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Sample records for hollow ds eutectic

  1. Effect of DS Concentration on the PRO Performance Using a 5-Inch Scale Cellulose Triacetate-Based Hollow Fiber Membrane Module

    Masahiro Yasukawa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO performance of a 5-inch scale cellulose triacetate (CTA-based hollow fiber (HF membrane module was evaluated under a wide range of operating conditions (0.0–6.0 MPa of applied pressure, 0.5–2.0 L/min feed solution (FS inlet flow rate, 1.0–6.0 L/min DS inlet flow rate and 0.1–0.9 M draw solution (DS concentration by using a PRO/reverse osmosis (RO hybrid system. The subsequent RO system for DS regeneration enabled the evaluation of the steady-stated module performance. In the case of pilot-scale module operation, since the DS dilution and the feed solution (FS up-concentration had occurred and was not negligible, unlike the lab-scale experiment, PRO performance strongly depended on operating conditions such as inlet flow rates of both the DS and FS concentration. To compare the module performance with different configurations, we proposed a converted parameter in which a difference of the packing density between the spiral wound (SW and the HF module was fairly considered. In the case of HF configuration, because of high packing density, volumetric-based performance was higher than that of SW module, that is, the required number of the module would be less than that of SW module in a full-scale PRO plant.

  2. Directionally solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down method

    Cao, Xue; Su, Haijun; Guo, Fengwei; Tan, Xi; Cao, Lamei

    2016-11-01

    We reported a novel route to prepare directionally solidified (DS) Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) method. The eutectic crystallizations, microstructure characters and evolutions, and their mechanical properties were investigated in detail. The results showed that the Al2O3/GAP eutectic composites can be successfully fabricated through μ-PD method, possessed smooth surface, full density and large crystal size (the maximal size: φ90 mm × 20 mm). At the process of Diameter, the as-solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic presented a combination of "Chinese script" and elongated colony microstructure with complex regular structure. Inside the colonies, the rod-type or lamellar-type eutectic microstructures with ultra-fine GAP surrounded by the Al2O3 matrix were observed. At an appropriate solidificational rate, the binary eutectic exhibited a typical DS irregular eutectic structure of "chinese script" consisting of interpenetrating network of α-Al2O3 and GAP phases without any other phases. Therefore, the interphase spacing was refined to 1-2 µm and the irregular microstructure led to an outstanding vickers hardness of 17.04 GPa and fracture toughness of 6.3 MPa × m1/2 at room temperature.

  3. General characteristics of eutectic alloy solidification mechanisms

    Lemaignan, Clement.

    1977-01-01

    The eutectic alloy sodification was studied in binary systems: solidification of non facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy (theoretical aspects, variation of the lamellar spacing, crystallographic relation between the various phases); solidification of facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy; coupled growth out of eutectic alloy; eutectic nucleation [fr

  4. HEASARC SAOImage DS9

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SAOImage DS9 is an astronomical imaging and data visualization application. DS9 supports FITS images and binary tables, multiple frame buffers, region manipulation,...

  5. Coatings for directional eutectics

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings developed to provide oxidation protection for the directionally-solidified eutectic alloy NiTaC-B (4.4 weight percent Cr) were evaluated. Of seven Co-, Fe- and Ni-base coatings that were initially investigated, best resistance to cyclic oxidation was demonstrated by duplex coatings fabricated by depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam source followed by deposition of an Al overlayer using the pack cementation process. It was found that addition of carbon to the coating alloy substantially eliminated the problem of fiber denudation in TaC-type eutectic alloys. Burner rig cycled NiTaC-B samples coated with Ni-20Cr-5Al-0.1C-0.1Y+Al and rupture-tested at 1100 deg C performed as well as or better than uncoated, vacuum cycled and air-tested NiTaC-13; however, a slight degradation with respect to uncoated material was noted in air-stress rupture tests at 870 deg C for both cycled and uncycled samples.

  6. DS02 uncertainty analysis

    Kaul, Dean C.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Woolson, William A.

    2005-01-01

    In order to avoid the pitfalls that so discredited DS86 and its uncertainty estimates, and to provide DS02 uncertainties that are both defensible and credible, this report not only presents the ensemble uncertainties assembled from uncertainties in individual computational elements and radiation dose components but also describes how these relate to comparisons between observed and computed quantities at critical intervals in the computational process. These comparisons include those between observed and calculated radiation free-field components, where observations include thermal- and fast-neutron activation and gamma-ray thermoluminescence, which are relevant to the estimated systematic uncertainty for DS02. The comparisons also include those between calculated and observed survivor shielding, where the observations consist of biodosimetric measurements for individual survivors, which are relevant to the estimated random uncertainty for DS02. (J.P.N.)

  7. Infiltration SuDS Map

    Dearden, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Infiltration SuDS are sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) that allow surface water to infiltrate to the ground. Examples include soakaways, infiltration basins, infiltration trenches and permeable pavements. Before planning to install Infiltration SuDS, the suitability of the ground should be assessed. The British Geological Survey has developed a bespoke Infiltration SuDS Map that enables a preliminary assessment of the suitability of the ground for infiltration SuDS. Th...

  8. Hollow MEMS

    Larsen, Peter Emil

    Miniaturization of electro mechanical sensor systems to the micro range and beyond has shown impressive sensitivities measuring sample properties like mass, viscosity, acceleration, pressure and force just to name a few applications. In order to enable these kinds of measurements on liquid samples...... a hollow MEMS sensor has been designed, fabricated and tested. Combined density, viscosity, buoyant mass spectrometry and IR absorption spectroscopy are possible on liquid samples and micron sized suspended particles (e.g. single cells). Measurements are based on changes in the resonant behavior...... of these sensors. Optimization of the microfabrication process has led to a process yield of almost 100% .This is achieved despite the fact, that the process still offers a high degree of flexibility. By simple modifications the Sensor shape can be optimized for different size ranges and sensitivities...

  9. Fabrication of polymeric hollow nanospheres, hollow nanocubes and hollow plates

    Cheng, Daming; Xia, Haibing; Chan, Hardy Sze On

    2006-03-01

    A facile strategy for fabricating polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CS) hollow nanostructures with different shapes (sphere, cube and plate) and a wide range of sizes (from 35 to 600 nm) is described. These hollow structures have been fabricated using silver bromide as a single template material for polymer nucleation and growth. PPy-CS hollow nanostructures are formed by reaction with an etching agent to remove the core. These hollow nanostructures have been extensively characterized using various techniques such as TEM, FT-IR, UV-vis, and XRD.

  10. Evaporation Behavior and Characterization of Eutectic Solvent and Ibuprofen Eutectic Solution.

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun; Charoensuksai, Purin

    2016-10-01

    Liquid eutectic system of menthol and camphor has been reported as solvent and co-solvent for some drug delivery systems. However, surprisingly, the phase diagram of menthol-camphor eutectic has not been reported previously. The evaporation behavior, physicochemical, and thermal properties of this liquid eutectic and ibuprofen eutectic solution were characterized in this study. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis indicated that a eutectic point of this system was near to 1:1 menthol/camphor and its eutectic temperature was -1°C. The solubility of ibuprofen in this eutectic was 282.11 ± 6.67 mg mL(-1) and increased the drug aqueous solubility fourfold. The shift of wave number from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated the hydrogen bonding of each compound in eutectic mixture. The weight loss from thermogravimetric analysis of menthol and camphor related to the evaporation and sublimation, respectively. Menthol demonstrated a lower apparent sublimation rate than camphor, and the evaporation rate of eutectic solvent was lower than the sublimation rate of camphor but higher than the evaporation of menthol. The evaporation rate of the ibuprofen eutectic solution was lower than that of the eutectic solvent because ibuprofen did not sublimate. This eutectic solvent prolonged the ibuprofen release with diffusion control. Thus, the beneficial information for thermal behavior and related properties of eutectic solvent comprising menthol-camphor and ibuprofen eutectic solution was attained successfully. The rather low evaporation of eutectic mixture will be beneficial for investigation and tracking the mechanism of transformation from nanoemulsion into nanosuspension in the further study using eutectic as oil phase.

  11. Initial stages of solidification of eutectic alloys

    Lemaignan, Clement

    1980-01-01

    The study of the various initial stages of eutectic solidification - i.e. primary nucleation, eutectic structure formation and stable growth conditions - was undertaken with various techniques including low angle neutron diffusion, in-situ electron microscopy on solidifying alloys and classical metallography. The results obtained allow to discuss the effect of metastable states during primary nucleation, of surface dendrite during eutectic nucleation and also of the crystallographic anisotropy during growth. (author) [fr

  12. Scaling-Up Eutectic Freeze Crystallization

    Genceli, F.E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel crystallization technology, Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC) has been investigated and further developed in this thesis work. EFC operates around the eutectic temperature and composition of aqueous solutions and can be used for recovery of (valuable) dissolved salts (and/or or acids)

  13. The growth of faceted/nonfaceted eutectics

    Suchtelen, J. van

    1976-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the unidirectional solidification of eutectic melts in which one of the phases has a faceted, the other a nonfaceted solid-liquid interface. The occurrence of complex microstructures in such eutectics is explained as a growth phenomenon. The essential condition for the occurrence of such structures is a non-isothermal solid-liquid interface, developing into a faceted-cellular structure. The faceted shape of the cells is imposed by the faceted component of the eutectic. Breakdown to such a cellular structure occurs not only in constitutional-supercooling conditions, but under any circumstances, the cellular period being a function of growth velocity, temperature gradient etc. The two-phase morphology of the eutectic structure is discussed in terms of the relative magnitude of the periods of the cellular and of the eutectic structure. (orig.) [de

  14. Examination of Clustering in Eutectic Microstrcture

    Bortnyik K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The eutectic microstructures are complex microstructures and a hard work to describe it with few numbers. The eutectics builds up eutectic cells. In the cells the phases are clustered. With the development of big databases the data mining also develops, and produces a lot of method to handling the large datasets, and earns information from the sets. One typical method is the clustering, which finds the groups in the datasets. In this article a partitioning and a hierarchical clustering is applied to eutectic structures to find the clusters. In the case of AlMn alloy the K-means algorithm work well, and find the eutectic cells. In the case of ductile cast iron the hierarchical clustering works better. With the combination of the partitioning and hierarchical clustering with the image transformation, an effective method is developed for clustering the objects in the microstructures.

  15. Study of the Decay Bs0→Ds(*)Ds(*)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Ancu, L. S.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Barfuss, A.-F.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Berntzon, L.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calfayan, P.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hansson, P.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoeth, H.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kasper, P.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kaushik, V.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Krop, D.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lam, D.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lesne, V.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Z.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martin, B.; McCarthy, R.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, L.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miettinen, H.; Millet, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mommsen, R. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Monk, J.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Mundal, O.; Mundim, L.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nilsen, H.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Obrant, G.; Ochando, C.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Onoprienko, D.; Oshima, N.; Osta, J.; Otec, R.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padley, P.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Park, S.-J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Pompoš, A.; Pope, B. G.; Popov, A. V.; Potter, C.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Renkel, P.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Siccardi, V.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Svoisky, P.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Tiller, B.; Tissandier, F.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tomoto, M.; Toole, T.; Torchiani, I.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Unalan, R.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Eijk, B.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vint, P.; Vlimant, J.-R.; von Toerne, E.; Voutilainen, M.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wahl, H. D.; Walder, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wenger, A.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, C.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.

    2007-12-01

    We report a study of the decay Bs0→Ds(*)Ds(*) using a data sample corresponding to 1.3fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in 2002 2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. One Ds(*) meson was partially reconstructed in the decay Ds→ϕμν, and the other Ds(*) meson was identified using the decay Ds→ϕπ where no attempt was made to distinguish Ds and Ds* states. For the branching fraction Br(Bs0→Ds(*)Ds(*)) we obtain a 90% C.L. range [0.002,0.080] and central value 0.039-0.017+0.019(stat)-0.015+0.016(syst). This was subsequently used to make the most precise estimate of the width difference ΔΓsCP in the Bs0-B¯s0 system: ΔΓsCP/Γs=0.079-0.035+0.038(stat)-0.030+0.031(syst).

  16. 3ds Max 2012 Bible

    Murdock, Kelly L

    2011-01-01

    Updated version of the bestselling 3ds Max book on the market 3ds Max 2012 Bible is one of the most popular 3ds Max how-tos on the market. If you're a beginner just itching to create something right away, the Quick Start project in Part 1 is for you. If you're an experienced user checking out 3ds Max 2012's latest and greatest features, you'll love the fact that the 3ds Max 2012 Bible continues to be the most comprehensive reference on this highly complex application.Find out what's new, what's tried and true, and how creative you can get using the tips, tricks, and techniques in this must-hav

  17. Structural perfection of directionally solidified lamellar eutectics

    Attallah, T.; Gurzleski, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms for the formation of faults in lamellar eutectics are reviewed, and it is postulated that faults play several roles in eutectic freezing with their exact importance depending on the specific alloy system and the growth conditions. Faults are not the cause of lamellar spiralling although they are necessary for it to occur. Lamellar spiralling is found to occur only when the crystallographic orientations of the two eutectic phases lead to a growth component normal to the lamellar plane, and although some systems such as Pb-Sn normally spiral it is possible for them to achieve orientation relationships where no spiralling occurs

  18. Structure of the aluminium-uranium eutectic

    Ambrozio Filho, F.; Vieira, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The authors discuss the factors which might effect the eutectic structure, including external conditions during solidification as well as factors peculiar to each individual system. They studied the structure of the A1-U eutectic, consisting of the solid solution of uranium in aluminium and UA1 4 , as obtained in ingot moulds and by unidirectional solidification, and found a tendency for the structure to develop in a spiral, in the form of a rhombus. They discuss this structure in terms of certain variables with emphasis on the growth characteristics of the phases comprising the eutectic, the velocity of growth and thermal gradient in the liquid [pt

  19. Morphology of the aluminium-uranium eutectic

    Ambrozio Filho, F.; Vieira, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The factors which might affect the eutectic structure including external condition during solidification as well as factors peculiar to each individual system is discussed. The structure of the Al-U eutectic, consisting of the solid solution of uranium in aluminium and UAl 4 , as obtained in ingot moulds and by unidirectional solidification. The extructure in terms of certain variables with emphasis on the growth characteristics of the phases comprising the eutectic the velocity of growth and thermal gradient in the liquid is also presented [pt

  20. Raman mapping in the elucidation of solid salt eutectic and near eutectic structures

    Berg, Rolf W.; Kerridge, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of the different components of solidified eutectic or near-eutectic salt mixtures (eutectics) was examined by use of Raman microscope mapping of the structures formed when these melts were slowly cooled. Seven binary and one ternary system were investigated. In most cases...... and the composition. When unidirectional cooling was applied it was possible for the system (KCl-Na2SO4, 60:40 mol/mol) to observe lamellar arrangements of the component phases, in an arrangement closely similar to what is frequently found among metallic or ceramic eutectics. Each area, conglomerate or lamellar, did...

  1. Phase-field model of eutectic growth

    Karma, A.

    1994-01-01

    A phase-field model which describes the solidification of a binary eutectic alloy with a simple symmetric phase diagram is introduced and the sharp-interface limit of this model is explored both analytically and numerically

  2. Eutectic Composite Turbine Blade Development

    1976-11-01

    Special Metals Corporation. Several problems were encountered with this heat (DS 729), causing it to be scrapped. These included: runout of 92...of work removed/volume of wheel worn), were found to be 9.7, which is equiva- lent to Astroloy at 9.0, M252 at 10.0, and Udimet 500 at 8.0...fu|.,i|.^,UU4,,i,iW|j|i| TABLE yz RECOMMENDED CONVENTIONAL MACHINING CONDITIONS Surface Grinding (Low Stress) Wheel Speed Table Speed Cross

  3. Nucleation-controlled microstructures and anomalous eutectic formation in undercooled Co-Sn and Ni-Si eutectic melts

    Li, Mingjun; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2003-12-01

    Co-20.5 at. pct Sn and Ni-21.4 at. pct Si eutectic alloys have been levitated and undercooled in an electromagnetic levitator (EML) and then solidified spontaneously at different undercoolings. The original surface and cross-sectional morphologies of these solidified samples consist of separate eutectic colonies regardless of melt undercooling, indicating that microstructures in the free solidification of the eutectic systems are nucleation controlled. Regular lamellae always grow from the periphery of an independent anomalous eutectic grain in each eutectic colony. This typical morphology shows that the basic unit should be a single eutectic colony, when discussing the solidification behavior. Special emphasis is focused on the anomalous eutectic formation after a significant difference in linear kinetic coefficients is recognized for terminal eutectic phases, in particular when a eutectic reaction contains a nonfaceted disordered solid solution and a faceted ordered intermetallic compound as the terminal eutectic phases. It is this remarkable difference in the linear kinetic coefficients that leads to a pronounced difference in kinetic undercoolings. The sluggish kinetics in the interface atomic attachment of the intermetallic compound originates the occurrence of the decoupled growth of two eutectic phases. Hence, the current eutectic models are modified to incorporate kinetic undercooling, in order to account for the competitive growth behavior of eutectic phases in a single eutectic colony. The critical condition for generating the decoupled growth of eutectic phases is proposed. Further analysis reveals that a dimensionless critical undercooling may be appropriate to show the tendency for the anomalous eutectic-forming ability when considering the difference in linear kinetic coefficients of terminal eutectic phases. This qualitative criterion, albeit crude with several approximations and assumptions, can elucidate most of the published experimental results

  4. Growth and Morphology of Rod Eutectics

    Jing Teng; Shan Liu; R. Trivedi

    2008-03-17

    The formation of rod eutectic microstructure is investigated systematically in a succinonitrile-camphor alloy of eutectic composition by using the directional solidification technique. A new rod eutectic configuration is observed in which the rods form with elliptical cylindrical shape. Two different orientations of the ellipse are observed that differ by a 90{sup o} rotation such that the major and the minor axes are interchanged. Critical experiments in thin samples, where a single layer of rods forms, show that the spacing and orientation of the elliptic rods are governed by the growth rate and the sample thickness. In thicker samples, multi layers of rods form with circular cross-section and the scaling law between the spacing and velocity predicted by the Jackson and Hunt model is validated. A theoretical model is developed for a two-dimensional array of elliptical rods that are arranged in a hexagonal or a square array, and the results are shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. The model of elliptic rods is also shown to reduce to that for the circular rod eutectic when the lengths of the two axes are equal, and to the lamellar eutectic model when one of the axes is much larger than the other one.

  5. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions.

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5 x 10(3) kg/m(3) are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites." This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface.

  6. Controllable Synthesis of Functional Hollow Carbon Nanostructures with Dopamine As Precursor for Supercapacitors.

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Jing; Li, Jiansheng; Luo, Rui; Shen, Jinyou; Sun, Xiuyun; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-08-26

    N-doped hollow carbon spheres (N-HCSs) are promising candidates as electrode material for supercapacitor application. In this work, we report a facile one-step synthesis of discrete and highly dispersible N-HCSs with dopamine (DA) as a carbon precursor and TEOS as a structure-assistant agent in a mixture containing water, ethanol, and ammonia. The architectures of resultant N-HCSs, including yolk-shell hollow carbon spheres (YS-HCSs), single-shell hollow carbon spheres (SS-HCSs), and double-shells hollow carbon spheres (DS-HCSs), can be efficiently controlled through the adjustment of the amount of ammonia. To explain the relation and formation mechanism of these hollow carbon structures, the samples during the different synthetic steps, including polymer/silica spheres, carbon/silica spheres and silica spheres by combustion in air, were characterized by TEM. Electrochemical measurements performed on YS-HCSs, SS-HCSs, and DS-HCSs showed high capacitance with 215, 280, and 381 F g(-1), respectively. Moreover, all the nitrogen-doped hollow carbon nanospheres showed a good cycling stability 97.0% capacitive retention after 3000 cycles. Notably, the highest capacitance of DS-HCSs up to 381 F g(-1) is higher than the capacitance reported so far for many carbon-based materials, which may be attributed to the high surface area, hollow structure, nitrogen functionalization, and double-shell architecture. These kinds of N-doped hollow-structured carbon spheres may show promising prospects as advanced energy storage materials and catalyst supports.

  7. Norm for betonkonstruktioner DS411

    Hertz, Kristian

    The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for the structural use of concrete DS 411 contains methods and data for design of fire exposed concrete structures, all of them derived and documented by Kristian Hertz, who is a member of the two project teams writing the chapter. A considerable do...

  8. Microstructure Of MnBi/Bi Eutectic Alloy

    Wilcox, William R.; Eisa, G. F.; Baskaran, B.; Richardson, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Collection of three reports describes studies of directional solidification of MnBi/Bi eutectic alloy. Two of the reports, "Influence of Convection on Lamellar Spacing of Eutectics" and "Influence of Convection on Eutectic Microstructure," establish theoretical foundation for remaining document. Reports seek to quantify effect of convection on concentration field of growing lamellar eutectic. Remaining report, "Study of Eutectic Formation," begins by continuing theoretical developments. New technique under development by one of the authors helps to reveal three-dimensional microstructures of alloys.

  9. Into the depths of deep eutectic solvents

    Rodriguez, N.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Kroon, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been successfully tested in a wide range of applications; however, their high price and complicated synthesis make them infeasible for large scale implementation. A decade ago, a new generation of solvents so called deep eutectic solvents (DESs) was reported for the first

  10. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  11. First observation of the decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ and measurement of its branching ratio.

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-01-18

    We report the observation of the exclusive decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ at the 7.5 standard deviation level using 355 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the relative branching ratio B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)/B(B0-->D-Ds+)=1.44(-0.44)(+0.48). Using the world average value for B(B0-->D-Ds+), we find B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)=(9.4(-4.2)(+4.4))x10(-3). This provides a lower bound DeltaGammasCP/Gammas>or=2B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)>1.2x10(-2) at 95% C.L.

  12. HOLLOW FIBRE MEMBRANE

    Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Kopec, K.K.; Dutczak, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for manufacturing a hollow fibre membrane having a supporting layer and a separating layer, said process comprising: (a)extruding a spinning composition comprising a first polymer and a solvent for the first polymer through an inner annular orifice of a

  13. HOLLOW FIBRE MEMBRANE

    Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Kopec, K.K.; Dutczak, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for manufacturing a hollow fibre membrane having a supporting layer and a separating layer, said process comprising: (a) extruding a spinning composition comprising a first polymer and a solvent for the first polymer through an inner annular orifice of a

  14. Modelling Eutectic Growth in Unmodified and Modified Near-Eutectic Al-Si Alloy

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Taylor, John A.

    2013-01-01

    growth parameters from the literature that depend on the type of modification (unmodified, Na-modified or Sr-modified) are used to describe differences in growth of the alloys. Modelling results are compared with solidification experiments where an Al-12.5wt%Si alloy was cast in unmodified, Na modified......A numerical model that describes solidification of primary aluminium grains and nucleation and growth of eutectic cells is used to analyse the solidification of an Al-12.5wt% Si alloy. Nucleation of eutectic cells is modelled using an Oldfield-type nucleation model where the number of nuclei...... and Sr modified forms. The model confirms experimental observations of how modification and alloy composition influence nucleation, growth and finally the size of eutectic cells in the alloys. Modelling results are used to explain how cooling conditions in the casting act together with the nuclei density...

  15. Hollow bunches production

    Hancock, S

    2017-01-01

    Hollow bunches address the issue of high-brightnessbeams suffering from transverse emittance growth in a strongspace charge regime. During the Proton Synchrotron (PS)injection plateau, the negative space charge tune shift canpush the beam onto theQy=6integer resonance. Modify-ing the longitudinal bunch profile in order to reduce the peakline charge density alleviates the detrimental impact of spacecharge. To this end we first produce longitudinally hollowphase space distributions in the PS Booster by exciting aparametric resonance with the phase loop feedback system.These inherently flat bunches are then transferred to the PS,where the beam becomes less prone to the emittance growthcaused by the integer resonance.During the late 2016 machine development sessions inthe PS Booster we profited from solved issues from 2015and managed to reliably extract hollow bunches of1.3eVsmatched longitudinal area. Furthermore, first results to cre-ate hollow bunches with larger longitudinal emittances to-wards the LHC Inject...

  16. Mastering Autodesk 3ds Max 2013

    Harper, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Get professional training in 3ds Max from this Autodesk Official Training Guide Extremely popular with video game designers as well as architects, 3ds Max offers integrated 3D modeling, animation, rendering, and compositing tools designed to streamline production. If you already have a working knowledge of 3ds Max basics, this official guide will take your skills to the next level. Detailed tutorials cover all the latest features of 3ds Max. From modeling, texturing, animation, and architectural visualization to high-level techniques for film, television, games, and more, this book provides

  17. Process for manufacturing hollow fused-silica insulator cylinder

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Krogh, Michael L.; Davis, Steven C.; Decker, Derek E.; Rosenblum, Ben Z.; Sanders, David M.; Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2001-01-01

    A method for building hollow insulator cylinders that can have each end closed off with a high voltage electrode to contain a vacuum. A series of fused-silica round flat plates are fabricated with a large central hole and equal inside and outside diameters. The thickness of each is related to the electron orbit diameter of electrons that escape the material surface, loop, and return back. Electrons in such electron orbits can support avalanche mechanisms that result in surface flashover. For example, the thickness of each of the fused-silica round flat plates is about 0.5 millimeter. In general, the thinner the better. Metal, such as gold, is deposited onto each top and bottom surface of the fused-silica round flat plates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Eutectic metals can also be used with one alloy constituent on the top and the other on the bottom. The CVD, or a separate diffusion step, can be used to defuse the deposited metal deep into each fused-silica round flat plate. The conductive layer may also be applied by ion implantation or gas diffusion into the surface. The resulting structure may then be fused together into an insulator stack. The coated plates are aligned and then stacked, head-to-toe. Such stack is heated and pressed together enough to cause the metal interfaces to fuse, e.g., by welding, brazing or eutectic bonding. Such fusing is preferably complete enough to maintain a vacuum within the inner core of the assembled structure. A hollow cylinder structure results that can be used as a core liner in a dielectric wall accelerator and as a vacuum envelope for a vacuum tube device where the voltage gradients exceed 150 kV/cm.

  18. Measurement of the Bs0 → Ds (∗)+ Ds (∗)- branching fractions

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Everse, LA; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Coco, V.; David, P. N.Y.; De Bruyn, K.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Heijne, V.; Ketel, T.; Koopman, R. F.; Van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.; Onderwater, C. J.G.; Raven, G.; Schiller, M.; Serra, N.; Snoek, H.; Storaci, B.; Syropoulos, V.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tolk, S.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.

    2016-01-01

    The branching fraction of the decay Bs0→Ds(∗)+Ds(∗)- is measured using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, collected using the LHCb detector at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. It is found to be B(Bs0→Ds(∗)+Ds(∗)-)=(3.05±0.10±0.20±0.34)%, where the uncertainties

  19. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warrington, N; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps.

  20. Precision of the eutectic points determination by the isopleths

    Lutsyk, V I; Sumkina, O G; Savinov, V V; Zelenaya, A E, E-mail: vluts@pres.bscnet.ru [Physical Problems Department, Buryat Scientific Center of RAS (Siberian Branch), 8 Sakhyanova st., Ulan-Ude, 670047 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-29

    An imitation of quaternary eutectic point searching techniques by means of two-dimensional sections set construction (tie-lines method) was made, using the model of T-x-y-z diagram of eutectic type without solid-phases solubility as an example. The errors, appearing in sections graphics of experimentally studied systems, are analyzed.

  1. DS-Connect: The Down Syndrome Registry

    ... for Caregivers (NDSS) (10 MB PDF) Now Recruiting Attitudes towards usage of Green tea extract (EGCG) in Individuals with DS If ... the Indiana University to rec... Read more about Attitudes towards usage of Green tea extract (EGCG) in Individuals with DS Alzheimer's ...

  2. Production of D$^{**}_{s}$ mesons in hadronic Z decays

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    The production rates of the orbitally excited Ds** mesons, Ds1 and Ds2*, are measured with the 4.1 million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector during 1991--1995. The Ds** mesons are reconstructed in the decay modes Ds1+ -> D*+ K0, Ds1+ -> D*0 K+ and Ds2*+ -> D0 K+. The production rate of the Ds1 is measured to be n(Z->Ds1+-)=(0.52+-0.09+-0.06)%, under the assumption that the two considered decay modes of the Ds1 saturate the branching ratio. The production rate of the Ds2* is determined to be n(Z->Ds2*+-)=(0.83+-0.29+0.07-0.13)%, assuming that the branching fraction of the decay Ds2*+ -> D0 K+ is 45%. The production rates in Z->cc and Z->bbar decays are measured separately.

  3. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are

  4. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  5. Structure of eutectic alloys of Au with Si and Ge

    Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)], E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Tahara, S.; Nakashima, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S.; Itou, M. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Koto Sayo-cho, Sayo Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2008-03-06

    Au-Si and Au-Ge alloy systems have a deep eutectic point in the Au-rich concentration region where the melting point falls down to 633 K. In order to investigate the liquid structure in relation to the glass-forming tendency of these alloys, high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out at the eutectic composition and at compositions with excess amounts of Au or IVb element. The nearest neighbor correlations in the eutectic liquids are intense and sharp in the pair distribution function and exhibit a rather small temperature dependence in comparison with those alloys of other than the eutectic composition. Structural models for these liquid alloys are proposed with the aid of reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The reproduced atomic arrangements around the eutectic region exhibit a substitutional-type structure where the dense random packing of Au atoms is preserved and Si or Ge atoms occupy the Au-sites at random.

  6. Mercury - the hollow planet

    Rothery, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image

  7. Eutectics as improved pharmaceutical materials: design, properties and characterization.

    Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Nangia, Ashwini

    2014-01-28

    Eutectics are a long known class of multi-component solids with important and useful applications in daily life. In comparison to other multi-component crystalline solids, such as salts, solid solutions, molecular complexes and cocrystals, eutectics are less studied in terms of molecular structure organization and bonding interactions. Classically, a eutectic is defined based on its low melting point compared to the individual components. In this article, we attempt to define eutectics not just based on thermal methods but from a structural organization view point, and discuss their microstructures and properties as organic materials vis-a-vis solid solutions and cocrystals. The X-ray crystal structure of a cocrystal is different from that of the individual components whereas the unit cell of a solid solution is similar to that of one of the components. Eutectics are closer to the latter species in that their crystalline arrangement is similar to the parent components but they are different with respect to the structural integrity. A solid solution possesses structural homogeneity throughout the structure (single phase) but a eutectic is a heterogeneous ensemble of individual components whose crystal structures are like discontinuous solid solutions (phase separated). Thus, a eutectic may be better defined as a conglomerate of solid solutions. A structural analysis of cocrystals, solid solutions and eutectics has led to an understanding that materials with strong adhesive (hetero) interactions between the unlike components will lead to cocrystals whereas those having stronger cohesive (homo/self) interactions will more often give rise to solid solutions (for similar structures of components) and eutectics (for different structures of components). We demonstrate that the same crystal engineering principles which have been profitably utilized for cocrystal design in the past decade can now be applied to make eutectics as novel composite materials, illustrated by

  8. Containerless solidification of undercooled oxide and metallic eutectic melts

    Li Mingjun; Nagashio, Kosuke; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    A high-speed video was employed to monitor the in situ recalescence of undercooled oxide Al 2 O 3 -36.8 at.% ZrO 2 and metallic Ni-18.7 at.% Sn eutectics that were processed on an aero-acoustic levitator and an electromagnetic levitator, respectively. For the oxide eutectic, the entire sample becomes brighter and brighter without any clear recalescence front during spontaneous crystallization. When the sample was seeded at desired undercoolings, crystallization started from the seeding point and then spread through the entire sample. Microstructures of the oxide solidified via both the spontaneous crystallization and external seeding consist of many independent eutectic colonies at the sample surface, indicating that copious nucleation takes place regardless of melt undercooling and solidification mode. For the metallic eutectics, two kinds of recalescence are visualized. The surface and cross sectional microstructures reveal that copious nucleation is also responsible for the formation of independent eutectic colonies distributing within the entire sample. It is not possible to measure the growth velocity of a single eutectic colony using optical techniques under the usual magnification. The conventional nucleation concept derived from single-phase alloys may not be applicable to the free solidification of the undercooled double-phase oxide and metallic eutectic systems

  9. Introducing Autodesk 3ds Max 2011

    Derakhshani, Dariush

    2010-01-01

    An Autodesk Official Training Guide to 3ds Max 2011. 3ds Max is a popular 3D animation-and-effects software used in movies, visual effects, games, cartoons, short films, commercials, and other animation. However, it also presents a number of challenges to newcomers. This introduction to the latest version breaks down the complexities of learning 3D software and walks you through the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, and using visual effects. Real-world examples from talented beginning 3ds max users motivate you to learn the software and helpful tutorials offer realistic, professional c

  10. Containerless solidification of acoustically levitated Ni-Sn eutectic alloy

    Geng, D.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B. [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an (China)

    2012-10-15

    Containerless solidification of Ni-18.7at%Sn eutectic alloy has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The temperature, motion, and oscillation of the sample were monitored by a high speed camera. The temperature of the sample can be determined from its image brightness, although the sample moves vertically and horizontally during levitation. The experimentally observed frequency of vertical motion is in good agreement with theoretical prediction. The sample undergoes shape oscillation before solidification finishes. The solidification microstructure of this alloy consists of a mixture of anomalous eutectic plus regular lamellar eutectic. This indicates the achievement of rapid solidification under acoustic levitation condition. (orig.)

  11. Eutectic propeties of primitive Earth's magma ocean

    Lo Nigro, G.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Perillat, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    It is widely accepted that the early Earth was partially molten (if not completely) due to the high energy dissipated by terrestrial accretion [1]. After core formation, subsequent cooling of the magma ocean has led to fractional crystallization of the primitive mantle. The residual liquid corresponds to what is now called the fertile mantle or pyrolite. Melting relations of silicates have been extensively investigated using the multi-anvil press, for pressures between 3 and 25 GPa [2,3]. Using the quench technique, it has been shown that the pressure affects significantly the solidus and liquidus curves, and most probably the composition of the eutectic liquid. At higher pressures, up to 65 GPa, melting studies were performed on pyrolite starting material using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) technique [4]. However, the quench technique is not ideal to define melting criteria, and furthermore these studies were limited in pressure range of investigation. Finally, the use of pyrolite may not be relevant to study the melting eutectic temperature. At the core-mantle boundary conditions, melting temperature is documented by a single data point on (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine, provided by shock wave experiments at around 130-140 GPa [5]. These previous results present large uncertainties of ~1000 K. The aim of this study is to determine the eutectic melting temperature in the chemically simplified system composed of the two major lower mantle phases, the MgSiO3 perovskite and MgO periclase. We investigated melting in-situ using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell coupled with angle dispersive X-ray diffraction at the ID27 beamline of the ESRF [6]. Melting relations were investigated in an extended P-T range comparable to those found in the Earth's lower mantle, i.e. from 25 to 120 GPa and up to more than 5000 K. Melting was evidenced from (a) disappearance of one of the two phases in the diffraction pattern, (b) drastic changes of the diffraction image itself, and

  12. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  13. Stream Habitat Reach Summary - NCWAP [ds158

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Stream Habitat - NCWAP - Reach Summary [ds158] shapefile contains in-stream habitat survey data summarized to the stream reach level. It is a derivative of the...

  14. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    California Natural Resource Agency — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  15. Measurement of the Ds l(+)ve branching fractions and the decay constant fDs+

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Andersson, W. Ikegami; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Koehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Using 482 pb(-1) of e(+) e(-) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of root s = 4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector, we measure the branching fractions of the decays D-s(+) -> u(+)v(u) and D-s(+) -> tau(+)v(tau). By constraining the ratio of decay rates of Ds(+) to tau(+)v(u) and to

  16. Deep Eutectic Solvents Enable More Robust Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation Reactions

    Zhou, Pengfei; Wang, Xuping; Zeng, Chaoxi; Wang, Weifei; Yang, Bo; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    A chemoenzymatic method for the production of epoxidized vegetable oils was developed. The unique combination of the commercial lipase G from Penicillieum camembertii with certain deep eutectic solvents enabled the efficient production of epoxidized vegetable oils.

  17. The creep behavior of In-Ag eutectic solder joints

    Reynolds, H.L.; Kang, S.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA

    1999-01-01

    The addition of 3 wt.% Ag to In results in a eutectic composition with improved mechanical properties while only slightly lowering the melting temperature. Steady-state creep properties of In-Ag eutectic solder joints have been measured using constant load tests at 0, 30, 60, and 90 C. Constitutive equations are derived to describe the creep behavior. The data are well represented by an equation of the form proposed by Dorn: a power-law equation applies to each independent creep mechanism. Two parallel mechanisms were observed for the In-Ag eutectic joints. The high-stress mechanism is a bulk mechanism with a thermal dependence dominated by the thermal dependence of creep in the In-rich matrix. The low-stress mechanism is a grain boundary mechanism. Results of this work are discussed with regard to creep behavior of typical eutectic systems

  18. Method for sizing hollow microspheres

    Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

    1975-10-29

    Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

  19. Study on the morphology of Pb-Sn eutectics

    Ambrozio Filho, F.; Gentile, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of factors such as rate of growth of the solid phase, thermal gradient in the liquid and presence of impurities on the solidification of eutectic structures is studied. To emphasize certain aspects of the basic concept, the technique of unidirectional cooling was used in a specially constructed apparatus. Micrographs of the structure obtained with the eutectic Pb-Sn alloy are shown and a purely qualitative analysis of the factors described is given [pt

  20. Mechanism of eutectic formation upon compaction and its effects on tablet properties

    Bi, Mingda; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Morris, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    The unique property of a eutectic mixture is a lower melting temperature than that of any of its pure components. What differentiates a eutectic mixture from a simple physical mixture is less well understood. This impedes the ability to anticipate and/or detect unintentional eutectic formation during pharmaceutical tablet manufacturing and any potential negative impact. In this study, a thermodynamic/heat transfer approach was used to explain the mechanism of eutectic formation upon exposure to a physical stress, i.e. compaction, and a differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) method was developed to detect and quantify the amount of eutectic formed in the compacts. Furthermore, the mechanism of eutectic formation upon compaction was tested experimentally by correlating the amount of eutectic formed in tablets with the particle size, compaction force, the estimated intimate contact area between the eutectic-forming materials, calculated tablet tensile strength, and tablet porosity. The effect of the presence of eutectics on tablet properties was also investigated. The results show that intimate contact and mutual solubility between eutectic-forming materials are the necessary and sufficient criteria for eutectic formation upon compaction. The systems of acetaminophen (APAP)/caffeine and APAP/propylphenazone were both shown to exhibit eutectic behavior upon compaction and the extent of formation was dependent upon the amount of intimate contact between eutectic-forming materials. Finally, it was found that eutectic had no negative effect on tablet hardness

  1. Pseudobinary eutectics in Cu–Ag–Ge alloy droplets under containerless condition

    Ruan, Y.; Wang, X.J.; Lu, X.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two pseudobinary eutectics form in Cu–Ag–Ge alloy. ► It is influenced by thermodynamic and kinetic factors of the alloy in the drop tube. ► As droplet size reduces, anomalous → lamellar → anomalous transition happens in (Ag + ζ). ► (Ag + ε 2 ) is a product of both peri-eutectic and pseudobinary eutectic transitions. -- Abstract: Pseudobinary eutectic generated by pseudobinary eutectic transition or peri-eutectic transition is a crucial structure in ternary alloy systems. Its formation mechanism strongly influences mechanical properties of these metallic materials. However, it was customarily neglected. In this paper, two pseudobinary eutectics, i.e. (Ag + ζ) and (Ag + ε 2 ), were investigated during the rapid solidification of Cu–Ag–Ge ternary alloy in a 3 m-drop tube. The sharp temperature variations and dramatic kinetic activities of the falling alloy droplets before solidification cause special microstructural characteristics. (Ag) dendrite is the heterogeneous nucleus for anomalous (Ag + ζ) pseudobinary eutectic in large droplets. Lamellar (Ag + ζ) pseudobinary eutectic grain forms independently on condition that primary (Ag) dendrite cannot form and its eutectic morphology becomes anomalous with the decrease of droplet size. Nanoscaled (Ag + ε 2 ) pseudobinary eutectic generating at the last stage of solidification is the product of both peri-eutectic and pseudobinary eutectic transitions. It distributes in the gaps of (Ag + ζ) pseudobinary eutectic grains and its morphology remains lamellar regardless of droplet size

  2. Thermoluminescence dosimetry for gamma rays. Part B. Comparison of TLD measurements with DS86 and DS02

    Cullings, Harry M.; Fujita, Shoichiro; Egbert, Stephen D.; Maruyama, Takashi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2005-01-01

    The overall agreement between measurement and calculation continues to be good for DS02, as it was for DS86. In Hiroshima, the overall agreement is somewhat better for DS02 than for DS86. Agreement near the hypocenter in Hiroshima is excellent with DS02 based on the methods described in this work. Agreement at middle and longer distances in Hiroshima is better for DS02 than for DS86, although there remain some indications of measured values exceeding calculated values at longer distances. These indications must be qualified by a careful consideration of issues related to background as described in this chapter. (J.P.N.)

  3. Influence of convection on eutectic microstructure

    Baskaran, V.; Eisa, G. F.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    When the MnBi-Bi eutectic is directionally solidified, it forms fibers of MnBi in a matrix of bismuth. When the material solidified in space at rates of 30 and 50 cm/hr, the average fiber spacing lambda was about one half of the value obtained in cases in which the same material solidified on earth. Neither an altered temperature gradient nor a fluctuating freezing rate are apparently responsible for the change in lambda, and the possibility is studied that natural convection increases lambda on earth by perturbing the compositional field in the melt ahead of the growing solid. A theoretical analysis is conducted along with some experiments. On the basis of the theoretical results for lamellar growth, it is concluded that the spacing lambda increases with increasing stirring, especially at small freezing rates. The experiments indicate that at low growth rates the cross-sectional area of the MnBi blades increases with increased stirring and with decreased growth rate.

  4. Switching a Nanocluster Core from Hollow to Non-hollow

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-03-24

    Modulating the structure-property relationship in atomically precise nanoclusters (NCs) is vital for developing novel NC materials and advancing their applications. While promising biphasic ligand-exchange (LE) strategies have been developed primarily to attain novel NCs, understanding the mechanistic aspects involved in tuning the core and the ligand-shell of NCs in such biphasic processes is challenging. Here, we design a single phase LE process that enabled us to elucidate the mechanism of how a hollow NC (e.g., [Ag44(SR)30]4-, -SR: thiolate) converts into a non-hollow NC (e.g., [Ag25(SR)18]-), and vice versa. Our study reveals that the complete LE of the hollow [Ag44(SPhF)30]4- NCs (–SPhF: 4-fluorobenzenethiolate) with incoming 2,4-dimethylbenzenethiol (HSPhMe2) induced distortions in the Ag44 structure forming the non-hollow [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- by a disproportionation mechanism. While the reverse reaction of [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- with HSPhF prompted an unusual dimerization of Ag25, followed by a rearrangement step that reproduces the original [Ag44(SPhF)30]4-. Remarkably, both the forward and the backward reactions proceed through similar size intermediates that seem to be governed by the boundary conditions set by the thermodynamic and electronic stability of the hollow and non-hollow metal cores. Furthermore, the resizing of NCs highlights the surprisingly long-range effect of the ligands which are felt by atoms far deep in the metal core, thus opening a new path for controlling the structural evolution of nanoparticles.

  5. The Electrospun Ceramic Hollow Nanofibers

    Shahin Homaeigohar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hollow nanofibers are largely gaining interest from the scientific community for diverse applications in the fields of sensing, energy, health, and environment. The main reasons are: their extensive surface area that increases the possibilities of engineering, their larger accessible active area, their porosity, and their sensitivity. In particular, semiconductor ceramic hollow nanofibers show greater space charge modulation depth, higher electronic transport properties, and shorter ion or electron diffusion length (e.g., for an enhanced charging–discharging rate. In this review, we discuss and introduce the latest developments of ceramic hollow nanofiber materials in terms of synthesis approaches. Particularly, electrospinning derivatives will be highlighted. The electrospun ceramic hollow nanofibers will be reviewed with respect to their most widely studied components, i.e., metal oxides. These nanostructures have been mainly suggested for energy and environmental remediation. Despite the various advantages of such one dimensional (1D nanostructures, their fabrication strategies need to be improved to increase their practical use. The domain of nanofabrication is still advancing, and its predictable shortcomings and bottlenecks must be identified and addressed. Inconsistency of the hollow nanostructure with regard to their composition and dimensions could be one of such challenges. Moreover, their poor scalability hinders their wide applicability for commercialization and industrial use.

  6. Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 essentials

    Derakhshani, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    A four-color, task-based Autodesk Official Training Guide covering the core features of 3ds Max Beginning users of this popular 3D animation and effects software will find everything they need for a thorough understanding of the software's key features and functions in this colorful guide. The authors break down the complexities of learning 3D software and get you going right away with interesting, job-related projects. You'll learn the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, lighting, visualization, and visual effects with 3ds Max, exploring the methods and why they are used as they are.

  7. Autodesk 3ds Max 2012 Essentials

    Derakhshani, Randi L

    2011-01-01

    Get a jump-start on Autodesk 3ds Max 2012 essentials-with the Essentials! The new Essentials books from Sybex are beautiful, task-based, full-color Autodesk Official Training Guides that help you get up to speed on Autodesk topics quickly and easily. Autodesk 3ds Max 2012 Essentials thoroughly covers the fundamentals of this popular 3D animation effects, and visualization software, teaching you what you need to become quickly productive. By following the book's clear explanations, practical tutorials, and step-by-step exercises, you'll cover all the bases. Topics include modeling, animation,

  8. Autodesk 3ds Max 2014 bible

    Murdock, Kelly L

    2013-01-01

    A complete reference covering the newest version of 3ds Max software Autodesk 3ds Max is the popular 3D modeling, animation, rendering, and compositing software preferred by game developers and graphic designers in film and television. This comprehensive reference not only introduces beginners to this pricey and complex software, but also serves as a reference for experienced users. Packed with expert advice from popular author Kelly Murdock, it begins with a Quick Start tutorial to get you up and running, then continues with more than 150 step-by-step tutorials, advanced coverage, and plenty

  9. The Riddle of the Apparently Hollow Himalaya

    The Riddle of the Apparently Hollow Himalaya. Ramesh .... It was as if the Himalayas were hollow inside. ... block would be consistent with the ground elevation in such a ... Alternative models and possible preference: Many refinements of.

  10. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings.

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  11. Hollow fiber liquid supported membranes

    Violante, V.

    1987-01-01

    The hollow fiber system are well known and developed in the scientific literature because of their applicability in the process separation units. The authors approach to a mathematical model for a particular hollow fiber system, usin liquid membranes. The model has been developed in order to obtain a suitable tool for a sensitivy analysis and for a scaling-up. This kind of investigation is very usefull from an engineering point of view, to get a spread range of information to build up a pilot plant from the laboratory scale

  12. Leptonic decays of the $D_s$ meson

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    The purely leptonic decays Ds -> tau nu and Ds -> mu nu are studied in a sample of four million hadronic Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at the LEP e+e- collider from 1991 to 1995. The branching fractions are extracted from a combination of two analyses, one optimized to select Ds -> tau nu decays with tau -> e nu nubar or mu nu nubar, and the other optimized for Ds-> mu nu decays. The results are used to evaluate the Ds decay constant, within the Standard Model: fDs = [285 +- 19(stat) +- 40 (syst)] MeV.

  13. Material properties influence on steam explosion efficiency. Prototypic versus simulant melts, eutectic versus non-eutectic melts

    Leskovar, M.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    A steam explosion may occur during a severe nuclear reactor accident if the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. A strong enough steam explosion in a nuclear power plant could jeopardize the containment integrity and so lead to a direct release of radioactive material to the environment. Details of processes taking place prior and during the steam explosion have been experimentally studied for a number of years with adjunct efforts in modelling these processes to address the scaling of these experiments. Steam explosion experiments have shown that there are important differences of behaviour between simulant and prototypical melts, and that also at prototypical melts the fuel coolant interactions depend on the composition of the corium. In experiments with prototypic materials no spontaneous steam explosions occurred (except with an eutectic composition), whereas with simulant materials the steam explosions were triggered spontaneously. The energy conversion ratio of steam explosions with prototypic melts is at least one order of magnitude lower than the energy conversion ratio of steam explosions with simulant melts. Although the different behaviour of prototypic and simulant melts has been known for a number of years, there is no reliable explanation for these differences. Consequently it is not possible to reliably estimate whether corium would behave so non-explosive also in reactor conditions, where the mass of poured melt is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than in experimental conditions. An even more fascinating material effect was observed recently at corium experiments with eutectic and non-eutectic compositions. It turned out that eutectic corium always exploded spontaneously, whereas non-eutectic corium never exploded spontaneously. In the paper, a possible explanation of both material effects (prototypic/simulant melts, eutectic/non-eutectic corium) on the steam explosion is provided. A model for the calculation of the

  14. DsJ(2860) as the First Radial Excitation of Ds0*(2317)

    van Beveren, Eef; Rupp, George

    2006-11-01

    A coupled-channel model previously employed to describe the narrow Ds0*(2317) and broad D0*(2400) charmed scalar mesons is generalized so as to include all ground-state pseudoscalar-pseudoscalar and vector-vector two-meson channels. All parameters are chosen fixed at published values, except for the overall coupling constant, which is fine-tuned to reproduce the Ds0*(2317) mass. Thus, the radial excitations Ds0*(2850) and D0*(2740) are predicted, both with a width of about 50 MeV. The former state appears to correspond to the new DsJ(2860) resonance decaying to DK announced by BABAR in the course of this work. Also, the D0*(2400) resonance is roughly reproduced, though perhaps with a somewhat too low central resonance peak.

  15. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  16. Hollow core plasma channel generation

    Quast, Heinrich Martin

    2018-03-01

    The use of a hollow plasma channel in plasma-based acceleration has beneficial properties for the acceleration of electron and positron bunches. In the scope of the FLASHForward facility at DESY, the generation of such a plasma structure is examined. Therefore, the generation of a ring-shaped laser intensity profile with different techniques is analyzed. From the obtained intensity profiles the electron density of a hollow plasma channel is simulated in the focal region. Different parameters are scanned to understand their influence on the electron density distribution - an important parameter being, for example, the radius of the central region of the channel. In addition to the simulations, experiments are presented, during which a laser pulse is transformed into a hollow beam with a spiral phase plate. Subsequently, it forms a plasma during the interaction with hydrogen, where the plasma is imaged with interferometry. For energies above 0.9 mJ a hollow plasma structure can be observed at the location of first plasma formation.

  17. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

    Washington; Irving

    1987-01-01

    Part Ⅰ On the Eastern shore of the Hudson River there was a little valley, among high hills, which was one of the quietest places in the whole world. This little valley had long been known by the name of SIeepy Hollow. Many strange stories about ghosts were told and retold in the village situated there.

  18. Microstructured hollow fibers for ultrafiltration

    Culfaz, Pmar Zeynep; Culfaz, P.Z.; Rolevink, Hendrikus H.M.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Hollow fiber ultrafiltration membranes with a corrugated outer microstructure were prepared from a PES/PVP blend. The effect of spinning parameters such as air gap, take-up speed, polymer dope viscosity and coagulation value on the microstructure and membrane characteristics was investigated. Fibers

  19. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary

  20. Quantum gravity on dS3

    Govindarajan, T R; Kaul, R K; Suneeta, V

    2002-01-01

    We study quantum gravity on dS 3 using the Chern-Simons formulation of three-dimensional gravity. We derive an exact expression for the partition function for quantum gravity on dS 3 in a Euclidean path integral approach. We show that the topology of the space relevant for studying de Sitter entropy is a solid torus. The quantum fluctuations of de Sitter space are sectors of configurations of point masses taking a discrete set of values. The partition function gives the correct semiclassical entropy. The sub-leading correction to the entropy is logarithmic in horizon area, with a coefficient -1. We discuss this correction in detail, and show that the sub-leading correction to the entropy from the dS/CFT correspondence agrees with our result. A comparison with the corresponding results for the AdS 3 BTZ black hole is also presented

  1. Containers of DS-2 Decontaminating Solution

    1982-03-01

    percent sodium hydroxide, and the remainder is ethylene glycol monomethyl ether. Because of its reactivity, it must be protected from moisture and... carbon dioxide. It has been demonstrated that DS-2 does not corrode terneplate or steel. However, satisfactory terneplate and steel containers are...not produce a pail with a polyethylene insert. However, Mr. Wood told me that Hedwin Corporation (a subsidiary of Solvay ) does produce this kind of

  2. Deep eutectic solvents as performance additives in biphasic reactions

    Lan, Dongming; Wang, Xuping; Zhou, Pengfei; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents act as surfactants in biphasic (hydrophobic/aqueous) reaction mixtures enabling higher interfacial surface areas at lower mechanical stress as compared to simple emulsions. Exploiting this effect the rate of a chemoenzymatic epoxidation reaction was increased more than

  3. Hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents as water-immiscible extractants

    Osch, van D.J.G.P.; Zubeir, L.F.; Bruinhorst, van den A.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Kroon, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are presented for the first time. They consist of decanoic acid and various quaternary ammonium salts. The effect of the alkyl chains on the hydrophobicity and the equilibrium of the two-phase DES–water system were investigated. These new DESs were

  4. Solidification with back-diffusion of irregular eutectics

    M. Trepczyńska-Łent

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The definition of the α - parameter back-diffusion has been introduced in the work. The alternative models of solidification were describedtaking into consideration back-diffusion process. The possibility of using those models for eutectic alloys solidification is worthyof interest.

  5. Effect of titanium on the near eutectic grey iron

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The effect of Titanium on the microstructure of grey iron was investigated experimentally in this work. Tensile test bars of grey cast iron of near eutectic alloys containing 0.01, 0.1, 0.26 and 0.35% Ti, respectively were made in green sand moulds. Chemical analysis, metallographic investigation...

  6. Organic alloy systems suitable for the investigation of regular binary and ternary eutectic growth

    Sturz, L.; Witusiewicz, V. T.; Hecht, U.; Rex, S.

    2004-09-01

    Transparent organic alloys showing a plastic crystal phase were investigated experimentally using differential scanning calorimetry and directional solidification with respect to find a suitable model system for regular ternary eutectic growth. The temperature, enthalpy and entropy of phase transitions have been determined for a number of pure substances. A distinction of substances with and without plastic crystal phases was made from their entropy of melting. Binary phase diagrams were determined for selected plastic crystal alloys with the aim to identify eutectic reactions. Examples for lamellar and rod-like eutectic solidification microstructures in binary systems are given. The system (D)Camphor-Neopentylglycol-Succinonitrile is identified as a system that exhibits, among others, univariant and a nonvariant eutectic reaction. The ternary eutectic alloy close to the nonvariant eutectic composition solidifies with a partially faceted solid-liquid interface. However, by adding a small amount of Amino-Methyl-Propanediol (AMPD), the temperature of the nonvariant eutectic reaction and of the solid state transformation from plastic to crystalline state are shifted such, that regular eutectic growth with three distinct nonfaceted phases is observed in univariant eutectic reaction for the first time. The ternary phase diagram and examples for eutectic microstructures in the ternary and the quaternary eutectic alloy are given.

  7. EURISOL-DS Multi-MW Target Preliminary Study of the Liquid Metal Proton-to-Neutron Converter

    Herrera-Martínez, A; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2006-01-01

    This technical note summarises the design calculations performed within Task #2 of the European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Design Study (EURISOL-DS) [1]. A preliminary study was carried out in order to determine the optimum value of relevant parameters in the target design. Different scenarios were simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA [2]. Namely, sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impact of the projectile particle energy on the neutronics and energy deposition in the spallation target. The optimal target dimensions were also studied for every case as well as the proper target material for the liquid metal proton-to-neutron converter, since mercury and lead-bismuth eutectic are reasonable options. The effect of the beam width on the power densities was also evaluated, taking into account the geometrical limitations of the facility. Finally, a comparison between protons and deuterons as primary particles was performed, acknowledging the limitations of using FLU...

  8. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  9. Space Charge Mitigation With Longitudinally Hollow Bunches

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  10. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    Kravitz, Stanley H [Placitas, NM; Ingersoll, David [Albuquerque, NM; Schmidt, Carrie [Los Lunas, NM; Flemming, Jeb [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  11. On the stable eutectic solidification of iron–carbon–silicon alloys

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Alonso, Gorka; Larrañaga, Pello; Suarez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Extensive effort was expanded to elucidate the growth and morphology of the stable eutectic grains during early solidification of continuous cooled Fe–C–Si alloys. To this purpose, quenching experiments at successive stages during solidification have been carried out on five cast irons with various magnesium and titanium levels designed to produce graphite morphologies ranging from lamellar to mixed compacted–spheroidal. The graphite shape factors were measured on the metallographic samples, and their evolution as a function of the chemical composition and the solid fraction was analyzed. Extensive scanning electron microscopy was carried on to evaluate the change in graphite shape during early solidification, to establish the fraction of solid at which the transition from spheroidal-to-compacted-to-lamellar graphite occurs, and to outline the early morphology of the eutectic grains. It was confirmed that solidification of Mg containing irons started with the development of spheroidal graphite even at Mg levels as low as 0.013 mass%. Then, as solidification proceeds, when some spheroids developed one or more tails (tadpole graphite), the spheroidal-to-compacted graphite transition occurs. The new findings were then integrated in previous knowledge to produce an understanding of the eutectic solidification of these materials. It was concluded that in hypoeutectic lamellar graphite iron austenite/graphite eutectic grains can nucleate at the austenite/liquid interface or in the bulk of the liquid, depending on the sulfur content and on the cooling rate. When graphite nucleation occurs on the primary austenite, several eutectic grains can nucleate and grow on the same dendrite. The primary austenite continues growing as eutectic austenite and therefore the two have the same crystallographic orientation. Thus, a final austenite grain may include several eutectic grains. In eutectic irons the eutectic grains nucleate and grow mostly in the liquid. The eutectic

  12. Measurement of the branching fractions of Ds+→η′X and Ds+→η′ρ+ in e+e−→Ds+Ds−

    M. Ablikim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We study Ds+ decays to final states involving the η′ with a 482 pb−1 data sample collected at s=4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. We measure the branching fractions B(Ds+→η′X=(8.8±1.8±0.5% and B(Ds+→η′ρ+=(5.8±1.4±0.4% where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. In addition, we estimate an upper limit on the non-resonant branching ratio B(Ds+→η′π+π0<5.1% at the 90% confidence level. Our results are consistent with CLEO's recent measurements and help to resolve the disagreement between the theoretical prediction and CLEO's previous measurement of B(Ds+→η′ρ+.

  13. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE40_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Full Text Available tware without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by PowerFT ...SE40_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks Raw data files are converted to text file by MSGet sof

  14. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE41_DS1 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Full Text Available tware without cut off value and peaks are extracted from the text files by PowerFT ...SE41_DS1 PowerGet analysis for detection of all peaks Raw data files are converted to text file by MSGet sof

  15. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE37_DS4 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Full Text Available SE37_DS4 Labeled peak search by ShiftedIonsFinder The candidate labeled peaks were ...searched by comparing the peak list from a sample labeled with a stable isotope against the peak list from an unlabele...hiftedIonsFinder and the labeled ions were searched with parameters (Max fold: C

  16. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge (100) single crystals

    Knowlton, W.B.; Beeman, J.W.; Emes, J.H.; Loretto, D.; Itoh, K.M.; Haller, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The author present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two (100) Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900 angstrom/surface to 300 angstrom/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500 angstrom/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300 angstrom/surface Au sample show epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200 angstrom/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150 angstrom across an interval of lmm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons

  17. The preferential orientation and lattice misfit of the directionally solidified Fe-Al-Ta eutectic composite

    Cui, Chunjuan; Wang, Pei; Yang, Meng; Wen, Yagang; Ren, Chiqiang; Wang, Songyuan

    2018-01-01

    Fe-Al intermetallic compound has been paid more attentions recently in many fields such as aeronautic, aerospace, automobile, energy and chemical engineering, and so on. In this paper Fe-Al-Ta eutectic was prepared by a modified Bridgman directional solidification technique, and it is found that microstructure of the Fe-Al-Ta eutectic alloy transforms from the broken-lamellar eutectic to cellular eutectic with the increase of the solidification rate. In the cellular eutectic structure, the fibers are parallel to each other within the same grain, but some fibers are deviated from the original orientation at the grain boundaries. To study the crystallographic orientation relationship (OR) between the two phases, the preferential orientation of the Fe-Al-Ta eutectic alloy at the different solidification rates was studied by Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). Moreover, the lattice misfit between Fe2Ta(Al) Laves phase and Fe(Al,Ta) matrix phase was calculated.

  18. Hollow nanocrystals and method of making

    Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Yin, Yadong [Moreno Valley, CA; Erdonmez, Can Kerem [Berkeley, CA

    2011-07-05

    Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

  19. Effect of length scale on mechanical properties of Al-Cu eutectic alloy

    Tiwary, C. S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2012-10-01

    This paper attempts a quantitative understanding of the effect of length scale on two phase eutectic structure. We first develop a model that considers both the elastic and plastic properties of the interface. Using Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectic as model system, the parameters of the model were experimentally determined using indentation technique. The model is further validated using the results of bulk compression testing of the eutectics having different length scales.

  20. A fluorescence sedimentation assay for dsDNA antibodies

    Duus, K; Draborg, A H; Güven, E

    2017-01-01

    The Farr assay is a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for dsDNA antibodies, based on antibody precipitation using ammonium sulphate and quantification using radio-labelled dsDNA. The RIA-Farr assay offers outstanding clinical specificity and sensitivity for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared to other...... on precipitation with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and fluorescence of EvaGreen intercalated in dsDNA as detection principle. As dsDNA antibodies are quantified using fluorescence, the disadvantages of working with radioactivity are eliminated. The Fluoro-Farr assay was developed and validated, and the diagnostic...

  1. Hollow rods for the oil producing industry

    Khalimova, L M; Elyasheva, M A

    1970-01-01

    Hollow sucker rods have several advantages over conventional ones. The hollow rods actuate the well pump and at the same time conduct produced fluids to surface. When paraffin deposition occurs, it can be minimized by injecting steam, hot oil or hot water into the hollow rod. Other chemicals, such as demulsifiers, scale inhibitors, corrosion inhibitors, etc., can also be placed in the well through the hollow rods. This reduces cost of preventive treatments, reduces number of workovers, increases oil production, and reduces cost of oil. Because the internal area of the rod is small, the passing liquids have a high velocity and thereby carry sand and dirt out of the well. This reduces pump wear between the piston and the plunger. Specifications of hollow rods, their operating characteristics, and results obtained with such rods under various circumstances are described.

  2. Application of SEM/EBSD and FEG-TEM/CBED to determine eutectic solidification mechanisms

    Nogita, K.; Dahle, A.K.; Drennan, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This study shows the application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in SEM and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) in FEG-TEM to determine eutectic nucleation and growth in hypoeutectic Al-Si foundry alloys. Because the eutectic reaction is often the final stage of solidification it can be expected to have a significant impact on the formation of casting defects, particularly porosity. Previous EBSD work by Nogita and Dahle (2001), Dahle et al (2001), has shown that the eutectic nucleates on the primary phase in the unmodified alloy, and eutectic grains are nucleated in the intergranular liquid, instead of filling the dendrite envelopes, when Sr or Sb is added. However, the orientation relationship between silicon and aluminium in the eutectic has so far not been determined because of difficulties with sample preparation for EBSD and also detection limitations of Kikuchi refraction of silicon and aluminium, particularly in modified alloys with a refined eutectic. The combination of the EBSD technique in SEM and CBED in TEM analyses can provide crystallographic orientation relationships between primary aluminium dendrites, eutectic aluminium and silicon, which are important to explicitly define the solidification mode of the eutectic in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys. These relationships are influenced, and altered, by the addition of certain elements. This paper also describes the sample preparation techniques for SEM and TEM for samples with different eutectic structures. The advantages the techniques are discussed. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  3. Directional solidification and characterization of the Al Nb2 - Al3 Nb eutectic system

    Trevisan, Eduardo A.O.; Andreotti, Fabio; Caram, Rubens

    1996-01-01

    The manufacturing of components to operate at high temperatures requires the use of metallic materials which can keep satisfactory mechanical and chemical properties, even at temperatures beyond 1000 deg C. An interesting alternative is the use of directionally solidified eutectic alloys. The eutectic alloy solidification makes possible the production of 'in situ' composite. A potentially useful system for manufacturing structural materials is the Al-Nb eutectic system. The aim of this work is to present the directional solidification of the Al-Nb eutectic alloy. (author)

  4. $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow D_{s}^{+(*)} D_{s}^{-(*)}$ decays in LHCb

    Pritchard, A

    2014-01-01

    The decay of a $B_{s}^{0}$ meson to two oppositely charged $D_{s}$ mesons is one that is postulated to be almost exclusively CP even. Measuring the properties of this decay can therefore give important information about the behaviour of the $B_{s}^{0}$ system. This poster presents two of these measurements, made by LHCb, using data from run 1 of the LHC.

  5. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE53_DS03 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Full Text Available SE53_DS03 In-house software An original data file (.wiff) was converted to an uniqu...e binary file (.kiff) using in-house software (nondisclosure). Peak picking and alignment were performed usi...s including internal standards, peaks were annotated automatically using the same software. For normalizatio...ng the another in-house software (nondisclosure), peaks were picked and aligned among samples automatically.

  6. Modification mechanism of eutectic silicon in Al–6Si–0.3Mg alloy with scandium

    Patakham, Ussadawut [Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Program, Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep [National Metal and Material Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@kmutt.ac.th [Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Program, Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Morphologies and growth of Sc and Sr-modified eutectic silicon resemble those of dendrites. •Crystal orientation of eutectic aluminum depends on growth characteristics of eutectic silicon. •We report strong evidence of the occurrence of an impurity-induced twinning mechanism. -- Abstract: The modification mechanism of eutectic silicon in Al–6Si–0.3Mg alloy with scandium was studied. The crystallographic orientation relationships between primary dendrites and the eutectic phase of unmodified and modified Al–6Si–0.3 Mg alloys were determined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The orientation of aluminum modified with scandium in the eutectic phase was different from that of the neighboring primary dendrites. This result implies that eutectic aluminum grows epitaxially from the surrounding primary aluminum dendrites in the unmodified alloy and that eutectic aluminum grows competitively from the surrounding primary aluminum dendrites in the modified alloy. The pole figure maps of eutectic Si in the [1 0 0], [1 1 0] and [1 1 1] axes of the unmodified and Sc-modified alloys were different, suggesting that the eutectic Al and Si crystals in modified alloy growth are more isotropic and cover a larger set of directions. The lattice fringes of Si of the alloys with and without Sc modification were different in the TEM results. The lattice fringes of Si in modified alloy were found to be multiple twins. However, this was not observed in the unmodified alloy. The growth characteristic of eutectic Si crystal in modified alloy suggests the occurrence of multiple twinning reactions and the formation of a high density of twins. This modification mechanism by Sc is explained by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, which provide strong evidence of the occurrence of the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism.

  7. Effect of Ni on eutectic structural evolution in hypereutectic Al-Mg2Si cast alloys

    Li Chong; Wu Yaping; Li Hui; Wu Yuying; Liu Xiangfa

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → By the injection of rod-like NiAl 3 phase in Al-Mg 2 Si alloys, Al-Mg 2 Si binary eutectic structure gradually evolves into Al-Mg 2 Si-NiAl 3 ternary eutectic. → The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl 3 and Mg 2 Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. → The mechanism of structural evolution was analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations. → The high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structural evolution. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to investigate the eutectic structural evolution of hypereutectic Al-20% Mg 2 Si with Ni addition under a gravity casting process. Three-dimensional morphologies of eutectic phases were observed in detail using field emission scanning electron microscopy, after Al matrix was removed by deep etching or extraction. The results show that Al-Mg 2 Si binary eutectic gradually evolves into Al-Mg 2 Si-NiAl 3 ternary eutectic with the increase of Ni content, and flake-like eutectic Mg 2 Si transforms into rods. The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl 3 and Mg 2 Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. Further, the high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structure evolution, and the mechanism of structural evolution was discussed and analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations.

  8. DS read-out transcription in transgenic tomato plants

    Rudenko, George N.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1994-01-01

    To select for Ds transposition in transgenic tomato plants a phenotypic excision assay, based on restoration of hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT II) gene expression, was employed. Some tomato plants, however, expressed the marker gene even though the Ds had not excised. Read-out transcriptional

  9. Hollow Micro-/Nanostructures: Synthesis and Applications

    Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2008-11-03

    Hollow micro-nanostructures are of great interest in many current and emerging areas of technology. Perhaps the best-known example of the former is the use of fly-ash hollow particles generated from coal power plants as partial replacement for Portland cement, to produce concrete with enhanced strength and durability. This review is devoted to the progress made in the last decade in synthesis and applications of hollow micro-nanostructures. We present a comprehensive overview of synthetic strategies for hollow structures. These strategies are broadly categorized into four themes, which include well-established approaches, such as conventional hard-templating and soft-templating methods, as well as newly emerging methods based on sacrificial templating and template-free synthesis. Success in each has inspired multiple variations that continue to drive the rapid evolution of the field. The Review therefore focuses on the fundamentals of each process, pointing out advantages and disadvantages where appropriate. Strategies for generating more complex hollow structures, such as rattle-type and nonspherical hollow structures, are also discussed. Applications of hollow structures in lithium batteries, catalysis and sensing, and biomedical applications are reviewed. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA,.

  10. Biodegradation of furfural by Bacillus subtilis strain DS3.

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Lv, Quanxi

    2015-07-01

    An aerobic bacterial strain DS3, capable of growing on furfural as sole carbon source, was isolated from actived sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory after enrichment. Based on morphological physiological tests as well as 16SrDNA sequence and Biolog analyses it was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The study revealed that strain DS3 utilized furfural, as analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Under following conditions: pH 8.0, temperature 35 degrees C, 150 rpm and 10% inoculum, strain DS3 showed 31.2% furfural degradation. Furthermore, DS3 strain was found to tolerate furfural concentration as high as 6000 mg(-1). The ability of Bacillus subtilis strain DS3 to degrade furfural has been demonstrated for the first time in the present study.

  11. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T >approx. 600 0 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10 3 μm) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants

  12. Formation of Uniform Hollow Silica microcapsules

    Yan, Huan; Kim, Chanjoong

    2013-03-01

    Microcapsules are small containers with diameters in the range of 0.1 - 100 μm. Mesoporous microcapsules with hollow morphologies possess unique properties such as low-density and high encapsulation capacity, while allowing controlled release by permeating substances with a specific size and chemistry. Our process is a one-step fabrication of monodisperse hollow silica capsules with a hierarchical pore structure and high size uniformity using double emulsion templates obtained by the glass-capillary microfluidic technique to encapsulate various active ingredients. These hollow silica microcapsules can be used as biomedical applications such as drug delivery and controlled release.

  13. Microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser

    Linslal, C. L., E-mail: linslal@gmail.com; Sebastian, S.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Girijavallabhan, C. P.; Kailasnath, M. [International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 22 (India)

    2015-03-30

    Strongly modulated laser emission has been observed from rhodamine B doped microring resonator embedded in a hollow polymer optical fiber by transverse optical pumping. The microring resonator is fabricated on the inner wall of a hollow polymer fiber. Highly sharp lasing lines, strong mode selection, and a collimated laser beam are observed from the fiber. Nearly single mode lasing with a side mode suppression ratio of up to 11.8 dB is obtained from the strongly modulated lasing spectrum. The microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser has shown efficient lasing characteristics even at a propagation length of 1.5 m.

  14. LHCb: Search for $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^- \\mu^+ \\mu^+$ decays

    Greening, E

    2013-01-01

    A search for non-resonant $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^- \\mu^+ \\mu^+$ decays is performed using 1.0 $fb^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at s = 7 TeV recorded by the LHCb experiment. No signals are observed and the world's best limits on the branching fractions are set.

  15. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  16. Development of high temperature fasteners using directionally solidified eutectic alloys

    George, F. D.

    1972-01-01

    The suitability of the eutectics for high temperature fasteners was investigated. Material properties were determined as a function of temperature, and included shear parallel and perpendicular to the growth direction and torsion parallel to it. Techniques for fabricating typical fastener shapes included grinding, creep forming, and direct casting. Both lamellar Ni3Al-Ni3Nb and fibrous (Co,Cr,Al)-(Cr,Co)7C3 alloys showed promise as candidate materials for high temperature fastener applications. A brief evaluation of the performance of the best fabricated fastener design was made.

  17. Exploring orange peel treatment with deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids

    van den Bruinhorst, A.; Kouris, P.; Timmer, J.M.K.; de Croon, M.H.J.M.; Kroon, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The disintegration of orange peel waste in deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids is presented in this work. The albedo and flavedo layers of the peel were studied separately, showing faster disintegration of the latter. Addition of water to the deep eutectic solvents lowered the amount of

  18. Interest and difficulties of O-g studies of the mechanisms of eutectic growth

    Lemaignan, Clement; Malmejac, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    The possible modifications of the very diverse mechanisms involved in a typical eutectic solidification due to the effects of O-g conditions are described. The convection effects, eutectic solidification, nucleation and relations between interlamellar spacing and growth rate are studied [fr

  19. Phase equilibrium, crystallization behavior and thermodynamic studies of (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) eutectic system

    Singh, Jayram; Singh, N.B.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The phase diagram of (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) system. - Highlights: • (Thaw + melt) method has shown that (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) system forms simple eutectic type phase diagram. • Excess thermodynamic functions showed that eutectic mixture is non-ideal. • The flexural strength measurements have shown that in eutectic mixture, crystallization occurs in an ordered way. - Abstract: The phase diagram of (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) system has been studied by the thaw melt method and an eutectic type phase diagram was obtained. The linear velocities of crystallization of the parent components and the eutectic mixture were determined. The enthalpy of fusion of the components and the eutectic mixture were determined using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. Excess Gibbs energy, excess entropy, excess enthalpy of mixing, and interfacial energy have been calculated. FTIR spectroscopic studies and flexural strength measurements were also made. The results have shown that the eutectic is a non-ideal mixture of the two components. On the basis of Jackson’s roughness parameter, it is predicted that the eutectic has faceted morphology

  20. Structural models of faceted-faceted eutectic system vanillin-acenaphthene

    Sharma, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    Thermodynamic model for the eutectic system vanillin-acenaphthene has been developed by analysing the excess functions computed from its experimentally determined solidus-liquidus equilibrium data. Spontaneous nucleation model has been explored from the maximum limit of undercooling of the system and verified by the experimental evidences of dislocation mechanism governing the anisotropic velocity of crystallisation determined at different undercoolings. Viscosity measurements of eutectic and non-eutectic melts at different temperatures revealed the essence of peculiar structural changes and specific energy interactions in the eutectic melt in the temperature range near its melting temperature. The rheological activation energy, E vis for eutectic and non-eutectic melts is found to be a function of temperature. Crystalline faceted structure of the system has been furnished with morphological evidences obtained from microscopic studies at different growth rates, whereas whisker reinforced structural model has been accomplished with mechanical properties computed for both isotropic and anisotropic modes of growth. Of greater interest is the special reference of moderate anisotropic growth, since experimental confirmation was obtained for the theoretical shape of parabolic variation in the mechanical properties of eutectic composite material with growth velocity. Direct evidence of three- to four-fold increase in strength properties of the eutectic material at its moderate anisotropic growth velocity (3.11x10 -7 m 3 s -1 ) in comparison with its isotropic growth in an ice bath (∼273 K), confirms a complete composite microstructure with whiskers in equilibrium with the matrix, embedded parallel to the growth direction

  1. Eutectic gamma (Nickel)/gamma vprime(Nickel Aluminide) delta (Nickel Niobium) polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys: Chemistry, processing, microstructure and properties

    Xie, Mengtao

    Directionally solidified (D.S.) gamma(Ni)/gamma'(Ni 3A1)-delta(Ni3Nb) eutectic alloys were considered as candidate turbine blade materials. Currently, the properties of polycrystalline gamma/gamma'-delta alloys are of interest as they inherit many advantageous attributes from the D.S. gamma/gamma'-delta alloys. This thesis is therefore dedicated towards the development of a fundamental understanding of these novel eutectic alloys from several important perspectives. This thesis will first be focused on quantifying the effect of several elements. A set of Ni-Cr-Al-Nb alloy compositions with increasing levels of Cr was designed to investigate the influence of Cr on the primary phase formation, solidus and liquidus temperatures and g-d eutectic morphology. A matrix of complex gamma/gamma'-delta alloy compositions with the same (Ta+Nb) content but varying Ta/Nb ratios was designed to study the influence of Ta on elemental segregation and solid state partitioning behaviors. Thermodynamic predicaitons using the Computherm Pandat database (PanNi7) were compared to experimental results in these investigations. The second part of this thesis will provide a more general understanding of the effects of common elements. A large number of experimental alloys covering a broad range of compositions were selected for the analysis. Important alloy attributes were characterized as a function of element concentration. Linear regression analysis was performed to reveal the relative effectiveness of different elements. An extensive comparison between the experimental observations and Pandat predictions was provided to critically evaluate the strength and weakness of existing thermodynamic database model in this novel alloy system. The last part of this thesis emphasizes the development of cast and wrought processes for cast gamma/gamma'-delta alloys as a cost effective alternative to the powder metallurgy route. Hot rolling of workpieces encapsulated within a steel can was performed on

  2. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of Ds0 *(2317 )±→π0Ds±

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Albrecht, M.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, P. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. G.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, S.; Gu, Y. T.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Khan, T.; Khoukaz, A.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Koch, L.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuessner, M.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Leiber, S.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, J. Q.; Li, K. J.; Li, Kang; Li, Ke; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, Huanhuan; Liu, Huihui; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Ke; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Meng, Z. X.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Morello, G.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pellegrino, J.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Pitka, A.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Richter, M.; Ripka, M.; Rolo, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, J. J.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Sowa, C.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, L.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. K.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, G. Y.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Tiemens, M.; Tsednee, B.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Dan; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, Meng; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Zongyuan; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, X.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Y. J.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiong, X. A.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, Y. X.; Yang, Yifan; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhou, Y. X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    The process e+e-→Ds*+Ds0 *(2317 )-+c .c . is observed for the first time with the data sample of 567 pb-1 collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider at a center-of-mass energy √{s }=4.6 GeV . The statistical significance of the Ds0 *(2317 )± signal is 5.8 σ and the mass is measured to be (2318.3 ±1.2 ±1.2 ) MeV /c2 . The absolute branching fraction B (Ds0 *(2317 )±→π0Ds±) is measured as 1.00-0.14+0.00(stat)-0.14+0.00(syst) for the first time. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  3. Antimony Influence on Shape of Eutectic Silicium in Al-Si Based Alloys

    Bolibruchová D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid AI-Si alloys are usually given special treatments before they are cast to obtain finer or modified matrix and eutectic structures, leading to improved properties. For many years, sodium additions to hypoeutectic and eutectic AI-Si melts have been recognized as the most effective method of modifying the eutectic morphology, although most of the group IA or IIA elements have significant effects on the eutectic structure. Unfortunately, many of these approaches also have associated several founding difficulties, such as fading, forming dross in presence of certain alloying elements, reduced fluidity, etc. ln recent years, antimony additions to AI-Si castings have attracted considerable attention as an alternative method of refining the eutectic structure. Such additions eliminate many of the difficulties listed above and provide permanent (i.e. non-fading refining ability. In this paper, the authors summarize work on antimony treatment of Al-Si based alloys.

  4. The novel eutectic microstructures of Si-Mn-P ternary alloy

    Wu Yaping; Liu Xiangfa

    2010-01-01

    The microstructures of Si-Mn-P alloy manufactured by the technique of combining phosphorus transportation and alloy melting were investigated using electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). The phase compositions were determined by energy spectrum and the varieties of eutectic morphologies were discussed. It is found that there is no ternary compound but Si, MnP and MnSi 1.75-x could appear when the Si-Mn-P alloy's composition is proper. Microstructure is greatly refined by rapid solidification technique and the amount of eutectic phases change with faster cooling rates. Moreover, primary Si or MnP are surrounded firstly by the binary eutectic (Si + MnP) and then the ternary eutectic (Si + MnSi 1.75-x + MnP) which also exhibit binary structures due to divorced eutectic determined by the particularity of some Si-Mn-P alloys.

  5. Physico-mechanical properties of naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system by different modes of solidification

    Sharma, B.L.; Gupta, S.; Tandon, S.; Kant, R.

    2008-01-01

    Anisotropic crystal growth kinetics from compositional melts encompassing the entire naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system, evidentially, evinces the dislocation mechanism. Rheological properties of eutectic phase melts at different temperatures explore the occurrence of molecular interactions emanating molecular clusters, rich in one phase or the other, in the eutectic melt. Microscopic studies confirm the crystalline faceted-faceted structure of the naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system. Implicit in the present work is the concept of strength-growth relationship that follows an identical form of the Weibull probability distribution curve. The curve exhibits two cut-off points corresponding to a lower strength limit in the slow and fast growth regions, and an upper strength limit in the moderate growth region. Relational essence between microstructural parameters essentially structuring morphology and excess thermodynamic functions implicitly governing molten state of the naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system is extracted

  6. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre; Pitchford, Leanne

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking CPAT as follows: The Grantee will perform theoretical modeling of point, surface, and volume high-pressure plasmas created using Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge sources...

  7. optimizing compressive strength characteristics of hollow building

    eobe

    Keywords: hollow building Blocks, granite dust, sand, partial replacement, compressive strength. 1. INTRODUCTION ... exposed to extreme climate. The physical ... Sridharan et al [13] conducted shear strength studies on soil-quarry dust.

  8. Hollow Micro-/Nanostructures: Synthesis and Applications

    Lou, Xiong Wen (David); Archer, Lynden A.; Yang, Zichao

    2008-01-01

    for Portland cement, to produce concrete with enhanced strength and durability. This review is devoted to the progress made in the last decade in synthesis and applications of hollow micro-nanostructures. We present a comprehensive overview of synthetic

  9. Plasma generation using the hollow cathod

    Moon, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    A hollow cathode of tungsten was adapted to an University of California, Berkely, LBL bucket ion source to investigate ion density fluctuations at the extractior grid. Fluctuations in plasma ion density are observed to range between 100kHz to 2 MHz. The observed fluctuation frequencies of plasma ion density are found to be inversely proportional to the square root of ion masses. It is guessed that the plasma fluctuation are also correlated with the hollow cathode length. (Author)

  10. Adsorption characteristics of activated carbon hollow fibers

    B. V. Kaludjerović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon hollow fibers were prepared with regenerated cellulose or polysulfone hollow fibers by chemical activation using sodium phosphate dibasic followed by the carbonization process. The activation process increases the adsorption properties of fibers which is more prominent for active carbone fibers obtained from the cellulose precursor. Chemical activation with sodium phosphate dibasic produces an active carbon material with both mesopores and micropores.

  11. Hollow cathode for positive ion sources

    Schechter, D.E.; Kim, J.; Tsai, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    Development to incorporate hollow cathodes into high power ion sources for neutral beam injection systems is being pursued. Hollow tube LaB 6 -type cathodes, similar to a UCLA design, have been constructed and tested in several ORNL ion source configurations. Results of testing include arc discharge parameters of >1000 and 500 amps for 0.5 and 10 second pulse lengths, respectively. Details of cathode construction and additional performance results are discussed

  12. Hollow-duct radiation delivery system investigation

    Kramer D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of hollow-duct structure for high-power laser-diode-array radiation delivery into the end-pumped large-aperture gain media is reported. A ray tracing method has been used to evaluate the performance of the structure designed for maximum transmission efficiency and output beam profile homogeneity. Variable hollow-duct lengths as well as emanating angles of laser-diode-array have been taken into account.

  13. DS Mesons in Asymmetric Hot and Dense Hadronic Matter

    Divakar Pathak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-medium properties of DS mesons are investigated within the framework of an effective hadronic model, which is a generalization of a chiral SU(3 model, to SU(4, in order to study the interactions of the charmed hadrons. In the present work, the DS mesons are observed to experience net attractive interactions in a dense hadronic medium, hence reducing the masses of the DS+ and DS- mesons from the vacuum values. While this conclusion holds in both nuclear and hyperonic media, the magnitude of the mass drop is observed to intensify with the inclusion of strangeness in the medium. Additionally, in hyperonic medium, the mass degeneracy of the DS mesons is observed to be broken, due to opposite signs of the Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction term in the Lagrangian density. Along with the magnitude of the mass drops, the mass splitting between DS+ and DS- mesons is also observed to grow with an increase in baryonic density and strangeness content of the medium. However, all medium effects analyzed are found to be weakly dependent on isospin asymmetry and temperature. We discuss the possible implications emanating from this analysis, which are all expected to make a significant difference to observables in heavy ion collision experiments, especially the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, GSI, where matter at high baryonic densities is planned to be produced.

  14. Structure of RDE-4 dsRBDs and mutational studies provide insights into dsRNA recognition in the Caenorhabditis elegans RNAi pathway.

    Chiliveri, Sai Chaitanya; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2014-02-15

    The association of RDE-4 (RNAi defective 4), a protein containing two dsRBDs (dsRNA-binding domains), with long dsRNA and Dcr-1 (Dicer1 homologue) initiates the siRNA pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. Unlike its homologues in higher eukaryotes, RDE-4 dsRBDs possess weak (micromolar) affinity for short dsRNA. With increasing length of dsRNA, RDE-4 exhibits enhanced affinity due to co-operativity. The linker and dsRBD2 are indispensable for RDE-4's simultaneous interaction with dsRNA and Dcr-1. In the present study, we have determined the solution structures of RDE-4 constructs that contain both dsRBDs and the linker region. In addition to the canonical dsRBD fold, both dsRBDs of RDE-4 show modified structural features such as truncation in the β1-β2 loop that rationalize RDE-4's relatively weak dsRNA affinity. Structure and binding studies demonstrate that dsRBD2 plays a decisive role in the RDE-4-dsRNA interaction; however, in contrast with previous findings, we found ephemeral interaction of RDE-4 dsRBD1 with dsRNA. More importantly, mutations in two tandem lysine residues (Lys217 and Lys218) in dsRBD2 impair RDE-4's dsRNA-binding ability and could obliterate RNAi initiation in C. elegans. Additionally, we postulate a structural basis for the minimal requirement of linker and dsRBD2 for RDE-4's association with dsRNA and Dcr-1.

  15. Divorced eutectic in a HPDC magnesium-aluminum alloy

    Barbagallo, S.; Laukli, H.I.; Lohne, O.; Cerri, E.

    2004-01-01

    The morphology of the eutectic in a thin-wall high pressure die cast (HPDC) U-shape AM60 magnesium box was investigated by light microscope, SEM, TEM and EPMA. The extremely fast cooling rate taking place in the solidification process produces a highly segregated zone near the boundaries of small grains and a fine distribution of β particles, which is typical of a completely divorced eutectic. It was shown that the segregated zone is coherent with the primary α-Mg grain core even if the increased aluminium content produces a deformation of the hexagonal crystal lattice, which was estimated through diffraction patterns (SADP). The variation of the alloying elements content through the grain boundaries was shown by means of EPMA line scanning. The β particle composition was quantitatively investigated and the results show that, in comparison with the equilibrium phase diagram, the non-equilibrium phase boundary of the Mg 17 Al 12 region is moved some percent towards the lower aluminium content, at the high cooling rate that occurs in high pressure die castings. The cubic structure of the β phase was revealed by diffraction pattern. The presence of small Al-Mn particles both inside the grain and in the boundary region was also put in evidence by TEM

  16. Particle Filtering for Multiple Access DS/CDMA Systems DS/CDMA Channel Estimation

    Rafael Oliveira Ribeiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses computational implementation aspects and performance of a Bayesian methodology, namely particle filter (PF. The PF channel estimation technique is directly applied to the channel coefficients estimation of DS/CDMA systems. Simulation results for non-line-of-sight (NLOS Rayleigh fading channel propagation have indicated that the bootstrap PF estimator is capable to provide RMSE in the range of [10-3 ; 10-2] for a wide range of multiple access interference (MAI levels and signal-noise ratio (SNR, and still be able to offer robustness to near-far ratio (NFR effect.

  17. Data Analysis Details (DS): SE51_DS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Full Text Available SE51_DS01 ReSpect The literature used for the MS/MS data we...re obtained from PubMed and Google Scholar, and the MS/MS data were manually digitalized. All literature use...the heights of the MS peaks in the figures were manually measured and calculated. For literature data that h...se contains 163 selected literature reports (3341 records corresponding to 2741 metabolites), Q-TOF/MS data ... data type selection (ignores all single fragments and one major fragment spectrum) and data set selection (literature, Q-TOF/MS and QqQ/MS). ...

  18. J /ψ →Ds ,dπ , Ds ,dK decays with perturbative QCD approach

    Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling; Gao, Jie; Chang, Qin; Huang, Jinshu; Lu, Gongru

    2016-08-01

    Besides the conventional strong and electromagnetic decay modes, the J /ψ particle can also decay via the weak interaction in the standard model. In this paper, nonleptonic J /ψ →Ds ,dπ , Ds ,dK weak decays, corresponding to the externally emitted virtual W boson process, are investigated with the perturbative QCD approach. It is found that the branching ratio for the Cabibbo-favored J /ψ →Dsπ decay can reach up to O (10-10), which might be potentially measurable at the future high-luminosity experiments.

  19. Kerr Hollow Quarry Remediation Project

    Walker, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry is a 3-acre flooded limestone quarry located near the Y-12 Facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The quarry was used in the 1940s as a source of construction material for the Department of Energy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Its use was discontinued in the early 1950s, and it was allowed to flood with water. The quarry presently has a maximum water depth of approximately 55 ft. During the period between the early 1950s until about 1988, the quarry was used for the treatment and disposal of a variety of materials including water-reactive, alkali metals, shock-sensitive chemicals, and compressed gas cylinders. For some of these materials, the treatment consisted of dropping the vessels containing the materials into the quarry from a high bluff located on one side of the quarry. The vessels were then punctured by gun shot, and the materials were allowed to react with the water and sink to the bottom of the quarry. Very few disposal records exist for the period from 1952 to 1962. The records after that time, from 1962 until 1988, indicate some 50 t of hazardous and nonhazardous materials were disposed of in the quarry. This report documents remediation efforts that have taken place at the quarry beginning in September 1990

  20. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  1. Formation of anomalous eutectic in Ni-Sn alloy by laser cladding

    Wang, Zhitai; Lin, Xin; Cao, Yongqing; Liu, Fencheng; Huang, Weidong

    2018-02-01

    Ni-Sn anomalous eutectic is obtained by single track laser cladding with the scanning velocity from 1 mm/s to 10 mm/s using the Ni-32.5 wt.%Sn eutectic powders. The microstructure of the cladding layer and the grain orientations of anomalous eutectic were investigated. It is found that the microstructure is transformed from primary α-Ni dendrites and the interdendritic (α-Ni + Ni3Sn) eutectic at the bottom of the cladding layer to α-Ni and β-Ni3Sn anomalous eutectic at the top of the cladding layer, whether for single layer or multilayer laser cladding. The EBSD maps and pole figures indicate that the spatially structure of α-Ni phase is discontinuous and the Ni3Sn phase is continuous in anomalous eutectic. The transformation from epitaxial growth columnar at bottom of cladding layer to free nucleation equiaxed at the top occurs, i.e., the columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) at the top of cladding layer during laser cladding processing leads to the generation of anomalous eutectic.

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of the Solidification of Eutectic Al-Si Alloy

    Sen, S.; Catalina, A. V.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The eutectic alloys have a wide spectrum of applications due to their good castability and physical and mechanical properties. The interphase spacing resulting during solidification is an important microstructural feature that significantly influences the mechanical behavior of the material. Thus, knowledge of the evolution of the interphase spacing during solidification is necessary in order to properly design the solidification process and optimize the material properties. While the growth of regular eutectics is rather well understood, the irregular eutectics such as Al-Si or Fe-graphite exhibit undercoolings and lamellar spacings much larger than those theoretically predicted. Despite of a considerable amount of experimental and theoretical work a clear understanding of the true mechanism underlying the spacing selection in irregular eutectics is yet to be achieved. A new experimental study of the solidification of the eutectic Al-Si alloy will be reported in this paper. The measured interface undercoolings and lamellar spacing will be compared to those found in the literature in order to get more general information regarding the growth mechanism of irregular eutectics. A modification of the present theory of the eutectic growth is also proposed. The results of the modified mathematical model, accounting for a non-isothermal solid/liquid interface, will be compared to the experimental measurements.

  3. Thermal energy storage using chloride salts and their eutectics

    Myers, Philip D.; Goswami, D. Yogi

    2016-01-01

    Achieving the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sunshot initiative requires (1) higher operating temperatures for concentrating solar power (CSP) plants to increase theoretical efficiency, and (2) effective thermal energy storage (TES) strategies to ensure dispatchability. Current inorganic salt-based TES systems in large-scale CSP plants generally employ molten nitrate salts for energy storage, but nitrate salts are limited in application to lower temperatures—generally, below 600 °C. These materials are sufficient for parabolic trough power plants, but they are inadequate for use at higher temperatures. At the higher operating temperatures achievable in solar power tower-type CSP plants, chloride salts are promising candidates for application as TES materials, owing to their thermal stability and generally lower cost compared to nitrate salts. In light of this, a recent study was conducted, which included a preliminary survey of chloride salts and binary eutectic systems that show promise as high temperature TES media. This study provided some basic information about the salts, including phase equilibria data and estimates of latent heat of fusion for some of the eutectics. Cost estimates were obtained through a review of bulk pricing for the pure salts among various vendors. This review paper updates that prior study, adding data for additional salt eutectic systems obtained from the literature. Where possible, data are obtained from the thermodynamic database software, FactSage. Radiative properties are presented, as well, since at higher temperatures, thermal radiation becomes a significant mode of heat transfer. Material compatibility for inorganic salts is another important consideration (e.g., with regard to piping and/or containment), so a summary of corrosion studies with various materials is also presented. Lastly, cost data for these systems are presented, allowing for meaningful comparison among these systems and other materials for TES

  4. Distribution of Ds-like sequences in genomes of cereals

    Vershinin, A.V.; Salina, E.A.; Shumnii, V.K.; Svitashev, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    It has been suggested that insertions of Ds-elements may alter the effectiveness of transcription or translation of the genetic loci and the normal processing of introns and exons, and that they may impair coding frames, etc. The object of the present study was to determine the frequency of occurence of DNA sequences similar to the Ds-controlling elements of mazie (Ds-like sequences) among other representatives of cereals. The conservative feature of the primary structure of transposons from different eukaryotic species served as a basis in this investigation. By means of the ''nick-translation'' reaction with the aid of DNA-polymerase I (alpha- 32 P) dCTP or TTP was introduced into the Ds-element. The specific radioactivity of the preparations obtained was 5 x 10 7 to 1 x 10 8 cpm/gamma. From the results obtained, it is suggested that the genomes of cereals examined contain a collection of Ds-like sequences. The Ds-element may have a significant effect on gene expression in the presence of Ac-like or other sequences, which undergo transposition

  5. Diclofenac sodium (DS) loaded bioerodible polymer based constructs

    Piras, M.; Chiellini, F.; Nikkola, L.; Ashammakhi, N.; Chiellini, E.

    2008-02-01

    Pain is a prevalent problem that can raise morbidity of patients. Pain killer releasing biodegradable materials have been developed by using different techniques and biomaterials. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the use of a new bioerodible polymer for release of diclofenac sodium (DS). 1-butanol hemiester poly(maleic anhydride-alt-2-methoxyethyl vinyl ether) (PAM14) was prepared in the university of Pisa and selected as polymer of choice for the study. Polymer solutions of 5-10% (in ethanol or in acetic acid) were prepared, half of them containing 2% DS. The solutions were then electrospun to produce nanomats that were subsequently characterized using SEM. Fiber diameter was 160 nm 1 μm. Increasing polymer concentration increased the size of the fibers but reduced the number of beads (with or without DS). In the specimens obtained from acetic acid solution, the addition of DS resulted in a reduction in fiber diameter and an increase in the inter-bead distance. Corresponding ethanol solutions gave more homogeneous specimens than did acetic acid, having a lower number of beads. With the addition of DS a reduction in fiber diameter was observed for the acetic acid specimens. However, in ethanol, adding DS resulted in increased fiber diameter. Accordingly, it can be concluded that it is feasible to develop electrospun diclofenac releasing bioerodible nanostructures that have potential use in pain management. Their further evaluation is however, needed both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Oxygen partial pressure: a key to alloying and discovery in metal oxide--metal eutectic systems

    Holder, J.D.; Clark, G.W.; Oliver, B.F.

    1978-01-01

    Control of oxygen partial pressure is essential in the directional solidification of oxide--metal eutectic composites by techniques involving gas-solid and gas-liquid interactions. The existence of end components in the eutectic composite is Po 2 sensitive as are melt stoichiometry, solid phase compositions, and vapor losses due to oxidation-volatilization. Simple criteria are postulated which can aid the experimentalist in selecting the proper gas mixture for oxide--metal eutectic composite growth. The Cr 2 O 3 --Mo--Cr systems was used to verify certain aspects of the proposed criteria

  7. Polymerisation of activated RNA in eutectic ice phases

    Dörr, Mark; Maurer, Sarah Elisabeth; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    , metal catalyzed condensation reactions (s. micrograph, right). With a new, non-radioactive ex-perimental essay we are selectively monitoring the 5'-3' and 5'-2' elongation of 5'-fluorescence labeled RNA oligomers. At - 18.5 °C the polymerization reaction and its selectivity is expected to be much higher...... than at room temperature. In the case of a mixed dimer or oligomer experiment this might lead to a particular sequence distribution. The concurrence between polymerization and degradation seen in the previous work shall be further investigated, focusing on possible sequences stabilizing and increasing...... (“cooperative sequences”) or degrading (“parasitic sequences”) the RNA population. These eutectic phases in water-ice are plausible prebiotic micro-environments that should help to overcome the dilution problem in origin of life scenarios. They might have supported the production of libraries...

  8. The solvent extraction of ytterbium from a molten eutectic

    Lengyel, T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results which were obtained in measurements performed with different binary mixtures of solvents being capable of effectively extracting ytterbium from the molten eutectic lithium nitrate--ammonium nitrate. In the course of elaborating the possible ways of extractive separation of rare earths systematic investigations regarding the individual members of the group are required. The binary solvent mixtures consisted of thenoyl-trifluoracetone (TTA), β-isopropil-tropolone (IPT), tributyl phosphate (TBP), di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP), 2,2'-bipyridyl (bipy), dibutyl phtalate (DBP) and Amberlite LA-2 (LA-2). The concentration of the central ion was kept at 5x10 -6 M by using Yb-169 of high specific activity as a tracer for the radiometric assay. (T.I.)

  9. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES; FINAL

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-01-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO(sub x)). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process

  10. Characterization of tin films synthesized from ethaline deep eutectic solvent

    Ghosh, Swatilekha; Roy, Sudipta

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tin deposition was achieved by galvanostatic method on the basic substrates from ethaline deep eutectic solvent without use of any additives. • The current potential behaviour of tin system changes with increase in concentration of hydrated tin chloride in ethaline. • The deposition rate in ethaline display three times lower value compared to aqueous electrolytes. • Fine grained crystals of 62 ± 10 nm were obtained for tin deposits. • The deposition process is economical and can be adapted for industrial applications. - Abstract: Tin (Sn) films were electrodeposited by galvanostatic method from ethaline deep eutectic solvent (DES), without any additives. The effect of various deposition parameters on the microstructure was studied. With increase in metal salt concentration from 0.01 to 0.1 M, changes in current–potential behaviour were observed in the polarization scans. This might be due to the existence of [SnCl 3 ] − , [Sn 2 Cl 5 ] − complexes in ethaline DES. Smooth and homogeneous deposits were obtained on a steel substrate surface by applying current density of 1.57 × 10 −3 A/cm 2 at 25 °C. Under these conditions the deposition rate was found to be 0.1 ± 10% μm/min and current efficiency was obtained as 84 ± 3%. XRD analysis of the deposit confirmed the polycrystalline tetragonal structure with mostly (2 0 0) orientation having a crystallite size about 62 ± 16% nm along with an internal strain of 0.0031 ± 22%. The present deposition method is simple, economical and can be adapted for industrial applications

  11. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

  12. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy ...

    countries. The known alternative in such condition is ... Key words: Hollow mill, stripped screws, titanium locked plates ... used a locally manufactured stainless steel hollow mill, ... head ‑ plate hole” assembly as a mono‑block single unit. In.

  13. Method for the production of fabricated hollow microspheroids

    Wickramanayake, Shan; Luebke, David R.

    2015-06-09

    The method relates to the fabrication of a polymer microspheres comprised of an asymmetric layer surrounding a hollow interior. The fabricated hollow microsphere is generated from a nascent hollow microsphere comprised of an inner core of core fluid surrounded by a dope layer of polymer dope, where the thickness of the dope layer is at least 10% and less than 50% of the diameter of the inner core. The nascent hollow microsphere is exposed to a gaseous environment, generating a vitrified hollow microsphere, which is subsequently immersed in a coagulation bath. Solvent exchange produces a fabricated hollow microsphere comprised of a densified outer skin surrounding a macroporous inner layer, which surrounds a hollow interior. In an embodiment, the polymer is a polyimide or a polyamide-imide, and the non-solvent in the core fluid and the coagulation bath is water. The fabricated hollow microspheres are particularly suited as solvent supports for gas separation processes.

  14. Ac-induced disruption of the doubleDs structure in tomato

    Rommens, Caius M.T.; Biezen, Erik A. van der; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1991-01-01

    The maize doubleDs element is stably maintained in the tomato genome. Upon the subsequent introduction of Ac into a plant containing doubleDs, disruption of the doubleDs structure and DNA rearrangements at the site of the doubleDs element were observed. No indications were obtained for excision of

  15. Development of tree hollows in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur)

    Ranius, Thomas; Niklasson, Mats; Berg, Niclas

    2009-01-01

    Many invertebrates, birds and mammals are dependent on hollow trees. For landscape planning that aims at persistence of species inhabiting hollow trees it is crucial to understand the development of such trees. In this study we constructed an individual-based simulation model to predict diameter distribution and formation of hollows in oak tree populations. Based on tree-ring data from individual trees, we estimated the ages when hollow formation commences for pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) ...

  16. Transmission properties of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Hald, Jan; Petersen, Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers.......Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers....

  17. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  18. Crystallization processes in Ni-Ti-B glassy alloys of near-ternary-eutectic composition

    Merk, N.; Morris, D.G.; Stadelmann, P.

    1987-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics and mechanisms of three Ni-Ti-B glasses have been examined with a view to elucidating the roles of chemical composition and quenched structure on behaviour. Alloys of composition near a ternary-eutectic point have been chosen because they represent a real and complex situation where several crystalline phases may form simultaneously. Crystallization processes are analysed in terms of nucleation and growth stages. Different nucleation mechanisms seem to be best explained in terms of the short range ordered structure of the quenched glass. Analysis of crystal glass interface energies indicates that it is not this energy term which controls the nucleation of crystals on annealing. Crystal growth may involve a eutectic mechanism or a single-phase mechanism controlled by interface or matrix-diffusion kinetics. Crystallization is fastest when eutectic nucleation and growth occurs. Formation of the eutectic colony requires the initial formation of the phase of complex structure followed by the phase of simpler structure

  19. Prospects for designing structural cast eutectic alloys on Al-Ce-Ni system base

    Belov, N.A.; Naumova, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The phase diagram of Al-Ce-Ni system is built for an aluminium corner at component concentration up to 16 mass %Ce and 8 mass%Ni. A ternary eutectic reaction is established at 12%Ce, 5%Ni and 626 deg C. The ternary eutectic alloy is similar in structure to rapidly cooled Al base alloys with transition metals. The possibility to design new cast alloys based on three-phase (Al)+NiAl 3 +CeAl 4 eutectics is under consideration. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu, Al-Sc and Al-Zr base alloys can be used as (Al) constituent of the eutectics. The new alloys may be considered as heat resistant ones due to the fact that no structural changes are observed in castings on heating up to 350 deg C. 18 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Data supporting the prediction of the properties of eutectic organic phase change materials

    Samer Kahwaji

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article include the molar masses, melting temperatures, latent heats of fusion and temperature-dependent heat capacities of fifteen fatty acid phase change materials (PCMs. The data are used in conjunction with the thermodynamic models discussed in Kahwaji and White (2018 [1] to develop a computational tool that calculates the eutectic compositions and thermal properties of eutectic mixtures of PCMs. The computational tool is part of this article and consists of a Microsoft Excel® file available in Mendeley Data repository [2]. A description of the computational tool along with the properties of nearly 100 binary mixtures of fatty acid PCMs calculated using this tool are also included in the present article. The Excel® file is designed such that it can be easily modified or expanded by users to calculate the properties of eutectic mixtures of other classes of PCMs. Keywords: Phase change materials, PCM, Eutectic, Thermal properties, Thermal energy storage

  1. Microstructure of directionally solidified Ti-Fe eutectic alloy with low interstitial and high mechanical strength

    Contieri, R. J.; Lopes, E. S. N.; Taquire de La Cruz, M.; Costa, A. M.; Afonso, C. R. M.; Caram, R.

    2011-10-01

    The performance of Ti alloys can be considerably enhanced by combining Ti and other elements, causing an eutectic transformation and thereby producing composites in situ from the liquid phase. This paper reports on the processing and characterization of a directionally solidified Ti-Fe eutectic alloy. Directional solidification at different growth rates was carried out in a setup that employs a water-cooled copper crucible combined with a voltaic electric arc moving through the sample. The results obtained show that a regular fiber-like eutectic structure was produced and the interphase spacing was found to be a function of the growth rate. Mechanical properties were measured using compression, microindentation and nanoindentation tests to determine the Vickers hardness, compressive strength and elastic modulus. Directionally solidified eutectic samples presented high values of compressive strength in the range of 1844-3000 MPa and ductility between 21.6 and 25.2%.

  2. Studies on pulsed hollow cathode capillary discharges

    Choi, P; Dumitrescu-Zoita, C; Larour, J; Rous, J [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises; Favre, M; Moreno, J; Chuaqui, H; Wyndham, E [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Zambra, M [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Wong, C S [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Plasma Research Lab

    1997-12-31

    Preliminary results on radiation characteristics of pulsed hollow cathode capillary discharges are presented. The device combines the on axis electron beam assisted ionization capabilities of the transient hollow cathode discharge with a novel high voltage low inductance geometrical design, which integrates the local energy storage into the electrode system. A nanosecond regime high temperature plasma is produced in a long, high aspect ratio capillary, with light emission in the UV to XUV region. The discharge is operated from near vacuum to pressure in the 1000 mTorr range. (author). 2 figs., 7 refs.

  3. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis E. H.; Miao, Jianmin

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF6/O2 isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases.

  4. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    Ji Jing; Tay, Francis E H; Miao Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF 6 /O 2 isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases

  5. Microfabricated hollow microneedle array using ICP etcher

    Ji Jing [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Tay, Francis E H [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Miao Jianmin [MicroMachines Center, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a developed process for fabrication of hollow silicon microneedle arrays. The inner hollow hole and the fluidic reservoir are fabricated in deep reactive ion etching. The profile of outside needles is achieved by the developed fabrication process, which combined isotropic etching and anisotropic etching with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher. Using the combination of SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} isotropic etching chemistry and Bosch process, the high aspect ratio 3D and high density microneedle arrays are fabricated. The generated needle external geometry can be controlled by etching variables in the isotropic and anisotropic cases.

  6. Computational predictions of zinc oxide hollow structures

    Tuoc, Vu Ngoc; Huan, Tran Doan; Thao, Nguyen Thi

    2018-03-01

    Nanoporous materials are emerging as potential candidates for a wide range of technological applications in environment, electronic, and optoelectronics, to name just a few. Within this active research area, experimental works are predominant while theoretical/computational prediction and study of these materials face some intrinsic challenges, one of them is how to predict porous structures. We propose a computationally and technically feasible approach for predicting zinc oxide structures with hollows at the nano scale. The designed zinc oxide hollow structures are studied with computations using the density functional tight binding and conventional density functional theory methods, revealing a variety of promising mechanical and electronic properties, which can potentially find future realistic applications.

  7. Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS): treatment options and considerations.

    Vilke, Gary M; Bozeman, William P; Dawes, Donald M; Demers, Gerard; Wilson, Michael P

    2012-04-01

    The term Excited Delirium Syndrome (ExDS) has traditionally been used in the forensic literature to describe findings in a subgroup of patients with delirium who suffered lethal consequences from their untreated severe agitation.(1-5) Excited delirium syndrome, also known as agitated delirium, is generally defined as altered mental status and combativeness or aggressiveness. Although the exact signs and symptoms are difficult to define precisely, clinical findings often include many of the following: tolerance to significant pain, rapid breathing, sweating, severe agitation, elevated temperature, delirium, non-compliance or poor awareness to direction from police or medical personnel, lack of fatiguing, unusual or superhuman strength, and inappropriate clothing for the current environment. It has become increasingly recognized that individuals displaying ExDS are at high risk for sudden death, and ExDS therefore represents a true medical emergency. Recently the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) published the findings of a white paper on the topic of ExDS to better find consensus on the issues of definition, diagnosis, and treatment.(6) In so doing, ACEP joined the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) in recognizing ExDS as a medical condition. For both paramedics and physicians, the difficulty in diagnosing the underlying cause of ExDS in an individual patient is that the presenting clinical signs and symptoms of ExDS can be produced by a wide variety of clinical disease processes. For example, agitation, combativeness, and altered mental status can be produced by hypoglycemia, thyroid storm, certain kinds of seizures, and these conditions can be difficult to distinguish from those produced by cocaine or methamphetamine intoxication.(7) Prehospital personnel are generally not expected to differentiate between the multiple possible causes of the patient's presentation, but rather simply to recognize that the patient has a medical emergency

  8. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-01-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl 2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting

  9. The effect of the solidification mode on eutectic structure in Fe-C-V alloys

    Fras, E.; Guzik, E.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine such a chemical composition of Fe-C-V alloys which would ensure the formation of perfectly eutectic structures as well as to investigate the eutectic morphology of these alloys when undergoing bulk and directional solidification. Attempts have been done to get in situ composites from Fe-C-V alloys. The adopted testing methods as well as obtained results are described in detail. (H.M.)

  10. Experimental investigation of thermophysical properties of eutectic Mo–C, graphite and tantalum at high temperatures

    Senchenko, V N; Belikov, R S; Popov, V S

    2016-01-01

    An experimental technique based on fast electrical heating for investigation of thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressures and at high temperatures is considered. A set of thermophysical properties of refractory materials such as specific enthalpy, specific heat capacity, specific resistivity, melting heat of eutectic Mo-C and thermal expansion of graphite and tantalum were determined. The obtained temperature of eutectic melting of MoC 0.82 shows close agreement with equilibrium Mo-C phase diagram. (paper)

  11. Dicer uses distinct modules for recognizing dsRNA termini.

    Sinha, Niladri K; Iwasa, Janet; Shen, Peter S; Bass, Brenda L

    2018-01-19

    Invertebrates rely on Dicer to cleave viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and Drosophila Dicer-2 distinguishes dsRNA substrates by their termini. Blunt termini promote processive cleavage, while 3' overhanging termini are cleaved distributively. To understand this discrimination, we used cryo-electron microscopy to solve structures of Drosophila Dicer-2 alone and in complex with blunt dsRNA. Whereas the Platform-PAZ domains have been considered the only Dicer domains that bind dsRNA termini, unexpectedly, we found that the helicase domain is required for binding blunt, but not 3' overhanging, termini. We further showed that blunt dsRNA is locally unwound and threaded through the helicase domain in an adenosine triphosphate-dependent manner. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism for optimizing antiviral defense and set the stage for the discovery of helicase-dependent functions in other Dicers. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. Evaluation and modeling of the eutectic composition of various drug-polyethylene glycol solid dispersions.

    Baird, Jared A; Taylor, Lynne S

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of which factors contribute to the eutectic composition of drug-polyethylene glycol (PEG) blends and to compare experimental values with predictions from the semi-empirical model developed by Lacoulonche et al. Eutectic compositions of various drug-PEG 3350 solid dispersions were predicted, assuming athermal mixing, and compared to experimentally determined eutectic points. The presence or absence of specific interactions between the drug and PEG 3350 were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The eutectic composition for haloperidol-PEG and loratadine-PEG solid dispersions was accurately predicted using the model, while predictions for aceclofenac-PEG and chlorpropamide-PEG were very different from those experimentally observed. Deviations in the model prediction from ideal behavior for the systems evaluated were confirmed to be due to the presence of specific interactions between the drug and polymer, as demonstrated by IR spectroscopy. Detailed analysis showed that the eutectic composition prediction from the model is interdependent on the crystal lattice energy of the drug compound (evaluated from the melting temperature and the heat of fusion) as well as the nature of the drug-polymer interactions. In conclusion, for compounds with melting points less than 200°C, the model is ideally suited for predicting the eutectic composition of systems where there is an absence of drug-polymer interactions.

  13. The formation mechanism of eutectic microstructures in NiAl-Cr composites.

    Tang, Bin; Cogswell, Daniel A; Xu, Guanglong; Milenkovic, Srdjan; Cui, Yuwen

    2016-07-20

    NiAl-based eutectic alloys, consisting of an ordered bcc matrix (B2) and disordered bcc fibers (A2), have been a subject of intensive efforts aimed at tailoring the properties of many of the currently used nickel-based superalloys. A thermodynamic phase field model was developed on a thermodynamic foundation and fully integrated with a thermo-kinetic database of the Ni-Al-Cr ternary system to elucidate the resulting peculiar eutectic microstructure. Invoking a variation of the liquid/solid interfacial thickness with temperature, we simulated the characteristic sunflower-like eutectic microstructures in the NiAl-Cr composites, consistent with experimental observations. The mechanism that governs the formation of the peculiar eutectic morphology was envisioned from the modeled evolutions associated with six sequential steps. Our calculations show that the conditional spinodal decomposition occurring in sequence could further trim and revise the microstructure of the eutectics by generating fine-domain structures, thereby providing an additional method to explore the novel NiAl-based eutectic composites with tunable properties at elevated temperatures.

  14. Monotonic and fatigue deformation of Ni--W directionally solidified eutectic

    Garmong, G.; Williams, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    Unlike many eutectic composites, the Ni--W eutectic exhibits extensive ductility by slip. Furthermore, its properties may be greatly varied by proper heat treatments. Results of studies of deformation in both monotonic and fatigue loading are reported. During monotonic deformation the fiber/matrix interface acts as a source of dislocations at low strains and an obstacle to matrix slip at higher strains. Deforming the quenched-plus-aged eutectic causes planar matrix slip, with the result that matrix slip bands create stress concentrations in the fibers at low strains. The aged eutectic reaches generally higher stress levels for comparable strains than does the as-quenched eutectic, and the failure strains decrease with increasing aging times. For the composites tested in fatigue, the aged eutectic has better high-stress fatigue resistance than the as-quenched material, but for low-stress, high-cycle fatigue their cycles to failure are nearly the same. However, both crack initiation and crack propagation are different in the two conditions, so the coincidence in high-cycle fatigue is probably fortuitous. The effect of matrix strength on composite performance is not simple, since changes in strength may be accompanied by alterations in slip modes and failure processes. (17 fig) (auth)

  15. Hollow-in-Hollow Carbon Spheres for Lithium-ion Batteries with Superior Capacity and Cyclic Performance

    Zang, Jun; Ye, Jianchuan; Fang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Xiangwu; Zheng, Mingsen; Dong, Quanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hollow-in-hollow structured HIHCS was synthesized via a facile templating strategy. • The HCS core and hollow carbon shell constitute the hollow-in-hollow structure. • The HIHCS exhibited superior rate capability and cycle stability as anode material. • The excellent performance is attributed to the unique hollow-in-hollow structure. - Abstract: Hollow spheres structured materials have been intensively pursued due to their unique properties for energy storage. In this paper, hollow-in-hollow carbon spheres (HIHCS) with a multi-shelled structure were successfully synthesized using a facile hard-templating procedure. When evaluated as anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the resultant HIHCS anode exhibited superior capacity and cycling stability than HCS. It could deliver reversible capacities of 937, 481, 401, 304 and 236 mAh g −1 at current densities of 0.1 A g −1 , 1 A g −1 , 2 A g −1 , 5 A g −1 and 10 A g −1 , respectively. And capacity fading is not apparent in 500 cycles at 5 A g −1 . The excellent performance of the HIHCS anode is ascribed to its unique hollow-in-hollow structure and high specific surface area.

  16. Multi-scale simulation of single crystal hollow turbine blade manufactured by liquid metal cooling process

    Xuewei Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metal cooling (LMC process as a powerful directional solidification (DS technique is prospectively used to manufacture single crystal (SC turbine blades. An understanding of the temperature distribution and microstructure evolution in LMC process is required in order to improve the properties of the blades. For this reason, a multi-scale model coupling with the temperature field, grain growth and solute diffusion was established. The temperature distribution and mushy zone evolution of the hollow blade was simulated and discussed. According to the simulation results, the mushy zone might be convex and ahead of the ceramic beads at a lower withdrawal rate, while it will be concave and laggard at a higher withdrawal rate, and a uniform and horizontal mushy zone will be formed at a medium withdrawal rate. Grain growth of the blade at different withdrawal rates was also investigated. Single crystal structures were all selected out at three different withdrawal rates. Moreover, mis-orientation of the grains at 8 mm/min reached ~30°, while it was ~5° and ~15° at 10 mm/min and 12 mm/min, respectively. The model for predicting dendritic morphology was verified by corresponding experiment. Large scale for 2D dendritic distribution in the whole sections was investigated by experiment and simulation, and they presented a well agreement with each other. Keywords: Hollow blade, Single crystal, Multi-scale simulation, Liquid metal cooling

  17. Higher spin realization of the DS/CFT correspondence

    Anninos, Dionysios; Hartman, Thomas; Strominger, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We conjecture that Vasiliev’s theory of higher spin gravity in four-dimensional de Sitter space (dS 4 ) is holographically dual to a three-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT 3 ) living on the spacelike boundary of dS 4 at future timelike infinity. The CFT 3 is the Euclidean Sp ( N ) vector model with anticommuting scalars. The free CFT 3 flows under a double-trace deformation to an interacting CFT 3 in the IR. We argue that both CFTs are dual to Vasiliev dS 4 gravity but with different future boundary conditions on the bulk scalar field. Our analysis rests heavily on analytic continuations of bulk and boundary correlators in the proposed duality relating the O ( N ) model with Vasiliev gravity in AdS 4 . (paper)

  18. Molecular motor transport through hollow nanowires

    Lard, Mercy; Ten Siethoff, Lasse; Generosi, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    -driven motion of fluorescent probes (actin filaments) through 80 nm wide, Al2O 3 hollow nanowires of micrometer length. The motor-driven transport is orders of magnitude faster than would be possible by passive diffusion. The system represents a necessary element for advanced devices based on gliding assays...

  19. Hollow micro string based calorimeter device

    2014-01-01

    positions so as to form a free released double clamped string in-between said two longitudinally distanced positions said micro-channel string comprising a microfluidic channel having a closed cross section and extending in the longitudinal direction of the hollow string, acoustical means adapted...

  20. Hollow fibre supported liquid membrane extraction of ...

    A simple sample pre-treatment method utilizing hollow fibre supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) was carried out on pharmaceuticals samples comprising of cough syrups (CS1 and CS2) and an anti-inflammatory product (AI). The active ingredients targeted in the extraction process were diphenylhydramine (DPH), ...

  1. TEACHING PHYSICS: Biking around a hollow sphere

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    1999-11-01

    The conditions required for a cyclist riding a motorbike in a horizontal circle on or above the equator of a hollow sphere are derived using concepts of equilibrium and the condition for uniform circular motion. The result is compared with an empirical analysis based on a video show. Some special cases of interest derived from the general solution are elaborated.

  2. Evidence of fire resistance of hollow-core slabs

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    is therefore going on in the Netherlands about the fire resistance of hollow-core slabs. In 2014 the producers of hollow-core slabs have published a report of a project called Holcofire containing a collection of 162 fire tests on hollow-core slabs giving for the first time an overview of the fire tests made....... The present paper analyses the evidence now available for assessment of the fire resistance of extruded hollow-core slabs. The 162 fire tests from the Holcofire report are compared against the requirements for testing from the product standard for hollow-core slabs EN1168 and knowledge about the possible......Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes...

  3. First Observation and Measurement of the Branching Fraction for the Decay $B^0_S \\rightarrow D{_S}^* K$

    Sestini, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Bs -> Ds* K and Bs -> Ds* \\pi decays are of paramount interest as they can be used, combined with Bs -> Ds K and Bd -> D* \\pi, to measure the weak phase \\gamma. We present the first observation of the Bs -> Ds* K decay, where Ds* are reconstructed through the decay chain Ds* -> Ds (-> K K \\pi) \\gamma, using an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb^{-1} recorded by the LHCb experiment.

  4. Directional solidification of Al2-Cu-Al and Al3-Ni-Al eutectics during TEXUS rocket flight

    Favier, J. J.; Degoer, J.

    1984-01-01

    One lamellar eutectic sample and one fiber-like eutectic sample were solidified directionally during the TEXUS-6 rocket flight. The microstructures and the results of the thermal analysis, obtained from the temperatures recorded on the cartridge skin, are compared. No appreciable modifications of the regularity of the eutectic structures were observed by passing from 1 g to 0.0001 g in these experiments. No steady state growth conditions were achieved in these experiments.

  5. Measurement of the $D_s^+ - D_s^-$ production asymmetry in 7 TeV pp collisions

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    Heavy quark production in 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions at the LHC is not necessarily flavour symmetric. The production asymmetry, $A_P$, between $D_s^+$ and $D_s^-$ mesons is studied using the $\\phi\\pi^\\pm$ decay mode in a data sample of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. The difference between $\\pi^+$ and $\\pi^-$ detection efficiencies is determined using the ratios of fully reconstructed to partially reconstructed $D^{*\\pm}$ decays. The overall production asymmetry in the $D_s$ rapidity region 2.0 to 4.5 with transverse momentum larger than 2 GeV is measured to be $A_P=(-0.33 \\pm 0.22 \\pm 0.10)\\%$. This result can constrain models of heavy flavour production.

  6. Evolution of nickel sulfide hollow spheres through topotactic transformation

    Wei, Chengzhen; Lu, Qingyi; Sun, Jing; Gao, Feng

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a topotactic transformation route was proposed to synthesize single-crystalline β-NiS hollow spheres with uniform phase and morphology evolving from polycrystalline α-NiS hollow spheres. Uniform polycrystalline α-NiS hollow spheres were firstly prepared with thiourea and glutathione as sulfur sources under hydrothermal conditions through the Kirkendall effect. By increasing the reaction temperature the polycrystalline α-NiS hollow spheres were transformed to uniform β-NiS hollow spheres. The β-NiS crystals obtained through the topotactic transformation route not only have unchanged morphology of hollow spheres but are also single-crystalline in nature. The as-prepared NiS hollow spheres display a good ability to remove the organic pollutant Congo red from water, which makes them have application potential in water treatment.In this study, a topotactic transformation route was proposed to synthesize single-crystalline β-NiS hollow spheres with uniform phase and morphology evolving from polycrystalline α-NiS hollow spheres. Uniform polycrystalline α-NiS hollow spheres were firstly prepared with thiourea and glutathione as sulfur sources under hydrothermal conditions through the Kirkendall effect. By increasing the reaction temperature the polycrystalline α-NiS hollow spheres were transformed to uniform β-NiS hollow spheres. The β-NiS crystals obtained through the topotactic transformation route not only have unchanged morphology of hollow spheres but are also single-crystalline in nature. The as-prepared NiS hollow spheres display a good ability to remove the organic pollutant Congo red from water, which makes them have application potential in water treatment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD patterns; SEM images and TEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03371f

  7. Assessing the toxicity and biodegradability of deep eutectic solvents.

    Wen, Qing; Chen, Jing-Xin; Tang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Juan; Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as a new type of promising ionic solvents with a broad range of potential applications. Although their ecotoxicological profile is still poorly known, DESs are generally regarded as "green" because they are composed of ammonium salts and H-bond donors (HBDs) which are considered to be eco-friendly. In this work, cholinium-based DESs comprised of choline chloride (ChCl) and choline acetate (ChAc) as the salt and urea (U), acetamide (A), glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) as the HBD were evaluated for their toxic effects on different living organisms such as Escherichia coli (a bacterium), Allium sativum (garlic, a plant) and hydra (an invertebrate), and their biodegradabilities were assessed by means of closed bottle tests. These DESs possessed an anti-bacterial property and exhibited inhibitory effects on the test organisms adopted, depending on the composition and concentration of the DES. The mechanism for the impact of DESs and their components on different living organisms can be associated to their interactions with the cellular membranes. Not all DESs can be considered readily biodegradable. By extending the limited knowledge about the toxicity and biodegradation of this particular solvent family, this investigation on DESs provides insight into our structure-based understanding of their ecotoxicological behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    Phaechamud T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thawatchai Phaechamud,1 Sarun Tuntarawongsa2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Pharmaceutical Intelligence Unit Prachote Plengwittaya, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand Abstract: Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (Tg of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and -31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. Keywords

  9. Eutectic and solid-state wafer bonding of silicon with gold

    Abouie, Maryam; Liu, Qi; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Eutectic and solid-state Au-Si bonding are compared for both a-Si and c-Si samples. ► Exchange of a-Si and Au layer was observed in both types of bonded samples. ► Use of c-Si for bonding resulted in formation of craters at the Au/c-Si interface. ► Solid-state Au-Si bonding produces better bonds in terms of microstructure. - Abstract: The simple Au-Si eutectic, which melts at 363 °C, can be used to bond Si wafers. However, faceted craters can form at the Au/Si interface as a result of anisotropic and non-uniform reaction between Au and crystalline silicon (c-Si). These craters may adversely affect active devices on the wafers. Two possible solutions to this problem were investigated in this study. One solution was to use an amorphous silicon layer (a-Si) that was deposited on the c-Si substrate to bond with the Au. The other solution was to use solid-state bonding instead of eutectic bonding, and the wafers were bonded at a temperature (350 °C) below the Au-Si eutectic temperature. The results showed that the a-Si layer prevented the formation of craters and solid-state bonding not only required a lower bonding temperature than eutectic bonding, but also prevented spill out of the solder resulting in strong bonds with high shear strength in comparison with eutectic bonding. Using amorphous silicon, the maximum shear strength for the solid-state Au-Si bond reached 15.2 MPa, whereas for the eutectic Au-Si bond it was 13.2 MPa.

  10. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Sequence Selection and Performance in DS/CDMA Systems

    Jefferson Santos Ambrosio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work key concepts on coding division multiple access (CDMA communication systems have been discussed. The sequence selection impact on the performance and capacity of direct sequence CDMA (DS/CDMA systems under AWGN and increasing system loading, as well as under multiple antennas channels was investigated.

  12. Statistical inconsistencies in the KiDS-450 data set

    Efstathiou, George; Lemos, Pablo

    2018-05-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) has been used in several recent papers to infer constraints on the amplitude of the matter power spectrum and matter density at low redshift. Some of these analyses have claimed tension with the Planck Λ cold dark matter cosmology at the ˜2σ-3σ level, perhaps indicative of new physics. However, Planck is consistent with other low-redshift probes of the matter power spectrum such as redshift-space distortions and the combined galaxy-mass and galaxy-galaxy power spectra. Here, we perform consistency tests of the KiDS data, finding internal tensions for various cuts of the data at ˜2.2σ-3.5σ significance. Until these internal tensions are understood, we argue that it is premature to claim evidence for new physics from KiDS. We review the consistency between KiDS and other weak lensing measurements of S8, highlighting the importance of intrinsic alignments for precision cosmology.

  13. Norm for last på konstruktioner DS410

    Hertz, Kristian

    The fire chapter of the Danish Code of Practice for Loads for the Design of Structures DS410 contains definitions of basic concepts and principles of calculation and thermal fire load, and calculation methods for nominal fire courses and for parametric fire courses and modification for thermal in...

  14. Hyperthyroidism in a population with Down syndrome (DS).

    Goday-Arno, Alberto; Cerda-Esteva, Mariaina; Flores-Le-Roux, Juana Antonia; Chillaron-Jordan, Juan José; Corretger, Josep Maria; Cano-Pérez, Juan Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Thyroid disorders are frequent in patients with Down syndrome (DS). It is well-known that the prevalence of hypothyroidism is high but data on hyperthyroidism are scarce. To assess the prevalence, aetiology, clinical characteristics, evolution and treatment of hyperthyroidism in a population with DS attending a specialized medical centre. Data were gathered by systematic review of 1832 medical records from the Catalan DS Foundation, in Spain, registered between January 1991 and February 2006. Patients with the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism were identified and data on clinical features, physical examination, laboratory and imaging tests, treatment and evolution were collected. Twelve patients with hyperthyroidism were recorded (6.5 cases/1000 patients with DS). There were 5 males and 7 females, with a mean age at diagnosis of 16.8 years. The most common presenting symptoms were decreased heat tolerance, sweating, increased irritability and weight loss. All patients had diffuse goitre at physical examination and two patients presented with exophthalmia. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed biochemically. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin levels were raised (mean 128.1 U/l) and imaging tests confirmed the diagnosis of Graves' disease in all cases. Patients started treatment with carbimazole at diagnosis and after a mean period of 40 months without clinical remission, they required definitive therapy with radioactive iodine. Subjects developed hypothyroidism after radio-iodine therapy and replacement therapy with levothyroxine was necessary. Hyperthyroidism is more prevalent in patients with DS than in the general population and has no gender predominance. It is caused mainly by Graves' disease. Anti-thyroid drugs were not effective in achieving remission and radioactive iodine as a definitive treatment was required in all cases.

  15. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology

    Dai, Yuntao; Spronsen, Jaap van; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Natural products were used as a source for deep eutectic solvents and ionic liquids. ► We define own chemical and physical properties of natural deep eutectic solvents. ► Interaction between natural deep eutectic solvents and solutes was confirmed by NMR. ► The developed natural deep eutectic solvents were applied as green media. - Abstract: Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the

  16. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology

    Dai, Yuntao [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Spronsen, Jaap van; Witkamp, Geert-Jan [Laboratory for Process Equipment, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Verpoorte, Robert [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Choi, Young Hae, E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► Natural products were used as a source for deep eutectic solvents and ionic liquids. ► We define own chemical and physical properties of natural deep eutectic solvents. ► Interaction between natural deep eutectic solvents and solutes was confirmed by NMR. ► The developed natural deep eutectic solvents were applied as green media. - Abstract: Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the

  17. Molecular interactions in the betaine monohydrate-polyol deep eutectic solvents: Experimental and computational studies

    Zahrina, Ida; Mulia, Kamarza; Yanuar, Arry; Nasikin, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    DES (deep eutectic solvents) are a new class of ionic liquids that have excellent properties. The strength of interaction between molecules in the DES affects their properties and applications. In this work, the strength of molecular interactions between components in the betaine monohydrate salt and polyol (glycerol or/and propylene glycol) eutectic mixtures was studied by experimental and computational studies. The melting point and fusion enthalpy of the mixtures were measured using STA (Simultaneous Thermal Analyzer). The nature and strength of intermolecular interactions were observed by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy. The molecular dynamics simulation was used to determine the number of H-bonds, percent occupancy, and radial distribution functions in the eutectic mixtures. The interaction between betaine monohydrate and polyol is following order: betaine monohydrate-glycerol-propylene glycol > betaine monohydrate-glycerol > betaine monohydrate-propylene glycol, where the latter is the eutectic mixture with the lowest stability, strength and extent of the hydrogen bonding interactions between component molecules. The presence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions, the inter-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions between betaine molecule and polyol, and also interactions between polyol and H2O of betaine monohydrate in the eutectic mixtures.

  18. Microstructural evolution of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy inside ultrasonic field

    Wei Zhai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic field with a frequency of 20 kHz is introduced into the solidification process of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy from the sample bottom to its top. The ultrasound stimulates the nucleation of alloy melt and prevents its bulk undercooling. At low ultrasound power of 250 W, the primary ε2 phase in the whole alloy sample grows into non-faceted equiaxed grains, which differs to its faceted morphology of long strip under static condition. The pseudobinary (Ag+ε2 eutectic transits from dendrite shape grain composed of rod type eutectic to equiaxed chrysanthemus shape formed by lamellar structure. By contrast, the ultrasound produces no obvious variation in the morphology of ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2 eutectic except a coarsening effect. When ultrasound power rises to 500 W, divorced ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2 eutectic forms at the sample bottom. However, in the upper part, the ultrasonic energy weakens, and it only brings about prominent refining effect to primary ε2 phase. The microstructural evolution mechanism is investigated on the cavitation, acoustic streaming and acoustic attenuation.

  19. Surface functionalized hollow silica particles and composites

    Rodionov, Valentin; Khanh, Vu Bao

    2017-01-01

    Composition comprising hollow spherical silica particles having outside particle walls and inside particle walls, wherein the particles have an average particle size of about 10 nm to about 500 nm and an average wall thickness of about 10 nm to about 50 nm; and wherein the particles are functionalized with at least one organic functional group on the outside particle wall, on the inside particle wall, or on both the outside and inside particle walls, wherein the organic functional group is in a reacted or unreacted form. The organic functional group can be epoxy. The particles can be mixed with polymer precursor or a polymer material such as epoxy to form a prepreg or a nanocomposite. Lightweight but strong materials can be formed. Low loadings of hollow particles can be used.

  20. Space Charge Mitigation by Hollow Bunches

    Oeftiger, AO

    2014-01-01

    To satisfy the requirements of the HL-LHC (High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider), the LHC injector chain will need to supply a higher brightness, i.e. deliver the same transverse beam emittances \\epsilon_{x,y} while providing a higher intensity N. However, a larger number of particles per bunch enhances space charge effects. One approach to mitigate the impact of space charge is to change the longitudinal phase space distribution: hollow bunches feature a depleted bunch centre and a densely populated periphery. Thus, the spatial line density maximum is depressed which ultimately decreases the tune spread imposed by space charge. Therefore, a higher intensity can be accepted while keeping the same overall space charge tune shift. 3 different methods to create hollow bunches in the PSBooster are simulated.

  1. Surface functionalized hollow silica particles and composites

    Rodionov, Valentin

    2017-05-26

    Composition comprising hollow spherical silica particles having outside particle walls and inside particle walls, wherein the particles have an average particle size of about 10 nm to about 500 nm and an average wall thickness of about 10 nm to about 50 nm; and wherein the particles are functionalized with at least one organic functional group on the outside particle wall, on the inside particle wall, or on both the outside and inside particle walls, wherein the organic functional group is in a reacted or unreacted form. The organic functional group can be epoxy. The particles can be mixed with polymer precursor or a polymer material such as epoxy to form a prepreg or a nanocomposite. Lightweight but strong materials can be formed. Low loadings of hollow particles can be used.

  2. Mesoporous hollow spheres from soap bubbling.

    Yu, Xianglin; Liang, Fuxin; Liu, Jiguang; Lu, Yunfeng; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2012-02-01

    The smaller and more stable bubbles can be generated from the large parent bubbles by rupture. In the presence of a bubble blowing agent, hollow spheres can be prepared by bubbling a silica sol. Herein, the trapped gas inside the bubble acts as a template. When the porogen, i.e., other surfactant, is introduced, a mesostructured shell forms by the co-assembly with the silica sol during sol-gel process. Morphological evolution emphasizes the prerequisite of an intermediate interior gas flow rate and high exterior gas flow rate for hollow spheres. The method is valid for many compositions from inorganic, polymer to their composites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers

    Vladimir S. eShiryaev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments on chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers (HC-MOFs are presented. The comparative analysis of simulated optical properties for chalcogenide HC-MOFs of negative-curvature with different size and number of capillaries is given. The technique for the manufacture of microstructured chalcogenide preforms, which includes the assembly of the substrate glass tube and 8-10 capillaries, is described. Further trends to improve the optical transmission in chalcogenide NCHCFs are considered.

  4. Deep Eutectic Solvents pretreatment of agro-industrial food waste.

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Rehmann, Lars; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Waste biomass from agro-food industries are a reliable and readily exploitable resource. From the circular economy point of view, direct residues from these industries exploited for production of fuel/chemicals is a winning issue, because it reduces the environmental/cost impact and improves the eco-sustainability of productions. The present paper reports recent results of deep eutectic solvent (DES) pretreatment on a selected group of the agro-industrial food wastes (AFWs) produced in Europe. In particular, apple residues, potato peels, coffee silverskin, and brewer's spent grains were pretreated with two DESs, (choline chloride-glycerol and choline chloride-ethylene glycol) for fermentable sugar production. Pretreated biomass was enzymatic digested by commercial enzymes to produce fermentable sugars. Operating conditions of the DES pretreatment were changed in wide intervals. The solid to solvent ratio ranged between 1:8 and 1:32, and the temperature between 60 and 150 °C. The DES reaction time was set at 3 h. Optimal operating conditions were: 3 h pretreatment with choline chloride-glycerol at 1:16 biomass to solvent ratio and 115 °C. Moreover, to assess the expected European amount of fermentable sugars from the investigated AFWs, a market analysis was carried out. The overall sugar production was about 217 kt yr -1 , whose main fraction was from the hydrolysis of BSGs pretreated with choline chloride-glycerol DES at the optimal conditions. The reported results boost deep investigation on lignocellulosic biomass using DES. This investigated new class of solvents is easy to prepare, biodegradable and cheaper than ionic liquid. Moreover, they reported good results in terms of sugars' release at mild operating conditions (time, temperature and pressure).

  5. Lead-Bismuth-Eutectic Spallation Neutron Source for Nuclear Transmuter

    Gohar, Y.; Herceg, J.; Krajtl, L.; Micklich, B.; Pointer, D.; Saiveau, J.; Sofu, T.; Finck, P.

    2002-01-01

    A lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation target design concept has been developed for the subcritical multiplier (SCM) design of the accelerator-driven test facility (ADTF). The design is based on a coaxial geometrical configuration, which has been carefully analyzed and designed to achieve an optimum performance. The target design description, the results from the parametric studies, and the design analyses including neutronics, heat transfer, and hydraulics analyses are given in this paper. A detailed MCNPX geometrical model for the target has been developed to generate heating rates and nuclear responses in the structural material for the design process. The beam has a uniform distribution of 600 MeV protons and 5-MW total power. A small LBE buffer is optimized to reduce the irradiation damage in the SCM fuel elements from the scatter protons and the high-energy neutrons, to maximize the neutron yield to the SCM operation, and to provide inlet and outlet manifolds for the LBE coolant. A special attention has been given to the target window design to enhance its lifetime. The window volumetric heating is 766 W/cm 3 relative to 750 W/cm 3 in LBE for a 40-μA/cm 2 current density. The results show that the nuclear heating from the proton beam diminishes at about 32 cm along the beam axis in the LBE target material. The neutron contribution to the atomic displacement is in the range of 94 to ∼100% for the structure material outside the proton beam path. In the beam window, the neutron contribution is ∼74% and the proton beam is responsible for more than 95% of the total gas production. The proton contribution to the gas production vanishes outside the beam path. The LBE average velocity is ∼2 m/s. The heat transfer and the hydraulics analyses have been iterated to reduce the maximum temperature and the thermal stress level in the target window to enhance its operating life. (authors)

  6. Comparison of hollow cathode discharge plasma configurations

    Farnell, Casey C; Farnell, Cody C; Williams, John D

    2011-01-01

    Hollow cathodes used in plasma contactor and electric propulsion devices provide electrons for sustaining plasma discharges and enabling plasma bridge neutralization. Life tests show erosion on hollow cathodes exposed to the plasma environment produced in the region downstream of these devices. To explain the observed erosion, plasma flow field measurements are presented for hollow cathode generated plasmas using both directly immersed probes and remotely located plasma diagnostics. Measurements on two cathode discharge configurations are presented: (1) an open, no magnetic field configuration and (2) a setup simulating the discharge chamber environment of an ion thruster. In the open cathode configuration, large amplitude plasma potential oscillations, ranging from 20 to 85 V within a 34 V discharge, were observed using a fast response emissive probe. These oscillations were observed over a dc potential profile that included a well-defined potential hill structure. A remotely located electrostatic analyzer (ESA) was used to measure the energy of ions produced within the plasma, and energies were detected that met, and in some cases exceeded, the peak oscillatory plasma potentials detected by the emissive probe. In the ion thruster discharge chamber configuration, plasma potentials from the emissive probe again agreed with ion energies recorded by the remotely located ESA; however, much lower ion energies were detected compared with the open configuration. A simplified ion-transit model that uses temporal and spatial plasma property measurements is presented and used to predict far-field plasma streaming properties. Comparisons between the model and remote measurements are presented.

  7. Formation of hollow atoms above a surface

    Briand, Jean Pierre; Phaneuf, Ronald; Terracol, Stephane; Xie, Zuqi

    2012-06-01

    Slow highly stripped ions approaching or penetrating surfaces are known to capture electrons into outer shells of the ions, leaving the innermost shells empty, and forming hollow atoms. Electron capture occurs above and below the surfaces. The existence of hollow atoms below surfaces e.g. Ar atoms whose K and L shells are empty, with all electrons lying in the M and N shells, was demonstrated in 1990 [1]. At nm above surfaces, the excited ions may not have enough time to decay before hitting the surfaces, and the formation of hollow atoms above surfaces has even been questioned [2]. To observe it, one must increase the time above the surface by decelerating the ions. We have for the first time decelerated O^7+ ions to energies as low as 1 eV/q, below the minimum energy gained by the ions due to the acceleration by their image charge. As expected, no ion backscattering (trampoline effect) above dielectric (Ge) was observed and at the lowest ion kinetic energies, most of the observed x-rays were found to be emitted by the ions after surface contact. [4pt] [1] J. P. Briand et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 65(1990)159.[0pt] [2] J.P. Briand, AIP Conference Proceedings 215 (1990) 513.

  8. A novel synthesis of micrometer silica hollow sphere

    Pan Wen; Ye Junwei; Ning Guiling; Lin Yuan; Wang Jing

    2009-01-01

    Silica microcapsules (hollow spheres) were synthesized successfully by a novel CTAB-stabilized water/oil emulsion system mediated hydrothermal method. The addition of urea to a solution of aqueous phase was an essential step of the simple synthetic procedure of silica hollow spheres, which leads to the formation of silica hollow spheres with smooth shell during hydrothermal process. The intact hollow spheres were obtained by washing the as-synthesized solid products with distilled water to remove the organic components. A large amount of silanol groups were retained in the hollow spheres by this facile route without calcination. The morphologies and optical properties of the product were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, on the basis of a series of SEM observations, phenomenological elucidation of a mechanism for the growth of the silica hollow spheres has been presented

  9. Ni hollow spheres as catalysts for methanol and ethanol electrooxidation

    Xu, Changwei [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Hu, Yonghong; Rong, Jianhua; Liu, Yingliang [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Jiang, San Ping [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2007-08-15

    In this paper, we successfully synthesized Ni hollow spheres consisting of needle-like nickel particles by using silica spheres as template with gold nanoparticles seeding method. The Ni hollow spheres are applied to methanol and ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media. The results show that the Ni hollow spheres give a very high activity for alcohol electrooxidation at a very low nickel loading of 0.10 mg cm{sup -2}. The current on Ni hollow spheres is much higher than that on Ni particles. The onset potential and peak potential on Ni hollow spheres are more negative than that on Ni particles for methanol and ethanol electrooxidation. The Ni hollow spheres may be of great potential in alcohol sensor and direct alcohol fuel cells. (author)

  10. Algorithm of calculation of multicomponent system eutectics using electronic digital computer

    Posypajko, V.I.; Stratilatov, B.V.; Pervikova, V.I.; Volkov, V.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    A computer algorithm is proposed for determining low-temperature equilibrium regions for existing phases. The algorithm has been used in calculating nonvariant parameters (temperatures of melting of eutectics and the concentrations of their components) for a series of trinary systems, among which are Ksub(long)Cl, WO 4 , SO 4 (x 1 =K 2 WO 4 ; x 2 =K 2 SO 4 ), Ag, Cd, Pbsub(long)Cl(x 1 =CdCl 2 , x 2 =PbCl 2 ); Ksub(long)F, Cl, I (x 1 =KF, x 2 =KI). The proposed method of calculating eutectics permits the planning of the subsequent experiment in determining the parameters of the eutectics of multicomponent systems and the forecasting of chemical interaction in such systems. The algorithm can be used in calculating systems containing any number of components

  11. Data supporting the prediction of the properties of eutectic organic phase change materials.

    Kahwaji, Samer; White, Mary Anne

    2018-04-01

    The data presented in this article include the molar masses, melting temperatures, latent heats of fusion and temperature-dependent heat capacities of fifteen fatty acid phase change materials (PCMs). The data are used in conjunction with the thermodynamic models discussed in Kahwaji and White (2018) [1] to develop a computational tool that calculates the eutectic compositions and thermal properties of eutectic mixtures of PCMs. The computational tool is part of this article and consists of a Microsoft Excel® file available in Mendeley Data repository [2]. A description of the computational tool along with the properties of nearly 100 binary mixtures of fatty acid PCMs calculated using this tool are also included in the present article. The Excel® file is designed such that it can be easily modified or expanded by users to calculate the properties of eutectic mixtures of other classes of PCMs.

  12. Modelling of Eutectic Saturation Influence on Microstructure in Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting Using Cellular Automata

    Burbelko A.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model of the globular eutectic solidification in 2D was designed. Proposed model is based on the Cellular Automaton Finite Differences (CA-FD calculation method. Model has been used for studies of the primary austenite and of globular eutectic grains growth during the ductile iron solidification in the thin wall casting. Model takes into account, among other things, non-uniform temperature distribution in the casting wall cross-section, kinetics of the austenite and graphite grains nucleation, and non-equilibrium nature of the interphase boundary migration. Calculation of eutectic saturation influence (Sc = 0.9 - 1.1 on microstructure (austenite and graphite fraction, density of austenite and graphite grains and temperature curves in 2 mm wall ductile iron casting has been done.

  13. Growth and solid/solid transformation in a Ni-Si eutectic alloy

    Dutra, A.T. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Ferrandini, P.L. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Costa, C.A.R. [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, M.C. [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Caram, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rcaram@fem.unicamp.br

    2005-08-16

    High temperature structural components demand materials that maintain satisfactory mechanical and chemical characteristics. These needs may be met by applying some eutectic alloys, including Ni-Ni{sub 3}Si. This paper deals with the directional solidification of Ni-Ni{sub 3}Si grown under several growth rates. The analysis of the eutectic microstructure was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results obtained provided a precise analysis of the Ni{sub 3}Si phase. It could be noticed that the solid/solid transformations by which Ni{sub 3}Si phase goes through, deeply affects its morphology. In addition, quantitative information on the eutectic structure was obtained. It was confirmed that the growth rate variation deeply affects the final microstructure as it influences the efficiency of atomic diffusion along the solid/liquid interface.

  14. Growth and solid/solid transformation in a Ni-Si eutectic alloy

    Dutra, A.T.; Ferrandini, P.L.; Costa, C.A.R.; Goncalves, M.C.; Caram, R.

    2005-01-01

    High temperature structural components demand materials that maintain satisfactory mechanical and chemical characteristics. These needs may be met by applying some eutectic alloys, including Ni-Ni 3 Si. This paper deals with the directional solidification of Ni-Ni 3 Si grown under several growth rates. The analysis of the eutectic microstructure was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results obtained provided a precise analysis of the Ni 3 Si phase. It could be noticed that the solid/solid transformations by which Ni 3 Si phase goes through, deeply affects its morphology. In addition, quantitative information on the eutectic structure was obtained. It was confirmed that the growth rate variation deeply affects the final microstructure as it influences the efficiency of atomic diffusion along the solid/liquid interface

  15. Behavior of radioisotope in liquid neutron irradiated Pb-17Li eutectic

    Tebus, V.N.; Aksenov, B.S.; Klabukov, U.G.

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of radioisotope 210 Po evaporation from liquid neutron irradiated Pb- 17 Li eutectic has been performed by Knudsen method. Equilibrium 210 Po vapor pressures at temperatures 250-700 degrees C were found about 3-4 orders of magnitude less than that for pure Po and were closed to equilibrium vapor pressures of Po-Pb compound. It was proposed Po forms stable Po-Pb compounds in eutectic at temperatures up to 750-800 degrees C. But disintegrates during long storage owing to self irradiation. It was determined Po aerosol transfer with radio gases takes place at the melting period. Contamination is happened also under irradiated eutectic storage at room temperature owing to aggregate recoil characteristic of Po

  16. Review of Synthetic Methods to Form Hollow Polymer Nanocapsules

    Barker, Madeline T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-13

    Syntactic foams have grown in interest due to the widened range of applications because of their mechanical strength and high damage tolerance. In the past, hollow glass or ceramic particles were used to create the pores. This paper reviews literature focused on the controlled synthesis of hollow polymer spheres with diameters ranging from 100 –200 nm. By using hollow polymer spheres, syntactic foams could reach ultra-low densities.

  17. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Knowlton, W.B.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 angstrom Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 angstrom, 500 angstrom, and 300 angstrom per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 angstrom/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 angstrom/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study

  18. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  19. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (Tg) of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and −31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. PMID:27366064

  20. Manufacturing hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy

    Michael Josef Kridanto Kamadjaja

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A resilient denture liner is placed in the part of the hollow obturator base that contacts to post hemimaxillectomy mucosa. Replacing the resilient denture liner can makes the hollow obturator has an intimate contact with the mucosa, so it can prevents the mouth liquid enter to the cavum nasi and sinus, also eliminates painful because of using the hollow obturator. Resilient denture liner is a soft and resilient material that applied to the fitting surface of a denture in order to allow a more distribution of load. A case was reported about using the hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy to overcome these problems.

  1. Complex Hollow Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energy-Related Applications.

    Yu, Le; Hu, Han; Wu, Hao Bin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2017-04-01

    Hollow nanostructures offer promising potential for advanced energy storage and conversion applications. In the past decade, considerable research efforts have been devoted to the design and synthesis of hollow nanostructures with high complexity by manipulating their geometric morphology, chemical composition, and building block and interior architecture to boost their electrochemical performance, fulfilling the increasing global demand for renewable and sustainable energy sources. In this Review, we present a comprehensive overview of the synthesis and energy-related applications of complex hollow nanostructures. After a brief classification, the design and synthesis of complex hollow nanostructures are described in detail, which include hierarchical hollow spheres, hierarchical tubular structures, hollow polyhedra, and multi-shelled hollow structures, as well as their hybrids with nanocarbon materials. Thereafter, we discuss their niche applications as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and hybrid supercapacitors, sulfur hosts for lithium-sulfur batteries, and electrocatalysts for oxygen- and hydrogen-involving energy conversion reactions. The potential superiorities of complex hollow nanostructures for these applications are particularly highlighted. Finally, we conclude this Review with urgent challenges and further research directions of complex hollow nanostructures for energy-related applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hollow spheres: crucial building blocks for novel nanostructures and nanophotonics

    Zhong Kuo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize the latest developments in research specifically derived from the unique properties of hollow microspheres, in particular, hollow silica spheres with uniform shells. We focus on applications in nanosphere (colloidal lithography and nanophotonics. The lithography from a layer of hollow spheres can result in nanorings, from a multilayer in unique nano-architecture. In nanophotonics, disordered hollow spheres can result in antireflection coatings, while ordered colloidal crystals (CCs of hollow spheres exhibit unique refractive index enhancement upon infiltration, ideal for optical sensing. Furthermore, whispering gallery mode (WGM inside the shell of hollow spheres has also been demonstrated to enhance light absorption to improve the performance of solar cells. These applications differ from the classical applications of hollow spheres, based only on their low density and large surface area, such as catalysis and chemical sensing. We provide a brief overview of the synthesis and self-assembly approaches of the hollow spheres. We elaborate on their unique optical features leading to defect mode lasing, optomicrofluidics, and the existence of WGMs inside shell for light management. Finally, we provide a perspective on the direction towards which future research relevant to hollow spheres might be directed.

  3. Hollow spheres: crucial building blocks for novel nanostructures and nanophotonics

    Zhong, Kuo; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2018-03-01

    In this review, we summarize the latest developments in research specifically derived from the unique properties of hollow microspheres, in particular, hollow silica spheres with uniform shells. We focus on applications in nanosphere (colloidal) lithography and nanophotonics. The lithography from a layer of hollow spheres can result in nanorings, from a multilayer in unique nano-architecture. In nanophotonics, disordered hollow spheres can result in antireflection coatings, while ordered colloidal crystals (CCs) of hollow spheres exhibit unique refractive index enhancement upon infiltration, ideal for optical sensing. Furthermore, whispering gallery mode (WGM) inside the shell of hollow spheres has also been demonstrated to enhance light absorption to improve the performance of solar cells. These applications differ from the classical applications of hollow spheres, based only on their low density and large surface area, such as catalysis and chemical sensing. We provide a brief overview of the synthesis and self-assembly approaches of the hollow spheres. We elaborate on their unique optical features leading to defect mode lasing, optomicrofluidics, and the existence of WGMs inside shell for light management. Finally, we provide a perspective on the direction towards which future research relevant to hollow spheres might be directed.

  4. Astro-WISE for KiDS survey production and quality control

    Kleijn, G.V.; de Jong, Jelte; Valentijn, E.; Kuijken, K.; Consortiums, KiDS; Consortium, Astro-WISE; Ballester, P.; Egret, D.; Lorente, N.P.F.

    The Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) is a 1500 square degree optical imaging survey with the recently commissioned OmegaCAM wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). A suite of data products will be delivered to ESO and the community by the KiDS survey team. Spread over Europe, the KiDS team

  5. Preparation of TiO2 hollow fibers using poly(vinylidene fluoride) hollow fiber microfiltration membrane as a template

    Lu Haiqiang; Zhang Lixiong; Xing Weihong; Wang Huanting; Xu Nanping

    2005-01-01

    TiO 2 hollow fibers were successfully prepared by using poly(vinylidene fluoride) hollow fiber microfiltration membrane as a template. The preparation procedure includes repeated impregnation of the TiO 2 precursor in the pores of the polymeric membrane, and calcination to burn off the template, producing the TiO 2 hollow fibers. The TiO 2 hollow fibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). TiO 2 hollow fibers with other structures, such as honeycomb monolith and spring, were also prepared by preshaping the polymeric membranes into the honeycomb structure and spring, respectively. The phase structure of the TiO 2 hollow fibers could be readily adjusted by changing the calcination temperature

  6. KSHV strategies for host dsDNA sensing machinery.

    Gao, Hang; Song, Yanyan; Liu, Chengrong; Liang, Qiming

    2016-12-01

    The innate immune system utilizes pattern recognition receptors cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to sense cytosolic double-stranded (ds) DNA and initiate type 1 interferon signaling and autophagy pathway, which collaborate to limit pathogen infections as well as alarm the adaptive immune response. The genomes of herpesviruses are large dsDNA, which represent a major class of pathogen signatures recognized by cellular DNA sensor cGAS. However, to successfully establish the persistent infection, herpesviruses have evolved their viral genes to modulate different aspects of host immune signaling. This review summarizes the evasion strategies of host cGAS DNA sensing pathway by Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) and their contributions to KSHV life cycles.

  7. Iterative Overlap FDE for Multicode DS-CDMA

    Takeda, Kazuaki; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    Recently, a new frequency-domain equalization (FDE) technique, called overlap FDE, that requires no GI insertion was proposed. However, the residual inter/intra-block interference (IBI) cannot completely be removed. In addition to this, for multicode direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA), the presence of residual interchip interference (ICI) after FDE distorts orthogonality among the spreading codes. In this paper, we propose an iterative overlap FDE for multicode DS-CDMA to suppress both the residual IBI and the residual ICI. In the iterative overlap FDE, joint minimum mean square error (MMSE)-FDE and ICI cancellation is repeated a sufficient number of times. The bit error rate (BER) performance with the iterative overlap FDE is evaluated by computer simulation.

  8. User's manual for CBS3DS, version 1.0

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1995-10-01

    CBS3DS is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute the backscattering radar cross section of cavity backed apertures in infinite ground plane and slots in thick infinite ground plane. CBS3DS implements the hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM) and Method of Moments (MoM) techniques. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM in the volume of the cavity/slot and the triangular elements with the basis functions for MoM at the apertures. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional cavities filled with inhomogeneous lossy materials; due to MoM, the apertures can be of any arbitrary shape. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computer the code is intended to run.

  9. Universal dS vacua in STU-models

    Blåbäck, J. [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS,F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Danielsson, UniversityH.; Dibitetto, G.; Vargas, S.C. [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-10-09

    Stable de Sitter solutions in minimal F-term supergravity are known to lie close to Minkowski critical points. We consider a class of STU-models arising from type IIB compactifications with generalised fluxes. There, we apply an analytical method for solving the equations of motion for the moduli fields based on the idea of treating derivatives of the superpotential of different orders up to third as independent objects. In particular, supersymmetric and no-scale Minkowski solutions are singled out by physical reasons. Focusing on the study of dS vacua close to supersymmetric Minkowski points, we are able to elaborate a complete analytical treatment of the mass matrix based on the sGoldstino bound. This leads to a class of interesting universal dS vacua. We finally explore a similar possibility around no-scale Minkowski points and discuss some examples.

  10. A potentiostatic and galvanostatic study of the selective dissolution of Cd/Pb eutectic alloy

    Sokharev, N.P.; Rabdel, A.A.; Zhadanov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors consider the selective dissolution (SD) of the electronegative component of a two-phase, eutectic alloy (Cd/Pb) under galvanostatic conditions. Treating this process as the extraction of a solid substance from a porous matrix, the distribution of the concentration of EC ions, c(x, t), can be described by a differential equation (presented). Experimental data are presented in two equations which are applicable for the description of the selective dissolution process of the electronegative component of a eutectic alloy under conditions of concentration polarization

  11. Eutectic fusion used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions

    Savane, Y.S.; Katty, S.; Balde, M.L.; Cisse, S.; Rogov, V.I.

    1997-09-01

    The phenomenon of eutectic fusion could be used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions, which allows to determine the part of the ionic conductibility in the solutions. The survey done in the system In 2 Bi Bi-In at a temperature of 72 deg. C with a current of 4A allowed to find a ionic current of 2,6.10 -3 which constitutes about 0,07% of the total current. So the part of ionic conductibility in the eutectic fusion of the system In 2 Bi Bi-In is of 0,07%. (author)

  12. Structure of liquid Au-Si alloys around the eutectic region

    Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)], E-Mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouo Mikazuki-cho, Sayou-gun Hyogo 670-5198 (Japan)

    2007-03-25

    X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out for liquid Au-Si alloys around the eutectic region by the transmission method using high-energy X-ray to investigate the atomic arrangements in the liquid state. From the temperature dependence of the observed structure factors, the partial pair correlation and the detailed atomic arrangements will be discussed on the basis of a Reverse Monte Carlo analysis. The reproduced atomic arrangements around the eutectic region suggest the substitution structure and also rather dense liquid with decreasing temperature.

  13. Binary eutectic clusters and glass formation in ideal glass-forming liquids

    Lu, Z. P.; Shen, J.; Xing, D. W.; Sun, J. F.; Liu, C. T.

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, a physical concept of binary eutectic clusters in 'ideal' glass-forming liquids is proposed based on the characteristics of most well-known bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The authors approach also includes the treatment of binary eutectic clusters as basic units, which leads to the development of a simple but reliable method for designing BMGs more efficiently and effectively in these unique glass-forming liquids. As an example, bulk glass formers with superior glass-forming ability in the Zr-Ni-Cu-Al and Zr-Fe-Cu-Al systems were identified with the use of the strategy

  14. Sequential action of ATPase, ATP, ADP, Pi and dsDNA in procapsid-free system to enlighten mechanism in viral dsDNA packaging.

    Schwartz, Chad; Fang, Huaming; Huang, Lisa; Guo, Peixuan

    2012-03-01

    Many cells and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses contain an AAA(+) ATPase that assembles into oligomers, often hexamers, with a central channel. The dsDNA packaging motor of bacteriophage phi29 also contains an ATPase to translocate dsDNA through a dodecameric channel. The motor ATPase has been investigated substantially in the context of the entire procapsid. Here, we report the sequential action between the ATPase and additional motor components. It is suggested that the contact of ATPase to ATP resulted in its conformational change to a higher binding affinity toward dsDNA. It was found that ATP hydrolysis led to the departure of dsDNA from the ATPase/dsDNA complex, an action that is speculated to push dsDNA to pass the connector channel. Our results suggest that dsDNA packaging goes through a combined effort of both the gp16 ATPase for pushing and the channel as a one-way valve to control the dsDNA translocation direction. Many packaging models have previously been proposed, and the packaging mechanism has been contingent upon the number of nucleotides packaged per ATP relative to the 10.5 bp per helical turn for B-type dsDNA. Both 2 and 2.5 bp per ATP have been used to argue for four, five or six discrete steps of dsDNA translocation. Combination of the two distinct roles of gp16 and connector renews the perception of previous dsDNA packaging energy calculations and provides insight into the discrepancy between 2 and 2.5 bp per ATP.

  15. FIR Filter of DS-CDMA UWB Modem Transmitter

    Kang, Kyu-Min; Cho, Sang-In; Won, Hui-Chul; Choi, Sang-Sung

    This letter presents low-complexity digital pulse shaping filter structures of a direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) ultra wide-band (UWB) modem transmitter with a ternary spreading code. The proposed finite impulse response (FIR) filter structures using a look-up table (LUT) have the effect of saving the amount of memory by about 50% to 80% in comparison to the conventional FIR filter structures, and consequently are suitable for a high-speed parallel data process.

  16. Uplink Packet-Data Scheduling in DS-CDMA Systems

    Choi, Young Woo; Kim, Seong-Lyun

    In this letter, we consider the uplink packet scheduling for non-real-time data users in a DS-CDMA system. As an effort to jointly optimize throughput and fairness, we formulate a time-span minimization problem incorporating the time-multiplexing of different simultaneous transmission schemes. Based on simple rules, we propose efficient scheduling algorithms and compare them with the optimal solution obtained by linear programming.

  17. Discovery of the target for immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs).

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Half a century ago, the sedative thalidomide caused a serious drug disaster because of its teratogenicity and was withdrawn from the market. However, thalidomide, which has returned to the market, is now used for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma (MM) under strict control. The mechanism of thalidomide action had been a long-standing question. We developed a new affinity bead technology and identified cereblon (CRBN) as a thalidomide-binding protein. We found that CRBN functions as a substrate receptor of an E3 cullin-Ring ligase complex 4 (CRL4) and is a primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Recently, new thalidomide derivatives, called immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), have been developed by Celgene. Among them, lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide (Pom) were shown to exert strong therapeutic effects against MM. It was found that Len and Pom both bind CRBN-CRL4 and recruit neomorphic substrates (Ikaros and Aiolos). More recently it was reported that casein kinase 1a (Ck1a) was identified as a substrate for CRBN-CRL4 in the presence of Len, but not Pom. Ck1a breakdown explains why Len is specifically effective for myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion. It is now proposed that binding of IMiDs to CRBN appears to alter the substrate specificity of CRBN-CRL4. In this review, we introduce recent findings on IMiDs.

  18. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕs in Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) decays.

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elena, E; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-11-21

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating weak mixing phase ϕs using the decay Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) in a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. An analysis of the time evolution of the system, which does not use the constraint |λ|=1 to allow for the presence of CP violation in decay, yields ϕs=0.02±0.17(stat)±0.02(syst)  rad, |λ|=0.91(-0.15)(+0.18)(stat)±0.02(syst). This result is consistent with the standard model expectation.

  19. $B0 \\to Ds^{(*)}Ds^{(*)}$ and outlook of $B0 \\to D^{(*)}D$ at LHCb

    Belloli, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the inclusive branching fraction of $B0s \\to Ds^{(*)+} Ds^{(*)-}$ decay together with its contribution to the determination of $\\Delta \\Gamma{s}/ \\Gamma {s}$ are presented. The branching fraction value is compatible with results from previous experiments, improving the world average. The $B0 \\to D^+D^-$ and $B0 \\to D^*D^{(*)}$ decays are used to measure the parameters associated with $CP$ Violation in those channels; while the analysis associated to the second channel is at an initial stage the first one is almost concluded, the values obtained for the sensitivity on the $CP$ observables show that LHCb can rival the results obtained by previous experiments.

  20. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  1. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily

  2. Performance of Generalized Multicarrier DS-CDMA over Nakagami-$m$ Fading Channels

    Yang, L-L.; Hanzo, L.

    2002-01-01

    A class of generalized multicarrier direct sequence code-division multiple-access (MC DS-CDMA) schemes is defined and its performance is considered over multipath Nakagamifading channels. The spacing between two adjacent subcarriers of the generalized MC DS-CDMA is a variable, allowing us to gain insight into the effects of the spacing on the bit error rate (BER) performance of MC DS-CDMA systems. This generalized MC DS-CDMA scheme includes the subclasses of multitone DS-CDMA and orthogonal M...

  3. Hollow mandrin facilitates external ventricular drainage placement.

    Heese, O; Regelsberger, J; Kehler, U; Westphal, M

    2005-07-01

    Placement of ventricular catheters is a routine procedure in neurosurgery. Ventricle puncture is done using a flexible ventricular catheter stabilised by a solid steel mandrin in order to improve stability during brain penetration. A correct catheter placement is confirmed after removing the solid steel mandrin by observation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow out of the flexible catheter. Incorrect placement makes further punctures necessary. The newly developed device allows CSF flow observation during the puncture procedure and in addition precise intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement. The developed mandrin is hollow with a blunt tip. On one side 4-5 small holes with a diameter of 0.8 mm are drilled corresponding exactly with the holes in the ventricular catheter, allowing CSF to pass into the hollow mandrin as soon as the ventricle is reached. By connecting a small translucent tube at the distal portion of the hollow mandrin ICP can be measured without loss of CSF. The system has been used in 15 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) or intraventricular haemeorrhage (IVH) and subsequent hydrocephalus. The new system improved the external ventricular drainage implantation procedure. In all 15 patients catheter placement was correct. ICP measurement was easy to perform immediately at ventricle puncture. In 4 patients at puncture no spontaneous CSF flow was observed, therefore by connecting a syringe and gentle aspiration of CSF correct placement was confirmed in this unexpected low pressure hydrocephalus. Otherwise by using the conventional technique further punctures would have been necessary. Advantages of the new technique are less puncture procedures with a lower risk of damage to neural structures and reduced risk of intracranial haemorrhages. Implantation of the ventricular catheter to far into the brain can be monitored and this complication can be overcome. Using the connected pressure monitoring tube an exact measurement of the opening

  4. Hollow-Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Mitchell, Keith; Settles, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The hollow-fiber spacesuit water membrane evaporator (HoFi SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits and spacecraft to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust, heat-rejection device that is less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. After recent contamination tests, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) micro porous hollow-fiber membrane was selected for prototype development as the most suitable candidate among commercial hollow-fiber evaporator alternatives. An innovative design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was developed into a full-scale prototype for the spacesuit application. Vacuum chamber testing has been performed to characterize heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor back-pressure, and to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the wastewater reclamation distillation processes. Other tests showed tolerance to freezing and suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment. In summary, HoFi SWME is a lightweight, compact evaporator for heat rejection in the spacesuit that is robust, contamination- insensitive, freeze-tolerant, and able to reject the required heat of spacewalks in microgravity, lunar, and Martian environments. The HoFi is packaged to reject 810 W of heat through 800 hours of use in a vacuum environment, and 370 W in a Mars environment. The device also eliminates free gas and dissolved gas from the coolant loop.

  5. H1DS: A new web-based data access system

    Pretty, D.G., E-mail: david.pretty@anu.edu.au; Blackwell, B.D.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • We present H1DS, a new RESTful web service for accessing fusion data. • We examine the scalability and extensibility of H1DS. • We present a fast and user friendly web browser client for the H1DS web service. • A summary relational database is presented as an application of the H1DS API. - Abstract: A new data access system, H1DS, has been developed and deployed for the H-1 Heliac at the Australian Plasma Fusion Research Facility. The data system provides access to fusion data via a RESTful web service. With the URL acting as the API to the data system, H1DS provides a scalable and extensible framework which is intuitive to new users, and allows access from any internet connected device. The H1DS framework, originally designed to work with MDSplus, has a modular design which can be extended to provide access to alternative data storage systems.

  6. H1DS: A new web-based data access system

    Pretty, D.G.; Blackwell, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present H1DS, a new RESTful web service for accessing fusion data. • We examine the scalability and extensibility of H1DS. • We present a fast and user friendly web browser client for the H1DS web service. • A summary relational database is presented as an application of the H1DS API. - Abstract: A new data access system, H1DS, has been developed and deployed for the H-1 Heliac at the Australian Plasma Fusion Research Facility. The data system provides access to fusion data via a RESTful web service. With the URL acting as the API to the data system, H1DS provides a scalable and extensible framework which is intuitive to new users, and allows access from any internet connected device. The H1DS framework, originally designed to work with MDSplus, has a modular design which can be extended to provide access to alternative data storage systems

  7. Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres as carriers for biomolecules

    Li, Shuyi; Dynan, William S; Wicks, George; Serkiz, Steven

    2013-09-17

    The present invention includes compositions of porous-wall hollow glass microspheres and one or more biomolecules, wherein the one or more biomolecules are positioned within a void location within the hollow glass microsphere, and the use of such compositions for the diagnostic and/or therapeutic delivery of biomolecules.

  8. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material

    Bidhan Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration.

  9. Chemoenzymatic epoxidation of alkenes with Candida antarctica lipase B and hydrogen peroxide in deep eutectic solvents

    Zhou, Pengfei; Wang, Xuping; Yang, Bo; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    Epoxides are important synthetic intermediates for the synthesis of a broad range of industrial products. This study presents a promising solution to the current limitation of enzyme instability. By using simple deep eutectic solvents such as choline chloride/sorbitol, significant stabilization

  10. Al based ultra-fine eutectic with high room temperature plasticity and elevated temperature strength

    Tiwary, C.S., E-mail: cst311@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kashyap, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kim, D.H. [Center for Non-Crystalline Materials, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chattopadhyay, K. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-07-15

    Developments of aluminum alloys that can retain strength at and above 250 °C present a significant challenge. In this paper we report an ultrafine scale Al–Fe–Ni eutectic alloy with less than 3.5 at% transition metals that exhibits room temperature ultimate tensile strength of ~400 MPa with a tensile ductility of 6–8%. The yield stress under compression at 300 °C was found to be 150 MPa. We attribute it to the refinement of the microstructure that is achieved by suction casting in copper mold. The characterization using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) reveals an unique composite structure that contains the Al–Al{sub 3}Ni rod eutectic with spacing of ~90 nm enveloped by a lamellar eutectic of Al–Al{sub 9}FeNi (~140 nm). Observation of subsurface deformation under Vickers indentation using bonded interface technique reveals the presence of extensive shear banding during deformation that is responsible for the origin of ductility. The dislocation configuration in Al–Al{sub 3}Ni eutectic colony indicates accommodation of plasticity in α-Al with dislocation accumulation at the α-Al/Al{sub 3}Ni interface boundaries. In contrast the dislocation activities in the intermetallic lamellae are limited and contain set of planner dislocations across the plates. We present a detailed analysis of the fracture surface to rationalize the origin of the high strength and ductility in this class of potentially promising cast alloy.

  11. Thermophysical properties and solubility of different sugar-derived molecules in deep eutectic solvents

    Dietz, C.H.J.T.; Kroon, M.C.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.

    2017-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are designer solvents analogous to ionic liquids but with lower preparation cost. Most known DESs are water-miscible, but recently water-immiscible DESs have also been presented, which are a combination of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors with long hydrophobic alkyl

  12. Aliphatic-aromatic separation using deep eutectic solvents as extracting agents

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Nerea; Fernandez Requejo, Patricia; Kroon, Maaike

    2015-01-01

    The separation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds is a great challenge for chemical engineers. There is no efficient separation process for mixtures with compositions lower than 20 wt % in aromatics. In this work, the feasibility of two different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as novel extracting

  13. PC-SAFT modeling of CO2 solubilities in hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents

    Dietz, C.H.J.T.; van Osch, D.J.G.P.; Kroon, M.C.; Sadowski, G.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.; Zubeir, L.F.; Held, C.

    2017-01-01

    The PC-SAFT 'pseudo-pure' approach was used for the modeling of CO2 solubilities in various hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) for the first time. Only liquid density data were used to obtain the segment number, the temperature-independent segment diameter and the dispersion-energy parameter,

  14. Carbon dioxide solubilities in decanoic acid-based hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents

    Zubeir, Lawien F.; Van Osch, Dannie J.G.P.; Rocha, Marisa A.A.; Banat, Fawzi; Kroon, Maaike C.

    2018-01-01

    The solubility of CO2 in hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) has been measured for the first time. Six different hydrophobic DESs are studied in the temperature range from 298 to 323 K and at CO2 pressures up to 2 MPa. The results are evaluated by comparing the solubility data with existing

  15. Free energy change of off-eutectic binary alloys on solidification

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.; Lin, J.-C.; Perepezko, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    A formula for the free energy difference between the undercooled liquid phase and the stable solid phase is derived for off-eutectic binary alloys in which the equilibrium solid/liquid transition takes place over a certain temperature range. The free energy change is then evaluated numerically for a Bi-25 at. pct Cd alloy modeled as a sub-subregular solution.

  16. Dimethylurea/citric acid as a highly efficient deep eutectic solvent

    Dimethylurea/citric acid deep eutectic solvent was used as a dual catalyst and a green reaction medium for the efficient synthesis of bis(indolyl)methanes, quinolines and aryl-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles. Ease of recovery and reusability of DES with high activity makes this method efficient and eco-friendly.

  17. Deep eutectic solvents for highly efficient separations in oil and gas industries

    Warrag, S.E.E.; Peters, C.J.; Kroon, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have captured a great scientific attention as a new, ‘green’ and sustainable class of tailor-made solvents. DESs share many properties with ionic liquids (ILs) including low vapor pressure, wide liquid range, thermal stability, low flammability, and high solvation

  18. Modeling of Eutectic Formation in Al-Si Alloy Using A Phase-Field Method

    Ebrahimi Z.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized a phase-field model to investigate the evolution of eutectic silicon in Al-Si alloy. The interfacial fluctuations are included into a phase-field model of two-phase solidification, as stochastic noise terms and their dominant role in eutectic silicon formation is discussed. We have observed that silicon spherical particles nucleate on the foundation of primary aluminum phase and their nucleation continues on concentric rings, through the Al matrix. The nucleation of silicon particles is attributed to the inclusion of fluctuations into the phase-field equations. The simulation results have shown needle-like, fish-bone like and flakes of silicon phase by adjusting the noise coefficients to larger values. Moreover, the role of primary Al phase on nucleation of silicon particles in Al-Si alloy is elaborated. We have found that the addition of fluctuations plays the role of modifiers in our simulations and is essential for phase-field modeling of eutectic growth in Al-Si system. The simulated finger-like Al phases and spherical Si particles are very similar to those of experimental eutectic growth in modified Al-Si alloy.

  19. Estimation of the Critical Temperatures of Some More Deep Eutectic Solvents from Their Surface Tensions

    Yizhak Marcus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical temperatures of two dozen deep eutectic solvents, for only some of which these have been estimated previously, were estimated from the temperature dependences of their surface tensions and densities available in the literature according to the Eötvös and the Guggenheim expressions.

  20. Preparation, heat treatment, and mechanical properties of the uranium-5 weight percent chromium eutectic alloy

    Townsend, A.B.

    1980-10-01

    The eutectic alloy of uranium-5 wt % chromium (U-5Cr) was prepared from high-purity materials and cast into 1-in.-thick ingots. This material was given several simple heat treatments, the mechanical properties of these heat-treated samples were determined; and the microstructure was examined. Some data on the melting point and transformation temperatures were obtained

  1. Establishment of the Co-C Eutectic Fixed-Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibrations at NIMT

    Ongrai, O.; Elliott, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, NIMT first established a Co-C eutectic temperature reference (fixed-point) cell measurement capability for thermocouple calibration to support the requirements of Thailand's heavy industries and secondary laboratories. The Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell is a facility transferred from NPL, where the design was developed through European and UK national measurement system projects. In this paper, we describe the establishment of a Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell for thermocouple calibration at NIMT. This paper demonstrates achievement of the required furnace uniformity, the Co-C plateau realization and the comparison data between NIMT and NPL Co-C cells by using the same standard Pt/Pd thermocouple, demonstrating traceability. The NIMT measurement capability for noble metal type thermocouples at the new Co-C eutectic fixed point (1324.06°C) is estimated to be within ± 0.60 K (k=2). This meets the needs of Thailand's high-temperature thermocouple users—for which previously there has been no traceable calibration facility.

  2. Lauric and palmitic acids eutectic mixture as latent heat storage material for low temperature heating applications

    Tuncbilek, Kadir; Sari, Ahmet; Tarhan, Sefa; Erguenes, Gazanfer; Kaygusuz, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA, 59.8 deg. C) and lauric acid (LA, 42.6 deg. C) are phase change materials (PCM) having quite high melting temperatures which can limit their use in low temperature solar applications such as solar space heating and greenhouse heating. However, their melting temperatures can be tailored to appropriate value by preparing a eutectic mixture of the lauric and the palmitic acids. In the present study, the thermal analysis based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique shows that the mixture of 69.0 wt% LA and 31 wt% PA forms a eutectic mixture having melting temperature of 35.2 deg. C and the latent heat of fusion of 166.3 J g -1 . This study also considers the experimental determination of the thermal characteristics of the eutectic mixture during the heat charging and discharging processes. Radial and axial temperature distribution, heat transfer coefficient between the heat transfer fluid (HTF) pipe and the PCM, heat recovery rate and heat charging and discharging fractions were experimentally established employing a vertical concentric pipe-in-pipe energy storage system. The changes of these characteristics were evaluated with respect to the effect of inlet HTF temperature and mass flow rate. The DSC thermal analysis and the experimental results indicate that the LA-PA eutectic mixture can be a potential material for low temperature thermal energy storage applications in terms of its thermo-physical and thermal characteristics

  3. Review of possible experiments in the eutectic growth and thermodiffusion fields

    Malmejac, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    The results now available from the SKYLAB and ASTP programmes give a clearer indication of the lines of the research to pursue in the years to come. The criteria necessary for the choice of experiments are analysed in the fields of eutectic solidification and diffusion along a temperature gradient in liquid alloys [fr

  4. Phase Evolution in and Creep Properties of Nb-Rich Nb-Si-Cr Eutectics

    Gang, Florian; Kauffmann, Alexander; Heilmaier, Martin

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the Nb-rich ternary eutectic in the Nb-Si-Cr system has been experimentally determined to be Nb-10.9Si-28.4Cr (in at. pct). The eutectic is composed of three main phases: Nb solid solution (Nbss), β-Cr2Nb, and Nb9(Si,Cr)5. The ternary eutectic microstructure remains stable for several hundred hours at a temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C). At 1573 K (1300 °C) and above, the silicide phase Nb9(Si,Cr)5 decomposes into α-Nb5Si3, Nbss, and β-Cr2Nb. Under creep conditions at 1473 K (1200 °C), the alloy deforms by dislocation creep while the major creep resistance is provided by the silicide matrix. If the silicide phase is fragmented and, thus, its matrix character is destroyed by prior heat treatment [ e.g., at 1773 K (1500 °C) for 100 hours], creep is mainly controlled by the Laves phase β-Cr2Nb, resulting in increased minimum strain rates. Compared to state of the art Ni-based superalloys, the creep resistance of this three-phase eutectic alloy is significantly higher.

  5. Eutectic cell and nodule count as the quality factors of cast iron

    E. Fraś

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the predictions based on a theoretical analysis aimed at elucidating of eutectic cell count or nodule counts N wereexperimentally verified. The experimental work was focused on processing flake graphite and ductile iron under various inoculationconditions in order to achieve various physicochemical states of the experimental melts. In addition, plates of various wall thicknesses, s were cast and the resultant eutectic cell or nodule counts were established. Moreover, thermal analysis was used to find out the degree of maximum undercooling for the graphite eutectic, Tm. A relationship was found between the eutectic cell or nodule count and the maximum undercooling Tm.. In addition it was also found that N can be related to the wall thickness of plate shaped castings. Finally, the present work provides a rational for the effect of technological factors such as the melt chemistry, inoculation practice, and holding temperature and time on the resultant cell count or nodule count of cast iron. In particular, good agreement was found between the predictions of the theoretical analysis and the experimental data.

  6. Coupled growth of Al-Al2Cu eutectics in Al-Cu-Ag alloys

    Hecht, U; Witusiewicz, V; Drevermann, A

    2012-01-01

    Coupled eutectic growth of Al and Al 2 Cu was investigated in univariant Al-Cu-Ag alloys during solidification with planar and cellular morphology. Experiments reveal the dynamic selection of small spacings, below the minimum undercooling spacing and show that distinct morphological features pertain to nearly isotropic or anisotropic Al-Al 2 Cu interfaces.

  7. Pressure-induced structural change in liquid GaIn eutectic alloy

    Yu, Q.; Ahmad, A. S.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction reveals a pressure induced crystallization at about 3.4 GPa and a polymorphic transition near 10.3 GPa when compressed a liquid GaIn eutectic alloy up to ~13 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell. Upon decompression, the high pressure crystalline phase...

  8. On the relation between primary and eutectic solidification structures in gray iron

    Elmquist, L; Sonawane, P A

    2012-01-01

    The solidification of hypoeutectic gray cast iron starts with the nucleation of primary austenite crystals. Before graphite is nucleated, and the eutectic structure is formed, these crystals start to grow as columnar or equiaxed dendrites. However, very little is known about these dendrites, and especially how they influence the subsequent eutectic structure. Besides, it has previously been shown that the primary solidification structure influences the formation of defects. Shrinkage porosity was found between the dendrites, in the grain boundaries, and the formation of the primary solidification structure was found to influence problems related to metal expansion penetration. Therefore a better understanding about the formation of this structure is of importance. In this work, different inoculants and their influence on the formation of the micro- and macrostructures has been investigated. The inoculants considered are commercially used inoculants, i.e. inoculants used in the foundries, as well as different iron powders. The addition of iron powder is used to promote the primary solidification structure. It is shown that the nucleation of the dendrites is influenced by the amount of iron powder. Secondary dendrite arm spacing is a quantitative measurement in the microstructure related to these dendrites, which in turn depends on the solidification time. Eutectic cell size, on the other hand, is found to depend on secondary dendrite arm spacing. It is shown how the addition of inoculants influences both primary and eutectic solidification structures, and how they are related to each other.

  9. Fe2O3 hollow sphere nanocomposites for supercapacitor applications

    Zhao, Yu; Wen, Yang; Xu, Bing; Lu, Lu; Ren, Reiming

    2018-02-01

    Nanomaterials have attracted increasing interest in electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Hollow sphere Fe2O3 nanocomposites were successfully prepared through facile low temperature water-bath method with carbon sphere as hard template. The morphology and microstructure of samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. Through hydrolysis mechanism, using ferric chloride direct hydrolysis, iron hydroxide coated on the surface of carbon sphere, after high temperature calcination can form the hollow spherical iron oxide materials. Electrochemical performances of the hollow sphere Fe2O3 nanocomposites electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammery (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge. The Pure hollow sphere Fe2O3 nanocomposites achieves a specific capacitance of 125 F g-1 at the current density of 85 mA g-1. The results indicate that the uniform dispersion of hollow ball structure can effectively reduce the particle reunion in the process of charging and discharging.

  10. Thermodynamic and morphological analysis of eutectic formation of CBZ-L-Asp and L-PheOMe.HCl mixtures

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Youn, Sung Hun; Shin, Chul Soo

    2006-01-01

    The eutectic melting of a CBZ-L-Asp/L-PheOMe.HCl model mixture was investigated in kinetic, thermal, thermodynamic, rheological, and morphological aspects. From TX-phase diagrams, the eutectic composition was determined to be 0.55 M fraction of CBZ-L-Asp. The highest melting rate and the lowest apparent viscosity in the range of 55-75 deg. C were obtained at the eutectic composition. Using Arrhenius plots of melting rates and apparent viscosities, minimum activation energies in the range of 60-80 deg. C were obtained at the eutectic composition, whereas maximum values were attained below 60 deg. C. At the eutectic composition, the maximum heat of fusion, the lowest excess free energy, and the highest excess entropy values were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A highly homogeneous morphology due to rearrangement of molecules was observed in the eutectic mixture via scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. IR spectra revealed that hydrogen bonding in the mixture increases during eutectic melting

  11. Definitive difference among [DS-D2O], [DS-H2O] and [Bulk-D2O] cells in the deuterization and deuterium-reaction

    Arata, Yoshiaki; Zhang, Yue Chang

    2000-01-01

    We observed a new phenomena that the enormous amount of deuterium/hydrogen can be absorbed quickly as a 'solute-atom' into fine metal powders embedded inside a double-structure (DS) cathode in the electrolyses of D 2 O and H 2 O-electrolytes, respectively, but such highly deuterated powders can be produced only using DS-cathode immersed in D 2 O-electrolyte; [DS-D 2 O], and never generated in H 2 O-electrolyte even using the DS-cathode; [DS-H 2 O]. On the other hand, [Bulk-D 2 O] with bulk-cathode made by the bulk Pd metal never produces highly deuterated metal as mentioned above even though using D 2 O-electrolyte. In short, the deuterium-concentration generating in [Bulk-D 2 O] is found to be much lower than that in [DS-D 2 O]. As a result, because of reason mentioned above, in marked contrast to the case with the [DS-D 2 O], neither excess heat nor 4 He production are observed with both [DS-H 2 O] and [Bulk-D 2 O]. (author)

  12. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the

  13. Eutectic melting temperature of the lowermost Earth's mantle

    Andrault, D.; Lo Nigro, G.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bouhifd, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Partial melting of the Earth's deep mantle probably occurred at different stages of its formation as a consequence of meteoritic impacts and seismology suggests that it even continues today at the core-mantle boundary. Melts are important because they dominate the chemical evolution of the different Earth's reservoirs and more generally the dynamics of the whole planet. Unfortunately, the most critical parameter, that is the temperature profile inside the deep Earth, remains poorly constrained accross the planet history. Experimental investigations of the melting properties of materials representative of the deep Earth at relevant P-T conditions can provide anchor points to refine past and present temperature profiles and consequently determine the degree of melting at the different geological periods. Previous works report melting relations in the uppermost lower mantle region, using the multi-anvil press [1,2]. On the other hand, the pyrolite solidus was determined up to 65 GPa using optical observations in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) [3]. Finally, the melting temperature of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine is documented at core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions by shock wave experiments [4]. Solely based on these reports, experimental data remain too sparse to draw a definite melting curve for the lower mantle in the relevant 25-135 GPa pressure range. We reinvestigated melting properties of lower mantle materials by means of in-situ angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements in the LH-DAC at the ESRF [5]. Experiments were performed in an extended P-T range for two starting materials: forsterite and a glass with chondrite composition. In both cases, the aim was to determine the onset of melting, and thus the eutectic melting temperatures as a function of pressure. Melting was evidenced from drastic changes of diffraction peak shape on the image plate, major changes in diffraction intensities in the integrated pattern, disappearance of diffraction rings

  14. Sustainable Poly(Ionic Liquids) for CO2 Capture Based on Deep Eutectic Monomers

    Isik, Mehmet; Zulfiqar, Sonia; Edhaim, Fatimah; Ruiperez, Fernando; Rothenberger, Alexander; Mecerreyes, David

    2016-01-01

    The design of high performance solid sorbent materials for CO2 capture is a technology which has been employed to mitigate global warming. However, the covalent incorporation of functionalities into polymeric supports usually involves multistep energy-intensive chemical processes. This fact makes the net CO2 balance of the materials negative even though they possess good properties as CO2 sorbents. Here we show a new family of polymers which are based on amines, amidoximes, and natural carboxylic acids and can be obtained using sustainable low energy processes. Thus, deep eutectic monomers based on natural carboxylic acids, amidoximes, and amines have been prepared by just mixing with cholinium type methacrylic ammonium monomer. The formation of deep eutectic monomers was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry measurements. In all cases, the monomers displayed glass transition temperatures well below room temperature. Computational studies revealed that the formation of eutectic complexes lengthens the distance between the cation and the anion causing charge delocalization. The liquid nature of the resulting deep eutectic monomers (DEMs) made it possible to conduct a fast photopolymerization process to obtain the corresponding poly(ionic liquids). Materials were characterized by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction to evaluate the properties of the polymers. The polymers were then used as solid sorbents for CO2 capture. It has been shown that the polymers prepared with citric acid displayed better performance both experimentally and computationally. The current endeavor showed that sustainable poly(ionic liquids) based on deep eutectic monomers can be easily prepared to produce low-energy-cost alternatives to the materials currently being researched for CO2 capture. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  15. Sustainable Poly(Ionic Liquids) for CO2 Capture Based on Deep Eutectic Monomers

    Isik, Mehmet

    2016-10-05

    The design of high performance solid sorbent materials for CO2 capture is a technology which has been employed to mitigate global warming. However, the covalent incorporation of functionalities into polymeric supports usually involves multistep energy-intensive chemical processes. This fact makes the net CO2 balance of the materials negative even though they possess good properties as CO2 sorbents. Here we show a new family of polymers which are based on amines, amidoximes, and natural carboxylic acids and can be obtained using sustainable low energy processes. Thus, deep eutectic monomers based on natural carboxylic acids, amidoximes, and amines have been prepared by just mixing with cholinium type methacrylic ammonium monomer. The formation of deep eutectic monomers was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry measurements. In all cases, the monomers displayed glass transition temperatures well below room temperature. Computational studies revealed that the formation of eutectic complexes lengthens the distance between the cation and the anion causing charge delocalization. The liquid nature of the resulting deep eutectic monomers (DEMs) made it possible to conduct a fast photopolymerization process to obtain the corresponding poly(ionic liquids). Materials were characterized by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction to evaluate the properties of the polymers. The polymers were then used as solid sorbents for CO2 capture. It has been shown that the polymers prepared with citric acid displayed better performance both experimentally and computationally. The current endeavor showed that sustainable poly(ionic liquids) based on deep eutectic monomers can be easily prepared to produce low-energy-cost alternatives to the materials currently being researched for CO2 capture. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  16. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Long-term evaluation of hollow screw and hollow cylinder dental implants : Clinical and radiographic results after 10 years

    Telleman, Gerdien; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    Background: In 1988, an implant manufacturer offered a new dental implant system, with a wide choice of hollow cylinder (HC) and hollow screw (HS) implants. The purpose of this retrospective study of HS and HC implants was to evaluate clinical and radiographic parameters of peri-implant tissue and

  18. Air Separation Using Hollow Fiber Membranes

    Huang, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with the Ohio Aerospace Institute provides internship programs for high school and college students in the areas of science, engineering, professional administrative, and other technical areas. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Dr. Clarence T. Chang at NASA Glenn Research Center s combustion branch on air separation using hollow fiber membrane technology. . In light of the accident of Trans World Airline s flight 800, FAA has mandated that a suitable solution be created to prevent the ignition of fuel tanks in aircrafts. In order for any type of fuel to ignite, three important things are needed: fuel vapor, oxygen, and an energy source. Two different ways to make fuel tanks less likely to ignite are reformulating the fuel to obtain a lower vapor pressure for the fuel and or using an On Board Inert Gas Generating System (OBIGGS) to inert the Central Wing Tank. goal is to accomplish the mission, which means that the Air Separation Module (ASM) tends to be bulky and heavy. The primary goal for commercial aviation companies is to transport as much as they can with the least amount of cost and fuel per person, therefore the ASM must be compact and light as possible. The plan is to take bleed air from the aircraft s engines to pass air through a filter first to remove particulates and then pass the air through the ASM containing hollow fiber membranes. In the lab, there will be a heating element provided to simulate the temperature of the bleed air that will be entering the ASM and analysis of the separated air will be analyzed by a Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS). The GUMS will separate the different compounds in the exit streams of the ASM and provide information on the performance of hollow fiber membranes. Hopefully I can develop ways to improve efficiency of the ASM. different types of jet fuel were analyzed and data was well represented on SAE Paper 982485. Data consisted of the concentrations of over

  19. 3ds Max design architectural visualization for intermediate users

    Smith, Brian L

    2012-01-01

    Learn time-saving techniques and tested production-ready tips for maximum speed and efficiency in creating professional-level architectural visualizations in 3ds Max. Move from intermediate to an advanced level with specific and comprehensive instruction with this collaboration from nine different authors from around the world. Get their experience and skills in this full-color book, which not only teaches more advanced features, but also demonstrates the practical applications of those features to get readers ready for a real production environment. Fully updated for the most recent version o

  20. Adaptive Multiuser Detectors for DS-CDMA Systems

    Paul Jean Etienne Jeszensky

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This work makes a review of the main Adaptives Multi-user Detectors (MuD-Adpt for Direct Sequence - Code Division Multiple Access (DS-CDMA systems. The MuD-Adpt based on Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE and Decorrelator (MuD-Dec are focused. Multi-user detectors show great resistance to the near-far effect and combat effectively the Multiple Access Interference (MAI. Comparative numeric results characterize the substantial performance improvement of those detectors in relation to the matched filter conventional receiver (Conv.

  1. Passivation Strategies on Board Airbus ds Leo Pcdus

    Lapeña Emilio

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the different strategies followed in the Airbus DS LEO PCDUs regarding the implementation of the passivation function in several LEO missions with different architectures (DET and MPPT solar array power conditioning. In the selection of the solution implemented in the frame of every mission, a key driver is the degree of advance in the test performed over flight representative battery modules regarding their safe behavior when deeply depleted after a long period in orbit with the passivation applied over the spacecraft.

  2. A Unified Approach to the Analysis of Multicarrier DS-CDMA over Nakagami-$M$ Fading Channels

    Yang, L-L.; Hanzo, L.

    2001-01-01

    A class of unified multicarrier DS-CDMA (MC DS-CDMA) schemes is defined and its performance is considered over multipath Nakagami-$M$ fading channels. The spacing between two adjacent subcarriers of the unified MC DS-CDMA scheme is a variable, allowing us to gain insight into the effects of the spacing on the bit error rate (BER) performance of MC DS-CDMA systems. This unified MC DS-CDMA scheme includes the subclasses of multitone DS-CDMA and orthogonal MC DS-CDMA as special cases. The optimu...

  3. Experimental study on hollow structural component by explosive welding

    Duan, Mianjun, E-mail: dmjwl@163.com [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Wei, Ling, E-mail: 386006087@qq.com [Tongda College, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunication, Nanjing 210007 (China); Hong, Jin [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Ran, Hong [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Ma, Rui; Wang, Yaohua [PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • This paper relates to a study on a thin double-layers hollow structural component by using an explosive welding technology. • This thin double-layer hollow structural component is an indispensable component required for certain core equipment of thermonuclear experimental reactor. • An adjusted explosive welding technology for manufacturing an inconel625 hollow structural component was developed which cannot be made by common technology. • The result shows that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs of the hollow sheet. • The shearing strength of bonding interface exceeds that of the parent metal. - Abstract: A large thin-walled hollow structural component with sealed channels is required for the vacuum chamber of a thermonuclear experimental reactor, with inconel625 as its fabrication material. This hollow structural component is rarely manufactured by normal machining method, and its manufacture is also problematic in the field of explosive welding. With this in mind, we developed an adjusted explosive welding technology which involves a two-step design, setting and annealing technology. The joints were evaluated using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope, and a mechanical experiment was conducted, involving micro-hardness test, cold helium leak test and hydraulic pressure test. The results showed that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs, and the shearing strength of the bonding interface exceeded that of the parent metal. Hence, the hollow structural component has a good comprehensive mechanical performance and sealing property.

  4. Experimental study on hollow structural component by explosive welding

    Duan, Mianjun; Wei, Ling; Hong, Jin; Ran, Hong; Ma, Rui; Wang, Yaohua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper relates to a study on a thin double-layers hollow structural component by using an explosive welding technology. • This thin double-layer hollow structural component is an indispensable component required for certain core equipment of thermonuclear experimental reactor. • An adjusted explosive welding technology for manufacturing an inconel625 hollow structural component was developed which cannot be made by common technology. • The result shows that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs of the hollow sheet. • The shearing strength of bonding interface exceeds that of the parent metal. - Abstract: A large thin-walled hollow structural component with sealed channels is required for the vacuum chamber of a thermonuclear experimental reactor, with inconel625 as its fabrication material. This hollow structural component is rarely manufactured by normal machining method, and its manufacture is also problematic in the field of explosive welding. With this in mind, we developed an adjusted explosive welding technology which involves a two-step design, setting and annealing technology. The joints were evaluated using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope, and a mechanical experiment was conducted, involving micro-hardness test, cold helium leak test and hydraulic pressure test. The results showed that a metallurgical bonding was realized by the ribs and slabs, and the shearing strength of the bonding interface exceeded that of the parent metal. Hence, the hollow structural component has a good comprehensive mechanical performance and sealing property

  5. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics (Conference Presentation)

    Genç, Aziz; Patarroyo, Javier; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Duchamp, Martial; Gonzalez, Edgar; Bastus, Neus G.; Houben, Lothar; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal; Puntes, Victor F.; Arbiol, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Complex metal nanoparticles offer a great playground for plasmonic nanoengineering, where it is possible to cover plasmon resonances from ultraviolet to near infrared by modifying the morphologies from solid nanocubes to nanoframes, multiwalled hollow nanoboxes or even nanotubes with hybrid (alternating solid and hollow) structures. We experimentally show that structural modifications, i.e. void size and final morphology, are the dominant determinants for the final plasmonic properties, while compositional variations allow us to get a fine tuning. EELS mappings of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) reveal an enhanced plasmon field inside the voids of hollow AuAg nanostructures along with a more homogeneous distributions of the plasmon fields around the nanostructures. With the present methodology and the appropriate samples we are able to compare the effects of hybridization at the nanoscale in hollow nanostructures. Boundary element method (BEM) simulations also reveal the effects of structural nanoengineering on plasmonic properties of hollow metal nanostructures. Possibility of tuning the LSPR properties of hollow metal nanostructures in a wide range of energy by modifying the void size/shell thickness is shown by BEM simulations, which reveals that void size is the dominant factor for tuning the LSPRs. As a proof of concept for enhanced plasmonic properties, we show effective label free sensing of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with some of our hollow nanostructures. In addition, the different plasmonic modes observed have also been studied and mapped in 3D.

  6. Boron nitride hollow nanospheres: Synthesis, formation mechanism and dielectric property

    Zhong, B.; Tang, X.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Huang, X.X., E-mail: swliza@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xia, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Zhang, X.D. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, C.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Wen, G.W., E-mail: g.wen@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • BN hollow nanospheres are fabricated in large scale via a new CVD method. • Morphology and structure are elucidated by complementary analytical techniques. • Formation mechanism is proposed based on experimental observations. • Dielectric properties are investigated in the X-band microwave frequencies. • BN hollow nanospheres show lower dielectric loss than regular BN powders. - Abstract: Boron nitride (BN) hollow nanospheres have been successfully fabricated by pyrolyzing vapors decomposed from ammonia borane (NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 1300 °C. The final products have been extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The BN hollow nanospheres were ranging from 100 to 300 nm in diameter and around 30–100 nm in thickness. The internal structure of the products was found dependent on the reaction temperatures. A possible formation mechanism of the BN hollow nanospheres was proposed on the basis of the experimental observations. Dielectric measurements in the X-band microwave frequencies (8–12 GHz) showed that the dielectric loss of the paraffin filled by the BN hollow nanospheres was lower than that filled by regular BN powders, which indicated that the BN hollow nanospheres could be potentially used as low-density fillers for microwave radomes.

  7. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  8. Asynchronous, Decentralized DS-CDMA Using Feedback-Controlled Spreading Sequences for Time-Dispersive Channels

    Miyatake, Teruhiko; Chiba, Kazuki; Hamamura, Masanori; Tachikawa, Shin'ichi

    We propose a novel asynchronous direct-sequence codedivision multiple access (DS-CDMA) using feedback-controlled spreading sequences (FCSSs) (FCSS/DS-CDMA). At the receiver of FCSS/DS-CDMA, the code-orthogonalizing filter (COF) produces a spreading sequence, and the receiver returns the spreading sequence to the transmitter. Then the transmitter uses the spreading sequence as its updated version. The performance of FCSS/DS-CDMA is evaluated over time-dispersive channels. The results indicate that FCSS/DS-CDMA greatly suppresses both the intersymbol interference (ISI) and multiple access interference (MAI) over time-invariant channels. FCSS/DS-CDMA is applicable to the decentralized multiple access.

  9. Microstructural and mechanical properties of binary Ni–Si eutectic alloys

    Gogebakan, Musa, E-mail: gogebakan@ksu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras 46100 (Turkey); Kursun, Celal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras 46100 (Turkey); Gunduz, Kerem Ozgur; Tarakci, Mehmet; Gencer, Yucel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, Gebze, 41400 Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20}, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30}, Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} were prepared by arc melting method. • The maximum microhardness value of 1126 HV obtained for Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} alloy. • The microhardness values decreases with increase of Si/Ni ratio. • Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20} and Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} are soft ferromagnetic, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} are paramagnetic. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Si eutectic alloys with nominal compositions of Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20}, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30}, Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} (Ni and Si with the purity of 99.99%) were prepared by arc melting method under vacuum/argon atmosphere. The effects of Si/Ni ratio on the microstructural properties, thermal transformation behavior, micro-hardness and magnetic properties of the Ni–Si eutectic alloys were investigated. These alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Vickers microhardness measurement and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The phases expected according to Ni–Si phase diagram for conventional solidified eutectic Ni–Si alloys are considerably consistent with phase detected by XRD in this study. The quantitative results confirm that the chemical composition of the alloys very close to eutectic compositions and the microstructures are in typical lamellar eutectic morphology. The maximum microhardness value of 1126 HV obtained for Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} alloy which has highest melting temperature amongst Ni–Si eutectics. The microhardness values decreases with increase of Si/Ni ratio. Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20} and Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} alloys are soft ferromagnetic, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} alloys are paramagnetic with no magnetic saturation.

  10. RDE-4 preferentially binds long dsRNA and its dimerization is necessary for cleavage of dsRNA to siRNA.

    Parker, Greg S; Eckert, Debra M; Bass, Brenda L

    2006-05-01

    In organisms ranging from Arabidopsis to humans, Dicer requires dsRNA-binding proteins (dsRBPs) to carry out its roles in RNA interference (RNAi) and micro-RNA (miRNA) processing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the dsRBP RDE-4 acts with Dicer during the initiation of RNAi, when long dsRNA is cleaved to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). RDE-4 is not required in subsequent steps, and how RDE-4 distinguishes between long dsRNA and short siRNA is unclear. We report the first detailed analysis of RDE-4 binding, using purified recombinant RDE-4 and various truncated proteins. We find that, similar to other dsRBPs, RDE-4 is not sequence-specific. However, consistent with its in vivo roles, RDE-4 binds with higher affinity to long dsRNA. We also observe that RDE-4 is a homodimer in solution, and that the C-terminal domain of the protein is required for dimerization. Using extracts from wild-type and rde-4 mutant C. elegans, we show that the C-terminal dimerization domain is required for the production of siRNA. Our findings suggest a model for RDE-4 function during the initiation of RNAi.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF HEAT TREATMENT WITH THE LIQUID PHASE ON FORMATION OF A MICROSTRUCTURE OF EUTECTIC Al-Si-ALLOY

    A. Anikin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on the structure of the eutectic Al-Si-alloy, a theoretical substantiation process based on thermal analyzer and cooked microstructures was presented in this paper.

  12. Role of bismuth on solidification, microstructure and mechanical properties of a near eutectic Al-Si alloys

    Farahany, Saeed; Ourdjini, Ali; Bakar, Tuty Asma Abu; Idris, Mohd Hasbullah

    2014-09-01

    Computer aided thermal analysis and microstructural observation showed that addition of bismuth (Bi) within the range of 0.25 and 2 wt% produced a greater effect on the Al-Si eutectic phase than on primary aluminium and Al2Cu phases. Results showed that with addition of 1 wt% Bi the eutectic silicon structure was refined from flake-like morphology into lamellar. Bi refines rather than modifies the Si structure and increases the Al-Si eutectic fraction solid and more significantly there was no fading even up to 180 min of melt holding. Transmission electron microscopy study showed that the Si twin spacing decreased from 160 to 75 nm which is likely attributed to the refining effect of Bi. It was also found that addition of 1 wt% Bi increased the tensile strength, elongation and the absorbed energy for fracture due to the refined eutectic silicon structure.

  13. Hollow fiber membranes and methods for forming same

    Bhandari, Dhaval Ajit; McCloskey, Patrick Joseph; Howson, Paul Edward; Narang, Kristi Jean; Koros, William

    2016-03-22

    The invention provides improved hollow fiber membranes having at least two layers, and methods for forming the same. The methods include co-extruding a first composition, a second composition, and a third composition to form a dual layer hollow fiber membrane. The first composition includes a glassy polymer; the second composition includes a polysiloxane; and the third composition includes a bore fluid. The dual layer hollow fiber membranes include a first layer and a second layer, the first layer being a porous layer which includes the glassy polymer of the first composition, and the second layer being a polysiloxane layer which includes the polysiloxane of the second composition.

  14. Axisymmetric Vibration of Piezo-Lemv Composite Hollow Multilayer Cylinder

    E. S. Nehru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Axisymmetric vibration of an infinite piezolaminated multilayer hollow cylinder made of piezoelectric layers of 6 mm class and an isotropic LEMV (Linear Elastic Materials with Voids layers is studied. The frequency equations are obtained for the traction free outer surface with continuity conditions at the interfaces. Numerical results are carried out for the inner, middle, and outer hollow piezoelectric layers bonded by LEMV (It is hypothetical material layers and the dispersion curves are compared with that of a similar 3-layer model and of 3 and 5 layer models with inner, middle, and outer hollow piezoelectric layers bonded by CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

  15. Recovery of uranium from seawater using amidoxime hollow fibers

    Saito, K.; Uezu, K.; Hori, T.; Furusaki, S.; Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J.

    1988-01-01

    A novel amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent of hollow-fiber form (AO-H fiber) was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto a polyethylene hollow fiber, followed by chemical conversion of the produced cyano group to an amidoxime group. Distribution of the amidoxime group was uniform throughout hollow-fiber membrane. The fixed-bed adsorption column, 30 cm in length and charged with the bundle of AO-H fibers, was found to adsorb uranium from natural seawater at a sufficiently high rate: 0.66 mg uranium per g of adsorbent in 25 days

  16. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    Stancari, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Still, D A; Valishev, A; Vorobiev, L G; Assmann, R; Kabantsev, A

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  17. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    Stancari, G.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Assmann, R.; Kabantsev, A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams

  18. Generation and propagation characteristics of a localized hollow beam

    Xia, Meng; Wang, Zhizhang; Yin, Yaling; Zhou, Qi; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2018-05-01

    A succinct experimental scheme is demonstrated to generate a localized hollow beam by using a π-phase binary bitmap and a convergent thin lens. The experimental results show that the aspect ratio of the dark-spot size of the hollow beam can be effectively controlled by the focal length of the lens. The measured beam profiles in free space also agree with the theoretical modeling. The studies hold great promise that such a hollow beam can be used to cool trapped atoms (or molecules) by Sisyphus cooling and to achieve an optically-trapped Bose–Einstein condensate by optical-potential evaporative cooling.

  19. Two-piece hollow bulb obturator

    Subramaniam Elangovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various types of obturator fabrication achievable by prosthodontist. Maxillectomy, which is a term used by head and neck surgeons and prosthodontists to describe the partial or total removal of the maxilla in patients suffering from benign or malignant neoplasms is a defect for which to provide an effective obturator is a difficult task for the maxillofacial prosthodontist. Multidisciplinary treatment planning is essential to achieve adequate retention and function for the prosthesis. Speech is often unintelligible as a result of the marked defects in articulation and nasal resonance. This paper describes how to achieve the goal for esthetics and phonetics and also describes the fabrication of a hollow obturator by two piece method, which is simple and maybe used as definitive obturator for maximum comfort of the patient.

  20. Uranium vapor generator: pulsed hollow cathode lamp

    Carleer, M.; Gagne, J.; Leblanc, B.; Demers, Y.; Mongeau, B.

    1979-01-01

    The production of uranium vapors has been studied in the 5 L 0 6 ground state using a pulsed hollow cathode lamp. The evolution of the 238 U ( 5 L 0 6 ) concentration with time has been studied with Xe and Ar as buffer gases. A density of 2.7 x 10 13 atoms cm -3 was obtained with Xe as a buffer gas. In addition, those measurements, obtained from the absorption of a laser beam tuned to the 5758.143 A ( 5 L 0 6 -17,361 7 L 6 ) transition, allowed the determination of the transition probability A=2.1 x 10 5 sec -1 and of the branching ratio BR=0.08 for this transition

  1. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  2. On the performance of a novel grain refiner in hyper-eutectic Al-Si cast alloys

    Bolzoni, L; Nowak, M; Hari Babu, N

    2014-01-01

    The stringent requirements for pollution reduction are pushing the automotive industry towards the employment of lightweight structures and, therefore, aluminium and its alloys play a remarkable role. Al-Si casting alloy with eutectic or hyper- eutectic compositions are, normally, employed for the production of high performance automotive products such as pistons and engine blocks which have to withstand critical loading conditions (i.e. high temperature, high pressure and corrosive exhaust g...

  3. Search for $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{+}$ decays

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-07-23

    A search for non-resonant $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{+}$ decays is performed using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV recorded by the LHCb experiment in 2011. No signals are observed and the $90\\% \\, (95\\%)$ confidence level (CL) limits on the branching fractions are found to be \\begin{eqnarray*} \\mathcal{B}(D^{+} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}) < 7.3 \\, (8.3) \\times 10^{-8},\\\\ \\mathcal{B}(D^{+}_{s} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}) < 4.1 \\, (4.8) \\times 10^{-7},\\\\ \\mathcal{B}(D^{+} \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{+}) < 2.2 \\, (2.5) \\times 10^{-8},\\\\ \\mathcal{B}(D^{+}_{s} \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\mu^{+} \\mu^{+}) < 1.2 \\, (1.4) \\times 10^{-7}.\\\\ \\end{eqnarray*} These limits are the most stringent to date.

  4. Professional BlazeDS Creating Rich Internet Applications with Flex and Java

    Tiwari, Shashank

    2009-01-01

    A hands-on guide to creating Rich Internet Applications (RIA) using BlazeDS. BlazeDS enables you to easily connect to back-end distributed data and push data in real time to Adobe Flex and Adobe AIR applications in order to garner more responsive Rich Internet Application (RIA) experiences. It is a scalable option for Flex and Java integration and allows you to create excellent RIAs with both Flex and Java. This informative resource provides you with detailed examples and walkthroughs that explain the best practices for creating RIAs using BlazeDS. You'll begin with the essentials of BlazeDS a

  5. Correlation between CHA2DS2-VASc Score and Glaucoma Treatment and Prognosis.

    Pikkel, Yoav Y; Krebs, Daniel; Igal, Vadim; Sharabi-Nov, Adi; Epstein, Irena; Pikkel, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    To find if CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scale can accurately predict the treatment, prognosis, and outcome for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). A survey of 250,000 patient years was taken, using the records of the Ophthalmology Department at Ziv Medical Center. Data was collected regarding the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), visual field (VF), line of treatment (LOT) of glaucoma, and all the data needed to accurately calculate CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score for each patient. Sixty-seven patients were included in the statistical analysis. The mean age was 72.5 years. The mean CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score was 3.27 + -1.7. Positive Pearson's correlation coefficients were found for LOT and CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score, 0.35, and for RNFL grade and CHA2DS2-VASc score, 0.37. The correlation was negative for RNFL width and CHA2DS2-VASc score, -0.35. CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score was shown to be correlated with glaucoma. This correlation was manifested positively by the LOT needed to stop glaucoma progression, with higher CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scores correlated with more aggressive treatment. Since glaucoma is a disease with a progressing nature, it is important to treat patients aggressively on one hand, while offering the most benign treatment as possible on the other hand. Modification of the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score could achieve an even higher correlation.

  6. Self-consistent theory of steady-state lamellar solidification in binary eutectic systems

    Nash, G.E.; Glicksman, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    The potential theoretic methods developed recently at NRL for solving the diffusion equation are applied to the free-boundary problem describing lamellar eutectic solidification. Using these techniques, the original boundary value problem is reduced to a set of coupled integro-differential equations for the shape of the solid/liquid interface and various quantities defined on the interface. The behavior of the solutions is discussed in a qualitative fashion, leading to some interesting inferences regarding the nature of the eutectic solidification process. Using the information obtained from the analysis referred to above, an approximate theory of the lamellar-rod transition is formulated. The predictions of the theory are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations of this transition. In addition, a simplified version of the general integro-differential equations is developed and is used to assess the effect of interface curvature on the interfacial solute concentrations, and to check the new theory for consistency with experiment

  7. Studies on SiC(p) reinforced Al-Al sub 3 Ni eutectic matrix composites

    Masrom, A.K.; Foo, L.C.; Ismail, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation on processing of Al-5.69wt% Ni eutectic with SiC particulate composites is reported. The intermetallic composites are prepared by elemental powder metallurgy route and sintered at two different temperatures, i.e., 600 degree C and 620 degree C. Results show that the metal matrix was Al-Al sub 3 Ni eutectic. The phase analysis by XRD identified the presence of Al sub 3 Ni and Al as dominant phases together with silicon and Al sub 4 C sub 3 phase as minor phases. The Al sub 4 C sub 3 and Si phases are formed during sintering due to SiC-Al interface reaction. SEM micrographs also reveal the formation of microvoid surrounding the SiC particle

  8. Flux flow and proximity effects in aligned Pb--Cd eutectic lamellar structures

    Spencer, C. R.

    1977-09-01

    A high speed directional solidification technique was used to fabricate lamellar Pb-Cd and (Pb-Mg)--(Cd-Mg) superconductor-normal metal composites in which all the lamellae are oriented perpendicular to the broad surface of the sample. These lamellar composites are found to behave like a large number (approximately 1000) of superconducting-normal-superconducting junctions. For the Pb-Cd eutectic system, the critical current densities and critical fields have shown no dependence upon the lamellar periods between 1.0 and 3.1 microns. The critical current density of the aligned lamellar Pb-Cd structures was enhanced approximately 50% when compared to quenched eutectic alloy and to pure Pb. The superconducting transition temperature, T/sub c/, varies inversely with the square of the thickness of the superconducting material as expected from Ginzburg-Landau theory. Upon annealing, the Pb lamellae change from type II to type I superconductivity.

  9. Filtration of aluminum alloys and its influence on mechanical properties and shape of eutectical silicium

    M. Brůna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Filtration during casting of high quality aluminum alloys belongs to main refining methods. Even when there are many years of experiences and experimental works on this subject, there are still some specific anomalies. While using ceramic filtration media during casting of aluminum alloys, almost in all experiments occurred increase of strength limit and atypical increase of extension. This anomaly was not explained with classical metallurgical methods, black-white contrast after surface etching neither with color surface etching. For that reason was used deep etching on REM. By using pressed ceramic filters, by studying morphology eutectical silicon was observed modification morphology of eutectical silicon, this explains increase extension after filtration. Pressed ceramic filters were used on experimental works. Casting was executed on hardenable alloy AlSi10MgMn.

  10. Chip bonding of low-melting eutectic alloys by transmitted laser radiation

    Hoff, Christian; Venkatesh, Arjun; Schneider, Friedrich; Hermsdorf, Jörg; Bengsch, Sebastian; Wurz, Marc C.; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2017-06-01

    Present-day thermode bond systems for the assembly of radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips are mechanically inflexible, difficult to control, and will not meet future manufacturing challenges sufficiently. Chip bonding, one of the key processes in the production of integrated circuits (ICs), has a high potential for optimization with respect to process duration and process flexibility. For this purpose, the technologies used, so far, are supposed to be replaced by a transmission laser-bonding process using low-melting eutectic alloys. In this study, successful bonding investigations of mock silicon chips and of RFID chips on flexible polymer substrates are presented using the low-melting eutectic alloy, 52In48Sn, and a laser with a wavelength of 2 μm.

  11. Flux flow and proximity effects in aligned Pb--Cd eutectic lamellar structures

    Spencer, C.R.

    1977-09-01

    A high speed directional solidification technique was used to fabricate lamellar Pb-Cd and (Pb-Mg)--(Cd-Mg) superconductor-normal metal composites in which all the lamellae are oriented perpendicular to the broad surface of the sample. These lamellar composites are found to behave like a large number (approximately 1000) of superconducting-normal-superconducting junctions. For the Pb-Cd eutectic system, the critical current densities and critical fields have shown no dependence upon the lamellar periods between 1.0 and 3.1 microns. The critical current density of the aligned lamellar Pb-Cd structures was enhanced approximately 50% when compared to quenched eutectic alloy and to pure Pb. The superconducting transition temperature, T/sub c/, varies inversely with the square of the thickness of the superconducting material as expected from Ginzburg-Landau theory. Upon annealing, the Pb lamellae change from type II to type I superconductivity

  12. Metal-ion catalyzed polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Szostak, Jack W.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of an RNA world requires among other processes the non-enzymatic, template-directed replication of genetic polymers such as RNA or related nucleic acids, possibly catalyzed by metal ions. The absence of uridilate derivative polymerization on adenine containing templates has been...... the main issue preventing an efficient template-directed RNA polymerization. We report here the investigation of template-directed RNA polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice. In particular, it was found that activated Uridilate monomers in the presence of metal-ion catalysts could efficiently......-pairing opportunities. These results suggest that a template-directed RNA polymerization catalyzed by metal-ions could be carried out under eutectic phase in water-ice conditions....

  13. Phase-field-lattice Boltzmann study for lamellar eutectic growth in a natural convection melt

    Ang Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the influence of natural convection on the lamellar eutectic growth is determined by a phase-field-lattice Boltzmann study for Al-Cu eutectic alloy. The mass difference resulting from concentration difference led to the fluid flow, and a robust parallel and adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was employed to improve the computational efficiency without any compromising accuracy. Results show that the existence of natural convection would affect the growth undercooling and thus control the interface shape by adjusting the lamellar width. In particular, by alternating the magnitude of the solute expansion coefficient, the strength of the natural convection is changed. Corresponding microstructure patterns are discussed and compared with those under no-convection conditions.

  14. Directional solidification of Zn-Al-Cu eutectic alloy by the vertical Bridgman method

    Büyük U.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the effect of growth rate and temperature gradient on microstructure and mechanical properties of Zn-7wt.%Al-4wt.%Cu eutectic alloy has been investigated. Alloys prepared under steady-state conditions by vacuumed hot filing furnace. Then, the alloys were directionally solidified upward with different growth rates (V=11.62-230.77 mm/s at a constant temperature gradient (G=7.17 K/mm and with different temperature gradients (G=7.17-11.04 K/mm at a constant growth rate (V=11.62 mm/s by a Bridgman furnace. The microstructures were observed to be lamellae of Zn, Al and broken lamellae CuZn4 phases from quenched samples. The values of eutectic spacing, microhardness and ultimate tensile strength of alloys were measured. The dependency of the microstructure and mechanical properties on growth rate and temperature gradient were investigated using regression analysis.

  15. Polyazole hollow fiber membranes for direct contact membrane distillation

    Maab, Husnul; Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem; Francis, Lijo; Livazovic, Sara; Ghaffour, NorEddine; Amy, Gary L.; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Porous hollow fiber membranes were fabricated from fluorinated polyoxadiazole and polytriazole by a dry-wet spinning method for application in desalination of Red Sea water by direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The data were compared with commercially available hollow fiber MD membranes prepared from poly(vinylidene fluoride). The membranes were characterized by electron microscopy, liquid entry pressure (LEP), and pore diameter measurements. Finally, the hollow fiber membranes were tested for DCMD. Salt selectivity as high as 99.95% and water fluxes as high as 35 and 41 L m -2 h-1 were demonstrated, respectively, for polyoxadiazole and polytriazole hollow fiber membranes, operating at 80 C feed temperature and 20 C permeate. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Development of Hollow Cathode of High Power Middle Pressure Arcjet

    Vaulin, Eujeni

    1995-01-01

    ...: Determine integral performances of arcjet devices in nitrogen, ammonia, and their mixtures using hollow cathode devices at low and high current levels, perform short term tests (up to 50 hours...

  17. Ultraviolet Generation by Atmospheric Micro-Hollow Cathode Discharges

    Cooper, J

    2004-01-01

    Report developed under STTR contract for topic AFO3TOl9. This report documents the program objectives, work performed, results obtained, and future plans for a program to develop micro-hollow cathode discharge (MHCD...

  18. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    Heung, Leung K.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Wicks, George G.

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  19. Fundamental investigation on the impact strength of hollow fan blades

    Ikeda, T; Miyachi, T; Sofue, Y

    1985-01-01

    Models of hollow fan blades were made and tested to prove that their strength is sufficient for use in real engines. The hollow blades were fabricated by diffusion bonding of two titanium alloy (6Al-4V-Ti) plates, one of which had three spanwise stiffners and the other being flat plate. The model as a nontwisted tapered blade. Impact tests were carried out on the hollow fan blade models in which the ingestion of a 1.5 pounds bird was simulated. Solid blades with the same external form were also tested by similar methods for comparison. The results of these tests show that properly designed hollow blades have sufficient stiffness and strength for use as fan blades in the turbo-fan engine.

  20. Coprecipitation-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of PLZT hollow nanospheres

    Zhu, Renqiang; Zhu, Kongjun; Qiu, Jinhao; Bai, Lin; Ji, Hongli

    2010-01-01

    Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate Pb 1-x La x (Zr 1-y Ti y )O 3 (PLZT) hollow nanospheres have been successfully prepared via a template-free hydrothermal method using the well-mixed coprecipitated precursors and the KOH mineralizer. The structure, composition, and morphology of the PLZT hollow nanospheres were characterized by XRD (X-ray diffraction), ICP (inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectra), TG/DTA (thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis), TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and SEAD (selected area diffraction). The results show that the composition and the morphology control of the PLZT products are determined by the KOH concentration. The PLZT hollow nanospheres with uniform size of about 4 nm were synthesized in the presence of 5 M KOH. The crystalline nanoparticles can be prepared at dilute KOH, in contrast to the amorphous powders prepared at concentrated KOH. Formation mechanisms of the PLZT hollow nanospheres are also discussed.

  1. Spray Modeling for Outwardly-Opening Hollow-Cone Injector

    Sim, Jaeheon; Badra, Jihad; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Im, Hong G.

    2016-01-01

    linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) model was originally developed for pressure swirl hollow-cone injectors with moderate spray angle and toroidal ligament breakups. Therefore, it is not appropriate for the outwardly-opening injectors having wide

  2. Polyazole hollow fiber membranes for direct contact membrane distillation

    Maab, Husnul

    2013-08-07

    Porous hollow fiber membranes were fabricated from fluorinated polyoxadiazole and polytriazole by a dry-wet spinning method for application in desalination of Red Sea water by direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The data were compared with commercially available hollow fiber MD membranes prepared from poly(vinylidene fluoride). The membranes were characterized by electron microscopy, liquid entry pressure (LEP), and pore diameter measurements. Finally, the hollow fiber membranes were tested for DCMD. Salt selectivity as high as 99.95% and water fluxes as high as 35 and 41 L m -2 h-1 were demonstrated, respectively, for polyoxadiazole and polytriazole hollow fiber membranes, operating at 80 C feed temperature and 20 C permeate. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Investigation of concrete mixtures incorporating hollow plastic microspheres.

    1981-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of hollow plastic microspheres, HPM, for providing non-air-entrained portland cement concrete resistance to damage from cycles of freezing and thawing. In the study, a mixture with an air-entraining agent (vinsol...

  4. Block copolymer/homopolymer dual-layer hollow fiber membranes

    Hilke, Roland; Neelakanda, Pradeep; Behzad, Ali Reza; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2014-01-01

    We manufactured the first time block copolymer dual-layer hollow fiber membranes and dual layer flat sheet membranes manufactured by double solution casting and phase inversion in water. The support porous layer was based on polystyrene

  5. Mechanical properties of thermomechanical treated hyper-eutectic Al-Si-(Fe, Mn, Cu) materials

    Umezawa, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    Tensile and high-cycle fatigue behavior of thermomechanical treated hyper-eutectic Al-Si-(Fe, Mn, Cu) materials were studied. Through the repeated thermomechanical treatment (RTMT) which is a repeat of the multi steps cold-working followed by heat treatment, Si crystals and/or intermetallic compounds were broken into some fragments and dispersed in the aluminum matrix. Fine dispersion of the second phase particles exhibited good ductility, since early fracture was overcome. A few large Si cry...

  6. Stabilizing Effects of Deep Eutectic Solvents on Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mediated Systems

    Fatima Zohra Ibn Majdoub Hassani; Ivan Lavandera; Joseph Kreit

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of different organic solvents, temperature, and the amount of glycerol on the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-catalysed stereoselective reduction of different ketones. These conversions were then analyzed by gas chromatography. It was found that when the amount of deep eutectic solvents (DES) increases, it can improve the stereoselectivity of the enzyme although reducing its ability to convert the substrate into the corresponding alcohol. Moreover, glycerol was fou...

  7. The effect of the electrode material on the electrodeposition of zinc from deep eutectic solvents

    Vieira, L.; Schennach, R.; Gollas, B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mechanistic insight into zinc electrodeposition from deep eutectic solvents. • Overpotential for hydrogen evolution affects the electrodeposition of zinc. • Electrodeposited zinc forms surface alloys on Cu, Au, and Pt. • In situ PM-IRRAS of a ZnCl_2 containing deep eutectic solvent on glassy carbon. - Abstract: The voltammetric behaviour of the ZnCl_2 containing deep eutectic solvent choline chloride/ethylene glycol 1:2 was investigated on glassy carbon, stainless steel, Au, Pt, Cu, and Zn electrodes. While cyclic voltammetry on glassy carbon and stainless steel showed a cathodic peak for zinc electrodeposition only in the anodic reverse sweep, a cathodic peak was found also in the cathodic forward sweep on Au, Pt, Cu, and Zn. This behaviour is in agreement with the proposed mechanism of zinc deposition from an intermediate species Z, whose formation depends on the cathodic reduction potential of the solvent. The voltammetric reduction of the electrolyte involves hydrogen evolution and as a result the formation of Z and its reduction to zinc depend on the hydrogen overpotential for each electrode material. On Au, Pt, and Cu also the anodic stripping was different from that on glassy carbon and steel due to the formation of surface zinc alloys with the three former metals. The morphology of the zinc layers on Cu has been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and focussed ion beam. X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of crystalline zinc and a Cu_4Zn phase. Spectroelectrochemistry by means of polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) on a glassy carbon electrode in the ZnCl_2 containing deep eutectic solvent showed characteristic potential dependent changes. The variation of band intensities at different applied potentials correlate with the voltammetry and suggest the formation of a compact blocking layer on the electrode surface, which inhibits the electrodeposition of zinc at sufficiently negative

  8. The influence of high gravity in PbSn eutectic alloy

    Freitas, F.E.; Toledo, R.C.; Poli, A.K.S.; An, C.Y.; Bandeira, I.N., E-mail: filipe.estevao@gmail.com, E-mail: chen@las.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The study of materials processed in centrifuges improves the understanding of the acceleration influence in the convection behavior in materials processing. This work aims to study the influence of high gravity in PbSn eutectic alloy solidification using a small centrifuge designed and built in the Associate Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the Brazilian Space Research Institute (LAS/INPE). The samples were analyzed by densitometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (author)

  9. Temperature-dependent viscosities of eutectic Al-Si alloys modified with Sr and P

    Song Xigui [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China)], E-mail: sxglm@126.com; Bian Xiufang; Zhang Jingxiang; Zhang Jie [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China)

    2009-06-24

    The viscosities of eutectic Al-12 wt.%Si alloy and those modified with Sr and P were investigated using high-temperature torsional oscillation viscometer. Strontium decreased melt's viscosity, while phosphorus increased viscosity. Both additional level and means of addition affected the variation of viscosity. The activation energy of viscous flow was strengthened after modification, but the influence of modification on the molar volume was perplexing.

  10. Experimental investigation of thermophysical properties of eutectic Re-C at high temperatures

    Belikov, R. S.; Senchenko, V. N.; Sulyanov, S. N.

    2018-01-01

    Using the previously described experimental setup for investigation of thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressures and temperatures a few experiments with samples of cast eutectic Re-C were carried out. The experimental technique was extended for millisecond electrical heating of the samples under the high static pressure of inert gas. First experimental data on the specific enthalpy, specific heat capacity and linear thermal expansion of ReC0.3 were obtained.

  11. Chemical and electrochemical properties in the molten lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic

    Delarue, G.

    1960-12-01

    We have studied the behaviour of several chemical species in the molten LiCI-KCI eutectic. The solubility of certain oxides and sulphides has made it possible for us to show the existence of O 2- and S 2- ions. We have been able to show the existence of a certain number of chemical reactions: oxido-reduction precipitation, complex formation; we have studied, amongst others, the oxidation of O 2- and of S 2- . (author) [fr

  12. Chemical interaction of the In-Ga eutectic with Al and Al-base alloys

    Trenikhin, M.V.; Bubnov, A.V.; Duplyakin, V.K.; Nizovskij, A.I.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical interaction of the indium-gallium eutectic with Al and Al-base alloys is studied by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and electron microscopy. Experimental data are presented that shed light on the reaction mechanism and the diffusion processes responsible for the subsequent disintegration of the material and its dissolution in water. Mechanical tests show that the activation of aluminum leads to a transition from plastic to brittle fracture [ru

  13. Metallurgical Parameters Controlling the Eutectic Silicon Charateristics in Be-Treated Al-Si-Mg Alloys.

    Ibrahim, Mohamed F; Elgallad, Emad M; Valtierra, Salvador; Doty, Herbert W; Samuel, Fawzy H

    2016-01-27

    The present work was carried out on Al-7%Si-0.4%Mg-X alloy (where X = Mg, Fe, Sr or Be), where the effect of solidification rate on the eutectic silicon characteristics was investigated. Two solidification rates corresponding to dendrite arm spacings (DAS) of 24 and 65 μm were employed. Samples with 24 μm DAS were solution heat-treated at 540 °C for 5 and 12 h prior to quenching in warm water at 65 °C. Eutectic Si particle charateristics were measured using an image analyzer. The results show that the addition of 0.05% Be leads to partial modification of the Si particles. Full modification was only obtained when Sr was added in an amount of 150-200 ppm, depending on the applied solidification rate. Increasing the amount of Mg to 0.8% in Sr-modified alloys leads to a reduction in the effectiveness of Sr as the main modifier. Similar observations were made when the Fe content was increased in Be-treated alloys due to the Be-Fe interaction. Over-modification results in the precipitation of hard Sr-rich particles, mainly Al₄SrSi₂, whereas overheating causes incipient melting of the Al-Cu eutectic and hence the surrounding matrix. Both factors lead to a deterioration in the alloy mechanical properties. Furthermore, the presence of long, acicular Si particles accelerates the occurrence of fracture and, as a result, yields poor ductility. In low iron (less than 0.1 wt%) Al-Si-Mg alloys, the mechanical properties in the as cast, as well as heat treated conditions, are mainly controlled by the eutectic Si charatersitics. Increasing the iron content and, hence, the volume fraction of Fe-based intermetallics leads to a complex fracture mode.

  14. Metallurgical Parameters Controlling the Eutectic Silicon Charateristics in Be-Treated Al-Si-Mg Alloys

    Mohamed F. Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was carried out on Al-7%Si-0.4%Mg-X alloy (where X = Mg, Fe, Sr or Be, where the effect of solidification rate on the eutectic silicon characteristics was investigated. Two solidification rates corresponding to dendrite arm spacings (DAS of 24 and 65 μm were employed. Samples with 24 μm DAS were solution heat-treated at 540 °C for 5 and 12 h prior to quenching in warm water at 65 °C. Eutectic Si particle charateristics were measured using an image analyzer. The results show that the addition of 0.05% Be leads to partial modification of the Si particles. Full modification was only obtained when Sr was added in an amount of 150–200 ppm, depending on the applied solidification rate. Increasing the amount of Mg to 0.8% in Sr-modified alloys leads to a reduction in the effectiveness of Sr as the main modifier. Similar observations were made when the Fe content was increased in Be-treated alloys due to the Be-Fe interaction. Over-modification results in the precipitation of hard Sr-rich particles, mainly Al4SrSi2, whereas overheating causes incipient melting of the Al-Cu eutectic and hence the surrounding matrix. Both factors lead to a deterioration in the alloy mechanical properties. Furthermore, the presence of long, acicular Si particles accelerates the occurrence of fracture and, as a result, yields poor ductility. In low iron (less than 0.1 wt% Al-Si-Mg alloys, the mechanical properties in the as cast, as well as heat treated conditions, are mainly controlled by the eutectic Si charatersitics. Increasing the iron content and, hence, the volume fraction of Fe-based intermetallics leads to a complex fracture mode.

  15. Subband Adaptive Array for DS-CDMA Mobile Radio

    Tran Xuan Nam

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel scheme of subband adaptive array (SBAA for direct-sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA. The scheme exploits the spreading code and pilot signal as the reference signal to estimate the propagation channel. Moreover, instead of combining the array outputs at each output tap using a synthesis filter and then despreading them, we despread directly the array outputs at each output tap by the desired user's code to save the synthesis filter. Although its configuration is far different from that of 2D RAKEs, the proposed scheme exhibits relatively equivalent performance of 2D RAKEs while having less computation load due to utilising adaptive signal processing in subbands. Simulation programs are carried out to explore the performance of the scheme and compare its performance with that of the standard 2D RAKE.

  16. A Joint Optimization Criterion for Blind DS-CDMA Detection

    Sergio A. Cruces-Alvarez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of the blind detection of a desired user in an asynchronous DS-CDMA communications system with multipath propagation channels. Starting from the inverse filter criterion introduced by Tugnait and Li in 2001, we propose to tackle the problem in the context of the blind signal extraction methods for ICA. In order to improve the performance of the detector, we present a criterion based on the joint optimization of several higher-order statistics of the outputs. An algorithm that optimizes the proposed criterion is described, and its improved performance and robustness with respect to the near-far problem are corroborated through simulations. Additionally, a simulation using measurements on a real software-radio platform at 5 GHz has also been performed.

  17. A Joint Optimization Criterion for Blind DS-CDMA Detection

    Durán-Díaz, Iván; Cruces-Alvarez, Sergio A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the blind detection of a desired user in an asynchronous DS-CDMA communications system with multipath propagation channels. Starting from the inverse filter criterion introduced by Tugnait and Li in 2001, we propose to tackle the problem in the context of the blind signal extraction methods for ICA. In order to improve the performance of the detector, we present a criterion based on the joint optimization of several higher-order statistics of the outputs. An algorithm that optimizes the proposed criterion is described, and its improved performance and robustness with respect to the near-far problem are corroborated through simulations. Additionally, a simulation using measurements on a real software-radio platform at 5 GHz has also been performed.

  18. Measurement of $D_{s}^{-} \\to \\tau^{-}\\overline{\

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pakhlov, P; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    Using a data sample of 1,475,000 $\\ZQQG$ events collected during 1994 with the L3 detector at LEP, we have studied the purely leptonic decays of heavy flavour mesons, $\\Dtau$ and $\\Btau$. A signal is observed in the invariant mass distribution $\\MDgamma$ corresponding to the decay sequence $\\Dstar \\rightarrow \\gamma {\\rm D^{-}_{s}}$, ~$\\Dtau$, ~$\\tauto \\lnunu$. The branching fraction for $\\Dtau$ decays is measured to be {$\\BR (\\Dtau) = 0.074 \\pm 0.028(stat) \\pm 0.016(syst) \\pm 0.018(norm)$}. No signal of $\\Btau$ decays is observed in the data, corresponding to an upper limit on the branching fraction $\\BR(\\Btau) < 5.7 \\times 10^{-4}$ at 90\\% CL. \\end{abstract}

  19. User's Manual for FEMOM3DS. Version 1.0

    Reddy, C.J.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    FEMOM3DS is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute electromagnetic(EM) scattering characteristics of a three dimensional object with complex materials using combined Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM in the volume of the cavity and the triangular elements with the basis functions similar to that described for MoM at the outer boundary. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional cavities filled with inhomogeneous lossy materials. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computers on which the code is intended to run.

  20. Clinical psychopharmacology and medical malpractice: the four Ds.

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2014-09-01

    The four Ds of medical malpractice are duty, dereliction (negligence or deviation from the standard of care), damages, and direct cause. Each of these four elements must be proved to have been present, based on a preponderance of the evidence, for malpractice to be found. The principles of psychopharmacology and the information in the package insert for a drug often play a central role in deciding whether dereliction and direct cause for damages were or were not applicable in a particular case. The author uses data from two cases in which patients were inadvertently fatally poisoned by medication to illustrate two ways in which such information can affect the outcome. In one case, the clinician should have known that he was giving a toxic dose to the patient, whereas that was not true in the other case.

  1. A comparative study on the compatibility of liquid lead–gold eutectic and liquid lead–bismuth eutectic with T91 and SS 316LN steels

    Dai, Y.; Gao, W.; Zhang, T.; Platacis, E.; Heinitz, S.; Thomsen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid lead–gold eutectic (LGE) is considered as a potential target material for high power spallation sources. In the present work, the corrosion effects of LGE on T91 and SS 316LN steels have been investigated in comparison with that of liquid lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) under the same testing conditions. Two tests were conducted at 400 °C for 1800 h and at 450 °C for 1300 h, in which specimens of the two steels were exposed to 1 m/s flowing LGE and LBE. Surface inspections showed that the specimens underwent a mixed corrosion mode of dissolution and oxidation. The results obtained from the SS 316LN specimens are very interesting. Firstly, EDX (electron energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry) analyses revealed that Ni, Cr and Mn have a higher dissolution rate in LGE than in LBE. Secondly, it was observed that LBE attacked strongly on grain-boundaries (GBs) and twin-boundaries (TBs), while LGE did not preferentially attack GBs and TBs. Further, the diffusion or penetration paths of LBE look straight, while those of LGE look like a complex network. In the attacked regions the chemical composition of the steel did not change much in the LBE case, but changed greatly in the LGE case. The T91 specimens exhibited considerably weaker corrosion effects under the present testing conditions.

  2. 3D hollow nanostructures as building blocks for multifunctional plasmonics

    De Angelis, Francesco De; Malerba, Mario; Patrini, Maddalena; Miele, Ermanno; Das, Gobind; Toma, Andrea; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    We present an advanced and robust technology to realize 3D hollow plasmonic nanostructures which are tunable in size, shape, and layout. The presented architectures offer new and unconventional properties such as the realization of 3D plasmonic hollow nanocavities with high electric field confinement and enhancement, finely structured extinction profiles, and broad band optical absorption. The 3D nature of the devices can overcome intrinsic difficulties related to conventional architectures in a wide range of multidisciplinary applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. 3D hollow nanostructures as building blocks for multifunctional plasmonics

    De Angelis, Francesco De

    2013-08-14

    We present an advanced and robust technology to realize 3D hollow plasmonic nanostructures which are tunable in size, shape, and layout. The presented architectures offer new and unconventional properties such as the realization of 3D plasmonic hollow nanocavities with high electric field confinement and enhancement, finely structured extinction profiles, and broad band optical absorption. The 3D nature of the devices can overcome intrinsic difficulties related to conventional architectures in a wide range of multidisciplinary applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Preparation and Application of Hollow Silica/magnetic Nanocomposite Particle

    Wang, Cheng-Chien; Lin, Jing-Mo; Lin, Chun-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chang

    The hollow silica/cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic microsphere with amino-groups were successfully prepared via several steps, including preparing the chelating copolymer microparticles as template by soap-free emulsion polymerization, manufacturing the hollow cobalt ferrite magnetic microsphere by in-situ chemical co-precipitation following calcinations, and surface modifying of the hollow magnetic microsphere by 3-aminopropyltrime- thoxysilane via the sol-gel method. The average diameter of polymer microspheres was ca. 200 nm from transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurement. The structure of the hollow magnetic microsphere was characterized by using TEM and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The spinel-type lattice of CoFe2O4 shell layer was identified by using XRD measurement. The diameter of CoFe2O4 crystalline grains ranged from 54.1 nm to 8.5 nm which was estimated by Scherrer's equation. Additionally, the hollow silica/cobalt ferrite microsphere possesses superparamagnetic property after VSM measurement. The result of BET measurement reveals the hollow magnetic microsphere which has large surface areas (123.4m2/g). After glutaraldehyde modified, the maximum value of BSA immobilization capacity of the hollow magnetic microsphere was 33.8 mg/g at pH 5.0 buffer solution. For microwave absorption, when the hollow magnetic microsphere was compounded within epoxy resin, the maximum reflection loss of epoxy resins could reach -35dB at 5.4 GHz with 1.9 mm thickness.

  5. Monodisperse Hollow Tricolor Pigment Particles for Electronic Paper

    Meng Xianwei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A general approach has been designed to blue, green, and red pigments by metal ions doping hollow TiO 2. The reaction involves initial formation of PS at TiO2 core–shell nanoparticles via a mixed-solvent method, and then mixing with metal ions solution containing PEG, followed calcining in the atmosphere. The as-prepared hollow pigments exhibit uniform size, bright color, and tunable density, which are fit for electronic paper display.

  6. Control of Dispersion in Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    The dispersion of hollow core photonic crystal fibers can be tailored by modifying a single ring of holes in the cladding. The dispersion can be lowered and flattened, or alternatively greatly increased, in a controlled manner.......The dispersion of hollow core photonic crystal fibers can be tailored by modifying a single ring of holes in the cladding. The dispersion can be lowered and flattened, or alternatively greatly increased, in a controlled manner....

  7. Thin-walled reinforcement lattice structure for hollow CMC buckets

    de Diego, Peter

    2017-06-27

    A hollow ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine bucket with an internal reinforcement lattice structure has improved vibration properties and stiffness. The lattice structure is formed of thin-walled plies made of CMC. The wall structures are arranged and located according to high stress areas within the hollow bucket. After the melt infiltration process, the mandrels melt away, leaving the wall structure to become the internal lattice reinforcement structure of the bucket.

  8. Highly efficient fluorescence sensing with hollow core photonic crystal fibers

    Smolka, Stephan; Barth, Michael; Benson, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We investigate hollow core photonic crystal fibers for ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection by selectively infiltrating the central hole with fluorophores. Dye concentrations down to 10(-9) M can be detected using only nanoliter sample volumes.......We investigate hollow core photonic crystal fibers for ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection by selectively infiltrating the central hole with fluorophores. Dye concentrations down to 10(-9) M can be detected using only nanoliter sample volumes....

  9. New eutectic ionic liquids for lipase activation and enzymatic preparation of biodiesel†

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2012-01-01

    The enzymatic preparation of biodiesel has been hampered by the lack of suitable solvents with desirable properties such as high lipase compatibility, low cost, low viscosity, high biodegradability, and ease of product separation. Recent interest in using ionic liquids (ILs) as advanced reaction media has led to fast reaction rates and high yields in the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel. However, conventional (i.e., cation–anion paired) ILs based on imidazolium and other quaternary ammonium salts remain too expensive for wide application at industrial scales. In this study, we report on newly-synthesized eutectic ILs derived from choline acetate or choline chloride coupled with biocompatible hydrogen-bond donors, such as glycerol. These eutectic solvents have favorable properties including low viscosity, high biodegradability, and excellent compatibility with Novozym® 435, a commercial immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B. Furthermore, in a model biodiesel synthesis system, we demonstrate high reaction rates for the enzymatic transesterification of Miglyol® oil 812 with methanol, catalyzed by Novozym® 435 in choline acetate/glycerol (1 : 1.5 molar ratio). The high conversion (97%) of the triglyceride obtained within 3 h, under optimal conditions, suggests that these novel eutectic solvents warrant further exploration as potential media in the enzymatic production of biodiesel. PMID:21283901

  10. Brazing characteristics of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe eutectic alloy filler metal for Zircaloy-4

    Lee, Jung G.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    A Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe quaternary eutectic alloy was employed as a new Be-free brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 to supersede physically vapor-deposited Be coatings used conventionally with several disadvantages. The quaternary eutectic composition of Zr58Ti16Cu10Fe16 (at.%) showing a low melting temperature range from 832 °C to 853 °C was designed by a partial substitution of Zr with Ti based on a Zr-Cu-Fe ternary eutectic system. By applying an alloy ribbon with the determined composition, a highly reliable joint was obtained with a homogeneous formation of predominantly grown α-Zr phases owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting strength higher than that of Zircaloy-4. The homogenization of the joint was rate-controlled by the diffusion of the filler elements (Ti, Cu, and Fe) into the Zircaloy-4 base metal, and the detrimental segregation of the Zr2Fe phase in the central zone was completely eliminated by an isothermal holding at a brazing temperature of 920 °C for 10 min.

  11. Electrochemical behaviour of ThF4 in LiCl-KCl eutectic

    Agarwal, Renu; Mukerjee, S.K.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrochemical processing of nuclear fuels is an integral part of molten salt reactor technology. Thorium containing molten salt reactors are relevant for transmutation of minor actinides and utilizations of vast thorium resources. Understanding chemical and electrochemical behavior of actinide and lanthanide ions in chloride melts is an important task in this process. A eutectic of lithium and potassium chloride is found to be the most suitable salt for this study due to its low melting, high reduction potential and significant solubility of most of the actinide and lanthanide salts. However, electrochemistry of thorium in chloride melt is inconsistent due to dispute over the presence of Th(II) cation along with Th(IV). In the present experiments, cyclic-voltammograms of ThF 4 in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were measured using three electrodes cell, where all the electrodes were 1 mm molybdenum wires and counter electrode wire was twisted into a spiral shape to increase surface area and was used for mixing the salts in molten state. Cyclic-voltammograms of pure eutectic melt and with ThF 4 were measured at scanning rates 50-300 mV/s, at 648 K and 723 K. Diffusion coefficient of Th 4+ was calculated using Delahay equation

  12. Experimental specifications for eutectic reaction between metallic fuel and HT-9

    Hwang, Woan; Nam, Cheol; Lee, Byoung Oon; Ryu, Woo Seog

    1998-10-01

    The chemical interaction between metallic fuel and cladding is important in designing the fuel pin of the KALIMER. When metal fuel and cladding are contacted, the elements in fuel and cladding are inter-diffuse each other, forming the reaction layers at interface. The reaction layers may cause two important factors in aspects of fuel pin integrity. Firstly, it degrades cladding strength by reducing effective cladding thickness. Secondly, these layers accelerate eutectic reaction at transient conditions. To evaluate these phenomena, the diffusion couple experiment is planned by using metal fuels with various zirconium contents and HT-9 steel. The U-Zr fuel alloys will be used for the experiment with the different zirconium contents, these are 8, 10 and 12 weight %. This experiment aims to evaluate the effects of zirconium content on the chemical reaction. Furthermore, the reaction rate and threshold temperature of the eutectic melting will be determined as a function of the zirconium content. This document describes the detail experimental specifications for the eutectic reaction such as test setup, test requirements and test procedure. (author). 10 refs

  13. The effect of deep eutectic solvents on catalytic function and structure of bovine liver catalase.

    Harifi-Mood, Ali Reza; Ghobadi, Roohollah; Divsalar, Adeleh

    2017-02-01

    Aqueous solutions of reline and glyceline, the most common deep eutectic solvents, were used as a medium for Catalase reaction. By some spectroscopic methods such as UV-vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) function and structure of Catalase were investigated in aqueous solutions of reline and glyceline. These studies showed that the binding affinity of the substrate to the enzyme increased in the presence of 100mM glyceline solution, which contrasts with reline solution that probably relates to instructive changes in secondary structure of protein. Meanwhile, enzyme remained nearly 70% and 80% active in this concentration of glyceline and reline solutions respectively. In the high concentration of DES solutions, enzyme became mainly inactive but surprisingly stayed in nearly 40% active in choline chloride solution, which is the common ion species in reline and glyceline solvents. It is proposed that the chaotropic nature of choline cation might stop the reducing trend of activity in concentrated choline chloride solutions but this instructive effect is lost in aqueous deep eutectic solvents. In this regard, the presence of various concentrations of deep eutectic solvents in the aqueous media of human cells would be an activity adjuster for this important enzyme in its different operation conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential Process for the Decontamination of Pyro-electrometallurgical LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salt Electrolyte

    Griffith, Christopher S.; Sizgek, Erden; Sizgek, Devlet; Luca, Vittorio

    2008-01-01

    Presented here is a potential option with experimental validation for the decontamination of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte from a pyro-electrometallurgical process by employing already developed inorganic ion exchange materials. Adsorbent materials considered include titano-silicates and molybdo- and tungstophosphates for Cs extraction, Si-doped antimony pyrochlore for Sr extraction and hexagonal tungsten bronzes for lanthanide (LN) and minor actinide (MA) polishing. Encouraging results from recent investigations on the removal of target elements (Cs, Sr and LN) from aqueous solutions containing varying concentrations of alkali and alkali metal contaminants which would be akin to a solution formed from the dissolution of spent LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte are presented. Further investigations have also shown that the saturated adsorbents can be treated at relatively low temperatures to afford potential waste forms for the adsorbed elements. Efficient evaporation and drying of a solution of dissolved LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte (50 L, 5 L.h -1 ) has been demonstrated using a Microwave-Heated Mechanical Fluidized Bed (MWMFB) apparatus. (authors)

  15. Potential Process for the Decontamination of Pyro-electrometallurgical LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salt Electrolyte

    Griffith, Christopher S.; Sizgek, Erden; Sizgek, Devlet; Luca, Vittorio [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Institute of Materials Engineering, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, New South Wales, 2234 (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    Presented here is a potential option with experimental validation for the decontamination of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte from a pyro-electrometallurgical process by employing already developed inorganic ion exchange materials. Adsorbent materials considered include titano-silicates and molybdo- and tungstophosphates for Cs extraction, Si-doped antimony pyrochlore for Sr extraction and hexagonal tungsten bronzes for lanthanide (LN) and minor actinide (MA) polishing. Encouraging results from recent investigations on the removal of target elements (Cs, Sr and LN) from aqueous solutions containing varying concentrations of alkali and alkali metal contaminants which would be akin to a solution formed from the dissolution of spent LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte are presented. Further investigations have also shown that the saturated adsorbents can be treated at relatively low temperatures to afford potential waste forms for the adsorbed elements. Efficient evaporation and drying of a solution of dissolved LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte (50 L, 5 L.h{sup -1}) has been demonstrated using a Microwave-Heated Mechanical Fluidized Bed (MWMFB) apparatus. (authors)

  16. A Sustainable Redox-Flow Battery with an Aluminum-Based, Deep-Eutectic-Solvent Anolyte.

    Zhang, Changkun; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Leyuan; Wang, Xuelan; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yu, Guihua

    2017-06-19

    Nonaqueous redox-flow batteries are an emerging energy storage technology for grid storage systems, but the development of anolytes has lagged far behind that of catholytes due to the major limitations of the redox species, which exhibit relatively low solubility and inadequate redox potentials. Herein, an aluminum-based deep-eutectic-solvent is investigated as an anolyte for redox-flow batteries. The aluminum-based deep-eutectic solvent demonstrated a significantly enhanced concentration of circa 3.2 m in the anolyte and a relatively low redox potential of 2.2 V vs. Li + /Li. The electrochemical measurements highlight that a reversible volumetric capacity of 145 Ah L -1 and an energy density of 189 Wh L -1 or 165 Wh kg -1 have been achieved when coupled with a I 3 - /I - catholyte. The prototype cell has also been extended to the use of a Br 2 -based catholyte, exhibiting a higher cell voltage with a theoretical energy density of over 200 Wh L -1 . The synergy of highly abundant, dendrite-free, multi-electron-reaction aluminum anodes and environmentally benign deep-eutectic-solvent anolytes reveals great potential towards cost-effective, sustainable redox-flow batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The Influence of Cr on the Solidification Behavior of Polycrystalline γ(Ni)/ γ'(Ni3Al)- δ(Ni3Nb) Eutectic Ni-Base Superalloys

    Xie, Mengtao; Helmink, Randolph; Tin, Sammy

    2012-04-01

    In the current investigation, the effect of Cr on the solidification characteristics and as-cast microstructure of pseudobinary γ- δ eutectic alloys based on a near-eutectic composition (Ni-5.5Al-13.5Nb at. pct) was investigated. It was found that Cr additions promote the formation of a higher volume fraction of γ- δ eutectic microstructure in the interdendritic region. Increasing levels of Cr also triggered morphological changes in the γ- δ eutectic and the formation of γ- γ'- δ ternary eutectic during the last stage of solidification. A detailed characterization of the as-cast alloys also revealed that Cr additions suppressed the liquidus, solidus, and γ' precipitation temperature of these γ/ γ'- δ eutectic alloys. A comparison of the experimental results with thermodynamic calculations using the CompuTherm Pandat database (CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI) showed qualitative agreement.

  18. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase phi(s) in (B)over-bar(s)(0) -> Ds+Ds- Decays

    Aaij, R.; Ali, S.; De Bruyn, K.; Farinelli, C.; Heijne, V.A.M.; Ketel, T.J.; Koopman, R.F.; Kozlinskiy, A.; van Leerdam, J.; Merk, M.H.M.; Oggero, S.; Pellegrino, A.; Raven, H.G.; Snoek, H.; Syropoulos, V.; David, P.N.Y.; Tolk, S.; LHCb, Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating weak mixing phase φs using the decay B¯s0→Ds+Ds- in a data sample corresponding to 3.0fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. An analysis of the time evolution of the

  19. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase phi(s) in (B)over-bar(s)(0) -> Ds+Ds- Decays

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Onderwater, G.; Pellegrino, A.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating weak mixing phase phi(s) using the decay (B) over bar (0)(s) -> Ds+Ds- in a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. An analysis of the

  20. Purification of used eutectic (LiCl-KCl) salt electrolyte from pyroprocessing

    Cho, Yung-Zun; Lee, Tae-Kyo; Eun, Hee-Chul; Choi, Jung-Hoon; Kim, In-Tae; Park, Geun-Il

    2013-06-01

    The separation characteristics of surrogate rare-earth fission products in a eutectic (LiCl-KCl) molten salt were investigated. This system is based on the eutectic salt used for the pyroprocessing treatment of used nuclear fuel (UNF). The investigation was performed using an integrated rare-earth separation apparatus comprising a precipitation reactor, a solid detachment device, and a layer separation device. To separate rare-earth fission products, a phosphate precipitation method using both Li3PO4 and K3PO4 as a precipitant was performed. The use of an equivalent phosphate precipitant composed of 0.408 molar ratio-K3PO4 and 0.592 molar ratio-Li3PO4 can preserve the original eutectic ratio, LiCl-0.592 molar ratio (or 45.2 wt%), as well as provide a high separation efficiency of over 99.5% under conditions of 550 °C and Ar sparging when using La, Nd, Ce, and Pr chlorides. The mixture of La, Nd, Ce, and Pr phosphate had a typical monoclinic (or monazite) structure, which has been proposed as a reliable host matrix for the permanent disposal of a high-level waste form. To maximize the reusability of purified eutectic waste salt after rare-earth separation, the successive rare-earth separation process, which uses both phosphate precipitation and an oxygen sparging method, were introduced and tested with eight rare-earth (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) chlorides. In the successive rare-earth separation process, the phosphate reaction was terminated within 1 h at 550 °C, and a 4-8 h oxygen sparging time were required to obtain over a 99% separation efficiency at 700-750 °C. The mixture of rare-earth precipitates separated by the successive rare-earth separation process was found to be phosphate, oxychloride, and oxide. Through the successive rare-earth separation process, the eutectic ratio of purified salt maintained its original value, and impurity content including the residual precipitant of purified salt can be minimized.

  1. Effect of scandium on structure and hardening of Al–Ca eutectic alloys

    Belov, N.A., E-mail: nikolay-belov@yandex.ru [National Research and Technological University “MISIS”, 4, Leninsky pr., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Naumova, E.A. [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 5, 2 ul. Baumanskaya, Moscow, 105005 (Russian Federation); Alabin, A.N. [National Research and Technological University “MISIS”, 4, Leninsky pr., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); UC RUSAL, 13/1, Nikoloyamskaya st., Moscow, 109240 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, I.A. [UC RUSAL, 13/1, Nikoloyamskaya st., Moscow, 109240 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The phase composition, structure and hardening of alloys in the aluminium corner of the Al–Ca–Sc system were studied in the range up to 10% Ca and up to 1% S≿. The experimental study (optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy with electron-microprobe analysis, differential thermal analysis and hardness measurements) was combined with Thermo-Calc software simulation for the optimization of the alloy composition. It was shown that only phases of the binary systems (Al{sub 4}Ca and Al{sub 3}Sc) might be in equilibrium with the aluminium solid solution. It was shown that the (Al) + Al{sub 4}Ca eutectic had a much finer structure as compared with the Al–Si eutectic, which suggests a possibility of reaching higher mechanical properties as compared to commercial alloys of the A356 type. The influence of the annealing temperature within the range up to 600 °C on the structure and hardness of the Al–Ca–Sc experimental alloys was studied. It was determined that the maximum hardening corresponded to the annealing at 300 °C, which was due to the precipitation of Al{sub 3}Sc nanoparticles with their further coarsening. With an example of an Al-7.6% Ca-0.3% Sc model experimental alloy, a principal possibility of manufacturing aluminium casting alloys based on the (Al) + Al{sub 4}Ca eutectic was demonstrated. Unlike commercial alloys of the A356 type, the model alloy does not require quenching, as hardening particles are formed in the course of annealing of casting. - Highlights: • Al–Ca–Sc phase diagram in aluminum corner. • Formation of Al{sub 3}Sc nanoparticles in eutectic (Al) + Al{sub 4}Ca during heating at 300–450 °C. • Hardening and thermal stability of proposed (Al–Ca–Sc) and commercial (Al–Si–Mg, 356 type) eutectic alloys.

  2. The UC{sub 2−x} – Carbon eutectic: A laser heating study

    Manara, D., E-mail: dario.manara@ec.europa.eu; Boboridis, K.; Morel, S.; De Bruycker, F.

    2015-11-15

    The UC{sub 2−x} – carbon eutectic has been studied by laser heating and fast multi-wavelength pyrometry under inert atmosphere. The study has been carried out on three compositions, two of which close to the phase boundary of the UC{sub 2−x} – C miscibility gap (with C/U atomic ratios 2 and 2.1), and one, more crucial, with a large excess of carbon (C/U = 2.82). The first two compositions were synthesised by arc-melting. This synthesis method could not be applied to the last composition, which was therefore completed directly by laser irradiation. The U – C – O composition of the samples was checked by using a combustion method in an ELTRA{sup ®} analyser. The eutectic temperature, established to be 2737 K ± 20 K, was used as a radiance reference together with the cubic – tetragonal (α → β) solid state transition, fixed at 2050 K ± 20 K. The normal spectral emissivity of the carbon-richer compounds increases up to 0.7, whereas the value 0.53 was established for pure hypostoichiometric uranium dicarbide at the limit of the eutectic region. This increase is analysed in the light of the demixing of excess carbon, and used for the determination of the liquidus temperature (3220 K ± 50 K for UC{sub 2.82}). Due to fast solid state diffusion, also fostered by the cubic – tetragonal transition, no obvious signs of a lamellar eutectic structure could be observed after quenching to room temperature. The eutectic surface C/UC{sub 2−x} composition could be qualitatively, but consistently, followed during the cooling process with the help of the recorded radiance spectra. Whereas the external liquid surface is almost entirely constituted by uranium dicarbide, it gets rapidly enriched in demixed carbon upon freezing. Demixed carbon seems to quickly migrate towards the inner bulk during further cooling. At the α → β transition, uranium dicarbide covers again the almost entire external surface. - Highlights: • The melting behaviour

  3. Ebolavirus VP35 uses a bimodal strategy to bind dsRNA for innate immune suppression

    Kimberlin, Christopher R.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Li, Sheng; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; MacRae, Ian J.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps); (UCSD)

    2010-03-12

    Ebolavirus causes a severe hemorrhagic fever and is divided into five distinct species, of which Reston ebolavirus is uniquely nonpathogenic to humans. Disease caused by ebolavirus is marked by early immunosuppression of innate immune signaling events, involving silencing and sequestration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the viral protein VP35. Here we present unbound and dsRNA-bound crystal structures of the dsRNA-binding domain of Reston ebolavirus VP35. The structures show that VP35 forms an unusual, asymmetric dimer on dsRNA binding, with each of the monomers binding dsRNA in a different way: one binds the backbone whereas the other caps the terminus. Additional SAXS, DXMS, and dsRNA-binding experiments presented here support a model of cooperative dsRNA recognition in which binding of the first monomer assists binding of the next monomer of the oligomeric VP35 protein. This work illustrates how ebolavirus VP35 could mask key recognition sites of molecules such as RIG-I, MDA-5, and Dicer to silence viral dsRNA in infection.

  4. Behavioral phenotype in children with 22q11Ds : Agreement between parents and teachers

    Klaassen, Petra W J; Duijff, Sasja N.; Sinnema, Gerben; Beemer, Frits A.; Swanenburg de Veye, Henriëtte F N; Vorstman, Jacob A S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the 22q11-deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are at an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. Besides the effects of genetic variation, environmental factors could also be important in modifying the risk of schizophrenia in 22q11DS patients. In particular, previous studies have shown the

  5. dsRNA binding properties of RDE-4 and TRBP reflect their distinct roles in RNAi.

    Parker, Greg S; Maity, Tuhin Subhra; Bass, Brenda L

    2008-12-26

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding proteins facilitate Dicer functions in RNA interference. Caenorhabditis elegans RDE-4 facilitates cleavage of long dsRNA to small interfering RNA (siRNA), while human trans-activation response RNA-binding protein (TRBP) functions downstream to pass siRNA to the RNA-induced silencing complex. We show that these distinct in vivo roles are reflected in in vitro binding properties. RDE-4 preferentially binds long dsRNA, while TRBP binds siRNA with an affinity that is independent of dsRNA length. These properties are mechanistically based on the fact that RDE-4 binds cooperatively, via contributions from multiple domains, while TRBP binds noncooperatively. Our studies offer a paradigm for how dsRNA-binding proteins, which are not sequence specific, discern dsRNA length. Additionally, analyses of the ability of RDE-4 deletion constructs and RDE-4/TRBP chimeras to reconstitute Dicer activity suggest RDE-4 promotes activity using its dsRNA-binding motif 2 to bind dsRNA, its linker region to interact with Dicer, and its C-terminus for Dicer activation.

  6. Thermo-physical stability of fatty acid eutectic mixtures subjected to accelerated aging for thermal energy storage (TES) application

    Fauzi, Hadi; Metselaar, Hendrik S.C.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Silakhori, Mahyar

    2014-01-01

    The thermo-physical stability of fatty acids eutectic mixtures subjected to accelerated number of melting/solidification processes has been identified using thermal cycling test in this study. Myristic acid/palmitic acid (MA/PA) (70/30, wt.%) and myristic acid/palmitic acid/sodium stearate (MA/PA/SS) (70/30/5, wt.%) were selected as eutectic phase change materials (PCMs) to evaluate their stability of phase transition temperature, latent heat of fusion, chemical structure, and volume changes after 200, 500, 1000, and 1500 thermal cycles. The thermal properties of each eutectic PCMs measured by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) indicated the phase transition temperature and latent heat of fusion values of MA/PA/SS has a smallest changes after 1500 thermal cycles than MA/PA eutectic mixture. MA/PA/SS also has a better chemical structure stability and smaller volume change which is 1.2%, compared to MA/PA with a volume change of 1.6% after 1500 cycles. Therefore, it is concluded that the MA/PA/SS eutectic mixture is suitable for use as a phase change material in thermal energy storage (TES) such as solar water heating and solar space heating applications. - Highlights: •The prepared MA/PA and MA/PA/SS were used as eutectic phase change materials (PCM). •Thermo-physical reliability of eutectic PCMs evaluated using a thermal cycling test. •MA/PA/SS has a great thermo-physical stability than MA/PA after 1500 thermal cycles

  7. Creating opportunities for science PhDs to pursue careers in high school education.

    Doyle, Kari M H; Vale, Ronald D

    2013-11-01

    The United States is confronting important challenges at both the early and late stages of science education. At the level of K-12 education, a recent National Research Council report (Successful K-12 STEM Education) proposed a bold restructuring of how science is taught, moving away from memorizing facts and emphasizing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and a deeper understanding of the process of science. At higher levels of training, limited funding for science is leading PhDs to seek training and careers in areas other than research. Might science PhDs play a bigger role in the future of K-12 education, particularly at the high school level? We explore this question by discussing the roles that PhDs can play in high school education and the current and rather extensive barriers to PhDs entering the teaching profession and finally suggest ways to ease the entrance of qualified PhDs into high school education.

  8. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al 2 O 3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values

  9. Pair of accelerated black holes in a de Sitter background: The dS C metric

    Dias, Oscar J.C.; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2003-01-01

    Following the work of Kinnersley and Walker for flat spacetimes, we analyzed the anti-de Sitter C metric in a previous paper. In this paper we study the de Sitter C metric (dS C metric). The C metric with a generic cosmological constant and other extra parameters was introduced by Plebanski and Demianski. When one then sets to zero some of the extra parameters, and works with a positive cosmological constant, one has the dS C metric which has been analyzed and physically interpreted by Podolsky and Griffiths. It describes a pair of accelerated black holes in the dS background with the acceleration being provided (in addition to the cosmological constant) by a strut that pushes away the two black holes or, alternatively, by a string that pulls them. We extend their analysis mainly in four directions. First, we draw the Carter-Penrose diagrams of the massless uncharged dS C metric, of the massive uncharged dS C metric and of the massive charged dS C metric. These diagrams allow us to clearly identify the presence of two dS black holes and to conclude that they cannot interact gravitationally. Second, we reexamine the embedding of the dS C metric in the 5D Minkowski spacetime and we represent the motion of the dS C metric origin in the dS 4-hyperboloid as well as the localization of the strut. Third, we comment on the physical properties of the strut that connects the two black holes. Finally, we find the range of parameters that correspond to nonextreme black holes, extreme black holes, and naked particles

  10. Use of bacterially expressed dsRNA to downregulate Entamoeba histolytica gene expression.

    Carlos F Solis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modern RNA interference (RNAi methodologies using small interfering RNA (siRNA oligonucleotide duplexes or episomally synthesized hairpin RNA are valuable tools for the analysis of gene function in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. However, these approaches still require time-consuming procedures including transfection and drug selection, or costly synthetic molecules. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an efficient and handy alternative for E. histolytica gene down-regulation mediated by bacterial double-stranded RNA (dsRNA targeting parasite genes. The Escherichia coli strain HT115 which is unable to degrade dsRNA, was genetically engineered to produce high quantities of long dsRNA segments targeting the genes that encode E. histolytica beta-tubulin and virulence factor KERP1. Trophozoites cultured in vitro were directly fed with dsRNA-expressing bacteria or soaked with purified dsRNA. Both dsRNA delivery methods resulted in significant reduction of protein expression. In vitro host cell-parasite assays showed that efficient downregulation of kerp1 gene expression mediated by bacterial dsRNA resulted in significant reduction of parasite adhesion and lytic capabilities, thus supporting a major role for KERP1 in the pathogenic process. Furthermore, treatment of trophozoites cultured in microtiter plates, with a repertoire of eighty-five distinct bacterial dsRNA segments targeting E. histolytica genes with unknown function, led to the identification of three genes potentially involved in the growth of the parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the use of bacterial dsRNA is a powerful method for the study of gene function in E. histolytica. This dsRNA delivery method is also technically suitable for the study of a large number of genes, thus opening interesting perspectives for the identification of novel drug and vaccine targets.

  11. Decay properties of {sup 256-339}Ds superheavy nuclei

    Santhosh, K.P.; Nithya, C. [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2017-09-15

    The decay properties of 84 isotopes of darmstadtium superheavy nuclei (Z = 110) have been studied using various theoretical models. The proton emission half-lives, the alpha decay half-lives, the spontaneous fission half-lives and the cluster decay half-lives of all the isotopes are evaluated. The one-proton emission half-lives and the alpha decay half-lives are predicted using the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The calculated alpha half-lives are compared with the available experimental results as well as with the predictions of other theoretical models. The predicted half-lives matches well with the experimental results. The one-proton half-lives are also compared with the predictions using other formalisms. The shell-effect-dependent formula of Santhosh et al. has been employed for calculating the spontaneous fission half-lives. A theoretical comparison of spontaneous fission half-lives with four different formalisms is performed. By comparing the one-proton emission half-lives, the alpha decay half-lives and the spontaneous fission half-lives decay modes are predicted for all the isotopes of Ds. It is seen that the isotopes within the range 256 ≤ A ≤ 263 and 279 ≤ A ≤ 339 decay through spontaneous fission and the isotopes 264 ≤ A ≤ 278 exhibit alpha decay. Cluster decay half-lives are calculated using different models including the Coulomb and proximity potential (CPPM), for determining the magicities in the superheavy region. The effect of magicity at N = 184 and N = 202 were confirmed from the plot of log{sub 10}T{sub 1/2} versus neutron number of the daughter nuclei for the emission of different clusters. We hope that the systematic and detailed study of all the possible decay modes of {sup 256-339}Ds using various theoretical models will be helpful in the experimental identification of the isotopes of the element in the future. (orig.)

  12. Differential Genetic Associations for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Based on Anti–dsDNA Autoantibody Production

    Chung, Sharon A.; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Graham, Robert R.; Nititham, Joanne; Lee, Annette T.; Ortmann, Ward A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Tsao, Betty P.; Harley, John B.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Moser, Kathy L.; Petri, Michelle; Demirci, F. Yesim; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Manzi, Susan; Gregersen, Peter K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Criswell, Lindsey A.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous, systemic autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody formation. Previously published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated SLE as a single phenotype. Therefore, we conducted a GWAS to identify genetic factors associated with anti–dsDNA autoantibody production, a SLE–related autoantibody with diagnostic and clinical importance. Using two independent datasets, over 400,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were studied in a total of 1,717 SLE cases and 4,813 healthy controls. Anti–dsDNA autoantibody positive (anti–dsDNA +, n = 811) and anti–dsDNA autoantibody negative (anti–dsDNA –, n = 906) SLE cases were compared to healthy controls and to each other to identify SNPs associated specifically with these SLE subtypes. SNPs in the previously identified SLE susceptibility loci STAT4, IRF5, ITGAM, and the major histocompatibility complex were strongly associated with anti–dsDNA + SLE. Far fewer and weaker associations were observed for anti–dsDNA – SLE. For example, rs7574865 in STAT4 had an OR for anti–dsDNA + SLE of 1.77 (95% CI 1.57–1.99, p = 2.0E-20) compared to an OR for anti–dsDNA – SLE of 1.26 (95% CI 1.12–1.41, p = 2.4E-04), with pheterogeneity<0.0005. SNPs in the SLE susceptibility loci BANK1, KIAA1542, and UBE2L3 showed evidence of association with anti–dsDNA + SLE and were not associated with anti–dsDNA – SLE. In conclusion, we identified differential genetic associations with SLE based on anti–dsDNA autoantibody production. Many previously identified SLE susceptibility loci may confer disease risk through their role in autoantibody production and be more accurately described as autoantibody propensity loci. Lack of strong SNP associations may suggest that other types of genetic variation or non-genetic factors such as environmental exposures have a greater impact on susceptibility to anti–dsDNA – SLE. PMID

  13. Differential genetic associations for systemic lupus erythematosus based on anti-dsDNA autoantibody production.

    Sharon A Chung

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a clinically heterogeneous, systemic autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody formation. Previously published genome-wide association studies (GWAS have investigated SLE as a single phenotype. Therefore, we conducted a GWAS to identify genetic factors associated with anti-dsDNA autoantibody production, a SLE-related autoantibody with diagnostic and clinical importance. Using two independent datasets, over 400,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were studied in a total of 1,717 SLE cases and 4,813 healthy controls. Anti-dsDNA autoantibody positive (anti-dsDNA +, n = 811 and anti-dsDNA autoantibody negative (anti-dsDNA -, n = 906 SLE cases were compared to healthy controls and to each other to identify SNPs associated specifically with these SLE subtypes. SNPs in the previously identified SLE susceptibility loci STAT4, IRF5, ITGAM, and the major histocompatibility complex were strongly associated with anti-dsDNA + SLE. Far fewer and weaker associations were observed for anti-dsDNA - SLE. For example, rs7574865 in STAT4 had an OR for anti-dsDNA + SLE of 1.77 (95% CI 1.57-1.99, p = 2.0E-20 compared to an OR for anti-dsDNA - SLE of 1.26 (95% CI 1.12-1.41, p = 2.4E-04, with p(heterogeneity<0.0005. SNPs in the SLE susceptibility loci BANK1, KIAA1542, and UBE2L3 showed evidence of association with anti-dsDNA + SLE and were not associated with anti-dsDNA - SLE. In conclusion, we identified differential genetic associations with SLE based on anti-dsDNA autoantibody production. Many previously identified SLE susceptibility loci may confer disease risk through their role in autoantibody production and be more accurately described as autoantibody propensity loci. Lack of strong SNP associations may suggest that other types of genetic variation or non-genetic factors such as environmental exposures have a greater impact on susceptibility to anti-dsDNA - SLE.

  14. Effects of Eutectic Si Particles on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Toughness of Cast A356 Aluminum Alloys

    Lee, Kyu Hong; Lee, Sung Hak; Kwon, Yong Nam

    2007-01-01

    The present study aims at investigating the effects of eutectic Si particles on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of three A356 aluminum alloys. These A356 alloys were fabricated by casting processes such as rheo-casting, squeeze-casting, and casting-forging, and their mechanical properties and fracture toughness were analyzed in relation with microfracture mechanism study. All the cast A356 alloys contained eutectic Si particles mainly segregated along solidification cells, and the distribution of Si particles was modified by squeeze-casting and casting-forging processes. Microfracture observation results showed that eutectic Si particles segregated along cells were cracked first, but that aluminum matrix played a role in blocking crack propagation. Tensile properties and fracture toughness of the squeeze cast and cast-forged alloys having homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles were superior to those of the rheo-cast alloy. In particular, the cast-forged alloy had excellent hardness, strength, ductility, and fracture toughness because of the matrix strengthening and homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles due to forging process

  15. Length-scale dependent mechanical properties of Al-Cu eutectic alloy: Molecular dynamics based model and its experimental verification

    Tiwary, C. S.; Chakraborty, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2014-05-01

    This paper attempts to gain an understanding of the effect of lamellar length scale on the mechanical properties of two-phase metal-intermetallic eutectic structure. We first develop a molecular dynamics model for the in-situ grown eutectic interface followed by a model of deformation of Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectic. Leveraging the insights obtained from the simulation on the behaviour of dislocations at different length scales of the eutectic, we present and explain the experimental results on Al-Al2Cu eutectic with various different lamellar spacing. The physics behind the mechanism is further quantified with help of atomic level energy model for different length scale as well as different strain. An atomic level energy partitioning of the lamellae and the interface regions reveals that the energy of the lamellae core are accumulated more due to dislocations irrespective of the length-scale. Whereas the energy of the interface is accumulated more due to dislocations when the length-scale is smaller, but the trend is reversed when the length-scale is large beyond a critical size of about 80 nm.

  16. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  17. Eutectic mixtures of some fatty acids for latent heat storage: Thermal properties and thermal reliability with respect to thermal cycling

    Sari, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Accelerated thermal cycle tests have been conducted to study the change in melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion of the eutectic mixtures of lauric acid (LA)-myristic acid (MA), lauric acid (LA)-palmitic acid (PA) and myristic acid (MA)-stearic acid (SA) as latent heat storage materials. The thermal properties of these materials were determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis method. The thermal reliability of the eutectic mixtures after melt/freeze cycles of 720, 1080 and 1460 was also evaluated using the DSC curves. The accelerated thermal cycle tests indicate that the melting temperatures usually tend to decrease, and the variations in the latent heats of fusion are irregular with increasing number of thermal cycles. Moreover, the probable reasons for the change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures after repeated thermal cycles were investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic analysis indicates that the accelerated melt/freeze processes do not cause any degradation in the chemical structure of the mixtures. The change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures with increasing number of thermal cycles is only because of the presence of certain amounts of impurities in the fatty acids used in their preparation. It is concluded that the tested eutectic mixtures have reasonable thermal properties and thermal reliability as phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat storage in any solar heating applications that include a four year utilization period

  18. Insertion of lead lithium eutectic mixture in RELAP/SCDAPSIM Mod 4.0 for Fusion Reactor Systems

    Tiwari, Ashutosh; Allison, Brian; Hohorst, J.K.; Wagner, R.J.; Allison, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermodynamic and transport properties of lead lithium eutectic mixture have been inserted in RELAP/SCDAPSIM MOD 4.0 code. ► Code results are verified for a simple pipe problem with lead lithium eutectic mixture flowing in it. ► Code is calculating the inserted properties of lead lithium eutectic mixture to a fairly good agreement. - Abstract: RELAP/SCDAPSIM Mod 4.0 code was developed by Innovative System Software (ISS) for the analysis of nuclear power plants (NPPs) cooled by light water and heavy water. Later on the code was expanded to analyze the NPPs cooled by liquid metal, in this sequence: lead bismuth eutectic mixture, liquid sodium and lead lithium eutectic mixture (LLE) are inserted in the code. This paper focuses on the insertion of liquid LLE as a coolant for NPPs in the RELAP/SCDAPSIM Mod 4.0 code. Evaluation of the code was made for a simple pipe problem connected with heat structures having liquid LLE as a coolant in it. The code is predicting well all the thermodynamic and transport properties of LLE.

  19. On the D*s and charmonia leptonic decays

    Bailas, Gabriela; Blossier, Benoît; Heitger, Jochen; Morénas, Vincent; Post, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    Among the different scenarios of New Physics, those with an extended Higgs sector are examined with a lot of attention. Recent experimental observations of several anomalies in flavour physics with respect to expectations of the Standard Model further motivate the effort of phenomenologists. First, informations about the RDs ratio, a test of lepton flavour universality equivalent to RD, already measured, but with the s quark as spectator, are awaited in coming years to constrain the corner of an extended Higgs sector with charged doublets. On another side, leptonic widths of pseudoscalar quarkonia are particularly interesting to test an extended Higgs sector with a light CP-odd Higgs boson singlet, through the study of its mixing with quarkonia states. Hadronic parameters entering those processes have to be determined from lattice QCD with enough confidence on the control of systematic errors. We report on the very first step of a long-term program tackled with Nf = 2 Wilson-Clover fermions to put relevant constraints on extensions of the Higgs sector: extraction of decay constants of D*s, ƞc, ƞc (2S), J/Ψ and Ψ(2S) with lattice ensembles provided by the CLS effort, considering 2 lattice spacings and a large range of pion masses to estimate cut-off effects and extrapolate results to the chiral limit.

  20. Study of the hollow cathode plasma electron-gun

    Zhang Yonghui; Jiang Jinsheng; Chang Anbi

    2003-01-01

    For developing a novel high-current, long pulse width electron source, the theoretics and mechanism of the hollow cathode plasma electron-gun are analyzed in detail in this paper, the structure and the physical process of hollow cathode plasma electron-gun are also studied. This gun overcomes the limitations of most high-power microwave tubes, which employ either thermionic cathodes that produce low current-density beams because of the limitation of the space charge, or field-emission cathodes that offer high current density but provide only short pulse width because of plasma closure of the accelerating gap. In the theories studying on hollow cathode plasma electron-gun, the characteristic of the hollow-cathode discharge is introduced, the action during the forming of plasma of the stimulating electrode and the modulating anode are discussed, the movement of electrons and ions and the primary parameters are analyzed, and the formulas of the electric field, beam current density and the stabilization conditions of the beam current are also presented in this paper. The numerical simulation is carried out based on Poisson's equation, and the equations of current continuity and movement. And the optimized result is reported. On this basis, we have designed a hollow-cathode-plasma electron-gun, whose output pulse current is 2 kA, and pulse width is 1 microsecond

  1. Hollow proppants and a process for their manufacture

    Jones, A.H.; Cutler, R.A.

    1985-10-15

    Hollow, fine-grained ceramic proppants are less expensive and improve fracture control when compared to conventional proppants (dense alumina, mullite, bauxite, zirconia, etc.). Hollow proppants of the present invention have been fabricated by spray drying, followed by sintering in order to obtain a dense case and a hollow core. These proppants generally have high sphericity and roundness (Krumbein sphericity and roundness greater than 0.8), have diameters on average between 2,250 and 125 [mu]m, depending on proppant size required, and have strength equal to or greater than that of sand. The hollow core, the size of which can be controlled, permits better fracture control in hydraulic fracturing treatments since the proppant can be transported in lower viscosity fluids. Hollow proppants produced at the same cost/weight as conventional proppants also provide for lower costs, since less weight is required to fill the same volume. The fine-grained (preferably less than 5 [mu]m in diameter) ceramic case provides the strength necessary to withstand closure stresses and prevent crushing. 6 figs.

  2. A novel pathway to detect and cope with exogenous dsDNA.

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    How a living cell responds to exogenous materials is one of the fundamental questions in the life sciences. In particular, understanding the mechanisms by which a cell recognizes exogenous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is important for immunology research because it will facilitate the control of pathogen infections that entail the presence of exogenous dsDNA in the cytoplasm of host cells. Several cytosolic dsDNA sensor proteins that trigger innate immune responses have been identified and the downstream signaling pathways have been investigated. However, the events that occur at the site of exogenous dsDNA when it is exposed to the cytosol of the host cell remain unknown. Using dsDNA-coated polystyrene beads incorporated into living cells, we recently found that barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) binds to the exogenous dsDNA immediately after its appearance in the cytosol and plays a role in DNA avoidance of autophagy. Our findings reveal a novel pathway in which BAF plays a key role in the detection of and response to exogenous dsDNA.

  3. Predictive performance of the CHA2DS2-VASc rule in atrial fibrillation : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Van Doorn, S.; Debray, T. P. A.; Kaasenbrood, F.; Hoes, A. W.; Rutten, F. H.; Moons, K. G. M.; Geersing, G. J.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials The widely recommended CHA2DS2-VASc shows conflicting results in contemporary validation studies. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of 19 studies validating CHA2DS2-VASc. There was high heterogeneity in stroke risks for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores. This was not

  4. Solvent-free synthesis of nanosized hierarchical sodalite zeolite with a multi-hollow polycrystalline structure

    Zeng, Shangjing; Wang, Runwei; Li, Ang; Huang, Weiwei; Zhang, Zongtao; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-01-01

    A solvent-free route is developed for preparing nanoscale sodalite zeolite with a multi-hollow structure. Furthermore, the synthesis of nanosized hollow sodalite polycrystalline aggregates with a mesoporous structure and high crystallinity

  5. Magnetic deep eutectic solvents molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective recognition and separation of protein

    Liu, Yanjin; Wang, Yuzhi; Dai, Qingzhou; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    A novel and facile magnetic deep eutectic solvents (DES) molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the selective recognition and separation of Bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was prepared. The new-type DES was adopted as the functional monomer which would bring molecular imprinted technology to a new direction. The amounts of DES were optimized. The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs were characterized with fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), elemental analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results suggested that the imprinted polymers were successfully formed and possessed a charming magnetism. The maximum adsorption capability (Q_m_a_x) and dissociation constant (K_L) were analyzed by Langmuir isotherms (R"2 = 0.9983) and the value were estimated to be 175.44 mg/g and 0.035 mg/mL for the imprinted particles. And the imprinted particles showed a high imprinting factor of 4.77. In addition, the magnetic DES-MIPs presented outstanding recognition specificity and selectivity so that it can be utilized to separate template protein from the mixture of proteins and real samples. Last but not least, the combination of deep eutectic solvents and molecular imprinted technology in this paper provides a new perspective for the recognition and separation of proteins. - Highlights: • Combined green deep eutectic solvents (DES) and molecular imprinted technology in recognition and separation of proteins. • DES was adopted as a new-type functional monomer. • The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs can separate proteins rapidly by an external magnetic field. • Adsorption and selectivity properties were discussed.

  6. Magnetic deep eutectic solvents molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective recognition and separation of protein

    Liu, Yanjin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Dai, Qingzhou [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Zhou, Yigang [Department of Microbiology, College of Basic Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2016-09-14

    A novel and facile magnetic deep eutectic solvents (DES) molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the selective recognition and separation of Bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was prepared. The new-type DES was adopted as the functional monomer which would bring molecular imprinted technology to a new direction. The amounts of DES were optimized. The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs were characterized with fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), elemental analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results suggested that the imprinted polymers were successfully formed and possessed a charming magnetism. The maximum adsorption capability (Q{sub max}) and dissociation constant (K{sub L}) were analyzed by Langmuir isotherms (R{sup 2} = 0.9983) and the value were estimated to be 175.44 mg/g and 0.035 mg/mL for the imprinted particles. And the imprinted particles showed a high imprinting factor of 4.77. In addition, the magnetic DES-MIPs presented outstanding recognition specificity and selectivity so that it can be utilized to separate template protein from the mixture of proteins and real samples. Last but not least, the combination of deep eutectic solvents and molecular imprinted technology in this paper provides a new perspective for the recognition and separation of proteins. - Highlights: • Combined green deep eutectic solvents (DES) and molecular imprinted technology in recognition and separation of proteins. • DES was adopted as a new-type functional monomer. • The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs can separate proteins rapidly by an external magnetic field. • Adsorption and selectivity properties were discussed.

  7. Excited-state dynamics of mononucleotides and DNA strands in a deep eutectic solvent.

    Zhang, Yuyuan; de La Harpe, Kimberly; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2018-04-17

    The photophysics of several mono- and oligonucleotides were investigated in a deep eutectic solvent for the first time. The solvent glyceline, prepared as a 1 : 2 mole ratio mixture of choline chloride and glycerol, was used to study excited-state deactivation in a non-aqueous solvent by the use of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. DNA strands in glyceline retain the secondary structures that are present in aqueous solution to some degree, thus enabling a study of the effects of solvent properties on the excited states of stacked bases and stacked base pairs. The excited-state lifetime of the mononucleotide 5'-AMP in glyceline is 630 fs, or twice as long as in aqueous solution. Even slower relaxation is seen for 5'-TMP in glyceline, and a possible triplet state with a lifetime greater than 3 ns is observed. Circular dichroism spectra show that the single strand (dA)18 and the duplex d(AT)9·d(AT)9 adopt similar structures in glyceline and in aqueous solution. Despite having similar conformations in both solvents, femtosecond transient absorption experiments reveal striking changes in the dynamics. Excited-state decay and vibrational cooling generally take place more slowly in glyceline than in water. Additionally, the fraction of long-lived excited states in both oligonucleotide systems is lower in glyceline than in aqueous solution. For a DNA duplex, water is suggested to favor decay pathways involving intrastrand charge separation, while the deep eutectic solvent favors interstrand deactivation channels involving neutral species. Slower solvation dynamics in the viscous deep eutectic solvent may also play a role. These results demonstrate that the dynamics of excitations in stacked bases and stacked base pairs depend not only on conformation, but are also highly sensitive to the solvent.

  8. The Au/Si eutectic bonding compatibility with KOH etching for 3D devices fabrication

    Liang, Hengmao; Liu, Mifeng; Liu, Song; Xu, Dehui; Xiong, Bin

    2018-01-01

    KOH etching and Au/Si eutectic bonding are cost-efficient technologies for 3D device fabrication. Aimed at investigating the process compatibility of KOH etching and Au/Si bonding, KOH etching tests have been carried out for Au/bulk Si and Au/amorphous Si (a-Si) bonding wafers in this paper. For the Au/bulk Si bonding wafer, a serious underetch phenomenon occurring on the damage layer in KOH etching definitely results in packaging failure. In the microstructure analysis, it is found that the formation of the damage layer between the bonded layer and bulk Si is attributed to the destruction of crystal Si lattices in Au/bulk Si eutectic reaction. Considering the occurrence of underetch for Au/Si bonding must meet two requirements: the superfluous Si and the defective layer near the bonded layer, the Au/a-Si bonding by regulating the a-Si/Au thickness ratio is presented in this study. Only when the a-Si/Au thickness ratio is relatively low are there not underetch phenomena, of which the reason is the full reaction of the a-Si layer avoiding the formation of the damage layer for easy underetch. Obviously, the Au/a-Si bonding via choosing a moderate a-Si/Au thickness ratio (⩽1.5:1 is suggested) could be reliably compatible with KOH etching, which provides an available and low-cost approach for 3D device fabrication. More importantly, the theory of the damage layer proposed in this study can be naturally applied to relevant analyses on the eutectic reaction of other metals and single crystal materials.

  9. Biodiesel production from ethanolysis of palm oil using deep eutectic solvent (DES) as co-solvent

    Manurung, R.; Winarta, A.; Taslim; Indra, L.

    2017-06-01

    Biodiesel produced from ethanolysis is more renewable and have better properties (higher oxidation stability, lower cloud and pour point) compared to methanolysis, but it has a disadvantage such as complicated purification. To improve ethanolysis process, deep eutectic solvent (DES) can be prepared from choline chloride and glycerol and used as co-solvent in ethanolysis. The deep eutectic solvent is formed from a quaternary ammonium salt (choline chloride) and a hydrogen bond donor (Glycerol), it is a non-toxic, biodegradable solvent compared to a conventional volatile organic solvent such as hexane. The deep eutectic solvent is prepared by mixing choline chloride and glycerol with molar ratio 1:2 at temperature 80 °C, stirring speed 300 rpm for 1 hour. The DES is characterized by its density and viscosity. The ethanolysis is performed at a reaction temperature of 70 °C, ethanol to oil molar ratio of 9:1, potassium hydroxide as catalyst concentration of 1.2 wt. DES as co-solvent with concentration 0.5 to 3 wt. stirring speed 400 rpm, and a reaction time 1 hour. The obtained biodiesel is then characterized by its density, viscosity, and ester content. The oil - ethanol phase condition is observed in the reaction tube. The oil - ethanol phase with DES tends to form meniscus compared to without DES, showed that oil and ethanol become more slightly miscible, which favors the reaction. Using DES as co-solvent in ethanolysis showed increasing in yield and easier purification. The esters properties meet the international standards ASTM D6751, with the highest yield achieved 83,67 with 99,77 conversion at DES concentration 2 . Increasing DES concentration above 2 in ethanolysis decrease the conversion and yield, because of the excessive glycerol in the systems makes the reaction equilibrium moves to the reactant side.

  10. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Eutectic Hydrate Salt Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Liang, Lin; Chen, Xi

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a new cold storage phase change material eutectic hydrate salt (K2HPO4·3H2O–NaH2PO4·2H2O–Na2S2O3·5H2O) was prepared, modified, and tested. The modification was performed by adding a nucleating agent and thickener. The physical properties such as viscosity, surface tension, cold storage characteristics, supercooling, and the stability during freeze-thaw cycles were studied. Results show that the use of nucleating agents, such as sodium tetraborate, sodium fluoride, and nanoparti...

  11. Chemical properties of some elements in a molten lithium chloride, potassium chloride eutectic (1962)

    Molina, R.

    1961-12-01

    The increasing use of molten media especially in chemical preparations and for certain technological applications, has made it more necessary to have a knowledge of the chemical properties of elements in these solvents. Structural studies on molten solutions show the existence of certain species such as ions and complexes known to exist in aqueous solutions. This fact, together with certain experiments on chemical reactions in molten media has led us to establish a comparison between these media and aqueous solutions. We wish to show that the same fundamental phenomena occur in these media as are found in the chemistry of aqueous solutions and that this makes it possible to predict certain reactions. We have taken as examples the chemical properties of vanadium, uranium and sulphur in a LiCl-KCl eutectic melted at 480 deg. C. The first problem is to identify the various degrees of oxidation of these elements existing in the solvent chosen. We have tried to resolve it by comparing the absorption spectra obtained in aqueous solution and in the molten eutectic. We consider the possibilities of this method in a chapter on absorption spectrophotometry in the LiCl-KCl eutectic. During the study of the chemical properties we stress the various methods of displacing the equilibria: complex formation, variation of the oxidation-reduction properties with complex formation. The complexes of the O 2- ion are considered in particular. The study of the exchange of this particle is facilitated by the use of a classification of some of its complexes which we call the pO 2- scale by analogy with the pH scale; the value pO 2- is defined by the relationship: pO 2- = log O 2- Similarly, the use of apparent potential diagrams pO 2- makes it possible to predict and to interpret reactions involving the simultaneous exchange of electrons and O 2- ions between the various degrees of oxidation of the same element. It is possible, by studying some reactions of this type between two elements

  12. Spatial profile of thermoelectric effects during Peltier pulsing in Bi and Bi/MnBi eutectic

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial profile of the thermal transients that occur during and following the current pulsing associated with Peltier Interface Demarcation during directional solidification is studied. Results for pure Bi are presented in detail and compared with corresponding results for the Bi/MnBi eutectic. Significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample that can be accounted for by the Peltier effect, the Thomson effect, and Joule heating. These effects are separated and their behavior is studied as a function of time, current density, and position with respect to the solid/liquid interface.

  13. Design of a Eutectic Freeze Crystallization process for multicomponent waste water stream

    Lewis, Alison E.; Nathoo, J.; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    Complex, hypersaline brines originating from the mining and extractive metallurgical industries have the potential to be treated using Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC). Although EFC has been shown to be effective in separating a single salt and water, it has yet to be applied to the complex...... hypersaline brines that are typical of reverse osmosis retentates in South Africa. This paper focuses on the application of EFC for the purification of a typical brine containing high levels of sodium, chlorine, sulphate and ammonia that cannot be achieved with other separation techniques. The presence...

  14. Study on corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. Joint research report in JFY2002

    Takahashi, Minoru; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The evaluation of corrosion behaviors of core and structural materials in lead bismuth eutectic is one of the key issues for the utilization of lead bismuth eutectic as a coolant of the primary loops of lead bismuth cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs) and the intermediate heat transport media of new-type steam generators of the sodium cooled FBRs. The purpose of the present study is to establish corrosion test techniques in lead bismuth eutectic flow. The techniques of steel corrosion test and oxygen control in flowing lead bismuth eutectic, and the technologies of a lead bismuth flow test at high temperature and high velocity were developed through corrosion test using a lead bismuth flow test loop of the Tokyo Institute of Technology in JFY2002. The major results are summarized as follows: (1) Techniques of fabrication, mount and rinse of corrosion specimens, measurement method of weight loss, and SEM/EDX analysis method have been established through lead bismuth corrosion test. (2) Weight losses were measured, corrosion and lead bismuth-adhered layers and eroded parts were observed in two 1000 hr-corrosion tests, and the results were compared with each other for twelve existing steels including ODS, F82H and SUH-3. (3) An oxygen sensor made of zirconia electrolyte structurally resistant to thermal stress and thermal shock was developed and tested in the lead bismuth flow loop. Good performance has been obtained. (4) An oxygen control method by injecting argon and hydrogen mixture gas containing steam into lead bismuth was applied to the lead bismuth flow loop, and technical issues for the development of the oxygen control method were extracted. (5) Technical measures for freezing and leakage of lead bismuth in the flow loop were accumulated. (6) Technical measures for flow rate decrease/blockage due to precipitation of oxide and corrosion products in a low temperature section of the lead bismuth flow loop were accumulated. (7) Electromagnetic flow meters with MI

  15. Directional solidification of filamentary shapes of Pb--Cd and Pb--Sn eutectic alloys

    Dhindaw, B.K.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Spencer, C.R.; Gibson, E.D.

    1978-01-01

    Eutectic alloys of Pb--Cd and Pb--Sn were directionally solidified as thin filamentary strips contained in stainless steel and quartz capillaries. As the solidification rate increased the filament width, w, had to be reduced to maintain complete alignment of the lamellae clear across the filament. It was determined that in order to achieve complete alignment the ratio of filament width to lamellar spacing, w/lambda had to be less than about 30. Experiments were carried out at rates of 2-400 μm/s and at temperature gradients of 130 and 320 0 C/cm

  16. Vaporization of liquid Pb-Li eutectic alloy from 1000K to 1200K - A high temperature mass spectrometric study

    Jain, U.; Mukherjee, A.; Dey, G. K.

    2017-09-01

    Liquid lead-lithium eutectic will be used as a coolant in fusion reactor blanket loop. Vapor pressure of the eutectic is an important parameter to accurately predict its in-loop behavior. Past measurements of vapor pressure of the eutectic relied on indirect methods. In this paper, we report for the first time the in-situ vaporization behavior of the liquid alloy between 1042 and 1176 K by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). It was seen that the vaporization occurred by independent evaporation of lead and lithium. No complex intermetallic vapor was seen in the mass spectra. The partial pressures and enthalpy of vaporization of Pb and Li were evaluated directly from the measured ion intensities formed from the equilibrium vapor over the alloy. The activity of Li over a temperature range of 1042-1176 K was found to be 4.8 × 10-5 to that of pure Li, indicating its very low activity in the alloy.

  17. Fundamental study on the salt distillation from the mixtures of rare earth precipitates and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt

    Yang, H. C.; Eun, H. C.; Cho, Y. Z.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, I. T.

    2008-01-01

    An electrorefining process of spent nuclear fuel generates waste salt containing some radioactive metal chlorides. The most effective method to reduce salt waste volume is to separate radioactive metals from non-radioactive salts. A promising approach is to change radioactive metal chlorides into salt-insoluble oxides by an oxygen sparging. Following this, salt distillation process is available to effectively separate the precipitated particulate metal oxides from salt. This study investigated the distillation rates of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt under different vacuums at elevated temperatures. The first part study investigated distillation rates of eutectic salt under different vacuums at high temperatures by using thermo-gravimetric furnace system. In the second part, we tested the removal of eutectic salt from the RE precipitates by using the laboratory vacuum distillation furnace system. Investigated variables were the temperature of mixture, the degree of vacuum and the time

  18. Measurement of solid-liquid interfacial energy in the In-Bi eutectic alloy at low melting temperature

    Marasli, N; Akbulut, S; Ocak, Y; Keslioglu, K; Boeyuek, U; Kaya, H; Cadirli, E

    2007-01-01

    The Gibbs-Thomson coefficient and solid-liquid interfacial energy of the solid In solution in equilibrium with In Bi eutectic liquid have been determined to be (1.46 ± 0.07) x 10 -7 K m and (40.4 ± 4.0) x 10 -3 J m -2 by observing the equilibrated grain boundary groove shapes. The grain boundary energy of the solid In solution phase has been calculated to be (79.0 ± 8.7) x 10 -3 J m -2 by considering force balance at the grain boundary grooves. The thermal conductivities of the In-12.4 at.% Bi eutectic liquid phase and the solid In solution phase and their ratio at the eutectic melting temperature (72 deg. C) have also been measured with radial heat flow apparatus and Bridgman-type growth apparatus

  19. Effects of Eutectic Si and Secondary Dendrite Arm Spacing on the Mechanical Properties of Al-Si-Cu Cast Alloys

    Lee, Kyungmin; Kim, Yumi; Kim, Youngman; Hong, Sungkil; Choi, Seweon; Kim, Youngchan; Kang, Changseok

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at investigating the effects of eutectic Si and Secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) on mechanical properties of Al-Si-Cu alloy. Heat treatment and controlling of solidification rate affect to microstructure of Al-Si-Cu alloy. Al-Si-Cu alloy was dissolved in an electric furnace. The alloy cast in STD61 mold which had been pre-heated to 95 ℃ and 200 ℃. Eutectic Si and SDAS were finer as cooling rate increased. Image analysis technique has been utilized to examine the microstructure. Microstructure observation results showed that T6 heat treatment has a strong influence eutectic Si particle morphology. The mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, were improved by ASTM E8 standard. Tensile properties of the Al-Si-Cu alloys prepared by different cooling rates were the same as each other by T6 heat treatment.

  20. Pressure effects in hollow and solid iron oxide nanoparticles

    Silva, N.J.O., E-mail: nunojoao@ua.pt [Departamento de Física and CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Saisho, S.; Mito, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu 804-8550 (Japan); Millán, A.; Palacio, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC - Universidad de Zaragoza. Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cabot, A. [Universitat de Barcelona and Catalonia Energy Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain); Iglesias, Ò.; Labarta, A. [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona and Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-06-15

    We report a study on the pressure response of the anisotropy energy of hollow and solid maghemite nanoparticles. The differences between the maghemite samples are understood in terms of size, magnetic anisotropy and shape of the particles. In particular, the differences between hollow and solid samples are due to the different shape of the nanoparticles and by comparing both pressure responses it is possible to conclude that the shell has a larger pressure response when compared to the core. - Highlights: ► Study of the pressure response of core and shell magnetic anisotropy. ► Contrast between hollow and solid maghemite nanoparticles. ► Disentanglement of nanoparticles core and shell magnetic properties.

  1. Enhancement of acoustical performance of hollow tube sound absorber

    Putra, Azma; Khair, Fazlin Abd; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents acoustical performance of hollow structures utilizing the recycled lollipop sticks as acoustic absorbers. The hollow cross section of the structures is arranged facing the sound incidence. The effects of different length of the sticks and air gap on the acoustical performance are studied. The absorption coefficient was measured using impedance tube method. Here it is found that improvement on the sound absorption performance is achieved by introducing natural kapok fiber inserted into the void between the hollow structures. Results reveal that by inserting the kapok fibers, both the absorption bandwidth and the absorption coefficient increase. For test sample backed by a rigid surface, best performance of sound absorption is obtained for fibers inserted at the front and back sides of the absorber. And for the case of test sample with air gap, this is achieved for fibers introduced only at the back side of the absorber.

  2. Hollow volcanic tumulus caves of Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii County, Hawaii

    William R. Halliday

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to lava tube caves with commonly noted features, sizable subcrustal spaces of several types exist on the floor of Kilauea Caldera. Most of these are formed by drainage of partially stabilized volcanic structures enlarged or formed by injection of very fluid lava beneath a plastic crust. Most conspicuous are hollow tumuli, possibly first described by Walker in 1991. Walker mapped and described the outer chamber of Tumulus E-I Cave. Further exploration has revealed that it has a hyperthermic inner room beneath an adjoining tumulus with no connection evident on the surface. Two lengthy, sinuous hollow tumuli also are present in this part of the caldera. These findings support Walkers conclusions that hollow tumuli provide valuable insights into tumulus-forming mechanisms, and provide information about the processes of emplacement of pahoehoe sheet flows.

  3. Management of maxillectomy defect with a hybrid hollow bulb obturator

    Singh, Kamleshwar; Singh, Saumyendra V; Mishra, Niraj; Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor

    2013-01-01

    A woman having already undergone maxillectomy came to the department complaining of difficulty in eating and speech. During the construction of an obturator, the bulb area should be hollowed to reduce weight so that the teeth and supporting tissues are not stressed unnecessarily. The conventional open design drains fluid from the adjacent mucosa, possibly increasing the weight of the prosthesis, and is difficult to clean. The closed bulb design does not drain secretions and may cause obstruction and susceptibility to infection in the paranasal and pharyngeal regions, though it is easier to maintain. An alternative to the two designs, combining their advantages, is presented in this report. As the open hollow part of the obturator was shallow, it was easy to clean. Making the inferior part of the bulb hollow and closed led to a reduction in the overall weight of the prosthesis while increasing its resonance. PMID:23436886

  4. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Jakobsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power...... picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30 mu m was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10 mu m and a 18 mu m core diameter photonic band gap hollow......-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  5. Forged hollows (alloy 617) for PNP-hot gas collectors

    Hofmann, F.

    1984-01-01

    When the partners in the PNP-Project decided to manufacture components, such as gas collectors, from material of type alloy 617, the problem arose that required semi-fabricated products, especially forged hollows weighing several tons each, were not available. As VDM (Vereinigte Deutsche Metallwerke AG) had already experience in production of other semi-fabricated products of this alloy, attempts were made based on this knowledge, to develop manufacturing methods for forged hollows. The aim was to produce hollows as long as possible, and to keep the welding cost minimum. Welded seams are always critical during fabrication, as well as during later inspection under actual operating conditions. The three stage plan used to perform the above task illustrates the development aims is described

  6. Enhancement of acoustical performance of hollow tube sound absorber

    Putra, Azma, E-mail: azma.putra@utem.edu.my; Khair, Fazlin Abd, E-mail: fazlinabdkhair@student.utem.edu.my; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd, E-mail: jai@utem.edu.my [Centre for Advanced Research on Energy, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, Durian Tunggal Melaka 76100 Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2016-03-29

    This paper presents acoustical performance of hollow structures utilizing the recycled lollipop sticks as acoustic absorbers. The hollow cross section of the structures is arranged facing the sound incidence. The effects of different length of the sticks and air gap on the acoustical performance are studied. The absorption coefficient was measured using impedance tube method. Here it is found that improvement on the sound absorption performance is achieved by introducing natural kapok fiber inserted into the void between the hollow structures. Results reveal that by inserting the kapok fibers, both the absorption bandwidth and the absorption coefficient increase. For test sample backed by a rigid surface, best performance of sound absorption is obtained for fibers inserted at the front and back sides of the absorber. And for the case of test sample with air gap, this is achieved for fibers introduced only at the back side of the absorber.

  7. Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T greater than or equal to 600 0 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10 3 μm) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants

  8. Fire resistance of extruded hollow-core slabs

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    to the structural codes with data derived from a standard fire test and from a thorough examination of the comprehensive test documentation available on fire exposed hollow-core slabs. Findings – Mechanisms for loss of load-bearing capacity are clarified, and evidence of the fire resistance is found. Originality......Purpose – Prefabricated extruded hollow-core slabs are preferred building components for floor structures in several countries. It is therefore important to be able to document the fire resistance of these slabs proving fulfilment of standard fire resistance requirements of 60 and 120 min found...... in most national building regulations. The paper aims to present a detailed analysis of the mechanisms responsible for the loss of loadbearing capacity of hollow-core slabs when exposed to fire. Design/methodology/approach – Furthermore, it compares theoretica calculation and assessment according...

  9. Fabrication of Polyacrylonitrile Hollow Fiber Membranes from Ionic Liquid Solutions

    Kim, Dooli; Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2015-01-01

    The interest in green processes and products has increased to reduce the negative impact of many industrial processes to the environment. Solvents, which play a crucial role in the fabrication of membranes, need to be replaced by sustainable and less toxic solvent alternatives for commonly used polymers. The purpose of this study is the fabrication of greener hollow fiber membranes based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN), substituting dimethylformamide (DMF) by less toxic mixtures of ionic liquids (IL) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). A thermodynamic analysis was conducted, estimating the Gibbs free energy of mixing to find the most convenient solution compositions. Hollow fiber membranes were manufactured and optimized. As a result, a uniform pattern and high porosity were observed in the inner surface of the membranes prepared from the ionic liquid solutions. The membranes were coated with a polyamide layer by interfacial polymerization the hollow fiber membranes were applied in forward osmosis experiments by using sucrose solutions as draw solution.

  10. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle array by microinjection moulding

    Yung, K. L.; Xu, Yan; Kang, Chunlei; Liu, H.; Tam, K. F.; Ko, S. M.; Kwan, F. Y.; Lee, Thomas M. H.

    2012-01-01

    A method of producing sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays using microinjection moulding is presented in this paper. Unlike traditional approaches, three mould inserts were used to create the sharp tips of the microneedles. Mould inserts with low surface roughness were fabricated using a picosecond laser machine. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedles 500 µm in height were fabricated using a microinjection moulding machine developed by the authors’ group. In addition, the strength of the microneedle was studied by simulation and penetration experiments. Results show that the microneedles can penetrate into skin, delivering liquid successfully without any breakage or severe deformation. Techniques presented in this paper can be used to fabricate sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays massively with low cost.

  11. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle array by microinjection moulding

    Yung, K L; Xu, Yan; Kang, Chunlei; Liu, H; Tam, K F; Ko, S M; Kwan, F Y; Lee, Thomas M H

    2012-01-01

    A method of producing sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays using microinjection moulding is presented in this paper. Unlike traditional approaches, three mould inserts were used to create the sharp tips of the microneedles. Mould inserts with low surface roughness were fabricated using a picosecond laser machine. Sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedles 500 µm in height were fabricated using a microinjection moulding machine developed by the authors’ group. In addition, the strength of the microneedle was studied by simulation and penetration experiments. Results show that the microneedles can penetrate into skin, delivering liquid successfully without any breakage or severe deformation. Techniques presented in this paper can be used to fabricate sharp tipped plastic hollow microneedle arrays massively with low cost. (paper)

  12. Fabrication of Polyacrylonitrile Hollow Fiber Membranes from Ionic Liquid Solutions

    Kim, Dooli

    2015-10-08

    The interest in green processes and products has increased to reduce the negative impact of many industrial processes to the environment. Solvents, which play a crucial role in the fabrication of membranes, need to be replaced by sustainable and less toxic solvent alternatives for commonly used polymers. The purpose of this study is the fabrication of greener hollow fiber membranes based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN), substituting dimethylformamide (DMF) by less toxic mixtures of ionic liquids (IL) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). A thermodynamic analysis was conducted, estimating the Gibbs free energy of mixing to find the most convenient solution compositions. Hollow fiber membranes were manufactured and optimized. As a result, a uniform pattern and high porosity were observed in the inner surface of the membranes prepared from the ionic liquid solutions. The membranes were coated with a polyamide layer by interfacial polymerization the hollow fiber membranes were applied in forward osmosis experiments by using sucrose solutions as draw solution.

  13. Emission mechanism in high current hollow cathode arcs

    Krishnan, M.

    1976-01-01

    Large (2 cm-diameter) hollow cathodes have been operated in a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc over wide ranges of current (0.25 to 17 kA) and mass flow (10 -3 to 8 g/sec), with orifice current densities and mass fluxes encompassing those encountered in low current steady-state hollow cathode arcs. Detailed cathode interior measurements of current and potential distributions show that maximum current penetration into the cathode is about one diameter axially upstream from the tip, with peak inner surface current attachment up to one cathode diameter upstream of the tip. The spontaneous attachment of peak current upstream of the cathode tip is suggested as a criterion for characteristic hollow cathode operation. This empirical criterion is verified by experiment

  14. A liquid-based eutectic system: LiBH4·NH 3-nNH3BH3 with high dehydrogenation capacity at moderate temperature

    Tan, Yingbin; Guo, Yanhui; Li, Shaofeng; Sun, Weiwei; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Qi; Yu, Xuebin

    2011-01-01

    A novel eutectic hydrogen storage system, LiBH4·NH 3-nNH3BH3, which exists in a liquid state at room temperature, was synthesized through a simple mixing of LiBH 4·NH3 and NH3BH3 (AB). In the temperature range of 90-110 °C, the eutectic system

  15. Thermal properties and stabilities of the eutectic mixture: 1,6-hexanediol/lauric acid as a phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Han, Lipeng; Ma, Guixiang; Xie, Shaolei; Sun, Jinhe; Jia, Yongzhong; Jing, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The eutectic mixture of 1,6-hexanediol/lauric acid was studied as a phase change material. • The mass fraction of 1,6-hexanediol in eutectic point is 70%. • The melting point and latent heat are measured to be 36.92 °C and 177.11 J g −1 . • The eutectic mixture showed good thermal and cyclic stabilities. - Abstract: Thermal properties and stabilities of the eutectic mixture: 1,6-hexanediol (HE) and lauric acid (LA) as a new phase change material (PCM) for latent heat thermal energy storage (TES) were investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicated that the aforementioned HE/LA mixture with eutectic composition (70/30 wt.%) was a suitable PCM in terms of melting point (T peak = 36.92 ± 0.71 °C) and latent heat of fusion (ΔH m = 177.11 ± 7.93 J g −1 ). After 1000 thermal cycles, the change in melting point for the eutectic mixture was in the range of −0.49% to −1.19%, and the change in latent heat of fusion was in the range of −0.22% to −3.24%. The eutectic mixture was thermally and chemically stable according to results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), volatile test and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic analysis. Therefore, the HE/LA eutectic mixture is an effective TES material to reduce energy consumption.

  16. A method for manufacturing a hollow mems structure

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for manufacturing an at least partly hollow MEMS structure. In a first step one or more through-going openings is/are provided in core material. The one or more through-going openings is/are then covered by an etch-stop layer. After this step, a bottom...... further comprises the step of creating bottom and top conductors in the respective bottom and top layers. Finally, excess core material is removed in order to create the at least partly hollow MEMS structure which may include a MEMS inductor....

  17. Rotary compression process for producing toothed hollow shafts

    J. Tomczak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical analyses of the rotary compression process for hollow stepped shafts with herringbone teeth. The numerical simulations were performed by Finite Element Method (FEM, using commercial software package DEFORM-3D. The results of numerical modelling aimed at determining the effect of billet wall thickness on product shape and the rotary compression process are presented. The distributions of strains, temperatures, damage criterion and force parameters of the process determined in the simulations are given, too. The numerical results obtained confirm the possibility of producing hollow toothed shafts from tube billet by rotary compression methods.

  18. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Silver Doped Hollow Carbon Nanofibers

    LI Fu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Silver doped PAN-based hollow carbon nanofibers were prepared combining co-electrospinning with in situ reduction technique subsequently heat treatment to improve the electrochemical performances of carbon based supercapacitor electrodes. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performances of the resulted nanofiber were studied. The results show that the silver nanoparticles can be doped on the surface of hollow carbon nanofibers and the addition of silver favors the improvement of the electrochemical performances, exhibiting the enhanced reversibility of electrode reaction and the capacitance and the reduced charge transfer impedance.

  19. Antiresonant hollow core fiber with seven nested capillaries

    Antonio-Lopez, Jose E.; Habib, Selim; Van Newkirk, Amy

    2016-01-01

    We report an antiresonant hollow core fiber formed of 7 non-touching capillaries with inner tubes. The fiber has a core diameter of ∼33μm and a core wall of ∼780nm of thickness. We demonstrate robust single mode operation at 1064nm and broad transmission bandwidth.......We report an antiresonant hollow core fiber formed of 7 non-touching capillaries with inner tubes. The fiber has a core diameter of ∼33μm and a core wall of ∼780nm of thickness. We demonstrate robust single mode operation at 1064nm and broad transmission bandwidth....

  20. Soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    of an approximate scaling relation is tested. It is concluded that compression of input pulses of several ps duration and sub-MW peak power can lead to a formation of solitons with ∼100 fs duration and multi-megawatt peak powers. The dispersion slope of realistic hollow-core fibers appears to be the main obstacle......The formation of solitons upon compression of linearly chirped pulses in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers is investigated numerically. The dependence of soliton duration on the chirp and power of the input pulse and on the dispersion slope of the fiber is investigated, and the validity...

  1. The Nature of Mercury's Hollows, and Space Weathering Close to the Sun

    Blewett, D. T.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.

    2018-05-01

    Hollows are a landform that appear to form by loss of a volatile-bearing phase from silicate rock. Hollows are very young and are likely to be forming in the present day. Hollows may be an analog for extreme weathering on near-Sun asteroids.

  2. Tunable colorimetric performance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAG:Ce{sup 3+} eutectic crystal by Ce{sup 3+} concentration

    Sai, Qinglin, E-mail: saiql@siom.ac.cn; Xia, Changtai, E-mail: xia_ct@siom.ac.cn

    2017-06-15

    Ce-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAG eutectics with different percentage of Ce were successfully grown by the optical floating zone technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the structure. The results show that they have typical eutectic structure of interpenetrating sapphire and garnet phases with the tens of microns lamella spacing. The photoluminescence spectra of the eutectics showed that they have wide excitation band, and samples with 1.6 mol% Ce-doped has the highest emission intensity. The eutectic-packaged LED has high luminous efficiency and its color can be modulated by changing Ce concentration. The results reveal that Ce-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAG eutectic is a promising phosphor for white LED applications.

  3. Investigation on cored-eutectic structure in Ni60/WC composite coatings fabricated by wide-band laser cladding

    Ma, Qunshuang, E-mail: maqunshuang@126.com; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan, E-mail: jwang@sdu.edu.cn; Liu, Kun, E-mail: liu_kun@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Perfect composite coatings were fabricated using wide-band laser cladding. • Special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized in Ni60/WC composite coatings. • Cored-eutectic consists of hard carbide compounds and fine lamellar eutectic of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe). • Wear resistance of coating layer was significantly improved due to precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. - Abstract: Ni60 composite coatings reinforced with WC particles were fabricated on the surface of Q550 steel using LDF4000-100 fiber laser device. The wide-band laser and circular beam laser used in laser cladding were obtained by optical lens. Microstructure, elemental distribution, phase constitution and wear properties of different composite coatings were investigated. The results showed that WC particles were partly dissolved under the effect of wide-band fiber laser irradiation. A special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized due to dissolution of WC particles. According to EDS and XRD results, the inside cores were confirmed as carbides of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} enriched in Cr, W and Fe. These complex carbides were primarily separated out in the molten metal when solidification started. Eutectic structure composed of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe) grew around carbides when cooling. Element content of Cr and W is lower at the bottom of cladding layer. In consequence, the eutectic structure formed in this region did not have inside carbides. The coatings made by circular laser beam were composed of dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic carbides, lacking of block carbides. Compared to coatings made by circular laser spot, the cored-eutectic structure formed in wide-band coatings had advantages of well-distribution and tight binding with matrix. The uniform power density and energy distribution and the weak liquid convection in molten pool lead to the unique microstructure evolution in composite coatings made by wide-band laser

  4. Directional crystallization of B4C-NbB2 and B4C-MoB2 eutectic compositions

    Paderno, Varvara; Paderno, Y.B.; Filippov, Vladimir; Liashchenko, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    We studied the directional crystallization of different compositions in B 4 C-NbB 2 and B 4 C-MoB 2 systems. The eutectic compositions for both systems are evaluated. It is shown that in the first system the rod-like eutectic structure is formed, in second, the 'Chinese hieroglyphics'. In both cases high hardness and high microplasticity are observed, which are much more than for individual component phases. These compositions may be considered as a new kind of self-strengthening composite materials

  5. SuDS for managing surface water in Diepsloot informal settlement ...

    2017-04-02

    Apr 2, 2017 ... ... of intervention. Keywords: SuDS, action research, water quality, informal settlements, Diepsloot ..... principles, solutions were explored that were a fusion of these ... was thought that the leachates from the landfill and surface.

  6. An efficient digital signal processing method for RRNS-based DS-CDMA systems

    Peter Olsovsky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an efficient method for achieving low power and high speed in advanced Direct-Sequence Code Division Multiple-Access (DS-CDMA wireless communication systems based on the Residue Number System (RNS. A modified algorithm for multiuser DS-CDMA signal generation in MATLAB is proposed and investigated. The most important characteristics of the generated PN code are also presented. Subsequently, a DS-CDMA system based on the combination of the RNS or the so-called Redundant Residue Number System (RRNS is proposed. The enhanced method using a spectrally efficient 8-PSK data modulation scheme to improve the bandwidth efficiency for RRNS-based DS-CDMA systems is presented. By using the C-measure (complexity measure of the error detection function, it is possible to estimate the size of the circuit. Error detection function in RRNSs can be efficiently implemented by LookUp Table (LUT cascades.

  7. A Charrelation Matrix-Based Blind Adaptive Detector for DS-CDMA Systems

    Zhongqiang Luo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a blind adaptive detector is proposed for blind separation of user signals and blind estimation of spreading sequences in DS-CDMA systems. The blind separation scheme exploits a charrelation matrix for simple computation and effective extraction of information from observation signal samples. The system model of DS-CDMA signals is modeled as a blind separation framework. The unknown user information and spreading sequence of DS-CDMA systems can be estimated only from the sampled observation signals. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the improved performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison with the existing conventional algorithms used in DS-CDMA systems. Especially, the proposed scheme is suitable for when the number of observation samples is less and the signal to noise ratio (SNR is low.

  8. Uniform Circular Antenna Array Applications in Coded DS-CDMA Mobile Communication Systems

    Seow, Tian

    2003-01-01

    ...) has greatly increased. This thesis examines the use of an equally spaced circular adaptive antenna array at the mobile station for a typical coded direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA...

  9. A Charrelation Matrix-Based Blind Adaptive Detector for DS-CDMA Systems.

    Luo, Zhongqiang; Zhu, Lidong

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, a blind adaptive detector is proposed for blind separation of user signals and blind estimation of spreading sequences in DS-CDMA systems. The blind separation scheme exploits a charrelation matrix for simple computation and effective extraction of information from observation signal samples. The system model of DS-CDMA signals is modeled as a blind separation framework. The unknown user information and spreading sequence of DS-CDMA systems can be estimated only from the sampled observation signals. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the improved performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison with the existing conventional algorithms used in DS-CDMA systems. Especially, the proposed scheme is suitable for when the number of observation samples is less and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low.

  10. SMART-DS: Synthetic Models for Advanced, Realistic Testing: Distribution Systems and Scenarios

    Palmintier, Bryan: Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2017-01-26

    This presentation provides a Smart-DS project overview and status update for the ARPA-e GRID DATA program meeting 2017, including distribution systems, models, and scenarios, as well as opportunities for GRID DATA collaborations.

  11. Parameters promoting liquid metal embrittlement of the T91 steel in lead-bismuth eutectic alloy

    Proriol Serre, I.; Ye, C.; Vogt, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    The use of liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) as a spallation target and a coolant in accelerator-driven systems raises the question of the reliability of structural materials, such as T91 martensitic steel in terms of liquid metal assisted damage and corrosion. In this study, the mechanical behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel was examined in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and in inert atmosphere. Several conditions showed the most sensitive embrittlement factor. The Small Punch Test technique was employed using smooth specimens. In this standard heat treatment, T91 appeared in general as a ductile material, and became brittle in the considered conditions if the test was performed in LBE. It turns out that the loading rate appeared as a critical parameter for the occurrence of liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the T91 steel in LBE. Loading the T91 very slowly instead of rapidly in oxygen saturated LBE resulted in brittle fracture. Furthermore, low-oxygen content in LBE and an increase in temperature promote LME. (authors)

  12. Thermodynamic properties and equation of state of liquid lead and lead bismuth eutectic

    Sobolev, V. P.; Schuurmans, P.; Benamati, G.

    2008-06-01

    Since the 1950s, liquid lead (Pb) and lead-bismuth eutectic (Pb-Bi) have been studied in the USA, Canada and in the former-USSR as potential coolants for nuclear installations due to their very attractive thermophysical and neutronic properties. However, experimental data on the thermal properties of these coolants in the temperature range of interest are still incomplete and often contradictory. This makes it very difficult to perform design calculations and to analyse the normal and abnormal behaviour of nuclear installations where these coolants are expected to be used. Recently, a compilation of heavy liquid metal (HLM) properties along with recommendations for its use was prepared by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Fuel Cycle (WPFC) Expert Group on Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Technology. A brief review of this compilation and some new data are presented in this article. A set of correlations for the temperature dependence of the main thermodynamic properties of Pb and Pb-Bi(e) at normal pressure, and a set of simplified thermal and caloric equations of state for the liquid phase are proposed.

  13. Liquid-liquid structure transition and nucleation in undercooled Co-B eutectic alloys

    He, Yixuan [Northwestern Polytechnical University, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Xi' an, Shanxi (China); Universite Grenoble Alpes, LNCMI, Grenoble (France); CNRS, LNCMI, Grenoble (France); Li, Jinshan; Wang, Jun; Kou, Hongchao [Northwestern Polytechnical University, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Xi' an, Shanxi (China); Beagunon, Eric [Universite Grenoble Alpes, LNCMI, Grenoble (France); CNRS, LNCMI, Grenoble (France)

    2017-06-15

    Cyclic superheating and cooling were carried out for the undercooled hypereutectic Co{sub 80}B{sub 20}, eutectic Co{sub 81.5}B{sub 18.5,} and hypoeutectic Co{sub 83}B{sub 17} alloys. For each alloy, there is a critical overheating temperature T{sub c}° at which there is a sharp increase of the mean undercooling, i.e., below (above) T{sub c}°, and the mean undercooling is about 80 °C (200 °C). DSC measurements show that there is a thermal absorption peak in the heating process, the peak temperature of which is nearly equal to the critical overheating temperature, indicating that the temperature-induced liquid-liquid structure transition does occur and should relate highly to nucleation in the undercooled Co-B eutectic melts. The effect of the liquid-liquid structure transition on nucleation was interpreted by the recent nucleation theory that considers the structures of overheated melts, and the composition-dependent overheating temperature was ascribed to the change of local favored structures. The present work provides further evidences for the liquid-liquid structure transition and is helpful for understanding solidification in undercooled melts. (orig.)

  14. Effect of rare earth elements on uranium electrodeposition in LiCl-KCI eutectic salt

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Peak, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to investigate the electrodeposition behavior of uranium and other elements on the cathode in the electrorefining process to recover the uranium selectively from the reduced metals of the electrolytic reduction process since transuranic elements and rare earth elements is dissolved in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Study on separation factors of U, Ce, Y and Nd based on U and Ce was performed to investigate the deposition behavior of the cathode with respect to the concentration of rare earth elements in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. After electrorefining with constant current mode by using Ce metal as a sacrifice anode, the contents of U, Ce, Y and Nd in the salt phase and the deposit phase of the cathode were analyzed, and separation factors of the elements were obtained from the analyses. Securing conditions of pure uranium recovery in the electrorefining process was investigated by considering the separation factors with respect to UCl 3 and CeCl 3 /UCl 3 ratio

  15. Electrochemical study in the molten sodium acid sulphate - potassium acid sulphate eutectic

    Le Ber, F.

    1964-01-01

    The general properties of the NaHSO 4 - KHSO 4 molten eutectic resemble those of neutral sulphates and those of concentrated H 2 SO 4 . We have been able to show the existence in solution of the ions HSO - 4 SO 2- 4 , and H 3 O + , these last being formed by the action of the HSO - 4 ions on dissolved H 2 O. The electro-active zone with a polished platinum electrode is limited in oxidation by the ions H 3 O + and SO 2- 4 , and in reduction by the protons of HSO - 4 . We have compared the electro-active zones obtained with different electrodes (Ag-Au-graphite-mercury). We have considered the dissolution of a few metallic oxides and halides. This work shows the role as O 2- ion acceptors of HSO - 4 ions. We have undertaken an electro-chemical study of a few oxido-reduction Systems: H + / H 2 , Ag↓ / Ag (1), the vanadium and uranium Systems, those of mercury Hg↓ / Hg 2- 2 and of gold Au/Au 3+ , then of the attack by the solvent of a few common metals such as aluminium, iron, copper and nickel. The study of silver Systems has made it possible to obtain the solubility products of AgCl and AgBr and to consider the possibility of coulometric titration Cl - ions with Ag + ions. We have shown the existence of various chemical species of vanadium which may exist in the molten eutectic. (author) [fr

  16. Recovery of Residual LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salts in Radioactive Rare Earth Precipitates

    Eun, Hee Chul; Yang, Hee Chul; Kim, In Tae; Lee, Han Soo; Cho, Yung Zun

    2010-01-01

    For the pyrochemical process of spent nuclear fuels, recovery of LiCl-KCl eutectic salts is needed to reduce radioactive waste volume and to recycle resource materials. This paper is about recovery of residual LiCl-KCl eutectic salts in radioactive rare earth precipitates (rare earth oxychlorides or oxides) by using a vacuum distillation process. In the vacuum distillation test apparatus, the salts in the rare earth precipitates were vaporized and were separated effectively. The separated salts were deposited in three positions of the vacuum distillation test apparatus or were collected in the filter and it is difficult to recover them. To resolve the problem, a vacuum distillation and condensation system, which is subjected to the force of a temperature gradient at a reduced pressure, was developed. In a preliminary test of the vacuum distillation/condensation recovery system, it was confirmed that it was possible to condense the vaporized salts only in the salt collector and to recover the condensed salts from the salt collector easily

  17. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Ben De Pauw

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation.

  18. Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) as green solvents for carbon dioxide capture

    Mulia, Kamarza; Putri, Sylvania; Krisanti, Elsa; Nasruddin

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent (NADES), consisting of choline chloride and a hydrogen bonding donor (HBD) compound, in terms of carbon dioxide absorption. Solubility of carbon dioxide in NADES was found to be influenced HBD compound used and choline chloride to HBD ratio, carbon dioxide pressure, and contact time. HBD and choline/HBD ratios used were 1,2-propanediol (1:2), glycerol (1:2), and malic acid (1:1). The carbon dioxide absorption measurement was conducted using an apparatus that utilizes the volumetric method. Absorption curves were obtained up to pressures of 30 bar, showing a linear relationship between the amount absorbed and the final pressure of carbon dioxide. The choline and 1,2-propanediol eutectic mixture absorbs the highest amount of carbon dioxide, approaching 0.1 mole-fraction at 3.0 MPa and 50°C. We found that NADES ability to absorb carbon dioxide correlates with its polarity as tested using Nile Red as a solvatochromic probe.

  19. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG.

  20. Creep deformation behavior in eutectic Sn-Ag solder joints using a novel mapping technique

    Lucas, J.P.; Guo, F.; McDougall, J.; Bieler, T.R.; Subramanian, K.N.; Park, J.K.

    1999-11-01

    Creep deformation behavior was measured for 60--100 {micro}m thick solder joints. The solder joints investigated consisted of: (1) non-composite solder joints made with eutectic Sn-Ag solder, and (2) composite solder joints with eutectic Sn-Ag solder containing 20 vol.%, 5 {micro}m diameter in-situ Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic reinforcements. All creep testing in this study was carried out at room temperature. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of creep deformation was characterized on the solder joints. Creep deformation was analyzed using a novel mapping technique where a geometrical-regular line pattern was etched over the entire solder joint using excimer laser ablation. During creep, the laser-ablation (LA) pattern becomes distorted due to deformation in the solder joint. By imaging the distortion of laser-ablation patterns using the SEM, actual deformation mapping for the entire solder joint is revealed. The technique involves sequential optical/digital imaging of the deformation versus time history during creep. By tracing and recording the deformation of the LA patterns on the solder over intervals of time, local creep data are obtained in many locations in the joint. This analysis enables global and localized creep shear strains and strain rate to be determined.

  1. Density functional theory study of the interfacial properties of Ni/Ni3Si eutectic alloy

    Zhao, Yuhong; Wen, Zhiqin; Hou, Hua; Guo, Wei; Han, Peide

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the heterogeneous nucleation potential of α-Ni grains on Ni 3 Si particles in Ni-Ni 3 Si eutectic alloy, the work of adhesion (W ad ), fracture toughness (G), interfacial energy (γ i ), and electronic structure of the index (0 0 1), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) Ni/Ni 3 Si interfaces with two different cohesive manners are investigated using first-principles method based on density functional theory. Results indicate that the center site stacking sequence (OM) is preferable to continue the natural stacking sequence of bulk Ni and Ni 3 Si. Since OM stacking interfaces have larger W ad , G and γ i than that of the top site stacking (OT) interfaces. The Ni/Ni 3 Si (1 1 0) interface with OM stacking has the best mechanical properties. Therefore, the formation of this interface can improve the stability, ductility and fracture toughness of Ni-Ni 3 Si eutectic alloy. The calculated interfacial energy of Ni/Ni 3 Si (0 0 1), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) interfaces with OM stacking proves the excellent nucleation potency of Ni 3 Si particles for α-Ni phase from thermodynamic considerations. Besides, the electronic structure and chemical bonding of (1 1 0) interface with OM stacking are also discussed.

  2. Crystallization behavior of Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 films in optical disks

    Khulbe, Pramod K.; Hurst, Terril; Mansuripur, Masud; Horie, Michikazu

    2002-01-01

    We report laser-induced crystallization behavior of binary Sb-Te and ternary Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 thin film samples in a typical quadrilayer stack as used in phase-change optical disk data storage. Several experiments have been conducted on a two-laser static tester in which one laser operating in pulse mode writes crystalline marks on amorphous film or amorphous marks on crystalline film, while the second laser operating at low-power cw mode simultaneously monitors the progress of the crystalline or amorphous mark formation in real time in terms of the reflectivity variation. The results of this study show that the crystallization kinetics of this class of film is strongly growth dominant, which is significantly different from the crystallization kinetics of stochiometric Ge-Sb-Te compositions. In Sb-Te and Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 thin-film samples, the crystallization behavior of the two forms of amorphous states, namely, as-deposited amorphous state and melt-quenched amorphous state, remains approximately same. We have also presented experiments showing the effect of the variation of the Sb/Te ratio and Ge doping on the crystallization behavior of these films

  3. Green Processing of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Its Derivatives in Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Tang, Xing; Zuo, Miao; Li, Zheng; Liu, Huai; Xiong, Caixia; Zeng, Xianhai; Sun, Yong; Hu, Lei; Liu, Shijie; Lei, Tingzhou; Lin, Lu

    2017-07-10

    The scientific community has been seeking cost-competitive and green solvents with good dissolving capacity for the valorization of lignocellulosic biomass. At this point, deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are currently emerging as a new class of promising solvents that are generally liquid eutectic mixtures formed by self-association (or hydrogen-bonding interaction) of two or three components. DESs are attractive solvents for the fractionation (or pretreatment) of lignocellulose and the valorization of lignin, owing to the high solubility of lignin in DESs. DESs are also employed as effective media for the modification of cellulose to afford functionalized cellulosic materials, such as cellulose nanocrystals. More interestingly, biomassderived carbohydrates, such as fructose, can be used as one of the constituents of DESs and then dehydrated to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in high yield. In this review, a comprehensive summary of recent contribution of DESs to the processing of lignocellulosic biomass and its derivatives is provided. Moreover, further discussion about the challenges of the application of DESs in biomass processing is presented. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Synthesis of a Novel Allyl-Functionalized Deep Eutectic Solvent to Promote Dissolution of Cellulose

    Hongwei Ren

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep eutectic solvents (DESs offer attractive options for the “green” dissolution of cellulose. However, the protic hydroxyl group causes weak dissolving ability of DESs, requiring the substitution of hydroxyl groups in the cation. In this study, a novel allyl-functionalized DES was synthesized and characterized, and its possible effect on improved dissolution of cellulose was investigated. The DES was synthesized by a eutectic mixture of allyl triethyl ammonium chloride ([ATEAm]Cl and oxalic acid (Oxa at a molar ratio of 1:1 and a freezing point of 49 °C. The [ATEAm]Cl-Oxa exhibited high polarity (56.40 kcal/mol, dipolarity/polarizability effects (1.10, hydrogen-bond donating acidity (0.41, hydrogen-bond basicity (0.89, and low viscosity (76 cP at 120 °C owing to the π-π conjugative effect induced by the allyl group. The correlation between temperature and viscosity on the [ATEAm]Cl-Oxa fit the Arrhenius equation well. The [ATEAm]Cl-Oxa showed low pseudo activation energy for viscous flow (44.56 kJ/mol. The improved properties of the [ATEAm]Cl-Oxa noticeably promoted the solubility (6.48 wt.% of cellulose.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of thulium and ytterbium in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic

    Novoselova, A., E-mail: A.Novoselova@ihte.uran.ru [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Smolenski, V. [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: > Tm and Yb chloride compounds as fission products. > The investigation of electrochemical properties of lanthanides. > Determination of the apparent standard redox potentials of the couple Ln(III)/Ln(II) in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic at (823 to 973) K. > The calculation of the basic thermodynamic properties of redox reaction in molten salt. - Abstract: This work presents the results of a study of the Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+} and Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+} couple redox potentials vs. Cl{sup -}/Cl{sub 2} reference electrode at the temperature range (823 to 973) K in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic by direct potentiometric method. Initial concentrations of TmCl{sub 3} and YbCl{sub 3} in solvents did not exceed 5.0 mol%. Basic thermodynamic properties of the reactions TmCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} TmCl{sub 3(l)} and YbCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} YbCl{sub 3(l)} were calculated using the temperature dependencies of apparent standard potentials of the couples E{sub Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+*}} and E{sub Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+*}}.

  6. A eutectic-alloy-infused soft actuator with sensing, tunable degrees of freedom, and stiffness properties

    Hao, Yufei; Wang, Tianmiao; Xie, Zhexin; Sun, Wenguang; Liu, Zemin; Fang, Xi; Yang, Minxuan; Wen, Li

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a soft actuator embedded with two types of eutectic alloys which enable sensing, tunable mechanical degrees of freedom (DOF), and variable stiffness properties. To modulate the stiffness of the actuator, we embedded a low melting point alloy (LMPA) in the bottom portion of the soft actuator. Different sections of the LMPA could be selectively melted by the Ni-Cr wires twined underneath. To acquire the curvature information, EGaIn (eutectic gallium indium) was infused into a microchannel surrounding the chambers of the soft actuator. Systematic experiments were performed to characterize the stiffness, tunable DOF, and sensing the bending curvature. We found that the average bending force and elasticity modulus could be increased about 35 and 4000 times, respectively, with the LMPA in a solid state. The entire LMPA could be melted from a solid to a liquid state within 12 s. In particular, up to six different motion patterns could be achieved under each pneumatic pressure of the soft actuator. Furthermore, the kinematics of the actuator under different motion patterns could be obtained by a mathematical model whose input was provided by the EGaIn sensor. For demonstration purposes, a two-fingered gripper was fabricated to grasp various objects by adjusting the DOF and mechanical stiffness.

  7. Improved mechanical properties of near-eutectic Al-Si piston alloy through ultrasonic melt treatment

    Jung, Jae-Gil; Lee, Sang-Hwa [Implementation Research Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 51508 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Moo, E-mail: jmoolee@kims.re.kr [Implementation Research Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 51508 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young-Hee [Implementation Research Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 51508 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su-Hyeon [Metal Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 51508 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Woon-Ha [Implementation Research Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 51508 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-04

    The effects of ultrasonic melt treatment (UST) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-12.2Si-3.3Cu-2.4Ni-0.8Mg-0.1Fe (wt%) piston alloy were systematically investigated. Rigid colonies consisting of primary Si, eutectic Si, Mg{sub 2}Si and various aluminides (ε-Al{sub 3}Ni, δ-Al{sub 3}CuNi, π-Al{sub 8}FeMg{sub 3}Si{sub 6}, γ-Al{sub 7}Cu{sub 4}Ni, Q-Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} and θ-Al{sub 2}Cu) were observed in the as-cast alloys. The sizes of the secondary phases, eutectic cell and grain were significantly decreased by UST because of the enhanced nucleation of each phase under ultrasonic irradiation. The yield strength, tensile strength and elongation at 25 °C were significantly improved by UST mainly because of the refinement of the microstructures. Both tensile strength and elongation at 350 °C were also improved by UST despite the unchanged yield strength.

  8. Influence of Lanthanum on Solidification, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Eutectic Al-Si Piston Alloy

    Ahmad, R.; Asmael, M. B. A.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of Lanthanum (La) concentration on the solidification parameters of the α-Al, Al-Si, and Al-Cu phases and on the microstructure, tensile, and hardness properties of eutectic Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy were systematically investigated. The solidification parameters were examined using computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis (CA-CCTA). The cooling curve and microstructure analysis showed that La altered the Si structure. The nucleation and growth temperatures of eutectic Si decreased when 0.3 wt.% La was added, and a high depression temperature was obtained with 1.0 wt.% La. High amounts of La considerably modified the Si structure and decreased the area and aspect ratio by 69.9 and 51%, respectively. The thermal analysis result recorded a faster freezing time with the La addition and a 36% alteration in the secondary dendrite arm spacing. Two secondary or ternary La-rich intermetallic phases were formed with needle- and plate-like structures. Furthermore, the mechanical properties were investigated by hardness and tensile tests with different La concentrations. The addition of small amounts of La (0.1 wt.%) significantly improved the ultimate tensile strength and quality index of the Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy. In addition, the hardness value of Al-11Si-Cu increased by 7-8% with the increasing amount of La added.

  9. Structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by dsRNA-binding domains of human RNA helicase A (DHX9).

    Fu, Qinqin; Yuan, Y Adam

    2013-03-01

    Intensive research interest has focused on small RNA-processing machinery and the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), key cellular machines in RNAi pathways. However, the structural mechanism regarding RISC assembly, the primary step linking small RNA processing and RNA-mediated gene silencing, is largely unknown. Human RNA helicase A (DHX9) was reported to function as an RISC-loading factor, and such function is mediated mainly by its dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Here, we report the crystal structures of human RNA helicase A (RHA) dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 domains in complex with dsRNAs, respectively. Structural analysis not only reveals higher siRNA duplex-binding affinity displayed by dsRBD1, but also identifies a crystallographic dsRBD1 pair of physiological significance in cooperatively recognizing dsRNAs. Structural observations are further validated by isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) assay. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assay coupled with mutagenesis demonstrated that both dsRBDs are required for RISC association, and such association is mediated by dsRNA. Hence, our structural and functional efforts have revealed a potential working model for siRNA recognition by RHA tandem dsRBDs, and together they provide direct structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by RHA.

  10. Implementation of Distance Support (DS) to Reduce Total Ownership Cost (R-TOC)

    2012-02-01

    Policy of 22 Mar 2007, states that DS combines people, processes and technology into a collaborative infrastructure regardless of geographic location...Tech Assist Data for Submarine Enterprise 120 FTA Events Performed 164 MH Via On-Si te Support Average Cost Per Event (Based on $60.00 Per Hour...CFFC/Command Policy) 16% Success Rate Overa l l On Al l FTA Events 37% Success Rate On Out-Of-Area Events Average MHs Per Event 19 MH Via DS

  11. Goatpoxvirus ATPase activity is increased by dsDNA and decreased by zinc ion.

    Lee, Ming-Liang; Hsu, Wei-Li; Wang, Chi-Young; Chen, Hui-Yu; Lin, Fong-Yuan; Chang, Ming-Huang; Chang, Hong-You; Wong, Min-Liang; Chan, Kun-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Viral-encoded ATPase can act as a part of molecular motor in genome packaging of DNA viruses, such as vaccinia virus and adenovirus, by ATP hydrolysis and interaction with DNA. Poxviral ATPase (also called A32) is involved in genomic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) encapsidation, and inhibition of the expression of A32 causes formation of immature virions lacking viral DNA. However, the role of A32 in goatpoxvirus genome packaging and its dsDNA binding property are not known. In this study, purified recombinant goatpoxvirus A32 protein (rA32) was examined for its dsDNA binding property as well as the effect of dsDNA on ATP hydrolysis. We found that rA32 could bind dsDNA, and its ATPase activity was significant increased with dsDNA binding. Effects of magnesium and calcium ions on ATP hydrolysis were investigated also. The ATPase activity was dramatically enhanced by dsDNA in the presence of Mg(2+); in contrast, ATPase function was not altered by Ca(2+). Furthermore, the enzyme activity of rA32 was completely blocked by Zn(2+). Regarding DNA-protein interaction, the rA32-ATP-Mg(2+) showed lower dsDNA binding affinity than that of rA32-ATP-Ca(2+). The DNA-protein binding was stronger in the presence of zinc ion. Our results implied that A32 may play a role in viral genome encapsidation and DNA condensation.

  12. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  13. In-medium properties of pseudoscalar D_s and B_s mesons

    Chhabra, Rahul; Kumar, Arvind

    2017-11-01

    We calculate the shift in the masses and decay constants of D_s(1968) and B_s(5370) mesons in hot and dense asymmetric strange hadronic matter using QCD sum rules and chiral SU(3) model. In-medium strange quark condensates _{ρ _B}, and gluon condensates _{ρ _B}, to be used in the QCD sum rules for pseudoscalar D_s and B_s mesons, are calculated using a chiral SU(3) model. As an application of our present work, we calculate the in-medium decay widths of the excited (c\\bar{s}) states D_s^*(2715) and D_s^*(2860) decaying to (D_s(1968),η ) mesons. The medium effects in their decay widths are incorporated through the mass modification of the D_s(1968) and η mesons. The results of the present investigation may be helpful in understanding the possible outcomes of the future experiments like CBM and PANDA under the FAIR facility.

  14. On the completeness of the set of classical W-algebras obtained from DS reductions

    Feher, L.; Ruelle, P.; Tsutsui, I.

    1993-04-01

    We clarify the notions of the DS-generalized Drinfeld-Sokolov-reduction approach to classical W-algebras and collect evidence supporting the conjecture that the canonical W-algebras (called W S G -algebras), defined by the highest weights of the sl(2) embeddings S contains or equal to G into the simple Lie algebras, essentially exhaust the set of W-algebras that may be obtained by reducing the affine Kac-Moody (KM) Poisson bracket algebras in this approach. We first prove that an sl(2) embedding S contains or equal to G can be associated to every DS reduction and then derive restrictions on the possible cases belonging to the same sl(2) embedding. We find examples of noncanonical DS reductions, but in all those examples the resultant noncanonical W-algebra decouples into the direct product of the corresponding W S G -algebra and a system of 'free fields' with conformal weights Δ element of {0, 1/2, 1}. We also show that if the conformal weights of the generators of a W-algebra obtained from DS reduction are nonnegative Δ ≥ 0 (which is the case for all DS reductions known to date), then the Δ ≥ 3/2 subsectors of the weights are necessarily the same as in the corresponding W S G -algebra. The paper is concluded by a list of open problems concerning DS reductions and more general Hamiltonian KM reductions. (orig.)

  15. Hollow density profile on electron cyclotron resonance heating JFT-2M plasma

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Kawashima, Hisato; Ogawa, Toshihide; Kawakami, Tomohide; Shiina, Tomio; Ishige, Youichi

    1998-01-01

    The first hollow electron density profile in the central region on the JAERI Fusion Torus-2M (JFT-2M) is measured during electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with a TV Thomson scattering system (TVTS). The peripheral region is not hollow but is accumulated due to pump-out from the central region. The hollowness increases with time but is saturated at ∼40 ms and maintains a constant hollow ratio. The hollowness is strongly related to the steep temperature gradient of the heated zone. (author)

  16. High performance yttrium-doped BSCF hollow fibre membranes

    Haworth, P.; Smart, S.; Glasscock, Julie

    2012-01-01

    measurements in air was similar for both compositions, suggesting that the higher oxygen fluxes obtained for BSCFY hollow fibres could be attributed to the higher non-stoichiometry due to yttrium addition to the BSCF crystal structure. In addition, the improvement of oxygen fluxes for small wall thickness (∼0...

  17. Measurements on the source properties of a hollow cathode

    Vogels, J.M.M.J.; Konings, L.U.E.; Koelman, J.M.V.A.; Schram, D.C.; Bötticher, W.; Wenk, H.; Schulz-Gulde, E.

    1983-01-01

    The ion production rate of a hollow cathode in a magnetized arc has been measured. At low magnetic fields supersonic ion drifts have been observed. The ionized fraction of the gas flow decreases with increasing flow and the ion flux saturates at high flow rates

  18. Auger electron and X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atoms

    Morgenstern, R; Johnson, RL; Schmidtbocking, H; Sonntag, BF

    1997-01-01

    Hollow atoms as formed during collisions of multiply charged ions on metallic, semiconducting and insulating surfaces have in recent years successfully been investigated by various spectroscopic methods: low- and high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy as well as high resolution Auger electron

  19. The magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    We consider the magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet. This magnet is the cylindrical permanent magnet that generates a uniform field in the cylinder bore, using the least amount of magnetic energy to do so. The remanence distribution of this magnet is derived...

  20. Preparation of hollow fiber membranes for gas separation

    Li, Shu-Guang

    1994-01-01

    Today, immersion precipitation is the most often used process for the preparation of gas separation membranes from polymeric materials. In this process a polymer solution in the form of a thin liquid film or hollow fiber is immersed in a nonsolvent bath where the polymer precipitates and forms a

  1. Fire Response of Concrete Filled Hollow Steel Sections

    Nyman, Simon; Virdi, Kuldeep

    2011-01-01

    Advanced and simplified methods of analysis and design for the fire resistance of structural elements and assemblages of structures have been developed in recent years. Some simplified methods for the fire design of concrete filled tubes have appeared in Eurocode 4 part 1.2. Experience to date in...... hollow sections....

  2. theoretical investigation of stresses distributions in hollow sandcrete

    user

    The test thin plate distributes the load on the block and the hollow block is regarded as a two ... Some research works had been done on the relationship between cavity ... The results would help reduce the cost, labour and time necessary to.

  3. Hollow Nanospheres Array Fabrication via Nano-Conglutination Technology.

    Zhang, Man; Deng, Qiling; Xia, Liangping; Shi, Lifang; Cao, Axiu; Pang, Hui; Hu, Song

    2015-09-01

    Hollow nanospheres array is a special nanostructure with great applications in photonics, electronics and biochemistry. The nanofabrication technique with high resolution is crucial to nanosciences and nano-technology. This paper presents a novel nonconventional nano-conglutination technology combining polystyrenes spheres (PSs) self-assembly, conglutination and a lift-off process to fabricate the hollow nanospheres array with nanoholes. A self-assembly monolayer of PSs was stuck off from the quartz wafer by the thiol-ene adhesive material, and then the PSs was removed via a lift-off process and the hollow nanospheres embedded into the thiol-ene substrate was obtained. Thiolene polymer is a UV-curable material via "click chemistry" reaction at ambient conditions without the oxygen inhibition, which has excellent chemical and physical properties to be attractive as the adhesive material in nano-conglutination technology. Using the technique, a hollow nanospheres array with the nanoholes at the diameter of 200 nm embedded into the rigid thiol-ene substrate was fabricated, which has great potential to serve as a reaction container, catalyst and surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate.

  4. Silicon micromachined hollow microneedles for transdermal liquid transport

    Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Lüttge, Regina; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Yeshurun, Shuki Y.; Hefetz, Meir; van 't Oever, Ronny; van den Berg, Albert

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel process for the fabrication of out-of-plane hollow microneedles in silicon. The fabrication method consists of a sequence of deep-reactive ion etching (DRIE), anisotropic wet etching and conformal thin film deposition, and allows needle shapes with different,

  5. Silicon micromachined hollow microneedles for transdermal liquid transport

    Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Luttge, R.; Berenschot, J.W.; Boer, de M.J.; Yeshurun, S.Y.; Hefetz, M.; Oever, van't R.; Berg, van den A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel process for the fabrication of out-of-plane hollow micro needles in silicon. The fabrication method consists of a sequence of deep-reactive ion etching (DRIE), anisotropic wet etching and conformal thin film deposition, and allows needle shapes with different,

  6. A microring multimode laser using hollow polymer optical fibre

    Dye-doped optical fibre; fibre laser; microcavity; whispering gallery mode. ... Cylindrical microcavities with diameters 155, 340 and 615 m were fabricated from a dye-doped hollow polymer optical fibre preform. ... International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682 022, India ...

  7. Hollow-core photonic band gap fibers for particle acceleration

    Robert J. Noble

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Photonic band gap (PBG dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency passbands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of prototype PBG fibers with dimensions appropriate for speed-of-light TM modes.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanoenergetic Hollow Spherical Hexanitrostibene (HNS Derivatives

    Xiong Cao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherization of nanoenergetic materials is the best way to improve the sensitivity and increase loading densities and detonation properties for weapons and ammunition, but the preparation of spherical nanoenergetic materials with high regularization, uniform size and monodispersity is still a challenge. In this paper, nanoenergetic hollow spherical hexanitrostibene (HNS derivatives were fabricated via a one-pot copolymerization strategy, which is based on the reaction of HNS and piperazine in acetonitrile solution. Characterization results indicated the as-prepared reaction nanoenergetic products were HNS-derived oligomers, where a free radical copolymerization reaction process was inferred. The hollow sphere structure of the HNS derivatives was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and synchrotron radiation X-ray imaging technology. The properties of the nanoenergetic hollow spherical derivatives, including thermal decomposition and sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sensitivity studies showed that the nanoenergetic derivatives exhibited lower impact, friction and spark sensitivity than raw HNS. Thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimeter (TG-DSC results showed that continuous exothermic decomposition occurred in the whole temperature range, which indicated that nanoenergetic derivatives have a unique role in thermal applications. Therefore, nanoenergetic hollow spherical HNS derivatives could provide a new way to modify the properties of certain energetic compounds and fabricate spherical nanomaterials to improve the charge configuration.

  9. High selectivity ZIF-93 hollow fiber membranes for gas separation.

    Cacho-Bailo, Fernando; Caro, Guillermo; Etxeberría-Benavides, Miren; Karvan, Oğuz; Téllez, Carlos; Coronas, Joaquín

    2015-06-30

    Zeolitic imidazolate framework-93 (ZIF-93) continuous membranes were synthesized on the inner side of P84 co-polyimide hollow fiber supports by microfluidics. MOFs and polymers showed high compatibility and the membrane exhibited H2-CH4 and CO2-CH4 separation selectivities of 97 (100 °C) and 17 (35 °C), respectively.

  10. Morphology conserving aminopropyl functionalization of hollow silica nanospheres in toluene

    Dobó, Dorina G.; Berkesi, Dániel; Kukovecz, Ákos

    2017-07-01

    Inorganic nanostructures containing cavities of monodisperse diameter distribution find applications in e.g. catalysis, adsorption and drug delivery. One of their possible synthesis routes is the template assisted core-shell synthesis. We synthesized hollow silica spheres around polystyrene cores by the sol-gel method. The polystyrene template was removed by heat treatment leaving behind a hollow spherical shell structure. The surface of the spheres was then modified by adding aminopropyl groups. Here we present the first experimental evidence that toluene is a suitable alternative functionalization medium for the resulting thin shells, and report the comprehensive characterization of the amino-functionalized hollow silica spheres based on scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption, FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrokinetic potential measurement. Both the presence of the amino groups and the preservation of the hollow spherical morphology were unambiguously proven. The introduction of the amine functionality adds amphoteric character to the shell as shown by the zeta potential vs. pH function. Unlike pristine silica particles, amino-functionalized nanosphere aqueous sols can be stable at both acidic and basic conditions.

  11. comparative analysis of the compressive strength of hollow

    user

    2016-04-02

    Apr 2, 2016 ... Previous analysis showed that cavity size and number on one hand and combinations thickness affect the compressive strength of hollow sandcrete blocks. Series arrangement of the cavities is common but parallel arrangement has been recommended. This research performed a comparative analysis of ...

  12. Biotemplate synthesis of monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres

    Cao Feng; Li Dongxu

    2010-01-01

    Monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres with a high degree of crystallization were prepared through a facile in situ deposition method using rape pollen grains as a biotemplate. The functional group on the surface of the pollen grains could adsorb Fe 3+ , which provided the nucleation sites for growth of iron phosphate nanoparticles. After being sintered at 600 deg. C for 10 h, the pollen grains were removed and iron phosphate hollow microspheres were obtained. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction were applied to characterize the morphology and crystalline structure of the pollen grains, iron phosphate-coated pollen grains and iron phosphate hollow microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravity analyses were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the iron phosphate-coated pollen grains during the calcinations. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the interaction between the pollen grains and iron phosphate. The effect of the pollen wall on the surface morphology of these iron phosphate hollow microspheres was also proven in this work.

  13. Biotemplate synthesis of monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres

    Cao Feng; Li Dongxu, E-mail: dongxuli@njut.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Jiangsu Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres with a high degree of crystallization were prepared through a facile in situ deposition method using rape pollen grains as a biotemplate. The functional group on the surface of the pollen grains could adsorb Fe{sup 3+}, which provided the nucleation sites for growth of iron phosphate nanoparticles. After being sintered at 600 deg. C for 10 h, the pollen grains were removed and iron phosphate hollow microspheres were obtained. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction were applied to characterize the morphology and crystalline structure of the pollen grains, iron phosphate-coated pollen grains and iron phosphate hollow microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravity analyses were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the iron phosphate-coated pollen grains during the calcinations. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the interaction between the pollen grains and iron phosphate. The effect of the pollen wall on the surface morphology of these iron phosphate hollow microspheres was also proven in this work.

  14. Characterization of silane coated hollow sphere alumina-reinforced

    Silane coated hollow sphere alumina ceramic particles were moulded with ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to form a series of composites with alumina weight percent in the range from 15 to 50. The composites were prepared in a cylindrical mould using powder-processing technique. The composites ...

  15. Hollow beam formation in the extraction region of ECRIS

    Batygin, Y.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Beam optics in the extraction system of an ECR ion source (ECRIS) are examined both analytically and numerically, by taking nonlinear effect due to aberrations of einzel lens into account. It is shown that this effect can cause hollow beam formation. Simple analytical criteria to keep the good beam quality in the focusing system are given. (author)

  16. Mixed matrix microporous hollow fibers with ion-exchange functionality

    Kiyono, R.; Kiyono, R.; Koops, G.H.; Wessling, Matthias; Strathmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Heterogeneous hollow fiber membranes with cation exchange functionality are prepared using a wet spinning technique. The spinning dope solutions are prepared by dispersing finely ground cation ion-exchange resin (CER) particles in an N-methyl pyrrolidone solution of polysulfone (PSF). The polymer

  17. Synthesis of Porous Inorganic Hollow Fibers without Harmful Solvents

    Shukla, Sushumna; de Wit, Patrick; Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Kappert, Emiel; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2015-01-01

    A route for the fabrication of porous inorganic hollow fibers with high surface-area-to-volume ratio that avoids harmful solvents is presented. The approach is based on bio-ionic gelation of an aqueous mixture of inorganic particles and sodium alginate during wet spinning. In a subsequent thermal

  18. Tensile Strength of GFRP Reinforcing Bars with Hollow Section

    Young-Jun You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP has been proposed to replace steel as a reinforcing bar (rebar due to its high tensile strength and noncorrosive material properties. One obstacle in using FRP rebars is high price. Generally FRP is more expensive than conventional steel rebar. There are mainly two ways to reduce the cost. For example, one is making the price of each composition cost of FRP rebar (e.g., fibers, resin, etc. lower than steel rebar. Another is making an optimized design for cross section and reducing the material cost. The former approach is not easy because the steel price is very low in comparison with component materials of FRP. For the latter approach, the cost could be cut down by reducing the material cost. Therefore, an idea of making hollow section over the cross section of FRP rebar was proposed in this study by optimizing the cross section design with acceptable tensile performance in comparison with steel rebar. In this study, glass reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars with hollow section and 19 mm of outer diameter were manufactured and tested to evaluate the tensile performance in accordance with the hollowness ratio. From the test results, it was observed that the tensile strength decreased almost linearly with increase of hollowness ratio and the elastic modulus decreased nonlinearly.

  19. Permeation of supercritical carbon dioxide through polymeric hollow fiber membranes

    Patil, V.E.; Broeke, van den L.J.P.; Vercauteren, F.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2006-01-01

    Permeation of carbon dioxide was measured for two types of composite polymeric hollow fiber membranes for feed pressures up to 18 MPa at a temp. of 313 K. support membrane. The membranes consist of a polyamide copolymer (IPC) layer or a poly(vinyl alc.) (PVA) layer on top of a polyethersulfone

  20. Mathematical modelling of dextran filtration through hollow fibre membranes

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of an ultrafiltration process. The results of the model are produced using standard numerical techniques with Comsol Multiphysics. The model describes the fluid flow and separation in hollow fibre membranes. The flow of solute and solvent within the h...

  1. Confinement less spectral behavior in hollow-core Bragg fibers

    Foroni, M.; Passaro, D.; Poli, F.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of each cross-section geometric parameter on hollow-core Bragg fiber guiding properties has been numerically investigated. Fabricated fibers have been modeled, giving insight into the spectral behavior of the confinement loss. It has been verified that, by changing the amount...

  2. Biodegradable hollow fibres for the controlled release of drugs

    Schakenraad, J.M.; Oosterbaan, J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Molenaar, I.; Olijslager, J.; Potman, W.; Eenink, M.J.D.; Feijen, Jan

    1988-01-01

    Biodegradable hollow fibres of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) filled with a suspension of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel in castor oil were implanted subcutaneously in rats to study the rate of drug release, rate of biodegradation and tissue reaction caused by the implant. The in vivo drug

  3. Hollow-core infrared fiber incorporating metal-wire metamaterial

    Yan, Min; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    Infrared (IR) light is considered important for short-range wireless communication, thermal sensing, spectroscopy, material processing, medical surgery, astronomy etc. However, IR light is in general much harder to transport than optical light or microwave radiation. Existing hollow-core IR...

  4. safety of carbon fibre reinforced plastic hollow sections in compression

    ADMINUSER

    2014-01-06

    Jan 6, 2014 ... Steel hollow sections were also designed using the same method. This serves as a basis of ..... used for the numerical analysis and design of circular and rectangular model sections. The software was used to analyse failure ...

  5. Hollow fiber ultrafiltration membranes with microstructured inner skin

    Culfaz, P.Z.; Wessling, Matthias; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes with microstructured inner surfaces were fabricated from a PES/PVP blend using a spinneret with a microstructured needle. The effect of spinning parameters such as polymer dope flow rate, bore liquid flowrate, air gap and take-up speed on the microstructure and shape of the

  6. Faraday effect in hollow quantum cylinder of finite thickness

    Ismailov, T.G.; Jabrailova, G.G.

    2009-01-01

    The interband Faraday rotation in hollow quantum cylinder of finite thickness is theoretically investigated. Faraday rotation in the dependence on incident light energy for different values of cylinder thickness. It is seen that the resonance peaks appear on Faraday rotation curve. The roles of selection are obtained

  7. Evolution of radiation resistant hollow fibers membranes for nuclear

    Neelam Kumari; Raut, D.R.; Bhardwaj, Y.K.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    We have evaluated hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) technique for the separation of actinides, fission products and other valuables from the nuclear waste solutions. In this technique, ligand responsible for separation of metal ion is held in tiny pores of membrane. Any drastic change as a consequence of irradiation, like change in pore size, change in hydrophobicity of polymeric material can be fatal for separation process as it may lead dislodging of carrier ligands from the pores. It was therefore needed to study the irradiation stability of hollow fibers. We have earlier showed that polypropylene fibers were stable up to 500 radiation dose and we therefore need to look into other options. In the present work, hollow fiber membranes made from polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polysulphone (PS). Polymers were evaluated for their radiation stability after exposing to varying absorbed dose of gamma radiation. The hollow fibers were irradiated to 100 KGy, 200 KGy, 500 KGy and 1000 KGy and its changes in hydrophobicity were measured using contact angle measurement studies

  8. Observation of $B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_s^+$ and $B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_s^{*+}$ decays

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; 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Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The decays $B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_s^+$ and $B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_s^{*+}$ are observed for the first time using a dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3$fb^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$=7 and 8 TeV. The statistical significance for both signals is in excess of 9 standard deviations. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured to be \\begin{equation*}BR( B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_s^+)/BR( B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi+ ) = 2.90 \\pm 0.57 \\pm 0.24$,\\end{equation*} \\begin{equation*}BR( B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_s^{*+} ) / BR ( B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_s^+ ) = 2.37 \\pm 0.56 \\pm 0.10, \\end{equation*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The mass of the $B^+_c$ meson is measured to be \\begin{equation*}m_{B^+_c} = 6276.28 \\pm 1.44 (stat) \\pm 0.36(syst) MeV/c^2,\\end{equation*} using the $B^+_c \\rightarrow J/\\psi D_...

  9. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  10. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model of the plasma and neutral gas inside dispenser orificed hollow cathodes has been developed to quantify plasma processes that ultimately determine the life of the porous emitters inserted in these devices. The model self-consistently accounts for electron emission from the insert as well as for electron and ion flux losses from the plasma. Two cathodes, which are distinctively different in size and operating conditions, have been simulated numerically. It is found that the larger cathode, with outer tube diameter of 1.5 cm and orifice diameter of 0.3 cm, establishes an effective emission zone that spans approximately the full length of the emitter when operated at a discharge current of 25 A and a flow rate of 5.5 sccm. The net heating of the emitter is caused by ions that are produced by ionization of the neutral gas inside the tube and are then accelerated by the sheath along the emitter. The smaller cathode, with an outer diameter of 0.635 cm and an orifice diameter of 0.1 cm, does not exhibit the same operational characteristics. At a flow rate of 4.25 sccm and discharge current of 12 A, the smaller cathode requires 4.5 times the current density near the orifice and operates with more than 6 times the neutral particle density compared to the large cathode. As a result, the plasma particle density is almost one order of magnitude higher compared to the large cathode. The plasma density in this small cathode is high enough such that the Debye length is sufficiently small to allow 'sheath funneling' into the pores of the emitter. By accessing areas deeper into the insert material, it is postulated that the overall emission of electrons is significantly enhanced. The maximum emission current density is found to be about 1 A/mm 2 in the small cathode, which is about one order of magnitude higher than attained in the large cathode. The effective emission zone in the small cathode extends to about 15% of the emitter length only, and the

  11. Recent progress in hollow sphere-based electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Min; Wu, Limin

    2016-08-01

    Hollow spheres have drawn much attention in the area of energy storage and conversion, especially in high-performance supercapacitors owing to their well-defined morphologies, uniform size, low density and large surface area. And quite some significant breakthroughs have been made in advanced supercapacitor electrode materials with hollow sphere structures. In this review, we summarize and discuss the synthesis and application of hollow spheres with controllable structure and morphology as electrode materials for supercapacitors. First, we briefly introduce the fabrication strategies of hollow spheres for electrode materials. Then, we discuss in detail the recent advances in various hollow sphere-based electrode materials for supercapacitors, including single-shelled, yolk-shelled, urchin-like, double-shelled, multi-shelled, and mesoporous hollow structure-based symmetric and asymmetric supercapacitor devices. We conclude this review with some perspectives on the future research and development of the hollow sphere-based electrode materials.

  12. A novel approach to fabrication of superparamagnetite hollow silica/magnetic composite spheres

    Yuan Junjie, E-mail: yuanjunjie@tongji.edu.c [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Xiong; Qian He [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2010-08-15

    We described a method for synthesizing hollow silica/magnetic composite spheres using sulfonic acid functionalized hollow silica spheres (SAFHSS) as templates. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were deposited on or imbedded in the hollow silica shell by a precipitation reaction. The morphologies, composition and properties of the hollow composite spheres were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared analysis, X-ray diffraction measurement and vibrating-sample magnetometry measurement. The results indicated crystal sizes and amount of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on the SAFHSS. The magnetic properties of the hollow composite spheres were controlled by adjusting the proportion between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} and iron ion total concentration. When appropriate loading species were added into the system, superparamagnetite hollow composite spheres were obtained. The method also could be applicable to prepare other superparamagnetite hollow silica/ferrite composite spheres.

  13. Hollow fiber apparatus and use thereof for fluids separations and heat and mass transfers

    Bikson, Benjamin; Etter, Stephen; Ching, Nathaniel

    2017-04-18

    A hollow fiber fluid separation device includes a hollow fiber cartridge, comprising a plurality of hollow fiber membranes arranged around a central tubular core, a first tubesheet and a second tubesheet encapsulating respective distal ends of the hollow fiber bundle. The tubesheets have boreholes in fluid communication with bores of the hollow fiber membrane. In at least one of the tubesheets, the boreholes are formed radially and are in communication with the central tubular core. The hollow fiber fluid separation device can be utilized in liquid separation applications such as ultrafiltration and in gas separation processes such as air separation. The design disclosed herein is light weight and compact and is particularly advantageous at high operating temperatures when the pressure of the feed fluid introduced into the bores of hollow fibers is higher than the pressure on the shell side of the device.

  14. Recent progress in hollow sphere-based electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Min; Wu, Limin

    2016-08-26

    Hollow spheres have drawn much attention in the area of energy storage and conversion, especially in high-performance supercapacitors owing to their well-defined morphologies, uniform size, low density and large surface area. And quite some significant breakthroughs have been made in advanced supercapacitor electrode materials with hollow sphere structures. In this review, we summarize and discuss the synthesis and application of hollow spheres with controllable structure and morphology as electrode materials for supercapacitors. First, we briefly introduce the fabrication strategies of hollow spheres for electrode materials. Then, we discuss in detail the recent advances in various hollow sphere-based electrode materials for supercapacitors, including single-shelled, yolk-shelled, urchin-like, double-shelled, multi-shelled, and mesoporous hollow structure-based symmetric and asymmetric supercapacitor devices. We conclude this review with some perspectives on the future research and development of the hollow sphere-based electrode materials.

  15. Increased RNAi Efficacy in Spodoptera exigua via the Formulation of dsRNA With Guanylated Polymers

    Olivier Christiaens

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera comprise some of the most devastating herbivorous pest insects worldwide. One of the most promising novel pest control strategies is exploiting the RNA interference (RNAi mechanism to target essential genes for knockdown and incite toxic effects in the target species without harming other organisms in the ecosystem. However, many insects are refractory to oral RNAi, often due to rapid degradation of ingested dsRNA in their digestive system. This is the case for many lepidopteran insects, including the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua, which is characterized by a very alkaline gut environment (pH > 9.0 and a strong intestinal nucleolytic activity. In this research, guanidine-containing polymers were developed to protect dsRNA against nucleolytic degradation, specifically in high pH environments. First, their ability to protect dsRNA against nucleolytic degradation in gut juice of the beet armyworm S. exigua was investigated ex vivo. Polymers with high guanidine content provided a strong protection against nucleolytic degradation at pH 11, protecting the dsRNA for up to 30 h. Next, cellular uptake of the dsRNA and the polyplexes in lepidopteran CF203 midgut cells was investigated by confocal microscopy, showing that the polymer also enhanced cellular uptake of the dsRNA. Finally, in vivo feeding RNAi bioassays demonstrated that using these guanidine-containing polymer nanoparticles led to an increased RNAi efficiency in S. exigua. Targeting the essential gene chitin synthase B, we observed that the mortality increased to 53% in the polymer-protected dsRNA treatment compared to only 16% with the naked dsRNA and found that polymer-protected dsRNA completely halted the development of the caterpillars. These results show that using guanylated polymers as a formulation strategy can prevent degradation of dsRNA in the alkaline and strongly nucleolytic gut of lepidopteran insects. Furthermore, the polymer also enhances cellular uptake in

  16. Does the KIR2DS5 gene protect from some human diseases?

    Izabela Nowak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KIR2DS5 gene encodes an activating natural killer cell receptor whose ligand is not known. It was recently reported to affect the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our studies on KIR2DS5 gene associations with human diseases, we compared the frequencies of this gene in patients and relevant controls. Typing for KIR2DS5 gene was performed by either individual or multiplex polymerase chain reactions which, when compared in the same samples, gave concordant results. We noted an apparently protective effect of KIR2DS5 gene presence in several clinical conditions, but not in others. Namely, this effect was observed in ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.003, odds ratio [OR]=0.47, confidence interval [CI]=0.28-0.79, endometriosis (p=0.03, OR=0.25, CI = 0.07-0.82 and acute rejection of kidney graft (p=0.0056, OR=0.44, CI=0.24-0.80, but not in non-small-cell lung carcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis, spontaneous abortion, or leukemia (all p>0.05. In addition, the simultaneous presence of KIR2DS5 gene and HLA-C C1 allotype exhibited an even stronger protective effect on ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.0003, OR=0.35, CI=0.19-0.65, whereas a lack of KIR2DS5 and the presence of the HLA-C C2 allotype was associated with ankylosing spondylitis (p=0.0017, OR=1.92, CI=1.28-2.89, whereas a lack of KIR2DS5 and presence of C1 allotype was associated with rheumatoid arthritis (p=0.005, OR=1.47, CI=1.13-1.92. The presence of both KIR2DS5 and C1 seemed to protect from acute kidney graft rejection (p=0.017, OR=0.47, CI=0.25-0.89, whereas lack of KIR2DS5 and presence of C2 seemed to favor rejection (p=0.0015, OR=2.13, CI=1.34-3.37. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that KIR2DS5 may protect from endometriosis, ankylosing spondylitis, and acute rejection of kidney graft.

  17. Synthesis of novel lidocaine-releasing poly(diol-co-citrate) elastomers by using deep eutectic solvents.

    Serrano, M Concepción; Gutiérrez, María C; Jiménez, Ricardo; Ferrer, M Luisa; del Monte, Francisco

    2012-01-14

    Poly(octanediol-co-citrate) elastomers containing high loading of lidocaine were synthesized at temperatures below 100 °C by means of using deep eutectic mixtures of 1,8-octanediol and lidocaine. The preservation of lidocaine integrity resulted in high-capacity drug-eluting elastomers. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  18. Glycerol-based deep eutectic solvents as extractants for the separation of MEK and ethanol via liquid-liquid extraction

    Rodriguez, N.R.; Ferré Güell, J.; Kroon, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Four different glycerol-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were tested as extracting agents for the separation of the azeotropic mixture {methyl ethyl ketone + ethanol} via liquid-liquid extraction. The selected DESs for this work were: glycerol/choline chloride with molar ratios (4:1) and (2:1),

  19. Effect of the type of ammonium salt on the extractive desulfurization of fuels using deep eutectic solvents

    Warrag, Samah E.E.; Adeyemi, Idowu; Rodriguez, Nerea R.; Nashef, Inas M.; van Sint Annaland, Martin; Kroon, Maaike C.; Peters, Cor J.

    2018-01-01

    In a previous work, we proved that the deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of mixtures of tetraalkylammonium salts with polyols are promising candidates for oil desulfurization based on the obtained liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data. In this study, the capability of DESs containing other

  20. Quantitative Comparison of Ternary Eutectic Phase-Field Simulations with Analytical 3D Jackson-Hunt Approaches

    Steinmetz, Philipp; Kellner, Michael; Hötzer, Johannes; Nestler, Britta

    2018-02-01

    For the analytical description of the relationship between undercoolings, lamellar spacings and growth velocities during the directional solidification of ternary eutectics in 2D and 3D, different extensions based on the theory of Jackson and Hunt are reported in the literature. Besides analytical approaches, the phase-field method has been established to study the spatially complex microstructure evolution during the solidification of eutectic alloys. The understanding of the fundamental mechanisms controlling the morphology development in multiphase, multicomponent systems is of high interest. For this purpose, a comparison is made between the analytical extensions and three-dimensional phase-field simulations of directional solidification in an ideal ternary eutectic system. Based on the observed accordance in two-dimensional validation cases, the experimentally reported, inherently three-dimensional chain-like pattern is investigated in extensive simulation studies. The results are quantitatively compared with the analytical results reported in the literature, and with a newly derived approach which uses equal undercoolings. A good accordance of the undercooling-spacing characteristics between simulations and the analytical Jackson-Hunt apporaches are found. The results show that the applied phase-field model, which is based on the Grand potential approach, is able to describe the analytically predicted relationship between the undercooling and the lamellar arrangements during the directional solidification of a ternary eutectic system in 3D.