the widely accepted presumption that hydrolytic proofreading activity must reside in an additional, separate editing domain, not present in SerRSs. Finally, the plant tRNA serylation system is discussed, which is particularly interesting due to the fact that protein biosynthesis takes place

  13. The Sites of Transcription and Translation for Euglena Chloroplastic Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, L. I.; Egan, J.; Reynolds, R. J.; Nix, C. E.; Schiff, J. A.; Barnett, W. Edgar

    1974-01-01

    We find that cycloheximide completely blocks the light-induced apearance of Euglena chloroplastic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in dark-grown cells of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris. Streptomycin, on the other hand, has no effect on the light-induction of these organellar enzymes. These observations, together with the finding that an aplastidic mutant (strain W3BUL, which has neither significant plastid structure nor detectable chloroplast DNA) contains low levels of the chloroplastic synthetases, indicate that the chloroplastic synthetases are transcriptional products of nuclear genes and are translated on cytoplasmic ribosomes prior to compartmentalization within the chloroplasts. PMID:4525469

  14. In Silico Discovery of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxue Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNA. They play a pivotal role in protein synthesis and are essential for cell growth and survival. The aaRSs are one of the leading targets for development of antibiotic agents. In this review, we mainly focused on aaRS inhibitor discovery and development using in silico methods including virtual screening and structure-based drug design. These computational methods are relatively fast and cheap, and are proving to be of great benefit for the rational development of more potent aaRS inhibitors and other pharmaceutical agents that may usher in a much needed generation of new antibiotics.

  15. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Mirando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis.

  16. Common peptides study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Gottlieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs constitute an essential enzyme super-family, providing fidelity of the translation process of mRNA to proteins in living cells. They are common to all kingdoms and are of utmost importance to all organisms. It is thus of great interest to understand the evolutionary relationships among them and underline signature motifs defining their common domains. RESULTS: We utilized the Common Peptides (CPs framework, based on extracted deterministic motifs from all aaRSs, to study family-specific properties. We identified novel aaRS-class related signatures that may supplement the current classification methods and provide a basis for identifying functional regions specific to each aaRS class. We exploited the space spanned by the CPs in order to identify similarities between aaRS families that are not observed using sequence alignment methods, identifying different inter-aaRS associations across different kingdom of life. We explored the evolutionary history of the aaRS families and evolutionary origins of the mitochondrial aaRSs. Lastly, we showed that prevalent CPs significantly overlap known catalytic and binding sites, suggesting that they have meaningful functional roles, as well as identifying a motif shared between aaRSs and a the Biotin-[acetyl-CoA carboxylase] synthetase (birA enzyme overlapping binding sites in both families. CONCLUSIONS: The study presents the multitude of ways to exploit the CP framework in order to extract meaningful patterns from the aaRS super-family. Specific CPs, discovered in this study, may play important roles in the functionality of these enzymes. We explored the evolutionary patterns in each aaRS family and tracked remote evolutionary links between these families.

  17. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Biology and Biophysics

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy+ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy+ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy+ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  18. Studies towards the synthesis of ATP analogs as potential glutamine synthetase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salisu, S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In research directed at the development of adenine triphosphate (ATP) analogs as potential glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitors, adenine and allopurinol derivatives have been synthesized either as novel ATP analogs or as scaffolds...

  19. 3-substituted anilines as scaffolds for the construction of glutamine synthetase and DXP-reductoisomerase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutorwa, M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available -1 Synthetic Communications Volume 39, Issue 15, 2009 3-Substituted Anilines as Scaffolds for the Construction of Glutamine Synthetase and DXP-Reductoisomerase Inhibitors Marius Mutorwaa, Sheriff Salisua, Gregory L. Blatchbc, Colin Kenyond & Perry T...

  20. Amino acid environment determines expression of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; van Roon, M.; Mooren, P. G.; de Graaf, A.; Charles, R.

    1985-01-01

    A completely defined medium (EHM-1), which reflects the amino acid composition of fetal rat serum and contains albumin as the sole proteinaceous compound, allows the accumulation of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the presence of dexamethasone, dibutyryl cyclic

  1. Biocytin synthetase activity in human milk as assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oizumi, J; Hayakawa, K

    1993-01-29

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatographic assay for biocytin synthetase activity has been developed. By this method, biocytin synthetase, isolated to homogeneity from human milk, was found to synthetize biocytin from biotin and L-lysine in the presence of ATP and magnesium ion(s). Both ATP and magnesium ion(s) were required for the synthesis of biocytin. Equal molar amounts of ADP and ATP were produced and consumed, respectively, in the course of the production of the same molar amount of biocytin; however, production of AMP was not observed. Biocytin synthetase Michaelis constants were 2.5, 1.8, and 0.11 mM for biotin, L-lysine, and ATP, respectively. Biocytin synthetase from milk was shown to synthesize biocytin in a stoichiometric amount.

  2. Transposon mutagenesis of probiotic Lactobacillus casei identifies asnH, an asparagine synthetase gene involved in its immune-activating capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masahiro; Kim, Yun-Gi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kiwaki, Mayumi; Nomoto, Koji; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 enhances host innate immunity, and the J1 phage-resistant mutants of this strain lose the activity. A transposon insertion mutant library of L. casei ATCC 27139 was constructed, and nine J1 phage-resistant mutants out of them were obtained. Cloning and sequencing analyses identified three independent genes that were disrupted by insertion of the transposon element: asnH, encoding asparagine synthetase, and dnaJ and dnaK, encoding the molecular chaperones DnaJ and DnaK, respectively. Using an in vivo mouse model of Listeria infection, only asnH mutant showed deficiency in their ability to enhance host innate immunity, and complementation of the mutation by introduction of the wild-type asnH in the mutant strain recovered the immuno-augmenting activity. AsnH protein exhibited asparagine synthetase activity when the lysozyme-treated cell wall extracts of L. casei ATCC 27139 was added as substrate. The asnH mutants lost the thick and rigid peptidoglycan features that are characteristic to the wild-type cells, indicating that AsnH of L. casei is involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. These results indicate that asnH is required for the construction of the peptidoglycan composition involved in the immune-activating capacity of L. casei ATCC 27139.

  3. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman

    2004-01-01

    . Screening of antibodies from a hybridoma library led to the identification of an acyl-CoA synthetase 5-specific monoclonal antibody. Protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and the enzyme activity of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 were studied by several methods in human small intestinal tissues with Crohn's disease...... or coeliac disease, respectively. Acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mRNA and protein levels were substantially reduced in injured small intestinal mucosa. Moreover, impaired synthesis of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 protein was reflected by a decrease in intramucosal enzyme activity. Subtle changes of the acyl...

  4. The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes tRNAAsn as a substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Alperstein

    Full Text Available The predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus preys on other Gram-negative bacteria and was predicted to be an asparagine auxotroph. However, despite encoding asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase and glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, B. bacteriovorus also contains the amidotransferase GatCAB. Deinococcus radiodurans, and Thermus thermophilus also encode both of these aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with GatCAB. Both also code for a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and use the additional aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB to synthesize asparagine on tRNAAsn. Unlike those two bacteria, B. bacteriovorus encodes only one aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Here we demonstrate the lone B. bacteriovorus aspartyl-tRNA synthetase catalyzes aspartyl-tRNAAsn formation that GatCAB can then amidate to asparaginyl-tRNAAsn. This non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase with GatCAB thus provides B. bacteriovorus a second route for Asn-tRNAAsn formation with the asparagine synthesized in a tRNA-dependent manner. Thus, in contrast to a previous prediction, B. bacteriovorus codes for a biosynthetic route for asparagine. Analysis of bacterial genomes suggests a significant number of other bacteria may also code for both routes for Asn-tRNAAsn synthesis with only a limited number encoding a second aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

  5. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies of Bacillomycin and Iturin synthetases with novel ligands for the production of therapeutic lipopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswari, Jujjavarapu Satya; Dhagat, Swasti; Kaser, Shubham; Tiwari, Anoop

    2017-08-15

    Lipopeptide synthetases play an important role in the production of lipopeptides. Lipopeptides are molecules made up of peptides and fatty acid moieties and have shown to have a broad range of antimicrobial activity. As infectious diseases have caused severe health problems mainly resulting from the development of antibiotic resistant strains of disease causing microorganisms there is a need of alternatives to antibiotics. The lipopeptide synthetase of the corresponding lipopeptides can be used as templates to design these as drugs using computational techniques. The objective of this study was homology modeling and molecular docking of two lipopeptide synthetases, bacillomycin D synthetase and iturin A synthetase, with their ligands as a means of drug design. Schrödinger software was used for homology modeling and molecular docking. After the identification of ligands, molecular docking of these ligands with the lipopeptide (bacillomycin and iturin) synthetases was performed. The docking was tested on the parameters of docking score and glide energy. 5 out of 21 ligands were found to dock with bacillomycin D synthetase whereas 8 out of 20 ligands docked with the iturin A synthetase. The knowledge of the docking sites and docking characteristics of the lipopeptide synthetases mentioned in the paper with the ligands can provide advantages of high speed and reliability, reduced costs on chemicals and experiments and the ethical issues concerned with the use of animal models for screening of drug toxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  7. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  8. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika M; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C; Butterfield, D Allan; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Castegna, Alessandra

    2017-03-10

    Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351-363.

  9. Induction of glutamine synthetase and transient co-expression with carbamoylphosphate synthetase in hepatocytes transplanted into fat pads of syngeneic hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebhardt, R.; Jirtle, R.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.; Michalopoulos, G.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes were transplanted into the interscapular and both anterior lateral fat pads of hepatectomized syngeneic rats. At various time points following transplantation, the fat pads were removed, fixed and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections were stained for glutamine synthetase

  10. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  11. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  12. When contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases invent their cognate amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Hervé; Becker, Hubert Dominique; Reinbolt, Joseph; Kern, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Faithful protein synthesis relies on a family of essential enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, assembled in a piecewise fashion. Analysis of the completed archaeal genomes reveals that all archaea that possess asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) also display a second ORF encoding an AsnRS truncated from its anticodon binding-domain (AsnRS2). We show herein that Pyrococcus abyssi AsnRS2, in contrast to AsnRS, does not sustain asparaginyl-tRNAAsn synthesis but is instead capable of converting aspartic acid into asparagine. Functional analysis and complementation of an Escherichia coli asparagine auxotrophic strain show that AsnRS2 constitutes the archaeal homologue of the bacterial ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase A (AS-A), therefore named archaeal asparagine synthetase A (AS-AR). Primary sequence- and 3D-based phylogeny shows that an archaeal AspRS ancestor originated AS-AR, which was subsequently transferred into bacteria by lateral gene transfer in which it underwent structural changes producing AS-A. This study provides evidence that a contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase can be recruited to sustain amino acid metabolism. PMID:12874385

  13. Substrate activation and conformational dynamics of guanosine 5'-monophosphate synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Justin C; Linger, Rebecca S; Chittur, Sridar V; Davisson, V Jo

    2013-08-06

    Glutamine amidotransferases catalyze the amination of a wide range of molecules using the amide nitrogen of glutamine. The family provides numerous examples for study of multi-active-site regulation and interdomain communication in proteins. Guanosine 5'-monophosphate synthetase (GMPS) is one of three glutamine amidotransferases in de novo purine biosynthesis and is responsible for the last step in the guanosine branch of the pathway, the amination of xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). In several amidotransferases, the intramolecular path of ammonia from glutamine to substrate is understood; however, the crystal structure of GMPS only hinted at the details of such transfer. Rapid kinetics studies provide insight into the mechanism of the substrate-induced changes in this complex enzyme. Rapid mixing of GMPS with substrates also manifests absorbance changes that report on the kinetics of formation of a reactive intermediate as well as steps in the process of rapid transfer of ammonia to this intermediate. Isolation and use of the adenylylated nucleotide intermediate allowed the study of the amido transfer reaction distinct from the ATP-dependent reaction. Changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence upon mixing of enzyme with XMP suggest a conformational change upon substrate binding, likely the ordering of a highly conserved loop in addition to global domain motions. In the GMPS reaction, all forward rates before product release appear to be faster than steady-state turnover, implying that release is likely rate-limiting. These studies establish the functional role of a substrate-induced conformational change in the GMPS catalytic cycle and provide a kinetic context for the formation of an ammonia channel linking the distinct active sites.

  14. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood...... samples taken at age 48-72 h were diagnostic whereas repeat samples at an older age were normal in 4/6 babies. Urine analysis was normal in 5/5. We conclude that the timing of blood sampling for newborn screening is important and that it is important to perform mutation analysis to avoid false......-negative diagnoses of VLCADD in asymptomatic newborn babies. In view of the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation in this disorder, the information derived from mutational analysis can be helpful in designing the appropriate follow-up and therapeutic regime for these patients....

  15. Carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Răşanu, T; Mehedinţi-Hâncu, Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Mehedinţi, T; Gheorghe, Emma; Damian, Irene

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a female patient, aged 12 years, with fatigability and exertional myalgias, progressively developed within the last two years. Negative family history, as well as negative personal medical history, were found. At physical examination, short stature, proximal muscle weakness and mild hepatomegaly were noted. Urine ketones level was slightly decreased, serum transaminases, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels were increased. Electromyographical examination showed a myopathic non-specific pattern. Deltoid muscle biopsy revealed: small, clear vesicles are present on Hematoxylin-Eosin and modified Gömöri trichrome stains; modified Gömöri trichrome stain also revealed muscle fibers (especially type I of muscle fibers) having mild to moderate mitochondrial proliferation (red rim and speckled sarcoplasm). The lipid storage has been well demonstrated by Sudan Black stain, which revealed small lipid droplets in type I muscle fibers. Abnormal internal architecture with a punctate pattern was showed by adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase and succinate dehydrogenase stains. Electron microscopy showed small inter-myofibrillar accumulations of round, amorphous, homogeneous acellular substances that are not membrane bounded. These features indicate that these are neutral fat (lipid) droplets. Subsarcolemmal accumulations of mitochondria were also revealed. The differential diagnosis of this case is discussed, and the up to date general data concerning carnitine deficiency are presented. The aim of our case-report is to emphasize the role of muscle biopsy in carnitine deficiency, as well as to remind the necessity of keeping in mind such metabolic disorders when doing the differential diagnostic of a muscular weakness.

  16. A simple method for isolation and construction of markerless cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kouji; Keta, Sumie; Uesaka, Kazuma; Kato, Akihiro; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Ihara, Kunio; Omata, Tatsuo; Aichi, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas) secrete free fatty acids (FFAs) into the external medium and hence have been used for the studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels. While the wild-type strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is highly sensitive to exogenously added linolenic acid, mutants defective in the aas gene are known to be resistant to the externally provided fatty acid. In this study, the wild-type Synechocystis cells were shown to be sensitive to lauric, oleic, and linoleic acids as well, and the resistance to these fatty acids was shown to be enhanced by inactivation of the aas gene. On the basis of these observations, we developed an efficient method to isolate aas-deficient mutants from cultures of Synechocystis cells by counter selection using linoleic acid or linolenic acid as the selective agent. A variety of aas mutations were found in about 70 % of the FFA-resistant mutants thus selected. Various aas mutants were isolated also from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, using lauric acid as a selective agent. Selection using FFAs was useful also for construction of markerless aas knockout mutants from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Thus, genetic engineering of FFA-producing cyanobacterial strains would be greatly facilitated by the use of the FFAs for counter selection.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  18. Mechanistic Basis for ATP-Dependent Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase by Tabtoxinine-β-lactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Garrett J; Fang, Luting; Schaefer, Jacob; Singh, Sukrit; Bowman, Gregory R; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2018-01-09

    Tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL), also known as wildfire toxin, is a time- and ATP-dependent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase produced by plant pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Here we demonstrate that recombinant glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli phosphorylates the C3-hydroxyl group of the TβL 3-(S)-hydroxy-β-lactam (3-HβL) warhead. Phosphorylation of TβL generates a stable, noncovalent enzyme-ADP-inhibitor complex that resembles the glutamine synthetase tetrahedral transition state. The TβL β-lactam ring remains intact during enzyme inhibition, making TβL mechanistically distinct from traditional β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin. Our findings could enable the design of new 3-HβL transition state inhibitors targeting enzymes in the ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase superfamily with broad therapeutic potential in many disease areas.

  19. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron–sulfur cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang-Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E.; Krishna, S. Sri; Rife, Christopher L.; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M.; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron–sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron–sulfur [4Fe–­4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an l-­tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe–4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x 22-C-x 6-C-x 2-C). It is speculated that the iron–sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon. PMID:20944229

  20. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E; Krishna, S Sri; Rife, Christopher L; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Elsliger, Marc André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron-sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron-sulfur [4Fe-4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an L-tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x₂₂-C-x₆-C-x₂-C). It is speculated that the iron-sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon.

  1. A bacterial ortholog of class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase activates lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter; Moses, Sarath

    2010-07-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalytic core of lysyl-tRNA synthetase, but it lacks the amino terminal anticodon binding domain of the latter enzyme. We show that, in agreement with its well-conserved lysine binding site, GenX can activate in vitro l-lysine and lysine analogs, but does not acylate tRNA(Lys) or other cellular RNAs. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli. Properties of the purified enzyme and primary structure of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.; King, Cheryl J.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP) synthetase of Escherichia coli has been purified to near homogeneity from a strain harboring the prs gene, encoding P-Rib-PP synthetase, on a multicopy plasmid. Analysis of the enzyme showed that it required inorganic phosphate for activity and for stability...

  3. Effects of polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on S-adenosylmethionine synthetase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activities in carrot cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.C. Minocha; R. Minocha; A. Komamine

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the activites of S-adcnosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase (methionine adenosyltransferase, EC 2.5.1.6.) and SAM decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50) were studied in carrot (Daucus carota) cell cultures in response to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and several inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. Activity of SAM synthetase increased...

  4. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Erland J.F.; Nystrøm, Birthe T.

    2001-01-01

    acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes......acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes...

  5. Brain and Liver Glutamine Synthetase of Rana catesbeiana and Rana cancrivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    ammonia into urea in marine Chondrichthyes liver 7 Table 1--Liver and brain glutamine synthetase of urea-retaining and non-urea-retaining amphibians 8... Osteichthyes , is a marine fish that also retains urea as an osmolyte (3,12). It too has a relatively high level of glu- tamine synthetase in its liver (16...for assimilation of ammonia into urea in marine Chondrichthyes liver (from Webb (15)) C1 klA IWE LO, AT? VH3 tLt TKATICAkMUIYL PUOSPULArL I CflALLLINE

  6. A Bacterial Ortholog of Class II Lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Activates Lysine

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter; Moses, Sharath

    2010-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalyt...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  8. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  9. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  11. ISOLEUCYL-tRNA-SYNTHETASE A FLUORESCENCE STUDY OP THE BINDINGPROPERTIES OF THE SYNTHETASE FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzer, Geoffrey R.; Bennett, Edward L.; Calvin, Melvin.

    1970-11-01

    Fluorescence properties of purified isoleucyl-tRNA-synthetase isolated from E. coli B have been studied. No changes in the quantum yield, energy or polarization of the emission were detected in the presence (either individually or in combinations) of the substrates and cofactors required for activation of L-isoleucine. In 2.5 M urea enzyme activity and intrinsic fluorescence intensity (at 340 nm) each decrease with time, showing similar kinetics and rate constants. The rate of this decay is reduced in the presence of ligands which can bind to the enzyme and the effect has been used to measure dissociation constants for enzyme-ligand complexes. Values have been obtained for the complexes between enzyme and L-isoleucine (K{sub diss} = 2.5 x 10{sup -5} M), L-valine (K{sub diss} = 3.0 x 10{sup -4} M), ATP (K{sub diss} = 1.5 x 10{sup -4} M) and PP{sub i} (K{sub diss} = 2.0 x 10{sup -4} M) at 25{sup o}. The effects of ionic strength, and the temperature dependence and urea concentration dependence of L-isoleucine binding have also been studied. Magnesium ions, which are required for catalysis, do not greatly affect the binding of single substrates, but changes are seen in the presence of ATP and L-isoleucine together. The magnesium ion concentration dependence of this effect (half-point about 2 x 10{sup -4} M) and the equilibrium constant for L-isoleucine activation (2 x 10{sup -6} M) have both been measured. The reliability of the methods has been discussed. Results have been interpreted in terms of current theories of amino acid activation. The binding parameters are sufficient to explain the stability of enzyme bound L-isoleucylarenylate without invoking conformation changes. This is consistent with the absence of substrate induced fluorescence changes. Magnesium effects are explained in terms of reduced electrostatic repulsion between reactants bearing like charges.

  12. Association of IDDM and attenuated response of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase to yellow fever vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnevie-Nielsen, V; Larsen, M L; Frifelt, J J

    1989-01-01

    Basal and yellow fever vaccination-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2',5'A) activity was determined in blood mononuclear cells (peripheral blood lymphocytes [PBLs]) from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and matched control subjects. The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine repre...

  13. The parallel and convergent universes of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, D E; Walsh, C T

    1999-12-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) catalyze chain elongation from simple building blocks to create a diverse array of natural products. PKS and NRPS proteins share striking architectural and organizational similarities that can be exploited to generate entirely new natural products.

  14. Isolation and characterization of the rat glutamine synthetase-encoding gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Zande, L.; Labruyère, W. T.; Arnberg, A. C.; Wilson, R. H.; van den Bogaert, A. J.; Das, A. T.; van Oorschot, D. A.; Frijters, C.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    From a rat genomic library in phage lambda Charon4A, a complete glutamine synthetase-encoding gene was isolated. The gene is 9.5-10 kb long, consists of seven exons, and codes for two mRNA species of 1375 nucleotides (nt) and 2787 nt, respectively. For both mRNAs, full-length cDNAs containing a

  15. Synthesis, accumulation and turnover of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, M. A.; Charles, R.; Lamers, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroid, thyroid hormones and cyclic AMP can induce the synthesis of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of hepatocytes as soon as these cells differentiate from the embryonic foregut. The low levels of both enzymes that can accumulate in such

  16. Regulation of the spatiotemporal pattern of expression of the glutamine synthetase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; Hakvoort, T. B.; van Hemert, F. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase, the enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of glutamate and ammonia into glutamine, is expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally controlled manner. The first part of this review focuses on its spatiotemporal pattern of expression, the factors that regulate

  17. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  18. Argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase: two ornithine cycle enzymes from Agaricus bisporus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemaker, M.J.M.; Eastwood, D.C.; Drift, van der C.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Burton, K.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.; Camp, op den H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Accumulation of high quantities of urea in fruiting bodies is a known feature of larger basidiomycetes. Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) and argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) are two ornithine cycle enzymes catalysing the last two steps in the arginine biosynthetic pathway. Arginine is the main

  19. Purification and properties of phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnvig, Kirsten; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PPRibP) synthetase from Bacillus subtiliis has been purified to near homogeneity from an Escherichia coli Δprs strain bearing the cloned B. subtilis prs gene, encoding PPRibP synthentase, on a plasmid. The Mr of the subunit (34,000) and its amino-terminal amino acid...

  20. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RAT GENE FOR CARBAMOYLPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENHOFF, MJB; VANDEZANDE, LPWGM; DINGEMANSE, MA; DAS, AT; LABRUYERE, W; MOORMAN, AFM; CHARLES, R; LAMERS, WH; Jacobus Mgn Van De Zande, Louis

    1995-01-01

    Carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CbmPS) is first expressed in rat hepatocytes shortly before birth. After birth, expression of CbmPS gradually becomes confined to the hepatocytes surrounding the portal veins. To obtain insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of its expression, the rat CbmPS gene

  1. Maize glutamine synthetase cDNAs: isolation by direct genetic selection in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snustad, D P; Hunsperger, J P; Chereskin, B M; Messing, J

    1988-12-01

    Maize glutamine synthetase cDNA clones were isolated by genetic selection for functional rescue of an Escherichia coli delta glnA mutant growing on medium lacking glutamine. The Black Mexican Sweet cDNA library used in this study was constructed in pUC13 such that cDNA sense strands were transcribed under the control of the lac promoter. E. coli delta glnA cells were transformed with cDNA library plasmid DNA, grown briefly in rich medium to allow phenotypic expression of the cDNAs and the pUC13 ampr gene, and challenged to grow on agar medium lacking glutamine. Large numbers of glutamine synthetase cDNA clones have been identified in individual 150-mm Petri dishes; all characterized cDNA clones carry complete coding sequences. Two cDNAs identical except for different 5' and 3' termini have been sequenced. The major open reading frame predicts a protein with an amino acid sequence that exhibits striking similarity to the amino acid sequences of the predicted products of previously sequenced eukaryotic glutamine synthetase cDNAs and genes. In addition, the maize glutamine synthetase cDNAs were shown to contain a 5' mini-ORF of 29 codons separated by 37 nucleotide pairs from the major ORF. This mini-ORF was shown not to be essential for the functional rescue of the E. coli delta glnA mutant. Expression of the cDNAs in E. coli is presumed to be due to the function of a polycistronic hybrid lac messenger RNA or translational fusions encoded by the pUC plasmids. Proteins of the expected sizes encoded by two different pUC clones were shown to react with antibodies to tobacco glutamine synthetase.

  2. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis in the liver leads to S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, F; Ochoa, P; Rivas, C; Martin-Lomas, M; Mato, J M; Pajares, M A

    1991-09-01

    The hepatic levels of glutathione in rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine (4 mmol/kg), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, were 72.5% +/- 4.9% of those determined in control animals. This decrease in glutathione concentration was prevented by the administration of glutathione monoethyl ester (7.5 mmol/kg). S-Adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity in the liver of rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine was 39.4% +/- 6.5% of that determined in control animals. Again, glutathione monoethyl ester prevented the effect of buthionine sulfoximine on S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity. There was a close correlation (r = 0.936) between the hepatic levels of glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity. The hepatic concentration of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in buthionine sulfoximine-treated animals was 59.7% +/- 3.7% of that measured in control rats. Contrasting with the protective effects mentioned above, glutathione monoester had no preventive action on buthionine sulfoximine-induced S-adenosyl-L-methionine depletion. Electron microscopic examination of liver samples of rats after buthionine sulfoximine administration showed evidence of liver degeneration, which was attenuated by glutathione monoethyl ester treatment. Glutathione (7.5 mmol/kg) treatment was less effective than glutathione monoethyl ester in attenuating buthionine sulfoximine effects on hepatic S-adenosyl-L-methionine metabolism and morphology. The reduction of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity observed after treatment with buthionine sulfoximine and its prevention by glutathione monoethyl ester, as well as the correlation between the activity of this enzyme and glutathione levels, indicate that glutathione plays an important role in maintaining S-adenosyl-L-methionine-synthetase activity in the liver.

  3. Molecular recognition of histidine tRNA by histidyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatoyo, Yukari; Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Satoko; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the recognition sites of histidine tRNA for histidyl-tRNA synthetase from an extreme hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined histidylation activities by using overexpressed histidyl-tRNA synthetase and various histidine tRNA transcripts that were prepared by in vitro transcription system. Results indicated that anticodon was not recognized by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase similar to that of Escherichia coli histidine tRNA recognition system. Discriminator base C73 was weekly recognized and an additional G residue was specifically recognized by the enzyme.

  4. Activation of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase by single-stranded and double-stranded RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, R; Norby, P L; Martensen, P M

    1998-01-01

    A number of small RNA molecules that are high affinity ligands for the 46-kDa form of human 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase have been identified by the SELEX method. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that these RNAs bind to the enzyme with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range....... Competition experiments indicate that the binding site for the small RNAs on the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase molecule at least partially overlaps that for the synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(I).poly(C). Several of the RNAs function as potent activators of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in vitro......-stranded RNA, can also be activated by RNA ligands with little secondary structure. Since 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase possesses no homology to other known RNA-binding proteins, the development of small specific ligands by SELEX should facilitate studies of RNA-protein interactions and may reveal novel...

  5. A peroxisomal long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase from Glycine max involved in lipid degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yu

    Full Text Available Seed storage oil, in the form of triacylglycerol (TAG, is degraded to provide carbon and energy during germination and early seedling growth by the fatty acid β-oxidation in the peroxisome. Although the pathways for lipid degradation have been uncovered, understanding of the exact involved enzymes in soybean is still limited. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL is a critical enzyme that activates free fatty acid released from TAG to form the fatty acyl-CoA. Recent studies have shown the importance of ACSL in lipid degradation and synthesis, but few studies were focused on soybean. In this work, we cloned a ACSL gene from soybean and designated it as GmACSL2. Sequence analysis revealed that GmACSL2 encodes a protein of 733 amino acid residues, which is highly homologous to the ones in other higher plants. Complementation test showed that GmACSL2 could restore the growth of an ACS-deficient yeast strain (YB525. Co-expression assay in Nicotiana benthamiana indicated that GmACSL2 is located at peroxisome. Expression pattern analysis showed that GmACSL2 is highly expressed in germinating seedling and strongly induced 1 day after imbibition, which indicate that GmACSL2 may take part in the seed germination. GmACSL2 overexpression in yeast and soybean hairy root severely reduces the contents of the lipids and fatty acids, compared with controls in both cells, and enhances the β-oxidation efficiency in yeast. All these results suggest that GmACSL2 may take part in fatty acid and lipid degradation. In conclusion, peroxisomal GmACSL2 from Glycine max probably be involved in the lipid degradation during seed germination.

  6. A CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase purified from a marine bacterium, Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Mine, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    A cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) synthetase was found in a crude extract prepared from Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145, a marine bacterium that also produces a β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase. The CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase was purified from the crude extract of the cells by a combination of anion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography. The purified enzyme migrated as a single band (60 kDa) on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The activity of the enzyme was maximal at 35 °C at pH 9.0, and the synthetase required Mg(2+) for activity. Although these properties are similar to those of other CMP-Neu5Ac synthetases isolated from bacteria, this synthetase produced not only CMP-Neu5Ac from cytidine triphosphate and Neu5Ac, but also CMP-N-glycolylneuraminic acid from cytidine triphosphate and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, unlike CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase purified from Escherichia coli.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ... also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood loss isn't always obvious, and ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom ... appetite, slowed growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... coped with having iron-deficiency anemia. Prior to her diagnosis, Susan had symptoms such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  2. Recoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases for synthetic biology by rational protein-RNA engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2014-12-19

    We have taken a rational approach to redesigning the amino acid binding and aminoacyl-tRNA pairing specificities of bacterial glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. The four-stage engineering incorporates generalizable design principles and improves the pairing efficiency of noncognate glutamate with tRNA(Gln) by over 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Better optimized designs of the protein-RNA complex include substantial reengineering of the globular core region of the tRNA, demonstrating a role for specific tRNA nucleotides in specifying the identity of the genetically encoded amino acid. Principles emerging from this engineering effort open new prospects for combining rational and genetic selection approaches to design novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that ligate noncanonical amino acids onto tRNAs. This will facilitate reconstruction of the cellular translation apparatus for applications in synthetic biology.

  3. Enzymes of Krebs-Henseleit Cycle in Vitis vinifera L: II. Arginosuccinate Synthetase and Lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubelakis, K A; Kliewer, W M

    1978-09-01

    Arginosuccinate (ASA) synthetase and lyase activities were detected in extracts from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chenin blanc mature leaves and seedlings. Optimum reaction conditions for ASA synthetase were 10 millimolar l-citrulline, 7.5 millimolar l-aspartate, 3 to 4 millimolar ATP, 12 millimolar Mg(2+) (pH 7.5 to 8.0), enzyme extract up to equivalent of about 200 milligrams of fresh tissue, and incubation temperature of 38 to 40 C. Optimum reaction conditions for ASA lyase were 4 millimolar ASA-K salt (pH 7.3 to 7.8), amount of extract up to equivalent of about 180 milligrams of fresh tissue, and incubation temperature of 38 to 40 C.

  4. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  5. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  6. Fatty acid synthetase from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes: formation of monounsaturated fatty acids by a multienzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S

    1977-01-01

    A multienzyme fatty acid synthetase complex isolated from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes has been purified to a specific activity of 1440 nmol of malonyl-CoA incorporated per min/mg. The enzyme is homogeneous, as judged by gel electrophoresis on agarose gels, and has a molecular weight of 1.2 X 10(6). Both NADPH and NADH are required for activity. In contrast to other fatty acid synthetase complexes, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of both long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids from malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA. The formation of unsaturated fatty acids is oxygen-independent and sharply reduced by 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a known inhibitor of Escherchia coli beta-hydroxydecanoyl thioester dehydrase (EC 4.2.1.60). PMID:20622

  7. A Survey of Glutamine Synthetase Activities in Tissues from Three Classes of Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    glutamine synthetase activity is defined as the production of one pmole of y-glutamyl hydroxamate per min at 25°C. Protein was determined by the biuret method ...content. P. is listed as at progein per g tissue ( biuret method ); nm ± standard deviation.’ Number of specimens examined is listed in parenthesis. 3 body...lamprey, coelacanth . AOSTRACT (Continue en revere., olde It necessary and Identify by block nuotbor) nzyme assays using the y-glutamyl transferase method

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Tumblr. Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who ...

  13. Pasteurella multocida CMP-sialic acid synthetase and mutants of Neisseria meningitidis CMP-sialic acid synthetase with improved substrate promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; Cao, Hongzhi; Muthana, Saddam; Chen, Xi

    2012-03-01

    Cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP)-sialic acid synthetases (CSSs) catalyze the formation of CMP-sialic acid from CTP and sialic acid, a key step for sialyltransferase-catalyzed biosynthesis of sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. More than 50 different sialic acid forms have been identified in nature. To facilitate the enzymatic synthesis of sialosides with diverse naturally occurring sialic acid forms and their non-natural derivatives, CMP-sialic acid synthetases with promiscuous substrate specificity are needed. Herein we report the cloning, characterization, and substrate specificity studies of a new CSS from Pasteurella multocida strain P-1059 (PmCSS) and a CSS from Haemophillus ducreyi (HdCSS). Based on protein sequence alignment and substrate specificity studies of these two CSSs and a Neisseria meningitidis CSS (NmCSS), as well as crystal structure modeling and analysis of NmCSS, NmCSS mutants (NmCSS_S81R and NmCSS_Q163A) with improved substrate promiscuity were generated. The strategy of combining substrate specificity studies of enzymes from different sources and protein crystal structure studies can be a general approach for designing enzyme mutants with improved activity and substrate promiscuity.

  14. Differential inactivation of alfalfa nodule glutamine synthetases by tabtoxinine-. beta. -lactam. [Pseudomonas syringae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1987-04-01

    The presence of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci within the rhizosphere of nodulated alfalfa plants results in an increase in N/sub 2/-fixation potential and growth, but a 40-50% decrease in nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, as compared to nodulated control plants. Tabtoxinine-..beta..-Lactam an exocellular toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci irreversibly inhibits glutamine synthetase. Partial purification of nodule GS by DEAE-cellulose chromatography reveals two enzyme forms are present (GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/). In vitro inactivation of the two glutamine synthetases associated with the nodule indicates a differential sensitivity to T-..beta..-L. The nodule specific GS/sub n1/ is much less sensitive to T-..beta..-L than the GS/sub n2/ enzyme, which was found to coelute with the root enzyme (GS/sub r/). However, both GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/ are rapidly inactivated by methionine sulfoximine, another irreversible inhibitor of GS.

  15. Probing a CMP-Kdn synthetase by 1H, 31P, and STD NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Münster-Kühnel, Anja K; Stolz, Anita; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Kitajima, Ken; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; von Itzstein, Mark

    2005-02-11

    CMP-Kdn synthetase catalyses the reaction of sialic acids (Sia) and cytidine-5'-triphosphate (CTP) to the corresponding activated sugar nucleotide CMP-Sia and pyrophosphate PP(i). STD NMR experiments of a recombinant nucleotide cytidine-5'-monophosphate-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-nonulosonic acid synthetase (CMP-Kdn synthetase) were performed to map the binding epitope of the substrate CTP and the product CMP-Neu5Ac. The STD NMR analysis clearly shows that the anomeric proton of the ribose moiety of both investigated compounds is in close proximity to the protein surface and is likely to play a key role in the binding process. The relative rates of the enzyme reaction, derived from (1)H NMR signal integrals, show that Kdn is activated at a rate 2.5 and 3.1 faster than Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc, respectively. Furthermore, proton-decoupled (31)P NMR spectroscopy was successfully used to follow the enzyme reaction and clearly confirmed the appearance of CMP-Sia and the inorganic pyrophosphate by-product.

  16. Structure of the terminal PCP domain of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in teicoplanin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, Kristina; Redfield, Christina; Cryle, Max J

    2015-04-01

    The biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotics, of which teicoplanin and vancomycin are representative members, relies on the combination of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis and modification of the peptide by cytochrome P450 (Oxy) enzymes while the peptide remains bound to the peptide synthesis machinery. We have structurally characterized the final peptidyl carrier protein domain of the teicoplanin non-ribosomal peptide synthetase machinery: this domain is believed to mediate the interactions with tailoring Oxy enzymes in addition to its function as a shuttle for intermediates between multiple non-ribosomal peptide synthetase domains. Using solution state NMR, we have determined structures of this PCP domain in two states, the apo and the post-translationally modified holo state, both of which conform to a four-helix bundle assembly. The structures exhibit the same general fold as the majority of known carrier protein structures, in spite of the complex biosynthetic role that PCP domains from the final non-ribosomal peptide synthetase module must play in glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis. These structures thus support the hypothesis that it is subtle rearrangements, rather than dramatic conformational changes, which govern carrier protein interactions and selectivity during non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding the mitochon......Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding...... the mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (mtPheRS) in two patients with fatal epileptic mitochondrial encephalopathy. The mutations affected highly conserved amino acids, p.I329T and p.D391V. Recently, a homozygous FARS2 variant p.Y144C was reported in a Saudi girl with mitochondrial...... was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial...

  18. Regulation of 3-Deoxy-d-arabino-Heptulosonic 7-Phosphate Acid Synthetase Activity in Relation to the Synthesis of the Aromatic Vitamins in Escherichia coli K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B. J.; Pittard, J.

    1969-01-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro experiments on wild-type Escherichia coli K-12 and mutant strains possessing only single 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonic 7-phosphate acid (DAHP) synthetase isoenzymes indicated that, under conditions when all three isoenzymes are fully repressed, sufficient chorismate is still formed for the synthesis of aromatic vitamins. Under repressed conditions both DAHP synthetase (phe) and (trp), but not DAHP synthetase (tyr), were shown to contribute to vitamin production. PMID:4905534

  19. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  20. Beta-Ketothiolase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Abdelkreem MD, MSc

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Beta-ketothiolase deficiency is an inherited disorder of ketone body metabolism and isoleucine catabolism. It typically manifests as recurrent ketoacidotic episodes with characteristic abnormalities in the urinary organic acid profile. However, several challenges in the diagnosis of beta-ketothiolase deficiency have been encountered: atypical presentations have been reported and some other disorders, such as succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase and 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies, can mimic the clinical and/or biochemical signs of beta-ketothiolase deficiency. A final diagnosis of beta-ketothiolase deficiency requires an enzymatic assay and/or a molecular analysis, but some caveats must be considered. Despite the reported missed cases, screening programs have successfully identified an increasing number of patients with beta-ketothiolase deficiency. Early diagnosis and management of beta-ketothiolase deficiency will enable prevention of its serious acute and chronic complications and ultimately improve the prognosis.

  1. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V; Carvalho, Helena G; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  2. Computing sleep deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, Thomas C; Groß, J Valerie; Lewis, Philip

    2017-11-20

    Sleep deficiency is a major public health concern. Since epidemiological studies play an important role in public health evaluations, this theoretical paper pursues answers to the question: 'How can we compute sleep deficiency as informative measures of exposures or doses in observational research?' Starting from the social jetlag concept and based on the chronodisruption rationale, we illustrate and discuss five approaches (one established and four untested, each with unique strengths and limitations) to quantify sleep deficiency by focusing on the timing and duration of sleep. Hitherto, social jetlag and chronodisruption rationale were neither explicitly proposed nor developed as assessments of sleep deficiency but, as we suggest, could potentially be utilized to this end. This first foray into computing sleep deficiency in epidemiological studies makes clear that laboratory, field and epidemiological collaboration is pre-requisite to elucidating potential (co-)causal roles of sleep deficiency in disease endpoints. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Mini-Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase/Mini-Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase on Angiogenesis in Rhesus Monkeys after Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rui; Wang, Mian; You, Gui-ying; Yue, Rong-zheng; Chen, Yu-cheng; Zeng, Zhi; Liu, Rui; Qiang, Ou; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of mini-tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase/mini-tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS) in ischemic angiogenesis in rhesus monkeys with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A 27-gauge needle was incorporated percutaneously into the left ventricular myocardium of rhesus monkeys with AMI. All monkeys were randomized to receive adenoviral vector mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS, which was administered as five injections into the infarcted myocardium, or saline or ad-null (control groups). The injections were guided by EnSite NavX left ventricular electroanatomical mapping. Mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS proteins were detected by Western blot and immunoprecipitation analyses. Microvessel density (MVD) per section was measured using immunostaining with a CD34 monoclonal antibody. Proliferating cardiomyocytes were identified through histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Myocardial perfusion and cardiac function were estimated by G-SPECT. Infarction size was also measured. Western blot analyses showed that compared to the normal zone, the expression level of mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS was significantly different in the infarction zone. G-SPECT analysis indicated that the mini-TyrRS group had better cardiac function and myocardial perfusion after the injection of ad-mini-TyrRS than before, while mini-TrpRS injection had a totally opposite effect. After mini-TyrRS was administered, there was less of an infarction zone and more proliferating cardiomyocytes and capillaries in the mini-TyrRS group compared to both of the control groups, and the ad-mini-TrpRS group had a totally opposite effect. These results indicated that angiogenesis could be either stimulated by mini-TyrRS or inhibited by mini-TrpRS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of Aerobactin Synthetase IucA from a Hypervirulent Pathotype of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Daniel C.; Drake, Eric J.; Grant, Thomas D.; Gulick, Andrew M. (Buffalo); (HWMRI)

    2016-06-28

    Iron is a vital mineral nutrient required by virtually all life forms to prosper; pathogenic bacteria are no exception. Despite the abundance of iron within the human host, highly regulated iron physiology can result in exceedingly low levels of iron bioavailable to prospective invading bacteria. To combat this scarcity of iron, many pathogenic bacteria have acquired specific and efficient iron acquisition systems, which allow them to thrive in iron-deficient host environments. One of the more prominent bacterial iron acquisition systems involves the synthesis, secretion, and reuptake of small-molecule iron chelators known as siderophores. Aerobactin, a citrate-hydroxamate siderophore originally isolated nearly 50 years ago, is produced by a number of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Aerobactin has recently been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in mediating the enhanced virulence of a particularly invasive pathotype of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP). Toward further understanding of this key virulence factor, we report the structural and functional characterization of aerobactin synthetase IucA from a strain of hvKP. The X-ray crystal structures of unliganded and ATP-bound forms of IucA were solved, forming the foundation of our structural analysis. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data suggest that, unlike its closest structurally characterized homologues, IucA adopts a tetrameric assembly in solution. Finally, we employed activity assays to investigate the substrate specificity and determine the apparent steady-state kinetic parameters of IucA.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene from Chorispora bungeana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chenchen; Chen, Tao; Yang, Yu; Liu, Sha; Yan, Kan; Yue, Xiule; Zhang, Hua; Xiang, Yun; An, Lizhe; Chen, Shuyan

    2015-11-10

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) which is a molecule essential for polyamines and ethylene biosynthesis, methylation modifications of protein, DNA and lipids. SAMS also plays an important role in abiotic stress response. Chorispora bungeana (C. bungeana) is an alpine subnival plant species which possesses strong tolerance to cold stress. Here, we cloned and characterized an S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene, CbSAMS (C. bungeana S-adenosylmethionine synthetase), from C. bungeana, which encodes a protein of 393 amino acids containing a methionine binding motif GHPDK, an ATP binding motif GAGDQG and a phosphate binding motif GGGAFSGDK. Furthermore, an NES (nuclear export signal) peptide was identified through bioinformatics analysis. To explore the CbSAMS gene expression regulation, we isolated the promoter region of CbSAMS gene 1919bp upstream the ATG start codon, CbSAMSp, and analyzed its cis-acting elements by bioinformatics method. It was revealed that a transcription start site located at 320 bp upstream the ATG start codon and cis-acting elements related to light, ABA, auxin, ethylene, MeJA, low temperature and drought had been found in the CbSAMSp sequence. The gene expression pattern of CbSAMS was then analyzed by TR-qPCR and GUS assay method. The result showed that CbSAMS is expressed in all examined tissues including callus, roots, petioles, leaves, and flowers with a significant higher expression level in roots and flowers. Furthermore, the expression level of CbSAMS was induced by low temperature, ethylene and NaCl. Subcellular localization revealed that CbSAMS was located in the cytoplasm and nucleus but has a significant higher level in the nucleus. These results indicated a potential role of CbSAMS in abiotic stresses and plant growth in C. bungeana. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ASN1-encoded asparagine synthetase in floral organs contributes to nitrogen filling in Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaufichon, Laure; Marmagne, Anne; Belcram, Katia; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Sakakibara, Yukiko; Hase, Toshiharu; Grandjean, Olivier; Clément, Gilles; Citerne, Sylvie; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline; Chardon, Fabien; Soulay, Fabienne; Xu, Xiaole; Trassaert, Marion; Shakiebaei, Maryam; Najihi, Amina; Suzuki, Akira

    2017-08-01

    Despite a general view that asparagine synthetase generates asparagine as an amino acid for long-distance transport of nitrogen to sink organs, its role in nitrogen metabolic pathways in floral organs during seed nitrogen filling has remained undefined. We demonstrate that the onset of pollination in Arabidopsis induces selected genes for asparagine metabolism, namely ASN1 (At3g47340), GLN2 (At5g35630), GLU1 (At5g04140), AapAT2 (At5g19950), ASPGA1 (At5g08100) and ASPGB1 (At3g16150), particularly at the ovule stage (stage 0), accompanied by enhanced asparagine synthetase protein, asparagine and total amino acids. Immunolocalization confined asparagine synthetase to the vascular cells of the silique cell wall and septum, but also to the outer and inner seed integuments, demonstrating the post-phloem transport of asparagine in these cells to developing embryos. In the asn1 mutant, aberrant embryo cell divisions in upper suspensor cell layers from globular to heart stages assign a role for nitrogen in differentiating embryos within the ovary. Induction of asparagine metabolic genes by light/dark and nitrate supports fine shifts of nitrogen metabolic pathways. In transgenic Arabidopsis expressing promoterCaMV35S ::ASN1 fusion, marked metabolomics changes at stage 0, including a several-fold increase in free asparagine, are correlated to enhanced seed nitrogen. However, specific promoterNapin2S ::ASN1 expression during seed formation and a six-fold increase in asparagine toward the desiccation stage result in wild-type seed nitrogen, underlining that delayed accumulation of asparagine impairs the timing of its use by releasing amide and amino nitrogen. Transcript and metabolite profiles in floral organs match the carbon and nitrogen partitioning to generate energy via the tricarboxylic acid cycle, GABA shunt and phosphorylated serine synthetic pathway. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxin synthetase genes in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii strains from Brazilian freshwater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hoff-Risseti

    Full Text Available The Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii population from Brazilian freshwater is known to produce saxitoxin derivatives (STX, while cylindrospermopsin (CYN, which is commonly detected in isolates from Australia and Asia continents, has thus far not been detected in South American strains. However, during the investigation for the presence of cyrA, cyrB, cyrC and cyrJ CYN synthetase genes in the genomes of four laboratory-cultured C. raciborskii Brazilian strains, the almost complete cyrA gene sequences were obtained for all strains, while cyrB and cyrC gene fragments were observed in two strains. These nucleotide sequences were translated into amino acids, and the predicted protein functions and domains confirmed their identity as CYN synthetase genes. Attempts to PCR amplify cyrJ gene fragments from the four strains were unsuccessful. Phylogenetic analysis grouped the nucleotide sequences together with their homologues found in known CYN synthetase clusters of C. raciborskii strains with high bootstrap support. In addition, fragments of sxtA, sxtB and sxtI genes involved in STX production were also obtained. Extensive LC-MS analyses were unable to detect CYN in the cultured strains, whereas the production of STX and its analogues was confirmed in CENA302, CENA305 and T3. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of cyr genes in South American strains of C. raciborskii and the presence of sxt and cyr genes in a single C. raciborskii strain. This discovery suggests a shift in the type of cyanotoxin production over time of South American strains of C. raciborskii and contributes to the reconstruction of the evolutionary history and diversification of cyanobacterial toxins.

  10. Characterisation of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsalov, Ilya B.; Novikov, Boris N.; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2016-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CMP-Sia synthetases that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterised its activity in vitro. Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, while the activity with Mg2+ was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in coordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  11. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase A renders Trypanosoma brucei auxotrophic to asparagine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Loureiro

    Full Text Available Asparagine synthetase (AS catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of aspartate into asparagine using ammonia or glutamine as nitrogen source. There are two distinct types of AS, asparagine synthetase A (AS-A, known as strictly ammonia-dependent, and asparagine synthetase B (AS-B, which can use either ammonia or glutamine. The absence of AS-A in humans, and its presence in trypanosomes, suggested AS-A as a potential drug target that deserved further investigation. We report the presence of functional AS-A in Trypanosoma cruzi (TcAS-A and Trypanosoma brucei (TbAS-A: the purified enzymes convert L-aspartate into L-asparagine in the presence of ATP, ammonia and Mg(2+. TcAS-A and TbAS-A use preferentially ammonia as a nitrogen donor, but surprisingly, can also use glutamine, a characteristic so far never described for any AS-A. TbAS-A knockdown by RNAi didn't affect in vitro growth of bloodstream forms of the parasite. However, growth was significantly impaired when TbAS-A knockdown parasites were cultured in medium with reduced levels of asparagine. As expected, mice infections with induced and non-induced T. brucei RNAi clones were similar to those from wild-type parasites. However, when induced T. brucei RNAi clones were injected in mice undergoing asparaginase treatment, which depletes blood asparagine, the mice exhibited lower parasitemia and a prolonged survival in comparison to similarly-treated mice infected with control parasites. Our results show that TbAS-A can be important under in vivo conditions when asparagine is limiting, but is unlikely to be suitable as a drug target.

  12. Kinetic Origin of Substrate Specificity in Post-Transfer Editing by Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulic, Morana; Cvetesic, Nevena; Zivkovic, Igor; Palencia, Andrés; Cusack, Stephen; Bertosa, Branimir; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2017-10-27

    The intrinsic editing capacities of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases ensure a high-fidelity translation of the amino acids that possess effective non-cognate aminoacylation surrogates. The dominant error-correction pathway comprises deacylation of misaminoacylated tRNA within the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase editing site. To assess the origin of specificity of Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) against the cognate aminoacylation product in editing, we followed binding and catalysis independently using cognate leucyl- and non-cognate norvalyl-tRNALeu and their non-hydrolyzable analogues. We found that the amino acid part (leucine versus norvaline) of (mis)aminoacyl-tRNAs can contribute approximately 10-fold to ground-state discrimination at the editing site. In sharp contrast, the rate of deacylation of leucyl- and norvalyl-tRNALeu differed by about 104-fold. We further established the critical role for the A76 3'-OH group of the tRNALeu in post-transfer editing, which supports the substrate-assisted deacylation mechanism. Interestingly, the abrogation of the LeuRS specificity determinant threonine 252 did not improve the affinity of the editing site for the cognate leucine as expected, but instead substantially enhanced the rate of leucyl-tRNALeu hydrolysis. In line with that, molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the wild-type enzyme, but not the T252A mutant, enforced leucine to adopt the side-chain conformation that promotes the steric exclusion of a putative catalytic water. Our data demonstrated that the LeuRS editing site exhibits amino acid specificity of kinetic origin, arguing against the anticipated prominent role of steric exclusion in the rejection of leucine. This feature distinguishes editing from the synthetic site, which relies on ground-state discrimination in amino acid selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A 1H STD NMR spectroscopic investigation of sialylnucleoside mimetics as probes of CMP-Kdn synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Oschlies, Melanie; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kiefel, Milton J; Tiralongo, Joe; Münster-Kühnel, Anja K; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; von Itzstein, Mark

    2006-07-01

    CMP-Kdn synthetase catalyses the reaction of sialic acids (Sia) and CTP to the corresponding activated sugar nucleotide CMP-Sia and pyrophosphate PP( i ). Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the sub-structural requirements of the enzyme's binding domain. Sialylnucleoside mimetics, where the sialic acid moiety has been replaced by a carboxyl group and a hydrophobic moiety, have been used in NMR experiments, to probe the tolerance of the CMP-Kdn synthetase to such replacements. From our data it would appear that unlike another sialylnucleotide-recognising protein, the CMP-Neu5Ac transport protein, either a phosphate group or other functional groups on the sialic acid framework may play important roles in recognition by the synthetase.

  14. Purification, gene cloning, and characterization of γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from Agrobacterium sp. 525a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimitsu, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Takubo, Sayaka; Fukui, Akiko; Okada, Kazuma; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The report is the first of purification, overproduction, and characterization of a unique γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from soil-isolated Agrobacterium sp. 525a. The primary structure of the enzyme shares 70-95% identity with those of ATP-dependent microbial acyl-CoA synthetases of the Rhizobiaceae family. As distinctive characteristics of the enzyme of this study, ADP was released in the catalytic reaction process, whereas many acyl CoA synthetases are annotated as an AMP-forming enzyme. The apparent Km values for γ-butyrobetaine, CoA, and ATP were, respectively, 0.69, 0.02, and 0.24 mM.

  15. S-adenosylmethionine treatment prevents carbon tetrachloride-induced S-adenosylmethionine synthetase inactivation and attenuates liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, F; Giménez, A; Alvarez, L; Caballería, J; Pajares, M A; Andreu, H; Parés, A; Mato, J M; Rodés, J

    1992-10-01

    Administration of carbon tetrachloride to rats resulted in induction of hepatic fibrosis and a 60% reduction of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine synthetase activity without producing any significant modification of hepatic levels of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase messenger RNA. The reduction of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase activity was corrected by treatment with S-adenosylmethionine (3 mg/kg/day, intramuscularly). Administration of carbon tetrachloride also produced a 45% depletion of liver glutathione (reduced form) that was corrected by S-adenosylmethionine treatment. After the rats received carbon tetrachloride, a 2.3-fold increase in liver collagen was observed; prolyl hydroxylase activity was 2.5 times greater than that seen in controls. These increases were attenuated in animals treated with carbon tetrachloride and S-adenosylmethionine. The attenuation by S-adenosylmethionine treatment of the fibrogenic effect of carbon tetrachloride was associated with a decrease in the number of rats in which cirrhosis developed.

  16. Biochemical and genetic characterization of a carbamyl phosphate synthetase mutant of Escherichia coli K12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, F; Galván, M; Martuscelli, J

    1976-05-01

    An unusual Escherichia coli K12 mutant for carbamyl phosphate synthetase is described. The mutation was generated by bacteriophage MUI insertion and left a 5% residual activity of the enzyme using either ammonia or glutamine as donors. The mutation is recessive to the wild-type allele and maps at or near the pyrA gene, but the mutant requires only arginine and not uracil for growth. By a second block in the pyrB gene it was possible to shift the accumulated carbamyl phosphate to arginine biosynthesis. The Km values and the levels of ornithine activation and inhibition by UMP were normal in the mutant enzyme.

  17. Diversity of nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes in the microbial metagenomes of marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila Marie; Grozdanov, Lubomir; Proksch, Sebastian; Hentschel, Ute

    2012-06-01

    Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  18. PRS1 is a key member of the gene family encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Andrew T.; Beiche, Flora; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the metabolite phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is required for purine, pyrimidine, tryptophan and histidine biosynthesis. Enzymes that can synthesize PRPP can be encoded by at least four genes. We have studied 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetases (PRS......) genetically and biochemically. Each of the four genes, all of which are transcribed, has been disrupted in haploid yeast strains of each mating type and although all disruptants are able to grow on complete medium, differences in growth rate and enzyme activity suggest that disruption of PRS1 or PRS3 has...

  19. Association of a multi-synthetase complex with translating ribosomes in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, Medha; Elgamal, Sara; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    )-triphosphatase 205, thiamine monophosphate kinase 179, pyruvate formate lyase family activating protein 298, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (mevanolate), N(2), N(2)-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 145, N2, N2-dimethylguanosine tRNA methyltransferase 170, putative 5-methylcytosine restriction......-oxoglutarate ferredoxin oxidoreductase subunit gamma 352, 2-oxoglutarate ferredoxin oxidoreductase subunit alpha 407, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, N-terminus of large subunit 172, AP endonuclease (base excision repair pathway) 365, CTP synthetase 105, PBP family phospholipid-binding protein 272, lipoate...

  20. Changes in polyamines, inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in response to nitrogen availability and form in red spruce (Picea rubens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle J. Serapiglia; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed effects of nitrogen availability and form on growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in in-vitro-cultured red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cells. Growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and glutamine synthetase activity declined when either the amount of nitrate or the total amount...

  1. Elevated levels of asparagine synthetase activity in physiologically and genetically derepressed Chinese hamster ovary cells are due to increased rates of enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, J S; Arfin, S M

    1981-07-25

    The activity of asparagine synthetase in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is increased in response to asparagine deprivation or decreased aminoacylation of several tRNAs (Andrulis, I. L., Hatfield, G. W., and Arfin, S. M. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 10629-10633). CHO cells resistant to beta-aspartylhydroxamate have up to 5-fold higher levels of asparagine synthetase than the parental line (Gantt, J. S., Chiang, C. S., Hatfield, G. W., and Arfin, S. M. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 4808-4813). We have investigated the basis for these differences in enzyme activity by combined radiochemical and immunological techniques. The asparagine synthetase of beef pancreas was purified to apparent homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the purified protein cross-react with the asparagine synthetase of CHO cells. Immunotitrations show that the amount of enzyme protein in physiologically or genetically derepressed CHO strains is proportional to the level of enzyme activity. Measurement of the relative rates of asparagine synthetase synthesis by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrate that the difference in the number of asparagine synthetase molecules is closely correlated with the rate of enzyme synthesis. In contrast, the half-life of asparagine synthetase in wild type cells and in physiologically or genetically derepressed cells is very similar. It appears that the increased levels of asparagine synthetase can be attributed solely to an increased rate of enzyme synthesis.

  2. High rate of CAD gene amplification in human cells deficient in MLH1 or MSH6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sihong; Bigner, Sandra H.; Modrich, Paul

    2001-01-01

    MutS and MutL homologs have been implicated in multiple genetic stabilization pathways. The activities participate in the correction of DNA biosynthetic errors, are involved in cellular responses to certain types of DNA damage, and serve to ensure the fidelity of genetic recombination. We show here that the rate of CAD (carbamyl-P synthetase/aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase) gene amplification is elevated 50- to 100-fold in human cell lines deficient in MLH1 or MSH6, as compared with mismatch repair-proficient control cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization indicates that these amplification events are the probable consequence of unequal sister chromatid exchanges involving chromosome 2, as well as translocation events involving other chromosomes. These results implicate MutSα and MutLα in the suppression of gene amplification and suggest that defects in this genetic stabilization function may contribute to the cancer predisposition associated with mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:11717437

  3. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torreira, Eva [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Seabra, Ana Rita [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Llorca, Óscar [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Robinson, Carol V. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, Helena G. [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [IBMC – Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas – CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  4. Characterization of TLR4-mediated auto-antibody production in a mouse model of histidyl-tRNA synthetase-induced myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Lisa; Fernandez, Irina; Soejima, Makoto; Ridgway, William M; Ascherman, Dana P

    2012-12-01

    We have previously shown that intramuscular immunization with a recombinant fragment of murine histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HRS) in the absence of exogenous adjuvant generates Ag-specific, IgG class switched Abs a murine model of myositis. Markedly diminished IgG anti-HRS auto-Ab responses in TLR4 signaling-deficient C3H/HeJ mice indicate that TLR4 is required for auto-Ab formation and/or class switching in this system. Comparative time course assessment of HRS-immunized C3H/HeOuJ (wild type) and C3H/HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice shows here that despite significant impairment of class switched IgG anti-HRS responses in TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice, production of IgM anti-HRS auto-Abs is relatively preserved-suggesting that TLR4-mediated signals modulate IgG class switching rather than auto-Ab formation in this genetic background. In C57BL/6-derived knockout mice lacking either MyD88 (B6.MyD88(-/-)) or TRIF (B6.TRIF(-/-)) adaptor molecules, immunization studies indicate that TRIF exerts a dominant role in the generation of HRS-specific IgG auto-Abs. Complementing these analyses, in vitro stimulation of unfractionated, as well as T cell-depleted, C3H/HeOuJ splenocytes with recombinant murine HRS reveals that TLR4-mediated generation of class switched auto-Abs can occur independently of T cell help. Overall, these findings support a broader role for TLR4 in the breakdown of immune tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  5. Vitamin-responsive disorders: cobalamin, folate, biotin, vitamins B1 and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic properties of many enzymes depend on the participation of vitamins as obligatory cofactors. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) and folic acid (folate) deficiencies in infants and children classically present with megaloblastic anemia and are often accompanied by neurological signs. A number of rare inborn errors of cobalamin and folate absorption, transport, cellular uptake, and intracellular metabolism have been delineated and identification of disease-causing mutations has improved our ability to diagnose and treat many of these conditions. Two inherited defects in biotin metabolism are known, holocarboxylase synthetase and biotinidase deficiency. Both lead to multiple carboxylase deficiency manifesting with metabolic acidosis, neurological abnormalities, and skin rash. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is characterized by megaloblastic anemia, non-type I diabetes, and sensorineural deafness that responds to pharmacological doses of thiamine (vitamin B1). Individuals affected with inherited vitamin E deficiencies including ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia present with a spinocerebellar syndrome similar to patients with Friedreich's ataxia. If started early, treatment of these defects by oral or parenteral administration of the relevant vitamin often results in correction of the metabolic defect and reversal of the signs of disease, stressing the importance of early and correct diagnosis in these treatable conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutation in the phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase gene (prs) that results in simultaneous requirements for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, nicotinamide nucleotide, histidine, and tryptophan in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1988-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli harboring a temperature-labile phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase was characterized. Despite the lack of a detectable PRPP pool or PRPP synthetase activity at 40 degrees C, the strain was fully viable at this temperature as long as guanosine, uridine, histi......-less strain and suggest that PRPP synthetase is dispensable for E. coli....

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diet. Young children who drink a lot of cow's milk may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. ... her risk for iron-deficiency anemia. For example, cow's milk is low in iron. For this and other ...

  8. Serine-deficiency syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Tom J; Klomp, Leo W J

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Serine-deficiency disorders comprise a new group of neurometabolic diseases and are caused by defects in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine. In contrast to most neurometabolic disorders, serine-deficiency disorders are potentially treatable. Furthermore, the severe

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs Contact Us FAQs Home » Iron-Deficiency Anemia Explore ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ...

  10. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have enough iron stored in your body to make up for the lost iron, you'll develop iron- ... by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency ... have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. At your ...

  12. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron-deficiency anemia. Prior to her diagnosis, Susan had symptoms such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing age who are ...

  16. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  17. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    deficiency and contributes to an international database located in Malmö, Sweden. This database is designed to increase understanding of AAT deficiency. Additionally, AIR members are engaged in active, wide-ranging investigations to improve the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of the disease and meet...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  19. Maternal vitamin D deficiency

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: A rare but reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy occurs in infants born to vitamin D deficient mothers due to hypocalcaemia. CASE REPORT: We report a case of dilated cardiomyopathy due to hypocalcaemia secondary to maternal vitamin D deficiency in an.

  20. G6PD Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  1. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have RLS often have a hard time sleeping. Iron-deficiency anemia can put children at greater risk for lead poisoning and infections. Some signs and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia are related to the condition's causes. For ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will diagnose iron-deficiency anemia based on your medical history, a physical exam, and the results from tests and procedures. Once ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical ... be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  6. Phosphorolytic activity of Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase towards its cognate aminoacyl adenylate detected by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, Jens Jørgen; Switon, Werner K.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1983-01-01

    The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses of adeno......The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses...... catalytic activities of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is discussed, as well as the biological significance of the reaction....

  7. Purification and characterization of delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase from Penicillium chrysogenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard, Hanne Birgitte; Kristiansen, K.N.; Henriksen, Claus Maxel

    1997-01-01

    delta-(L-alpha-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) from Penicillium chrysogenum was purified to homogeneity by a combination of (NH4)(2)SO4 precipitation, protamine sulphate treatment, ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The mole......delta-(L-alpha-Aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) from Penicillium chrysogenum was purified to homogeneity by a combination of (NH4)(2)SO4 precipitation, protamine sulphate treatment, ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography...

  8. Neurospora crassa glutamine synthetase. Role of enzyme synthesis and degradation on the regulation of enzyme concentration during exponential growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto, C; Mora, J; Palacios, R

    1977-12-10

    The specific activity of Neurospora crassa glutamine synthetase varies according to the nitrogen source in which the organism is grown. In a poor nitrogen source such as glutamate, the specific activity of the enzyme is higher than that found in good nitrogen sources such as ammonium or glutamine. These differences in specific enzyme activity correspond to differences in enzyme concentration. The relative rates of glutamine synthetase synthesis and degradation were measured in exponential cultures grown in different nitrogen sources. The differences in enzyme concentration are explained by differences in the relative rate of enzyme synthesis.

  9. Recognition sites of glycine tRNA for glycyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koji; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate the tRNA recognition sites of glycine tRNA from an extreme thermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined glycylation activities using in vitro mutant glycine tRNA transcripts and recombinant A. pernix glycyl-tRNA synthetase. The recognition nucleotides were determined to be C35 and C36 of anticodon, C2-G71 and G3-C70 base-pairs of acceptor stem. However, discriminator base A73 was not recognized by glycyl-tRNA synthetase.

  10. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H2O2, and increased......The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product...

  11. Entamoeba histolytica acetyl-CoA synthetase: biomarker of acute amoebic liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huat, Lim Boon; Garcia, Alfonso Olivos; Ning, Tan Zi; Kin, Wong Weng; Noordin, Rahmah; Azham, Siti Shafiqah Anaqi; Jie, Lee Zhi; Ching, Guee Cher; Chong, Foo Phiaw; Dam, Pim Chau

    2014-06-01

    To characterize the Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) antigen(s) recognized by moribound amoebic liver abscess hamsters. Crude soluble antigen of E. histolytica was probed with sera of moribund hamsters in 1D- and 2D-Western blot analyses. The antigenic protein was then sent for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-AI to produce the recombinant E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS) protein. A customised ELISA was developed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the recombinant protein. A ∼75 kDa protein band with a pI value of 5.91-6.5 was found to be antigenic; and not detected by sera of hamsters in the control group. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the protein to be the 77 kDa E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS). The customised ELISA results revealed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity when tested against infected (n=31) and control group hamsters (n=5) serum samples, respectively. This finding suggested the significant role of EhACS as a biomarker for moribund hamsters with acute amoebic liver abscess (ALA) infection. It is deemed pertinent that future studies explore the potential roles of EhACS in better understanding the pathogenesis of ALA; and in the development of vaccine and diagnostic tests to control ALA in human populations.

  12. Entamoeba histolytica acetyl-CoA synthetase: biomarker of acute amoebic liver abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huat, Lim Boon; Garcia, Alfonso Olivos; Ning, Tan Zi; Kin, Wong Weng; Noordin, Rahmah; Azham, Siti Shafiqah Anaqi; Jie, Lee Zhi; Ching, Guee Cher; Chong, Foo Phiaw; Dam, Pim Chau

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) antigen(s) recognized by moribound amoebic liver abscess hamsters. Methods Crude soluble antigen of E. histolytica was probed with sera of moribund hamsters in 1D- and 2D-Western blot analyses. The antigenic protein was then sent for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-AI to produce the recombinant E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS) protein. A customised ELISA was developed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the recombinant protein. Results A ∼75 kDa protein band with a pI value of 5.91-6.5 was found to be antigenic; and not detected by sera of hamsters in the control group. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed the protein to be the 77 kDa E. histolytica ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (EhACS). The customised ELISA results revealed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity when tested against infected (n=31) and control group hamsters (n=5) serum samples, respectively. Conclusions This finding suggested the significant role of EhACS as a biomarker for moribund hamsters with acute amoebic liver abscess (ALA) infection. It is deemed pertinent that future studies explore the potential roles of EhACS in better understanding the pathogenesis of ALA; and in the development of vaccine and diagnostic tests to control ALA in human populations. PMID:25182945

  13. Genetic Diversity of Dihydropteroate synthetase Gene (dhps Of Plasmodium vivax in Hormozgan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh MAGHSOODLOORAD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was formulated in order to determine pol­ymorphism of dihydropteroate synthetase gene (dhps of Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax in Hormozgan Province, southern Iran and mutations at codons 382, 383, 512, 553, and 585 associated with resistance of P. vivax to sulfadoxine.Method: One-hundred eighteen isolates of P. vivax were prepared within 2007-2008 to determine dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (dhfr-ts gene. The isolates were determined in the study of genetic diversity of dihy­dropteroate synthetase gene (dhps of P. vivax. The study was performed via PCR test and nucleotide sequencing.Results: Of 118 blood samples infected by P. vivax, 46 and 72 samples be­longed to Minab and Jask, respectively. No mutation was detected at 5 target codons. However, among these 118 samples, three isolates (2.54% were found to have a mutation at the new codon 421.Conclusion: Since mutation was detected in dihydrofolate reductase (Pvdhfr gene in the same samples but no mutation was found at five main codons of Pvdhps gene, it can be concluded that P. vivax, considering their mutations in Pvdhfr, is still susceptible to sulfadoxine and therefore, to fansidar in Hor­mozgan Province, Southern Iran.

  14. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  15. A single Danio rerio hars gene encodes both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley L Waldron

    Full Text Available Histidyl tRNA Synthetase (HARS is a member of the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS family of enzymes. This family of 20 enzymes is responsible for attaching specific amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules, a critical step in protein synthesis. However, recent work highlighting a growing number of associations between ARS genes and diverse human diseases raises the possibility of new and unexpected functions in this ancient enzyme family. For example, mutations in HARS have been linked to two different neurological disorders, Usher Syndrome Type IIIB and Charcot Marie Tooth peripheral neuropathy. These connections raise the possibility of previously undiscovered roles for HARS in metazoan development, with alterations in these functions leading to complex diseases. In an attempt to establish Danio rerio as a model for studying HARS functions in human disease, we characterized the Danio rerio hars gene and compared it to that of human HARS. Using a combination of bioinformatics, molecular biology, and cellular approaches, we found that while the human genome encodes separate genes for cytoplasmic and mitochondrial HARS protein, the Danio rerio genome encodes a single hars gene which undergoes alternative splicing to produce the respective cytoplasmic and mitochondrial versions of Hars. Nevertheless, while the HARS genes of humans and Danio differ significantly at the genomic level, we found that they are still highly conserved at the amino acid level, underscoring the potential utility of Danio rerio as a model organism for investigating HARS function and its link to human diseases in vivo.

  16. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. An Appended Domain Results in an Unusual Architecture for Malaria Parasite Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sameena; Garg, Ankur; Sharma, Arvind; Camacho, Noelia; Picchioni, Daria; Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; de Pouplana, Lluís Ribas; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Specific activation of amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) is essential for maintaining fidelity during protein translation. Here, we present crystal structure of malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (Pf-WRS) catalytic domain (AAD) at 2.6 Å resolution in complex with L-tryptophan. Confocal microscopy-based localization data suggest cytoplasmic residency of this protein. Pf-WRS has an unusual N-terminal extension of AlaX-like domain (AXD) along with linker regions which together seem vital for enzymatic activity and tRNA binding. Pf-WRS is not proteolytically processed in the parasites and therefore AXD likely provides tRNA binding capability rather than editing activity. The N-terminal domain containing AXD and linker region is monomeric and would result in an unusual overall architecture for Pf-WRS where the dimeric catalytic domains have monomeric AXDs on either side. Our PDB-wide comparative analyses of 47 WRS crystal structures also provide new mechanistic insights into this enzyme family in context conserved KMSKS loop conformations. PMID:23776638

  18. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Seabra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine Synthetase (GS catalyses the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of glutamine synthetase isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context.

  19. Regulation of Nodule Glutamine Synthetase by CO2 Levels in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, José-Luis; Sánchez, Federico; Soberón, Mario; Flores, Miguel Lara

    1992-01-01

    Nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were grown for 17 days after infection in normal (0.02%) CO2 and from day 8 to 17 in high (0.1%) CO2 in order to increase nitrogen fixation and define how nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) isoforms are regulated by the ammonia derived from the bacteroid. Nitrogenase activity was detected by day 10, and by day 17 activity was over twofold higher in 0.1% of CO2 compared with plants grown in 0.02% CO2 and inoculated with Rhizobium wild-type strain CE3. Likewise, plant fresh weight increased in response to increased CO2, particularly in plants inoculated with the Rhizobium phaseoli mutant strain CFN037. Glutamine synthetase specific activity increased 2.5- to 6.5-fold from day 11 to 17. However, increased CO2 did not appear to have an effect on GS specific activity. Analysis of the nodule GS polypeptide composition revealed that the γ polypeptide was significantly reduced in response to high CO2, whereas the β polypeptide was not affected. The significance of this result in relation to the regulation of GS isoforms and their role in the assimilation of ammonia in the nodule is discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 4 PMID:16668681

  20. Production of cyanophycin in Rhizopus oryzae through the expression of a cyanophycin synthetase encoding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meussen, Bas J; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Sanders, Johan P M; Graaff, Leo H de

    2012-02-01

    Cyanophycin or cyanophycin granule peptide is a protein that results from non-ribosomal protein synthesis in microorganisms such as cyanobacteria. The amino acids in cyanophycin can be used as a feedstock in the production of a wide range of chemicals such as acrylonitrile, polyacrylic acid, 1,4-butanediamine, and urea. In this study, an auxotrophic mutant (Rhizopus oryzae M16) of the filamentous fungus R. oryzae 99-880 was selected to express cyanophycin synthetase encoding genes. These genes originated from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, and a codon optimized version of latter gene. The genes were under control of the pyruvate decarboxylase promoter and terminator elements of R. oryzae. Transformants were generated by the biolistic transformation method. In only two transformants both expressing the cyanophycin synthetase encoding gene from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was a specific enzyme activity detected of 1.5 mU/mg protein. In one of these transformants was both water-soluble and insoluble cyanophycin detected. The water-soluble fraction formed the major fraction and accounted for 0.5% of the dry weight. The water-insoluble CGP was produced in trace amounts. The amino acid composition of the water-soluble form was determined and constitutes of equimolar amounts of arginine and aspartic acid.

  1. Compound heterozygous mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS cause mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nafisinia

    Full Text Available Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS; OMIM 600287 is one of thirty-seven tRNA-synthetase genes that catalyses the synthesis of glycyl-tRNA, which is required to insert glycine into proteins within the cytosol and mitochondria. To date, eighteen mutations in GARS have been reported in patients with autosomal-dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D (CMT2D; OMIM 601472, and/or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V (dSMA-V; OMIM 600794. In this study, we report a patient with clinical and biochemical features suggestive of a mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC disorder including mild left ventricular posterior wall hypertrophy, exercise intolerance, and lactic acidosis. Using whole exome sequencing we identified compound heterozygous novel variants, c.803C>T; p.(Thr268Ile and c.1234C>T; p.(Arg412Cys, in GARS in the proband. Spectrophotometric evaluation of the MRC complexes showed reduced activity of Complex I, III and IV in patient skeletal muscle and reduced Complex I and IV activity in the patient liver, with Complex IV being the most severely affected in both tissues. Immunoblot analysis of GARS protein and subunits of the MRC enzyme complexes in patient fibroblast extracts showed significant reduction in GARS protein levels and Complex IV. Together these studies provide evidence that the identified compound heterozygous GARS variants may be the cause of the mitochondrial dysfunction in our patient.

  2. Weak mitochondrial targeting sequence determines tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase in liver and brain cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, G.D.; Gur, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Pines, O.; Vardimon, L.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of the uricotelic system for ammonia detoxification required a mechanism for tissue-specific subcellular localization of glutamine synthetase (GS). In uricotelic vertebrates, GS is mitochondrial in liver cells and cytoplasmic in brain. Because these species contain a single copy of the GS

  3. Organ-specific activity of the 5' regulatory region of the glutamine synthetase gene in developing mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-Venema, H.; de Boer, P. A.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonia and glutamate into glutamine. We assessed the activity of the 5' regulatory region of the GS gene in developing transgenic mice carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under the control of 3150 bp of the upstream sequence of the rat GS

  4. Acetylation of lysine ϵ-amino groups regulates aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activity inEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Ji, Quan-Quan; Yan, Wei; Yang, Fang; Wang, En-Duo

    2017-06-23

    Previous proteomic analyses have shown that aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in many organisms can be modified by acetylation of Lys. In this present study, leucyl-tRNA synthetase and arginyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli ( Ec LeuRS and Ec ArgRS) were overexpressed and purified and found to be acetylated on Lys residues by MS. Gln scanning mutagenesis revealed that Lys 619 , Lys 624 , and Lys 809 in Ec LeuRS and Lys 126 and Lys 408 in Ec ArgRS might play important roles in enzyme activity. Furthermore, we utilized a novel protein expression system to obtain enzymes harboring acetylated Lys at specific sites and investigated their catalytic activity. Acetylation of these Lys residues could affect their aminoacylation activity by influencing amino acid activation and/or the affinity for tRNA. In vitro assays showed that acetyl-phosphate nonenzymatically acetylates Ec LeuRS and Ec ArgRS and suggested that the sirtuin class deacetylase CobB might regulate acetylation of these two enzymes. These findings imply a potential regulatory role for Lys acetylation in controlling the activity of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and thus protein synthesis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase single-nucleotide polymorphisms that lead to defects in refolding but not aminoacylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Reynolds, Noah M; Yadavalli, Srujana S

    2011-01-01

    that mutations in nuclear-encoded components of the mitochondrial translation machinery, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), can also lead to disease. In some cases, mutations can be directly linked to losses in enzymatic activity; however, for many, their effect is unknown. To investigate how aa...

  6. Organization and expression of genes in the genomic region surrounding the glutamine synthetase gene Gln1 from Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykjaer, T; Danielsen, D; She, Q

    1997-01-01

    within the 23326-bp genomic region analysed. The LjGln1 gene encodes a cytosolic glutamine synthetase and the LjKrm (Kinesin repeat motif) gene encodes a polypeptide with similarity to a repeated motif present in the microtubule-associated kinesin light chain protein. Transcripts of the glutamine...

  7. Purification and Properties of a Prokaryote Type Glutamine Synthetase from the Bialaphos Producer Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Yoichi; Takano, Eriko; Nagaoka, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    A prokaryote type glutamine synthetase (GS) was purified from a bialaphos (BA)-producing organism, Streptomyces hygroscopicus SF1293 (SF1293). The GS (GS I) consisted of a 55,000 dalton subunit, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was similar to that of S. coelicolor GS. GS I was highly sensitive

  8. Novel expression pattern of cytosolic gln synthetase in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of the actinorhizal host, Datisca glomerata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, A.M.; Murphy, T.M.; Okubara, P.A.; Jacobsen, K.R.; Swensen, S.M.; Pawlowski, K.

    2004-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme of primary ammonia assimilation in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes and actinorhizal (Frankia-nodulated) plants. In root nodules of Datisca glomerata (Datiscaceae), transcripts hybridizing to a conserved coding region of the abundant nodule isoform,

  9. The carB gene encoding the large subunit of carbamoylphosphate synthetase from Lactococcus lactis is transcribed monocistronically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalysed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPSase). The genes encoding the two subunits in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, whereas in Lactococcus lactis, the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) is shown to b...

  10. Modulation of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase by environmental stress in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, H.C.; Wiens, M.; Mueller, W.E.G. [Abteilung Angewandte Molekularbiologie, Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Physiologische Chemie; Kuusksalu, A.; Kelve, M. [Inst. of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1997-07-01

    Recently the authors established the presence of relatively high amounts of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylates (2{prime}-5{prime} A) and 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase (2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase) in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Here they determined by applying radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatographical methods that the concentration of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase change following exposure of G. cydonium tissue to environmental stress. The 2{prime}-5{prime} A content and the activity of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase, present in crude sponge extract, increase by up to three-fold after treating sponge cubes for 2 h with natural stressors including heat shock (26 C), cold shock (6 C), pH shock (pH 6), and hypertonic shock and subsequent incubation for 18 h under ambient conditions (16 C). No response was observed after exposure of sponges to an alkaline (pH 10) or hypotonic environment. Similar changes have been found for the expression of heat shock protein HSP70 in G. cydonium. These results show that 2{prime}-5{prime} A in sponges may be useful as a novel biomarker for environmental monitoring.

  11. Fatty acid biosynthesis VII. Substrate control of chain-length of products synthesised by rat liver fatty acid synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Carey, E.M.; Dils, R.

    1970-01-01

    - 1. Gas-liquid and paper chromatography have been used to determine the chain-lengths of fatty acids synthesised by purified rat liver fatty acid synthetase from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA, [1,3-14C2]malonyl-CoA and from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA plus partially purified rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. - 2. A w...... of long-chain fatty acids was synthesised from carboxylated acetyl-CoA than from added malonyl-CoA. - 5. It is suggested that acetyl-CoA carboxylase may carboxylate acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase.......- 1. Gas-liquid and paper chromatography have been used to determine the chain-lengths of fatty acids synthesised by purified rat liver fatty acid synthetase from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA, [1,3-14C2]malonyl-CoA and from [1-14C]acetyl-CoA plus partially purified rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. - 2....... A wide range (C4:0–C18:0) of fatty acids was synthesised and the proportions were modified by substrate concentrations in the same manner as for purified rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase. - 3. The relative amount of radioactivity incorporated from added acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA depended...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you have intestinal surgery (such as gastric bypass) or a disease of the intestine (such as ... produce red blood cells. People who have gastric bypass surgery also may develop iron-deficiency anemia. This ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

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    Full Text Available ... NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget ... include poor appetite, slowed growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs ...

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  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, ...

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or soil, or drinking water that contains lead. Teens Teens are at risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... for increased blood volume and for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron- ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ... Urinary tract bleeding Blood loss from severe injuries, surgery, or frequent blood drawings also can cause iron- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or soil, or drinking water that contains lead. Teens Teens are at risk for iron-deficiency anemia if ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ... flow. In some cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If ...

  10. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seafood, processed soy products, nuts, seeds, beans, and peas. A healthy diet is low in sodium (salt), ... help you cope with stress. Emotional Issues and Support Living with AAT deficiency may cause fear, anxiety, ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  12. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease osteoporosis. Severe vitamin D deficiency can cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Both problems cause soft, ... The oral dose is once daily or weekly. Children with rickets or at risk of this disease may get ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are to treat ... and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... low iron levels in women. Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency ... a diagnosis, look for a cause, and find out how severe the condition is. Complete Blood Count ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... People who have RLS often have a hard time sleeping. Iron-deficiency anemia can put children at ... Reticulocytes are young, immature red blood cells. Over time, reticulocytes become mature red blood cells that carry ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or iron supplements, when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. ... in the diet. Too much milk also may prevent children's bodies from absorbing iron from other foods. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health Information Center Health Professionals Systematic Evidence Reviews & Clinical Practice ... and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... green leafy vegetables. Eat poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low- ... help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and other ... common symptom of all types of anemia is fatigue (tiredness). Fatigue occurs because your body doesn't ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A ... Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Follow a very low-fat diet over a long time. Some higher fat foods, like meat, are ... iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain health, the American ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related ... with having iron-deficiency anemia. Prior to her diagnosis, Susan had symptoms such as tiredness, poor skin ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can ... colon cancer Regular use of aspirin or other pain medicines, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (for ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Infants and Young Children A baby's diet can affect his or her risk for iron-deficiency anemia. ... eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice. Grapefruit can affect the strength of a few medicines and how ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... also checks the number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets in your blood. Abnormal ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also can cause internal bleeding. Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the signs and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms ... rapid or uneven breathing Feel your abdomen to check the size of your liver and spleen Do ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... beans. Other lifestyle changes, such as getting enough sleep and exercising, also have helped Susan feel better. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... intestine (such as Crohn's disease or celiac disease). Prescription medicines that reduce acid in the stomach also ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop iron-deficiency anemia. This is because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who ... heavy menstrual flow, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help reduce your monthly blood flow. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing age ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ... or while checking for other problems. Specialists ... disease specialist), a gastroenterologist (a digestive system specialist), and ...

  2. Iron deficiency anemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z; Webb, Jinelle A; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    .... The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stomach also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children ... blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get enough iron ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... in your hands and feet, pale skin, chest pain, weakness, and fatigue (tiredness). If you don't ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  9. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults report falling asleep during the day without meaning to at least once a month. Also, an ... Sleep deficiency also has been linked to depression, suicide, and risk-taking behavior. Children and teens who ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent children's bodies from absorbing iron from other foods. Children who have lead in their blood also may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lead can interfere with ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  12. Iron deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlotti, Andrea; Vigani, Gianpiero; Zocchi, Graziano

    2012-10-11

    Nitrogen is a principal limiting nutrient in plant growth and development. Among factors that may limit NO3- assimilation, Fe potentially plays a crucial role being a metal cofactor of enzymes of the reductive assimilatory pathway. Very few information is available about the changes of nitrogen metabolism occurring under Fe deficiency in Strategy I plants. The aim of this work was to study how cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants modify their nitrogen metabolism when grown under iron deficiency. The activity of enzymes involved in the reductive assimilation of nitrate and the reactions that produce the substrates for the ammonium assimilation both at root and at leaf levels in Fe-deficient cucumber plants were investigated. Under Fe deficiency, only nitrate reductase (EC 1.7.1.1) activity decreased both at the root and leaf level, whilst for glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) and glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.1.14) an increase was found. Accordingly, the transcript analysis for these enzymes showed the same behaviour except for root nitrate reductase which increased. Furthermore, it was found that amino acid concentration greatly decreased in Fe-deficient roots, whilst it increased in the corresponding leaves. Moreover, amino acids increased in the xylem sap of Fe-deficient plants. The data obtained in this work provided new insights on the responses of plants to Fe deficiency, suggesting that this nutritional disorder differentially affected N metabolism in root and in leaf. Indeed under Fe deficiency, roots respond more efficiently, sustaining the whole plant by furnishing metabolites (i.e. aa, organic acids) to the leaves.

  13. Iron deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlotti Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrogen is a principal limiting nutrient in plant growth and development. Among factors that may limit NO3- assimilation, Fe potentially plays a crucial role being a metal cofactor of enzymes of the reductive assimilatory pathway. Very few information is available about the changes of nitrogen metabolism occurring under Fe deficiency in Strategy I plants. The aim of this work was to study how cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. plants modify their nitrogen metabolism when grown under iron deficiency. Results The activity of enzymes involved in the reductive assimilation of nitrate and the reactions that produce the substrates for the ammonium assimilation both at root and at leaf levels in Fe-deficient cucumber plants were investigated. Under Fe deficiency, only nitrate reductase (EC 1.7.1.1 activity decreased both at the root and leaf level, whilst for glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2 and glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.1.14 an increase was found. Accordingly, the transcript analysis for these enzymes showed the same behaviour except for root nitrate reductase which increased. Furthermore, it was found that amino acid concentration greatly decreased in Fe-deficient roots, whilst it increased in the corresponding leaves. Moreover, amino acids increased in the xylem sap of Fe-deficient plants. Conclusions The data obtained in this work provided new insights on the responses of plants to Fe deficiency, suggesting that this nutritional disorder differentially affected N metabolism in root and in leaf. Indeed under Fe deficiency, roots respond more efficiently, sustaining the whole plant by furnishing metabolites (i.e. aa, organic acids to the leaves.

  14. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Labrune Philippe; Gajdos Vincent; Eberschweiler Pascale; Hubert-Buron Aurélie; Petit François; Vianey-Saban Christine; Boudjemline Alix; Piraud Monique; Froissart Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, betw...

  15. Recognition of tRNAs with a long variable arm by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukalo M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotic cells three tRNA species, tRNASer, tRNALeu and tRNATyr, possess a long variable arm of 11–20 nucleotides (type 2 tRNA rather than usual 4 or 5 nucleotides (type 1 tRNA. In this review we have summarized the results of our research on the structural basis for recognition and discrimination of type 2 tRNAs by Thermus thermophilus seryl-, tyrosyl- and leucyl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, TyrRS and LeuRS obtained by X-ray crystallography and chemical probing tRNA in solution. Crystal structures are now known of all three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases complexed with type 2 tRNAs and the different modes of tRNA recognition represented by these structures will be discussed. In particular, emphasis will be given to the results on recognition of characteristic shape of type 2 tRNAs by cognate synthetases. In tRNASer, tRNATyr and tRNALeu the orientation of the long variable arm with respect to the body of the tRNA is different and is controlled by different packing of the core. In the case of SerRS the N-terminal domain and in the case of TyrRS, the C-terminal domain, bind to the characteristic long variable arm of the cognate RNA, thus recognizing the unique shape of the tRNA. The core of T. thermophilus tRNALeu has several layers of unusual base-pairs, which are revealed by the crystal structure of tRNALeu complexed with T. thermophilus LeuRS and by probing a ligand-free tRNA by specific chemical reagents in solution. In the crystal structure of the LeuRS-tRNALeu complex the unique D-stem structure is recognized by the C-terminal domain of LeuRS and these data are in good agreement with those obtained in solution. LeuRS has canonical class I mode of tRNA recognition, approaching the tRNA acceptor stem from the D-stem and minor groove of the acceptor stem side. SerRS also has canonical class II mode of tRNA recognition and approaches tRNASer from opposite, variable stem and major groove of acceptor stem site. And finally, TyrRS in strong

  16. Role of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in infectious diseases and targets for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Varun; Reader, John; Forsyth, Karin-Musier

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) play a pivotal role in protein synthesis and cell viability. These 22 "housekeeping" enzymes (1 for each standard amino acid plus pyrrolysine and o-phosphoserine) are specifically involved in recognizing and aminoacylating their cognate tRNAs in the cellular pool with the correct amino acid prior to delivery of the charged tRNA to the protein synthesis machinery. Besides serving this canonical function, higher eukaryotic AARSs, some of which are organized in the cytoplasm as a multisynthetase complex of nine enzymes plus additional cellular factors, have also been implicated in a variety of non-canonical roles. AARSs are involved in the regulation of transcription, translation, and various signaling pathways, thereby ensuring cell survival. Based in part on their versatility, AARSs have been recruited by viruses to perform essential functions. For example, host synthetases are packaged into some retroviruses and are required for their replication. Other viruses mimic tRNA-like structures in their genomes, and these motifs are aminoacylated by the host synthetase as part of the viral replication cycle. More recently, it has been shown that certain large DNA viruses infecting animals and other diverse unicellular eukaryotes encode tRNAs, AARSs, and additional components of the protein-synthesis machinery. This chapter will review our current understanding of the role of host AARSs and tRNA-like structures in viruses and discuss their potential as anti-viral drug targets. The identification and development of compounds that target bacterial AARSs, thereby serving as novel antibiotics, will also be discussed. Particular attention will be given to recent work on a number of tRNA-dependent AARS inhibitors and to advances in a new class of natural "pro-drug" antibiotics called Trojan Horse inhibitors. Finally, we will explore how bacteria that naturally produce AARS-targeting antibiotics must protect themselves against cell suicide using

  17. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  18. Determination of tryptophan tRNA recognition sites for tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Umehara, Takuya; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from extreme hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, tryptophanylation activities were examined by using mutant tryptophan tRNA transcripts prepared by in vitro transcription system. Their transcripts were aminoacylated with tryptophan by overexpressed A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides C34, C35 and A36, discriminator base A73, G1-C72 and G2-C71 base pairs of acceptor stem were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  19. Determination of phenylalanine tRNA recognition sites by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Kimura, Manami; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2007-01-01

    Phenylalanine tRNA identity has been determined in the bacteria and the eukaryote system, but remains unknown for the archaea system. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of phenylalanine tRNA by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of phenylalanine tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpressed A. pernix phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides G34, A35 and A36, discriminator base A73 and G20 in the variable pocket were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  20. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance and biochemical characterization of fluorotyrosine-labeled-thymidylate-synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosson, Dan; Lewis, Charles A.; Ellis, Paul D.; Dunlap, R. Bruce

    1994-03-01

    Fluorotyrosine has been incorporated into thymidylate synthetase from Lactobacillus casei by growth of the bacterium in media containing 3-fluorotyrosine. The enzyme exhibited a specific activity 70% of that of the normal enzyme and formed a covalent binary complex with pyrimidine nucleotides, as well as a covalent ternary complex with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to follow the formation of these complexes. 5-Fluorodeoxyuridylate, dUMP, dTMP and dCMP produced identical conformational changes in the enzyme as monitored by the fluorotyrosyl resonances. Ternary complex formation of the fluorotyrosine-containing enzyme with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate resulted in further spectral changes.

  1. Glutamine Synthetase in Legumes: Recent Advances in Enzyme Structure and Functional Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Betti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS is the key enzyme involved in the assimilation of ammonia derived either from nitrate reduction, N2 fixation, photorespiration or asparagine breakdown. A small gene family is encoding for different cytosolic (GS1 or plastidic (GS2 isoforms in legumes. We summarize here the recent advances carried out concerning the quaternary structure of GS, as well as the functional relationship existing between GS2 and processes such as nodulation, photorespiration and water stress, in this latter case by means of proline production. Functional genomic analysis using GS2-minus mutant reveals the key role of GS2 in the metabolic control of the plants and, more particularly, in carbon metabolism.

  2. CMP-Sialic Acid Synthetase: The Point of Constriction in the Sialylation Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellmeier, Melanie; Weinhold, Birgit; Münster-Kühnel, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Sialoglycoconjugates form the outermost layer of animal cells and play a crucial role in cellular communication processes. An essential step in the biosynthesis of sialylated glycoconjugates is the activation of sialic acid to the monophosphate diester CMP-sialic acid. Only the activated sugar is transported into the Golgi apparatus and serves as a substrate for the linkage-specific sialyltransferases. Interference with sugar activation abolishes sialylation and is embryonic lethal in mammals. In this chapter we focus on the enzyme catalyzing the activation of sialic acid, the CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CMAS), and compare the enzymatic properties of CMASs isolated from different species. Information concerning the reaction mechanism and active site architecture is included. Moreover, the unusual nuclear localization of vertebrate CMASs as well as the biotechnological application of bacterial CMAS enzymes is addressed.

  3. Role of asparagine and asparagine synthetase genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) germination and natural senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Maldonado, José María; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2006-10-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) contains three active asparagine synthetase (EC 6.3.5.4, AS) genes: HAS1, HAS1.1 and HAS2. Asparagine content and AS gene expression were determined during germination and leaf and cotyledon natural senescence to assess the role of asparagine as well as the extent of participation of each AS gene in different nitrogen mobilizing processes. Asparagine accumulated in the dry seed and was the predominant amide throughout germination. During cotyledon senescence, the asparagine level was slightly higher than that of glutamine. The opposite was true for leaf senescence. According to transcript accumulation data, most of the asparagine newly synthesized for germination and cotyledon expansion was due to HAS2 activity, with little contribution of the other AS genes. However, all three genes work together to synthesize asparagine for leaf senescence. The absence of significant AS gene expression in cotyledon senescence differentiates leaf and cotyledon senescence, and suggests a cotyledon-specific regulation.

  4. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

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    Ute Hentschel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  5. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains...... of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine......, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH4(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation...

  6. Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1991-06-11

    Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS): discovery and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahlan, Kapil; Moore, Marcus A; Jensen, Susan E

    2017-05-01

    The δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (ACV) tripeptide is the first dedicated intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the penicillin and cephalosporin classes of β-lactam natural products in bacteria and fungi. It is synthesized nonribosomally by the ACV synthetase (ACVS) enzyme, which has been purified and partially characterized from many sources. Due to its large size and instability, many details regarding the reaction mechanism of ACVS are still not fully understood. In this review we discuss the chronology and associated methodology that led to the discovery of ACVS, some of the main findings regarding its activities, and some recent/current studies being conducted on the enzyme. In addition, we conclude with perspectives on what can be done to increase our understating of this very important protein in the future.

  8. Expression of human aspartyl-tRNA synthetase in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, C; Qasba, P K; Yang, D C

    1994-11-09

    Mammalian aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (DRS) occurs in a multi-enzyme complex of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, while DRS exists as free soluble enzymes in bacteria and yeast. The properties of human DRS transient expressed in COS cells were examined. After transfection of COS cells with the recombinant plasmids pSVL-63 that contained hDRS cDNA coding and non-coding sequences, and pSV-hDRS where the non-coding sequences were deleted, DRS in the transfected COS cells significantly increased compared to mock transfected cells. COS cells transfected with pSV-hDRS delta 32 that contained N-terminal 32 residue-coding sequence deleted hDRS cDNA showed no increase in DRS activity. Northern blot analysis showed that concentrations of corresponding mRNAs of hDRS and hDRS delta 32 were greatly enhanced in transfected cells. The increases in the level of the transcripts were much higher than those of the corresponding proteins. Gel filtration analysis showed that hDRS in pSV-hDRS transfected cells expressed as a low molecular weight form of hDRS and pSV-hDRS delta 32 transfected cells did not. Epitope tagging and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was used to localize hDRS. Both hDRSmyc and hDRS delta 32myc were localized in the cytoplasm and showed diffused patterns. These results showed that hDRS has little tendency to aggregate in vivo and suggested that the N-terminal extension in hDRS was not involved in the expression and sub-cellular localization of hDRS, but may play a role in the maintenance of enzymatic activity of hDRS in COS cells.

  9. Characterization of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsalov, Ilya B; Novikov, Boris N; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M

    2016-07-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CSASs that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterized its activity in vitro Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+) and Mn(2+), whereas the activity with Mg(2+) was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in co-ordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. Purification, characterization, and expression of multiple glutamine synthetases from Prevotella ruminicola 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Nam; Cann, Isaac K O; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-01-01

    The Prevotella ruminicola 23 genome encodes three different glutamine synthetase (GS) enzymes: glutamine synthetase I (GSI) (ORF02151), GSIII-1 (ORF01459), and GSIII-2 (ORF02034). GSI, GSIII-1, and GSIII-2 have each been heterologously expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. The subunit molecular mass of GSI was 56 kDa, while GSIII-1 and GSIII-2 were both 83 kDa. Optimal conditions for γ-glutamyl transferase activity were found to be 35°C at pH 5.6 with 0.25 mM Mn(2+) ions (GSI) or 37°C at pH 6.0 (GSIII-1 and GSIII-2) with 0.50 to 1.00 mM Mn(2+) ions. GSIII biosynthetic activity was found to be optimal at 50 to 60°C and pH 6.8 to 7.0 with 10 mM Mn(2+) ions, while GSI displayed no GS biosynthetic activity. Kinetic analysis revealed K(m) values for glutamate and ammonium as well as for hydrolysis of ATP to be 8.58, 0.48, and 1.91 mM, respectively, for GSIII-1 and 1.72, 0.43, and 2.65 mM, respectively, for GSIII-2. A quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR assay (qRT-PCR) revealed GSIII-2 to be significantly induced by high concentrations of ammonia, and this corresponded with increases in measured GS activity. Collectively, these results show that both GSIII enzymes in P. ruminicola 23 are functional and indicate that GSIII-2, flanked by GOGAT (gltB and gltD genes), plays an important role in the acquisition and metabolism of ammonia, particularly under nonlimiting ammonia growth conditions.

  11. Molecular cloning, sequencing and expression in Escherichia coli cells Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko O. P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cloning and sequencing of the T. thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT followed by the creation of genetically engineered construct for protein expression in E.coli cells and its purification. Methods. Searching for the LeuRSTT gene was performed by Southern blot hybridization with chromosomal DNA, where digoxigenin-labeled PCR fragments of DNA were used as probes. Results. The gene of T. thermophilus HB27 leucyl-tRNA synthetase was cloned and sequenced. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide chain of 878 amino acid residues in length (molecular mass 101 kDa. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of T. thermophilus LeuRS with that of the enzymes from other organisms showed that LeuRSTT was a part of the group of similar enzymes of prokaryotes, formed by the proteins of protobacteriae, rickettsia and mitochondria of eukaryotes. The resulting phylogenetic tree of LeuRSs reveals dichotomous branching into two lines: prokaryotic/eukaryotic mitochondrial and arhaeal/eukaryotic cytosolic proteins. Differences between prokaryotic and arhaeal branches of the LeuRSs phylogenetic tree are primarily due to the structure of two domains of the enzyme – the editing and the C-terminal. T. thermophilus LeuRS was expressed in E. coli cells by cloning the corresponding gene into pET29b vector. Conclusions. The cloned T. thermophilus leuS gene and expressed recombinant protein will be used for structural and functional studies on LeuRSTT, including X-ray analysis of the enzyme and its mutant forms in complex with different substrates

  12. Effects of GSH1 and GSH2 Gene Mutation on Glutathione Synthetases Activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Jia, Haiyan; Zhang, Longmei; Wang, Haiyan; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, three mutants from wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae HBU2.558, called U2.558, UN2.558, and UNA2.558, were screened by UV, sodium nitrite, Atmospheric and room temperature plasma, respectively. Glutathione production of the three mutants increased by 41.86, 72.09 and 56.76%, respectively. We detected the activity of glutathione synthetases and found that its activity was improved. Amino acid sequences of three mutant colonies were compared with HBU2.558. Four mutants: Leu51→Pro51 (L51P), Glu62→Val62 (E62V), Ala332→Glu332 (A332E) and Ser653→Gly653 (S653G) were found in the analysis of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. L51 is located adjacently to the two active sites of GCL/E/Mg2+/ADP complex in the overall GCL structure. L51P mutant spread distortion on the β-sheet due to the fact that the φ was changed from -50.4° to -40.2°. A mutant Leu54→Pro54 (L54P) was found in the analysis of glutathione synthetase, and L54 was an amino acid located between an α-helix and a β-sheet. The results confirm that introduction of proline located at the middle of the β-sheet or at the N- or C-terminal between α-helix and β-sheet or, i.e., L51P and L54P, changed the φ, rigidity, hydrophobicity and conformational entropy, thus increased protein stability and improved the enzyme activity.

  13. Structural context for mobilization of a human tRNA synthetase from its cytoplasmic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengfei; Zhang, Hui-Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Marshall, Alan G; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Guo, Min

    2011-05-17

    Human lysyl-tRNA synthetase is bound to the multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) that maintains and regulates the aminoacylation and nuclear functions of LysRS. The p38 scaffold protein binds LysRS to the MSC and, only with the appropriate cue, mobilizes LysRS for redirection to the nucleus to interact with the microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF). In recent work, an (α(2))(2) LysRS tetramer crystallized to yield a high-resolution structure and raised the question of how LysRS is arranged (dimer or tetramer) in the MSC to interact with p38. To understand the structural organization of the LysRS-p38 complex that regulates LysRS mobilization, we investigated the complex by use of small angle X-ray scattering and hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry in solution. The structure revealed a surprising α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2) organization in which a dimeric p38 scaffold holds two LysRS α(2) dimers in a parallel configuration. Each of the N-terminal 48 residues of p38 binds one LysRS dimer and, in so doing, brings two copies of the LysRS dimer into the MSC. The results suggest that this unique geometry, which reconfigures the LysRS tetramer from α(2):α(2) to α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2), is designed to control both retention and mobilization of LysRS from the MSC.

  14. Deficiências de minerais Mineral deficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Franciscato Cozzolino

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo procuramos relatar a situação mundial e brasileira com relação aos micronutrientes, em especial sobre os minerais. Os elementos químicos minerais desempenham funções de grande importância no organismo humano, sendo indispensáveis para o desenvolvimento e a saúde dos indivíduos. Ainda não existe uma avaliação global do estado nutricional dos indivíduos em relação a esses micronutrientes no Brasil, mas os estudos existentes apontam para a necessidade do acompanhamento das tendências alimentares que poderiam levar às suas deficiências com conseqüências adversas para a saúde da população e o desenvolvimento do nosso país.In this paper we will try to report the Brazilian micronutrients status, as well as in worldwide, specifically for minerals. Minerals have major importance on human body, becoming indispensable for the development and health of individuals. There is not yet an integral assessment of micronutrient status in the Brazilian subjects, but there are some studies pointing to the need of observation of alimentary tendencies that might lead to deficiencies, with adverse consequences to the population’s health and the development of our country

  15. Vitamin deficiencies in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, T M; Williams, S N; Graham, T W

    1991-03-01

    Deficiencies of vitamins A, D, K, E and thiamin can cause severe limitations in beef production. In particular, vitamin A and E can be common causes of lost profit, secondary to limitations of reproductive and growth potential. Prolonged dry periods will reduce available A and E in pasture forage, as can ensiling and prolonged storage of harvested feedstuffs. Polioencephalomalacia is a thiamin responsive disorder, associated with high concentrate feeding and lush pastures. Antimetabolites, such as amprolium, will cause thiamine deficiency when fed in excess. Recent information has shown improved performance with supplemental beta carotene and niacin. The positive responses in reproductive performance, noted with cattle fed supplemental beta carotene, was independent of vitamin A. Supplementation of vitamins above National Research Council recommendations can be justified. However, proper evaluation of feed and animal status, and documentation of a response to supplementation is necessary before diagnosing deficiencies of specific nutrients.

  16. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  17. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Bacillus subtilis. Cloning, characterization and chromosomal mapping of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1987-01-01

    The gene (prs) encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase has been cloned from a library of Bacillus subtilis DNA by complementation of an Escherichia coli prs mutation. Flanking DNA sequences were pruned away by restriction endonuclease and exonuclease BAL 31 digestions, resulting...

  18. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Located in the Outer Membrane and Acyl-CoA Thioesterase in the Inner Membrane of Pea Chloroplast Envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J; Keegstra, K

    1983-07-01

    Both acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities are present in chloroplast envelope membranes. The functions of these enzymes in lipid metabolism remains unresolved, although the synthetase has been proposed to be involved in either plastid galactolipid synthesis or the export of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the cytoplasm. We have examined the locations of both enzymes within the two envelope membranes of pea (Pisum sativum var Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts. Inner and outer envelope membranes were purified from unfractionated envelope preparations by linear density sucrose gradient centrifugation. Acyl-CoA synthetase was located in the outer envelope membrane while acyl-CoA thioesterase was located in the inner envelope membrane. Thus, it seems unlikely that the synthetase is directly involved in galactolipid assembly. Instead, its localization supports the hypothesis that it functions in the transport of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the endoplasmic reticulum.

  19. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However...... remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes...

  20. Multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, B W; Casamassima, A C; Fink, J K; Constantopoulos, G; Horwitz, A L

    1988-08-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation of sulfatides, glycosaminoglycans, sphingolipids, and steroid sulfates in tissues and body fluids. The clinical manifestations represent the summation of two diseases: late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis. We present a 9-year-old girl with a phenotype similar to a mucopolysaccharidosis: short stature, microcephaly, and mild facial dysmorphism, along with dysphagia, retinal degeneration, developmental arrest, and ataxia. We discuss the importance of measuring the sulfatase activities in the leukocytes, and the instability of sulfatases in the cultured skin fibroblasts.

  1. Essential Role of Acyl-ACP Synthetase in Acclimation of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus Strain PCC 7942 to High-Light Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Nobuyuki; Use, Kazuhide; Kato, Akihiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Kojima, Kouji; Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    Most organisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis have an aas gene encoding an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas), which activates free fatty acids (FFAs) via esterification to acyl carrier protein. Cyanobacterial aas mutants are often used for studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels because the mutation leads to intracellular accumulation of FFAs and their secretion into the external medium, but the physiological significance of the production of FFAs and their recycling involving Aas has remained unclear. Using an aas-deficient mutant of Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942, we show here that remodeling of membrane lipids is activated by high-intensity light and that the recycling of FFAs is essential for acclimation to high-light conditions. Unlike wild-type cells, the mutant cells could not increase their growth rate as the light intensity was increased from 50 to 400 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1), and the high-light-grown mutant cells accumulated FFAs and the lysolipids derived from all the four major classes of membrane lipids, revealing high-light-induced lipid deacylation. The high-light-grown mutant cells showed much lower PSII activity and Chl contents as compared with the wild-type cells or low-light-grown mutant cells. The loss of Aas accelerated photodamage of PSII but did not affect the repair process of PSII, indicating that PSII is destabilized in the mutant. Thus, Aas is essential for acclimation of the cyanobacterium to high-light conditions. The relevance of the present finding s to biofuel production using cyanobacteria is discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Astrocytes and Glutamate Homoeostasis in Alzheimer's Disease: A Decrease in Glutamine Synthetase, But Not in Glutamate Transporter-1, in the Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kulijewicz-Nawrot

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes control tissue equilibrium and hence define the homoeostasis and function of the CNS (central nervous system. Being principal homoeostatic cells, astroglia are fundamental for various forms of neuropathology, including AD (Alzheimer's disease. AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of cognitive functions due to specific lesions in mnesic-associated regions, including the mPFC (medial prefrontal cortex. Here, we analyzed the expression of GS (glutamine synthetase and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1 in astrocytes in the mPFC during the progression of AD in a triple-transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD. GS is an astrocyte-specific enzyme, responsible for the intracellular conversion of glutamate into glutamine, whereas the removal of glutamate from the extracellular space is accomplished mainly by astroglia-specific GLT-1. We found a significant decrease in the numerical density (Nv, cells/mm3 of GS-positive astrocytes from early to middle ages (1–9 months; at the age of 1 month by 17%, 6 months by 27% and 9 months by 27% when compared with control animals in parallel with a reduced expression of GS (determined by Western blots, which started at the age of 6 months and was sustained up to 12 months of age. We did not, however, find any changes in the expression of GLT-1, which implies an intact glutamate uptake mechanism. Our results indicate that the decrease in GS expression may underlie a gradual decline in the vital astrocyte-dependent glutamate–glutamine conversion pathway, which in turn may compromise glutamate homoeostasis, leading towards failures in synaptic connectivity with deficient cognition and memory.

  3. Iodine Deficiency and Human Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Sviridonova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is а vital microelements that are essential for the normal human development and functions. Iodine deficiency is a global problem: about 2 billion individuals worldwide suffer from a lack of iodine. Despite goiter is the most visually noticeable manifestation of iodine deficiency, the most significant consequence of the iodine deficiency is impaired neurodevelopment, particularly early in life. Moreover, moderate to severe iodine deficiency increases the risk of spontaneous abortion, low birth weight and infant mortality. Babies in utero affected by iodine deficiency are at increased risk of mental developmental disorders, cretinism is their extreme degree. In addition, moderate to severe iodine deficiency in childhood negatively affects somatic growth. Iodine deficiency compensation improves cognitive and motor function in children. Iodine prophylaxis of deficient populations is an extremely effective approach to reduce the substantial adverse effects of iodine deficiency throughout the life cycle.

  4. [Carbamyl phosphate synthase deficiency: clinical symptoms, diagnosis and dietary-medicamentous treatment in the neonatal period and infancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreutener, H; Issakainen, J; Bachmann, C; Baerlocher, K

    1989-06-01

    Carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) catalyses the synthesis of carbamyl-phosphate from ammonia and bicarbonate and is the first step in ureagenesis. The infant described in this report suffered from deficiency of this enzyme. The symptoms started on the 2nd day of life with tachycardia, apathy, irritability and metabolic alcalosis, on the 4th day coma and fits occurred due to hyperammonia (ammonia in the blood max 496 mumol/l, normally up to 150 in newborns). In hepatic tissue no activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase could be measured (normal range 0.66-2.1 mumol/h/mg protein). Peritoneal dialysis was instituted, but the metabolic crisis could only be overcome by the following therapeutic measures: restriction of protein intake to 1.5 g/kg/d in part as a special aminoacid mixture, in part as breast milk; sufficient caloric supply (600-500 kJ/kg/d); sodium benzoate 350 mg/kg/d: arginine 2 mmol/kg/d respectively citrulline 350 mg/kg/d, and carnitine 150 mg/kg/d. By these procedures the exogenous and endogenous load of ammonia could be minimized. Electroencephalogram and mental development were normal. Acute metabolic crises with hyperammonia during catabolic states (infections) could be treated several times. At the age of 8 months, however, the patient died during such a crisis. This case shows that it is possible to achieve a normal psychomotor development in complete CPS-deficiency by adequate therapy. Catabolic states are difficult to manage.

  5. Identification and assessment of markers of biotin status in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Wei Kay; Giraud, David; Schlegel, Vicki L.; Wang, Dong; Lee, Bo Hyun; Zempleni, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Human biotin requirements are unknown and the identification of reliable markers of biotin status is necessary to fill this knowledge gap. Here, we used an outpatient feeding protocol to create states of biotin deficiency, sufficiency and supplementation in sixteen healthy men and women. A total of twenty possible markers of biotin status were assessed, including the abundance of biotinylated carboxylases in lymphocytes, the expression of genes from biotin metabolism and the urinary excretion of biotin and organic acids. Only the abundance of biotinylated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (holo-MCC) and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (holo-PCC) allowed for distinguishing biotin-deficient and biotin-sufficient individuals. The urinary excretion of biotin reliably identified biotin-supplemented subjects, but did not distinguish between biotin-depleted and biotin-sufficient individuals. The urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid detected some biotin-deficient subjects, but produced a meaningful number of false-negative results and did not distinguish between biotin-sufficient and biotin-supplemented individuals. None of the other organic acids that were tested were useful markers of biotin status. Likewise, the abundance of mRNA coding for biotin transporters, holocarboxylase synthetase and biotin-dependent carboxylases in lymphocytes were not different among the treatment groups. Generally, datasets were characterised by variations that exceeded those seen in studies in cell cultures. We conclude that holo-MCC and holo-PCC are the most reliable, single markers of biotin status tested in the present study. PMID:23302490

  6. Effect of anoxia and Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture on the activity of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in isolated pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasauskas, Artūras; Rodovicius, Hiliaras; Viezeliene, Dale; Lazauskas, Robertas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effect of anoxia and Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture on the activities of different tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in isolated pig heart. The isolated pig heart was perfused according to the modified method of Langendorf, using an artificial blood circulation apparatus. Anoxia 20 min in duration was performed by perfusion of isolated heart with Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer saturated with gas mixture (95% N(2) and 5% CO(2)). Control heart was perfused with the same buffer saturated with gas mixture (95% O(2) and 5% CO(2)). Effect of Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture was evaluated by perfusion of isolated heart with a buffer containing tincture. Total tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases were isolated from pig heart. Activities of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases were measured by the aminoacylation reaction using C(14)-amino acids. Anoxia 20 min in duration has caused a decrease in the acceptor activity of tRNA and increase in the activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases. Polyscias filicifolia Bailey tincture did not affect the acceptor activity of tRNA and activities aminacyl-tRNA synthetases. After 20-min anoxic perfusion with the buffer containing Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture, the acceptor activities of tRNA increased to the control value and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases reached the control value. The acceptor activity of tRNA from isolated pig heart decreased and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases increased under anoxia. Perfusion with buffer containing tincture of Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass restored acceptor activities of tRNA and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases.

  7. Interferon titer and the 2',5'-oligoadenylate-synthetase activity in rat thymus lymphocytes in conditions of Omeprazol-caused hypergastrinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kompanets I. V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the determination of rat thymocytes response to hypergastrinemia evoked by hypoacidity and multiprobiotic «Symbiter® acidophilic concentrated» (symbiter treatment via the estimation of the interferon (IFN titer and 2', 5'-oligoadenylate (OA-synthetase activity in lymphocytes. 2', 5'-OA-synthetase is the IFN-induced enzyme. Methods. The micromethod of IFN titer determination by antiviral activity, spectrophotometrical method of 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity determination. Results. It was shown that the IFN production by cultivated thymocytes is amplified while the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity decreases in these cells in conditions of hypoacidity caused by the 28-days omeprazol treatment. The treatment of animals by symbiter against a background of hypoacidity causes the augmentation of IFN production by thymocytes, but does not stimulate the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase activity. The IFN production by thymocytes in response to IFN inducers (PHA and cycloferone in vitro is intensified comparatively to the control at hypoacidity and symbiter treatment. Conclusions. The multiprobiotic symbiter exhibits interferonogenic properties. The IFN synthesis in response to induction in vitro is intensified in comparison with healthy animals at both hypoacidity and symbiter treatment while the 2', 5'-OA-synthetase acivity in thymocytes decreases.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen ... red blood cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue ( ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Every 5 to 10 years. Women who have risk factors for iron deficiency: Once a year. Pregnant women: At the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, your doctor ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other ... poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat diet over a ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods in the diet. Too much milk also may prevent children's bodies from absorbing iron from other foods. Children who have lead in their blood also may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lead can interfere with the body's ability to make hemoglobin. Lead may get into the body from ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and symptoms and any past problems you've had with anemia or low iron. He or she also may ask about your diet and whether you're taking any medicines. If ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  15. Deficiency Report Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-28

    The Customer Feedback Office of the Product Assurance Directorate, MICOM has the mission to manage and analyze data in the Deficiency Reporting...capability within the Customer Feedback Office (CFO) of the MICOM Product Assurance Directorate for government comment. The objective of this program is

  16. Partial Biotinidase Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1990-01-01

    The symptoms, biochemical features and inheritance pattern of partial biotinidase deficiency have been studied at the Departments of Human Genetics and Pediatrics, Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA; the State Laboratory Institute, Massachusetts Department of Public Health; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; the Lincoln Clinic, NB; and the Division of Human Genetics, university of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore.

  17. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor may ask whether you might be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of iron-deficiency ... remove the growth. If you have heavy menstrual flow, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to ...

  20. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools About MedlinePlus Show Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency URL of this page: //medlineplus. ...

  1. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Causes Not having enough iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... woman's risk for a premature or low-birth-weight baby. Adults Who Have Internal Bleeding Adults who have internal bleeding, such as intestinal bleeding, can develop iron-deficiency anemia due to blood loss. Certain conditions, such as colon cancer and bleeding ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as larger, full-term infants. Iron-fortified baby food or iron supplements, when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National ...

  8. Investigating the mechanism of ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl P; Khan, Kirin; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl

    2017-02-01

    ADP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACD) catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetate. The related succinyl-CoA synthetase follows a three-step mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme, but a novel four-step mechanism with two phosphoenzyme intermediates was proposed for Pyrococcus ACD. Characterization of enzyme variants of Entamoeba ACD in which the two proposed phosphorylated His residues were individually altered revealed that only His252 is essential for enzymatic activity. Analysis of variants altered at two residues proposed to interact with the phosphohistidine loop that swings between distinct parts of the active site are consistent with a mechanism involving a single phosphoenzyme intermediate. Our results suggest ACDs with different subunit structures may employ slightly different mechanisms to bridge the span between active sites I and II. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. coli at 2.71 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru, E-mail: tostars@mail.ru, E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Abramchik, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Zhukhlistova, N. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli was cloned, purified, and crystallized. Single crystals of the enzyme were grown under microgravity. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility and used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme by the molecular-replacement method at 2.71 Å resolution. The active and regulatory sites in the molecule of E. coli phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase were revealed by comparison with the homologous protein from Bacillus subtilis, the structure of which was determined in a complex with functional ligands. The conformations of polypeptide-chain fragments surrounding and composing the active and regulatory sites were shown to be identical in both proteins.

  10. Investigation of protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions in type II non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaremko, Matt J.

    2017-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are responsible for the biosynthesis of many pharmaceutically relavant compounds. Type II NRPSs are an emerging subfamily of NRPSs that form hybrid pathways with type I fatty acid synthases (FAS), polyketide synthases (PKS), type I NRPSs, or others. The type II NRPSs commonly contain tailoring enzymes that generate unique substrate modifications, such as dehydrogenations and halogenation. Unlike type I NRPSs, the type II systems consists of standalone...

  11. A non-radioactive assay for selenophosphate synthetase activity using recombinant pyruvate pyrophosphate dikinase from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Saho; Okugochi, Takahiro; Asano, Kaori; Tobe, Ryuta; Mihara, Hisaaki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Tamura, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Biosynthesis of selenocysteine-containing proteins requires monoselenophosphate, a selenium-donor intermediate generated by selenophosphate synthetase (Sephs). A non-radioactive assay was developed as an alternative to the standard [8-(14)C] AMP-quantifying assay. The product, AMP, was measured using a recombinant pyruvate pyrophosphate dikinase from Thermus thermophilus HB8. The KM and kcat for Sephs2-Sec60Cys were determined to be 26 μM and 0.352 min(-1), respectively.

  12. Fatty Acid Elongation Is Independent of Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Activities in Leek and Brassica napus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlousek-Radojcic, Alenka; Evenson, Kimberly J.; Jaworski, Jan G.; Post-Beittenmiller, Dusty

    1998-01-01

    In both animal and plant acyl elongation systems, it has been proposed that fatty acids are first activated to acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) before their elongation, and that the ATP dependence of fatty acid elongation is evidence of acyl-CoA synthetase involvement. However, because CoA is not supplied in standard fatty acid elongation assays, it is not clear if CoA-dependent acyl-CoA synthetase activity can provide levels of acyl-CoAs necessary to support typical rates of fatty acid elongation. Therefore, we examined the role of acyl-CoA synthetase in providing the primer for acyl elongation in leek (Allium porrum L.) epidermal microsomes and Brassica napus L. cv Reston oil bodies. As presented here, fatty acid elongation was independent of CoA and proceeded at maximum rates with CoA-free preparations of malonyl-CoA. We also showed that stearic acid ([1-14C]18:0)-CoA was synthesized from [1-14C]18:0 in the presence of CoA-free malonyl-CoA or acetyl-CoA, and that [1-14C]18:0-CoA synthesis under these conditions was ATP dependent. Furthermore, the appearance of [1-14C]18:0 in the acyl-CoA fraction was simultaneous with its appearance in phosphatidylcholine. These data, together with the s of a previous study (A. Hlousek-Radojcic, H. Imai, J.G. Jaworski [1995] Plant J 8: 803–809) showing that exogenous [14C]acyl-CoAs are diluted by a relatively large endogenous pool before they are elongated, strongly indicated that acyl-CoA synthetase did not play a direct role in fatty acid elongation, and that phosphatidylcholine or another glycerolipid was a more likely source of elongation primers than acyl-CoAs.

  13. Kinetic Basis for the Conjugation of Auxin by a GH3 Family Indole-acetic Acid-Amido Synthetase*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemi...

  14. The Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus halodurans Aspartyl-tRNA Synthetases Retain Recognition of tRNA(Asn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nilendra; Raff, Hannah; Islam, Mohammed Tarek; Feen, Melanie; Garofalo, Denise M; Sheppard, Kelly

    2016-02-13

    Synthesis of asparaginyl-tRNA (Asn-tRNA(Asn)) in bacteria can be formed either by directly ligating Asn to tRNA(Asn) using an asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) or by synthesizing Asn on the tRNA. In the latter two-step indirect pathway, a non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) attaches Asp to tRNA(Asn) and the amidotransferase GatCAB transamidates the Asp to Asn on the tRNA. GatCAB can be similarly used for Gln-tRNA(Gln) formation. Most bacteria are predicted to use only one route for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation. Given that Bacillus halodurans and Bacillus subtilis encode AsnRS for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation and Asn synthetases to synthesize Asn and GatCAB for Gln-tRNA(Gln) synthesis, their AspRS enzymes were thought to be specific for tRNA(Asp). However, we demonstrate that the AspRSs are non-discriminating and can be used with GatCAB to synthesize Asn. The results explain why B. subtilis with its Asn synthetase genes knocked out is still an Asn prototroph. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests that this may be common among Firmicutes and 30% of all bacteria. In addition, the phylogeny revealed that discrimination toward tRNA(Asp) by AspRS has evolved independently multiple times. The retention of the indirect pathway in B. subtilis and B. halodurans likely reflects the ancient link between Asn biosynthesis and its use in translation that enabled Asn to be added to the genetic code. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: transcobalamin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PH, Nordwall M, Hoffmann-Lücke E, Sorensen BS, Nexo E. Transcobalamin deficiency caused by compound heterozygosity for ... Hung C, Rupar T, Mühl A, Fowler B, Nexo E, Bodamer OA. Transcobalamin II deficiency at birth. ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: proopiomelanocortin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... due to pomc deficiency Orphanet: Obesity due to pro-opiomelanocortin deficiency Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (4 ... HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, ...

  18. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary gland, ...

  19. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults Patient Guide Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults June 2011 Download PDFs English ... depression, or moodiness What are the benefits of growth hormone therapy? Growth hormone treatment involves injections (shots) of ...

  20. Fusion of the subunits α and β of succinyl-CoA synthetase as a phylogenetic marker for Pezizomycotina fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Koire

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene fusions, yielding the formation of multidomain proteins, are evolutionary events that can be utilized as phylogenetic markers. Here we describe a fusion gene comprising the α and β subunits of succinyl-coA synthetase, an enzyme of the TCA cycle, in Pezizomycotina fungi. This fusion is present in all Pezizomycotina with complete genome sequences and absent from all other organisms. Phylogenetic analysis of the α and β subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase suggests that both subunits were duplicated and retained in Pezizomycotina while one copy was lost from other fungi. One of the duplicated copies was then fused in Pezizomycotina. Our results suggest that the fusion of the α and β subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase can be used as a molecular marker for membership in the Pezizomycotina subphylum. If a species has the fusion it can be reliably classified as Pezizomycotina, while the absence of the fusion is suggestive that the species is not a member of this subphylum.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from the Thermophilic thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramchik, Yu. A.; Timofeev, V. I.; Muravieva, T. I.; Sinitsyna, E. V.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetases (PRPP synthetases) are among the key enzymes essential for vital functions of organisms and are involved in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes, and the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. These enzymes are used in biotechnology for the combined chemoenzymatic synthesis of natural nucleotide analogs. Recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase I from the thermophilic strain HB27 of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus ( T. th HB27) has high thermal stability and shows maximum activity at 75°C, due to which this enzyme holds promise for biotechnological applications. In order to grow crystals and study them by X-ray crystallography, an enzyme sample, which was produced using a highly efficient producer strain, was purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The screening of crystallization conditions was performed by the vapor-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme suitable for X-ray diffraction were grown by the counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. These crystals were used to collect the X-ray diffraction data set at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility (Japan) to 3-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P21 and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 107.7 Å, b = 112.6 Å, c = 110.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 116.6°. The X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 3.0-Å resolution.

  2. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes.

  3. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  4. The pimeloyl-CoA synthetase BioW defines a new fold for adenylate-forming enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, Paola; Manandhar, Miglena; Dong, Shi-Hui; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cronan, John E.; Nair, Satish K.

    2017-04-17

    Reactions that activate carboxylates through acyl-adenylate intermediates are found throughout biology and include acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases and tRNA synthetases. Here we describe the characterization of Aquifex aeolicus BioW, which represents a new protein fold within the superfamily of adenylating enzymes. Substrate-bound structures identified the enzyme active site and elucidated the mechanistic strategy for conjugating CoA to the seven-carbon α,ω-dicarboxylate pimelate, a biotin precursor. Proper position of reactive groups for the two half-reactions is achieved solely through movements of active site residues, as confirmed by site-directed mutational analysis. The ability of BioW to hydrolyze adenylates of noncognate substrates is reminiscent of pre-transfer proofreading observed in some tRNA synthetases, and we show that this activity can be abolished by mutation of a single residue. These studies illustrate how BioW can carry out three different biologically prevalent chemical reactions (adenylation, thioesterification, and proofreading) in the context of a new protein fold.

  5. Dexamethasone enhances glutamine synthetase activity and reduces N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotoxicity in mixed cultures of neurons and astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Debroas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are claimed to protect neurons against excitotoxicity by clearing glutamate from the extracellular space and rapidly converting it into glutamine. Glutamine, is then released into the extracellular medium, taken up by neurons and transformed back into glutamate which is then stored into synaptic vesicles. Glutamine synthetase (GS, the key enzyme that governs this glutamate/glutamine cycle, is known to be upregulated by glucocorticoids. In the present work we have thus studied in parallel the effects of dexamethasone on glutamine synthetase activity and NMDA-induced neuronal death in cultures derived from the brain cortex of murine embryos. We showed that dexamethasone was able to markedly enhance GS activity in cultures of astrocytes but not in near pure neuronal cultures. The pharmacological characteristics of the dexamethasone action strongly suggest that it corresponds to a typical receptor-mediated effect. We also observed that long lasting incubation (72 h of mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures in the presence of 100 nM dexamethasone significantly reduced the toxicity of NMDA treatment. Furthermore we demonstrated that methionine sulfoximine, a selective inhibitor of GS, abolished the dexamethasone-induced increase in GS activity and also markedly potentiated NMDA toxicity. Altogether these results suggest that dexamethasone may promote neuroprotection through a stimulation of astrocyte glutamine synthetase.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from the Thermophilic thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramchik, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Sinitsyna, E. V.; Esipov, R. S., E-mail: esipov@mx.ibch.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetases (PRPP synthetases) are among the key enzymes essential for vital functions of organisms and are involved in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes, and the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. These enzymes are used in biotechnology for the combined chemoenzymatic synthesis of natural nucleotide analogs. Recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase I from the thermophilic strain HB27 of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus (T. th HB27) has high thermal stability and shows maximum activity at 75°Ð¡, due to which this enzyme holds promise for biotechnological applications. In order to grow crystals and study them by X-ray crystallography, an enzyme sample, which was produced using a highly efficient producer strain, was purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The screening of crystallization conditions was performed by the vapor-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme suitable for X-ray diffraction were grown by the counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. These crystals were used to collect the X-ray diffraction data set at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility (Japan) to 3-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 107.7 Å, b = 112.6 Å, c = 110.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 116.6°. The X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 3.0-Å resolution.

  7. Identification and Functional Characterization of Small Alarmone Synthetases in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ruwe

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The hyperphosphorylated guanosine derivatives ppGpp and pppGpp represent global regulators of the bacterial stress response, as they act as central elements of the stringent response system. Although it was assumed that both, (pppGpp synthesis and hydrolysis, are catalyzed by one bifunctional RSH-protein in the actinobacterial model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032, two putative short alarmone synthetases (SASs were identified by bioinformatic analyses. The predicted sequences of both enzymes, designated as RelP*Cg and RelSCg, exhibit high similarities to the conserved (pppGpp synthetase catalytic domain. In the context of sequence analysis, significant differences were found between the RelP variants of different C. glutamicum isolates. In contrast to the bifunctional RelA/SpoT homolog (RSH protein RelCg, whose gene deletion results in a reduced growth rate, no change in growth characteristics were observed for deletion mutants of the putative SAS proteins under standard growth conditions. The growth deficit of the Δrel strain could be restored by the additional deletion of the gene encoding RelSCg, which clearly indicates a functional relationship between both enzymes. The predicted pyrophosphokinase activity of RelSCg was demonstrated by means of genetic complementation of an Escherichia coli ΔrelAΔspoT strain. For the expression of RelP*Cg, as well as the slightly differing variant RelPCg from C. glutamicum AS1.542, no complementation was observed, concluding that both RelP versions possess no significant pyrophosphokinase activity in vivo. The results were confirmed by in vitro characterization of the corresponding proteins. In the course of this investigation, the additional conversion of GMP to pGpp was determined for the enzyme RelSCg. Since the SAS species analyzed extend both the network of stringent response related enzymes and the number of substances involved, the study of this class of enzymes is an important

  8. Insights into substrate promiscuity of human seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Kaitlyn M; Puppala, Anupama K; Lee, Jonathan W; Lee, Hyun; Simonović, Miljan

    2017-11-01

    Seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) attaches L-serine to the cognate serine tRNA (tRNA Ser ) and the noncognate selenocysteine tRNA (tRNA Sec ). The latter activity initiates the anabolic cycle of selenocysteine (Sec), proper decoding of an in-frame Sec UGA codon, and synthesis of selenoproteins across all domains of life. While the accuracy of SerRS is important for overall proteome integrity, it is its substrate promiscuity that is vital for the integrity of the selenoproteome. This raises a question as to what elements in the two tRNA species, harboring different anticodon sequences and adopting distinct folds, facilitate aminoacylation by a common aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. We sought to answer this question by analyzing the ability of human cytosolic SerRS to bind and act on tRNA Ser , tRNA Sec , and 10 mutant and chimeric constructs in which elements of tRNA Ser were transposed onto tRNA Sec We show that human SerRS only subtly prefers tRNA Ser to tRNA Sec , and that discrimination occurs at the level of the serylation reaction. Surprisingly, the tRNA mutants predicted to adopt either the 7/5 or 8/5 fold are poor SerRS substrates. In contrast, shortening of the acceptor arm of tRNA Sec by a single base pair yields an improved SerRS substrate that adopts an 8/4 fold. We suggest that an optimal tertiary arrangement of structural elements within tRNA Sec and tRNA Ser dictate their utility for serylation. We also speculate that the extended acceptor-TΨC arm of tRNA Sec evolved as a compromise for productive binding to SerRS while remaining the major recognition element for other enzymes involved in Sec and selenoprotein synthesis. © 2017 Holman et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  10. Acute Testosterone Deficiency Alters Adipose Tissue Fatty Acid Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Sylvia; Bush, Nikki C; Jensen, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Although the long-term effects of testosterone on adipose tissue lipid metabolism in men have been defined, the short-term regulation of these effects is not well understood. We examined the effects of acute testosterone withdrawal on subcutaneous abdominal and femoral adipose tissue fatty acid (FA) storage and cellular mechanisms. This was a prospective, randomized trial. Mayo Clinic Clinical Research Unit. Thirty-two male volunteers ages 18 to 50 participated in these studies. Volunteers were randomized to receive (1) no treatment (control), (2) injections (7.5 mg) of Lupron®, or (3) Lupron and testosterone (L+T) replacement for 49 days, resulting in 4 weeks of sex steroid suppression in the Lupron group. We measured body composition, fat cell size, adipose tissue meal FA and direct free FA storage, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), acyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS), diacylglycerol acyltransferase activities, and CD36 content. Compared with control and L+T groups, acute testosterone deficiency resulted in greater femoral adipose tissue meal FA storage rates, fasting and fed LPL activity, and ACS activity. These results suggest that in men, testosterone plays a tonic role in restraining FA storage in femoral adipose tissue via suppression of LPL and ACS activities. FA storage mechanisms in men appear sensitive to short-term changes in testosterone concentrations.

  11. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I.; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  12. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase (ASNS) suppresses cell proliferation and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Li; Zheng, Jia; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine. ASNS is deemed as a promising therapeutic target and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance in several human cancers. However, its role in gastric cancer tumorigenesis has not been investigated. In this study, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA) to transiently knockdown ASNS in two gastric cancer cell lines, AGS and MKN-45, followed by growth rate assay and colony formation assay. Dose response curve analysis was performed in AGS and MKN-45 cells with stable ASNS knockdown to assess sensitivity to cisplatin. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo synergistic effects of ASNS depletion and cisplatin on tumor growth. Expression level of ASNS was evaluated in human patient samples using quantitative PCR. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis was performed to evaluate association between ASNS expression and patient survival. Transient knockdown of ASNS inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in AGS and MKN-45 cells. Stable knockdown of ASNS conferred sensitivity to cisplatin in these cells. Depletion of ASNS and cisplatin treatment exerted synergistic effects on tumor growth in AGS xenografts. Moreover, ASNS was found to be up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared with matched normal colon tissues. Low expression of ASNS was significantly associated with better survival in gastric cancer patients. ASNS may contribute to gastric cancer tumorigenesis and may represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of gastric cancer.

  13. Ornithine decarboxylase or gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase overexpression protects Leishmania (Vianna) guyanensis against antimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maisa S; Comini, Marcelo A; Resende, Bethânia V; Santi, Ana Maria M; Zoboli, Antônio P; Moreira, Douglas S; Murta, Silvane M F

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomatids present a unique mechanism for detoxification of peroxides that is dependent on trypanothione (bisglutathionylspermidine). Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) produce molecules that are direct precursors of trypanothione. In this study, Leishmania guyanensis odc and gsh1 overexpressor cell lines were generated to investigate the contribution of these genes to the trivalent antimony (Sb(III))-resistance phenotype. The ODC- or GSH1-overexpressors parasites presented an increase of two and four-fold in Sb(III)-resistance index, respectively, when compared with the wild-type line. Pharmacological inhibition of ODC and GSH1 with the specific inhibitors α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), respectively, increased the antileishmanial effect of Sb(III) in all cell lines. However, the ODC- and GSH1-overexpressor were still more resistant to Sb(III) than the parental cell line. Together, our data shows that modulation of ODC and GSH1 levels and activity is sufficient to affect L. guyanensis susceptibility to Sb(III), and confirms a role of these genes in the Sb(III)-resistance phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cannabidiol protects retinal neurons by preserving glutamine synthetase activity in diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Remessy, A.B.; Khalifa, Y.; Ibrahim, A.S.; Liou, G.I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD) protects retinal neurons in diabetic rats by inhibiting reactive oxygen species and blocking tyrosine nitration. Tyrosine nitration may inhibit glutamine synthetase (GS), causing glutamate accumulation and leading to further neuronal cell death. We propose to test the hypothesis that diabetes-induced glutamate accumulation in the retina is associated with tyrosine nitration of GS and that CBD treatment inhibits this process. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection and received either vehicle or CBD (10 mg/kg/2 days). After eight weeks, retinal cell death, Müller cell activation, GS tyrosine nitration, and GS activity were determined. Results Diabetes causes significant increases in retinal oxidative and nitrative stress compared with controls. These effects were associated with Müller cell activation and dysfunction as well as with impaired GS activity and tyrosine nitration of GS. Cannabidiol treatment reversed these effects. Retinal neuronal death was indicated by numerous terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-labeled cells in diabetic rats compared with untreated controls or CBD-treated rats. Conclusions These results suggest that diabetes-induced tyrosine nitration impairs GS activity and that CBD preserves GS activity and retinal neurons by blocking tyrosine nitration. PMID:20806080

  15. ACR11 is an Activator of Plastid-Type Glutamine Synthetase GS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Otsuki, Hitomi; Saito, Kazuki; Yokota Hirai, Masami

    2017-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an important enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, and GS2, encoded by GLN2, is the only plastid-type GS in Arabidopsis thaliana. A co-expression analysis suggested that the expression level of the gene encoding a uridylyltransferase-like protein, ACR11, is strongly correlated with GLN2 expression levels. Here we showed that the recombinant ACR11 protein increased GS2 activity in vitro by reducing the Km values of its substrate glutamine. A T-DNA insertion mutant of ACR11 exhibited a reduced GS activity under low nitrate conditions and reduced glutamine levels. Biochemical analyses revealed that ACR11 and GS2 interacted both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ACR11 is an activator of GS2, giving it a mechanistic role in the nitrogen assimilation of A. thaliana. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Roongsawang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipopeptide biosurfactants (LPBSs consist of a hydrophobic fatty acid portion linked to a hydrophilic peptide chain in the molecule. With their complex and diverse structures, LPBSs exhibit various biological activities including surface activity as well as anti-cellular and anti-enzymatic activities. LPBSs are also involved in multi-cellular behaviors such as swarming motility and biofilm formation. Among the bacterial genera, Bacillus (Gram-positive and Pseudomonas (Gram-negative have received the most attention because they produce a wide range of effective LPBSs that are potentially useful for agricultural, chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The biosynthetic mechanisms and gene regulation systems of LPBSs have been extensively analyzed over the last decade. LPBSs are generally synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner with megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs. Production of active‑form NRPSs requires not only transcriptional induction and translation but also post‑translational modification and assemblage. The accumulated knowledge reveals the versatility and evolutionary lineage of the NRPSs system. This review provides an overview of the structural and functional diversity of LPBSs and their different biosynthetic mechanisms in Bacillus and Pseudomonas, including both typical and unique systems. Finally, successful genetic engineering of NRPSs for creating novel lipopeptides is also discussed.

  17. Biochemical and mutational analysis of glutamine synthetase type III from the rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus albus 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Kensey R; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana A; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2005-11-01

    Two different genes encoding glutamine synthetase type I (GSI) and GSIII were identified in the genome sequence of R. albus 8. The identity of the GSIII protein was confirmed by the presence of its associated conserved motifs. The glnN gene, encoding the GSIII, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. The recombinant protein was purified and subjected to biochemical and physical analyses. Subunit organization suggested a protein present in solution as both monomers and oligomers. Kinetic studies using the forward and the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) assays were carried out. Mutations that changed conserved glutamic acid residues to alanine in the four GSIII motifs resulted in drastic decreases in GS activity using both assays, except for an E380A mutation, which rather resulted in an increase in activity in the forward assay compared to the wild-type protein. Reduced GSIII activity was also exhibited by mutating, individually, two lysines (K308 and K318) located in the putative nucleotide-binding site to alanine. Most importantly, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the glnN gene in R. albus 8 cells grown under ammonia limiting conditions, whereas little or no transcript was detected in cells grown under ammonia sufficient conditions, suggested an important role for the GSIII in the nitrogen metabolism of R. albus 8. Furthermore, the mutational studies on the conserved GSIII motifs demonstrated, for the first time, their importance in the structure and/or function of a GSIII protein.

  18. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (MCSG); (UV); (MRC)

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  19. Conformational changes involving ammonia tunnel formation and allosteric control in GMP synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Justin C; Gudihal, Ravidra; Burgner, John W; Pedley, Anthony M; Zwierko, Alexander T; Davisson, V Jo; Linger, Rebecca S

    2014-03-01

    GMP synthetase is the glutamine amidotransferase that catalyzes the final step in the guanylate branch of de novo purine biosynthesis. Conformational changes are required to efficiently couple distal active sites in the protein; however, the nature of these changes has remained elusive. Structural information derived from both limited proteolysis and sedimentation velocity experiments support the hypothesis of nucleotide-induced loop- and domain-closure in the protein. These results were combined with information from sequence conservation and precedents from other glutamine amidotransferases to develop the first structural model of GMPS in a closed, active state. In analyzing this Catalytic model, an interdomain salt bridge was identified residing in the same location as seen in other triad glutamine amidotransferases. Using mutagenesis and kinetic analysis, the salt bridge between H186 and E383 was shown to function as a connection between the two active sites. Mutations at these residues uncoupled the two half-reactions of the enzyme. The chemical events of nucleotide binding initiate a series of conformational changes that culminate in the establishment of a tunnel for ammonia as well as an activated glutaminase catalytic site. The results of this study provide a clearer understanding of the allostery of GMPS, where, for the first time, key substrate binding and interdomain contacts are modeled and analyzed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Selenophosphate synthetase in the male accessory glands of an insect without selenoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuessl, Marion; Reinders, Jörg; Oefner, Peter J; Heinze, Jürgen; Schrempf, Alexandra

    2014-12-01

    Selenoproteins (containing the 21st proteinogenic amino acid selenocysteine) play important roles throughout all domains of life. Surprisingly, a number of taxa have small selenoproteomes, and Hymenopteran insects appear to have fully lost selenoproteins. Nevertheless, their genomes contain genes for several proteins of the selenocysteine insertion machinery, including selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SELD/SPS1). At present, it is unknown whether this enzyme has a selenoprotein-independent function, and whether the gene is actually translated into a protein in Hymenoptera. Here, we report that SELD/SPS1 is present as a protein in the accessory glands of males of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior. It appears to be more abundant in the glands of winged disperser males than in those of wingless, local fighter males. Mating increases the lifespan and fecundity of queens in C. obscurior, and mating with winged males has a stronger effect on queen fitness than mating with a wingless male. SELD/SPS 1 has been suggested to play an important role in oxidative stress defense, and might therefore be involved in the life-prolonging effect of mating. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  2. Dynamic QTL analysis of protein content and glutamine synthetase activity in recombinant inbred wheat lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H M; Liang, H; Li, Z; Tang, Z X; Fu, S L; Geng, Y Y; Yan, B J; Ren, Z L

    2015-07-31

    Protein content (PC) is a crucial factor that determines the end-use and nutritional quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a major participant in nitrogen metabolism, can convert inorganic nitrogen into organic nitrogen. Although many studies have been conducted on PC and GS, a dynamic analysis of all of the filling stages has not been conducted. Therefore, 115 F9-10 recombinant inbred wheat lines of 'R131/R142' were used to analyze PC and GS activity during different developmental stages, using the conditional quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping method. Twenty-two and six conditional QTL were detected for PC and GS activily, respectively. More QTL in leaf PC were detected during the early filling stages than in the later filling stages. Grain PC QTL displayed different dynamic variations to leaf PC QTL during the entire grain-filling stages. All of the QTL were expressed differently over time, and nine conditional QTL were detected across two filling stages. QTL with similar functions may have tended to group in specific locales. This study provides dynamic genetic information on protein accumulation during grain-filling stages.

  3. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2–5A) system (OAS, 2′-Phosphodiesterase (2′-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have...... not all been identified in sponges. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that in addition to the OAS activity, sponges possess a 2′-PDE activity, which highlights the probable existence of a premature 2–5A system. Indeed, Suberites domuncula and Crella elegans exhibited this 2–5A degrading activity....... Upon this finding, two out of three elements forming the 2–5A system have been found in sponges, only a endoribonuclease, RNAse L or similar, has to be found. We suspect the existence of a complex immune system in sponges, besides the self/non-self recognition system and the use of phagocytosis...

  4. Expression of asparagine synthetase genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) under various environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Rodríguez, María Begoña; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael; Maldonado, José-María

    2007-01-01

    In sunflower, asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4) is encoded by a small family of three genes (HAS1, HAS1.1 and HAS2) that are differentially regulated by light, carbon and nitrogen availability. In this study, the response of each gene to various stress conditions was examined by Northern analysis with gene-specific probes in leaves and roots. The expression of HAS1 and HAS1.1 genes was induced by osmotic stress (300 mM mannitol), salt stress (150 mM NaCl), and heavy-metal stress (20 microM CuSO(4)), more in roots than in leaves. The expression of HAS2 was not significantly altered by stress treatments. The positive response of HAS1 and HAS1.1 genes to osmotic and salt stresses occurred in the light, in contrast to that previously found in unstressed plants. Measurements of sucrose and total free amino acid contents in leaves and roots indicate that the expression of root HAS1 and HAS1.1 genes in stressed plants is not under metabolic control by the intracellular C/N ratio, suggesting the involvement of some specific stress factor(s). Growth of plants at 40 degrees C for 12h negatively affected the expression of HAS1 and HAS1.1 but not that of HAS2.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru; Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  6. Nuclear glutamine synthetase evolution in Nicotiana: phylogenetics and the origins of allotetraploid and homoploid (diploid) hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, James J; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Andrew R; Knapp, Sandra; Chase, Mark W

    2010-04-01

    Interspecies relationships in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) are complex because 40 species are diploid (two sets of chromosomes) and 35 species are allotetraploid (four sets of chromosomes, two from each progenitor diploid species). We sequenced a fragment (containing four introns) of the nuclear gene 'chloroplast-expressed glutamine synthetase' (ncpGS) in 65 species of Nicotiana. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis based on a low-copy nuclear gene for this well studied and important genus. Diploid species have a single-copy of ncpGS, and allotetraploids as expected have two homeologous copies, each derived from their progenitor diploid. Results were particularly useful for determining the paternal lineage of previously enigmatic taxa (for which our previous analyses had revealed only the maternal progenitors). In particular, we were able to shed light on the origins of the two oldest and largest allotetraploid sections, N. sects. Suaveolentes and Repandae. All homeologues have an intact reading frame and apparently similar rates of divergence, suggesting both remain functional. Difficulties in fitting certain diploid species into the sectional classification of Nicotiana on morphological grounds, coupled with discordance between the ncpGS data and previous trees (i.e. plastid, nuclear ribosomal DNA), indicate a number of homoploid (diploid) hybrids in the genus. We have evidence for Nicotiana glutinosa and Nicotiana linearis being of hybrid origin and patterns of intra-allelic recombination also indicate the possibility of reticulate origins for other diploid species. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drosophila selenophosphate synthetase 1 regulates vitamin B6 metabolism: prediction and confirmation

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    Park Jin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two selenophosphate synthetases (SPSs in higher eukaryotes, SPS1 and SPS2. Of these two isotypes, only SPS2 catalyzes selenophosphate synthesis. Although SPS1 does not contain selenophosphate synthesis activity, it was found to be essential for cell growth and embryogenesis in Drosophila. The function of SPS1, however, has not been elucidated. Results Differentially expressed genes in Drosophila SL2 cells were identified using two-way analysis of variance methods and clustered according to their temporal expression pattern. Gene ontology analysis was performed against differentially expressed genes and gene ontology terms related to vitamin B6 biosynthesis were found to be significantly affected at the early stage at which megamitochondria were not formed (day 3 after SPS1 knockdown. Interestingly, genes related to defense and amino acid metabolism were affected at a later stage (day 5 following knockdown. Levels of pyridoxal phosphate, an active form of vitamin B6, were decreased by SPS1 knockdown. Treatment of SL2 cells with an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate synthesis resulted in both a similar pattern of expression as that found by SPS1 knockdown and the formation of megamitochondria, the major phenotypic change observed by SPS1 knockdown. Conclusions These results indicate that SPS1 regulates vitamin B6 synthesis, which in turn impacts various cellular systems such as amino acid metabolism, defense and other important metabolic activities.

  8. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  9. Engineering a promiscuous pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase by a high throughput FACS screen

    KAUST Repository

    Hohl, Adrian

    2017-12-06

    The Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl are used to facilitate the incorporation of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into the genetic code of bacterial and eukaryotic cells by orthogonally reassigning the amber codon. Currently, the incorporation of new ncAAs requires a cumbersome engineering process composed of several positive and negative selection rounds to select the appropriate PylRS/tRNAPyl pair. Our fast and sensitive engineering approach required only a single FACS selection round to identify 110 orthogonal PylRS variants for the aminoacylation of 20 ncAAs. Pocket-substrate relationship from these variants led to the design of a highly promiscuous PylRS (HpRS), which catalyzed the aminoacylation of 31 structurally diverse lysine derivatives bearing clickable, fluorinated, fluorescent, and biotinylated entities. The high speed and sensitivity of our approach provides a competitive alternative to existing screening methodologies, and delivers insights into the complex PylRS-substrate interactions to facilitate the generation of additional promiscuous variants.

  10. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene clusters and decoding the natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mangal; Chaudhary, Sandeep; Sareen, Dipti

    2017-03-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are the major multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically important antibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a different amino or aryl acid, followed by their condensation to synthesize a linear or cyclic natural product. The studies on NRPS domains, the knowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic screening of the ever-expanding sequenced microbial genomic data for the identification of novel NRPS/PKS clusters and thus deciphering novel non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). Adenylation domain is an integral part of the NRPSs and is the substrate selecting unit for the final assembled NRP. In some cases, it also requires a small protein, the MbtH homolog, for its optimum activity. The presence of putative adenylation domain and MbtH homologs in a sequenced genome can help identify the novel secondary metabolite producers. The role of the adenylation domain in the NRPS gene clusters and its characterization as a tool for the discovery of novel cryptic NRPS gene clusters are discussed.

  11. Effect of bromochloromethane and fumarate on phylogenetic diversity of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene in bovine rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Matsui, Hiroki; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Shinkai, Takumi; Takenaka, Akio; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Effect of the methane inhibitor, bromochloromethane (BCM) and dietary substrate, fumarate, on microbial community structure of acetogen bacteria in the bovine rumen was investigated through analysis of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase gene (fhs). The fhs sequences obtained from BCM-untreated, BCM-treated, fumarate-untreated and fumarate-treated bovine rumen were categorized into homoacetogens and nonhomoacetogenic bacteria by homoacetogen similarity scores. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that most of the fhs sequences categorized into homoacetogens were divided into nine clusters, which were in close agreement with a result shown in a self-organizing map. The diversity of the fhs sequences from the BCM-treated rumen was significantly different from those from BCM-non-treated rumen. Principal component analysis also showed that addition of BCM to the rumen altered the population structure of acetogenic bacteria significantly but the effect of fumarate was comparatively minor. These results indicate that BCM affects diversity of actogens in the bovine rumen, and changes in acetogenic community structure in response to methane inhibitors may be caused by different mechanisms. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Glutamine Synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L.; Hock, Andreas K.; Barnett, Susan C.; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance tissue requirements of carbon and nitrogen. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle and, that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by Glutamine Synthetase (GS) (cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, 13C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA cycle-derived carbons. Finally, while it is contributed only marginally by the circulation, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  13. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-10-07

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation.

  14. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

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    Daniel Braga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis.

  15. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases from Methanogenic Archaea: Suppression of Bacterial Amber Mutation and Heterologous Toxicity

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    Drasko Boko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea possess unusual seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, evolutionarily distinct from the SerRSs found in other archaea, eucaryotes and bacteria. Our recent X-ray structural analysis of Methanosarcina barkeri SerRS revealed an idiosyncratic N-terminal domain and catalytic zinc ion in the active site. To shed further light on substrate discrimination by methanogenic-type SerRS, we set up to explore in vivo the interaction of methanogenic-type SerRSs with their cognate tRNAs in Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of various methanogenic-type SerRSs was toxic for E. coli, resulting in the synthesis of erroneous proteins, as revealed by β-galactosidase stability assay. Although SerRSs from methanogenic archaea recognize tRNAsSer from all three domains of life in vitro, the toxicity presumably precluded the complementation of endogenous SerRS function in both, E. coli and S. cerevisiae. However, despite the observed toxicity, coexpression of methanogenic-type SerRS with its cognate tRNA suppressed bacterial amber mutation.

  16. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis surfactin synthetase knockout and antimicrobial activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxia; Qu, Xiaoxu; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Shengming; Lu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Chong; Bie, Xiaomei

    2016-11-10

    Gene knockout is an important approach to improve the production of antimicrobial compounds. B. subtilis PB2-LS10, derived from B. subtilis PB2-L by a surfactin synthetase (srf) genes knockout, exhibits stronger inhibitory action than its parental strain against all tested pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The antimicrobial extracts produced by B. subtilis PB2-L and B. subtilis PB2-LS10 respectively were characterized by the high-resolution LC-ESI-MS. To provide further insight into the distinct antimicrobial activities, we investigated the impact of the srf genes deletion on the growth and gene transcriptional profile of the strains. The mutant strain grew quickly and reached stationary phase 2h earlier than the wild-type. Prominent expression changes in the modified strain involved genes that were essential to metabolic pathways and processes. Genes related to amino acid transport, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and protein export were up-regulated in strain PB2-LS10. However, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and fatty acid metabolism were repressed. Because of its excellent antimicrobial activity, strain PB2-LS10 has potential for use in food preservation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Nitric oxide synthetase and carbon monoxide decrease in the penile corpus cavernous of hyper homocysteine rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Jun; Cao, Hui-Feng; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Yang, Yu-Qi; Qin, Wen-Bo; Hu, Cun-Li; Hao, Peng

    2008-08-01

    To detect the levels of nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) and carbon monoxide (CO) in the penile corpus cavernous of adult male Wistar rats with high homocysteine (Hhcy) and to explore the relationship of NOS and CO levels with erectile dysfunction. Twenty Wistar rats were equally and randomly divided into a control and an Hhcy group and fed on normal diet and normal diet with 3.0% methionine respectively. Four weeks later, the levels of NOS and CO in the penile corpus cavernous were detected by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and that of serum homocysteine by the cycle enzyme method. Compared with the control group, the levels of NOS and CO in the penile corpus cavernous were significantly lower in the Hhcy group, (6.45 +/- 1.12) nmol/(g x min) vs (10.77 +/- 0.60) nmol/(g x min) and (10.60 +/- 0.92) micromol/L vs (13.36 +/- 0.44) micromol/L, while that of homocysteine was significantly higher, (22.32 +/- 1.65) micromol/L) vs (4.90 +/- 1.73) micromol/L. Four-week diet with methionine can cause Hhcy and significantly decreased levels of NOS and CO in the penile corpus cavernous in Wistar rats. Hhcy is an independent risk factor of erectile dysfunction.

  18. Functional identification of glutamate cysteine ligase and glutathione synthetase in the marine yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Min; Wang, Fengjuan; Tian, Liuying; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2018-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) fulfills a variety of metabolic functions, participates in oxidative stress response, and defends against toxic actions of heavy metals and xenobiotics. In this study, GSH was detected in Rhodosporidium diobovatum by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Then, two novel enzymes from R. diobovatum were characterized that convert glutamate, cysteine, and glycine into GSH. Based on reverse transcription PCR, we obtained the glutathione synthetase gene ( GSH2), 1866 bp, coding for a 56.6-kDa protein, and the glutamate cysteine ligase gene ( GSH1), 2469 bp, coding for a 90.5-kDa protein. The role of GSH1 and GSH2 for the biosynthesis of GSH in the marine yeast R. diobovatum was determined by deletions using the CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease system and enzymatic activity. These results also showed that GSH1 and GSH2 were involved in the production of GSH and are thus being potentially useful to engineer GSH pathways. Alternatively, pET- GSH constructed using vitro recombination could be used to detect the function of genes related to GSH biosynthesis. Finally, the fermentation parameters determined in the present study provide a reference for industrial GSH production in R. diobovatum.

  19. Phylogenetic Study of Polyketide Synthases and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Mycotoxins

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    Massimo Ferrara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyketide synthase (PKSs and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPSs are large multimodular enzymes involved in biosynthesis of polyketide and peptide toxins produced by fungi. Furthermore, hybrid enzymes, in which a reducing PKS region is fused to a single NRPS module, are also responsible of the synthesis of peptide-polyketide metabolites in fungi. The genes encoding for PKSs and NRPSs have been exposed to complex evolutionary mechanisms, which have determined the great number and diversity of metabolites. In this study, we considered the most important polyketide and peptide mycotoxins and, for the first time, a phylogenetic analysis of both PKSs and NRPSs involved in their biosynthesis was assessed using two domains for each enzyme: β-ketosynthase (KS and acyl-transferase (AT for PKSs; adenylation (A and condensation (C for NRPSs. The analysis of both KS and AT domains confirmed the differentiation of the three classes of highly, partially and non-reducing PKSs. Hybrid PKS-NRPSs involved in mycotoxins biosynthesis grouped together in the phylogenetic trees of all the domains analyzed. For most mycotoxins, the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes from distinct fungal species grouped together, except for PKS and NRPS involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis, for which an unlike process of evolution could be hypothesized in different species.

  20. Role of tRNAPro in pretransfer editing of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase

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    Boyarshin K. S.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To characterize the process of tRNA-dependent pretransfer edi- ting of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase of bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (ProRSEf. Methods. Velocity of the editing processes in vitro was determined by ATP hydrolysis by ProRSEf. Pretransfer and posttransfer editing were experimentally separated by site-directed mutagenesis. Results. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing is characterized by three-fold larger velocity then tRNA-independent editing. Effectivity of the process depends on the presence of 2'-hydroxyle group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro selective release of alanyl-AMP occurs simultaneously with tRNA-independent pretransfer editing. Released alanyl-AMP can be re-bound and hydrolyzed. Conclusions. tRNA-dependent pretransfer editing of alanine by ProRSEf is the catalytic mechanism, mediated by 2'-hydroxyl group of A76 tRNAPro. In the absence of tRNAPro tRNA-independent pretransfer editing and selective release of alanyl-AMP occur.

  1. Kinetic partitioning between synthetic and editing pathways in class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases occurs at both pre-transfer and post-transfer hydrolytic steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetesic, Nevena; Perona, John J; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2012-07-20

    Comprehensive steady-state and transient kinetic studies of the synthetic and editing activities of Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) demonstrate that the enzyme depends almost entirely on post-transfer editing to endow the cell with specificity against incorporation of norvaline into protein. Among the three class I tRNA synthetases possessing a dedicated post-transfer editing domain (connective peptide 1; CP1 domain), LeuRS resembles valyl-tRNA synthetase in its reliance on post-transfer editing, whereas isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase differs in retaining a distinct tRNA-dependent synthetic site pre-transfer editing activity to clear noncognate amino acids before misacylation. Further characterization of the post-transfer editing activity in LeuRS by single-turnover kinetics demonstrates that the rate-limiting step is dissociation of deacylated tRNA and/or amino acid product and highlights the critical role of a conserved aspartate residue in mediating the first-order hydrolytic steps on the enzyme. Parallel analyses of adenylate and aminoacyl-tRNA formation reactions by wild-type and mutant LeuRS demonstrate that the efficiency of post-transfer editing is controlled by kinetic partitioning between hydrolysis and dissociation of misacylated tRNA and shows that trans editing after rebinding is a competent kinetic pathway. Together with prior analyses of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase and valyl-tRNA synthetase, these experiments provide the basis for a comprehensive model of editing by class I tRNA synthetases, in which kinetic partitioning plays an essential role at both pre-transfer and post-transfer steps.

  2. Kinetic Partitioning between Synthetic and Editing Pathways in Class I Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases Occurs at Both Pre-transfer and Post-transfer Hydrolytic Steps*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetesic, Nevena; Perona, John J.; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive steady-state and transient kinetic studies of the synthetic and editing activities of Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) demonstrate that the enzyme depends almost entirely on post-transfer editing to endow the cell with specificity against incorporation of norvaline into protein. Among the three class I tRNA synthetases possessing a dedicated post-transfer editing domain (connective peptide 1; CP1 domain), LeuRS resembles valyl-tRNA synthetase in its reliance on post-transfer editing, whereas isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase differs in retaining a distinct tRNA-dependent synthetic site pre-transfer editing activity to clear noncognate amino acids before misacylation. Further characterization of the post-transfer editing activity in LeuRS by single-turnover kinetics demonstrates that the rate-limiting step is dissociation of deacylated tRNA and/or amino acid product and highlights the critical role of a conserved aspartate residue in mediating the first-order hydrolytic steps on the enzyme. Parallel analyses of adenylate and aminoacyl-tRNA formation reactions by wild-type and mutant LeuRS demonstrate that the efficiency of post-transfer editing is controlled by kinetic partitioning between hydrolysis and dissociation of misacylated tRNA and shows that trans editing after rebinding is a competent kinetic pathway. Together with prior analyses of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase and valyl-tRNA synthetase, these experiments provide the basis for a comprehensive model of editing by class I tRNA synthetases, in which kinetic partitioning plays an essential role at both pre-transfer and post-transfer steps. PMID:22648413

  3. Regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu

    2015-12-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin and is well-known as a co-factor for 5 indispensable carboxylases. Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the biotinylation of carboxylases and other proteins, whereas biotinidase catalyzes the release of biotin from biotinylated peptides. Previous studies have reported that nutritional biotin deficiency and genetic defects in either HLCS or biotinidase induces cutaneous inflammation and immunological disorders. Since biotin-dependent carboxylases involve various cellular metabolic pathways including gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids, metabolic abnormalities may play important roles in immunological and inflammatory disorders caused by biotin deficiency. Transcriptional factors, including NF-κB and Sp1/3, are also affected by the status of biotin, indicating that biotin regulates immunological and inflammatory functions independently of biotin-dependent carboxylases. An in-vivo analysis with a murine model revealed the therapeutic effects of biotin supplementation on metal allergies. The novel roles of biotinylated proteins and their related enzymes have recently been reported. Non-carboxylase biotinylated proteins induce chemokine production. HLCS is a nuclear protein involved in epigenetic and chromatin regulation. In this review, comprehensive knowledge on the regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin and its potential as a therapeutic agent is discussed.

  4. Biotin

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S. K.; Hassan, Yousef I.

    2009-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin and serves as a coenzyme for five carboxylases in humans. Biotin is also covalently attached to distinct lysine residues in histones, affecting chromatin structure and mediating gene regulation. This review describes mammalian biotin metabolism, biotin analysis, markers of biotin status, and biological functions of biotin. Proteins such as holocarboxylase synthetase, biotinidase, and the biotin transporters SMVT and MCT1 play crucial roles in biotin homeostas...

  5. Hydrogenosomal succinyl-CoA synthetase from the rumen-dwelling fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum; an energy-producing enzyme of mitochondrial origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacks, Joel B; Dyal, Patricia L; Embley, T Martin; van der Giezen, Mark

    2006-05-24

    Hydrogenosomes are hydrogen-producing organelles that are related to mitochondria and found in a variety of evolutionarily unrelated anaerobic microbial eukaryotes. Similar to classic mitochondria, hydrogenosomes contain the enzyme catalyzing the only reaction of the citric acid cycle directly producing energy; succinyl-CoA synthetase. We have isolated and characterized the genes encoding both subunits of this enzyme from the anaerobic chytrid fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum, a model organism in hydrogenosome research. Both subunits contain all characteristic features of this enzyme, including predicted hydrogenosomal targeting signals. Phylogenetic analyses of succinyl-CoA synthetase clearly indicate its mitochondrial ancestry, both by affiliation with mitochondrially localized fungal homologues and by the sisterhood of the eukaryotic succinyl-CoA synthetase clade with alpha-proteobacteria. Our analyses of the Trichomonas vaginalis SCS sequences also confirmed the mitochondrial affiliation of these hydrogenosomal enzymes, in contrast to previous results. While both hydrogenosomal and mitochondrial succinyl-CoA synthetase homologues have been identified, no succinyl-CoA synthetase proteins were identifiable in taxa possessing another mitochondrially derived organelle, the mitosome. Our analyses further confirm the mitochondrial ancestry of the Neocallimastix hydrogenosome and sheds light upon the stepwise process by which mitochondria evolve into alternate forms of the organelle.

  6. N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency: an insight into the genetics, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldovic L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Ah Mew, Ljubica CaldovicCenter for Genetic Medicine Research, Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington DC, USAAbstract: The conversion of ammonia into urea by the human liver requires the coordinated function of the 6 enzymes and 2 transporters of the urea cycle. The initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the urea cycle, carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1, requires an allosteric activator, N-acetylglutamate (NAG. The formation of this unique cofactor from glutamate and acetyl Coenzyme-A is catalyzed by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS. An absence of NAG as a consequence of NAGS deficiency may compromise flux through CPS1 and result in hyperammonemia. The NAGS gene encodes a 528-amino acid protein, consisting of a C-terminal catalytic domain, a variable segment, and an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal. Only 22 mutations in the NAGS gene have been reported to date, mostly in the catalytic domain. NAGS is primarily expressed in the liver and intestine. However, it is also surprisingly expressed in testis, stomach and spleen, and during early embryonic development at levels not concordant with the expression of other urea cycle enzymes, CPS1, or ornithine transcarbamylase. The purpose of NAGS expression in these tissues, and its significance to NAGS deficiency is as yet unknown. Inherited NAGS deficiency is the rarest of the urea cycle disorders, and we review the currently reported 34 cases. Treatment of NAGS deficiency with N-carbamyglutamate, a stable analog of NAG, can restore deficient urea cycle function and normalize blood ammonia in affected patients.Keywords: urea cycle, urea cycle disorder, N-acetyl-L-glutamate, N-acetylglutamate synthase, hyperammonemia, N-carbamyl-L-glutamate

  7. Isolation and Immunochemical Characterization of Plant Glutamine Synthetase in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Nodules 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groat, R. Gene; Schrader, Larry E.

    1982-01-01

    Host plant glutamine synthetase (GS) has been purified 100-fold from N2-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) nodules by a new procedure involving preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as a final step. An SDS-polypeptide fraction corresponding to plant GS was identified and consisted of two major polypeptides of 40,000 to 45,000 molecular weight. Antibodies to the SDS-polypeptide fraction were raised in mice by intraperitoneal injection, and antisera were collected as ascitic fluid. Crude extracts of soluble protein from the plant fraction of nodules were resolved by SDS-PAGE and then subjected to electrophoresis in the second dimension into antibody-containing agarose gel. A single immunochemically active protein species was observed using this crossed immunoelectrophoresis method, even though both major GS SDS-polypeptides were apparently resolved in the first (SDS-PAGE) dimension. Plant GS protein in crude nodule extracts was quantitated immunochemically by comparison with immunoprecipitin arcs of similarly treated amounts of pure antigen. Using this technique, it was determined that plant GS was present at 150 micrograms per gram fresh weight or 1.2% of total plant soluble protein in N2-fixing alfalfa nodules. Results suggest that alfalfa nodule plant GS consists of two major subunit polypeptides, but only a single immunochemically active native protein was observed. The crossed immunoelectrophoresis procedure described here should be generally applicable for immunochemical detection of lower abundance components of crude plant extracts. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16662757

  8. Expression and specific activities of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 in chronic hypoxic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uly A. Nikmah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urea biosynthesis is a very important process in the liver which needs ATP, CO2 and functional mitochondria or aerobic condition. Liver can adapt to hypoxic condition, generally and locally. This study aimed to analyze the effect of chronic hypoxia on liver urea biosynthesis as indicated by the level and specific activity of mRNA of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1, a key enzyme in urea biosynthesis in hypoxic rats.Methods: 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats were placed in hypoxic chamber supplied by a mixture of 10% O2 and 90% N2. Five rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. Liver homogenates were analyzed for HIF-1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1 by ELISA, CPS1 mRNA by real time RT-PCR and CPS1 enzymatic specific activities by Pierson method. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test and Pearson correlation.Results: The HIF-1 in liver increased significantly, as well as CPS1 mRNA and CPS1 enzymatic activities (p<0.05. There was a strong correlation (r=0.618; p<0.01 between the level of CPS1 mRNA and CPS1 enzymatic activities, moderate correlation between HIF-1 and CPS1 mRNA (r=0.419; p<0.05 but no correlation between HIF-1 and CPS1 enzymatic activities. The study indicated that urea biosynthesis in liver was affected by hypoxia and partially under HIF-1 regulation. The study also found increase of urea and NH3 biosynthesis related to proteolysis as indicated by the decrease of total body weight and liver weight.Conclusion: There was an increase in the expression and specific activities of CPS1 in urea biosynthesis as a result of increasing proteolysis  in chronic hypoxic condition.

  9. Identification of Novel Chemical Scaffolds Inhibiting Trypanothione Synthetase from Pathogenic Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Diego; Medeiros, Andrea; Fiestas, Lucía; Panozzo-Zenere, Esteban A; Maiwald, Franziska; Prousis, Kyriakos C; Roussaki, Marina; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Detsi, Anastasia; Jaeger, Timo; Šarlauskas, Jonas; Peterlin Mašič, Lucíja; Kunick, Conrad; Labadie, Guillermo R; Flohé, Leopold; Comini, Marcelo A

    2016-04-01

    The search for novel chemical entities targeting essential and parasite-specific pathways is considered a priority for neglected diseases such as trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism of trypanosomatids relies on bis-glutathionylspermidine [trypanothione, T(SH)2], a low molecular mass cosubstrate absent in the host. In pathogenic trypanosomatids, a single enzyme, trypanothione synthetase (TryS), catalyzes trypanothione biosynthesis, which is indispensable for parasite survival. Thus, TryS qualifies as an attractive drug target candidate. A library composed of 144 compounds from 7 different families and several singletons was screened against TryS from three major pathogen species (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum). The screening conditions were adjusted to the TryS´ kinetic parameters and intracellular concentration of substrates corresponding to each trypanosomatid species, and/or to avoid assay interference. The screening assay yielded suitable Z' and signal to noise values (≥0.85 and ~3.5, respectively), and high intra-assay reproducibility. Several novel chemical scaffolds were identified as low μM and selective tri-tryp TryS inhibitors. Compounds displaying multi-TryS inhibition (N,N'-bis(3,4-substituted-benzyl) diamine derivatives) and an N5-substituted paullone (MOL2008) halted the proliferation of infective Trypanosoma brucei (EC50 in the nM range) and Leishmania infantum promastigotes (EC50 = 12 μM), respectively. A bis-benzyl diamine derivative and MOL2008 depleted intracellular trypanothione in treated parasites, which confirmed the on-target activity of these compounds. Novel molecular scaffolds with on-target mode of action were identified as hit candidates for TryS inhibition. Due to the remarkable species-specificity exhibited by tri-tryp TryS towards the compounds, future optimization and screening campaigns should aim at designing and detecting, respectively, more potent and broad

  10. Identification of Novel Chemical Scaffolds Inhibiting Trypanothione Synthetase from Pathogenic Trypanosomatids.

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    Diego Benítez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for novel chemical entities targeting essential and parasite-specific pathways is considered a priority for neglected diseases such as trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism of trypanosomatids relies on bis-glutathionylspermidine [trypanothione, T(SH2], a low molecular mass cosubstrate absent in the host. In pathogenic trypanosomatids, a single enzyme, trypanothione synthetase (TryS, catalyzes trypanothione biosynthesis, which is indispensable for parasite survival. Thus, TryS qualifies as an attractive drug target candidate.A library composed of 144 compounds from 7 different families and several singletons was screened against TryS from three major pathogen species (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum. The screening conditions were adjusted to the TryS´ kinetic parameters and intracellular concentration of substrates corresponding to each trypanosomatid species, and/or to avoid assay interference. The screening assay yielded suitable Z' and signal to noise values (≥0.85 and ~3.5, respectively, and high intra-assay reproducibility. Several novel chemical scaffolds were identified as low μM and selective tri-tryp TryS inhibitors. Compounds displaying multi-TryS inhibition (N,N'-bis(3,4-substituted-benzyl diamine derivatives and an N5-substituted paullone (MOL2008 halted the proliferation of infective Trypanosoma brucei (EC50 in the nM range and Leishmania infantum promastigotes (EC50 = 12 μM, respectively. A bis-benzyl diamine derivative and MOL2008 depleted intracellular trypanothione in treated parasites, which confirmed the on-target activity of these compounds.Novel molecular scaffolds with on-target mode of action were identified as hit candidates for TryS inhibition. Due to the remarkable species-specificity exhibited by tri-tryp TryS towards the compounds, future optimization and screening campaigns should aim at designing and detecting, respectively, more potent

  11. Evolution of selenophosphate synthetases: emergence and relocation of function through independent duplications and recurrent subfunctionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Mateo, Andrea; Arnan, Carme; Johnson, Rory; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Gabaldón, Toni; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-09-01

    Selenoproteins are proteins that incorporate selenocysteine (Sec), a nonstandard amino acid encoded by UGA, normally a stop codon. Sec synthesis requires the enzyme Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS or SelD), conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes encoding selenoproteins. Here, we study the evolutionary history of SPS genes, providing a map of selenoprotein function spanning the whole tree of life. SPS is itself a selenoprotein in many species, although functionally equivalent homologs that replace the Sec site with cysteine (Cys) are common. Many metazoans, however, possess SPS genes with substitutions other than Sec or Cys (collectively referred to as SPS1). Using complementation assays in fly mutants, we show that these genes share a common function, which appears to be distinct from the synthesis of selenophosphate carried out by the Sec- and Cys- SPS genes (termed SPS2), and unrelated to Sec synthesis. We show here that SPS1 genes originated through a number of independent gene duplications from an ancestral metazoan selenoprotein SPS2 gene that most likely already carried the SPS1 function. Thus, in SPS genes, parallel duplications and subsequent convergent subfunctionalization have resulted in the segregation to different loci of functions initially carried by a single gene. This evolutionary history constitutes a remarkable example of emergence and evolution of gene function, which we have been able to trace thanks to the singular features of SPS genes, wherein the amino acid at a single site determines unequivocally protein function and is intertwined to the evolutionary fate of the entire selenoproteome. © 2015 Mariotti et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Generation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 reporter cell lines for the assessment of ammonia metabolism.

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    Wang, Yi; Chang, Le; Zhai, Jiahui; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Donggen; Wang, Yunfang

    2017-12-01

    Both primary hepatocytes and stem cells-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are major sources for bioartificial liver (BAL). Maintenance of hepatocellular functions and induction of functional maturity of HLCs are critical for BAL's support effect. It remains difficult to assess and improve detoxification functions inherent to hepatocytes, including ammonia clearance. Here, we aim to assess ammonia metabolism and identify ammonia detoxification enhancer by developing an imaging strategy. In hepatoma cell line HepG2, and immortalized hepatic cell line LO2, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) gene, the first enzyme of ammonia-eliminating urea cycle, was labelled with fluorescence protein via CRISPR/Cas9 system. With the reporter-based screening approach, cellular detoxification enhancers were selected among a collection of 182 small molecules. In both CPS1 reporter cell lines, the fluorescence intensity is positively correlated with cellular CPS1 mRNA expression, ammonia elimination and secreted urea, and reflected ammonia detoxification in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, high-level CPS1 reporter clones also reserved many other critical hepatocellular functions, for example albumin secretion and cytochrome 450 metabolic functions. Sodium phenylbutyrate and resveratrol were identified to enhance metabolism-related gene expression and liver-enriched transcription factors C/EBPα, HNF4α. In conclusion, the CPS1-reporter system provides an economic and effective platform for assessment of cellular metabolic function and high-throughput identification of chemical compounds that improve detoxification activities in hepatic lineage cells. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. The Usher Syndrome Type IIIB Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutation Confers Temperature Sensitivity.

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    Abbott, Jamie A; Guth, Ethan; Kim, Cindy; Regan, Cathy; Siu, Victoria M; Rupar, C Anthony; Demeler, Borries; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2017-07-18

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) is a highly conserved translation factor that plays an essential role in protein synthesis. HARS has been implicated in the human syndromes Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Type 2W and Type IIIB Usher (USH3B). The USH3B mutation, which encodes a Y454S substitution in HARS, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and associated with childhood deafness, blindness, and episodic hallucinations during acute illness. The biochemical basis of the pathophysiologies linked to USH3B is currently unknown. Here, we present a detailed functional comparison of wild-type (WT) and Y454S HARS enzymes. Kinetic parameters for enzymes and canonical substrates were determined using both steady state and rapid kinetics. Enzyme stability was examined using differential scanning fluorimetry. Finally, enzyme functionality in a primary cell culture was assessed. Our results demonstrate that the Y454S substitution leaves HARS amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and tRNAHis binding functions largely intact compared with those of WT HARS, and the mutant enzyme dimerizes like the wild type does. Interestingly, during our investigation, it was revealed that the kinetics of amino acid activation differs from that of the previously characterized bacterial HisRS. Despite the similar kinetics, differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that Y454S is less thermally stable than WT HARS, and cells from Y454S patients grown at elevated temperatures demonstrate diminished levels of protein synthesis compared to those of WT cells. The thermal sensitivity associated with the Y454S mutation represents a biochemical basis for understanding USH3B.

  14. Identification and biochemical characterization of two functional CMP-sialic acid synthetases in Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Wiebke; Bentrop, Joachim; Ustinova, Jana; Blume, Linda; Kats, Elina; Tiralongo, Joe; Weinhold, Birgit; Bastmeyer, Martin; Münster-Kühnel, Anja-K

    2012-04-13

    Sialic acids (Sia) form the nonreducing end of the bulk of cell surface-expressed glycoconjugates. They are, therefore, major elements in intercellular communication processes. The addition of Sia to glycoconjugates requires metabolic activation to CMP-Sia, catalyzed by CMP-Sia synthetase (CMAS). This highly conserved enzyme is located in the cell nucleus in all vertebrates investigated to date, but its nuclear function remains elusive. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of two Cmas enzymes in Danio rerio (dreCmas), one of which is exclusively localized in the cytosol. We show that the two cmas genes most likely originated from the third whole genome duplication, which occurred at the base of teleost radiation. cmas paralogues were maintained in fishes of the Otocephala clade, whereas one copy got subsequently lost in Euteleostei (e.g. rainbow trout). In zebrafish, the two genes exhibited a distinct spatial expression pattern. The products of these genes (dreCmas1 and dreCmas2) diverged not only with respect to subcellular localization but also in substrate specificity. Nuclear dreCmas1 favored N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas the cytosolic dreCmas2 showed highest affinity for 5-deamino-neuraminic acid. The subcellular localization was confirmed for the endogenous enzymes in fractionated zebrafish lysates. Nuclear entry of dreCmas1 was mediated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal, which seemed irrelevant for other enzymatic functions. With the current demonstration that in zebrafish two subfunctionalized cmas paralogues co-exist, we introduce a novel and unique model to detail the roles that CMAS has in the nucleus and in the sialylation pathways of animal cells.

  15. Diverse subcellular localizations of the insect CMP-sialic acid synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Wu; Fujita, Akiko; Hamaguchi, Kayo; Delannoy, Philippe; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence and biological importance of sialic acid (Sia) and its metabolic enzymes in insects have been studied using Drosophila melanogaster. The most prominent feature of D. melanogaster CMP-Sia synthetase (DmCSS) is its Golgi-localization, contrasted with nuclear localization of vertebrate CSSs. However, it remains unclear if the Golgi-localization is common to other insect CSSs and why it happens. To answer these questions, Aedes aegypti (mosquito) CSS (AaCSS) and Tribolium castaneum (beetle) CSS (TcCSS) were cloned and characterized for their activity and subcellular localization. Our new findings show: (1) AaCSS and TcCSS share a common overall structure with DmCSS in terms of evolutionarily conserved motifs and the absence of the C-terminal domain typical to vertebrate CSSs; (2) when expressed in mammalian and insect cells, AaCSS and TcCSS showed in vivo and in vitro CSS activities, similar to DmCSS. In contrast, when expressed in bacteria, they lacked CSS activity because the N-terminal hydrophobic region appeared to induce protein aggregation; (3) when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells, AaCSS and TcCSS were predominantly localized in the ER, but not in the Golgi. Surprisingly, DmCSS was mainly secreted into the culture medium, although partially detected in Golgi. Consistent with these results, the N-terminal hydrophobic regions of AaCSS and TcCSS functioned as a signal peptide to render them soluble in the ER, while the N-terminus of DmCSS functioned as a membrane-spanning region of type II transmembrane proteins whose cytosolic KLK sequence functioned as an ER export signal. Accordingly, the differential subcellular localization of insect CSSs are distinctively more diverse than previously recognized. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Functional role of C-terminal domain of Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

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    Tukalo M. A.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study a role of C-terminal domain of T. thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT in the reactions of aminoacylation and editing. Methods. A mutant of LeuRSTT without C- terminal domain (ΔС was obtained by the method of mutagenesis. The kinetic constants in aminoacylation reaction catalyzed by LeuRS and its mutant (ΔС were determined by the methods of equilibrium enzyme kinetics. To evaluate the contribution of C-terminal domain to interaction of the enzyme with tRNALeu, Kd of a complex between tRNA and LeuRSTT and its mutant ΔС was determined by fluorescence titration. Results. The C-terminal domain is shown to play a significant role in the aminoacylation and editing reactions of LeuRSTT and not essential for the activity in the reaction of amino acid activation. The kinetic parameters of aminoacylation of tRNALeu and tRNATyr by LeuRS and ΔС mutant were also determined, their analysis suggests that the C-domain is not critical for the manifestation of specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of homologous RNAs. At the same time a significant influence of the C-terminal domain on the value of catalytic constant was shown. At the domain deletion the kcat value is lower by 152-fold. Conclusion. The C-terminal domain of LeuRSTT is evolutionarily acquired to enhance the rate of catalysis in the aminoacylation and editing reactions, and makes no significant contribution to the specificity of the enzyme in the recognition of tRNA.

  17. Characterization of a microcystin and detection of microcystin synthetase genes from a Brazilian isolate of Nostoc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Welker, Martin; Beraldo Moraes, Luiz Alberto; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2010-04-01

    A nostocalean nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium isolated from an eutrophic freshwater reservoir located in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil, was evaluated for the production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins. Morphologically this new cyanobacterium strain appears closest to Nostoc, however, in the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene it falls into a highly stable cluster distantly only related to the typical Nostoc cluster. Extracts of Nostoc sp. CENA88 cultured cells, investigated using ELISA assay, gave positive results and the microcystin profile revealed by ESI-Q-TOF/MS/MS analysis confirmed the production of [Dha(7)]MCYST-YR. Further, Nostoc sp. CENA88 genomic DNA was analyzed by PCR for sequences of mcyD, mcyE and mcyG genes of microcystin synthetase (mcy) cluster. The result revealed the presence of mcyD, mcyE and mcyG genes with similarities to those from mcy of Nostoc sp. strains 152 and IO-102-I and other cyanobacterial genera. The phylogenetic tree based on concatenated McyG, McyD and McyE amino acids clustered the sequences according to cyanobacterial genera, with exception of the Nostoc sp. CENA88 sequence, which was placed in a clade distantly related from other Nostoc strains, as previously observed also in the 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. The present study describes for the first time a Brazilian Nostoc microcystin producer and also the occurrence of demethyl MCYST-YR variant in this genus. The sequenced Nostoc genes involved in the microcystin synthesis can contribute to a better understanding of the toxigenicity and evolution of this cyanotoxin. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A mathematical model for the adenylosuccinate synthetase reaction involved in purine biosynthesis

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    Likhoshvai Vitalii A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of the mathematical models that adequately describe biochemical reactions and molecular-genetic mechanisms is one of the most important tasks in modern bioinformatics. Because the enzyme adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS has long been extensively studied, a wealth of kinetic data has been accumulated. Results We describe a mathematical model for the reaction catalyzed by AdSS. The model's parameters were fitted to experimental data obtained from published literature. The advantage of our model is that it includes relationships between the reaction rate, the concentrations of three substrates (GTP, IMP and ASP, the effects of five inhibitors (GMP, GDP, AMP, ASUC and SUCC, and the influence of Mg2+ ions. Conclusion Our model describes the reaction catalyzed by AdSS as a fully random process. The model structure implies that each of the inhibitors included in it is only competitive to one of the substrates. The model was tested for adequacy using experimental data published elsewhere. The values obtained for the parameters are as follows: Vmax = 1.35·10-3 mM/min, KmGTP = 0.023 mM, KmIMP = 0.02 mM, KmASP = 0.3 mM, KiGMP = 0.024 mM, KiGDP = 8·10-3 mM, KiAMP = 0.01 mM, KiASUC = 7.5·10-3 mM, KiSUCC = 8 mM, KmMg = 0.08 mM.

  19. Identification of Staphylococcus argenteus in Eastern China based on a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Xu, Xuebin; Song, Qifa; Bai, Yalong; Zhang, Yi; Song, Minghui; Shi, Chunlei; Shi, Xianming

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether the Staphylococcus argenteus is present in Eastern China and to verify the utility of a new screening process. Phenotype observation, PCR assay targeting a hypothetical nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene, phylogenetic analysis of rpoB and multilocus sequence typing were used to screen and identify strains of S. argenteus from 839 presumptive S. aureus isolates. Eighty-nine (89/839, 10.6%) of the presumptive S. aureus isolates produced white colonies on tryptone soya agar plates. Of the white-colony isolates, six (6/89, 7%) were S. argenteus, 75 (75/89, 84%) were S. aureus and eight (8/89, 9%) were other bacteria. The PCR-based method targeting the NRPS gene can simultaneously identify and distinguish S. argenteus and S. aureus. All representative sequences of rpoB generated in this study were deposited in GenBank under accession numbers SJTU F20002, KT767581; SJTU F20269, KT767582; SJTU F20419, KT767583; SJTU F20420, KT767584; SJTU F20124, KT767585; SJTU F21164, KT767586; SJTU F21285, KT767587; SJTU F21224, KT767588; SJTU F21155, KT767589; SJTU F21294, KT767590; SJTU F20030, KT767591; SJTU F20044, KT767592; SJTU F20135, KT767593; SJTU F20123, KT767594; SJTU F21319, KT767595, respectively. All the new sequence types (STs) were submitted to a multilocus sequence typing database and the assigned ST numbers are ST3261 (151-469-20-101-145-150-131), ST3262 (12-3-1-1-4-4-410) and ST3267 (2-471-2-2-6-3-2).

  20. A sensing role of the glutamine synthetase in the nitrogen regulation network in Fusarium fujikuroi.

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    Dominik Wagner

    Full Text Available In the plant pathogenic ascomycete Fusarium fujikuroi the synthesis of several economically important secondary metabolites (SM depends on the nitrogen status of the cells. Of these SMs, gibberellin and bikaverin synthesis is subject to nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR and is therefore only executed under nitrogen starvation conditions. How the signal of available nitrogen quantity and quality is sensed and transmitted to transcription factors is largely unknown. Earlier work revealed an essential regulatory role of the glutamine synthetase (GS in the nitrogen regulation network and secondary metabolism as its deletion resulted in total loss of SM gene expression. Here we present extensive gene regulation studies of the wild type, the Δgln1 mutant and complementation strains of the gln1 deletion mutant expressing heterologous GS-encoding genes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin or 14 different F. fujikuroi gln1 copies with site-directed mutations. All strains were grown under different nitrogen conditions and characterized regarding growth, expression of NCR-responsive genes and biosynthesis of SM. We provide evidence for distinct roles of the GS in sensing and transducing the signals to NCR-responsive genes. Three site directed mutations partially restored secondary metabolism and GS-dependent gene expression, but not glutamine formation, demonstrating for the first time that the catalytic and regulatory roles of GS can be separated. The distinct mutant phenotypes show that the GS (1 participates in NH4 (+-sensing and transducing the signal towards NCR-responsive transcription factors and their subsequent target genes; (2 affects carbon catabolism and (3 activates the expression of a distinct set of non-NCR GS-dependent genes. These novel insights into the regulatory role of the GS provide fascinating perspectives for elucidating regulatory roles of GS proteins of different organism in general.

  1. Proximal tubule glutamine synthetase expression is necessary for the normal response to dietary protein restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2017-07-01

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion changes in parallel during changes in dietary protein intake. Dietary protein restriction decreases endogenous acid production and decreases urinary ammonia excretion, a major component of net acid excretion. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the reaction of [Formula: see text] and glutamate, which regenerates the essential amino acid glutamine and decreases net ammonia generation. Because renal proximal tubule GS expression increases during dietary protein restriction, this could contribute to the decreased ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current study was to determine the role of proximal tubule GS in the renal response to protein restriction. We generated mice with proximal tubule-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Cre-negative (Control) and PT-GS-KO mice in metabolic cages were provided 20% protein diet for 2 days and were then changed to low-protein (6%) diet for the next 7 days. Additional PT-GS-KO mice were maintained on 20% protein diet. Dietary protein restriction caused a rapid decrease in urinary ammonia excretion in both genotypes, but PT-GS-KO blunted this adaptive response significantly. This occurred despite no significant genotype-dependent differences in urinary pH or in serum electrolytes. There were no significant differences between Control and PT-GS-KO mice in expression of multiple other proteins involved in renal ammonia handling. We conclude that proximal tubule GS expression is necessary for the appropriate decrease in ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  2. Function of a glutamine synthetase-like protein in bacterial aniline oxidation via γ-glutamylanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Masahiro; Ohara, Akira; Sakae, Shinji; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kitamura, Chitoshi; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Negoro, Seiji

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain YAA has five genes (atdA1 to atdA5) involved in aniline oxidation as a part of the aniline degradation gene cluster. From sequence analysis, the five genes were expected to encode a glutamine synthetase (GS)-like protein (AtdA1), a glutamine amidotransferase-like protein (AtdA2), and an aromatic compound dioxygenase (AtdA3, AtdA4, and AtdA5) (M. Takeo, T. Fujii, and Y. Maeda, J. Ferment. Bioeng. 85:17-24, 1998). A recombinant Pseudomonas strain harboring these five genes quantitatively converted aniline into catechol, demonstrating that catechol is the major oxidation product from aniline. To elucidate the function of the GS-like protein AtdA1 in aniline oxidation, we purified it from recombinant Escherichia coli harboring atdA1. The purified AtdA1 protein produced gamma-glutamylanilide (γ-GA) quantitatively from aniline and l-glutamate in the presence of ATP and MgCl2. This reaction was identical to glutamine synthesis by GS, except for the use of aniline instead of ammonia as the substrate. Recombinant Pseudomonas strains harboring the dioxygenase genes (atdA3 to atdA5) were unable to degrade aniline but converted γ-GA into catechol, indicating that γ-GA is an intermediate to catechol and a direct substrate for the dioxygenase. Unexpectedly, a recombinant Pseudomonas strain harboring only atdA2 hydrolyzed γ-GA into aniline, reversing the γ-GA formation by AtdA1. Deletion of atdA2 from atdA1 to atdA5 caused γ-GA accumulation from aniline in recombinant Pseudomonas cells and inhibited the growth of a recombinant Acinetobacter strain on aniline, suggesting that AtdA2 prevents γ-GA accumulation that is harmful to the host cell.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase: biochemical features of a crucial enzyme for mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

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    Anna P Lucarelli

    Full Text Available The selection and soaring spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR-TB is a severe public health problem. Currently, there is an urgent need for new drugs for tuberculosis treatment, with novel mechanisms of action and, moreover, the necessity to identify new drug targets. Mycobacterial phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (MtbPRPPase is a crucial enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of decaprenylphosphoryl-arabinose, an essential precursor for the mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Moreover, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate, which is the product of the PRPPase catalyzed reaction, is the precursor for the biosynthesis of nucleotides and of some amino acids such as histidine and tryptophan. In this context, the elucidation of the molecular and functional features of MtbPRPPase is mandatory. MtbPRPPase was obtained as a recombinant form, purified to homogeneity and characterized. According to its hexameric form, substrate specificity and requirement of phosphate for activity, the enzyme proved to belong to the class I of PRPPases. Although the sulfate mimicked the phosphate, it was less effective and required higher concentrations for the enzyme activation. MtbPRPPase showed hyperbolic response to ribose 5-phosphate, but sigmoidal behaviour towards Mg-ATP. The enzyme resulted to be allosterically activated by Mg(2+ or Mn(2+ and inhibited by Ca(2+ and Cu(2+ but, differently from other characterized PRPPases, it showed a better affinity for the Mn(2+ and Cu(2+ ions, indicating a different cation binding site geometry. Moreover, the enzyme from M. tuberculosis was allosterically inhibited by ADP, but less sensitive to inhibition by GDP. The characterization of M. tuberculosis PRPPase provides the starting point for the development of inhibitors for antitubercular drug design.

  4. Interstitial lung disease in anti-synthetase syndrome: Initial and follow-up CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debray, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.debray@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Radiology, 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Borie, Raphael, E-mail: raphael.borie@bch.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, Department of Pneumology A and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, DHU Fire 46, rue Henri Huchard, 75877 Paris Cedex 18 (France); Inserm, U1152, Paris (France); Revel, Marie-Pierre, E-mail: marie-pierre.revel@htd.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Cochin Hospital, Department of Radiology, 27, Rue du Fg Saint Jacques, 75679 Paris Cedex 14 (France); Naccache, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.naccache@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Avicenne Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, Bobigny (France); AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Khalil, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.khalil@tnn.aphp.fr [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Radiology, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Toper, Cécile, E-mail: cecile.toper@gmail.com [AP-HP, Tenon Hospital, Department of Pneumology and Centre de Compétence Maladies Pulmonaires rares, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris (France); Israel-Biet, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.israel-biet@egp.aphp.fr [Université Paris Descartes and AP-HP, Department of Pneumology, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, 20, rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris (France); and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the initial and follow-up CT features of interstitial lung disease associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (AS-ILD). Materials and methods: Two independent thoracic radiologists retrospectively analysed thin-section CT images obtained at diagnosis of AS-ILD in 33 patients (17 positive for anti-Jo1, 13 for anti-PL12, and three for anti-PL7 antibodies). They evaluated the pattern, distribution and extent of the CT abnormalities. They also evaluated the change in findings during follow-up (median 27 months; range 13–167 months) in 26 patients. Results: At diagnosis, ground-glass opacities (100%), reticulations (87%) and traction bronchiectasis (76%) were the most common CT findings. Consolidations were present in 45% of patients. A non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP) or mixed NSIP-OP CT pattern were observed in 15 out of 33 (45%), seven out of 33 (21%) and eight out of 33 (24%) patients, respectively, whereas the CT pattern was indeterminate in three patients. During follow-up, consolidations decreased or disappeared in 11 out of 12 patients (92%), among which seven within the first 6 months, but honeycombing progressed or appeared in ten out of 26 patients (38%) and overall disease extent increased in nine out of 26 patients (35%). Conclusion: CT features at diagnosis of AS-ILD mainly suggest NSIP and OP, isolated or in combination. Consolidations decrease or disappear in most cases but the disease may progress to fibrosis in more than one third of patients.

  5. Stability Characteristics of "Aerobic" Acetyl-CoA Synthetase of Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Klein, Harold P.

    1976-01-01

    During the purification of the "aerobic" acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain LK2Gl2, it was noted that stronge at 4 C resulted in the loss of enzyme activity within 24 hr. Similar losses were observed during column chromatography. Addition of boiled extracts from either aerobic or anerobic cells completely prevents this. The stabilizing factor (SF) in these extracts is non-dialyzable and organic in nature. SF is excluded on G-25 and G-50 Sephadex columns and is slightly retarded on G-75 columns. On G-100 columns, SF elutes as a peak exactly coincident with that of cytochrome c, indicating a molecular weight of 13,000. SF activity was not destroyed by Pronase treatment, was adsorbed onto Norite, and absorbed in the UV with a single maximum at 260 nm. The action of SF could be replaced by a number of nucleotides. At 0.01 M, the order of effectiveness was: ATP>ADP>AMP>GTP>CTP>/=UTP>XTP. Even at 2 x 10(exp -4) M, ATP and ADP, but not AMP, cyclic AMP, adenosine or adenine, were effective in stabilizing this ACS. The mechanism of stabilization by ATP and AMP appears to be the same, since AMP competitively inhibited the ACS with respect to ATP in in vitro assays, while ADP gave a mixed type of inhibition, thus indicating a different mechanism. ACS from nonaerobic cells is also unstable in the absence of SF but, unlike aerobic ACS, is not affected by ATP or other nucleotides.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  7. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Autophagy induction by tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Sang Su; Suk, Jinkyu; Choi, Ji Hye; Yang, Seungkyung; Kim, Jin Woo; Sohn, Seonghyang; Chung, Jae Hoon; Hong, Yong Hee; Lee, Dong Hwan; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Min, Hyesun; Fu, Ya-Min; Meadows, Gary G.; Joe, Cheol O.

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency is a genetic disorder associated with a variety of metabolic syndromes such as phenylketonuria (PKU). In this article, the signaling pathway by which BH4 deficiency inactivates mTORC1 leading to the activation of the autophagic pathway was studied utilizing BH4-deficient Spr-/- mice generated by the knockout of the gene encoding sepiapterin reductase (SR) catalyzing BH4 synthesis. We found that mTORC1 signaling was inactivated and autophagic pathway was ac...

  9. MS_RHII-RSD, a dual-function RNase HII-(p)ppGpp synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdeshwar, Maya S; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2012-08-01

    In the noninfectious soil saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis, intracellular levels of the stress alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate, together termed (p)ppGpp, are regulated by the enzyme Rel(Msm). This enzyme consists of a single, bifunctional polypeptide chain that is capable of both synthesizing and hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp. The rel(Msm) knockout strain of M. smegmatis (Δrel(Msm)) is expected to show a (p)ppGpp null [(p)ppGpp(0)] phenotype. Contrary to this expectation, the strain is capable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp in vivo. In this study, we identify and functionally characterize the open reading frame (ORF), MSMEG_5849, that encodes a second functional (p)ppGpp synthetase in M. smegmatis. In addition to (p)ppGpp synthesis, the 567-amino-acid-long protein encoded by this gene is capable of hydrolyzing RNA·DNA hybrids and bears similarity to the conventional RNase HII enzymes. We have classified this protein as actRel(Msm) in accordance with the recent nomenclature proposed and have named it MS_RHII-RSD, indicating the two enzymatic activities present [RHII, RNase HII domain, originally identified as domain of unknown function 429 (DUF429), and RSD, RelA_SpoT nucleotidyl transferase domain, the SYNTH domain responsible for (p)ppGpp synthesis activity]. MS_RHII-RSD is expressed and is constitutively active in vivo and behaves like a monofunctional (p)ppGpp synthetase in vitro. The occurrence of the RNase HII and (p)ppGpp synthetase domains together on the same polypeptide chain is suggestive of an in vivo role for this novel protein as a link connecting the essential life processes of DNA replication, repair, and transcription to the highly conserved stress survival pathway, the stringent response.

  10. Evidence for sugar signalling in the regulation of asparagine synthetase gene expressed in Phaseolus vulgaris roots and nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvente, Sonia; Reddy, Pallavolu M; Khandual, Sanghamitra; Blanco, Lourdes; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xochitl; Sanchez, Federico; Lara-Flores, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    A cDNA clone, designated as PvNAS2, encoding asparagine amidotransferase (asparagine synthetase) was isolated from nodule tissue of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Negro Jamapa). Southern blot analysis indicated that asparagine synthetase in bean is encoded by a small gene family. Northern analysis of RNAs from various plant organs demonstrated that PvNAS2 is highly expressed in roots, followed by nodules in which it is mainly induced during the early days of nitrogen fixation. Investigations with the PvNAS2 promoter gusA fusion revealed that the expression of PvNAS2 in roots is confined to vascular bundles and meristematic tissues, while in root nodules its expression is solely localized to vascular traces and outer cortical cells encompassing the central nitrogen-fixing zone, but never detected in either infected or non-infected cells located in the central region of the nodule. PvNAS2 is down-regulated when carbon availability is reduced in nodules, and the addition of sugars to the plants, mainly glucose, boosted its induction, leading to the increased asparagine production. In contrast to PvNAS2 expression and the concomitant asparagine synthesis, glucose supplement resulted in the reduction of ureide content in nodules. Studies with glucose analogues as well as hexokinase inhibitors suggested a role for hexokinase in the sugar-sensing mechanism that regulates PvNAS2 expression in roots. In light of the above results, it is proposed that, in bean, low carbon availability in nodules prompts the down-regulation of the asparagine synthetase enzyme and concomitantly asparagine production. Thereby a favourable environment is created for the efficient transfer of the amido group of glutamine for the synthesis of purines, and then ureide generation.

  11. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  12. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  13. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase by the 2',3'-dialdehyde derivative of ATP. Identification of active site lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilden, Ida; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    . Cysteine 229 may also be labeled by oATP. Of these four residues, Lys193 is completely conserved within the family of PRPP synthetases, and Lys181 is found at a position in the sequence where the cognate amino acid (Asp181) in human isozyme I PRPP synthetase has been previously implicated in the regulation...... of enzymatic activity. These results imply a functional role for at least two of the identified amino acid residues.......M. Reaction with radioactive oATP demonstrated that complete inactivation of the enzyme corresponded to reaction at two or more sites with limiting stoichiometries of approximately 0.7 and 1.3 mol of oATP incorporated/mol of PRPP synthetase subunit. oATP served as a substrate in the presence of ribose-5...

  14. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, Anjo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform A. Theron1, R. L. Roth1, H. Hoppe1¤, C. Parkinson2, C. W. van der Westhuyzen1, S. Stoychev1, I. Wiid3, R. D. Pietersen3, B... contributes directly to PLOS ONE | https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185068 October 3, 2017 1 / 22 a1111111111 a1111111111 a1111111111 a1111111111 a1111111111 OPENACCESS Citation: Theron A, Roth RL, Hoppe H, Parkinson C, van der Westhuyzen CW, Stoychev S...

  15. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the regulation of phosphoryl transfer within kinases and synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkosi Thokozani C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinome comprises functionally diverse enzymes, with the current classification indicating very little about the extent of conserved regulatory mechanisms associated with phosphoryl transfer. The apparent Km of the kinases ranges from less than 0.4 μM to in excess of 1000 μM for ATP. It is not known how this diverse range of enzymes mechanistically achieves the regulation of catalysis via an affinity range for ATP varying by three-orders of magnitude. Results We have demonstrated a previously undiscovered mechanism in kinase and synthetase enzymes where the overall rate of reaction is regulated via the C8-H of ATP. Using ATP deuterated at the C8 position (C8D-ATP as a molecular probe it was shown that the C8-H plays a direct role in the regulation of the overall rate of reaction in a range of kinase and synthetase enzymes. Using comparative studies on the effect of the concentration of ATP and C8D-ATP on the activity of the enzymes we demonstrated that not only did C8D-ATP give a kinetic isotope effect (KIE but the KIE's obtained are clearly not secondary KIE effects as the magnitude of the KIE in all cases was at least 2 fold and in most cases in excess of 7 fold. Conclusions Kinase and synthetase enzymes utilise C8D-ATP in preference to non-deuterated ATP. The KIE obtained at low ATP concentrations is clearly a primary KIE demonstrating strong evidence that the bond to the isotopically substituted hydrogen is being broken. The effect of the ATP concentration profile on the KIE was used to develop a model whereby the C8H of ATP plays a role in the overall regulation of phosphoryl transfer. This role of the C8H of ATP in the regulation of substrate binding appears to have been conserved in all kinase and synthetase enzymes as one of the mechanisms associated with binding of ATP. The induction of the C8H to be labile by active site residues coordinated to the ATP purine ring may play a significant role in explaining the

  16. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-11-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaeal tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography following heat treatment at 363 K. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies were obtained under optimized crystallization conditions in the presence of 1.5 M ammonium sulfate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 A, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 A resolution at 100 K.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl acid amido synthetase mediates metabolic crosstalk in auxin and salicylic acid homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Westfall, Corey S.; Sherp, Ashley M.; Zubieta, Chloe; Alvarez, Sophie; Schraft, Evelyn; Marcellin, Romain; Ramirez, Loren; Jez, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl acid amido synthetase Gretchen Hagen 3.5 (AtGH3.5) conjugates both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and salicylic acid (SA) to modulate auxin and pathogen response pathways. To understand the molecular basis for the activity of AtGH3.5, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with IAA and AMP. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that the substrate preference of AtGH3.5 is wider than originally described and includes the natural auxin phenyl...

  18. The Nature of Foot Ray Deficiency in Congenital Fibular Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Bryan A; Birch, John G; Hootnick, David R; Cherkashin, Alex M; Samchukov, Mikhail L

    Absent lateral osseous structures in congenital fibular deficiency, including the distal femur and fibula, have led some authors to refer to the nature of foot ray deficiency as "lateral" as well. Others have suggested that the ray deficiency is in the central portion of the midfoot and forefoot.We sought to determine whether cuboid preservation and/or cuneiform deficiency in the feet of patients with congenital fibular deficiency implied that the ray deficiency is central rather than lateral in patients with congenital fibular deficiency. We identified all patients with a clinical morphologic diagnosis of congenital fibular deficiency at our institution over a 15-year period. We reviewed the records and radiographs of patients who had radiographs of the feet to allow determination of the number of metatarsals, the presence or absence of a cuboid or calcaneocuboid fusion, the number of cuneiforms present (if possible), and any other osseous abnormalities of the foot. We excluded patients with 5-rayed feet, those who had not had radiographs of the feet, or whose radiographs were not adequate to allow accurate assessment of these radiographic features. We defined the characteristic "lateral (fifth) ray present" if there was a well-developed cuboid or calcaneocuboid coalition with which the lateral-most preserved metatarsal articulated. Twenty-six patients with 28 affected feet met radiographic criteria for inclusion in the study. All affected feet had a well-developed cuboid or calcaneocuboid coalition. The lateral-most ray of 25 patients with 26 affected feet articulated with the cuboid or calcaneocuboid coalition. One patient with bilateral fibular deficiency had bilateral partially deficient cuboids, and the lateral-most metatarsal articulated with the medial remnant of the deformed cuboids. Twenty-one of 28 feet with visible cuneiforms had 2 or 1 cuneiform. Although the embryology and pathogenesis of congenital fibular deficiency remain unknown, based on the

  19. Recessive VARS2 mutation underlies a novel syndrome with epilepsy, mental retardation, short stature, growth hormone deficiency, and hypogonadism

    KAUST Repository

    Alsemari, Abdulaziz

    2017-11-14

    Most mitochondrial and cytoplasmic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are encoded by nuclear genes. Syndromic disorders resulting from mutation of aaRSs genes display significant phenotypic heterogeneity. We expand aaRSs-related phenotypes through characterization of the clinical and molecular basis of a novel autosomal-recessive syndrome manifesting severe mental retardation, ataxia, speech impairment, epilepsy, short stature, microcephaly, hypogonadism, and growth hormone deficiency.A G>A variant in exon 29 of VARS2 (c.3650G>A) (NM_006295) was identified in the index case. This homozygous variant was confirmed by Sanger sequencing and segregated with disease in the family studied. The c.3650G>A change results in alteration of arginine to histidine at residue 1217 (R1217H) of the mature protein and is predicted to be pathogenic.These findings contribute to a growing list of aaRSs disorders, broadens the spectrum of phenotypes attributable to VARS2 mutations, and provides new insight into genotype-phenotype correlations among the mitochondrial synthetase genes.

  20. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS...... analysis. This gives an incidence of MCADD detected by newborn screening in Denmark of 1/8954. In sharp contrast to this we found that the incidence of clinically presenting MCADD in Denmark in the 10 year period preceding introduction of MS/MS-based screening was only 1 in 39,691. This means that four...... lower proportion of newborns being homozygous for the prevalent disease-causing c.985A>G mutation. A significant number of the newborns have genotypes with mutations that have not been observed in patients detected clinically. Some of these mutations, like c.199T>C and c.127G>A, are always associated...

  1. Congenital fibular deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Reggie C; Makhdom, Asim M; Saran, Neil; Birch, John

    2014-04-01

    Congenital fibular deficiency (CFD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations ranging from mild limb length inequality (LLI) to severe shortening, with foot and ankle deformities and associated anomalies. The etiology of CFD remains unclear. Treatment goals are to achieve normal weight bearing, a functional plantigrade foot, and equal limb length. The recent Birch classification system has been proposed to provide a treatment guide: the functionality of the foot, LLI, and associated anomalies should be taken into account for decision-making. Treatment options include orthosis or epiphysiodesis, Syme or Boyd amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation, limb lengthening procedures, and foot and ankle reconstruction. The outcome of amputation for severe forms of CFD has shown favorable results and fewer complications compared with those of limb lengthening. Nevertheless, advances in the limb lengthening techniques may change our approach to treating patients with CFD and might extend the indications for reconstructive procedures to the treatment of severe LLI and foot deformities.

  2. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...... into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cutoff below or above 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Data on death were identified in national registries. Sex- and cause-specific mortalities were identified in CO and AO GHD when compared with controls. RESULTS: Mortality was increased...... versus AO males, both compared with controls (P mortality was increased due to cancer in all subgroups, due to circulatory diseases in all age groups for females and for males in the oldest age group. For CO, the increased mortality was due to cancer. CONCLUSIONS: We found...

  3. Expanding the library and substrate diversity of the pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate unnatural amino acids containing conjugated rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Vanessa K; Louie, Gordon V; Noel, Joseph P; Wang, Lei

    2013-11-04

    Unnatural amino acids (UAAs) containing conjugated ring systems are of interest for their optical properties. Until now, such bulky and planar UAAs could not be incorporated into proteins using the pyrrolysyl tRNA/synthetase shuttling system. Using the "small-intelligent" approach to construct a highly diverse library, we evolved novel synthetases specific for two such UAAs and incorporated them into proteins in E. coli and mammalian cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The nucleotide sequence of aroG, the gene for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthetase (phe) in Escherichia coli K 12

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, W.David; Davidson, Barrie E.

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of aroG, the gene coding for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthetase(phe), one of three isoenzymes that catalyse the first step of the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids and vitamins in Escherichia coli K12. The DNA sequence agrees with previously published data on the N-terminal sequence, amino acid composition, and subunit molecular weight of 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthetase(phe). There is significant identity i...

  5. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of

  6. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide oxygen to body tissues. There are many types of anemia. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia is a low red ... People with this type of anemia often do well with treatment. Long-term vitamin B12 deficiency can cause nerve damage. This may be permanent if ...

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  8. Upregulation of cystathionine-β-synthetase expression contributes to inflammatory pain in rat temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiuhua; Meng, Xiaowen; Wu, Geping; Ju, Zhong; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Hu, Shufen; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2014-02-03

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an endogenous gaseotransmitter/modulator, is becoming appreciated that it may be involved in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. However, the role for H2S in nociceptive processing in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron remains unknown. The aim of this study was designed to investigate whether endogenous H2S synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS) plays a role in inflammatory pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). TMJ inflammatory pain was induced by injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into TMJ of adult male rats. Von Frey filaments were used to examine pain behavioral responses in rats following injection of CFA or normal saline (NS). Whole cell patch clamp recordings were employed on acutely isolated TG neurons from rats 2 days after CFA injection. Western blot analysis was carried out to measure protein expression in TGs. Injection of CFA into TMJ produced a time dependent hyperalgesia as evidenced by reduced escape threshold in rats responding to VFF stimulation. The reduced escape threshold was partially reversed by injection of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor for CBS, in a dose-dependent manner. CFA injection led to a marked upregulation of CBS expression when compared with age-matched controls. CFA injection enhanced neuronal excitability as evidenced by depolarization of resting membrane potentials, reduction in rheobase, and an increase in number of action potentials evoked by 2 and 3 times rheobase current stimulation and by a ramp current stimulation of TG neurons innervating the TMJ area. CFA injection also led to a reduction of IK but not IA current density of TG neurons. Application of AOAA in TMJ area reduced the production of H2S in TGs and reversed the enhanced neural hyperexcitability and increased the IK currents of TG neurons. These data together with our previous report indicate that endogenous H2S generating enzyme CBS plays an

  9. Glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase are regulated in response to nitrogen availability in Myocbacterium smegmatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Paul

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assimilation of nitrogen is an essential process in all prokaryotes, yet a relatively limited amount of information is available on nitrogen metabolism in the mycobacteria. The physiological role and pathogenic properties of glutamine synthetase (GS have been extensively investigated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, little is known about this enzyme in other mycobacterial species, or the role of an additional nitrogen assimilatory pathway via glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, in the mycobacteria as a whole. We investigated specific enzyme activity and transcription of GS and as well as both possible isoforms of GDH (NAD+- and NADP+-specific GDH under varying conditions of nitrogen availability in Mycobacterium smegmatis as a model for the mycobacteria. Results It was found that the specific activity of the aminating NADP+-GDH reaction and the deaminating NAD+-GDH reaction did not change appreciably in response to nitrogen availability. However, GS activity as well as the deaminating NADP+-GDH and aminating NAD+-GDH reactions were indeed significantly altered in response to exogenous nitrogen concentrations. Transcription of genes encoding for GS and the GDH isoforms were also found to be regulated under our experimental conditions. Conclusions The physiological role and regulation of GS in M. smegmatis was similar to that which has been described for other mycobacteria, however, in our study the regulation of both NADP+- and NAD+-GDH specific activity in M. smegmatis appeared to be different to that of other Actinomycetales. It was found that NAD+-GDH played an important role in nitrogen assimilation rather than glutamate catabolism as was previously thought, and is it's activity appeared to be regulated in response to nitrogen availability. Transcription of the genes encoding for NAD+-GDH enzymes seem to be regulated in M. smegmatis under the conditions tested and may contribute to the changes in enzyme activity

  10. Structural Aspects of Phenylalanylation and Quality Control in Three Major Forms of Phenylalanyl-tRNA Synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Klipcan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are a canonical set of enzymes that specifically attach corresponding amino acids to their cognate transfer RNAs in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus. The aaRSs display great differences in primary sequence, subunit size, and quaternary structure. Existence of three types of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS—bacterial (αβ2, eukaryotic/archaeal cytosolic (αβ2, and mitochondrial α—is a prominent example of structural diversity within the aaRSs family. Although archaeal/eukaryotic and bacterial PheRSs share common topology of the core domains and the B3/B4 interface, where editing activity of heterotetrameric PheRSs is localized, the detailed investigation of the three-dimensional structures from three kingdoms revealed significant variations in the local design of their synthetic and editing sites. Moreover, as might be expected from structural data eubacterial, Thermus thermophilus and human cytoplasmic PheRSs acquire different patterns of tRNAPhe anticodon recognition.

  11. A WHEP Domain Regulates the Dynamic Structure and Activity of Caenorhabditis elegans Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Yao; Chien, Chin-I; Chang, Chia-Pei; Lin, Bo-Chun; Wang, Chien-Chia

    2016-08-05

    WHEP domains exist in certain eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and play roles in tRNA or protein binding. We present evidence herein that cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms of Caenorhabditis elegans glycyl-tRNA synthetase (CeGlyRS) are encoded by the same gene (CeGRS1) through alternative initiation of translation. The cytoplasmic form possessed an N-terminal WHEP domain, whereas its mitochondrial isoform possessed an extra N-terminal sequence consisting of an mitochondrial targeting signal and an appended domain. Cross-species complementation assays showed that CeGRS1 effectively rescued the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial defects of a yeast GRS1 knock-out strain. Although both forms of CeGlyRS efficiently charged the cytoplasmic tRNAs(Gly) of C. elegans, the mitochondrial form was much more efficient than its cytoplasmic counterpart in charging the mitochondrial tRNA(Gly) isoacceptor, which carries a defective TψC hairpin. Despite the WHEP domain per se lacking tRNA binding activity, deletion of this domain reduced the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Most interestingly, the deletion mutant possessed a higher thermal stability and a somewhat lower structural flexibility. Our study suggests a role for the WHEP domain as a regulator of the dynamic structure and activity of the enzyme. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Preparative synthesis of beta-L-malyl-coenzyme A assisted by malyl-coenzyme A synthetase from Pseudomonas AM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willibald, B; Boves, H; Holler, E

    1995-05-20

    beta-L-Malyl-CoA was synthesized from L-malate, CoA, and ATP in the presence of catalytic amounts of L-malyl-CoA synthetase (thiokinase) from Pseudomona AM1, which had been 50-fold purified by protamine sulfate precipitation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, and affinity chromatography on High Trap Blue in less than 2 days. The homogeneous enzyme was free of L-malyl-CoA lyase and showed 63% homology with succinyl-CoA synthetase from Thermus aquaticus in its N-terminal sequences. Yields of beta-L-[14C]malyl-CoA(1-10 mumol) were 70% before and 65% after purification in 0.1-0.5 mumol portions by high-performance liquid chromatography on a MN Nucleosil 100-7 C8 column. For most biochemical work, the product was partially purified with an overall 45% yield by chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel. The identity of the compound as beta-L-malyl-CoA was verified by chemical and enzymatic tests, and also in comparison with its chemically synthesized counterpart. The enzymatic synthesis, especially of radioactively labeled beta-L-malyl-CoA, is considerably faster, higher in yield, and less problematic than chemical synthesis.

  13. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Thermus aquaticus succinyl-CoA synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, Michael A. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H7 (Canada); Brownie, Edward R.; Hayakawa, Koto; Fraser, Marie E., E-mail: frasm@ucalgary.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H7 (Canada)

    2007-05-01

    Attempts to crystallize succinyl-CoA synthetase from the thermophile T. aquaticus were thwarted by proteolysis of the β-subunit and preferential crystallization of a truncated form. Crystals of the full-length enzyme were grown after the purification protocol was modified to include frequent additions of protease inhibitors. Succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) is an enzyme of the citric acid cycle and is thus found in most species. To date, there are no structures available of SCS from a thermophilic organism. To investigate how the enzyme adapts to higher temperatures, SCS from Thermus aquaticus was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Attempts to crystallize the enzyme were thwarted by proteolysis of the β-subunit and preferential crystallization of the truncated form. Crystals of full-length SCS were grown after the purification protocol was modified to include frequent additions of protease inhibitors. The resulting crystals, which diffract to 2.35 Å resolution, are of the protein in complex with Mn{sup 2+}-GDP.

  14. Disrupted function and axonal distribution of mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, Albena; Irobi, Joy; Thomas, Florian P; Van Dijck, Patrick; Meerschaert, Kris; Dewil, Maarten; Dierick, Ines; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Rao, Chitharanjan V; Tournev, Ivailo; Gondim, Francisco A A; D'Hooghe, Marc; Van Gerwen, Veerle; Callaerts, Patrick; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Timmermans, Jean-Pièrre; Robberecht, Wim; Gettemans, Jan; Thevelein, Johan M; De Jonghe, Peter; Kremensky, Ivo; Timmerman, Vincent

    2006-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies are common disorders of the peripheral nervous system caused by demyelination or axonal degeneration, or a combination of both features. We previously assigned the locus for autosomal dominant intermediate CMT neuropathy type C (DI-CMTC) to chromosome 1p34-p35. Here we identify two heterozygous missense mutations (G41R and E196K) and one de novo deletion (153-156delVKQV) in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YARS) in three unrelated families affected with DI-CMTC. Biochemical experiments and genetic complementation in yeast show partial loss of aminoacylation activity of the mutant proteins, and mutations in YARS, or in its yeast ortholog TYS1, reduce yeast growth. YARS localizes to axonal termini in differentiating primary motor neuron and neuroblastoma cultures. This specific distribution is significantly reduced in cells expressing mutant YARS proteins. YARS is the second aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase found to be involved in CMT, thereby linking protein-synthesizing complexes with neurodegeneration.

  15. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-05

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwaki, Jun [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Suzuki, Ryuichiro [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Research Centre for Glycoscience, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Fujimoto, Zui, E-mail: zui@affrc.go.jp; Momma, Mitsuru [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Kuno, Atsushi [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Research Centre for Glycoscience, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Hasegawa, Tsunemi [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon A. pernix K1 was cloned, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 Å, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 Å resolution at 100 K. Hyperthermophilic archaeal tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified by Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography following heat treatment at 363 K. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies were obtained under optimized crystallization conditions in the presence of 1.5 M ammonium sulfate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.1, c = 196.2 Å, and diffracted to beyond 2.15 Å resolution at 100 K.

  17. Molecular recognition of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2009-05-01

    The identity elements of transfer RNA are the molecular basis for recognition by each cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. In the archaea system, the tryptophan tRNA identity has not been determined in detail. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) from the hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of tryptophan tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpression of A. pernix TrpRS. Substitution of the discriminator base, A73, impaired tryptophan incorporation activity. Changing the G1-C72 base pair to other base pairs also decreased the aminoacylation activity. Substitutions of anticodon CCA revealed that the C34 and C35 mutants dramatically reduced aminoacylation with tryptophan, but the A36 mutants had the same activity as the wild type. The results indicate that the anticodon nucleotides C34, C35, discriminator base A73 and G1-C72 base pair are major recognition sites for A. pernix TrpRS.

  18. Genetic Code Optimization for Cotranslational Protein Folding: Codon Directional Asymmetry Correlates with Antiparallel Betasheets, tRNA Synthetase Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Seligmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new codon property, codon directional asymmetry in nucleotide content (CDA, reveals a biologically meaningful genetic code dimension: palindromic codons (first and last nucleotides identical, codon structure XZX are symmetric (CDA = 0, codons with structures ZXX/XXZ are 5′/3′ asymmetric (CDA = −1/1; CDA = −0.5/0.5 if Z and X are both purines or both pyrimidines, assigning negative/positive (−/+ signs is an arbitrary convention. Negative/positive CDAs associate with (a Fujimoto's tetrahedral codon stereo-table; (b tRNA synthetase class I/II (aminoacylate the 2′/3′ hydroxyl group of the tRNA's last ribose, respectively; and (c high/low antiparallel (not parallel betasheet conformation parameters. Preliminary results suggest CDA-whole organism associations (body temperature, developmental stability, lifespan. Presumably, CDA impacts spatial kinetics of codon-anticodon interactions, affecting cotranslational protein folding. Some synonymous codons have opposite CDA sign (alanine, leucine, serine, and valine, putatively explaining how synonymous mutations sometimes affect protein function. Correlations between CDA and tRNA synthetase classes are weaker than between CDA and antiparallel betasheet conformation parameters. This effect is stronger for mitochondrial genetic codes, and potentially drives mitochondrial codon-amino acid reassignments. CDA reveals information ruling nucleotide-protein relations embedded in reversed (not reverse-complement sequences (5′-ZXX-3′/5′-XXZ-3′.

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors of the tuberculosis target, phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from Penicillium griseofulvum CPCC-400528

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ning Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS, a member of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family, was the new target of anti-tubercular drug discovery. In an attempt to fully exploit the new potential anti-tuberculosis drugs presented in micro-organisms, we developed a high-throughput screening assay against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb PheRS and then screened a library consisting of 32,000 strains and 1500 natural product-derived compounds. One potent hit extract of Penicillium griseofulvum CPCC-400528 was identified. In this study, isopatulin (1, (+-epiepoformin (2 and gentisyl alcohol (3, three patulin-producing intermediates, together with three indole-tetramic acids, α-cyclopiazonic acid (4, β-cyclopiazonic acid (5 and iso-α-cyclopiazonic acid (6, were isolated and identified as bioactive constituents from P. griseofulvum CPCC-400528. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1, 3, 4, and 5 exhibited Mtb PheRS-inhibiting activities, as well as moderate to weak anti-tuberculosis activities against Mtb H37Rv.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl acid amido synthetase mediates metabolic crosstalk in auxin and salicylic acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Corey S; Sherp, Ashley M; Zubieta, Chloe; Alvarez, Sophie; Schraft, Evelyn; Marcellin, Romain; Ramirez, Loren; Jez, Joseph M

    2016-11-29

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl acid amido synthetase Gretchen Hagen 3.5 (AtGH3.5) conjugates both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and salicylic acid (SA) to modulate auxin and pathogen response pathways. To understand the molecular basis for the activity of AtGH3.5, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with IAA and AMP. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that the substrate preference of AtGH3.5 is wider than originally described and includes the natural auxin phenylacetic acid (PAA) and the potential SA precursor benzoic acid (BA). Residues that determine IAA versus BA substrate preference were identified. The dual functionality of AtGH3.5 is unique to this enzyme although multiple IAA-conjugating GH3 proteins share nearly identical acyl acid binding sites. In planta analysis of IAA, PAA, SA, and BA and their respective aspartyl conjugates were determined in wild-type and overexpressing lines of A thaliana This study suggests that AtGH3.5 conjugates auxins (i.e., IAA and PAA) and benzoates (i.e., SA and BA) to mediate crosstalk between different metabolic pathways, broadening the potential roles for GH3 acyl acid amido synthetases in plants.

  1. A paralog of lysyl-tRNA synthetase aminoacylates a conserved lysine residue in translation elongation factor P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Sumida, Tomomi; Ishii, Ryohei; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-09-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) paralogs with unknown functions exist in various species. We now report novel 'protein lysylation' by an Escherichia coli lysyl-tRNA synthetase paralog, GenX/PoxA/YjeA. X-ray crystallographic analysis shows that the structure of the GenX protein resembles that of a class II aaRS. Further in vitro studies reveal that it specifically aminoacylates EF-P with lysine. The shape of the protein substrate mimics that of the L-shaped tRNA, and its lysylation site corresponds to the tRNA 3' end. Thus, we show how the aaRS architecture can be adapted to achieve aminoacylation of a specific protein. Moreover, in vivo analyses reveal that the translation elongation factor P (EF-P) lysylation by GenX is enhanced by YjeK (lysine 2,3-aminomutase paralog), which is encoded next to the EF-P gene, and might convert alpha-lysyl-EF-P to beta-lysyl-EF-P. In vivo analyses indicate that the EF-P modification by GenX and YjeK is essential for cell survival.

  2. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency is a condition that affects how the ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SL, Raff ML. Novel mutations in CPT 1A define molecular heterogeneity of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I deficiency. ... What is newborn screening? New Pages type 2 diabetes mitochondrial complex I deficiency mitochondrial complex V deficiency ...

  6. Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... deficient ” or has a “ vitamin deficiency ”. What is vitamin K and why is it important? Vitamin K is ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... methyloxidase deficiency can cause nausea, vomiting, dehydration, low blood pressure, extreme tiredness (fatigue), and muscle weakness. Affected infants ...

  8. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...... identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO...... GHD compared with controls. RESULTS: Total morbidity was significantly increased in the GHD patients. HR for CO males: 3.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.7-3.7), CO females: 3.2 (95% CI: 2.6-3.9), AO males: 2.9 (95% CI: 2.6-3.2), and AO females: 3.2 (95% CI: 2.8-3.6). In 18 out of 20 chapters from...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 deficiency Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK): Phosphoglycerate Kinase Deficiency (PDF) General Information ...

  10. Assembly of the novel five-component apicomplexan multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex is driven by the hybrid scaffold protein Tg-p43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M van Rooyen

    Full Text Available In Toxoplasma gondii, as in other eukaryotes, a subset of the amino-acyl-tRNA synthetases are arranged into an abundant cytoplasmic multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (MARS complex. Through a series of genetic pull-down assays, we have identified the enzymes of this complex as: methionyl-, glutaminyl-, glutamyl-, and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases, and we show that the N-terminal GST-like domain of a partially disordered hybrid scaffold protein, Tg-p43, is sufficient for assembly of the intact complex. Our gel filtration studies revealed significant heterogeneity in the size and composition of isolated MARS complexes. By targeting the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases subunit, which was found exclusively in the complete 1 MDa complex, we were able to directly visualize MARS particles in the electron microscope. Image analyses of the negative stain data revealed the observed heterogeneity and instability of these complexes to be driven by the intrinsic flexibility of the domain arrangements within the MARS complex. These studies provide unique insights into the assembly of these ubiquitous but poorly understood eukaryotic complexes.

  11. In vivo footprinting of the carbamoylphosphate synthetase I cAMP-response unit indicates important roles for FoxA and PKA in formation of the enhanceosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenkamp, M.; Stallen, J. M. P.; Lamers, W. H.; Gaemers, I. C.

    2006-01-01

    The expression of carbamoylphosphate synthetase-I (CPS), the first and rate-determining enzyme of the urea cycle, is regulated at the transcriptional level by glucocorticoids and glucagon, the latter acting via cyclic AMP (cAMP). The hormonal response is mediated by a distal enhancer located 6.3 kb

  12. Crystal structures at 2.5 Angstrom resolution of seryl-tRNA synthetase complexed with two analogs of seryl adenylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belrhali, H.; Yaremchuk, A.; Tukalo, M.

    1994-01-01

    Crystal structures of seryl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus complexed with two different analogs of seryl adenylate have been determined at 2.5 Angstrom resolution. The first complex is between the enzyme and seryl-hydroxamate-AMP (adenosine monophosphate), produced enzymatically...

  13. scsB, a cDNA encoding the hydrogenosomal beta subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase from the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix frontalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brondijk, THC; Durand, R; vanderGiezen, M; Gottschal, JC; Prins, RA; Fevre, M

    1996-01-01

    A clone containing a Neocallimastix frontalis cDNA assumed to encode the beta subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCSB) was identified by sequence homology with prokaryotic and eukaryotic counterparts. An open reading frame of 1311 bp was found. The deduced 437 amino acid sequence showed a high

  14. In vivo study of developmental changes in carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I in rat liver. Repression of the enzyme synthesis immediately after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, A; Kitagawa, Y; Sugimoto, E

    1983-01-20

    The regulatory mechanism of the developmental increase of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I in fetal and neonatal rat liver was studied in vivo. The appearance and rapid increase of the enzyme in late fetal period were caused by de novo synthesis of the enzyme protein. The amount of the enzyme protein analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was proportional to the enzyme activity throughout the period of development. No indication was observed for preexisting protein which could be converted into the active protein. A novel system for the in vivo study of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I synthesis was developed. Hepatocytes, mechanically dispersed by repeated passage of the tissue through a pipet, incorporated [35S]methionine into the enzyme. Taking advantage of this system, the regulation of the enzyme synthesis was studied. In vivo synthesis of the enzyme was detected at 4 days before birth and rapidly increased until 1 day before birth. However, the enzyme synthesis was markedly repressed after birth, when the amount of carmamoyl-phosphate synthetase I itself reached the adult level. This result was in a clear contrast with the constant level of the translatable mRNA (Raymond, Y. and Shore, G.C. (1981) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 656, 111-119) and suggested that post-transcriptional regulation is important in addition to the level of mRNA for the regulation of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I level.

  15. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase Gln1;2 is the main isozyme contributing to GS1 activity and can be up-regulated to relieve ammonium toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao; de Bang, Thomas Christian; Pedersen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic GS1 (Gln synthetase) is central for ammonium assimilation in plants. High ammonium treatment enhanced the expression of the GS1 isogene Gln-1;2 encoding a low-affinity high-capacity GS1 protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) shoots. Under the same conditions, the expression of th...

  16. Genetic Diversity of Polyketide Synthase/Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in Isolates of the Barley Net Blotch Fungus Pyrenophora teres f. teres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multifunctional enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of diverse small molecules (e.g., mycotoxins and phytotoxins) in filamentous ascomycetes. Both PKS and NRPS genes are present in fungal genomes as large gene families but...

  17. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  18. Genetics Home Reference: CLPB deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or severe CLPB deficiency have clouding of the lenses of the eyes ( cataracts ) from birth (congenital) or ... Lung Cancer Awareness Month Celebrating National Family Health History Day All Bulletins Features What are genome editing ...

  19. Reconstructive surgery for fibular deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatilov, O E; Rozkov, A V; Cheminova, T V

    1991-08-01

    Three types of fibular deficiency are described which determine the nature of the surgery and prosthesis required. The surgical management of 50 patients who had a total of 103 operations is described.

  20. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  1. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A. S.; Pedersen, O. B.; Magnussen, K.

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  2. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  3. Autophagy induction by tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Sang Su; Suk, Jinkyu; Choi, Ji Hye; Yang, Seungkyung; Kim, Jin Woo; Sohn, Seonghyang; Chung, Jae Hoon; Hong, Yong Hee; Lee, Dong Hwan; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Min, Hyesun; Fu, Ya-Min; Meadows, Gary G

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency is a genetic disorder associated with a variety of metabolic syndromes such as phenylketonuria (PKU). In this article, the signaling pathway by which BH4 deficiency inactivates mTORC1 leading to the activation of the autophagic pathway was studied utilizing BH4-deficient Spr-/- mice generated by the knockout of the gene encoding sepiapterin reductase (SR) catalyzing BH4 synthesis. We found that mTORC1 signaling was inactivated and autophagic pathway was activated in tissues from Spr-/- mice. This study demonstrates that tyrosine deficiency causes mTORC1 inactivation and subsequent activation of autophagic pathway in Spr-/- mice. Therapeutic tyrosine diet completely rescued dwarfism and mTORC1 inhibition but inactivated autophagic pathway in Spr-/- mice. Tyrosine-dependent inactivation of mTORC1 was further supported by mTORC1 inactivation in Pahenu2 mouse model lacking phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah). NIH3T3 cells grown under the condition of tyrosine restriction exhibited autophagy induction. However, mTORC1 activation by RhebQ64L, a positive regulator of mTORC1, inactivated autophagic pathway in NIH3T3 cells under tyrosine-deficient conditions. In addition, this study first documents mTORC1 inactivation and autophagy induction in PKU patients with BH4 deficiency. PMID:21795851

  4. The Acyl-CoA synthetases encoded within FAA1 and FAA4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae function as components of the fatty acid transport system linking import, activation, and intracellular Utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Black, P N; Zhao, X D

    2001-01-01

    Exogenous long-chain fatty acids are activated to coenzyme A derivatives prior to metabolic utilization. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation of these compounds prior to metabolic utilization proceeds through the fatty acyl-CoA synthetases Faa1p and Faa4p. Faa1p or Faa4p...... enzymes acyl-CoA oxidase (POX1) and medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (FAA2). These data support the hypothesis that fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (Faa1p or Faa4p) functions as a component of the fatty acid import system by linking import and activation of exogenous fatty acids to intracellular utilization...

  5. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency resulting from CA5A alterations presents with hyperammonemia in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Karnebeek, Clara D; Sly, William S; Ross, Colin J; Salvarinova, Ramona; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Santra, Saikat; Shyr, Casper; Horvath, Gabriella A; Eydoux, Patrice; Lehman, Anna M; Bernard, Virginie; Newlove, Theresa; Ukpeh, Henry; Chakrapani, Anupam; Preece, Mary Anne; Ball, Sarah; Pitt, James; Vallance, Hilary D; Coulter-Mackie, Marion; Nguyen, Hien; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Bhavsar, Amit P; Sinclair, Graham; Waheed, Abdul; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2014-03-06

    Four children in three unrelated families (one consanguineous) presented with lethargy, hyperlactatemia, and hyperammonemia of unexplained origin during the neonatal period and early childhood. We identified and validated three different CA5A alterations, including a homozygous missense mutation (c.697T>C) in two siblings, a homozygous splice site mutation (c.555G>A) leading to skipping of exon 4, and a homozygous 4 kb deletion of exon 6. The deleterious nature of the homozygous mutation c.697T>C (p.Ser233Pro) was demonstrated by reduced enzymatic activity and increased temperature sensitivity. Carbonic anhydrase VA (CA-VA) was absent in liver in the child with the homozygous exon 6 deletion. The metabolite profiles in the affected individuals fit CA-VA deficiency, showing evidence of impaired provision of bicarbonate to the four enzymes that participate in key pathways in intermediary metabolism: carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (urea cycle), pyruvate carboxylase (anaplerosis, gluconeogenesis), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (branched chain amino acids catabolism). In the three children who were administered carglumic acid, hyperammonemia resolved. CA-VA deficiency should therefore be added to urea cycle defects, organic acidurias, and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency as a treatable condition in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia in the neonate and young child. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The implication of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase gene mutations in modification of Plasmodium falciparum characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elbasit, Ishraga E; Alifrangis, Michael; Khalil, Insaf F

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) are enzymes of central importance in parasite metabolism. The dhfr and dhps gene mutations are known to be associated with sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) resistance. OBJECTIVE: To investigate...... the effects of dhfr/dhps mutations on parasite characteristics other than SP resistance. METHOD: Parasite infections obtained from 153 Sudanese patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria treated with SP or SP + chloroquine, were successfully genotyped at nine codons in the dhfr/dhps genes by PCR......-ELISA. RESULTS & CONCLUSION: Mutations were detected in dhfr at N51I, S108N and C59R, and in at dhps at A/S436F, A437G, K540E and A581G, the maximum number of mutations per infection were five. Based on number of mutant codons per infection (multiplicity of mutation, MOM), the infections were organized into six...

  7. The Cell Wall Teichuronic Acid Synthetase (TUAS Is an Enzyme Complex Located in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Micrococcus luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyi Lynn Deng

    2010-01-01

    composed of disaccharide repeating units [-4-β-D-ManNAcAp-(1→6α-D-Glcp−1-]n, which is covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan on the inner cell wall and extended to the outer surface of the cell envelope. An enzyme complex responsible for the TUA chain biosynthesis was purified and characterized. The 440 kDa enzyme complex, named teichuronic acid synthetase (TUAS, is an octomer composed of two kinds of glycosyltransferases, Glucosyltransferase, and ManNAcA-transferase, which is capable of catalyzing the transfer of disaccharide glycosyl residues containing both glucose and the N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid residues. TUAS displays hydrophobic properties and is found primarily associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The purified TUAS contains carotinoids and lipids. TUAS activity is diminished by phospholipase digestion. We propose that TUAS serves as a multitasking polysaccharide assembling station on the bacterial membrane.

  8. Disruption of plastid acyl:acyl carrier protein synthetases increases medium chain fatty acid accumulation in seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjellström, Henrik; Strawsine, Merissa; Silva, Jillian; Cahoon, Edgar B; Ohlrogge, John B

    2013-04-02

    Engineering transgenic plants that accumulate high levels of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) has been least successful for shorter chain lengths (e.g., C8). We demonstrate that one limitation is the activity of acyl-ACP synthetase (AAE) that re-activates fatty acids released by acyl-ACP thioesterases. Seed expression of Cuphea pulcherrima FATB acyl-ACP thioesterase in a double mutant lacking AAE15/16 increased 8:0 accumulation almost 2-fold compared to expression in wild type. These results also provide an in planta demonstration that AAE enzymes participate not only in activation of exogenously added MCFA but also in activation of MCFA synthesized in plastids. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescence study on ligand induced conformational changes of glutamine synthetase from Bacillus brevis Bb G1 under sporulating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUJA ABRAHAM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase, an important enzyme of nitrogen metabolism, was purified under sporulating conditions (GSala. The effect of ligands on the tryptophan fluorescence of the purified enzyme GSala was investigated. With increasing concentrations of L-glutamine in GSala, a blue shift in emission maximum with an increase in fluorescence intensity and decrease in life times were observed compared to the emission maximum, fluorescence intensity and life times of GSala. With increasing concentrations of glycine in GSala, a shift in emission maximum, change in fluorescence intensity and change in lifetimes were observed compared to the emission maximum, fluorescence intensity and life times of GSala. These observations strongly support the possibility that GSala undergoes a conformational change on binding with ligands and each ligand produced different conformational changes in GSala. Also, different concentrations of each ligand produced different protein conformations in the enzyme GSala.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of putative threonyl-tRNA synthetases from Aeropyrum pernix and Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoru; Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Miyashita, Yu Ichiro; Sato, Yoshiteru; Hoque, Md Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Yogiashi, Masataka; Tsunoda, Masaru; Dock-Bregeon, Anne Catherine; Moras, Dino; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Takénaka, Akio

    2008-10-01

    Threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) plays an essential role in protein synthesis by catalyzing the aminoacylation of tRNA(Thr) and editing misacylation. ThrRS generally contains an N-terminal editing domain, a catalytic domain and an anticodon-binding domain. The sequences of the editing domain in ThrRSs from archaea differ from those in bacteria and eukaryotes. Furthermore, several creanarchaea including Aeropyrum pernix K1 and Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 contain two genes encoding either the catalytic or the editing domain of ThrRS. To reveal the structural basis for this evolutionary divergence, the two types of ThrRS from the crenarchaea A. pernix and S. tokodaii have been overexpressed in Eschericha coli, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and the structure of a selenomethionine-labelled A. pernix type-1 ThrRS crystal has been solved using the MAD method.

  11. Associations of antifolate resistance in vitro and point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase genes of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antifolate antimalarials like sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine are used as second-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria patients who fail to respond to chloroquine. The efficacy of the sulfa-pyrimethamine combination in the treatment is also compromised by the development of resistance in the parasite. Resistance to these drugs has been shown to encode with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase genes. Settings: An experimental study. Maerial and methods: Forty clinical isolates collected from different geographical locations in India were used to assess the relationships between resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and mutations in P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS. In vitro drug susceptibility and mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were also done. Results: It was observed that a number of isolates possessed mutant genotypes and showed low sensitivity to SP in vitro. Of the 40 clinical isolates studied, 87.5% had DHFR and 15% had DHPS gene mutations. As observed from PCR results, 55( (22/40 presented double mutation of DHFR Arg-59 and Asn-108 and 32.5 % (13/40 had single mutant type allele of Asn-108. Of the 40 isolates, 10 % (4/40 presented doubly mutated forms of DHPS Phe-436 and Thr-613 and single mutant type allele Gly-581 was detected in 5 % (2/40 isolates. Parasites carrying double or single mutant forms of DHFR/DHPS showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of both pyrimethamine (760-6754 nM; r=0.69 and sulfadoxine (108 - 540 mM; r=0.87 when compared to sensitive and resistant strains. Conclusion: Though there was a correlation between molecular techniques and in vitro drug sensitivity profiles, the relevance of these findings to the clinical efficacy of SP combination drugs needs to be established by controlled clinical trials.

  12. PPARδ activation induces hepatic long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 expression in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Dong, Bin; Shende, Vikram Ravindra; Liu, Jingwen

    2017-01-01

    The arachidonic acid preferred long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is a key enzyme for fatty acid metabolism in various metabolic tissues. In this study, we utilized hamsters fed a normal chow diet, a high-fat diet or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD) as animal models to explore novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for ACSL4 expression under hyperlipidemic conditions. Through cloning hamster ACSL4 homolog and tissue profiling ACSL4 mRNA and protein expressions we observed a selective upregulation of ACSL4 in testis and liver of HCHFD fed animals. Examination of transcriptional activators of the ACSL family revealed an increased hepatic expression of PPARδ but not PPARα in HCHFD fed hamsters. To explore a role of PPARδ in dietary cholesterol-mediated upregulation of ACSL4, we administered a PPARδ specific agonist L165041 to normolipidemic and dyslipidemic hamsters. We observed significant increases of hepatic ACSL4 mRNA and protein levels in all L165041-treated hamsters as compared to control animals. The induction of ACSL4 expression by L165041 in liver tissue in vivo was recapitulated in human primary hepatocytes and hepatocytes isolated from hamster and mouse. Moreover, employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we showed that depletion of PPARδ in hamster hepatocytes specifically reduced ACSL4 expression. Finally, utilizing HepG2 as a model system, we demonstrate that PPARδ activation leads to increased ACSL4 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and consequently higher arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase activity. Taken together, we have discovered a novel PPARδ-mediated regulatory mechanism for ACSL4 expression in liver tissue and cultured hepatic cells. PMID:25645621

  13. The Combination of Arginine Deprivation and 5-Fluorouracil Improves Therapeutic Efficacy in Argininosuccinate Synthetase Negative Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angkana Thongkum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS, a key enzyme to synthesize arginine is down regulated in many tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Similar to previous reports, we have found the decrease in ASS expression in poorly differentiated HCC. These ASS(- tumors are auxotrophic for arginine. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20, which degrades arginine, has shown activity in these tumors, but the antitumor effect is not robust and hence combination treatment is needed. Herein, we have elucidated the effectiveness of ADI-PEG20 combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU in ASS(-HCC by targeting urea cycle and pyrimidine metabolism using four HCC cell lines as model. SNU398 and SNU387 express very low levels of ASS or ASS(- while Huh-1, and HepG2 express high ASS similar to normal cells. Our results showed that the augmented cytotoxic effect of combination treatment only occurs in SNU398 and SNU387, and not in HepG2 and Huh-1 (ASS(+ cells, and is partly due to reduced anti-apoptotic proteins X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein (Mcl-1 and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2. Importantly, lack of ASS also influences essential enzymes in pyrimidine synthesis (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase2, aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydrooratase (CAD and thymidylate synthase (TS and malate dehydrogenase-1 (MDH-1 in TCA cycle. ADI-PEG20 treatment decreased these enzymes and made them more vulnerable to 5-FU. Transfection of ASS restored these enzymes and abolished the sensitivity to ADI-PEG20 and combination treatment. Overall, our data suggest that ASS influences multiple enzymes involved in 5-FU sensitivity. Combining ADI-PEG20 and 5-FU may be effective to treat ASS(-hepatoma and warrants further clinical investigation.

  14. Role of 4-Hydroxybutyrate-CoA Synthetase in the CO2 Fixation Cycle in Thermoacidophilic Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, AS; Han, YJ; Bennett, RK; Adams, MWW; Kelly, RM

    2013-02-08

    Metallosphaera sedula is an extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon that grows heterotrophically on peptides and chemolithoautotrophically on hydrogen, sulfur, or reduced metals as energy sources. During autotrophic growth, carbon dioxide is incorporated into cellular carbon via the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle (3HP/4HB). To date, all of the steps in the pathway have been connected to enzymes encoded in specific genes, except for the one responsible for ligation of coenzyme A (CoA) to 4HB. Although several candidates for this step have been identified through bioinformatic analysis of the M. sedula genome, none have been shown to catalyze this biotransformation. In this report, transcriptomic analysis of cells grown under strict H-2-CO2 autotrophy was consistent with the involvement of Msed_0406 and Msed_0394. Recombinant versions of these enzymes catalyzed the ligation of CoA to 4HB, with similar affinities for 4HB (K-m values of 1.9 and 1.5 mM for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively) but with different rates (1.69 and 0.22 mu mol x min(-1) x mg(-1) for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively). Neither Msed_0406 nor Msed_0394 have close homologs in other Sulfolobales, although low sequence similarity is not unusual for acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. The capacity of these two enzymes to use 4HB as a substrate may have arisen from simple modifications to acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. For example, a single amino acid substitution (W424G) in the active site of the acetate/propionate synthetase (Msed_1353), an enzyme that is highly conserved among the Sulfolobales, changed its substrate specificity to include 4HB. The identification of the 4-HB CoA synthetase now completes the set of enzymes comprising the 3HP/4HB cycle.

  15. Identification and characterization of important residues in the catalytic mechanism of CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase from Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, Louise E; Nelson, Adam; Berry, Alan

    2010-07-01

    Sialylated oligosaccharides, present on mammalian outer-cell surfaces, play vital roles in cellular interactions and some bacteria are able to mimic these structures to evade their host's immune system. It would be of great benefit to the study of infectious and autoimmune diseases and cancers, to understand the pathway of sialylation in detail to enable the design and production of inhibitors and mimetics. Sialylation occurs in two stages, the first to activate sialic acid and the second to transfer it to the target molecule. The activation step is catalysed by the enzyme CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase (CNS). Here we used crystal structures of CNS and similar enzymes to predict residues of importance in the CNS from Neisseria meningitidis. Nine residues were mutated to alanine, and the steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters were measured using a continuous assay to detect one of the products of the reaction, pyrophosphate. Mutations that caused the greatest loss in activity included K142A, D211A, D209A and a series of mutations at residue Q104, highlighted from sequence-alignment studies of related enzymes, demonstrating significant roles for these residues in the catalytic mechanism of CNS. The mutations of D211A and D209A provide strong evidence for a previously proposed metal-binding site in the enzyme, and the results of our mutations at residue Q104 lead us to include this residue in the metal-binding site of an intermediate complex. This suggests that, like the sugar-activating lipopolysaccharide-synthesizing CMP-2-keto-3-deoxy-manno-octonic acid synthetase enzyme KdsB, CNS recruits two Mg(2+) ions during the catalytic cycle.

  16. Common and distinct clinical features in adult patients with anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies: heterogeneity within the syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Hamaguchi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify similarities and differences in the clinical features of adult Japanese patients with individual anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies (anti-ARS Abs. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of 166 adult Japanese patients with anti-ARS Abs detected by immunoprecipitation assays. These patients had visited Kanazawa University Hospital or collaborating medical centers from 2003 to 2009. RESULTS: Anti-ARS Ab specificity included anti-Jo-1 (36%, anti-EJ (23%, anti-PL-7 (18%, anti-PL-12 (11%, anti-KS (8%, and anti-OJ (5%. These anti-ARS Abs were mutually exclusive, except for one serum Ab that had both anti-PL-7 and PL-12 reactivity. Myositis was closely associated with anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, and anti-PL-7, while interstitial lung disease (ILD was correlated with all 6 anti-ARS Abs. Dermatomyositis (DM-specific skin manifestations (heliotrope rash and Gottron's sign were frequently observed in patients with anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, anti-PL-7, and anti-PL-12. Therefore, most clinical diagnoses were polymyositis or DM for anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, and anti-PL-7; clinically amyopathic DM or ILD for anti-PL-12; and ILD for anti-KS and anti-OJ. Patients with anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, and anti-PL-7 developed myositis later if they had ILD alone at the time of disease onset, and most patients with anti-ARS Abs eventually developed ILD if they did not have ILD at disease onset. CONCLUSION: Patients with anti-ARS Abs are relatively homogeneous. However, the distribution and timing of myositis, ILD, and rashes differ among patients with individual anti-ARS Abs. Thus, identification of individual anti-ARS Abs is beneficial to define this rather homogeneous subset and to predict clinical outcomes within the "anti-synthetase syndrome."

  17. Detection of microcystin synthetase genes in health food supplements containing the freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, M L; Jungblut, A-D; Neilan, B A; Rawn, D F K; Vasconcelos, V M

    2005-10-01

    In this study we investigated the presence of toxin-producing cyanobacterial contaminants in food supplements manufactured from blooms of the non-toxic freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Previous reports investigating the contamination of health food supplements with toxin-producing cyanobacteria have used chemical and or biochemical methods such as HPLC, ELISA and protein phosphatase assays. Whilst these studies have drawn attention to the presence of hepatotoxic microcystins in some commercially available food supplements, the methods used do not provide any information on the source of the contaminant. Such information would be useful for the quality control of food supplements produced for human consumption. In this study we applied a molecular technique, involving the amplification of the 16s rRNA gene, the phycocyanin operon, and two genes of the microcystin synthetase gene cluster to show that all 12 food supplement samples, sourced from various internet distributors and containing non-toxic A. flos-aquae, also contained toxigenic cyanobacteria. Sequencing of the microcystin synthetase genes detected in all of the food supplements showed that M. aeruginosa was the organism responsible for the production of microcystins in the samples. The presence of microcystins in the food supplements was confirmed by ELISA, with concentrations within the range of 0.1--4.72 microgg(-1) (microcystin-LR equivalents). Given that the molecular methods applied here are highly sensitive, and show good agreement with the results obtained from ELISA, we believe that they could potentially be used as a quality control technique for food products that contain cyanobacteria.

  18. Kinetic basis for the conjugation of auxin by a GH3 family indole-acetic acid-amido synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S; Hicks, Leslie M; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M

    2010-09-24

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemical mechanisms of these enzymes. Here we use GH3-8 from Oryza sativa (rice; OsGH3-8), which functions as an indole-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetase, for detailed mechanistic studies. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that the OsGH3-8 requires either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) for maximal activity and is specific for aspartate but accepts asparagine as a substrate with a 45-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency and accepts other auxin analogs, including phenyl-acetic acid, indole butyric acid, and naphthalene-acetic acid, as acyl-acid substrates with 1.4-9-fold reductions in k(cat)/K(m) relative to IAA. Initial velocity and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme uses a Bi Uni Uni Bi Ping Pong reaction sequence. In the first half-reaction, ATP binds first followed by IAA. Next, formation of an adenylated IAA intermediate results in release of pyrophosphate. The second half-reaction begins with binding of aspartate, which reacts with the adenylated intermediate to release IAA-Asp and AMP. Formation of a catalytically competent adenylated-IAA reaction intermediate was confirmed by mass spectrometry. These mechanistic studies provide insight on the reaction catalyzed by the GH3 family of enzymes to modulate plant hormone action.

  19. Role of 4-Hydroxybutyrate-CoA Synthetase in the CO2 Fixation Cycle in Thermoacidophilic Archaea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Aaron S.; Han, Yejun; Bennett, Robert K.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Metallosphaera sedula is an extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon that grows heterotrophically on peptides and chemolithoautotrophically on hydrogen, sulfur, or reduced metals as energy sources. During autotrophic growth, carbon dioxide is incorporated into cellular carbon via the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle (3HP/4HB). To date, all of the steps in the pathway have been connected to enzymes encoded in specific genes, except for the one responsible for ligation of coenzyme A (CoA) to 4HB. Although several candidates for this step have been identified through bioinformatic analysis of the M. sedula genome, none have been shown to catalyze this biotransformation. In this report, transcriptomic analysis of cells grown under strict H2-CO2 autotrophy was consistent with the involvement of Msed_0406 and Msed_0394. Recombinant versions of these enzymes catalyzed the ligation of CoA to 4HB, with similar affinities for 4HB (Km values of 1.9 and 1.5 mm for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively) but with different rates (1.69 and 0.22 μmol × min−1 × mg−1 for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively). Neither Msed_0406 nor Msed_0394 have close homologs in other Sulfolobales, although low sequence similarity is not unusual for acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. The capacity of these two enzymes to use 4HB as a substrate may have arisen from simple modifications to acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. For example, a single amino acid substitution (W424G) in the active site of the acetate/propionate synthetase (Msed_1353), an enzyme that is highly conserved among the Sulfolobales, changed its substrate specificity to include 4HB. The identification of the 4-HB CoA synthetase now completes the set of enzymes comprising the 3HP/4HB cycle. PMID:23258541

  20. Lower Selenoprotein T Expression and Immune Response in the Immune Organs of Broilers with Exudative Diathesis Due to Selenium Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tingru; Liu, Tianqi; Tan, Siran; Wan, Na; Zhang, Yiming; Li, Shu

    2017-08-05

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether dietary selenium (Se) deficiency would affect the expression of selenoprotein T (SelT) and immune response in the immune organs of broilers. Changes in expression of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress response caused by Se deficiency can lead to organism damage, which in turn leads to immune response. Sixty (1-day-old) broilers were divided into the control group and Se-deficiency group. Animal models with exudative diathesis were duplicated in the broilers by feeding them Se-deficient diet for 20 days. After the Se-deficient group exhibited symptoms of exudative diathesis, all the broilers were euthanized, and their immune organs were taken for analysis. The tissues including spleen, bursa of Fabricius, and thymus were treated to determine the pathological changes (including microscopic and ultramicroscopic), the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of SelT and its synthetase (SecS and SPS1), cytokine mRNA expression levels, and antioxidant status. The microscopic and ultramicroscopic analyses showed that immune tissues were obviously injured in the Se-deficient group. The mRNA expression of SelT was decreased compared with that in the control group. Meanwhile, the mRNA expression levels of SecS and SPS1 were downregulated. In the Se-deficient group, the mRNA expression levels of IL-1R and IL-1β were higher than those of three control organs. Additionally, the IL-2 and INF-γ mRNA expression levels were lower than those of the control group. The activity of CAT was decreased, and the contents of H2O2 and •OH were increased due to Se deficiency. Pearson method analysis showed that the expression of SelT had a positive correlation with IL-2, INF-γ, SecS, and SPS1 and a negative correlation with IL-1R and IL-1β. In summary, these data indicated that Se-deficient diet decreased the SelT expression and its regulation of oxidative stress, and it inhibited a pleiotropic mechanism of the immune