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Sample records for hodgkin-huxley type kinetics

  1. Control of bursting synchronization in networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons with chemical synapses.

    Batista, C A S; Viana, R L; Ferrari, F A S; Lopes, S R; Batista, A M; Coninck, J C P

    2013-04-01

    Thermally sensitive neurons present bursting activity for certain temperature ranges, characterized by fast repetitive spiking of action potential followed by a short quiescent period. Synchronization of bursting activity is possible in networks of coupled neurons, and it is sometimes an undesirable feature. Control procedures can suppress totally or partially this collective behavior, with potential applications in deep-brain stimulation techniques. We investigate the control of bursting synchronization in small-world networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type thermally sensitive neurons with chemical synapses through two different strategies. One is the application of an external time-periodic electrical signal and another consists of a time-delayed feedback signal. We consider the effectiveness of both strategies in terms of protocols of applications suitable to be applied by pacemakers.

  2. A self-organizing state-space-model approach for parameter estimation in hodgkin-huxley-type models of single neurons.

    Dimitrios V Vavoulis

    Full Text Available Traditional approaches to the problem of parameter estimation in biophysical models of neurons and neural networks usually adopt a global search algorithm (for example, an evolutionary algorithm, often in combination with a local search method (such as gradient descent in order to minimize the value of a cost function, which measures the discrepancy between various features of the available experimental data and model output. In this study, we approach the problem of parameter estimation in conductance-based models of single neurons from a different perspective. By adopting a hidden-dynamical-systems formalism, we expressed parameter estimation as an inference problem in these systems, which can then be tackled using a range of well-established statistical inference methods. The particular method we used was Kitagawa's self-organizing state-space model, which was applied on a number of Hodgkin-Huxley-type models using simulated or actual electrophysiological data. We showed that the algorithm can be used to estimate a large number of parameters, including maximal conductances, reversal potentials, kinetics of ionic currents, measurement and intrinsic noise, based on low-dimensional experimental data and sufficiently informative priors in the form of pre-defined constraints imposed on model parameters. The algorithm remained operational even when very noisy experimental data were used. Importantly, by combining the self-organizing state-space model with an adaptive sampling algorithm akin to the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy, we achieved a significant reduction in the variance of parameter estimates. The algorithm did not require the explicit formulation of a cost function and it was straightforward to apply on compartmental models and multiple data sets. Overall, the proposed methodology is particularly suitable for resolving high-dimensional inference problems based on noisy electrophysiological data and, therefore, a

  3. The what and where of adding channel noise to the Hodgkin-Huxley equations.

    Joshua H Goldwyn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Conductance-based equations for electrically active cells form one of the most widely studied mathematical frameworks in computational biology. This framework, as expressed through a set of differential equations by Hodgkin and Huxley, synthesizes the impact of ionic currents on a cell's voltage--and the highly nonlinear impact of that voltage back on the currents themselves--into the rapid push and pull of the action potential. Later studies confirmed that these cellular dynamics are orchestrated by individual ion channels, whose conformational changes regulate the conductance of each ionic current. Thus, kinetic equations familiar from physical chemistry are the natural setting for describing conductances; for small-to-moderate numbers of channels, these will predict fluctuations in conductances and stochasticity in the resulting action potentials. At first glance, the kinetic equations provide a far more complex (and higher-dimensional description than the original Hodgkin-Huxley equations or their counterparts. This has prompted more than a decade of efforts to capture channel fluctuations with noise terms added to the equations of Hodgkin-Huxley type. Many of these approaches, while intuitively appealing, produce quantitative errors when compared to kinetic equations; others, as only very recently demonstrated, are both accurate and relatively simple. We review what works, what doesn't, and why, seeking to build a bridge to well-established results for the deterministic equations of Hodgkin-Huxley type as well as to more modern models of ion channel dynamics. As such, we hope that this review will speed emerging studies of how channel noise modulates electrophysiological dynamics and function. We supply user-friendly MATLAB simulation code of these stochastic versions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations on the ModelDB website (accession number 138950 and http://www.amath.washington.edu/~etsb/tutorials.html.

  4. Simulations of the cardiac action potential based on the Hodgkin-Huxley kinetics with the use of Microsoft Excel spreadsheets.

    Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2004-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to simulate the cardiac action potential using a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The mathematical model contained voltage-gated ionic currents that were modeled using either Beeler-Reuter (B-R) or Luo-Rudy (L-R) phase 1 kinetics. The simulation protocol involves the use of in-cell formulas directly typed into a spreadsheet. The capability of spreadsheet iteration was used in these simulations. It does not require any prior knowledge of computer programming, although the use of the macro language can speed up the calculation. The normal configuration of the cardiac ventricular action potential can be well simulated in the B-R model that is defined by four individual ionic currents, each representing the diffusion of ions through channels in the membrane. The contribution of Na+ inward current to the rate of depolarization is reproduced in this model. After removal of Na+ current from the model, a constant current stimulus elicits an oscillatory change in membrane potential. In the L-R phase 1 model where six types of ionic currents were defined, the effect of extracellular K+ concentration on changes both in the time course of repolarization and in the time-independent K+ current can be demonstrated, when the solutions are implemented in Excel. Using the simulation protocols described here, the users can readily study and graphically display the underlying properties of ionic currents to see how changes in these properties determine the behavior of the heart cell. The method employed in these simulation protocols may also be extended or modified to other biological simulation programs.

  5. Unidirectional synchronization of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Cornejo-Perez, Octavio [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: octavio@ipicyt.edu.mx; Femat, Ricardo [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: rfemat@ipicyt.edu.mx

    2005-07-01

    Synchronization dynamics of two noiseless Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons under the action of feedback control is studied. The spiking patterns of the action potentials evoked by periodic external modulations attain synchronization states under the feedback action. Numerical simulations for the synchronization dynamics of regular-irregular desynchronized spiking sequences are displayed. The results are discussed in context of generalized synchronization. It is also shown that the HH neurons can be synchronized in face of unmeasured states.

  6. Biophysical synaptic dynamics in an analog VLSI network of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

    Yu, Theodore; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2009-01-01

    We study synaptic dynamics in a biophysical network of four coupled spiking neurons implemented in an analog VLSI silicon microchip. The four neurons implement a generalized Hodgkin-Huxley model with individually configurable rate-based kinetics of opening and closing of Na+ and K+ ion channels. The twelve synapses implement a rate-based first-order kinetic model of neurotransmitter and receptor dynamics, accounting for NMDA and non-NMDA type chemical synapses. The implemented models on the chip are fully configurable by 384 parameters accounting for conductances, reversal potentials, and pre/post-synaptic voltage-dependence of the channel kinetics. We describe the models and present experimental results from the chip characterizing single neuron dynamics, single synapse dynamics, and multi-neuron network dynamics showing phase-locking behavior as a function of synaptic coupling strength. The 3mm x 3mm microchip consumes 1.29 mW power making it promising for applications including neuromorphic modeling and neural prostheses.

  7. Optimal decoding and information transmission in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons under metabolic cost constraints.

    Kostal, Lubomir; Kobayashi, Ryota

    2015-10-01

    Information theory quantifies the ultimate limits on reliable information transfer by means of the channel capacity. However, the channel capacity is known to be an asymptotic quantity, assuming unlimited metabolic cost and computational power. We investigate a single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley type neuronal model under the spike-rate coding scheme and address how the metabolic cost and the decoding complexity affects the optimal information transmission. We find that the sub-threshold stimulation regime, although attaining the smallest capacity, allows for the most efficient balance between the information transmission and the metabolic cost. Furthermore, we determine post-synaptic firing rate histograms that are optimal from the information-theoretic point of view, which enables the comparison of our results with experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identifying generalized Fitzhugh-Nagumo equation from a numerical solution of Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Nikola V. Georgiev

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytic time series in the form of numerical solution (in an appropriate finite time interval of the Hodgkin-Huxley current clamped (HHCC system of four differential equations, well known in the neurophysiology as an exact empirical model of excitation of a giant axon of Loligo, is presented. Then we search for a second-order differential equation of generalized Fitzhugh-Nagumo (GFN type, having as a solution the given single component (action potential of the numerical solution. The given time series is used as a basis for reconstructing orders, powers, and coefficients of the polynomial right-hand sides of GFN equation approximately governing the process of action potential. For this purpose, a new geometrical method for determining phase space dimension of the unknown dynamical system (GFN equation and a specific modification of least squares method for identifying unknown coefficients are developed and applied.

  9. Delay-enhanced coherence of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    Wang Qingyun; Perc, Matjaz; Duan Zhisheng; Chen Guanrong

    2008-01-01

    We study the spatial dynamics of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal ensembles evoked by different information transmission delays and network topologies. In classical settings of coherence resonance the intensity of noise is fine-tuned so as to optimize the system's response. Here, we keep the noise intensity constant, and instead, vary the length of information transmission delay amongst coupled neurons. We show that there exists an intermediate transmission delay by which the spiral waves are optimally ordered, hence indicating the existence of delay-enhanced coherence of spatial dynamics in the examined system. Additionally, we examine the robustness of this phenomenon as the diffusive interaction topology changes towards the small-world type, and discover that shortcut links amongst distant neurons hinder the emergence of coherent spiral waves irrespective of transmission delay length. Presented results thus provide insights that could facilitate the understanding of information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks

  10. Crisis of interspike intervals in Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Jin Wuyin; Xu Jianxue; Wu Ying; Hong Ling; Wei Yaobing

    2006-01-01

    The bifurcations of the chaotic attractor in a Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) model under stimulation of periodic signal is presented in this work, where the frequency of signal is taken as the controlling parameter. The chaotic behavior is realized over a wide range of frequency and is visualized by using interspike intervals (ISIs). Many kinds of abrupt undergoing changes of the ISIs are observed in different frequency regions, such as boundary crisis, interior crisis and merging crisis displaying alternately along with the changes of external signal frequency. And there are logistic-like bifurcation behaviors, e.g., periodic windows and fractal structures in ISIs dynamics. The saddle-node bifurcations resulting in collapses of chaos to period-6 orbit in dynamics of ISIs are identified

  11. The ISI distribution of the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron.

    Rowat, Peter F; Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of ion-channel noise has an important role in computational neuroscience. In recent years several approximate methods of carrying out this simulation have been published, based on stochastic differential equations, and all giving slightly different results. The obvious, and essential, question is: which method is the most accurate and which is most computationally efficient? Here we make a contribution to the answer. We compare interspike interval histograms from simulated data using four different approximate stochastic differential equation (SDE) models of the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron, as well as the exact Markov chain model simulated by the Gillespie algorithm. One of the recent SDE models is the same as the Kurtz approximation first published in 1978. All the models considered give similar ISI histograms over a wide range of deterministic and stochastic input. Three features of these histograms are an initial peak, followed by one or more bumps, and then an exponential tail. We explore how these features depend on deterministic input and on level of channel noise, and explain the results using the stochastic dynamics of the model. We conclude with a rough ranking of the four SDE models with respect to the similarity of their ISI histograms to the histogram of the exact Markov chain model.

  12. A study of quantum mechanical probabilities in the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Moradi, N; Scholkmann, F; Salari, V

    2015-03-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is a powerful model to explain different aspects of spike generation in excitable cells. However, the HH model was proposed in 1952 when the real structure of the ion channel was unknown. It is now common knowledge that in many ion-channel proteins the flow of ions through the pore is governed by a gate, comprising a so-called "selectivity filter" inside the ion channel, which can be controlled by electrical interactions. The selectivity filter (SF) is believed to be responsible for the selection and fast conduction of particular ions across the membrane of an excitable cell. Other (generally larger) parts of the molecule such as the pore-domain gate control the access of ions to the channel protein. In fact, two types of gates are considered here for ion channels: the "external gate", which is the voltage sensitive gate, and the "internal gate" which is the selectivity filter gate (SFG). Some quantum effects are expected in the SFG due to its small dimensions, which may play an important role in the operation of an ion channel. Here, we examine parameters in a generalized model of HH to see whether any parameter affects the spike generation. Our results indicate that the previously suggested semi-quantum-classical equation proposed by Bernroider and Summhammer (BS) agrees strongly with the HH equation under different conditions and may even provide a better explanation in some cases. We conclude that the BS model can refine the classical HH model substantially.

  13. Chimera states in a Hodgkin-Huxley model of thermally sensitive neurons

    Glaze, Tera A.; Lewis, Scott; Bahar, Sonya

    2016-08-01

    Chimera states occur when identically coupled groups of nonlinear oscillators exhibit radically different dynamics, with one group exhibiting synchronized oscillations and the other desynchronized behavior. This dynamical phenomenon has recently been studied in computational models and demonstrated experimentally in mechanical, optical, and chemical systems. The theoretical basis of these states is currently under active investigation. Chimera behavior is of particular relevance in the context of neural synchronization, given the phenomenon of unihemispheric sleep and the recent observation of asymmetric sleep in human patients with sleep apnea. The similarity of neural chimera states to neural "bump" states, which have been suggested as a model for working memory and visual orientation tuning in the cortex, adds to their interest as objects of study. Chimera states have been demonstrated in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of excitable cells and in the Hindmarsh-Rose neural model. Here, we demonstrate chimera states and chimera-like behaviors in a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of thermally sensitive neurons both in a system with Abrams-Strogatz (mean field) coupling and in a system with Kuramoto (distance-dependent) coupling. We map the regions of parameter space for which chimera behavior occurs in each of the two coupling schemes.

  14. [Hardware Implementation of Numerical Simulation Function of Hodgkin-Huxley Model Neurons Action Potential Based on Field Programmable Gate Array].

    Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Mai; Hu, Yanwen; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Pan, Qiangqiang

    2015-12-01

    Neuron is the basic unit of the biological neural system. The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is one of the most realistic neuron models on the electrophysiological characteristic description of neuron. Hardware implementation of neuron could provide new research ideas to clinical treatment of spinal cord injury, bionics and artificial intelligence. Based on the HH model neuron and the DSP Builder technology, in the present study, a single HH model neuron hardware implementation was completed in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The neuron implemented in FPGA was stimulated by different types of current, the action potential response characteristics were analyzed, and the correlation coefficient between numerical simulation result and hardware implementation result were calculated. The results showed that neuronal action potential response of FPGA was highly consistent with numerical simulation result. This work lays the foundation for hardware implementation of neural network.

  15. Saddle Slow Manifolds and Canard Orbits in [Formula: see text] and Application to the Full Hodgkin-Huxley Model.

    Hasan, Cris R; Krauskopf, Bernd; Osinga, Hinke M

    2018-04-19

    Many physiological phenomena have the property that some variables evolve much faster than others. For example, neuron models typically involve observable differences in time scales. The Hodgkin-Huxley model is well known for explaining the ionic mechanism that generates the action potential in the squid giant axon. Rubin and Wechselberger (Biol. Cybern. 97:5-32, 2007) nondimensionalized this model and obtained a singularly perturbed system with two fast, two slow variables, and an explicit time-scale ratio ε. The dynamics of this system are complex and feature periodic orbits with a series of action potentials separated by small-amplitude oscillations (SAOs); also referred to as mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs). The slow dynamics of this system are organized by two-dimensional locally invariant manifolds called slow manifolds which can be either attracting or of saddle type.In this paper, we introduce a general approach for computing two-dimensional saddle slow manifolds and their stable and unstable fast manifolds. We also develop a technique for detecting and continuing associated canard orbits, which arise from the interaction between attracting and saddle slow manifolds, and provide a mechanism for the organization of SAOs in [Formula: see text]. We first test our approach with an extended four-dimensional normal form of a folded node. Our results demonstrate that our computations give reliable approximations of slow manifolds and canard orbits of this model. Our computational approach is then utilized to investigate the role of saddle slow manifolds and associated canard orbits of the full Hodgkin-Huxley model in organizing MMOs and determining the firing rates of action potentials. For ε sufficiently large, canard orbits are arranged in pairs of twin canard orbits with the same number of SAOs. We illustrate how twin canard orbits partition the attracting slow manifold into a number of ribbons that play the role of sectors of rotations. The upshot is that we

  16. Numerical simulations of piecewise deterministic Markov processes with an application to the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Ding, Shaojie; Qian, Min; Qian, Hong; Zhang, Xuejuan

    2016-12-01

    The stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model is one of the best-known examples of piecewise deterministic Markov processes (PDMPs), in which the electrical potential across a cell membrane, V(t), is coupled with a mesoscopic Markov jump process representing the stochastic opening and closing of ion channels embedded in the membrane. The rates of the channel kinetics, in turn, are voltage-dependent. Due to this interdependence, an accurate and efficient sampling of the time evolution of the hybrid stochastic systems has been challenging. The current exact simulation methods require solving a voltage-dependent hitting time problem for multiple path-dependent intensity functions with random thresholds. This paper proposes a simulation algorithm that approximates an alternative representation of the exact solution by fitting the log-survival function of the inter-jump dwell time, H(t), with a piecewise linear one. The latter uses interpolation points that are chosen according to the time evolution of the H(t), as the numerical solution to the coupled ordinary differential equations of V(t) and H(t). This computational method can be applied to all PDMPs. Pathwise convergence of the approximated sample trajectories to the exact solution is proven, and error estimates are provided. Comparison with a previous algorithm that is based on piecewise constant approximation is also presented.

  17. Channel noise effects on first spike latency of a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron

    Maisel, Brenton; Lindenberg, Katja

    2017-02-01

    While it is widely accepted that information is encoded in neurons via action potentials or spikes, it is far less understood what specific features of spiking contain encoded information. Experimental evidence has suggested that the timing of the first spike may be an energy-efficient coding mechanism that contains more neural information than subsequent spikes. Therefore, the biophysical features of neurons that underlie response latency are of considerable interest. Here we examine the effects of channel noise on the first spike latency of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron receiving random input from many other neurons. Because the principal feature of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron is the stochastic opening and closing of channels, the fluctuations in the number of open channels lead to fluctuations in the membrane voltage and modify the timing of the first spike. Our results show that when a neuron has a larger number of channels, (i) the occurrence of the first spike is delayed and (ii) the variation in the first spike timing is greater. We also show that the mean, median, and interquartile range of first spike latency can be accurately predicted from a simple linear regression by knowing only the number of channels in the neuron and the rate at which presynaptic neurons fire, but the standard deviation (i.e., neuronal jitter) cannot be predicted using only this information. We then compare our results to another commonly used stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model and show that the more commonly used model overstates the first spike latency but can predict the standard deviation of first spike latencies accurately. We end by suggesting a more suitable definition for the neuronal jitter based upon our simulations and comparison of the two models.

  18. Synchronization of a coupled Hodgkin-Huxley neurons via high order sliding-mode feedback

    Aguilar-Lopez, R. [Division de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Reynosa-Tamaulipas, 02200 Azcapotzalco, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: raguilar@correo.azc.uam.mx; Martinez-Guerra, R. [Departamento de Control Automatico, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apartado Postal 14-740, Mexico, D.F. C.P. 07360 (Mexico)], E-mail: rguerra@ctrl.cinvestav.mx

    2008-07-15

    This work deals with the synchronizations of two both coupled Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) neurons, where the master neuron posses inner noise and the slave neuron is considered in a resting state, (without inner noise) and an exciting state (with inner noise). The synchronization procedure is done via a feedback control, considering a class of high order sliding-mode controller which provides chattering reduction and finite time synchronization convergence, with a satisfactory performance. Theoretical analysis is done in order to show the closed-loop stability of the proposed controller and the calculated finite time for convergence. The main results are illustrated via numerical experiments.

  19. Synchronization of a coupled Hodgkin-Huxley neurons via high order sliding-mode feedback

    Aguilar-Lopez, R.; Martinez-Guerra, R.

    2008-01-01

    This work deals with the synchronizations of two both coupled Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) neurons, where the master neuron posses inner noise and the slave neuron is considered in a resting state, (without inner noise) and an exciting state (with inner noise). The synchronization procedure is done via a feedback control, considering a class of high order sliding-mode controller which provides chattering reduction and finite time synchronization convergence, with a satisfactory performance. Theoretical analysis is done in order to show the closed-loop stability of the proposed controller and the calculated finite time for convergence. The main results are illustrated via numerical experiments

  20. Synchronization of two Hodgkin-Huxley neurons due to internal noise

    Casado, Jose Manuel

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that a strong coupling can synchronize a population of nonlinear oscillators. This fact has deep implications for the current understanding of information processing by the brain. The focus of this Letter is on the role of conductance noise on a system of two coupled Hodgkin-Huxley neurons in the so-called excitable region, where both neurons are at rest in the absence of noise. It is shown that, in this region, conductance noise allows the neurons to achieve both frequency and phase synchronization. This suggests that internal noise could play a role in the emergence of synchronous neural activity in populations of weakly coupled neurons

  1. Spike trains in Hodgkin-Huxley model and ISIs of acupuncture manipulations

    Wang Jiang; Si Wenjie; Che Yanqiu; Fei Xiangyang

    2008-01-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley equations (HH) are parameterized by a number of parameters and shows a variety of qualitatively different behaviors depending on the parameter values. Under stimulation of an external periodic voltage, the ISIs (interspike intervals) of a HH model are investigated in this work, while the frequency of the voltage is taken as the controlling parameter. As well-known, the science of acupuncture and moxibustion is an important component of Traditional Chinese Medicine with a long history. Although there are a number of different acupuncture manipulations, the method for distinguishing them is rarely investigated. With the idea of ISI, we study the electrical signal time series at the spinal dorsal horn produced by three different acupuncture manipulations in Zusanli point and present an effective way to distinguish them

  2. Spike trains in Hodgkin-Huxley model and ISIs of acupuncture manipulations

    Wang Jiang [School of Electrical and Automation Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)], E-mail: jiangwang@tju.edu.cn; Si Wenjie; Che Yanqiu; Fei Xiangyang [School of Electrical and Automation Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2008-05-15

    The Hodgkin-Huxley equations (HH) are parameterized by a number of parameters and shows a variety of qualitatively different behaviors depending on the parameter values. Under stimulation of an external periodic voltage, the ISIs (interspike intervals) of a HH model are investigated in this work, while the frequency of the voltage is taken as the controlling parameter. As well-known, the science of acupuncture and moxibustion is an important component of Traditional Chinese Medicine with a long history. Although there are a number of different acupuncture manipulations, the method for distinguishing them is rarely investigated. With the idea of ISI, we study the electrical signal time series at the spinal dorsal horn produced by three different acupuncture manipulations in Zusanli point and present an effective way to distinguish them.

  3. Resonant Activation in a Stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley Model: Interplay between noise and suprathreshold driving effect

    Pankratova, Evgeniya; Polovinkin, A.V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The paper considers an excitable Hodgkin-Huxley system subjected to a strong periodic forcing in the presence of random noise. The influence of the forcing frequency on the response of the system is examined in the realm of suprathreshold amplitudes. Our results confirm that the presence of noise...... a minimum as functions of the forcing frequency. The destructive influence of noise on the interspike interval can also be reduced. With driving signals in a certain frequency range, the system can show stable periodic spiking even for relatively large noise intensities. Outside this frequency range, noise...... of similar intensity destroys the regularity of the spike trains by suppressing the generation of some of the spikes....

  4. The Energy Coding of a Structural Neural Network Based on the Hodgkin-Huxley Model.

    Zhu, Zhenyu; Wang, Rubin; Zhu, Fengyun

    2018-01-01

    Based on the Hodgkin-Huxley model, the present study established a fully connected structural neural network to simulate the neural activity and energy consumption of the network by neural energy coding theory. The numerical simulation result showed that the periodicity of the network energy distribution was positively correlated to the number of neurons and coupling strength, but negatively correlated to signal transmitting delay. Moreover, a relationship was established between the energy distribution feature and the synchronous oscillation of the neural network, which showed that when the proportion of negative energy in power consumption curve was high, the synchronous oscillation of the neural network was apparent. In addition, comparison with the simulation result of structural neural network based on the Wang-Zhang biophysical model of neurons showed that both models were essentially consistent.

  5. Synchronization control of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons exposed to ELF electric field

    Che Yanqiu; Wang Jiang; Zhou Sisi; Deng Bin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive neural network H ∞ control for unidirectional synchronization of modified Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons exposed to extremely low frequency (ELF) electric field. The proposed modified HH neurons exhibit periodic and chaotic dynamics in response to sinusoidal electric field stimulation. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, we derive the updated laws of neural network for approximating the nonlinear uncertain functions of the error dynamical system. The H ∞ design technique makes the controller robust to unmodeled dynamics, disturbances and approximate errors. The proposed controller not only ensures closed-loop stability, but also guarantees an H ∞ performance for the synchronization error system. The states of the controlled slave system exponentially synchronize with that of the master one after control. The simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  6. Deriving Behaviour of Hodgkin Huxley model with fever dynamics: A computational study

    Hasan ESKALEN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A single neuron can be modeled by the set of differential equations. Hodgkin-Huxley (HH model, the one of the most famous neuron model, can be considered as a dynamical system with four independent variables. Here we studied to reduce the number of differential equation required for conductance based HH model under strong inhibitory noise. Exponential Integrate and Fire (EIF model, one independent variable, is used as a reduced model of HH model by using current-voltage (I-V curve of the original model. The required reduction parameters are determined from this curve. The behaviour of HH model and its reduced EIF (rEIF model are in good agreement in sub-threshold level. Above-threshold behaviour of reduced EIF model and original model compared in terms of threshold voltage under strong inhibitory noise. Our numerical simulations clearly show that sub-threshold behaviour of HH model perfectly reduced to rEIF model.

  7. Stochastic resonance on Newman-Watts networks of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with local periodic driving

    Ozer, Mahmut [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, 67100 Zonguldak (Turkey)], E-mail: mahmutozer2002@yahoo.com; Perc, Matjaz [University of Maribor, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Department of Physics, Koroska cesta 160, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Uzuntarla, Muhammet [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, 67100 Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2009-03-02

    We study the phenomenon of stochastic resonance on Newman-Watts small-world networks consisting of biophysically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with a tunable intensity of intrinsic noise via voltage-gated ion channels embedded in neuronal membranes. Importantly thereby, the subthreshold periodic driving is introduced to a single neuron of the network, thus acting as a pacemaker trying to impose its rhythm on the whole ensemble. We show that there exists an optimal intensity of intrinsic ion channel noise by which the outreach of the pacemaker extends optimally across the whole network. This stochastic resonance phenomenon can be further amplified via fine-tuning of the small-world network structure, and depends significantly also on the coupling strength among neurons and the driving frequency of the pacemaker. In particular, we demonstrate that the noise-induced transmission of weak localized rhythmic activity peaks when the pacemaker frequency matches the intrinsic frequency of subthreshold oscillations. The implications of our findings for weak signal detection and information propagation across neural networks are discussed.

  8. Canards Existence in FitzHugh-Nagumo and Hodgkin-Huxley Neuronal Models

    Jean-Marc Ginoux

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper we have proposed a new method for proving the existence of “canard solutions” for three- and four-dimensional singularly perturbed systems with only one fast variable which improves the methods used until now. The aim of this work is to extend this method to the case of four-dimensional singularly perturbed systems with two slow and two fast variables. This method enables stating a unique generic condition for the existence of “canard solutions” for such four-dimensional singularly perturbed systems which is based on the stability of folded singularities (pseudo singular points in this case of the normalized slow dynamics deduced from a well-known property of linear algebra. This unique generic condition is identical to that provided in previous works. Application of this method to the famous coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo equations and to the Hodgkin-Huxley model enables showing the existence of “canard solutions” in such systems.

  9. Spiral Wave in Small-World Networks of Hodgkin-Huxley Neurons

    Ma Jun; Zhang Cairong; Yang Lijian; Wu Ying

    2010-01-01

    The effect of small-world connection and noise on the formation and transition of spiral wave in the networks of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons are investigated in detail. Some interesting results are found in our numerical studies. i) The quiescent neurons are activated to propagate electric signal to others by generating and developing spiral wave from spiral seed in small area. ii) A statistical factor is defined to describe the collective properties and phase transition induced by the topology of networks and noise. iii) Stable rotating spiral wave can be generated and keeps robust when the rewiring probability is below certain threshold, otherwise, spiral wave can not be developed from the spiral seed and spiral wave breakup occurs for a stable rotating spiral wave. iv) Gaussian white noise is introduced on the membrane of neurons to study the noise-induced phase transition on spiral wave in small-world networks of neurons. It is confirmed that Gaussian white noise plays active role in supporting and developing spiral wave in the networks of neurons, and appearance of smaller factor of synchronization indicates high possibility to induce spiral wave. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  10. Phase-locking and chaos in a silent Hodgkin-Huxley neuron exposed to sinusoidal electric field

    Che Yanqiu; Wang Jiang; Si Wenjie; Fei Xiangyang

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal firing patterns are related to the information processing in neural system. This paper investigates the response characteristics of a silent Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the stimulation of externally-applied sinusoidal electric field. The neuron exhibits both p:q phase-locked (i.e. a periodic oscillation defined as p action potentials generated by q cycle stimulations) and chaotic behaviors, depending on the values of stimulus frequencies and amplitudes. In one-parameter space, a rich bifurcation structure including period-adding without chaos and phase-locking alternated with chaos suggests frequency discrimination of the neuronal firing patterns. Furthermore, by mapping out Arnold tongues, we partition the amplitude-frequency parameter space in terms of the qualitative behaviors of the neuron. Thus the neuron's information (firing patterns) encodes the stimulus information (amplitude and frequency), and vice versa

  11. Anti-electromagnetic interference analysis of equivalent circuit of ion channel based on the Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Chu, J; Chang, X L; Zhao, M; Man, M H; Wei, M; Yuan, L

    2013-01-01

    With the continuous improvement of circuit integration and working clock frequency in the electronic system, it is increasingly easy for the system to be affected by electromagnetic waves, and electromagnetic susceptibility and vulnerability become more severe. However, living beings in nature have shown extraordinary compatibility, immunity and adaptability to the electromagnetism at the same time. In addition, the ion channel on the neuron cytomembrane is a typical representation of b ioelectrical immunity . So the Hodgkin-Huxley circuit model with one capacitor in parallel with some power supplies and resistors was adopted to simulate the ion channel on the neuron cytomembrane. Through analysis, the circuit model can be used to simulate some electrical characteristics of biological neuron cells, and then acquire a certain level of anti-electromagnetic interference ability. This method will be useful for improving the reliability, compatibility and anti-interference capability of the electronic system in the complicated electromagnetic environment.

  12. Dynamical mean-field theory of noisy spiking neuron ensembles: Application to the Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    A dynamical mean-field approximation (DMA) previously proposed by the present author [H. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev E 67, 041903 (2003)] has been extended to ensembles described by a general noisy spiking neuron model. Ensembles of N-unit neurons, each of which is expressed by coupled K-dimensional differential equations (DEs), are assumed to be subject to spatially correlated white noises. The original KN-dimensional stochastic DEs have been replaced by K(K+2)-dimensional deterministic DEs expressed in terms of means and the second-order moments of local and global variables: the fourth-order contributions are taken into account by the Gaussian decoupling approximation. Our DMA has been applied to an ensemble of Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons (K=4), for which effects of the noise, the coupling strength, and the ensemble size on the response to a single-spike input have been investigated. Numerical results calculated by the DMA theory are in good agreement with those obtained by direct simulations, although the former computation is about a thousand times faster than the latter for a typical HH neuron ensemble with N=100

  13. Teaching and learning the Hodgkin-Huxley model based on software developed in NEURON's programming language hoc.

    Hernández, Oscar E; Zurek, Eduardo E

    2013-05-15

    We present a software tool called SENB, which allows the geometric and biophysical neuronal properties in a simple computational model of a Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) axon to be changed. The aim of this work is to develop a didactic and easy-to-use computational tool in the NEURON simulation environment, which allows graphical visualization of both the passive and active conduction parameters and the geometric characteristics of a cylindrical axon with HH properties. The SENB software offers several advantages for teaching and learning electrophysiology. First, SENB offers ease and flexibility in determining the number of stimuli. Second, SENB allows immediate and simultaneous visualization, in the same window and time frame, of the evolution of the electrophysiological variables. Third, SENB calculates parameters such as time and space constants, stimuli frequency, cellular area and volume, sodium and potassium equilibrium potentials, and propagation velocity of the action potentials. Furthermore, it allows the user to see all this information immediately in the main window. Finally, with just one click SENB can save an image of the main window as evidence. The SENB software is didactic and versatile, and can be used to improve and facilitate the teaching and learning of the underlying mechanisms in the electrical activity of an axon using the biophysical properties of the squid giant axon.

  14. Teaching and learning the Hodgkin-Huxley model based on software developed in NEURON’s programming language hoc

    2013-01-01

    Background We present a software tool called SENB, which allows the geometric and biophysical neuronal properties in a simple computational model of a Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) axon to be changed. The aim of this work is to develop a didactic and easy-to-use computational tool in the NEURON simulation environment, which allows graphical visualization of both the passive and active conduction parameters and the geometric characteristics of a cylindrical axon with HH properties. Results The SENB software offers several advantages for teaching and learning electrophysiology. First, SENB offers ease and flexibility in determining the number of stimuli. Second, SENB allows immediate and simultaneous visualization, in the same window and time frame, of the evolution of the electrophysiological variables. Third, SENB calculates parameters such as time and space constants, stimuli frequency, cellular area and volume, sodium and potassium equilibrium potentials, and propagation velocity of the action potentials. Furthermore, it allows the user to see all this information immediately in the main window. Finally, with just one click SENB can save an image of the main window as evidence. Conclusions The SENB software is didactic and versatile, and can be used to improve and facilitate the teaching and learning of the underlying mechanisms in the electrical activity of an axon using the biophysical properties of the squid giant axon. PMID:23675833

  15. Dynamics from seconds to hours in Hodgkin-Huxley model with time-dependent ion concentrations and buffer reservoirs.

    Niklas Hübel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The classical Hodgkin-Huxley (HH model neglects the time-dependence of ion concentrations in spiking dynamics. The dynamics is therefore limited to a time scale of milliseconds, which is determined by the membrane capacitance multiplied by the resistance of the ion channels, and by the gating time constants. We study slow dynamics in an extended HH framework that includes time-dependent ion concentrations, pumps, and buffers. Fluxes across the neuronal membrane change intra- and extracellular ion concentrations, whereby the latter can also change through contact to reservoirs in the surroundings. Ion gain and loss of the system is identified as a bifurcation parameter whose essential importance was not realized in earlier studies. Our systematic study of the bifurcation structure and thus the phase space structure helps to understand activation and inhibition of a new excitability in ion homeostasis which emerges in such extended models. Also modulatory mechanisms that regulate the spiking rate can be explained by bifurcations. The dynamics on three distinct slow times scales is determined by the cell volume-to-surface-area ratio and the membrane permeability (seconds, the buffer time constants (tens of seconds, and the slower backward buffering (minutes to hours. The modulatory dynamics and the newly emerging excitable dynamics corresponds to pathological conditions observed in epileptiform burst activity, and spreading depression in migraine aura and stroke, respectively.

  16. Dynamics from seconds to hours in Hodgkin-Huxley model with time-dependent ion concentrations and buffer reservoirs.

    Hübel, Niklas; Dahlem, Markus A

    2014-12-01

    The classical Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model neglects the time-dependence of ion concentrations in spiking dynamics. The dynamics is therefore limited to a time scale of milliseconds, which is determined by the membrane capacitance multiplied by the resistance of the ion channels, and by the gating time constants. We study slow dynamics in an extended HH framework that includes time-dependent ion concentrations, pumps, and buffers. Fluxes across the neuronal membrane change intra- and extracellular ion concentrations, whereby the latter can also change through contact to reservoirs in the surroundings. Ion gain and loss of the system is identified as a bifurcation parameter whose essential importance was not realized in earlier studies. Our systematic study of the bifurcation structure and thus the phase space structure helps to understand activation and inhibition of a new excitability in ion homeostasis which emerges in such extended models. Also modulatory mechanisms that regulate the spiking rate can be explained by bifurcations. The dynamics on three distinct slow times scales is determined by the cell volume-to-surface-area ratio and the membrane permeability (seconds), the buffer time constants (tens of seconds), and the slower backward buffering (minutes to hours). The modulatory dynamics and the newly emerging excitable dynamics corresponds to pathological conditions observed in epileptiform burst activity, and spreading depression in migraine aura and stroke, respectively.

  17. Optimal size of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal systems for maximal energy efficiency in coding pulse signals

    Yu, Lianchun; Liu, Liwei

    2014-03-01

    The generation and conduction of action potentials (APs) represents a fundamental means of communication in the nervous system and is a metabolically expensive process. In this paper, we investigate the energy efficiency of neural systems in transferring pulse signals with APs. By analytically solving a bistable neuron model that mimics the AP generation with a particle crossing the barrier of a double well, we find the optimal number of ion channels that maximizes the energy efficiency of a neuron. We also investigate the energy efficiency of a neuron population in which the input pulse signals are represented with synchronized spikes and read out with a downstream coincidence detector neuron. We find an optimal number of neurons in neuron population, as well as the number of ion channels in each neuron that maximizes the energy efficiency. The energy efficiency also depends on the characters of the input signals, e.g., the pulse strength and the interpulse intervals. These results are confirmed by computer simulation of the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model with a detailed description of the ion channel random gating. We argue that the tradeoff between signal transmission reliability and energy cost may influence the size of the neural systems when energy use is constrained.

  18. Coexistence between silent and bursting states in a biophysical Hodgkin-Huxley-type of model

    Stankevich, Nataliya; Mosekilde, Erik

    2017-01-01

    in a slightly modified, biophysical model that describe the dynamics of pancreatic beta-cells. To realize this form of coexistence, we have introduced an additional voltage-dependent potassium current that is activated in the region around the original, unstable equilibrium point. It is interesting to note...... that this modification also leads the model to display a blue-sky catastrophe in the transition region between chaotic and bursting states....

  19. Impact of Bounded Noise and Rewiring on the Formation and Instability of Spiral Waves in a Small-World Network of Hodgkin-Huxley Neurons.

    Yao, Yuangen; Deng, Haiyou; Ma, Chengzhang; Yi, Ming; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spiral waves are observed in the chemical, physical and biological systems, and the emergence of spiral waves in cardiac tissue is linked to some diseases such as heart ventricular fibrillation and epilepsy; thus it has importance in theoretical studies and potential medical applications. Noise is inevitable in neuronal systems and can change the electrical activities of neuron in different ways. Many previous theoretical studies about the impacts of noise on spiral waves focus an unbounded Gaussian noise and even colored noise. In this paper, the impacts of bounded noise and rewiring of network on the formation and instability of spiral waves are discussed in small-world (SW) network of Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons through numerical simulations, and possible statistical analysis will be carried out. Firstly, we present SW network of HH neurons subjected to bounded noise. Then, it is numerically demonstrated that bounded noise with proper intensity σ, amplitude A, or frequency f can facilitate the formation of spiral waves when rewiring probability p is below certain thresholds. In other words, bounded noise-induced resonant behavior can occur in the SW network of neurons. In addition, rewiring probability p always impairs spiral waves, while spiral waves are confirmed to be robust for small p, thus shortcut-induced phase transition of spiral wave with the increase of p is induced. Furthermore, statistical factors of synchronization are calculated to discern the phase transition of spatial pattern, and it is confirmed that larger factor of synchronization is approached with increasing of rewiring probability p, and the stability of spiral wave is destroyed.

  20. On non-linear dynamics and an optimal control synthesis of the action potential of membranes (ideal and non-ideal cases) of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) mathematical model

    Chavarette, Fabio Roberto; Balthazar, Jose Manoel; Rafikov, Marat; Hermini, Helder Anibal

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied the plasmatic membrane behavior using an electric circuit developed by Hodgkin and Huxley in 1952 and have dealt with the variation of the amount of time related to the potassium and sodium conductances in the squid axon. They developed differential equations for the propagation of electric signals; the dynamics of the Hodgkin-Huxley model have been extensively studied both from the view point of its their biological implications and as a test bed for numerical methods, which can be applied to more complex models. Recently, an irregular chaotic movement of the action potential of the membrane was observed for a number of techniques of control with the objective to stabilize the variation of this potential. This paper analyzes the non-linear dynamics of the Hodgkin-Huxley mathematical model, and we present some modifications in the governing equations of the system in order to make it a non-ideal one (taking into account that the energy source has a limited power supply). We also developed an optimal linear control design for the action potential of membranes. Here, we discuss the conditions that allow the use of control linear feedback for this kind of non-linear system.

  1. A path integral approach to the Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Baravalle, Roman; Rosso, Osvaldo A.; Montani, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    To understand how single neurons process sensory information, it is necessary to develop suitable stochastic models to describe the response variability of the recorded spike trains. Spikes in a given neuron are produced by the synergistic action of sodium and potassium of the voltage-dependent channels that open or close the gates. Hodgkin and Huxley (HH) equations describe the ionic mechanisms underlying the initiation and propagation of action potentials, through a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations that approximate the electrical characteristics of the excitable cell. Path integral provides an adequate approach to compute quantities such as transition probabilities, and any stochastic system can be expressed in terms of this methodology. We use the technique of path integrals to determine the analytical solution driven by a non-Gaussian colored noise when considering the HH equations as a stochastic system. The different neuronal dynamics are investigated by estimating the path integral solutions driven by a non-Gaussian colored noise q. More specifically we take into account the correlational structures of the complex neuronal signals not just by estimating the transition probability associated to the Gaussian approach of the stochastic HH equations, but instead considering much more subtle processes accounting for the non-Gaussian noise that could be induced by the surrounding neural network and by feedforward correlations. This allows us to investigate the underlying dynamics of the neural system when different scenarios of noise correlations are considered.

  2. Spike neural models (part I: The Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Johnson, Melissa G.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks, or ANNs, have grown a lot since their inception back in the 1940s. But no matter the changes, one of the most important components of neural networks is still the node, which represents the neuron. Within spiking neural networks, the node is especially important because it contains the functions and properties of neurons that are necessary for their network. One important aspect of neurons is the ionic flow which produces action potentials, or spikes. Forces of diffusion and electrostatic pressure work together with the physical properties of the cell to move ions around changing the cell membrane potential which ultimately produces the action potential. This tutorial reviews the Hodkgin-Huxley model and shows how it simulates the ionic flow of the giant squid axon via four differential equations. The model is implemented in Matlab using Euler's Method to approximate the differential equations. By using Euler's method, an extra parameter is created, the time step. This new parameter needs to be carefully considered or the results of the node may be impaired.

  3. Kinetic slow mode-type solitons

    K. Baumgärtel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional hybrid code simulations are presented, carried out in order both to study solitary waves of the slow mode branch in an isotropic, collisionless, medium-β plasma (βi=0.25 and to test the fluid based soliton interpretation of Cluster observed strong magnetic depressions (Stasiewicz et al., 2003; Stasiewicz, 2004 against kinetic theory. In the simulations, a variety of strongly oblique, large amplitude, solitons are seen, including solitons with Alfvenic polarization, similar to those predicted by the Hall-MHD theory, and robust, almost non-propagating, solitary structures of slow magnetosonic type with strong magnetic field depressions and perpendicular ion heating, which have no counterpart in fluid theory. The results support the soliton-based interpretation of the Cluster observations, but reveal substantial deficiencies of Hall-MHD theory in describing slow mode-type solitons in a plasma of moderate beta.

  4. Calcium current activation kinetics in isolated pyramidal neurones of the Ca1 region of the mature guinea-pig hippocampus.

    Kay, A R; Wong, R K

    1987-11-01

    1. Neurones were isolated from the CA1 region of the guinea-pig hippocampus and subjected to the whole-cell mode of voltage clamping, to determine the kinetics of voltage-gated Ca2+ channel activation. 2. Isolated neurones had an abbreviated morphology, having lost most of the distal dendritic tree during the isolation procedure. The electrical compactness of the cells facilitates voltage clamp analysis. 3. Block of sodium and potassium currents revealed a persistent current activated on depolarization above -40 mV, which inactivated slowly when the intracellular medium contained EGTA. The current was blocked by Co2+ and Cd2+, augmented by increases in Ca2+ and could be carried by Ba2+, suggesting that the current is borne by Ca2+. 4. Steady-state activation of the Ca2+ current was found to be well described by the Boltzman equation raised to the second power. 5. The open channel's current-voltage (I-V) relationship rectified in the inward direction and was consistent with the constant-field equation. 6. The kinetics of Ca2+ current onset followed m2 kinetics throughout the range of its activation. Tail current kinetics were in accord with this model. A detailed Hodgkin-Huxley model was derived, defining the activation of this current. 7. The kinetics of the currents observed in this regionally and morphologically defined class of neurones were consistent with the existence of a single kinetic class of channels.

  5. Heterogeneity in limb fatty acid kinetics in type 2 diabetes

    Sacchetti, M; Olsen, D B; Saltin, B

    2005-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In order to test the hypothesis that disturbances in skeletal muscle fatty acid metabolism with type 2 diabetes are not equally present in the upper and lower limbs, we studied fatty acid kinetics simultaneously across the arm and leg of type 2 diabetic patients (n=6) and matched...... control subjects (n=7) for 5 h under baseline conditions and during a 4-h hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. METHODS: Limb fatty acid kinetics was determined by means of continuous [U-(13)C]palmitate infusion and measurement of arteriovenous differences. RESULTS: The systemic palmitate rate...... in the dysregulation of skeletal muscle fatty acid metabolism, with only the leg, but not the arm, showing an impairment of fatty acid kinetics at baseline and during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp causing a physiological increase in insulin concentration....

  6. Kinetic Simulations of Type II Radio Burst Emission Processes

    Ganse, U.; Spanier, F. A.; Vainio, R. O.

    2011-12-01

    The fundamental emission process of Type II Radio Bursts has been under discussion for many decades. While analytic deliberations point to three wave interaction as the source for fundamental and harmonic radio emissions, sparse in-situ observational data and high computational demands for kinetic simulations have not allowed for a definite conclusion to be reached. A popular model puts the radio emission into the foreshock region of a coronal mass ejection's shock front, where shock drift acceleration can create eletrcon beam populations in the otherwise quiescent foreshock plasma. Beam-driven instabilities are then assumed to create waves, forming the starting point of three wave interaction processes. Using our kinetic particle-in-cell code, we have studied a number of emission scenarios based on electron beam populations in a CME foreshock, with focus on wave-interaction microphysics on kinetic scales. The self-consistent, fully kinetic simulations with completely physical mass-ratio show fundamental and harmonic emission of transverse electromagnetic waves and allow for detailled statistical analysis of all contributing wavemodes and their couplings.

  7. From Knights Corner to Landing: a Case Study Based on a Hodgkin-Huxley Neuron Simulator

    George Chatzikonstantis; Diego Jiménez; Esteban Meneses; Christos Strydis; Harry Sidiropoulos; Dimitrios Soudris

    2017-01-01

    Brain modeling has been presenting significant challenges to the world of high-performance computing (HPC) over the years. The field of computational neuroscience has been developing a demand for physiologically plausible neuron models, that feature increased complexity and thus, require greater computational power. We explore Intel’s newest generation of Xeon Phi computing platforms, named Knights Landing (KNL), as a way to match the need for processing power and as an upgrade over the previ...

  8. Effects of channel noise on firing coherence of small-world Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    Sun, X. J.; Lei, J. Z.; Perc, M.; Lu, Q. S.; Lv, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effects of channel noise on firing coherence of Watts-Strogatz small-world networks consisting of biophysically realistic HH neurons having a fraction of blocked voltage-gated sodium and potassium ion channels embedded in their neuronal membranes. The intensity of channel noise is determined by the number of non-blocked ion channels, which depends on the fraction of working ion channels and the membrane patch size with the assumption of homogeneous ion channel density. We find that firing coherence of the neuronal network can be either enhanced or reduced depending on the source of channel noise. As shown in this paper, sodium channel noise reduces firing coherence of neuronal networks; in contrast, potassium channel noise enhances it. Furthermore, compared with potassium channel noise, sodium channel noise plays a dominant role in affecting firing coherence of the neuronal network. Moreover, we declare that the observed phenomena are independent of the rewiring probability.

  9. Action potential energy efficiency varies among neuron types in vertebrates and invertebrates.

    Biswa Sengupta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs places high demands on the energetic resources of neural tissue. Each AP forces ATP-driven ion pumps to work harder to restore the ionic concentration gradients, thus consuming more energy. Here, we ask whether the ionic currents underlying the AP can be predicted theoretically from the principle of minimum energy consumption. A long-held supposition that APs are energetically wasteful, based on theoretical analysis of the squid giant axon AP, has recently been overturned by studies that measured the currents contributing to the AP in several mammalian neurons. In the single compartment models studied here, AP energy consumption varies greatly among vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, with several mammalian neuron models using close to the capacitive minimum of energy needed. Strikingly, energy consumption can increase by more than ten-fold simply by changing the overlap of the Na(+ and K(+ currents during the AP without changing the APs shape. As a consequence, the height and width of the AP are poor predictors of energy consumption. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid axon, optimizing the kinetics or number of Na(+ and K(+ channels can whittle down the number of ATP molecules needed for each AP by a factor of four. In contrast to the squid AP, the temporal profile of the currents underlying APs of some mammalian neurons are nearly perfectly matched to the optimized properties of ionic conductances so as to minimize the ATP cost.

  10. Comparison of two forms of Vlasov-type relativistic kinetic equations in hadrodynamics

    Mashnik, S.G.; Maino, G.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of two methods in the relativistic kinetic theory of the Fermi systems is carried out assuming, as an example, the simplest σω-version of quantum hadrodynamics with allowance for strong mean meson fields. It is shown that the Vlasov-type relativistic kinetic equation (VRKE) obtained by means of the procedure of squaring at an intermediate step is responsible for unphysical features. A direct method of derivation of kinetic equations is proposed. This method does not contain such drawback and gives rise to VRKE in hydrodynamics of a non-contradictory form in which both spin degrees of freedom and states with positive and negative energies are taken into account. 17 refs

  11. The soliton solution of BBGKY quantum kinetic equations chain for different type particles system

    Rasulova, M.Yu.; Avazov, U.; Hassan, T.

    2006-12-01

    In the present paper on the basis of BBGKY chain of quantum kinetic equations the chain of equations for correlation matrices is derived, describing the evolution of a system of different types particles, which interact by pair potential. The series, which is the solution of this chain of equations for correlation matrices, is suggested. Using this series the solution of the last chain of equations is reduced to a solution of a set of homogeneous and nonhomogeneous von-Neumann's kinetic equations (analogue of Vlasov equations for quantum case). The first and second equations of this set of equations coincide with the first and second kinetic equations of the set, which is used in plasma physics. For an potential in the form of Dirac delta function, the solution of von-Neumann equation is defined through soliton solution of nonlinear Schrodinger equations. Based on von-Neumann equation one can define all terms of series, which is a solution of a chain of equations for correlation matrices. On the basis of these correlation matrices for a system of different types of particles we can define exact solution of BBGKY chain of quantum kinetic equations

  12. Kinetic studies on purification capability of channel flow type wastewater treatment plant

    Hashimoto, S [Fukui Institute of Technology, Fukui (Japan); Furukawa, K; Kim, J [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1990-10-01

    In order to develop a wastewater treatment process of secondary effluent and a wastewater treatment process of a farm village, some experiments have been carried out using bench scale and full scale hydroponic type wastewater treatment plant. This wastewater treatment system mainly consists of water channels and hydroponic water tanks. The authors carried out of a kinetic study for purification capability of the water channels while assuring the growth of microorganism in the treatment scheme. It was shown experimentally that the channel flow type wastewater treatment plant had a high TOC removal capability regardless of the kind of contact material and treatment time. Activated sludge microorganism concentration in water channels was obtained by kinetic estimation from the measured effluent suspended solid concentration. Estimated amount of activated sludge in water channels comprised only 11.5-37.4 percent of the measured amounts of withdrawn sludge, indicating high photosynthesis production of algae in water channels. 8 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Photo-assisted Fenton type processes for the degradation of phenol: A kinetic study

    Kusic, Hrvoje; Koprivanac, Natalija; Bozic, Ana Loncaric; Selanec, Iva

    2006-01-01

    In this study the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), dark Fenton and photo-assisted Fenton type processes; Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 , Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 , Fe 0 /H 2 O 2 , UV/Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 , UV/Fe 3+ /H 2 O 2 and UV/Fe 0 /H 2 O 2 , for degradation of phenol as a model organic pollutant in the wastewater was investigated. A detail kinetic modeling which describes the degradation of phenol was performed. Mathematical models which predict phenol decomposition and formation of primary oxidation by-products: catechol, hydroquinone and benzoquinone, by applied processes were developed. The study also consist the modeling of mineralization kinetic of the phenol solution by applied AOPs. This part, besides well known reactions of Fenton and photo-Fenton chemistry, involves additional reactions which describe removal of iron from catalytic cycle through formation of ferric complexes and its regeneration induced by UV radiation. Phenol decomposition kinetic was monitored by HPLC analysis and total organic carbon content measurements (TOC). Complete phenol removal was obtained by all applied processes. Residual TOC by applied Fenton type processes ranged between 60.2 and 44.7%, while the efficiency of those processes was significantly enhanced in the presence of UV light, where residual TOC ranged between 15.2 and 2.4%

  14. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    Christian Andreas Lenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C. botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores.We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near isothermal HPT treatments at 300 – 1200 MPa at 30 – 75 °C for 1 s – 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone, large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed 1st order kinetics. DPA release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced germination at ≤ 450 MPa/≤ 45 °C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60 – 70 °C.Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores than spores from other C. botulinum types, could allow for the implementation of milder processes without

  15. Cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in differentiated type early gastric cancers with different mucin phenotype.

    Shibata, Naomi; Watari, Jiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Tanno, Satoshi; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the biological impact and molecular pathogenesis of cellular phenotype in differentiated-type gastric cancers (DGCs), we investigated cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in early stage of DGCs. A total of 43 early gastric cancers (EGCs) were studied. EGCs were divided into 3 phenotypic categories: gastric (G type, n = 11), ordinary (O type, n = 20), and complete intestinal (CI type, n = 12) based on the combination of HGM, ConA, MUC2, and CD10. Proliferative index (PI), apoptotic index (AI), and p53 overexpression were investigated by immunohistochemical staining with anti-Ki-67, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling method, and p53 antibody, respectively. Using a high-resolution fluorescent microsatellite analysis system, microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were examined. Frameshift mutation analysis of transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor (TGF-betaRII) and bcl-2-associated X (BAX) in cancers with MSI was also performed. The mean AI/PI ratio values were 0.04 for G-type, 0.10 for O-type, and 0.13 for CI-type cancers--significantly lower in G type than in O and CI types (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). No difference in the incidence of MSI and LOH was seen among the 3 cellular phenotypes. However, the major pattern of MSI, which showed drastic and widely dispersed changes and is related to an increased risk for cancer, was significantly higher in G and O types than in CI type (P cancers. These results indicate that G-type cancers are likely to show more aggressive behaviors than CI-type cancers, and that O-type cancers show the intermediate characteristics of both types. However, the molecular pathogenesis of each phenotypic cancer is not associated with microsatellite alterations. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg₂Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning.

    Zhang, Yang-Huan; Li, Bao-Wei; Ren, Hui-Ping; Li, Xia; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dong-Liang

    2011-01-18

    Mg₂Ni-type Mg₂Ni 1-x Co x (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1) alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4) alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg₂Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD) of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s) to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio () of the (x = 0.4) alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio () from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D) from 0.75 × 10 - 11 to 3.88 × 10 - 11 cm²/s and the limiting current density I L from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g.

  17. Transformation of benzophenone-type UV filters by chlorine: Kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessments

    Li, Jian; Ma, Li-yun; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Chlorination kinetics of three benzophenone-type UV filters (BPs) was studied. • Chlorination of BPs followed second-order reaction. • The transformation products (TPs) of six BPs were identified. • Several transformation pathways were proposed. • Mostly enhanced toxicity of TPs after chlorination was observed. - Abstract: The present study focused on the kinetics, transformation pathways and toxicity of several benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters (BPs) during the water chlorination disinfection process. The transformation kinetics of the studied three BPs was found to be second-order reaction, which was dependent on the concentration of BPs and chlorine. The second-order rate constants increased from 86.7 to 975 M"−"1 s"−"1 for oxybenzone, 49.6–261.7 M"−"1 s"−"1 for 4-hydroxybenzophenone and 51.7–540 M"−"1 s"−"1 for 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid with the increasing pH value from 6 to 8 of the chlorination disinfection condition. Then the transformation products (TPs) of these BPs were identified by HPLC-QTof analysis. Several transformation pathways, including electrophilic substitution, methoxyl substitution, ketone groups oxidation, hydrolysis, decarboxylation and ring cleavage reaction, were speculated to participate in the chlorination transformation process. Finally, according to the toxicity experiment on luminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, enhanced toxicity was observed for almost all the TPs of the studied BPs except for 2,2′-dihydroxy-4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone; it suggested the formation of TPs with more toxic than the parent compounds during the chlorination process. The present study provided a foundation to understand the transformation of BPs during chlorination disinfection process, and was of great significance to the drinking water safety.

  18. Transformation of benzophenone-type UV filters by chlorine: Kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessments

    Li, Jian; Ma, Li-yun; Xu, Li, E-mail: xulpharm@mails.tjmu.edu.cn

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • Chlorination kinetics of three benzophenone-type UV filters (BPs) was studied. • Chlorination of BPs followed second-order reaction. • The transformation products (TPs) of six BPs were identified. • Several transformation pathways were proposed. • Mostly enhanced toxicity of TPs after chlorination was observed. - Abstract: The present study focused on the kinetics, transformation pathways and toxicity of several benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters (BPs) during the water chlorination disinfection process. The transformation kinetics of the studied three BPs was found to be second-order reaction, which was dependent on the concentration of BPs and chlorine. The second-order rate constants increased from 86.7 to 975 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for oxybenzone, 49.6–261.7 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for 4-hydroxybenzophenone and 51.7–540 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid with the increasing pH value from 6 to 8 of the chlorination disinfection condition. Then the transformation products (TPs) of these BPs were identified by HPLC-QTof analysis. Several transformation pathways, including electrophilic substitution, methoxyl substitution, ketone groups oxidation, hydrolysis, decarboxylation and ring cleavage reaction, were speculated to participate in the chlorination transformation process. Finally, according to the toxicity experiment on luminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, enhanced toxicity was observed for almost all the TPs of the studied BPs except for 2,2′-dihydroxy-4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone; it suggested the formation of TPs with more toxic than the parent compounds during the chlorination process. The present study provided a foundation to understand the transformation of BPs during chlorination disinfection process, and was of great significance to the drinking water safety.

  19. Classification of Hand Grasp Kinetics and Types Using Movement-Related Cortical Potentials and EEG Rhythms

    Mads Jochumsen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of single-trial movement intentions from EEG is paramount for brain-computer interfacing in neurorehabilitation. These movement intentions contain task-related information and if this is decoded, the neurorehabilitation could potentially be optimized. The aim of this study was to classify single-trial movement intentions associated with two levels of force and speed and three different grasp types using EEG rhythms and components of the movement-related cortical potential (MRCP as features. The feature importance was used to estimate encoding of discriminative information. Two data sets were used. 29 healthy subjects executed and imagined different hand movements, while EEG was recorded over the contralateral sensorimotor cortex. The following features were extracted: delta, theta, mu/alpha, beta, and gamma rhythms, readiness potential, negative slope, and motor potential of the MRCP. Sequential forward selection was performed, and classification was performed using linear discriminant analysis and support vector machines. Limited classification accuracies were obtained from the EEG rhythms and MRCP-components: 0.48±0.05 (grasp types, 0.41±0.07 (kinetic profiles, motor execution, and 0.39±0.08 (kinetic profiles, motor imagination. Delta activity contributed the most but all features provided discriminative information. These findings suggest that information from the entire EEG spectrum is needed to discriminate between task-related parameters from single-trial movement intentions.

  20. BGK-type models in strong reaction and kinetic chemical equilibrium regimes

    Monaco, R; Bianchi, M Pandolfi; Soares, A J

    2005-01-01

    A BGK-type procedure is applied to multi-component gases undergoing chemical reactions of bimolecular type. The relaxation process towards local Maxwellians, depending on mass and numerical densities of each species as well as common velocity and temperature, is investigated in two different cases with respect to chemical regimes. These cases are related to the strong reaction regime characterized by slow reactions, and to the kinetic chemical equilibrium regime where fast reactions take place. The consistency properties of both models are stated in detail. The trend to equilibrium is numerically tested and comparisons for the two regimes are performed within the hydrogen-air and carbon-oxygen reaction mechanism. In the spatial homogeneous case, it is also shown that the thermodynamical equilibrium of the models recovers satisfactorily the asymptotic equilibrium solutions to the reactive Euler equations

  1. Plasma adrenaline kinetics in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    Dejgaard, A; Hilsted, J; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1989-01-01

    Plasma adrenaline kinetics (clearance, extraction across the forearm, initial plasma disappearance rate, mean sojourn time, volume of distribution) were studied in sixteen Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients during constant i.v. infusion of tritium labelled adrenaline. In patients with (n...... = 8) and without (n = 8) neuropathy forearm venous plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations as well as plasma clearance of adrenaline based on arterial sampling (1.7 vs 2.1 l/min) were not significantly different. The initial disappearance time (T 1/2) after the infusion of the tritium...... labelled adrenaline had been stopped was significantly prolonged in Type 1 diabetic patients with neuropathy compared to those without (after 20 min infusion 2.7 vs 2.2 min, p less than 0.02, after 75 min infusion 3.7 vs 2.9 min, p less than 0.05). The corresponding values for the mean sojourn time...

  2. Stability estimation of autoregulated genes under Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics

    Arani, Babak M. S.; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Lahti, Leo; González, Javier; Wit, Ernst C.

    2018-06-01

    Feedback loops are typical motifs appearing in gene regulatory networks. In some well-studied model organisms, including Escherichia coli, autoregulated genes, i.e., genes that activate or repress themselves through their protein products, are the only feedback interactions. For these types of interactions, the Michaelis-Menten (MM) formulation is a suitable and widely used approach, which always leads to stable steady-state solutions representative of homeostatic regulation. However, in many other biological phenomena, such as cell differentiation, cancer progression, and catastrophes in ecosystems, one might expect to observe bistable switchlike dynamics in the case of strong positive autoregulation. To capture this complex behavior we use the generalized family of MM kinetic models. We give a full analysis regarding the stability of autoregulated genes. We show that the autoregulation mechanism has the capability to exhibit diverse cellular dynamics including hysteresis, a typical characteristic of bistable systems, as well as irreversible transitions between bistable states. We also introduce a statistical framework to estimate the kinetics parameters and probability of different stability regimes given observational data. Empirical data for the autoregulated gene SCO3217 in the SOS system in Streptomyces coelicolor are analyzed. The coupling of a statistical framework and the mathematical model can give further insight into understanding the evolutionary mechanisms toward different cell fates in various systems.

  3. Changes in lipoprotein kinetics associated with type 2 diabetes affect the distribution of lipopolysaccharides among lipoproteins.

    Vergès, Bruno; Duvillard, Laurence; Lagrost, Laurent; Vachoux, Christelle; Garret, Céline; Bouyer, Karine; Courtney, Michael; Pomié, Céline; Burcelin, Rémy

    2014-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are inflammatory components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and, in plasma, are mostly associated with lipoproteins. This association is thought to promote their catabolism while reducing their proinflammatory effects. Our aim was to determine the impact of lipoprotein kinetics on plasma LPS distribution and how it may affect patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We performed a kinetic study in 30 individuals (16 T2DM patients, 14 controls) and analyzed the impact of changes in lipoprotein kinetics on LPS distribution among lipoproteins. Plasma LPS levels in T2DM patients were not different from those in controls, but LPS distribution in the two groups was different. Patients with T2DM had higher LPS-very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL; 31% ± 7% vs 22% ± 11%, P = .002), LPS-high-density lipoprotein (HDL; 29% ± 9% vs 19% ± 10%, P = .015), free (nonlipoprotein bound) LPS (10% ± 4% vs 7% ± 4%, P = .043) and lower LPS-low-density lipoprotein (LDL; 30% ± 13% vs 52% ± 16%, P = .001). In multivariable analysis, VLDL-LPS was associated with HDL-LPS (P < .0001); LDL-LPS was associated with VLDL-LPS (P = .004), and VLDL apolipoprotein (apo) B100 catabolism (P = .002); HDL-LPS was associated with free LPS (P < .0001) and VLDL-LPS (P = .033); free LPS was associated with HDL-LPS (P < .0001). In a patient featuring a dramatic decrease in VLDL catabolism due to apoA-V mutation, LDL-LPS was severely decreased (0.044 EU/mL vs 0.788 EU/mL in controls). The difference between T2DM patients and controls for LDL-LPS fraction was no longer significant after controlling for VLDL apoB100 total fractional catabolic rate. Our data suggest that in humans, free LPS transfers first to HDL and then to VLDL, whereas the LPS-bound LDL fraction is mainly derived from VLDL catabolism; the latter may hence represent a LPS catabolic pathway. T2DM patients show lower LDL-LPS secondary to reduced VLDL catabolism, which may represent an

  4. The influence of reagent type on the kinetics of ultrafine coal flotation

    Read, R.B.; Camp, L.R.; Summers, M.S.; Rapp, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    A kinetic study has been conducted to determine the influence of reagent type on flotation rates of ultrafine coal. Two ultrafine coal samples, the Illinois No. 5 (Springfield) and Pittsburgh No. 8, have been evaluated with various reagent types in order to derive the rate constants for coal (kc), ash (ka), and pyrite (kc). The reagents used in the study include anionic surfactants, anionic surfactant-alcohol mixtures, and frothing alcohols. In general, the surfactant-alcohol mixtures tend to float ultrafine coal at a rate three to four times faster than either pure alcohols or pure anionic surfactants. Pine oil, a mixture of terpene alcohols and hydrocarbons, was an exception to this finding; it exhibited higher rate constants than the pure aliphatic alcohols or other pure anionic surfactants studied; this may be explained by the fact that the sample of pine oil used (70% alpha-terpineol) acted as a frother/collector system similar to alcohol/kerosene. The separation efficiencies of ash and pyrite from coal, as evidenced by the ratios of kc/ka or kc/kp, tend to indicate, however, that commercially available surfactant-alcohol mixtures are not as selective as pure alcohols such as 2-ethyl-1-hexanol or methylisobutylcarbinol. Some distinct differences in various rate constants, or their ratios, were noted between the two coals studied, and are possibly attributable to surface chemistry effects. ?? 1989.

  5. Uptake kinetics and nanotoxicity of silica nanoparticles are cell type dependent.

    Blechinger, Julia; Bauer, Alexander T; Torrano, Adriano A; Gorzelanny, Christian; Bräuchle, Christoph; Schneider, Stefan W

    2013-12-09

    In this study, it is shown that the cytotoxic response of cells as well as the uptake kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) is cell type dependent. We use silica NPs with a diameter of 310 nm labeled with perylene dye and 304 nm unlabeled particles to evaluate cell type-dependent uptake and cytotoxicity on human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) and cancer cells derived from the cervix carcinoma (HeLa). Besides their size, the particles are characterized concerning homogeneity of the labeling and their zeta potential. The cellular uptake of the labeled NPs is quantified by imaging the cells via confocal microscopy in a time-dependent manner, with subsequent image analysis via a custom-made and freely available digital method, Particle_in_Cell-3D. We find that within the first 4 h of interaction, the uptake of silica NPs into the cytoplasm is up to 10 times more efficient in HUVEC than in HeLa cells. Interestingly, after 10 or 24 h of interaction, the number of intracellular particles for HeLa cells by far surpasses the one for HUVEC. Inhibitor studies show that these endothelial cells internalize 310 nm SiO₂ NPs via the clathrin-dependent pathway. Remarkably, the differences in the amount of taken up NPs are not directly reflected by the metabolic activity and membrane integrity of the individual cell types. Interaction with NPs leads to a concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial activity and an increase in membrane leakage for HUVEC, whereas HeLa cells show only a reduced mitochondrial activity and no membrane leakage. In addition, silica NPs lead to HUVEC cell death while HeLa cells survive. These findings indicate that HUVEC are more sensitive than HeLa cells upon silica NP exposure. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  7. Application of Littlewood-Paley decomposition to the regularity of Boltzmann type kinetic equations

    EL Safadi, M.

    2007-03-01

    We study the regularity of kinetic equations of Boltzmann type.We use essentially Littlewood-Paley method from harmonic analysis, consisting mainly in working with dyadics annulus. We shall mainly concern with the homogeneous case, where the solution f(t,x,v) depends only on the time t and on the velocities v, while working with realistic and singular cross-sections (non cutoff). In the first part, we study the particular case of Maxwellian molecules. Under this hypothesis, the structure of the Boltzmann operator and his Fourier transform write in a simple form. We show a global C ∞ regularity. Then, we deal with the case of general cross-sections with 'hard potential'. We are interested in the Landau equation which is limit equation to the Boltzmann equation, taking in account grazing collisions. We prove that any weak solution belongs to Schwartz space S. We demonstrate also a similar regularity for the case of Boltzmann equation. Let us note that our method applies directly for all dimensions, and proofs are often simpler compared to other previous ones. Finally, we finish with Boltzmann-Dirac equation. In particular, we adapt the result of regularity obtained in Alexandre, Desvillettes, Wennberg and Villani work, using the dissipation rate connected with Boltzmann-Dirac equation. (author)

  8. Initial sliding wear kinetics of two types of glass ionomer cement: a tribological study.

    Villat, Cyril; Ponthiaux, Pierre; Pradelle-Plasse, Nelly; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Colon, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the initial wear kinetics of two different types of glass ionomer cement used in dentistry (the conventional glass ionomer cement and the resin-modified glass ionomer cement) under sliding friction after 28-day storing in distilled water or Ringer's solution. Sliding friction was applied through a pin-on-disk tribometer, in sphere-on-plane contact conditions, under 5 N normal load and 120 rotations per minute. The test lasted 7500 cycles and replicas were performed at 2500, 5000 and 7500 cycles. A profilometer was used to evaluate the wear volume. Data were analysed using Student's t-test at a significant level of 5%. There is no statistical significant difference between the results obtained for a given material with the maturation media (P > 0.05). However, for a given maturation medium, there are significant statistical differences between the data obtained for the two materials at each measurement (P glass ionomer cement weakens the tribological behaviour of this material.

  9. Initial Sliding Wear Kinetics of Two Types of Glass Ionomer Cement: A Tribological Study

    Cyril Villat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the initial wear kinetics of two different types of glass ionomer cement used in dentistry (the conventional glass ionomer cement and the resin-modified glass ionomer cement under sliding friction after 28-day storing in distilled water or Ringer’s solution. Sliding friction was applied through a pin-on-disk tribometer, in sphere-on-plane contact conditions, under 5 N normal load and 120 rotations per minute. The test lasted 7500 cycles and replicas were performed at 2500, 5000 and 7500 cycles. A profilometer was used to evaluate the wear volume. Data were analysed using Student’s t-test at a significant level of 5%. There is no statistical significant difference between the results obtained for a given material with the maturation media (P>0.05. However, for a given maturation medium, there are significant statistical differences between the data obtained for the two materials at each measurement (P<0.0001. The wear rates of both materials decrease continuously during the running-in period between 0 and 2500 cycles. After 2500 cycles, the wear rate becomes constant and equal for both materials. The resin matrix contained in the resin-modified glass ionomer cement weakens the tribological behaviour of this material.

  10. Kinetics of M23C6 carbide growth in Type 316 stainless steel

    Skyrme, G.; Norbury, J.

    1980-11-01

    A mathematical model has been developed which describes the kinetics of the reduction in the dissolved carbon concentration in austenitic steels due to the precipitation of M 23 C 6 . It is assumed that carbon and chromium diffuse simultaneously and independently to carbide nucleation sites, and that at the carbide/matrix interface (a) the ratio of the fluxes of carbon and chromium is constant, and (b) the elements are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Two types of nucleation site have been considered, (a) at grain boundaries and (b) as isolated particles throughout the grains. Since the diffusion coefficient of carbon is several orders of magnitude greater than that of chromium, the carbon is shown to respond relatively rapidly to concentration changes and this fact has facilitated the formulation of approximate solutions to the equations. It is shown that the rate controlling process is the diffusion of chromium to the carbide site. The resultant equations are compared with available published data on carbide precipitation. Good agreement is found between the models and experimental observations. (U.K.)

  11. Solution of fractional kinetic equation by a class of integral transform of pathway type

    Kumar, Dilip

    2013-04-01

    Solutions of fractional kinetic equations are obtained through an integral transform named Pα-transform introduced in this paper. The Pα-transform is a binomial type transform containing many class of transforms including the well known Laplace transform. The paper is motivated by the idea of pathway model introduced by Mathai [Linear Algebra Appl. 396, 317-328 (2005), 10.1016/j.laa.2004.09.022]. The composition of the transform with differential and integral operators are proved along with convolution theorem. As an illustration of applications to the general theory of differential equations, a simple differential equation is solved by the new transform. Being a new transform, the Pα-transform of some elementary functions as well as some generalized special functions such as H-function, G-function, Wright generalized hypergeometric function, generalized hypergeometric function, and Mittag-Leffler function are also obtained. The results for the classical Laplace transform is retrieved by letting α → 1.

  12. Use of high temperature thermogravimetry for the determination of oxidation, reduction, corrosion-type reactions kinetics

    Benoist, Luc; Bancel, Fabrice; Setaram

    2002-01-01

    Full text.Thermogravimetry is a very powerful technique for the investigation of gas-solid interactions, by measuring the amount of gas adsorbed on the sample or desorbed from the sample. According to the type of interaction, this amount of gas can be very small, that means that the detection of the mass variation can be very difficult to achieve. This is especially the case for certain types of oxidation, reduction and corrosion reactions in the field of metallic and ceramic materials. The good configuration for such kinetic studies is a hanged up sample, to get every face of the sample in contact with the atmosphere. In order to improve the thermogravimetric measurement, two ways can be used: increase the sample mass and especially its area, second use a symmetrical balance. As the gas-solid interaction is adsorption or desorption-type, the area of the sample is one very important parameter. For such a determination, it is important to increase as much as possible this area, that means increasing the sample size and mass. By increasing the contact area for the gas interaction, the accuracy of such a thermogravimetric measurement is largely improved. This design is very convenient for any metallic or ceramic sample that can be directly hung to the balance, without using any container. The second way of improving the test is to use a symmetrical thermogravimetric design. If the variation of mass is too weak to be measured (some micrograms for example), a symmetrical design has to be used. In such a system, a sample and a reference are hung at each beam of the balance, in two identical furnaces. Such a symmetrical technique allows to compensate the buoyancy effect that is identical on both sides. The limit of detection of the thermogravimetric measure is largely improved, allowing accurate measurements on very small variations of mass for long term basis experiments. An example of oxidation of a plate of steel at 500 celsius degree, with a slow mass gain of 1.5

  13. Gymnasium-based unsupervised exercise maintains benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained following supervised training in type 2 diabetes.

    Macananey, Oscar; O'Shea, Donal; Warmington, Stuart A; Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel

    2012-08-01

    Supervised exercise (SE) in patients with type 2 diabetes improves oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise. Maintenance of these improvements, however, has not been examined when supervision is removed. We explored if potential improvements in oxygen uptake kinetics following a 12-week SE that combined aerobic and resistance training were maintained after a subsequent 12-week unsupervised exercise (UE). The involvement of cardiac output (CO) in these improvements was also tested. Nineteen volunteers with type 2 diabetes were recruited. Oxygen uptake kinetics and CO (inert gas rebreathing) responses to constant-load cycling at 50% ventilatory threshold (V(T)), 80% V(T), and mid-point between V(T) and peak workload (50% Δ) were examined at baseline (on 2 occasions) and following each 12-week training period. Participants decided to exercise at a local gymnasium during the UE. Thirteen subjects completed all the interventions. The time constant of phase 2 of oxygen uptake was significantly faster (p exercise maintained benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained during a supervised exercise in subjects with diabetes, and these benefits were associated with a faster dynamic response of heart rate after training.

  14. A kinetic formulation of piezoresistance in N-type silicon: Application to non-linear effects

    Charbonnieras, A. R.; Tellier, C. R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the theoretical study of the influence of the temperature and of the doping on the piezoresistance of N-type silicon. In the first step the fractional change in the resistivity caused by stresses is calculated in the framework of a multivalley model using a kinetic transport formulation based on the Boltzmann transport equation. In the second step shifts in the minima of the conduction band and the resulting shift of the Fermi level are expressed in terms of deformation potentials and of stresses. General expressions for the fundamental linear, π_{11} and π_{12}, and non-linear, π_{111}, π_{112}, π_{122} and π_{123}, piezoresistance coefficients are then derived. Plots of the non-linear piezoresistance coefficients against the reduced shift of the Fermi level or against temperature allow us to characterize the influence of doping and temperature. Finally some attempts are made to estimate the non-linearity for heavily doped semiconductor gauges. Cette publication est consacrée à l'étude théorique de l'influence de la température et du dopage sur la piezorésistivité du silicium type N. Dans une première étape nous adoptons le modèle de vallées et nous utilisons une formulation cinétique du transport électronique faisant appel à l'équation de transport de Boltzmann pour calculer la variation de la résistivité du semiconducteur sous contrainte. Dans la deuxième étape nous exprimons les déplacements des minima de la bande de conduction et du niveau de Fermi en termes de potentiels de déformation et de contraintes. Nous proposons ensuite des expressions générales pour les coefficients piezorésistifs fondamentaux linéaires, π_{11} et π_{12}, et non-linéaires, π_{111}, π_{112}, π_{122} et π_{123}. Des représentations graphiques des variations des coefficients non-linéaires permettent de caractériser l'influence du dopage et de la température. Enfin nous fournissons une première pré-estimation des effets

  15. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopic analysis of the effects of cereal type and variety within a type of grain on structural makeup in relation to rumen degradation kinetics.

    Walker, Amanda M; Yu, Peiqiang; Christensen, Colleen R; Christensen, David A; McKinnon, John J

    2009-08-12

    The objectives of this study were to use Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) to determine structural makeup (features) of cereal grain endosperm tissue and to reveal and identify differences in protein and carbohydrate structural makeup between different cereal types (corn vs barley) and between different varieties within a grain (barley CDC Bold, CDC Dolly, Harrington, and Valier). Another objective was to investigate how these structural features relate to rumen degradation kinetics. The items assessed included (1) structural differences in protein amide I to nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC, starch) intensity and ratio within cellular dimensions; (2) molecular structural differences in the secondary structure profile of protein, alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and their ratio; (3) structural differences in NSC to amide I ratio profile. From the results, it was observed that (1) comparison between grain types [corn (cv. Pioneer 39P78) vs barley (cv. Harrington)] showed significant differences in structural makeup in terms of NSC, amide I to NSC ratio, and rumen degradation kinetics (degradation ratio, effective degradability of dry matter, protein and NSC) (P makeup in terms of amide I, NSC, amide I to NSC ratio, alpha-helix and beta-sheet protein structures, and rumen degradation kinetics (effective degradability of dry matter, protein, and NSC) (P makeup differences between cereal types and between different varieties within a type of grain could be revealed. These structural makeup differences were related to the rate and extent of rumen degradation.

  16. New types of experimental data shape the use of enzyme kinetics for dynamic network modeling.

    Tummler, Katja; Lubitz, Timo; Schelker, Max; Klipp, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of Leonor Michaelis and Maude Menten's paper on the reaction kinetics of the enzyme invertase in 1913, molecular biology has evolved tremendously. New measurement techniques allow in vivo characterization of the whole genome, proteome or transcriptome of cells, whereas the classical enzyme essay only allows determination of the two Michaelis-Menten parameters V and K(m). Nevertheless, Michaelis-Menten kinetics are still commonly used, not only in the in vitro context of enzyme characterization but also as a rate law for enzymatic reactions in larger biochemical reaction networks. In this review, we give an overview of the historical development of kinetic rate laws originating from Michaelis-Menten kinetics over the past 100 years. Furthermore, we briefly summarize the experimental techniques used for the characterization of enzymes, and discuss web resources that systematically store kinetic parameters and related information. Finally, describe the novel opportunities that arise from using these data in dynamic mathematical modeling. In this framework, traditional in vitro approaches may be combined with modern genome-scale measurements to foster thorough understanding of the underlying complex mechanisms. © 2013 FEBS.

  17. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis.

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H](4+) ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 446 Å(2); the [M + 3H](3+) ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å(2) and 367 Å(2). Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H](3+) ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H](4+) ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H](4+) ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  18. Palladium mixed-metal surface-modified AB5-type intermetallides enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics

    Roman V. Denys

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering approaches were adopted in the preparation of advanced hydrogen sorption materials, based on ‘low-temperature’, AB5-type intermetallides. The approaches investigated included micro-encapsulation with palladium and mixed-metal mantles using electroless plating. The influence of micro-encapsulation on the surface morphology and kinetics of hydrogen charging were investigated. It was found that palladium-nickel (Pd-Ni co-deposition by electroless plating significantly improved the kinetics of hydrogen charging of the AB5-type intermetallides at low hydrogen pressure and temperature, after long-term pre-exposure to air. The improvement in the kinetics of hydrogen charging was credited to a synergistic effect between the palladium and nickel atoms in the catalytic mantle and the formation of an ‘interfacial bridge’ for hydrogen diffusion by the nickel atoms in the deposited layer. The developed surface-modified materials may find application in highly selective hydrogen extraction, purification, and storage from impure hydrogen feeds.

  19. Electrochemical reduction of CO2 and H2O into fuels: Cell types and kinetic barriers

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    of production rate/cost. Production rate is determined mainly by electrode kinetics. Therefore, parallel to improving the electrodes of these electrolyser cells, other cell types, which have faster electrode kinetics, can electrolyse CO2 and have potential lower investment costs, are being researched...

  20. Drosophila QVR/SSS modulates the activation and C-type inactivation kinetics of Shaker K+ channels

    Dean, Terry; Xu, Rong; Joiner, William; Sehgal, Amita; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2011-01-01

    The quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a small, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that plays a critical role in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila. Loss-of-function mutations in qvr/sss severely suppress sleep and effect multiple changes in in situ Shaker K+ currents, including decreased magnitude, slower time-to-peak, and cumulative inactivation. Recently, we demonstrated that SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein modulates Shaker channel activity, possibly through a direct interaction at the plasma membrane. We show here that SSS accelerates the activation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels with no effect on deactivation or fast N-type inactivation. Furthermore, this SSS-induced acceleration is sensitive to the pharmacological disruption of lipid rafts and sufficiently accounts for the slower time-to-peak of in situ Shaker currents seen in qvr/sss mutants. We also find that SSS decreases the rate of C-type inactivation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels, providing a potential mechanism for the cumulative inactivation phenotype induced by qvr/sss loss of function mutations. Kinetic modeling based on the in vitro results suggests that the SSS-dependent regulation of channel kinetics accounts for nearly 40% of the decrease in Shaker current magnitude in flies lacking SSS. Sleep duration in qvr/sss null mutants is restored to normal by a qvr/sss transgene that fully rescues the Shaker kinetic phenotypes but only partially rescues the decrease in current magnitude. Together, these results suggest that the role of SSS in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila correlates more strongly with the effects of SSS on Shaker kinetics than current magnitude. PMID:21813698

  1. Drosophila QVR/SSS modulates the activation and C-type inactivation kinetics of Shaker K(+) channels.

    Dean, Terry; Xu, Rong; Joiner, William; Sehgal, Amita; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2011-08-03

    The quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene encodes a small, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that plays a critical role in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila. Loss-of-function mutations in qvr/sss severely suppress sleep and effect multiple changes in in situ Shaker K(+) currents, including decreased magnitude, slower time-to-peak, and cumulative inactivation. Recently, we demonstrated that SLEEPLESS (SSS) protein modulates Shaker channel activity, possibly through a direct interaction at the plasma membrane. We show here that SSS accelerates the activation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels with no effect on deactivation or fast N-type inactivation. Furthermore, this SSS-induced acceleration is sensitive to the pharmacological disruption of lipid rafts and sufficiently accounts for the slower time-to-peak of in situ Shaker currents seen in qvr/sss mutants. We also find that SSS decreases the rate of C-type inactivation of heterologously expressed Shaker channels, providing a potential mechanism for the cumulative inactivation phenotype induced by qvr/sss loss-of-function mutations. Kinetic modeling based on the in vitro results suggests that the SSS-dependent regulation of channel kinetics accounts for nearly 40% of the decrease in Shaker current magnitude in flies lacking SSS. Sleep duration in qvr/sss-null mutants is restored to normal by a qvr/sss transgene that fully rescues the Shaker kinetic phenotypes but only partially rescues the decrease in current magnitude. Together, these results suggest that the role of SSS in the regulation of sleep in Drosophila correlates more strongly with the effects of SSS on Shaker kinetics than current magnitude.

  2. Kinetics of boron ions sorption from solution by inorganic anion exchanger of MNH type

    Leont'eva, G.V.

    1990-01-01

    By the method of restricted volume in case of boron excess in solution kinetics of boron sorption by inorganic anion-exchanger of the composition (Mg 0.55 Ni 0.45 )(OH) 2 has been studied. The sorption was carried out from solution containing Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Cl - , SO 4 2- , CO 3 2- , HCO 3 at 283, 293, 303 and 313 K and pH 8.1, while the density of solution was 1225 kg/m 3 . The sorption mechanism was considered. It is shown that heterogeneity of the character of kinetic curves is caused by the change in the mechanism of limiting stages of the sorption

  3. Foot Kinetics and Kinematics Profile in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Peripheral Neuropathy: A Hospital Based Study from South India.

    Hazari, Animesh; Maiya, Arun G; N, Shivashankara K

    2018-02-01

    A kinetic change in thefoot like altered plantar pressure is the most common etiological risk factor for causing foot ulcers among people with diabetes mellitus. Kinematic alterations in joint angle and spatiotemporal parameters of the gait have also been frequently observed in participants with diabetes peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes peripheral neuropathy is the most common long-term standing complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It leads to various micro and macrovascular related complication of the foot. There is a gap in theliteraturefor biomechanical evaluation and assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus with peripheral neuropathy in Indian population. The aim of the study was to assess and determine the biomechanical changes including kinetics and kinematics of foot among diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Diabetic Foot Clinic, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India. A total of 120 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathywere recruited under the purposive sampling method. Participants with any active ulceration or amputation were excluded from the study. The mean age, height, weight, body mass index, duration of diabetes was 57±14 year, 164±11cm, 61±18kg, 24± 3, 12±7 year respectively. There were significant changes in overall biomechanical profile along with clinical manifestations of diabetes peripheral neuropathy.The regression analysis showed statistical significance for dynamic maximum plantar pressure at forefoot with age, weight, height, duration of diabetes, body mass index, knee & ankle joint angle at toe-off phase of gait cycle,pinprick sensation and ankle reflex (R=.71,R =.55, F (12, 108)=521.9 kPa, p=.002) Conclusions: From the present study, we conclude that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy have significant changes in their foot kinetics and kinematicsparameters. Therefore, they could be at higher risk of foot

  4. A second dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (Type A) of the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis: expression, purification, and steady-state kinetic mechanism.

    Marcinkeviciene, J; Jiang, W; Locke, G; Kopcho, L M; Rogers, M J; Copeland, R A

    2000-05-01

    We report the identification, expression, and characterization of a second Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase A) from the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. The enzyme consists of a polypeptide chain of 322 amino acids that shares 68% identity with the cognate type A enzyme from the bacterium Lactococcus lactis. E. faecalis DHODase A catalyzed the oxidation of l-dihydroorotate while reducing a number of substrates, including fumarate, coenzyme Q(0), and menadione. The steady-state kinetic mechanism has been determined with menadione as an oxidizing substrate at pH 7.5. Initial velocity and product inhibition data suggest that the enzyme follows a two-site nonclassical ping-pong kinetic mechanism. The absorbance of the active site FMN cofactor is quenched in a concentration-dependent manner by titration with orotate and barbituric acid, two competitive inhibitors with respect to dihydroorotate. In contrast, titration of the enzyme with menadione had no effect on FMN absorbance, consistent with nonoverlapping binding sites for dihyroorotate and menadione, as suggested from the kinetic mechanism. The reductive half-reaction has been shown to be only partially rate limiting, and an attempt to evaluate the slow step in the overall reaction has been made by simulating orotate production under steady-state conditions. Our data indicate that the oxidative half-reaction is a rate-limiting segment, while orotate, most likely, retains significant affinity for the reduced enzyme, as suggested by the product inhibition pattern. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Unbinding Kinetics of a p38 MAP Kinase Type II Inhibitor from Metadynamics Simulations.

    Casasnovas, Rodrigo; Limongelli, Vittorio; Tiwary, Pratyush; Carloni, Paolo; Parrinello, Michele

    2017-04-05

    Understanding the structural and energetic requisites of ligand binding toward its molecular target is of paramount relevance in drug design. In recent years, atomistic free energy calculations have proven to be a valid tool to complement experiments in characterizing the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of protein/ligand interaction. Here, we investigate, through a recently developed metadynamics-based protocol, the unbinding mechanism of an inhibitor of the pharmacologically relevant target p38 MAP kinase. We provide a thorough description of the ligand unbinding pathway identifying the most stable binding mode and other thermodynamically relevant poses. From our simulations, we estimated the unbinding rate as k off = 0.020 ± 0.011 s -1 . This is in good agreement with the experimental value (k off = 0.14 s -1 ). Next, we developed a Markov state model that allowed identifying the rate-limiting step of the ligand unbinding process. Our calculations further show that the solvation of the ligand and that of the active site play crucial roles in the unbinding process. This study paves the way to investigations on the unbinding dynamics of more complex p38 inhibitors and other pharmacologically relevant inhibitors in general, demonstrating that metadynamics can be a powerful tool in designing new drugs with engineered binding/unbinding kinetics.

  6. Kinetic behaviour of low-Co AB5-type metal hydride electrodes

    Tliha, M.; Boussami, S.; Mathlouthi, H.; Lamloumi, J.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetic behaviour of the LaNi 3.55 Mn 0.4 Al 0.3 Co 0.4 Fe 0.35 metal hydride, used as a negative electrode in the nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries, was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different state of charge (SOC). Impedance measurements were performed in the frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 mHz. Electrochemical impedance spectrum of the metal hydride electrode was interpreted by an equivalent circuit including the different electrochemical processes taking place on the interface between the MH electrode and the electrolyte. Electrochemical kinetic parameters such as the charge-transfer resistance R tc , the exchange current density I 0 and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient D H were determined at different state of charge. The results of EIS measurements indicate that the electrochemical reaction activity of the LaNi 3.55 Mn 0.4 Al 0.3 Co 0.4 Fe 0.35 metal hydride electrode was markedly improved with increasing state of charge (SOC). The transformation α-β is probably a limiting step in the mechanisms of hydrogenation of metal hydride electrode.

  7. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg2Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning

    Hui-Ping Ren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mg2Ni-type Mg2Ni1−xCox (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1 alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4 alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg2Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio ( of the (x = 0.4 alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio ( from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D from 0.75 × 10−11 to 3.88 × 10−11 cm2/s and the limiting current density IL from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g.

  8. Investigations on the edge kinetic data in regimes with type-I and mitigated ELMs at ASDEX Upgrade

    Rathgeber, S.K.; Barrera, L.; Birkenmeier, G.; Fischer, R.; Suttrop, W.

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of profiles and gradients of electron density, temperature and pressure at the edge of ASDEX Upgrade was studied in regimes with type-I and small edge localized modes (ELMs) of discharges with and without applied magnetic perturbations (MPs). Estimation of the edge kinetic parameters was performed by means of integrated data analysis for joint reconstruction of electron density and temperature profiles via combination of data from different diagnostics. The MP fields for ELM mitigation were produced by 16 in-vessel coils allowing to execute this survey with large variations in poloidal spectrum and resonant component of the error field. With several dedicated discharges the effect of MPs on the edge kinetic data and ELMs was determined in dependence of heating power, gas puff and MP-coil configuration. Small ELMs are dominant—with and without MPs—in regimes with reduced pedestal top electron temperatures and flattened edge electron pressure gradients compared to type-I ELM phases. Furthermore, application of MPs opens an additional small ELM regime in the high temperature range at reduced electron pressure gradient. (paper)

  9. Kinetic analysis of in vitro production of wild-type Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Andréa Farias de Almeida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the kinetic behavior of Sf9 and Sf21 cells used in the production of a baculovirus biopesticide to control the pest of corn Spodoptera frugiperda was analyzed. Kinetic variables such as maximum specific growth rate, cell productivity, mean rate of infection, as well as the mean rate of occlusion body production were determined during the infection of these cell-lines with the extracellular virus of the S. frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV. The Sf9 cell-line resulted in better viral production results (5.0 x 10(8 OB/mL than the Sf21 cell-line (2.5 x 10(8 OB/mL.Neste trabalho, analisou-se o comportamento cinético das células Sf9 e Sf21 utilizadas na produção de biopesticida para o controle de Spodoptera frugiperda. Variáveis cinéticas, como velocidade específica máxima de crescimento, produtividade em células, velocidade média de infecção e a velocidade média de produção de OB foram determinadas durante a infecção destas linhagens com o vírus extracelular do nucleopoliedrovirus de S. frugiperda. A linhagem Sf9 resultou em melhores resultados de produção do baculovírus (5 x 10(8 OB/mL, quando comparada à linhagem Sf21 (2,5 x 10(8 OB/mL e outras linhagens da literatura.

  10. Kinetics of oil-cracking for different types of marine oils from Tahe Oilfield, Tarim Basin, NW China

    Anlai Ma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The C1–C5 gas and carbon isotope ratios generated during the cracking of heavy, normal and high-waxy marine oils from Tahe Oilfield, Tarim Basin, NW China, using a closed-gold tube system under high pressure were presented. The three types of oil tested resulted in a similar gas-generation process. The C2–C5 range initially increased its yield with the application of pyrolysis temperature and thereafter decreased, while the C1 yield increased with the same application. High-waxy oil had the highest C1–C5 yield of 510 mg/goil, whereas heavy oil had the lowest C1–C5 yield of 316 mg/goil. The δ13C1 value was low at first, but gradually became higher as the pyrolysis temperature increased. However, the δ13C2 and δ13C3 values gradually became higher when the temperature was greater than 420 °C. The kinetic parameters of the C1–C5 gas generation for the different types of marine oils were then calculated using KINETIC software. This calculation resulted in a frequency factor of about 1.78 × 1014 s−1, while the distribution of the activation energy of the C1–C5 gas mass generated was relatively narrow with a range from 56 to 66 kcal/mol. Among the three types of oil tested, heavy oil had the widest activation energy distribution and the lowest major frequency of activation energy. The maximum temperature at which oil could be preserved as a separate oil phase varied from about 178 °C at a slow geological heating rate to 206 °C at a fast geological heating rate. This result is based on the kinetic parameters determined and in combination with the fractional conversion (C of oil to gas. Testing conducted at the volatile Middle Cambrian reservoir of well Zhongshen 1 in the Tazhong Uplift strongly supported this conclusion.

  11. The effect of slicing type on drying kinetics and quality of dried carrot

    M Naghipour zadeh mahani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carrot is one of the most common vegetables used for human nutrition because of its high vitamin and fiber contents. Drying improves the product shelf life without addition of any chemical preservative and reduces both the size of package and the transport cost. Drying also aidsto reduce postharvest losses of fruits and vegetables especially, which can be as high as 70%. Dried carrots are used in dehydrated soups and in the form of powder in pastries and sauces. The main aim of drying agricultural products is decrease the moisture content to a level which allows safe storage over an extended period. Many fruits and vegetables can be sliced before drying.because of different tissue of a fruit or vegetable, cutting them in different direction and shape created different tissue slices. Due to drying is the exiting process of the moisture from internal tissue so different tissue slices caused different drying kinetics. Therefore, the study on effect of cutting parameters on drying is necessary. Materials and Methods: Carrots (Daucus carota L. were purchased from the local market (Kerman, Iran and stored in a refrigerator at 5°C. The initial moisture contents of the Carrot samples were determined by the oven drying method. The sample was dried in an oven at 105±2°C about 24 hours. The carrots cut by 3 models blade at 3 directions. The samples were dried in an oven at 70°C. Moisture content of the carrot slices were determined by weighting of samples during drying. Volume changes because of sample shrinkage were measured by a water displacement method. Rehydration experiment was performed by immersing a weighted amount of dried samples into hot water 50 °C for 30 min. In this study the effect of some cutting parameters was considered on carrot drying and the quality of final drying product. The tests were performed as a completely random design. The effects of carrot thickness at two levels (3 and 6 mm, blade in 3 models (flat blade

  12. Heart Rate and Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Type 2 Diabetes Patients - A Pilot Study on the Influence of Cardiovascular Medication on Regulatory Processes.

    Koschate, Jessica; Drescher, Uwe; Baum, Klaus; Brinkmann, Christian; Schiffer, Thorsten; Latsch, Joachim; Brixius, Klara; Hoffmann, Uwe

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether there are differences in heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in type 2 diabetes patients, considering their cardiovascular medication. It was hypothesized that cardiovascular medication would affect heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics and that this could be detected using a standardized exercise test. 18 subjects were tested for maximal oxygen uptake. Kinetics were measured in a single test session with standardized, randomized moderate-intensity work rate changes. Time series analysis was used to estimate kinetics. Greater maxima in cross-correlation functions indicate faster kinetics. 6 patients did not take any cardiovascular medication, 6 subjects took peripherally acting medication and 6 patients were treated with centrally acting medication. Maximum oxygen uptake was not significantly different between groups. Significant main effects were identified regarding differences in muscular oxygen uptake kinetics and heart rate kinetics. Muscular oxygen uptake kinetics were significantly faster than heart rate kinetics in the group with no cardiovascular medication (maximum in cross-correlation function of muscular oxygen uptake vs. heart rate; 0.32±0.08 vs. 0.25±0.06; p=0.001) and in the group taking peripherally acting medication (0.34±0.05 vs. 0.28±0.05; p=0.009) but not in the patients taking centrally acting medication (0.28±0.05 vs. 0.30±0.07; n.s.). It can be concluded that regulatory processes for the achievement of a similar maximal oxygen uptake are different between the groups. The used standardized test provided plausible results for heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in a single measurement session in this patient group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Picosecond kinetics of the electron-hole layers formation in wide-bandgap II-VI type-II heterostructures

    Filatov, E.V.; Zaitsev, S.V.; Tartakovskii, I.I.; Maksimov, A.A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Yakovlev, D.R. [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Experimentelle Physik II, Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Waag, A. [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Braunschweig Technical University, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Considerable slowdown of luminescence kinetics of the direct optical transition was discovered in ZnSe/BeTe type-II heterostructures under high levels of optical pumping. The effect is attributed to forming of a potential barrier for holes in the ZnSe layer due to band bending at high densities of spatially separated carriers. That results in a longer time of the photoexcited holes energy relaxation to their ground state in the BeTe layer. The decrease of overlapping of electron and hole wavefunctions in the ZnSe layer in thick ZnSe/BeTe structures at high levels of optical excitation reveals an additional important effect, that leads to sufficient retardation of radiative recombination time for photoexcited carriers (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. A Kinetic Study Using Evaporation of Different Types of Hand-Rub Sanitizers

    Pinhas, Allan R.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-based hand-rub sanitizers are the types of products that hospital professionals use very often. These sanitizers can be classified into two major groups: those that contain a large quantity of thickener, and thus are a gel, and those that contain a small quantity of thickener, and thus remain a liquid. In an effort to create a laboratory…

  15. Influence of fast and slow alkali myosin light chain isoforms on the kinetics of stretch-induced force transients of fast-twitch type IIA fibres of rat.

    Andruchov, Oleg; Galler, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This study contributes to understand the physiological role of slow myosin light chain isoforms in fast-twitch type IIA fibres of skeletal muscle. These isoforms are often attached to the myosin necks of rat type IIA fibres, whereby the slow alkali myosin light chain isoform MLC1s is much more frequent and abundant than the slow regulatory myosin light chain isoform MLC2s. In the present study, single-skinned rat type IIA fibres were maximally Ca(2+) activated and subjected to stepwise stretches for causing a perturbation of myosin head pulling cycles. From the time course of the resulting force transients, myosin head kinetics was deduced. Fibres containing MLC1s exhibited slower kinetics independently of the presence or absence of MLC2s. At the maximal MLC1s concentration of about 75%, the slowing was about 40%. The slowing effect of MLC1s is possibly due to differences in the myosin heavy chain binding sites of the fast and slow alkali MLC isoforms, which changes the rigidity of the myosin neck. Compared with the impact of myosin heavy chain isoforms in various fast-twitch fibre types, the influence of MLC1s on myosin head kinetics of type IIA fibres is much smaller. In conclusion, the physiological role of fast and slow MLC isoforms in type IIA fibres is a fine-tuning of the myosin head kinetics.

  16. Effect of wood type and thickness on acetification kinetics in traditional vinegar production

    Maria-Jesús Torija

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria-Jesús Torija1, Estibaliz Mateo1, Carlos-Alfredo Vegas1, Carla Jara1, Angel González1, Montse Poblet1, Cristina Reguant1, Jóse-Manuel Guillamon2, Albert Mas11Biotecnología enológica. Departament de Bioquímica i Biotecnologia, Facultat d’enologia, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain; 2Departamento de Biotecnología de los Alimentos, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de Alimentos (CSIC, Burjassot, València, SpainAbstract: Traditional vinegar production is a lengthy process which implies high operational risks and jeopardizes the organoleptic characteristics of the final product. In an effort to solve these problems without changing the traditional model, we modified the wood type and thickness of vinegar barrels. We acetified in triplicate in barrels made of acacia, cherry, chestnut, and oak and in three wood thicknesses (15, 20, and 25 mm in two different vinegar plants. The operating volume was set at 60 L. Reducing wood thickness improved neither maximum acetification velocity or the total length of the process, and in some cases even worsened them. The process took longer in oak barrels than in other types of wood barrel in one of the vinegar plants. Therefore, the choice of wood is a parameter to be considered in the wine vinegar production. Keywords: acacia, cherry, chestnut, oak, acetic acid bacteria

  17. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes.

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-15

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This 'DNA sliding' is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Kinetic analysis of synthetic analogues of linear-epitope peptides of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus type 1 by surface plasmon resonance

    Lasonder, E; Schellekens, GA; Koedijk, DGAM; Damhof, RA; WellingWester, S; Feijlbrief, M; Scheffer, AJ; Welling, GW

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between mAb A16 and glycoprorein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by studying the kinetics of binding with a surface-plasmon-resonance biosensor. mAb A16 belongs to group VII antibodies, which recognize residues 11-19 of gD. In a previous study, three critical

  19. Kinetic modeling of batch fermentation for Populus hydrolysate tolerant mutant and wild type strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    Linville, Jessica L; Rodriguez, Miguel; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Cox, Chris D

    2013-11-01

    The extent of inhibition of two strains of Clostridium thermocellum by a Populus hydrolysate was investigated. A Monod-based model of wild type (WT) and Populus hydrolysate tolerant mutant (PM) strains of the cellulolytic bacterium C. thermocellum was developed to quantify growth kinetics in standard media and the extent of inhibition to a Populus hydrolysate. The PM was characterized by a higher growth rate (μmax=1.223 vs. 0.571 h(-1)) and less inhibition (KI,gen=0.991 vs. 0.757) in 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate compared to the WT. In 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate inhibition of PM increased slightly (KI,gen=0.888), whereas the WT was strongly inhibited and did not grow in a reproducible manner. Of the individual inhibitors tested, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid was the most inhibitory, followed by galacturonic acid. The PM did not have a greater ability to detoxify the hydrolysate than the WT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A kinetic study of biological Cr(VI) reduction in trickling filters with different filter media types

    Dermou, E.; Vayenas, D.V.

    2007-01-01

    Two pilot-scale trickling filters were used in order to estimate Cr(VI) reduction through biological mechanisms in biofilm reactors operated in SBR mode with recirculation using different filter media types, i.e. plastic media and calcitic gravel. The feed concentrations of Cr(VI) examined were about 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 mg/l, while the concentration of the organic carbon was constant at 400 mg/l, in order to avoid carbon limitations in the bulk liquid. Maximum reduction rates of 4.8 and 4.7 g Cr(VI)/d were observed for feed Cr(VI) concentration of about 5 mg Cr(VI)/l, for the filters with the plastic support material and the gravel media, respectively. The reduction rates were significantly affected by the feed Cr(VI) concentration in both bioreactors. A dual-enzyme kinetic model was used in order to describe Cr(VI) reduction by aerobically grown mixed cultures. Model predictions were found to correspond very closely to experimental quantitative observations of Cr(VI) reduction at both pilot-scale trickling filters used

  1. Release kinetics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in a clinical model of acute myocardial infarction.

    Liebetrau, Christoph; Gaede, Luise; Dörr, Oliver; Troidl, Christian; Voss, Sandra; Hoffmann, Jedrzej; Paszko, Agata; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger; Möllmann, Helge

    2014-02-15

    N-terminal segment of B-type natriuretic peptide prohormone (NT-proBNP) is elevated in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) thus providing both diagnostic information and prognostic information. The aim of the present study was to determine the time course of NT-proBNP release in patients undergoing transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy (TASH) a procedure mimicking AMI. We analyzed the release kinetics of NT-proBNP in 18 consecutive patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy undergoing TASH. Serum samples were collected prior to and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 105 min, and 2, 4, 8, and 24h after TASH. NT-proBNP concentrations showed a continuous increase during the first 75 min with a significant percent change compared to baseline value already 15 min after TASH (105.6% [IQR 102.2-112.7]; Pvalue until the 8th h after initiation of myocardial infarction. NT-proBNP concentration increases immediately after induction of myocardial infarction proving early evidence of myocardial injury despite the decrease of the left ventricular wall stress due to the TASH related reduction of the left ventricular outflow gradient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Blood glucose kinetics and physiological changes in a type 1 diabetic finisher of the Ultraman triathlon: a case study.

    Bach, Christopher W; Baur, Daniel A; Hyder, William S; Ormsbee, Michael J

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the blood glucose kinetics and physiological effects experienced by a type 1 diabetic (T1D) finisher of a 3-day, multi-stage ultra endurance triathlon consisting of a 10 km swim and 144.8 km bike (stage 1), a 275.4 km bike (stage 2), and an 84.4 km run (stage 3). The athlete self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) levels via fingerstick blood draw and hand-held glucometer. Researchers evaluated blood glucose kinetics via a continuous glucose monitoring device. The athlete maintained normal dietary and insulin patterns before, during and after competition daily. Weight and body composition were measured via bioelectrical impedance and select biomarkers were measured in blood. The athlete spent 73.0, 3.4, and 15.1% of during race time in a hyperglycemic state (≥130 mg dL -1 ) during stages 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and 0.0, 78.6, and 33.6% in a hypoglycemic state (≤80 mg dL -1 ). Nocturnal glycemic levels showed the athlete spent 86.1, 83.0, and 84.8% of sleep in a hyperglycemic state during nights 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and 9.0, 0.0, and 0.0% in a hypoglycemic state. From pre- to post-race, body weight (73.2 to 76.9 kg) and total body water increased (49.2-51.6 kg). In addition, there were dramatic increases in creatine kinase (271.7-9252.8 µ L -1 ), cortisol (137.1-270.2 pg mL -1 ), CRP (188.3-8046.9 ng mL -1 ), and aldosterone (449.1-1679.6 pg mL -1 ). It is possible for a T1D athlete to complete a multi-stage ultraendurance triathlon and maintain glycemic control using SMBG methods. In addition, a T1D athlete participating in an ultraendurance triathlon results in substantial changes in body composition, hormones, and muscle damage.

  3. Prion propagation and toxicity occur in vitro with two-phase kinetics specific to strain and neuronal type.

    Hannaoui, Samia; Maatouk, Layal; Privat, Nicolas; Levavasseur, Etienne; Faucheux, Baptiste A; Haïk, Stéphane

    2013-03-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that occur in humans and animals. The neuropathological hallmarks of TSEs are spongiosis, glial proliferation, and neuronal loss. The only known specific molecular marker of TSEs is the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)), which accumulates in the brain of infected subjects and forms infectious prion particles. Although this transmissible agent lacks a specific nucleic acid component, several prion strains have been isolated. Prion strains are characterized by differences in disease outcome, PrP(Sc) distribution patterns, and brain lesion profiles at the terminal stage of the disease. The molecular factors and cellular mechanisms involved in strain-specific neuronal tropism and toxicity remain largely unknown. Currently, no cellular model exists to facilitate in vitro studies of these processes. A few cultured cell lines that maintain persistent scrapie infections have been developed, but only two of them have shown the cytotoxic effects associated with prion propagation. In this study, we have developed primary neuronal cultures to assess in vitro neuronal tropism and toxicity of different prion strains (scrapie strains 139A, ME7, and 22L). We have tested primary neuronal cultures enriched in cerebellar granular, striatal, or cortical neurons. Our results showed that (i) a strain-specific neuronal tropism operated in vitro; (ii) the cytotoxic effect varied among strains and neuronal cell types; (iii) prion propagation and toxicity occurred in two kinetic phases, a replicative phase followed by a toxic phase; and (iv) neurotoxicity peaked when abnormal PrP accumulation reached a plateau.

  4. Evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetic stability of P-type transparent conducting oxide, SrCu2O2 under various oxygen partial pressures

    Sugimoto, Takayuki; Yanagawa, Atsumi; Hashimoto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ▶ Thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of SrCu 2 O 2 under various P(O 2 ) was estimated. ▶ The reaction rate for decomposition decreased with decreasing temperature and P(O 2 ). ▶ The activation energy for decomposition of SrCu 2 O 2 was estimated to be 66 kJ/mol. ▶ SrCu 2 O 2 showed less stability than those of other transparent p-type semiconductors. - Abstract: Kinetic stability of transparent p-type conducting oxide, SrCu 2 O 2 , has been evaluated by using X-ray diffraction measurement and thermogravimetry. It was revealed that SrCu 2 O 2 decomposed to mixture of CuO and Sr 14 Cu 24 O 41 in air at temperatures above 300 °C. The decomposition reaction rate can be successfully explained by kinetic model assuming first-order chemical reaction. The rate constant can be suppressed with decreasing temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The activation energy for decomposition reaction of SrCu 2 O 2 calculated from Arrhenius plot was 66 kJ/mol, which was lower than those of other transparent p-type semiconductors such as CuAlO 2 and CuGaO 2 . The low decomposition temperature and activation energy for decomposition indicate that chemical stability of SrCu 2 O 2 is far lower than those of other p-type conducting oxides.

  5. Kinetic and HPV infection effects on cross-type neutralizing antibody and avidity responses induced by Cervarix®

    Kemp, Troy J.; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Hildesheim, Allan; Pan, Yuanji; Penrose, Kerri J.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that Cervarix® elicits antibody responses against vaccine-related types for which clinical efficacy was demonstrated (HPV-31 and -45). Here, we evaluated the kinetics of neutralization titers and avidity of Cervarix®-induced antibodies up to 36 months of follow-up in unexposed and HPV infected women. Methods A subset of women who participated in the Cost Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial had pre- and post-vaccination sera tested for antibody responses to HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, and -58 using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay, and HPV-16 antibody avidity using an HPV-16 L1 VLP (virus-like particle)-based ELISA developed in our laboratory. Results In uninfected women, neutralizing antibody titers did not reach significance until after the 3rd dose for HPV-31 (month 12, p=0.009) and HPV-45 (month 12, p=0.003), but then persisted up to month 36 (HPV-31, p=0.01; HPV-45, p=0.002). Individuals infected with HPV-16 or HPV-31 at enrollment developed a significantly higher median antibody response to the corresponding HPV type after one dose, but there was not a difference between median titers after three doses compared to the HPV negative group. Median HPV-16 antibody avidity and titer increased over time up to month 12; however, the HPV-16 avidity did not correlate well with HPV-16 neutralizing antibody titers at each time point examined, except for month 6. The median avidity levels were higher in HPV-16 infected women at month 1 (p=0.04) and lower in HPV-16 infected women at month 12 (p=0.006) compared to the HPV negative women. Conclusions The persistence of cross-neutralization titers at month 36 suggests cross-reactive antibody responses are likely to persist long-term and are not influenced by infection status at enrollment. However, the weak correlation between avidity and neutralization titers emphasizes the need for examining avidity in efficacy studies to determine if high avidity antibodies play a critical role in

  6. Mixing Rules Formulation for a Kinetic Model of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood Semipredictive Type Applied to the Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Degradation of Multicomponent Mixtures

    John Wilman Rodriguez-Acosta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixing rules coupled to a semipredictive kinetic model of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type were proposed to determine the behavior of the heterogeneous solar photodegradation with TiO2-P25 of multicomponent mixtures at pilot scale. The kinetic expressions were expressed in terms of the effective concentration of total organic carbon (xTOC. An expression was obtained in a generalized form which is a function of the mixing rules as a product of a global contribution of the reaction rate constant k′ and a mixing function fC. Kinetic parameters of the model were obtained using the Nelder and Mead (N-M algorithm. The kinetic model was validated with experimental data obtained from the degradation of binary mixtures of chlorinated compounds (DCA: dichloroacetic acid and 4-CP: 4-chlorophenol at different initial global concentration, using a CPC reactor at pilot scale. A simplex-lattice {2,3} design experiment was adopted to perform the runs.

  7. Kinetic characterization of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and t-PA deletion mutants

    de Vries, C. [=Carlie J. M.; Veerman, H.; Nesheim, M. E.; Pannekoek, H.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of t-PA to fibrin is mediated both by its "finger" (F) and its "kringle 2" (K2) domain. In addition, these domains are involved in the stimulation of t-PA activity by fibrin. We analyzed the kinetic characteristics of Glu-plasminogen activation by t-PA and a set of t-PA deletion mutants

  8. n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation Has No Effect on Postprandial Triglyceride-Rich Lipoprotein Kinetics in Men with Type 2 Diabetes

    André J. Tremblay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have been proposed to modulate plasma lipids, lipoprotein metabolism, and inflammatory state and to reduce triglyceride (TG concentrations. The present double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study investigated the effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation at 3 g/d for 8 weeks on the intravascular kinetics of intestinally derived apolipoprotein (apo B-48-containing lipoproteins in 10 men with type 2 diabetes. In vivo kinetics of the TG-rich lipoprotein (TRL apoB-48 and VLDL apoB-100 were assessed using a primed-constant infusion of L-[5,5,5-D3] leucine for 12 hours in a fed state. Compared with the placebo, n-3 PUFA supplementation significantly reduced fasting TG concentrations by −9.7% (P=0.05 but also significantly increased plasma levels of cholesterol (C (+6.0%, P=0.05, LDL-C (+12.2%, P=0.04, and HDL-C (+8.4, P=0.007. n-3 PUFA supplementation had no significant impact on postprandial TRL apoB-48 and VLDL apoB-100 levels or on the production or catabolic rates of these lipoproteins. These data indicate that 8-week supplementation with n-3 PUFAs in men with type 2 diabetes has no beneficial effect on TRL apoB-48 and VLDL apoB-100 levels or kinetics.

  9. Frequency domain kinetic of positron-electron annihilation in the MgO-Al2O3 spinel-type ceramics

    Fl'unt, Orest; Klym, Halyna; Ingram, Adam

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the kinetic of positron-electron annihilation in the MgO-Al2O3 spinel-type ceramics sintered at different temperatures (1100, 1200 and 1400 °C) has been calculated and analyzed in a frequency domain. The spectra of real (in-phase) and imaginary (quadrature) components of positron-electron annihilation kinetic have been obtained numerically from usual temporal characteristics using integral Fourier transform. The numerical calculations were carried out using cubic spline interpolation of the pulse characteristics of MgO-Al2O3 ceramics in time domain with following analytical calculations of integrals. The obtained spectra as real so imaginary part of MgO-Al2O3 ceramics in frequency domain almost good obey a Debye law denying correlation between elementary positron annihilation processes. Complex diagrams of frequency domain responses of as-prepared samples have a shape of semicircles with close characteristic frequencies. Some deviation on low-frequency side of the semicircles is observed confirming an availability of longer time kinetic processes. Sintering temperature dependencies of the relaxation times and characteristic frequencies of positron-electron annihilation processes have been obtained. It is shown that position of large maxima on the frequency dependencies of imaginary part corresponds to fast average relaxation lifetime representing the most intensive interaction process of positrons with small cavity traps in solids.

  10. Bond-specific reaction kinetics during the oxidation of (111) Si: Effect of n-type doping

    Gokce, B.; Aspnes, D. E.; Lucovsky, G.; Gundogdu, K.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that a higher concentration of free carriers leads to a higher oxide growth rate in the thermal oxidation of silicon. However, the role of electrons and holes in oxidation chemistry is not clear. Here, we report real-time second-harmonic-generation data on the oxidation of H-terminated (111)Si that reveal that high concentrations of electrons increase the chemical reactivity of the outer-layer Si-Si back bonds relative to the Si-H up bonds. However, the thicknesses of the natural oxides of all samples stabilize near 1 nm at room temperature, regardless of the chemical kinetics of the different bonds.

  11. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of DNA Processing by Wild Type DNA-Glycosylase Endo III and Its Catalytically Inactive Mutant Forms

    Olga A. Kladova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Endonuclease III (Endo III or Nth is one of the key enzymes responsible for initiating the base excision repair of oxidized or reduced pyrimidine bases in DNA. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of structural rearrangements of the specific and nonspecific DNA-duplexes during their interaction with Endo III is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO, a fluorescent analog of the natural nucleobase cytosine, is used to record multistep DNA binding and lesion recognition within a temperature range (5–37 °C. Standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of the specific steps are derived from kinetic data using Van’t Hoff plots. The data suggest that enthalpy-driven exothermic 5,6-dihydrouracil (DHU recognition and desolvation-accompanied entropy-driven adjustment of the enzyme–substrate complex into a catalytically active state play equally important parts in the overall process. The roles of catalytically significant amino acids Lys120 and Asp138 in the DNA lesion recognition and catalysis are identified. Lys120 participates not only in the catalytic steps but also in the processes of local duplex distortion, whereas substitution Asp138Ala leads to a complete loss of the ability of Endo III to distort a DNA double chain during enzyme–DNA complex formation.

  12. Similar kinetics of chromatid aberrations in X-irradiated xrs 5 and wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells

    MacLeod, R.A.F.; Bryant, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the kinetics of chromatid aberrations in cells of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) derived, X-ray sensitive cell line xrs 5 irradiated in the G 2 phase at 37 0 C, as well as during a cell cycle extended by transient hypothermia at 33 0 C. While a given X-ray dose was estimated to produce about 4 times as many chromatid break and twice the frequency of exchanges in xrs 5 cells as in the parent line, there was no difference between the lines in the rates of disappearance of chromatid breaks during G 2 at either temperature; and similar patterns of chromatid exchange kinetics were observed in the two lines. Both the frequencies and distributions of chromatid breaks at different times after irradiation are consistent with the view that the disappearance of these during incubation represents a repair process. These results imply that the G 2 chromosomal radiosensitivity of the xrs 5 mutant resides at the level of initial chromatid damage. (author)

  13. Studying the effect of particle size and coating type on the blood kinetics of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Roohi F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Farnoosh Roohi, Jessica Lohrke, Andreas Ide, Gunnar Schütz, Katrin DasslerMR and CT Contrast Media Research, Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, GermanyPurpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, one of the most powerful imaging techniques available, usually requires the use of an on-demand designed contrast agent to fully exploit its potential. The blood kinetics of the contrast agent represent an important factor that needs to be considered depending on the objective of the medical examination. For particulate contrast agents, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs, the key parameters are particle size and characteristics of the coating material. In this study we analyzed the effect of these two properties independently and systematically on the magnetic behavior and blood half-life of SPIOs.Methods: Eleven different SPIOs were synthesized for this study. In the first set (a, seven carboxydextran (CDX-coated SPIOs of different sizes (19–86 nm were obtained by fractionating a broadly size-distributed CDX–SPIO. The second set (b contained three SPIOs of identical size (50 nm that were stabilized with different coating materials, polyacrylic acid (PAA, polyethylene glycol, and starch. Furthermore, small PAA–SPIOs (20 nm were synthesized to gain a global insight into the effects of particle size vs coating characteristics. Saturation magnetization and proton relaxivity were determined to represent the magnetic and imaging properties. The blood half-life was analyzed in rats using MRI, time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.Results: By changing the particle size without modifying any other parameters, the relaxivity r2 increased with increasing mean particle diameter. However, the blood half-life was shorter for larger particles. The effect of the coating material on magnetic properties was less pronounced, but it had a strong influence on blood kinetics depending on the

  14. Studying the effect of particle size and coating type on the blood kinetics of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Roohi, Farnoosh; Lohrke, Jessica; Ide, Andreas; Schütz, Gunnar; Dassler, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), one of the most powerful imaging techniques available, usually requires the use of an on-demand designed contrast agent to fully exploit its potential. The blood kinetics of the contrast agent represent an important factor that needs to be considered depending on the objective of the medical examination. For particulate contrast agents, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), the key parameters are particle size and characteristics of the coating material. In this study we analyzed the effect of these two properties independently and systematically on the magnetic behavior and blood half-life of SPIOs. Eleven different SPIOs were synthesized for this study. In the first set (a), seven carboxydextran (CDX)-coated SPIOs of different sizes (19-86 nm) were obtained by fractionating a broadly size-distributed CDX-SPIO. The second set (b) contained three SPIOs of identical size (50 nm) that were stabilized with different coating materials, polyacrylic acid (PAA), poly-ethylene glycol, and starch. Furthermore, small PAA-SPIOs (20 nm) were synthesized to gain a global insight into the effects of particle size vs coating characteristics. Saturation magnetization and proton relaxivity were determined to represent the magnetic and imaging properties. The blood half-life was analyzed in rats using MRI, time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. By changing the particle size without modifying any other parameters, the relaxivity r(2) increased with increasing mean particle diameter. However, the blood half-life was shorter for larger particles. The effect of the coating material on magnetic properties was less pronounced, but it had a strong influence on blood kinetics depending on the ionic character of the coating material. In this report we systematically demonstrated that both particle size and coating material influence blood kinetics and magnetic properties of

  15. The type of GnRH analogue used during controlled ovarian stimulation influences early embryo developmental kinetics

    Muñoz, Manuel; Cruz, María; Humaidan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad (IVI) Alicante and the Instituto Universitario-IVI Valencia, Spain, 2817 embryos deriving from 400 couples undergoing oocyte donation were analysed. After controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF/intracytoplamic sperm injection, the timing of embryonic cleavages......OBJECTIVE: To explore if the GnRH analogue used for controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and the ovulation triggering factor (GnRH agonist+hCG triggering versus GnRH antagonist+GnRH agonist triggering) affect embryo development and kinetics. STUDY DESIGN: In a retrospective cohort study...... was assessed by a video time-lapse system. The results were analysed using Student's t test for comparison of timings (hours) and Chi-squared test for comparison of proportions. A p-value...

  16. Connection between kinetic phenomena and atomic ordering processes and electronic structure of Ni3(FeMe)-type alloys

    Vasil'eva, R.P.; Arkhipov, Yu.N.; Narkulov, N.; Fadin, V.P.

    1978-01-01

    The results are presented of the measurements of the Hall and the Nernst-Ettingshausen effect and of thermal emf, electric resistivity and magnetization measurements in alloys Ni 3 (FeMe), where Me is Mo, Cr, W. The concentration of additions is not higher than 12.5%. The relationship of the kinetic phenomena with peculiarities of the electron structure and ordering processes is investigated. The obtained data show that the Hall and Nernst-Ettingshausen electromotive forces in the investigated alloys have positive values. The effects of the concentration variations of the investigated phenomena manifest themselves stronger in ordered state, this testifyies to a considerable increase of the part, the hole sections of the Fermi surface play. The investigation enables some conclusions to be made on the energy characteristics of these alloys as a function of the variation of the concentration composition of the alloys and the ordering processes

  17. The JH2 domain and SH2-JH2 linker regulate JAK2 activity: A detailed kinetic analysis of wild type and V617F mutant kinase domains.

    Sanz Sanz, Arturo; Niranjan, Yashavanthi; Hammarén, Henrik; Ungureanu, Daniela; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Touw, Ivo P; Silvennoinen, Olli; Hilhorst, Riet

    2014-10-01

    JAK2 tyrosine kinase regulates many cellular functions. Its activity is controlled by the pseudokinase (JH2) domain by still poorly understood mechanisms. The V617F mutation in the pseudokinase domain activates JAK2 and causes myeloproliferative neoplasms. We conducted a detailed kinetic analysis of recombinant JAK2 tyrosine kinase domain (JH1) and wild-type and V617F tandem kinase (JH1JH2) domains using peptide microarrays to define the functions of the kinase domains. The results show that i) JAK2 follows a random Bi-Bi reaction mechanism ii) JH2 domain restrains the activity of the JH1 domain by reducing the affinity for ATP and ATP competitive inhibitors iii) V617F decreases affinity for ATP but increases catalytic activity compared to wild-type and iv) the SH2-JH2 linker region participates in controlling activity by reducing the affinity for ATP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetic Typography

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  19. In vitro kinetics of P700+ reduction of Thermosynechococcus elongatus trimeric Photosystem I complexes by recombinant cytochrome c 6 using a Joliot-type LED spectrophotometer.

    Nguyen, Khoa; Vaughn, Michael; Frymier, Paul; Bruce, Barry D

    2017-01-01

    The reduction rate of photo-oxidized Photosystem I (PSI) with various natural and artificial electron donors have been well studied by transient absorption spectroscopy. The electron transfer rate from various donors to P 700 + has been measured for a wide range of photosynthetic organisms encompassing cyanobacteria, algae, and plants. PSI can be a limiting component due to tedious extraction and purification methods required for this membrane protein. In this report, we have determined the in vivo, intracellular cytochrome c 6 (cyt c 6 )/PSI ratio in Thermosynechococcus elongatus (T.e.) using quantitative Western blot analysis. This information permitted the determination of P 700 + reduction kinetics via recombinant cyt c 6 in a physiologically relevant ratio (cyt c 6 : PSI) with a Joliot-type, LED-driven, pump-probe spectrophotometer. Dilute PSI samples were tested under varying cyt c 6 concentration, temperature, pH, and ionic strength, each of which shows similar trends to the reported literature utilizing much higher PSI concentrations with laser-based spectrophotometer. Our results do however indicate kinetic differences between actinic light sources (laser vs. LED), and we have attempted to resolve these effects by varying our LED light intensity and duration. The standardized configuration of this spectrophotometer will also allow a more uniform kinetic analysis of samples in different laboratories. We can conclude that our findings from the LED-based system display an added total protein concentration effect due to multiple turnover events of P 700 + reduction by cyt c 6 during the longer illumination regime.

  20. Effect of irradiation type (LED or QTH) on photo-activated composite shrinkage strain kinetics, temperature rise, and hardness.

    Hofmann, Norbert; Hugo, Burkard; Klaiber, Bernd

    2002-12-01

    This study compares commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) lights with a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) unit for photo-activating resin-based composites (RBC). Shrinkage strain kinetics and temperature within the RBC were measured simultaneously using the 'deflecting disc technique' and a thermocouple. Surface hardness (Knoop) at the bottom of 1.5-mm thick RBC specimens was measured 24 h after irradiation to indicate degree of cure. Irradiation was performed for 40 s using either the continuous or the ramp-curing mode of a QTH and a LED light (800 mW cm(-2) and 320 mW cm(-2), respectively) or the continuous mode of a lower intensity LED light (160 mW cm(-2)). For Herculite XRV and Filtek Z250 (both containing only camphoroquinone as a photo-initiator) the QTH and the stronger LED light produced similar hardness, while in the case of Definite (containing an additional photo-activator absorbing at lower wavelength) lower hardness was observed after LED irradiation. The temperature rise during polymerization and heating from radiation were lower with LED compared to QTH curing. The fastest increase of polymerization contraction was observed after QTH continuous irradiation, followed by the stronger and the weaker LED light in the continuous mode. Ramp curing decreased contraction speed even more. Shrinkage strain after 60 min was greater following QTH irradiation compared with both LED units (Herculite, Definite) or with the weaker LED light (Z250).

  1. The magnitude and kinetics of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistoma mansoni

    Ratcliffe, E.C.; Wilson, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A footpad assay was used to measure the DTH of mice to soluble worm antigens (SWAP), and to living day 7 lung schistosomula, following vaccination and challenge infections with Schistosoma mansoni. DTH to SWAP was first observed on day 10, and reached its maximum on day 17 post-vaccination. Treatment of mice with anti-CD4 antibody on the 3 days prior to footpad challenge completely abrogated this response. Reactivity to living parasites was of a slower order than that to SWAP; it also peaked earlier, on day 10 post-vaccination. By day 35, responsiveness to both sets of antigens had declined almost to control levels. There was no correlation between the level of DTH to living schistosomula, at any time, and the degree of resistance subsequently developed. Percutaneous challenge of vaccinated mice was followed by a resurgence of reactivity to SWAP. This secondary response occurred more rapidly than the primary response, peaking on day 7 post-challenge, and was of a similar magnitude. We were unable to detect a similar recall of DTH to living schistosomula, possibly because the assay was insufficiently sensitive. We conclude that the intensity and kinetics of DTH responsiveness are crucial features of the irradiated vaccine model, and suggest that further investigation of cell-mediated immune reaction, particularly those occuring in the lungs, is vital to a better understanding of events underlying the development and expression of immunity. (author)

  2. Modeling precipitation thermodynamics and kinetics in type 316 austenitic stainless steels with varying composition as an initial step toward predicting phase stability during irradiation

    Shim, Jae-Hyeok, E-mail: jhshim@kist.re.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Povoden-Karadeniz, Erwin [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Kozeschnik, Ernst [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We model the precipitation kinetics in irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels. • Radiation-induced phases are predicted to form at over 10 dpa segregation conditions. • The Si content is the most critical for the formation of radiation-induced phases. - Abstract: The long-term evolution of precipitates in type 316 austenitic stainless steels at 400 °C has been simulated using a numerical model based on classical nucleation theory and the thermodynamic extremum principle. Particular attention has been paid to the precipitation of radiation-induced phases such as γ′ and G phases. In addition to the original compositions, the compositions for radiation-induced segregation at a dose level of 5, 10 or 20 dpa have been used in the simulation. In a 316 austenitic stainless steel, γ′ appears as the main precipitate with a small amount of G phase forming at 10 and 20 dpa. On the other hand, G phase becomes relatively dominant over γ′ at the same dose levels in a Ti-stabilized 316 austenitic stainless steel, which tends to suppress the formation of γ′. Among the segregated alloying elements, the concentration of Si seems to be the most critical for the formation of radiation-induced phases. An increase in dislocation density as well as increased diffusivity of Mn and Si significantly enhances the precipitation kinetics of the radiation-induced phases within this model.

  3. In Situ Spectral Kinetics of Cr(VI) Reduction by c-Type Cytochromes in A Suspension of Living Shewanella putrefaciens 200

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai; Han, Rui; Wu, Yundang; Yuan, Xiu; Wang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Although c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) mediating metal reduction have been mainly investigated with in vitro purified proteins of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, the in vivo behavior of c-Cyts is still unclear given the difficulty in measuring the proteins of intact cells. Here, c-Cyts in living Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was successfully quantified using diffuse-transmission UV/Vis spectroscopy due to the strong absorbance of hemes, and the in situ spectral kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by c-Cyts were examined over time. The reduced product Cr(III) observed on the cell surface may play a role in inhibiting the Cr(VI) reduction and reducing the cell numbers with high concentrations (>200 μM) of Cr(VI) evidenced by the 16S rRNA analysis. A brief kinetic model was established with two predominant reactions, redox transformation of c-Cyts and Cr(VI) reduction by reduced c-Cyts, but the fitting curves were not well-matched with c-Cyts data. The Cr(III)-induced inhibitory effect to the cellular function of redox transformation of c-Cyts was then added to the model, resulting in substantially improved the model fitting. This study provides a case of directly examining the reaction properties of outer-membrane enzyme during microbial metal reduction processes under physiological conditions.

  4. Growth Kinetics of Diazotrophic Bacillus sphaericus UPMB10 Cultured Using Different Types and Concentrations of Carbon and Nitrogen Sources

    Ooi, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth kinetics of newly isolated diazotrophic Bacillus sphaericus UPMB10 grown in various carbon (lactate, acetate, glycerol, malate, fructose, xylose and sucrose and nitrogen (glutamate, yeast extract, arginine, hystadine, glycine, polypeptone, tryptophan, lysine, NH4Cl and urea sources was investigated using 2 L stirred tank fermenter. The highest growth was obtained in a medium containing lactate as a carbon source, which gave the highest maximum cell concentration of 2.30 g/L, which is corresponding to maximum viable cell count of 4.60 x 10^9 cfu/mL. However, the highest cell yield (1.06 g cell/g carbon consumed was obtained in cultivation using glycerol though slightly lower maximum viable cell count was obtained (3.22 x 10^9 cfu/mL. In addition, cost for the production of live cell using glycerol was about 15 times lower than the cost using lactate. Growth performance of this bacterium when yeast extract was used as a nitrogen source was comparable to the use of pure amino acid. The medium containing 1.8 g/L glycerol and 2 g/L yeast extract was suggested as optimal for growth of this bacterium, which gave carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N of 10:1. The maximum viable cell count obtained in cultivation using optimised medium in 2 L stirred tank fermenter was 3.34 x 10^9 cfu/mL and the cells maintained its capacity for N2 fixation at 18 nmol C2H2/h.mL.

  5. Effect of the external electric field on the kinetics of recombination of photoexcited carriers in a ZnSe/BeTe type II heterostructure

    Filatov, E. V.; Maksimov, A. A.; Tartakovskii, I. I.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Waag, A.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the radiative recombination of photoexcited electrons and holes for a spatially direct transition in a ZnSe/BeTe type II heterostructure in an external electric field has been analyzed. A strong decrease (more than two orders of magnitude) in the photoluminescence intensity, as well as a decrease in the duration of the relaxation of the direct transition, is observed when the electric field is applied. The energy levels and wavefunctions of electrons and holes in the ZnSe/BeTe heterostructure subjected to the electric field have been numerically calculated. It has been shown that the observed decrease in the photoluminescence intensity and duration of the relaxation of the direct transition is due to both an increase in the radiative recombination time and an increase in the rate of escape of photoexcited holes from the above-barrier level in the ZnSe layer to the BeTe layer.

  6. A-centres build-up kinetics in the conductive matrix of pulled n-type silicon with calculation of their recharges at defect clusters

    Dolgolenko, A.P.; Fishchuk, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    Pulled n-Si samples with rho approximately 40 Ωcm are investigated after irradiation with different doses of fast-pile neutrons. It is known that the simple defects are created not only in the conductive matrix but also in the region of the space charge of defect clusters. Then the charge state, for example, of A-centres in the region of the space charge is defined by both, the temperature and the value of the electrostatical potential. If this circumstance is not taken into account the calculation of the conductive volume is not precise enough. In the present paper the temperature dependence of the volume fraction is calculated, in which the space charge of defect clusters occurs, taking into account the recharges of A-centres in the region of the space charge. Using the expression obtained the A-centres build-up kinetics in the conductive matrix of pulled n-type silicon is calculated. (author)

  7. Pasteurization of milk: the heat inactivation kinetics of milk-borne dairy pathogens under commercial-type conditions of turbulent flow.

    Pearce, L E; Smythe, B W; Crawford, R A; Oakley, E; Hathaway, S C; Shepherd, J M

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to report kinetic data on the survival of a range of significant milk-borne pathogens under commercial-type pasteurization conditions. The most heat-resistant strain of each of the milk-borne pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica, pathogenic Escherichia coli, Cronobacter sakazakii (formerly known as Enterobacter sakazakii), Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella was selected to obtain the worst-case scenario in heat inactivation trials using a pilot-plant-scale pasteurizer. Initially, approximately 30 of each species were screened using a submerged coil unit. Then, UHT milk was inoculated with the most heat-resistant pathogens at ~10(7)/mL and heat treated in a pilot-plant-scale pasteurizer under commercial-type conditions of turbulent flow for 15s over a temperature range from 56 to 66°C and at 72°C. Survivors were enumerated on nonselective media chosen for the highest efficiency of plating of heat-damaged bacteria of each of the chosen strains. The mean log(10) reductions and temperatures of inactivation of the 6 pathogens during a 15-s treatment were Staph. aureus >6.7 at 66.5°C, Y. enterocolitica >6.8 at 62.5°C, pathogenic E. coli >6.8 at 65°C, C. sakazakii >6.7 at 67.5°C, L. monocytogenes >6.9 at 65.5°C, and Salmonella ser. Typhimurium >6.9 at 61.5°C. The kinetic data from these experiments will be used by the New Zealand Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry to populate the quantitative risk assessment model being developed to investigate the risks to New Zealand consumers from pasteurized, compared with nonpasteurized, milk and milk products. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A single Markov-type kinetic model accounting for the macroscopic currents of all human voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms.

    Balbi, Pietro; Massobrio, Paolo; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2017-09-01

    Modelling ionic channels represents a fundamental step towards developing biologically detailed neuron models. Until recently, the voltage-gated ion channels have been mainly modelled according to the formalism introduced by the seminal works of Hodgkin and Huxley (HH). However, following the continuing achievements in the biophysical and molecular comprehension of these pore-forming transmembrane proteins, the HH formalism turned out to carry limitations and inconsistencies in reproducing the ion-channels electrophysiological behaviour. At the same time, Markov-type kinetic models have been increasingly proven to successfully replicate both the electrophysiological and biophysical features of different ion channels. However, in order to model even the finest non-conducting molecular conformational change, they are often equipped with a considerable number of states and related transitions, which make them computationally heavy and less suitable for implementation in conductance-based neurons and large networks of those. In this purely modelling study we develop a Markov-type kinetic model for all human voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). The model framework is detailed, unifying (i.e., it accounts for all ion-channel isoforms) and computationally efficient (i.e. with a minimal set of states and transitions). The electrophysiological data to be modelled are gathered from previously published studies on whole-cell patch-clamp experiments in mammalian cell lines heterologously expressing the human VGSC subtypes (from NaV1.1 to NaV1.9). By adopting a minimum sequence of states, and using the same state diagram for all the distinct isoforms, the model ensures the lightest computational load when used in neuron models and neural networks of increasing complexity. The transitions between the states are described by original ordinary differential equations, which represent the rate of the state transitions as a function of voltage (i.e., membrane potential). The

  9. In vivo imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene expression: early kinetics of radiolabelled FIAU

    Haubner, R.; Avril, N.; Schwaiger, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Hantzopoulos, P.A.; Gansbacher, B. [Inst. of Experimental Oncology, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the early kinetics of I*-FIAU and the possibility of utilising iodine-123-labelled FIAU for imaging of gene expression. CMS-5 fibrosarcoma cells were transduced in vitro with the retroviral vector STK containing the HSV1-tk gene. BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk(+) and tk(-) cells into both flanks. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyluracil was radioiodinated ({sup 123}I, {sup 125}I)) using the iodogen method. High-performance liquid chromatography purification resulted in high specific activity and radiochemical purity for both tracers ([{sup 123}I]FIAU and [{sup 125}I]FIAU). Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h p.i. In addition, the genomic DNA of the tumours was isolated for measurement of the activity accumulation resulting from the [{sup 125}I]FIAU incorporation. Biodistribution studies 0.5 h p.i. showed tumour/blood and tumour/muscle ratios of 3.8 and 7.2, respectively, for the HSV1-tk(+) tumours, and 0.6 and 1.2, respectively, for negative control tumours. Fast renal elimination of the tracer from the body resulted in rapidly increasing tumour/blood and tumour/muscle ratios which reached values of 32 and 88 at 4 h p.i., respectively. Tracer clearance from blood was bi-exponential, with an initial half-life of 0.6 h followed by a half-life of 4.6 h. The tracer half-life in herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase-expressing tumours was 35.7 h. The highest activity accumulation (20.3%{+-}5.7% ID/g) in HSV1-tk(+) tumours was observed 1 h p.i. At that time, about 46% of the total activity found in HSV1-tk(+) tumours was incorporated into genomic DNA. Planar gamma camera imaging showed a distinct tracer accumulation as early as 0.5 h p.i., with an increase in contrast over time. These results suggest that sufficient tumour/background ratios for in vivo imaging of HSV1-tk expression with [{sup 123}I]FIAU are reached as early as 1 h p

  10. Lactate/H+ transport kinetics in rat skeletal muscle related to fibre type and changes in transport capacity

    Juel; Pilegaard

    1998-01-01

    muscles, muscles of old rats and rats that had been subjected to high-intensity training, endurance training, repeated exposure to hypoxia, and hypothyroid or hyperthyroid treatments. The lactate/H+ transport capacity of red muscles was greater than that of white muscles, and this difference...... and hypothyroidism was due to a decrease in Vmax. The denervation-induced decline in lactate/H+ transport capacity resulted from both an increased Km and a reduced Vmax. The present data show that muscle type differences and most changes in the lactate/H+ transport capacity are mediated by modifications in Vmax......, which is expected to represent the number of membrane transporter molecules. Km is unaffected by most treatments and appears to be independent of fibre type....

  11. Hepatic 123I-insulin binding kinetics in non-insulin-dependent (Type 2) diabetic patients after i.v. bolus administration

    Oolbekkink, M.; Veen, E.A. van der; Heine, R.J.; Hollander, W. den; Nauta, J.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Insulin binding kinetics in the liver were studied in non insulin dependent (Type 2) diabetic patients, by i.v. bolus administration of 123 I-insulin. Eight Type 2 diabetic patients were compared with six male volunteers. Uptake of 123 I-insulin by liver and kidneys was measured by dynamic scintigraphy with a gamma camera during 30 min. Images of liver and kidneys appeared within 2-3 min after administration of 123 I-insulin at a dose of 1 mCi (37 MBq). Peak radioactivity for the liver was found 7.5±0.2 and 6.9±0.3 min after injection for the healthy and the diabetic subjects, respectively (N.S.). The percentage 123 I-insulin hepatic uptake was not significantly different for the diabetic and the healthy subjects. Although a large variation exists for maximal uptake of radioactivity within both groups, the data suggest that binding differences in the liver in Type 2 diabetic patients, as compared to healthy subjects, may not account for hepatic insulin resistance. (orig.)

  12. Kinetic analysis of the rate of corneal wound healing in Otsuka long-evans Tokushima Fatty rats, a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Nagai, Noriaki; Murao, Takatoshi; Okamoto, Norio; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic keratopathy is a well-known ocular complication secondary to type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we performed a kinetic analysis of corneal wound healing in Long-Evans rats (normal rat) and Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Corneal wound healing in 7-week-old normal rats was mostly complete 24 h after corneal epithelial abrasion, and the process of corneal wound healing took place according to an equation with a first-order rate constant. The rate of corneal wound healing in normal rats decreased with aging. The process of corneal wound healing in 38- and 60-week-old normal and OLETF rats occurred in two phases with rate constants for the first and second phases represented as alpha and beta, respectively. The alpha and beta values in 38- and 60-week-old OLETF rats were lower than those in normal rats of the corresponding age. Furthermore, a close relationship was observed between the corneal wound healing rate constant and plasma glucose levels in OLETF rats. The present studies suggest the sequence of events that occur following damage to the corneal surface in OLETF rats as a model animal for a human type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Time-dependent extraction kinetics of infused components of different Indian black tea types using UV spectroscopy

    Asir Gani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Time-dependent aqueous extraction of six tea types was carried out with leaf–water–ratio of 0.5 g/100 ml, temperature of extraction 90°C and time of extraction ranging from 1 to 10 min. UV–vis spectroscopic analysis in the range varying from 220 to 900 nm of the aqueous tea extracts showed a prominent peak at 273 nm in the ultraviolet region which can be associated with n → π* electronic transition of caffeine molecules. Parabolic diffusion, Power law, hyperbolic, Weibull’s and Elovich’s models were fitted to represent the aqueous soluble component extraction behaviour for time-dependent extraction of aqueous extractables. Parabolic diffusion model, Power law and Elovich’s model were a close fit to the experimental data for all the selected tea types with correlation coefficients (R2 ranging 0.8029–0.9953, whereas hyperbolic and Weibull’s models showed poor fitness to represent the extraction behaviour of fanning and AO leaf, LD, fanning and dust, respectively, with R2 < 0.8, for time-dependent aqueous soluble component extraction.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells from sternum: the type of heart disease, ischemic or valvular, does not influence the cell culture establishment and growth kinetics.

    Dias, Lucinara Dadda; Casali, Karina Rabello; Ghem, Carine; da Silva, Melissa Kristocheck; Sausen, Grasiele; Palma, Patrícia Bonini; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Kalil, Renato A K; Schaan, Beatriz D; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2017-07-25

    In an attempt to increase the therapeutic potential for myocardial regeneration, there is a quest for new cell sources and types for cell therapy protocols. The pathophysiology of heart diseases may affect cellular characteristics and therapeutic results. To study the proliferative and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), isolated from bone marrow (BM) of sternum, we made a comparative analysis between samples of patients with ischemic (IHD) or non-ischemic valvular (VHD) heart diseases. We included patients with IHD (n = 42) or VHD (n = 20), with average age of 60 years and no differences in cardiovascular risk factors. BM samples were collected (16.4 ± 6 mL) and submitted to centrifugation with Ficoll-Paque, yielding 4.5 ± 1.5 × 10 7  cells/mL. Morphology, immunophenotype and differentiation ability had proven that the cultivated sternal BM cells had MSC features. The colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) frequency was similar between groups (p = 0.510), but VHD samples showed positive correlation to plated cells vs. CFU-F number (r = 0.499, p = 0.049). The MSC culture was established in 29% of collected samples, achieved passage 9, without significant difference in expansion kinetics between groups (p > 0.05). Dyslipidemia and the use of statins was associated with culture establishment for IHD patients (p = 0.049 and p = 0.006, respectively). Together, these results show that the sternum bone can be used as a source for MSC isolation, and that ischemic or valvular diseases do not influence the cellular yield, culture establishment or in vitro growth kinetics.

  15. Physical kinetics

    Lifschitz, E.M.; Pitajewski, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    The textbook covers the subject under the following headings: kinetic gas theory, diffusion approximation, collisionless plasma, collisions within the plasma, plasma in the magnetic field, theory of instabilities, dielectrics, quantum fluids, metals, diagram technique for nonequilibrium systems, superconductors, and kinetics of phase transformations

  16. Heparin kinetics

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  17. Enterovirus strain and type-specific differences in growth kinetics and virus-induced cell destruction in human pancreatic duct epithelial HPDE cells.

    Smura, Teemu; Natri, Olli; Ylipaasto, Petri; Hellman, Marika; Al-Hello, Haider; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Roivainen, Merja

    2015-12-02

    Enterovirus infections have been suspected to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of enterovirus-induced type 1 diabetes is not known. Pancreatic ductal cells are closely associated with pancreatic islets. Therefore, enterovirus infections in ductal cells may also affect beta-cells and be involved in the induction of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of different enterovirus strains to infect, replicate and produce cytopathic effect in human pancreatic ductal cells. Furthermore, the viral factors that affect these capabilities were studied. The pancreatic ductal cells were highly susceptible to enterovirus infections. Both viral growth and cytolysis were detected for several enterovirus serotypes. However, the viral growth and capability to induce cytopathic effect (cpe) did not correlate completely. Some of the virus strains replicated in ductal cells without apparent cpe. Furthermore, there were strain-specific differences in the growth kinetics and the ability to cause cpe within some serotypes. Viral adaptation experiments were carried out to study the potential genetic determinants behind these phenotypic differences. The blind-passage of non-lytic CV-B6-Schmitt strain in HPDE-cells resulted in lytic phenotype and increased progeny production. This was associated with the substitution of a single amino acid (K257E) in the virus capsid protein VP1 and the viral ability to use decay accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor. This study demonstrates considerable plasticity in the cell tropism, receptor usage and cytolytic properties of enteroviruses and underlines the strong effect of single or few amino acid substitutions in cell tropism and lytic capabilities of a given enterovirus. Since ductal cells are anatomically close to pancreatic islets, the capability of enteroviruses to infect and destroy pancreatic ductal cells may also implicate in respect to enterovirus induced type 1

  18. Liquid holding recovery kinetics in wild-type and radiosensitive mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces exposed to low- and high-LET radiations

    Petin, Vladislav G. [Biophysical Laboratory, Medical Radiological Research Center, 249036 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jkkim@kaeri.re.kr

    2005-02-15

    Three wild-type diploid yeast strains Saccharomyces ellipsoideus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and five radiosensitive mutants of S. cerevisiae in the diploid state were irradiated with {gamma}-rays from {sup 60}Co and {alpha}-particles from {sup 239}Pu in the stationary phase of growth. Survival curves and the kinetics of the liquid holding recovery were measured. It was shown that the irreversible component was enhanced for the densely ionizing radiation in comparison to the low-LET radiation while the probability of the recovery was identical for both the low- and high-LET radiations for all the strains investigated. It means that the recovery process itself is not damaged after densely ionizing radiation and the enhanced RBE of the high-LET radiation may be caused by the increased yield of the irreversible damage. A parent diploid strain and all its radiosensitive mutants showed the same probability for recovery from radiation damage. Thus, the mechanism of the enhanced radiosensitivity of the mutant cells might not be related to the damage of the repair systems themselves but with the production of some kind of radiation damage from which cells are incapable to recover.

  19. Kinetic Interface

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  20. Kinetics and

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  1. Granulocyte kinetics

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Saverymuttu, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    By using density gradient materials enriched with autologous plasma, the authors have been able to isolate granulocutes from other cellular elements and label them with In-111 without separation from a plasma environment. The kinetic behavior of these cells suggests that phenomena attributed to granulocyte activation are greatly reduced by this labeling. Here, they review their study of granulocyte kinetics in health and disease in hope of quantifying sites of margination and identifying principal sites of destruction. The three principle headings of the paper are distribution, life-span, and destruction

  2. Application of Littlewood-Paley decomposition to the regularity of Boltzmann type kinetic equations; Application de la decomposition de Littlewood-Paley a la regularite pour des equations cinetiques de type Boltzmann

    EL Safadi, M

    2007-03-15

    We study the regularity of kinetic equations of Boltzmann type.We use essentially Littlewood-Paley method from harmonic analysis, consisting mainly in working with dyadics annulus. We shall mainly concern with the homogeneous case, where the solution f(t,x,v) depends only on the time t and on the velocities v, while working with realistic and singular cross-sections (non cutoff). In the first part, we study the particular case of Maxwellian molecules. Under this hypothesis, the structure of the Boltzmann operator and his Fourier transform write in a simple form. We show a global C{sup {infinity}} regularity. Then, we deal with the case of general cross-sections with 'hard potential'. We are interested in the Landau equation which is limit equation to the Boltzmann equation, taking in account grazing collisions. We prove that any weak solution belongs to Schwartz space S. We demonstrate also a similar regularity for the case of Boltzmann equation. Let us note that our method applies directly for all dimensions, and proofs are often simpler compared to other previous ones. Finally, we finish with Boltzmann-Dirac equation. In particular, we adapt the result of regularity obtained in Alexandre, Desvillettes, Wennberg and Villani work, using the dissipation rate connected with Boltzmann-Dirac equation. (author)

  3. A potential role for muscle in glucose homeostasis: in vivo kinetic studies in glycogen storage disease type 1a and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency

    Huidekoper, Hidde H.; Visser, Gepke; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2010-01-01

    A potential role for muscle in glucose homeostasis was recently suggested based on characterization of extrahepatic and extrarenal glucose-6-phosphatase (glucose-6-phosphatase-beta). To study the role of extrahepatic tissue in glucose homeostasis during fasting glucose kinetics were studied in two

  4. Physisorption kinetics

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  5. Simulation of axonal excitability using a Spreadsheet template created in Microsoft Excel.

    Brown, A M

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this present study was to implement an established simulation protocol (A.M. Brown, A methodology for simulating biological systems using Microsoft Excel, Comp. Methods Prog. Biomed. 58 (1999) 181-90) to model axonal excitability. The simulation protocol involves the use of in-cell formulas directly typed into a spreadsheet and does not require any programming skills or use of the macro language. Once the initial spreadsheet template has been set up the simulations described in this paper can be executed with a few simple keystrokes. The model axon contained voltage-gated ion channels that were modeled using Hodgkin Huxley style kinetics. The basic properties of axonal excitability modeled were: (1) threshold of action potential firing, demonstrating that not only are the stimulus amplitude and duration critical in the generation of an action potential, but also the resting membrane potential; (2) refractoriness, the phenomenon of reduced excitability immediately following an action potential. The difference between the absolute refractory period, when no amount of stimulus will elicit an action potential, and relative refractory period, when an action potential may be generated by applying increased stimulus, was demonstrated with regard to the underlying state of the Na(+) and K(+) channels; (3) temporal summation, a process by which two sub-threshold stimuli can unite to elicit an action potential was shown to be due to conductance changes outlasting the first stimulus and summing with the second stimulus-induced conductance changes to drive the membrane potential past threshold; (4) anode break excitation, where membrane hyperpolarization was shown to produce an action potential by removing Na(+) channel inactivation that is present at resting membrane potential. The simulations described in this paper provide insights into mechanisms of axonal excitation that can be carried out by following an easily understood protocol.

  6. Stochastic kinetics

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  7. Cell kinetics and therapeutic efficiency

    Andreeff, M.; Abenhardt, W.; Gruner, B.; Stoffner, D.; Mainz Univ.

    1976-01-01

    The study shows that cell kinetics effects correlate with the effects of cytostatic drugs in the tumour model investigated here. It should, however, be noted that even genetically related tumour cell types may react differently to the same cytostatic drug, and that the cell kinetics effects, due to the changes in the cell cycle, cannot be predicted but should be followed with a very fast method, e.g. sequential flan fluorescence cytophotometry, for optimal therapeutic results. (orig./GSE) [de

  8. Tolrestat kinetics

    Hicks, D.R.; Kraml, M.; Cayen, M.N.; Dubuc, J.; Ryder, S.; Dvornik, D.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of tolrestat, a potent inhibitor of aldose reductase, were examined. Serum concentrations of tolrestat and of total 14 C were measured after dosing normal subjects and subjects with diabetes with 14 C-labeled tolrestat. In normal subjects, tolrestat was rapidly absorbed and disappearance from serum was biphasic. Distribution and elimination t 1/2s were approximately 2 and 10 to 12 hr, respectively, after single and multiple doses. Unchanged tolrestat accounted for the major portion of 14 C in serum. Radioactivity was rapidly and completely excreted in urine and feces in an approximate ratio of 2:1. Findings were much the same in subjects with diabetes. In normal subjects, the kinetics of oral tolrestat were independent of dose in the 10 to 800 mg range. Repetitive dosing did not result in unexpected cumulation. Tolrestat was more than 99% bound to serum protein; it did not compete with warfarin for binding sites but was displaced to some extent by high concentrations of tolbutamide or salicylate

  9. Improvement in low-temperature and instantaneous high-rate output performance of Al-free AB5-type hydrogen storage alloy for negative electrode in Ni/MH battery: Effect of thermodynamic and kinetic regulation via partial Mn substituting

    Zhou, Wanhai; Zhu, Ding; Tang, Zhengyao; Wu, Chaoling; Huang, Liwu; Ma, Zhewen; Chen, Yungui

    2017-03-01

    A series of Al-free Mn-modified AB5-type hydrogen storage alloys have been designed and the effects of thermodynamic stability and electrochemical kinetics on electrochemical performance via Mn substituting have been investigated. Compared with high-Al alloys, the Al-free alloys in this study have better low-temperature performance and instantaneous high-rate output because of the higher surface catalytic ability. After partial substitution of Ni by Mn, both the hydrogen desorption capacity and plateau pressure decrease, and correspondingly results in an improved thermodynamic stability which is adverse to low-temperature delivery. Additionally, with the improvement of charge acceptance ability and anti-corrosion property via Mn substitution, the room-temperature discharge capacity and cycling stability increase slightly. However, Mn adversely affects the electrochemical kinetics and deteriorates both the surface catalytic ability and the bulk hydrogen diffusion ability, leading to the drop of low-temperature dischargeability, high-rate dischargeability and peak power (Ppeak). Based on the thermodynamic and kinetic regulation and overall electrochemical properties, the optimal composition is obtained when x = 0.2, the discharge capacity is 243.6 mAh g-1 at -40 °C with 60 mA g-1, and the Ppeak attains to 969.6 W kg-1 at -40 °C.

  10. A study of gamma-ray mutagenesis in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. Analysis of reversion production kinetics in a wild-type haploid strain

    Levkovich, N.V.; Chepurnoj, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    After γ-irradiation of a synchronized yeast culture in the G 1 -phase of the cell cycle, radiation-induced leu2 reversions are found to be formed in the first three postradiation phases of DNA replication. Without replication and in periods between two phases of DNA replication, formation of induced reversions was not observed. The analysis of postradiation formation kinetics of induced mutants is proposed to be used together with other know approaches for studying mutation processes. Hypothetical schemes are proposed to explain the ascending descending trend in formation of γ-induced reversions during postradiation growth of irradiated cells. 7 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Effect of kinetic parameters on simultaneous ramp reactivity insertion plus beam tube flooding accident in a typical low enriched U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel-based material testing reactor-type research reactor

    Nasir, Rubina; Mirza, Nasir M. [Dept. of, Physics, Air University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Sikander M. [Dept. of, Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Post Office Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    This work looks at the effect of changes in kinetic parameters on simultaneous reactivity insertions and beam tube flooding in a typical material testing reactor-type research reactor with low enriched high density (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) fuel. Using a modified PARET code, various ramp reactivity insertions (from $0.1/0.5 s to $1.3/0.5 s) plus beam tube flooding ($0.5/0.25 s) accidents under uncontrolled conditions were analyzed to find their effects on peak power, net reactivity, and temperature. Then, the effects of changes in kinetic parameters including the Doppler coefficient, prompt neutron lifetime, and delayed neutron fractions on simultaneous reactivity insertion and beam tube flooding accidents were analyzed. Results show that the power peak values are significantly sensitive to the Doppler coefficient of the system in coupled accidents. The material testing reactor-type system under such a coupled accident is not very sensitive to changes in the prompt neutron life time; the core under such a coupled transient is not very sensitive to changes in the effective delayed neutron fraction.

  12. Effect of sporulation medium on wet-heat resistance and structure of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris DSM 3922-type strain spores and modeling of the inactivation kinetics in apple juice.

    Molva, Celenk; Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2014-10-17

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is a spoilage bacterium in fruit juices leading to high economic losses. The present study evaluated the effect of sporulation medium on the thermal inactivation kinetics of A. acidoterrestris DSM 3922 spores in apple juice (pH3.82±0.01; 11.3±0.1 °Brix). Bacillus acidocaldarius agar (BAA), Bacillus acidoterrestris agar (BATA), malt extract agar (MEA), potato dextrose agar (PDA) and B. acidoterrestris broth (BATB) were used for sporulation. Inactivation kinetic parameters at 85, 87.5 and 90°C were obtained using the log-linear model. The decimal reduction times at 85°C (D85°C) were 41.7, 57.6, 76.8, 76.8 and 67.2min; D87.5°C-values were 22.4, 26.7, 32.9, 31.5, and 32.9min; and D90°C-values were 11.6, 9.9, 14.7, 11.9 and 14.1min for spores produced on PDA, MEA, BATA, BAA and BATB, respectively. The estimated z-values were 9.05, 6.60, 6.96, 6.15, and 7.46, respectively. The present study suggests that the sporulation medium affects the wet-heat resistance of A. acidoterrestris DSM 3922 spores. Also, the dipicolinic acid content (DPA) was found highest in heat resistant spores formed on mineral containing media. After wet-heat treatment, loss of internal volume due to the release of DPA from spore core was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Since, there is no standardized media for the sporulation of A. acidoterrestris, the results obtained from this study might be useful to determine and compare the thermal resistance characteristics of A. acidoterrestris spores in fruit juices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of the solvent type and polymerization conditions on the curing kinetics, thermal and viscoelastic performance of poly(amide-imide resins

    Z. Rasheva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Isothermal and non-isothermal curing kinetics of both N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP and N-methylimidazole (MI based poly(amide-imide (PAI resins were investigated by DSC analysis using tightly closed high-pressure crucibles. Several exothermal peaks on the non-isothermal DSC-traces were observed and attributed to the reactions of different functional groups of PAI-resin. Furthermore the final conversion (polymerization degree of PAI was determined under isothermal conditions, simulating three programs with the post-curing temperatures set as 215, 240 and 270°C. For the MI-PAI based resin, the conversion values were found to be much higher compared to those for the NMP-PAI system. Compared to NMP-based PAI-resin, a shift of the main exothermal peaks to the lower temperatures was observed in the non-isothermal kinetic investigations when MI was used as a solvent. This was accompanied with a reduction of activation energy (Ea values, as up to a factor of 3 determined by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa approach for all the main formation reactions. It indicates a catalytic effect of MI on the PAI polymerization. In addition, conversion values were determined according to the Di Benedetto equation for both systems cured using open molds in the oven. Regardless the different post-curing temperatures, the conversion values were similar for all the samples. Thermal and viscoelastic properties as well as crosslink density (nc were also investigated for these systems. It was found that the MI-based samples demonstrate lower nc values compared to the NMP-based ones at an almost two times higher storage modulus (E' at room temperature.

  14. Transient kinetic studies of pH-dependent hydrolyses by exo-type carboxypeptidase P on a 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance.

    Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Takano, Hiroki; Okahata, Yoshio

    2008-02-15

    pH-Dependent kinetic parameters (k(on), k(off), and k(cat)) of protein (myoglobin) hydrolyses catalyzed by exo-enzyme (carboxypeptidase P, CPP) were obtained by using a protein-immobilized quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) in acidic aqueous solutions. The formation of the enzyme-substrate (ES) complex (k(on)), the decay of the ES complex (k(off)), and the formation of the product (k(cat)) could be analyzed by transient kinetics as mass changes on the QCM plate. The Kd (k(off)/k(on)) value was different from the Michaelis constant Km calculated from (k(off) + k(cat))/k(on) due to k(cat) > k(off). The rate-determining step was the binding step (k(on), and the catalytic rate k(cat) was faster than other k(on) and k(off) values. In the range of pH 2.5-5.0, values of k(on) gradually increased with decreasing pH showing a maximum at pH 3.7, values of k(off) were independent of pH, and k(cat) increased gradually with decreasing pH. As a result, the apparent rate constant (k(cat)/Km) showed a maximum at pH 3.7 and gradually increased with decreasing pH. The optimum pH at 3.7 of k(on) is explained by the optimum binding ability of CPP to the COOH terminus of the substrate with hydrogen bonds. The increase of k(cat) at the lower pH correlated with the decrease of alpha-helix contents of the myoglobin substrate on the QCM.

  15. Phosphorus Uptake Kinetics of Different Types of Duckweed.%不同品种浮萍磷素吸收动力学特征

    蔡树美; 刘文桃; 张震; 柏彦超; 钱晓晴

    2011-01-01

    以长江三角洲地区常见的3种浮萍--稀脉浮萍(Lemna aequinoctialis)、少根紫萍(Spirodela oligorrhiza)和紫萍(Spriodela polyrrhiza)为对象,研究不同品种浮萍对HPO42-的吸收动力学影响.结果表明,3种浮萍对无机磷的吸收动力学特征基本可采用Michaelis-Menten方程描述,3种浮萍无机磷吸收速率V对磷浓度S双倒数曲线的拟合关系均在α=0.01水平上显著.稀脉浮萍对无机磷的亲和力较强,适宜应用于对低磷浓度污水的净化;紫萍对无机磷的最大吸收速率Vmax较高,适宜应用于对高磷浓度污水的净化.%An increasing attention has been paid to the use of duckweed in treating eutrophicated water as a tool of bio-remediation of domestic wastewater.Phosphorus uptake kinetics was studied,of different species of duckweeds, i.e.Lemna aequinoctialis, Spirodela oligorrhiza and Spriodela polyrrhiza, which are common in the Yangtze River Delta area.Results show that the phosphorus uptake kinetics of the duckweeds could be expressed with the Michaelis-Menten equation; and the relation between phosphorus uptake rate (V) of the duckweeds and inorganic phosphorus(Pi) concentration (S), was well fitted with a double-reciprocal curve with at =0.01; the Km value for Pi uptake of Lemna aequinoctialis was lower than that of Spirodela oligorrhiza and Spriodela polyrrhiza, making it a better candidate for treating wastewater low in Pi concentration.The maximum phosphorus uptake rate of Spriodela polyrrhiza was higher than that of the other two species, which allows Spriodela polyrrhiza better performance in purifying wastewater higher in Pi concentration.

  16. Deconvolution of ferredoxin, plastocyanin, and P700 transmittance changes in intact leaves with a new type of kinetic LED array spectrophotometer.

    Klughammer, Christof; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    A newly developed compact measuring system for assessment of transmittance changes in the near-infrared spectral region is described; it allows deconvolution of redox changes due to ferredoxin (Fd), P700, and plastocyanin (PC) in intact leaves. In addition, it can also simultaneously measure chlorophyll fluorescence. The major opto-electronic components as well as the principles of data acquisition and signal deconvolution are outlined. Four original pulse-modulated dual-wavelength difference signals are measured (785-840 nm, 810-870 nm, 870-970 nm, and 795-970 nm). Deconvolution is based on specific spectral information presented graphically in the form of 'Differential Model Plots' (DMP) of Fd, P700, and PC that are derived empirically from selective changes of these three components under appropriately chosen physiological conditions. Whereas information on maximal changes of Fd is obtained upon illumination after dark-acclimation, maximal changes of P700 and PC can be readily induced by saturating light pulses in the presence of far-red light. Using the information of DMP and maximal changes, the new measuring system enables on-line deconvolution of Fd, P700, and PC. The performance of the new device is demonstrated by some examples of practical applications, including fast measurements of flash relaxation kinetics and of the Fd, P700, and PC changes paralleling the polyphasic fluorescence rise upon application of a 300-ms pulse of saturating light.

  17. Fluorescent-increase kinetics of different fluorescent reporters used for qPCR depend on monitoring chemistry, targeted sequence, type of DNA input and PCR efficiency

    Ruijter, Jan M.; Hoff, Maurice J. B. van den; Lorenz, Peter; Tuomi, Jari M.; Hecker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of quantitative PCR data usually does not take into account the fact that the increase in fluorescence depends on the monitoring chemistry, the input of ds-DNA or ss-cDNA, and the directionality of the targeting of probes or primers. The monitoring chemistries currently available can be categorized into six groups: (A) DNA-binding dyes; (B) hybridization probes; (C) hydrolysis probes; (D) LUX primers; (E) hairpin primers; and (F) the QZyme system. We have determined the kinetics of the increase in fluorescence for each of these groups with respect to the input of both ds-DNA and ss-cDNA. For the latter, we also evaluated mRNA and cDNA targeting probes or primers. This analysis revealed three situations. Hydrolysis probes and LUX primers, compared to DNA-binding dyes, do not require a correction of the observed quantification cycle. Hybridization probes and hairpin primers require a correction of −1 cycle (dubbed C-lag), while the QZyme system requires the C-lag correction and an efficiency-dependent C-shift correction. A PCR efficiency value can be derived from the relative increase in fluorescence in the exponential phase of the amplification curve for all monitoring chemistries. In case of hydrolysis probes, LUX primers and hairpin primers, however, this should be performed after cycle 12, and for the QZyme system after cycle 19, to keep the overestimation of the PCR efficiency below 0.5 %. (author)

  18. Total Synthesis and Stereochemical Assignment of Delavatine A: Rh-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Indene-Type Tetrasubstituted Olefins and Kinetic Resolution through Pd-Catalyzed Triflamide-Directed C-H Olefination.

    Zhang, Zhongyin; Wang, Jinxin; Li, Jian; Yang, Fan; Liu, Guodu; Tang, Wenjun; He, Weiwei; Fu, Jian-Jun; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Ang; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2017-04-19

    Delavatine A (1) is a structurally unusual isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Incarvillea delavayi. The first and gram-scale total synthesis of 1 was accomplished in 13 steps (the longest linear sequence) from commercially available starting materials. We exploited an isoquinoline construction strategy and developed two reactions, namely Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of indene-type tetrasubstituted olefins and kinetic resolution of β-alkyl phenylethylamine derivatives through Pd-catalyzed triflamide-directed C-H olefination. The substrate scope of the first reaction covered unfunctionalized olefins and those containing polar functionalities such as sulfonamides. The kinetic resolution provided a collection of enantioenriched indane- and tetralin-based triflamides, including those bearing quaternary chiral centers. The selectivity factor (s) exceeded 100 for a number of substrates. These reactions enabled two different yet related approaches to a key intermediate 28 in excellent enantiopurity. In the synthesis, the triflamide served as not only an effective directing group for C-H bond activation but also a versatile functional group for further elaborations. The relative and absolute configurations of delavatine A were unambiguously assigned by the syntheses of the natural product and its three stereoisomers. Their cytotoxicity against a series of cancer cell lines was evaluated.

  19. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  20. DNA immunization with fusion of CTLA-4 to hepatitis B virus (HBV core protein enhanced Th2 type responses and cleared HBV with an accelerated kinetic.

    Ying Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Typically, DNA immunization via the intramuscular route induces specific, Th1-dominant immune responses. However, plasmids expressing viral proteins fused to cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4 primed Th2-biased responses and were able to induced effective protection against viral challenge in the woodchuck model. Thus, we addressed the question in the mouse model how the Th1/Th2 bias of primed immune responses by a DNA vaccine influences hepatitis B virus (HBV clearance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasmids expressing HBV core protein (HBcAg or HBV e antigen and HBcAg fused to the extracellular domain of CTLA-4 (pCTLA-4-HBc, CD27, and full length CD40L were constructed. Immunizations of these DNA plasmids induced HBcAg-specific antibody and cytotoxic T-cell responses in mice, but with different characteristics regarding the titers and subtypes of specific antibodies and intensity of T-cell responses. The plasmid pHBc expressing HBcAg induced an IgG2a-dominant response while immunizations of pCTLA-4-HBc induced a balanced IgG1/IgG2a response. To assess the protective values of the immune responses of different characteristics, mice were pre-immunized with pCTLA-4-HBc and pHBc, and challenged by hydrodynamic injection (HI of pAAV/HBV1.2. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg and DNA in peripheral blood and HBcAg in liver tissue were cleared with significantly accelerated kinetics in both groups. The clearance of HBsAg was completed within 16 days in immunized mice while more than 50% of the control mice are still positive for HBsAg on day 22. Stronger HBcAg-specific T-cell responses were primed by pHBc correlating with a more rapid decline of HBcAg expression in liver tissue, while anti-HBs antibody response developed rapidly in the mice immunized with pCTLA-4-HBc, indicating that the Th1/Th2 bias of vaccine-primed immune responses influences the mode of viral clearance. CONCLUSION: Viral clearance could be efficiently achieved by Th1/Th2-balanced

  1. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation Using 3D Gait Analysis

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the gait patterns of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT) hypermobility type, using Gait Analysis. We quantified the gait strategy in 12 JHS/EDS-HT adults individuals (age: 43.08 + 6.78 years) compared to 20 healthy controls (age: 37.23 plus or minus 8.91 years), in…

  2. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    Dos Santos, E.; Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Fillion, G.; Scorzelli, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1 0 -type Fe 50 Ni 50 alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L 10 superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites

  3. Thermal physics kinetic theory and thermodynamics

    Singh, Devraj; Yadav, Raja Ram

    2016-01-01

    THERMAL PHYSICS: Kinetic Theory and Thermodynamics is designed for undergraduate course in Thermal Physics and Thermodynamics. The book provides thorough understanding of the fundamental principles of the concepts in Thermal Physics. The book begins with kinetic theory, then moves on liquefaction, transport phenomena, the zeroth, first, second and third laws, thermodynamics relations and thermal conduction. The book concluded with radiation phenomenon. KEY FEATURES: * Include exercises * Short Answer Type Questions * Long Answer Type Questions * Numerical Problems * Multiple Choice Questions

  4. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects.

    Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Girish C; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Detor, Mia M; Melkani, Anju; Marsan, Nathan P; Swank, Douglas M; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3) display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K) in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in decreased in vitro

  5. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects

    Jennifer A. Suggs

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3 display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in

  6. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics

  7. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  8. Plasma kinetic theory

    Elliott, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma kinetic theory is discussed and a comparison made with the kinetic theory of gases. The plasma is described by a modified set of fluid equations and it is shown how these fluid equations can be derived. (UK)

  9. Peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2 from the fruitfly: dehydrogenase and hydratase act as separate entities, as revealed by structure and kinetics.

    Haataja, Tatu J K; Koski, M Kristian; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Glumoff, Tuomo

    2011-05-01

    All of the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathways characterized thus far house at least one MFE (multifunctional enzyme) catalysing two out of four reactions of the spiral. MFE type 2 proteins from various species display great variation in domain composition and predicted substrate preference. The gene CG3415 encodes for Drosophila melanogaster MFE-2 (DmMFE-2), complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MFE-2 deletion strain, and the recombinant protein displays both MFE-2 enzymatic activities in vitro. The resolved crystal structure is the first one for a full-length MFE-2 revealing the assembly of domains, and the data can also be transferred to structure-function studies for other MFE-2 proteins. The structure explains the necessity of dimerization. The lack of substrate channelling is proposed based on both the structural features, as well as by the fact that hydration and dehydrogenation activities of MFE-2, if produced as separate enzymes, are equally efficient in catalysis as the full-length MFE-2.

  10. Whole body glucose kinetics in type I diabetes studied with [6,6-2H] and [U-13C]-glucose and the artificial B-cell

    Darmaun, D.; Cirillo, D.; Koziet, J.; Chauvet, D.; Young, V.R.; Robert, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic aspects of whole body glucose metabolism were assessed in ten young adult insulin-dependent (type I) diabetic men. Using a primed, continuous intravenous infusion of [6,6- 2 H]glucose and [U- 13 C]glucose, endogenous production, tissue uptake, carbon recycling, and oxidation of glucose were measured in the postabsorptive state. These studies were undertaken after blood glucose had been maintained overnight at 5.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/L (n = 10), and on another night at 10.5 +/- 0.4 mmol/L (n = 4) or 15.2 +/- 0.6 mmol/L (n = 6). In the normoglycemic state, endogenous glucose production averaged 2.15 +/- 0.13 mg x kg-1 x min-1. This value, as well as the rate of glucose carbon recycling (0.16 +/- 0.04 mg x kg-1 x min-1) and glucose oxidation (1.52 +/- 0.16 mg x kg-1 x min-1) are comparable to those found in nondiabetic controls. In the hyperglycemic states at 10 or 15 mmol/L, endogenous glucose production was increased by 11% (P less than .01) and 60% (P less than .01) compared to the normoglycemic states, respectively. Glucose carbon recycling contributed only a small percentage to this variation in glucose production (15% at the 15 mmol/L glucose level). This suggests that if gluconeogenesis participates in the increased glucose output, it is not dependent on a greater systemic supply of three-carbon precursors. The increased rate of glucose production in the hyperglycemic state was quantitatively offset by a rise in urinary glucose excretion. Glucose tissue uptake, as well as glucose oxidation, did not vary between normoglycemic and hyperglycemic states

  11. Hydrogen electrode reaction: A complete kinetic description

    Quaino, P.M.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic description of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) in the whole range of overpotentials (-0.2 < η (V) < 0.40) is presented. The Volmer-Heyrovsky-Tafel mechanism was solved considering simultaneously the following items: (i) the diffusional contribution of the molecular hydrogen from and towards the electrode surface, (ii) the forward and backward reaction rates of each elementary step and (iii) a Frumkin type adsorption for the reaction intermediate. In order to verify the descriptive capability of the kinetic expressions derived, an experimental study of the HER was carried out on a rotating platinum disc electrode in acid solution. From the correlation of these results the elementary kinetic parameters were evaluated and several aspects related to the kinetic mechanism were discussed. Finally, the use of these kinetic expressions to interpret results obtained on microelectrodes is also analysed

  12. Resonance transport and kinetic entropy

    Ivanov, Yu.B.; Knoll, J.; Voskresensky, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    We continue the description of the dynamics of unstable particles within the real-time formulation of nonequilibrium field theory initiated in a previous paper . There we suggest to use Baym's PHI-functional method in order to achieve approximation schemes with 'built in' consistency with respect to conservation laws and thermodynamics even in the case of particles with finite damping width. Starting from Kadanoff-Baym equations we discuss a consistent first order gradient approach to transport which preserves the PHI-derivable properties. The validity conditions for the resulting quantum four-phase-space kinetic theory are discussed under the perspective to treat particles with broad damping widths. This non-equilibrium dynamics naturally includes all those quantum features already inherent in the corresponding equilibrium limit (e.g. Matsubara formalism) at the same level of PHI-derivable approximation. Various collision-term diagrams are discussed including those of higher order which lead to memory effects. As an important novel part we derive a generalized nonequilibrium expression for the kinetic entropy flow, which includes contributions from fluctuations and mass-width effects. In special cases an H-theorem is derived implying that the entropy can only increase with time. Memory effects in the kinetic terms provide contributions to the kinetic entropy flow that in the equilibrium limit recover the famous bosonic type T 3 lnT correction to the specific heat in the case of Fermi liquids like Helium-3

  13. ESR low-temperature investigations on water-containing biological substances to determine type, concentration and kinetics of the free radicals induced by irradiation with X-rays and β-radiation

    Fell, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    In the present work, ESR investigations on pure water and further biological interesting substances with high water content were carried out. In order to stabilize the free primary radicals occurring after irradiation, it was necessary to cool down the samples to the temperature of liquid helium. Methods were developed which enabled irradiation of the pure sample substance at this temperature to be performed. Two different kinds of radiation were applied, X-ray and β-radiation, and the results were compared with one another. The problem of transporting the irradiated sample from the place of irradiation to the measuring position maintaining 4.2 K was solved. A device was constructed to study the radical kinetics with whose assistance the samples can be brought to a pre-chosen temperature for a certain time. A calibration of the ESR spectrometer as well as the use of a secondary standard was necessary for the quantitative determination of the radical concentration. The type and concentration of the primary radicals occurring were investigated in the measured samples as well as the reduction of the radical concentration with increasing temperature determined. The measured values were compared with theoretical considerations. The effect of the radicals on biological systems at various temperatures was discussed. (orig./LH) [de

  14. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  15. Principles of chemical kinetics

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  16. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  17. Kinetic equation solution by inverse kinetic method

    Salas, G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a computer program (CAMU) which permits to solve the inverse kinetic equation. The CAMU code is written in HPL language for a HP 982 A microcomputer with a peripheral interface HP 9876 A ''thermal graphic printer''. The CAMU code solves the inverse kinetic equation by taking as data entry the output of the ionization chambers and integrating the equation with the help of the Simpson method. With this program we calculate the evolution of the reactivity in time for a given disturbance

  18. Kinetics in radiation chemistry

    Hummel, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter the authors first briefly review the kinetics of first- and second-order processes for continuous and pulsed irradiation, without taking the effects of nonhomogeneous formation of the species into consideration. They also discuss diffusion controlled reactions under conditions where interactions of more than two particles can be neglected, first the kinetics of the diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly generated species (homogeneous reaction) and then that of isolated pairs of reactants. The latter is often called geminate kinetics when dealing with pairs of oppositely charged species; they shall use this term for the kinetics of isolated pairs in general. In the last section they discuss briefly the kinetics of groups of more than two reactants

  19. When long-range zero-lag synchronization is feasible in cortical networks

    Atthaphon eViriyopase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported long-range synchronization of neuronal activity between brain areas, in particular in the gamma-band with frequencies in the range of 40-80 Hz. Several studies have reported synchrony with zero phase lag, which is remarkable considering the synaptic and conduction delays inherent in the connections between distant brain areas. This result has led to many speculations about the possible functional role of zero-lag synchrony, e.g., for neuronal communication in attention, memory and feature binding. However, recent studies using recordings of single-unit activity and local field potentials report that neuronal synchronization occurs with non-zero phase lags. This raises the questions whether zero-lag synchrony can occur in the brain and, if so, under which conditions.We used analytical methods and computer simulations to investigate which connectivity between neuronal populations allows or prohibits zero-lag synchrony. We did so for a model where two oscillators interact via a relay oscillator. Analytical results and computer simulations were obtained for both type I Mirollo-Strogatz neurons and type II Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We have investigated the dynamics of the model for various types of synaptic coupling and importantly considered the potential impact of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP and its learning window. We confirm previous results that zero-lag synchrony can be achieved in this configuration. This is much easier to achieve with Hodgkin-Huxley neurons, which have a biphasic phase response curve, than for type I neurons. STDP facilitates zero-lag synchrony as it adjusts the synaptic strengths such that zero-lag synchrony is feasible for a much larger range of parameters than without STDP.

  20. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  1. A Neuron-Based Model of Sleep-Wake Cycles

    Postnova, Svetlana; Peters, Achim; Braun, Hans

    2008-03-01

    In recent years it was discovered that a neuropeptide orexin/hypocretin plays a main role in sleep processes. This peptide is produced by the neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, which project to almost all brain areas. We present a computational model of sleep-wake cycles, which is based on the Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons and considers reciprocal glutaminergic projections between the lateral hypothalamus and the prefrontal cortex. Orexin is released as a neuromodulator and is required to keep the neurons firing, which corresponds to the wake state. When orexin is depleted the neurons are getting silent as observed in the sleep state. They can be reactivated by the circadian signal from the suprachiasmatic nucleus and/or external stimuli (alarm clock). Orexin projections to the thalamocortical neurons also can account for their transition from tonic firing activity during wakefulness to synchronized burst discharges during sleep.

  2. Attempts to retreat from a dead-ended long capillary by backward swimming in Paramecium

    Itsuki eKunita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We have observed how the ciliate Paramecium attempts to retreat from the dead-end of a long capillary that is too narrow for turning. After many trial-and-error episodes of short-term backward swimming (SBS, which is the conventional avoidance behavior exhibited in free swimming when an obstacle is faced, long-term backward swimming (LBS that lasted five to ten times longer was developed. LBS may have a beneficial effect for complete withdrawal from the capillary space, although in our experiment it was impossible for the organism to do so due to the capillary length. In order to identify a physically possible mechanism for LBS, we propose model equations for the membrane potential of Hodgkin-Huxley type, which describe the control of ciliary movement. The physiological implications and physical mechanism of the development of LBS are discussed.

  3. Computer Modelling of Functional Aspects of Noise in Endogenously Oscillating Neurons

    Huber, M. T.; Dewald, M.; Voigt, K.; Braun, H. A.; Moss, F.

    1998-03-01

    Membrane potential oscillations are a widespread feature of neuronal activity. When such oscillations operate close to the spike-triggering threshold, noise can become an essential property of spike-generation. According to that, we developed a minimal Hodgkin-Huxley-type computer model which includes a noise term. This model accounts for experimental data from quite different cells ranging from mammalian cortical neurons to fish electroreceptors. With slight modifications of the parameters, the model's behavior can be tuned to bursting activity, which additionally allows it to mimick temperature encoding in peripheral cold receptors including transitions to apparently chaotic dynamics as indicated by methods for the detection of unstable periodic orbits. Under all conditions, cooperative effects between noise and nonlinear dynamics can be shown which, beyond stochastic resonance, might be of functional significance for stimulus encoding and neuromodulation.

  4. The catalytic oxidation of 1-butene over bismuth molybdate catalysts : V. The kinetics of the oxidation: A. Pulse reaction kinetics; exploratory experiments for a kinetic investigation

    Keizer, K.; Batist, P.A.; Schuit, G.C.A.

    1969-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidn. of 1-butene with O on three types of bismuth molybdate catalysts were investigated in pulse expts. For all the catalysts mentioned the kinetics can be expressed by a first-order dependency on the butene pressure and a zero-order dependency on the O pressure. A slight deviation

  5. Kinetics of phase transformations

    Thompson, M.O.; Aziz, M.J.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the Materials Research Society symposium on Kinetics of Phase Transformations held in Boston, Massachusetts from November 26-29, 1990. The symposium provided a forum for research results in an exceptionally broad and interdisciplinary field. Presentations covered nearly every major class of transformations including solid-solid, liquid-solid, transport phenomena and kinetics modeling. Papers involving amorphous Si, a dominant topic at the symposium, are collected in the first section followed by sections on four major areas of transformation kinetics. The symposium opened with joint sessions on ion and electron beam induced transformations in conjunction with the Surface Chemistry and Beam-Solid Interactions: symposium. Subsequent sessions focused on the areas of ordering and nonlinear diffusion kinetics, solid state reactions and amorphization, kinetics and defects of amorphous silicon, and kinetics of melting and solidification. Seven internationally recognized invited speakers reviewed many of the important problems and recent results in these areas, including defects in amorphous Si, crystal to glass transformations, ordering kinetics, solid-state amorphization, computer modeling, and liquid/solid transformations

  6. Irreversible processes kinetic theory

    Brush, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 2: Irreversible Processes deals with the kinetic theory of gases and the irreversible processes they undergo. It includes the two papers by James Clerk Maxwell and Ludwig Boltzmann in which the basic equations for transport processes in gases are formulated, together with the first derivation of Boltzmann's ""H-theorem"" and a discussion of this theorem, along with the problem of irreversibility.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to the fundamental nature of heat and of gases, along with Boltzmann's work on the kinetic theory of gases and s

  7. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  8. The Application of Biomimicry in Kinetic Facades

    Wijdan Deyaa Abdul Jalil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomimicry, as a way of thinking to go back to nature for inspiration, has its impact on many contemporary technological achievements. Some of them are used to design and construct kinetic facades in architecture, because of the importance role of facades in reducing sun radiation, that enter the building through using shading systems and components. In light of this, research problem is determined: "Do technologies which are inspired by biomimicry effect shading in kinetic facades through its characteristics in materials and the mechanics. So the research identifies its goal as: "To identify the types of kinetic facades in buildings and their characteristics as materials and shading mechanism associated with the biomimicry. The research explains the basic types of kinetic facades depending on the technology and materials used to provide the possibility of reducing solar radiation that enters the building. It also compares the case studies which have been chosen in their inspiration concept from biological world, which reflect on the system used of protecting against sun and reducing energy consumption as the designer teams suggest. The research concluded that kinetic façade which is depending on smart materials is self-responding and don't need energy to operate, so it is better in reducing consumption of energy.

  9. A balance principle approach for modeling phase transformation kinetics

    Lusk, M.; Krauss, G.; Jou, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    A balance principle is offered to model volume fraction kinetics of phase transformation kinetics at a continuum level. This microbalance provides a differential equation for transformation kinetics which is coupled to the differential equations governing the mechanical and thermal aspects of the process. Application here is restricted to diffusive transformations for the sake of clarity, although the principle is discussed for martensitic phase transitions as well. Avrami-type kinetics are shown to result from a special class of energy functions. An illustrative example using a 0.5% C Chromium steel demonstrates how TTT and CCT curves can be generated using a particularly simple effective energy function. (orig.)

  10. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302); J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601); M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302)].

  11. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-12-15

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302); J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601); M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302)].

  12. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  13. Relativistic Kinetic Theory

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V.; Aksenov, Alexey G.

    2017-02-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and definitions; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Foundations: 1. Basic concepts; 2. Kinetic equation; 3. Averaging; 4. Conservation laws and equilibrium; 5. Relativistic BBGKY hierarchy; 6. Basic parameters in gases and plasmas; Part II. Numerical Methods: 7. The basics of computational physics; 8. Direct integration of Boltzmann equations; 9. Multidimensional hydrodynamics; Part III. Applications: 10. Wave dispersion in relativistic plasma; 11. Thermalization in relativistic plasma; 12. Kinetics of particles in strong fields; 13. Compton scattering in astrophysics and cosmology; 14. Self-gravitating systems; 15. Neutrinos, gravitational collapse and supernovae; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Quantum kinetic theory

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents quantum kinetic theory in a comprehensive way. The focus is on density operator methods and on non-equilibrium Green functions. The theory allows to rigorously treat nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Of particular interest are ultrafast processes in plasmas, condensed matter and trapped atoms that are stimulated by rapidly developing experiments with short pulse lasers and free electron lasers. To describe these experiments theoretically, the most powerful approach is given by non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations that are discussed in detail, including computational aspects.

  15. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  16. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    Dhir, S.; Uppaluri, R.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H 2 O 2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  17. Modeling chemical kinetics graphically

    Heck, A.

    2012-01-01

    In literature on chemistry education it has often been suggested that students, at high school level and beyond, can benefit in their studies of chemical kinetics from computer supported activities. Use of system dynamics modeling software is one of the suggested quantitative approaches that could

  18. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  19. Kinetic energy budget details

    Abstract. This paper presents the detailed turbulent kinetic energy budget and higher order statistics of flow behind a surface-mounted rib with and without superimposed acoustic excitation. Pattern recognition technique is used to determine the large-scale structure magnitude. It is observed that most of the turbulence ...

  20. Point kinetics modeling

    Kimpland, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    A normalized form of the point kinetics equations, a prompt jump approximation, and the Nordheim-Fuchs model are used to model nuclear systems. Reactivity feedback mechanisms considered include volumetric expansion, thermal neutron temperature effect, Doppler effect and void formation. A sample problem of an excursion occurring in a plutonium solution accidentally formed in a glovebox is presented

  1. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  2. Dynamic phase transitions and dynamic phase diagrams in the kinetic spin-5/2 Blume–Capel model in an oscillating external magnetic field: Effective-field theory and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach

    Ertaş, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa; Deviren, Bayram

    2012-01-01

    Using an effective field theory with correlations, we study a kinetic spin-5/2 Blume–Capel model with bilinear exchange interaction and single-ion crystal field on a square lattice. The effective-field dynamic equation is derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. First, the phases in the kinetic system are obtained by solving this dynamic equation. Then, the thermal behavior of the dynamic magnetization, the hysteresis loop area and correlation are investigated in order to characterize the nature of the dynamic transitions and to obtain dynamic phase transition temperatures. Finally, we present the phase diagrams in two planes, namely (T/zJ, h 0 /zJ) and (T/zJ, D/zJ), where T absolute temperature, h 0 , the amplitude of the oscillating field, D, crystal field interaction or single-ion anisotropy constant and z denotes the nearest-neighbor sites of the central site. The phase diagrams exhibit four fundamental phases and ten mixed phases which are composed of binary, ternary and tetrad combination of fundamental phases, depending on the crystal field interaction parameter. Moreover, the phase diagrams contain a dynamic tricritical point (T), a double critical end point (B), a multicritical point (A) and zero-temperature critical point (Z). - Highlights: ► The effective-field theory is used to study the kinetic spin-5/2 Ising Blume–Capel model. ► Time variations of average order parameter have been studied to find phases in the system. ► The dynamic magnetization, hysteresis loop area and correlation have been calculated. ► The dynamic phase boundaries of the system depend on D/zJ. ► The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in the (T/zJ, h 0 /zJ) and (D/zJ, T/zJ) planes.

  3. Dynamic phase transitions and dynamic phase diagrams in the kinetic spin-5/2 Blume-Capel model in an oscillating external magnetic field: Effective-field theory and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach

    Ertas, Mehmet [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Deviren, Bayram [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey)

    2012-04-15

    Using an effective field theory with correlations, we study a kinetic spin-5/2 Blume-Capel model with bilinear exchange interaction and single-ion crystal field on a square lattice. The effective-field dynamic equation is derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. First, the phases in the kinetic system are obtained by solving this dynamic equation. Then, the thermal behavior of the dynamic magnetization, the hysteresis loop area and correlation are investigated in order to characterize the nature of the dynamic transitions and to obtain dynamic phase transition temperatures. Finally, we present the phase diagrams in two planes, namely (T/zJ, h{sub 0}/zJ) and (T/zJ, D/zJ), where T absolute temperature, h{sub 0}, the amplitude of the oscillating field, D, crystal field interaction or single-ion anisotropy constant and z denotes the nearest-neighbor sites of the central site. The phase diagrams exhibit four fundamental phases and ten mixed phases which are composed of binary, ternary and tetrad combination of fundamental phases, depending on the crystal field interaction parameter. Moreover, the phase diagrams contain a dynamic tricritical point (T), a double critical end point (B), a multicritical point (A) and zero-temperature critical point (Z). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effective-field theory is used to study the kinetic spin-5/2 Ising Blume-Capel model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Time variations of average order parameter have been studied to find phases in the system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic magnetization, hysteresis loop area and correlation have been calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic phase boundaries of the system depend on D/zJ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in the (T/zJ, h{sub 0}/zJ) and (D/zJ, T/zJ) planes.

  4. Nuclear reactor kinetics and control

    Lewins, J.

    1978-01-01

    A consistent, integrated account of modern developments in the study of nuclear reactor kinetics and the problem of their efficient and safe control. It aims to prepare the student for advanced study and research or practical work in the field. Special features include treatments of noise theory, reliability theory and safety related studies. It covers all aspects of the operation and control of nuclear reactors, power and research and is complete in providing physical data methods of calculation and solution including questions of equipment reliability. The work uses illustrations of the main types of reactors in use in the UK, USA and Europe. Each chapter contains problems and worked examples suitable for course work and study. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introductory review; neutron and precursor equations; elementary solutions at low power; linear reactor process dynamics with feedback; power reactor control systems; fluctuations and reactor noise; safety and reliability; nonlinear systems (safety and control); analogue computing. (author)

  5. Kinetic energy absorbing pad

    Bricmont, R.J.; Hamilton, P.A.; Ming Long Ting, R.

    1981-01-01

    Reactors, fuel processing plants etc incorporate pipes and conduits for fluids under high pressure. Fractures, particularly adjacent to conduit elbows, produce a jet of liquid which whips the broken conduit at an extremely high velocity. An enormous impact load would be applied to any stationary object in the conduit's path. The design of cellular, corrugated metal impact pads to absorb the kinetic energy of the high velocity conduits is given. (U.K.)

  6. Lumping procedure for a kinetic model of catalytic naphtha reforming

    H. M. Arani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A lumping procedure is developed for obtaining kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of catalytic naphtha reforming. All kinetic and deactivation parameters are estimated from industrial data and thermodynamic parameters are calculated from derived mathematical expressions. The proposed model contains 17 lumps that include the C6 to C8+ hydrocarbon range and 15 reaction pathways. Hougen-Watson Langmuir-Hinshelwood type reaction rate expressions are used for kinetic simulation of catalytic reactions. The kinetic parameters are benchmarked with several sets of plant data and estimated by the SQP optimization method. After calculation of deactivation and kinetic parameters, plant data are compared with model predictions and only minor deviations between experimental and calculated data are generally observed.

  7. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  8. Borosilicate nuclear waste glass alteration kinetics theoretical basis for the kinetic law of nuclear glass alteration

    Jegou, Ch.; Gin, St.; Advocat, Th.; Vernaz, E.

    1997-01-01

    Work carried out since the early 1980's to predict the long-term behavior of nuclear containment glasses has revealed the inadequacy of existing models, notably in accounting for the fundamental mechanisms involved in some complex systems (e.g. glass-water-clay), inciting us to examine and discuss the theoretical basis for the hypotheses generally assumed in our models. This paper discusses the theoretical basis for the Aagaard-Helgeson law and its application to nuclear glasses. The contribution of other types of kinetic laws is also considered to describe the alteration kinetics of nuclear glasses. (authors)

  9. Quantum kinetic Ising models

    Augusiak, R; Cucchietti, F M; Lewenstein, M; Haake, F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a quantum generalization of classical kinetic Ising models (KIM), described by a certain class of quantum many-body master equations. Similarly to KIMs with detailed balance that are equivalent to certain Hamiltonian systems, our models reduce to a set of Hamiltonian systems determining the dynamics of the elements of the many-body density matrix. The ground states of these Hamiltonians are well described by the matrix product, or pair entangled projected states. We discuss critical properties of such Hamiltonians, as well as entanglement properties of their low-energy states.

  10. A kinetic model for the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in

    Nielsen, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model for the first two steps in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. the ACV synthetase (ACVS) and the isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) is proposed. The model is based on Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with non-competitive inhibition of the ACVS by ACV, and competitive inhibition...... of the IPNS by glutathione. The model predicted flux through the pathway corresponds well with the measured rate of penicillin biosynthesis. From the kinetic model the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients are calculated throughout a fed-batch cultivation, and it is found...

  11. Warm ion effects on kinetic drift cyclotron loss cone instabilities

    Guo Shichong; Shen Jiewu; Cai Shidong

    1988-01-01

    The effects of adding warm plasmas on the kinetic DCLC mode in high β loss cone plasmas are investigated in detail. It is found that when the fluid DCLC mode is stabilized by a small amount of warm plasma, the kinetic excitation still remains due to two different mechanisms, namely, (1) magnetic drift resonance dissipation excites the negative energy wave; (2) a new type of positive energy wave can become unstable as the resonance condition is met. Comparing with fluid approximation theory, more warm plasmas are needed to suppress the kinetic DCLC instabilities

  12. Repair kinetics in tissues

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  13. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  14. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  15. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  16. Adsorption analysis equilibria and kinetics

    Do, Duong D

    1998-01-01

    This book covers topics of equilibria and kinetics of adsorption in porous media. Fundamental equilibria and kinetics are dealt with for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous particles. Five chapters of the book deal with equilibria and eight chapters deal with kinetics. Single component as well as multicomponent systems are discussed. In kinetics analysis, we deal with the various mass transport processes and their interactions inside a porous particle. Conventional approaches as well as the new approach using Maxwell-Stefan equations are presented. Various methods to measure diffusivity, such

  17. Mechanistic studies on β-ketoacyl thiolase from Zoogloea ramigera: Identification of the active-site nucleophile as Cys89, its mutation to Ser89, and kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of wild-type and mutant enzymes

    Thompson, S.; Mayerl, F.; Walsh, C.T.; Peoples, O.P.; Masamune, S.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Thiolase proceeds via covalent catalysis involving an acetyl-S-enzyme. The active-site thiol nucleophile is identified as Cys 89 by acetylation with [ 14 C]acetyl-CoA, rapid denaturation, tryptic digestion, and sequencing of the labeled peptide. The native acetyl enzyme is labile to hydrolytic decomposition with t 1/2 of 2 min at pH 7, 25 degree C. Cys 89 has been converted to the alternate nucleophile Ser 89 by mutagenesis and the C89S enzyme overproduced, purified, and assessed for activity. The Ser 89 enzyme retains 1% of the V max of the Cys 89 enzyme in the direction of acetoacetyl-CoA thiolytic cleavage and 0.05% of the V max in the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. A covalent acetyl-O-enzyme intermediate is detected on incubation with [ 14 C]acetyl-CoA and isolation of the labeled Ser 89 -containing tryptic peptide. Comparisons of the Cys 89 and Ser 89 enzymes have been made for kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the acetyl enzyme intermediates both by isolation and by analysis of [ 32 P]CoASH/acetyl-CoA partial reactions and for rate-limiting steps in catalysis with trideuterioacetyl-CoA

  18. Drainage and Stratification Kinetics of Foam Films

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Foam lifetime, drainage kinetics and stability are strongly influenced by surfactant type (ionic vs non-ionic), and added proteins, particles or polymers modify typical responses. The rate at which fluid drains out from a foam film, i.e. drainage kinetics, is determined in the last stages primarily by molecular interactions and capillarity. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, colloids and polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures, a layered ordering of molecules, micelles or particles inside the foam films leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. Though stratification is observed in many confined systems including foam films containing particles or polyelectrolytes, films containing globular proteins seem not to show this behavior. Using a Scheludko-type cell, we experimentally study the drainage and stratification kinetics of horizontal foam films formed by protein-surfactant mixtures, and carefully determine how the presence of proteins influences the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of foam films.

  19. Physics and kinetics of TRIGA reactor

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This training module is written as an introduction to reactor physics for reactor operators. It assumes the reader has a basic, fundamental knowledge of physics, materials and mathematics. The objective is to provide enough reactor theory knowledge to safely operate a typical research reactor. At this level, it does not necessarily provide enough information to evaluate the safety aspects of experiment or non-standard operation reviews. The material provides a survey of basic reactor physics and kinetics of TRIGA type reactors. Subjects such as the multiplication factor, reactivity, temperature coefficients, poisoning, delayed neutrons and criticality are discussed in such a manner that even someone not familiar with reactor physics and kinetics can easily follow. A minimum of equations are used and several tables and graphs illustrate the text. (author)

  20. Global kinetic theory of astrophysical jets

    Chang, T.

    1989-01-01

    We suggest that an astrophysical plasma stream flowing outward from a central object aling an open magnetic field line with decreasing field strength generally will have anisotropic velocity distributions. I particular, the electron distribution function of this type of plasma streams will contain a 'thermally populated' region and a stretche out high energy tail (or 'jet-like') region collimated in the utward direction of the magnetic field line. Our argument is based on a global, collisional, kinetic theory. Because the 'kinetic jets' are always pointed aling the outward direction of the field lines, thy are automatically collimated and will assume whatever the peculiar geometries dictated by the magnetic field. This result should be useful in the understanding of the basic structures of such diverse astrophysical objects as the extragalactic radio jets, stellar winds, the solar wind, planetary polar winds, and galactic jets. (author). 8 refs.; 2 figs

  1. Luminescence kinetics of porous silicon: fluctuation approach

    Bondarev, V N

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical interpretation of the kinetics of the photoluminescence (PL), caused by the tunnel radiative recombination of the photoexcited electron and hole, localized on the crystallite/matrix interface, is given on the basis of the notions on the porous silicon structure as an incidental totality of the Si nanodimensional crystallites, submerged into the SiO sub 2 matrix. The relatively slow (by the stretched exponential type) time drop in the PL intensity is the results of averaging the intensity in each PL elementary act by the electron and hole mutual disposition and by the crystallite dimensions. The good quantitative description of the low-temperature experiments may be obtained through the proposed approach both by the PL kinetics and time evolution of the porous silicon PL spectrum

  2. Kinetics of Social Contagion

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Karsai, Márton; Kertész, János

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of information, behavioral patterns or innovations follows diverse pathways depending on a number of conditions, including the structure of the underlying social network, the sensitivity to peer pressure and the influence of media. Here we study analytically and by simulations a general model that incorporates threshold mechanism capturing sensitivity to peer pressure, the effect of "immune" nodes who never adopt, and a perpetual flow of external information. While any constant, nonzero rate of dynamically introduced spontaneous adopters leads to global spreading, the kinetics by which the asymptotic state is approached shows rich behavior. In particular, we find that, as a function of the immune node density, there is a transition from fast to slow spreading governed by entirely different mechanisms. This transition happens below the percolation threshold of network fragmentation, and has its origin in the competition between cascading behavior induced by adopters and blocking due to immune nodes. This change is accompanied by a percolation transition of the induced clusters.

  3. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  4. Development of a low Reynolds number turbulence stress and heat flux equation model. A new type wall boundary condition for dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy aided by DNS data base

    Nishimura, M.

    1998-04-01

    To predict thermal-hydraulic phenomena in actual plant under various conditions accurately, adequate simulation of laminar-turbulent flow transition is of importance. A low Reynolds number turbulence model is commonly used for a numerical simulation of the laminar-turbulent transition. The existing low Reynolds number turbulence models generally demands very thin mesh width between a wall and a first computational node from the wall, to keep accuracy and stability of numerical analyses. There is a criterion for the distance between the wall and the first computational node in which non-dimensional distance y + must be less than 0.5. Due to this criterion the suitable distance depends on Reynolds number. A liquid metal sodium is used for a coolant in first reactors therefore, Reynolds number is usually one or two order higher than that of the usual plants in which air and water are used for the work fluid. This makes the load of thermal-hydraulic numerical simulation of the liquid sodium relatively heavier. From above context, a new method is proposed for providing wall boundary condition of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate ε. The present method enables the wall-first node distance 10 times larger compared to the existing models. A function of the ε wall boundary condition has been constructed aided by a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data base. The method was validated through calculations of a turbulent Couette flow and a fully developed pipe flow and its laminar-turbulent transition. Thus the present method and modeling are capable of predicting the laminar-turbulent transition with less mesh numbers i.e. lighter computational loads. (J.P.N.)

  5. Kinetic theory of Jeans instability

    Trigger, S.A.; Ershkovic, A.I.; Heijst, van G.J.F.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic treatment of the Jeans gravitational instability, with collisions taken into account, is presented. The initial-value problem for the distribution function which obeys the kinetic equation, with the collision integral conserving the number of particles, is solved. Dispersion relation is

  6. Fisher information, kinetic energy and uncertainty relation inequalities

    Luo Shunlong

    2002-01-01

    By interpolating between Fisher information and mechanical kinetic energy, we introduce a general notion of kinetic energy with respect to a parameter of Schroedinger wavefunctions from a statistical inference perspective. Kinetic energy is the sum of Fisher information and an integral of a parametrized analogue of quantum mechanical current density related to phase. A family of integral inequalities concerning kinetic energy and moments are established, among which the Cramer-Rao inequality and the Weyl-Heisenberg inequality, are special cases. In particular, the integral inequalities involving the negative order moments are relevant to the study of electron systems. Moreover, by specifying the parameter to a scale, we obtain a family of inequalities of uncertainty relation type which incorporate the position and momentum observables symmetrically in a single quantity. (author)

  7. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. This orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  8. Kinetic interaction in hydrogenitrogenation of quinoline and acridine

    El-Bishtawi, R.F.; Seapan, M.

    1988-01-01

    Liquid fossil fuels contain numerous nitrogen compounds. During hydrodenitrogenation processes, these compounds for the active catalytic sites, with each compound affecting the kinetics of the other compounds. An understanding of the kinetic interaction is essential in using the results of model compound kinetics to predict the behavior of complex mixtures. In this work, the authors study the hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline and acridine in n-hexadecane over a commercial nickel-molybdenum catalyst in a batch autoclave reactor at 8.3 MPa (1200 psig) and 357-390 0 C. The reaction networks and kinetics of individual compounds were developed. These results confirm the existing knowledge of reaction networks for quinoline and acridine. Furthermore, their experiments show that formation for o-ethylaniline, o-toluidine and aniline are also important steps in quinoline denitrogenation. For total nitrogen removal, a dual site Langmuir-Hinshelwood type model considering separate sites for adsorption of hydrogen and nitrogen compounds give the best fit

  9. Evaluation of kinetic uncertainty in numerical models of petroleum generation

    Peters, K.E.; Walters, C.C.; Mankiewicz, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Oil-prone marine petroleum source rocks contain type I or type II kerogen having Rock-Eval pyrolysis hydrogen indices greater than 600 or 300-600 mg hydrocarbon/g total organic carbon (HI, mg HC/g TOC), respectively. Samples from 29 marine source rocks worldwide that contain mainly type II kerogen (HI = 230-786 mg HC/g TOC) were subjected to open-system programmed pyrolysis to determine the activation energy distributions for petroleum generation. Assuming a burial heating rate of 1??C/m.y. for each measured activation energy distribution, the calculated average temperature for 50% fractional conversion of the kerogen in the samples to petroleum is approximately 136 ?? 7??C, but the range spans about 30??C (???121-151??C). Fifty-two outcrop samples of thermally immature Jurassic Oxford Clay Formation were collected from five locations in the United Kingdom to determine the variations of kinetic response for one source rock unit. The samples contain mainly type I or type II kerogens (HI = 230-774 mg HC/g TOC). At a heating rate of 1??C/m.y., the calculated temperatures for 50% fractional conversion of the Oxford Clay kerogens to petroleum differ by as much as 23??C (127-150??C). The data indicate that kerogen type, as defined by hydrogen index, is not systematically linked to kinetic response, and that default kinetics for the thermal decomposition of type I or type II kerogen can introduce unacceptable errors into numerical simulations. Furthermore, custom kinetics based on one or a few samples may be inadequate to account for variations in organofacies within a source rock. We propose three methods to evaluate the uncertainty contributed by kerogen kinetics to numerical simulations: (1) use the average kinetic distribution for multiple samples of source rock and the standard deviation for each activation energy in that distribution; (2) use source rock kinetics determined at several locations to describe different parts of the study area; and (3) use a weighted

  10. From particle to kinetic and hydrodynamic descriptions of flocking

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Tadmor, Eitan

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the Cucker-Smale's (C-S) particle model for flocking, deriving precise conditions for flocking to occur when pairwise interactions are sufficiently strong long range. We then derive a Vlasov-type kinetic model for the C-S particle model and prove it exhibits time-asymptotic flocking behavior for arbitrary compactly supported initial data. Finally, we introduce a hydrodynamic description of flocking based on the C-S Vlasov-type kinetic model and prove flocking behavior \\emph{without...

  11. A critical look at the kinetic models of thermoluminescence-II. Non-first order kinetics

    Sunta, C M; Ayta, W E F; Chubaci, J F D; Watanabe, S

    2005-01-01

    Non-first order (FO) kinetics models are of three types; second order (SO), general order (GO) and mixed order (MO). It is shown that all three of these have constraints in their energy level schemes and their applicable parameter values. In nature such restrictions are not expected to exist. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow peaks produced by these models shift their position and change their shape as the trap occupancies change. Such characteristics are very unlike those found in samples of real materials. In these models, in general, retrapping predominates over recombination. It is shown that the quasi-equilibrium (QE) assumption implied in the derivation of the TL equation of these models is quite valid, thus disproving earlier workers' conclusion that QE cannot be held under retrapping dominant conditions. However notwithstanding their validity, they suffer from the shortcomings as stated above and have certain lacunae. For example, the kinetic order (KO) parameter and the pre-exponential factor which are assumed to be the constant parameters of the GO kinetics expression turn out to be variables when this expression is applied to plausible physical models. Further, in glow peak characterization using the GO expression, the quality of fit is found to deteriorate when the best fitted value of KO parameter is different from 1 and 2. This means that the found value of the basic parameter, namely the activation energy, becomes subject to error. In the MO kinetics model, the value of the KO parameter α would change with dose, and thus in this model also, as in the GO model, no single value of KO can be assigned to a given glow peak. The paper discusses TL of real materials having characteristics typically like those of FO kinetics. Theoretically too, a plausible physical model of TL emission produces glow peaks which have characteristics of FO kinetics under a wide variety of parametric combinations. In the background of the above findings, it is suggested that

  12. Kinetics of thyroid hormones

    Inada, Mitsuo; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Naito, Kimikazu; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    1980-01-01

    Kinetics of thyroid hormones were outlined, and recent progress in metabolism of these hormones was also described. Recently, not only T 4 and T 3 but also rT 3 , 3,3'-T 2 , 3',5'-T 2 , and 3,5-T 2 can be measured by RIA. To clarify metabolic pathways of these hormones, metabolic clearance rate and production rate of these hormones were calculated. As single-compartment analysis was insufficient to clarify disappearance curves of thyroid hormones in blood such as T 3 and T 2 of which metabolic speed was so fast, multi-compartment analysis or non-compartment analysis were also performed. Thyroid hormones seemed to be measured more precisely by constant infusion method. At the first step of T 4 metabolism, T 3 was formed by 5'-monodeiodination of T 4 , and rT 3 was formed by 5-monodeiodination of T 4 . As metabolic pathways of T 3 and rT 3 , conversion of them to 3,3'-T 2 or to 3',5'-T 2 and 3,5-T 2 was supposed. This subject will be an interesting research theme in future. (Tsunoda, M.)

  13. MODELING STYRENE HYDROGENATION KINETICS USING PALLADIUM CATALYSTS

    G. T. Justino

    Full Text Available Abstract The high octane number of pyrolysis gasoline (PYGAS explains its insertion in the gasoline pool. However, its use is troublesome due to the presence of gum-forming chemicals which, in turn, can be removed via hydrogenation. The use of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic models was evaluated for hydrogenation of styrene, a typical gum monomer, using Pd/9%Nb2O5-Al2O3 as catalyst. Kinetic models accounting for hydrogen dissociative and non-dissociative adsorption were considered. The availability of one or two kinds of catalytic sites was analyzed. Experiments were carried out in a semi-batch reactor at constant temperature and pressure in the absence of transport limitations. The conditions used in each experiment varied between 16 - 56 bar and 60 - 100 ºC for pressure and temperature, respectively. The kinetic models were evaluated using MATLAB and EMSO software. Models using adsorption of hydrogen and organic molecules on the same type of site fitted the data best.

  14. Kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena

    Naito, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Taro

    2001-01-01

    Resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories are insufficient to adequately explain MHD phenomena in the high-temperature plasma. Recent progress in numerical simulations concerning kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena is summarized. The following three topics are studied using various models treating extended-MHD phenomena. (1) Kinetic modifications of internal kink modes in tokamaks with normal and reversed magnetic shear configurations. (2) Temporal evolution of the toroidal Alfven eigenmode and fishbone mode in tokamaks with energetic ions. (3) Kinetic stabilization of a title mode in field-reversed configurations by means of anchoring ions and beam ions. (author)

  15. Kinetic Analysis of Horizontal Plyometric Exercise Intensity.

    Kossow, Andrew J; Ebben, William P

    2018-05-01

    Kossow, AJ, DeChiara, TG, Neahous, SM, and Ebben, WP. Kinetic analysis of horizontal plyometric exercise intensity. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1222-1229, 2018-Plyometric exercises are frequently performed as part of a strength and conditioning program. Most studies assessed the kinetics of plyometric exercises primarily performed in the vertical plane. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the multiplanar kinetic characteristics of a variety of plyometric exercises, which have a significant horizontal component. This study also sought to assess sex differences in the intensity progression of these exercises. Ten men and 10 women served as subjects. The subjects performed a variety of plyometric exercises including the double-leg hop, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, bounding, skipping, power skipping, cone hops, and 45.72-cm hurdle hops. Subjects also performed the countermovement jump for comparison. All plyometric exercises were evaluated using a force platform. Dependent variables included the landing rate of force development and landing ground reaction forces for each exercise in the vertical, frontal, and sagittal planes. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance with repeated-measures for plyometric exercise type demonstrated main effects for exercise type for all dependent variables (p ≤ 0.001). There was no significant interaction between plyometric exercise type and sex for any of the variable assessed. Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons identified a number of differences between the plyometric exercises for the dependent variables assessed (p ≤ 0.05). These findings should be used to guide practitioners in the progression of plyometric exercise intensity, and thus program design, for those who require significant horizontal power in their sport.

  16. Reaction kinetic analysis of reactor surveillance data

    Yoshiie, T., E-mail: yoshiie@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Kinomura, A. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    In the reactor pressure vessel surveillance data of a European-type pressurized water reactor (low-Cu steel), it was found that the concentration of matrix defects was very high, and a large number of precipitates existed. In this study, defect structure evolution obtained from surveillance data was simulated by reaction kinetic analysis using 15 rate equations. The saturation of precipitation and the growth of loops were simulated, but it was not possible to explain the increase in DBTT on the basis of the defect structures. The sub-grain boundary segregation of solutes was discussed for the origin of the DBTT increase.

  17. Stress enhanced calcium kinetics in a neuron.

    Kant, Aayush; Bhandakkar, Tanmay K; Medhekar, Nikhil V

    2018-02-01

    Accurate modeling of the mechanobiological response of a Traumatic Brain Injury is beneficial toward its effective clinical examination, treatment and prevention. Here, we present a stress history-dependent non-spatial kinetic model to predict the microscale phenomena of secondary insults due to accumulation of excess calcium ions (Ca[Formula: see text]) induced by the macroscale primary injuries. The model is able to capture the experimentally observed increase and subsequent partial recovery of intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] concentration in response to various types of mechanical impulses. We further establish the accuracy of the model by comparing our predictions with key experimental observations.

  18. Kinetics of glucose transport in rat muscle

    Ploug, Thorkil; Galbo, Henrik; Vinten, Jørgen

    1987-01-01

    The effects of insulin and prior muscle contractions, respectively, on 3-O-methylglucose (3-O-MG) transport in skeletal muscle were studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Initial rates of entry of 3-O-MG in red gastrocnemius, soleus, and white gastrocnemius muscles as a function of perfusate 3-O-MG...... concentration exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Uptake by simple diffusion could not be detected. The maximum 3-O-MG transport velocity (Vmax) was increased more by maximum isometric contractions (10- to 40-fold, depending on fiber type) than by insulin (20,000 microU/ml; 3- to 20-fold) in both red and white...

  19. Biophysical Neural Spiking, Bursting, and Excitability Dynamics in Reconfigurable Analog VLSI.

    Yu, T; Sejnowski, T J; Cauwenberghs, G

    2011-10-01

    We study a range of neural dynamics under variations in biophysical parameters underlying extended Morris-Lecar and Hodgkin-Huxley models in three gating variables. The extended models are implemented in NeuroDyn, a four neuron, twelve synapse continuous-time analog VLSI programmable neural emulation platform with generalized channel kinetics and biophysical membrane dynamics. The dynamics exhibit a wide range of time scales extending beyond 100 ms neglected in typical silicon models of tonic spiking neurons. Circuit simulations and measurements show transition from tonic spiking to tonic bursting dynamics through variation of a single conductance parameter governing calcium recovery. We similarly demonstrate transition from graded to all-or-none neural excitability in the onset of spiking dynamics through the variation of channel kinetic parameters governing the speed of potassium activation. Other combinations of variations in conductance and channel kinetic parameters give rise to phasic spiking and spike frequency adaptation dynamics. The NeuroDyn chip consumes 1.29 mW and occupies 3 mm × 3 mm in 0.5 μm CMOS, supporting emerging developments in neuromorphic silicon-neuron interfaces.

  20. Bicarbonate kinetics in Indian males

    Madhu

    ized kinetics of bicarbonate using a three-compartment model, to assess which compartmental fluxes changed dur- .... total VCO2 was < 3 % and the average respiratory quotient ..... a part of the nonrespiratory losses of 13CO2 occur to this.

  1. Kinetic equations in dirty superconductors

    Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic equations for superconductors in the dirty limit are derived using a method developed for superfluid systems, which allows a systematic expansion in small parameters; exact charge conservation is obeyed. (orig.)

  2. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  3. Kinetics of depletion interactions

    Vliegenthart, G.A.; Schoot, van der P.P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Depletion interactions between colloidal particles dispersed in a fluid medium are effective interactions induced by the presence of other types of colloid. They are not instantaneous but built up in time. We show by means of Brownian dynamics simulations that the static (mean-field) depletion force

  4. Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory is developed as an extension of the existing gyrokinetic theories. In essence, the formalism introduced here is a kinetic description of magnetized plasmas in the gyrocenter coordinates which is fully equivalent to the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. In particular, provided the gyroradius is smaller than the scale-length of the magnetic field, it can treat high frequency range as well as the usual low frequency range normally associated with gyrokinetic approaches. A significant advantage of this formalism is that it enables the direct particle-in-cell simulations of compressional Alfven waves for MHD applications and of RF waves relevant to plasma heating in space and laboratory plasmas. The gyrocenter-gauge kinetic susceptibility for arbitrary wavelength and arbitrary frequency electromagnetic perturbations in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is shown to recover exactly the classical result obtained by integrating the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. This demonstrates that all the waves supported by the Vlasov-Maxwell system can be studied using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic model in the gyrocenter coordinates. This theoretical approach is so named to distinguish it from the existing gyrokinetic theory, which has been successfully developed and applied to many important low-frequency and long parallel wavelength problems, where the conventional meaning of gyrokinetic has been standardized. Besides the usual gyrokinetic distribution function, the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory emphasizes as well the gyrocenter-gauge distribution function, which sometimes contains all the physics of the problems being studied, and whose importance has not been realized previously. The gyrocenter-gauge distribution function enters Maxwell's equations through the pull-back transformation of the gyrocenter transformation, which depends on the perturbed fields. The efficacy of the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic approach is

  5. Crystallization Kinetics within a Generic Modelling Framework

    Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; von Solms, Nicolas; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    An existing generic modelling framework has been expanded with tools for kinetic model analysis. The analysis of kinetics is carried out within the framework where kinetic constitutive models are collected, analysed and utilized for the simulation of crystallization operations. A modelling...... procedure is proposed to gain the information of crystallization operation kinetic model analysis and utilize this for faster evaluation of crystallization operations....

  6. Kinetic analysis of overlapping multistep thermal decomposition comprising exothermic and endothermic processes: thermolysis of ammonium dinitramide.

    Muravyev, Nikita V; Koga, Nobuyoshi; Meerov, Dmitry B; Pivkina, Alla N

    2017-01-25

    This study focused on kinetic modeling of a specific type of multistep heterogeneous reaction comprising exothermic and endothermic reaction steps, as exemplified by the practical kinetic analysis of the experimental kinetic curves for the thermal decomposition of molten ammonium dinitramide (ADN). It is known that the thermal decomposition of ADN occurs as a consecutive two step mass-loss process comprising the decomposition of ADN and subsequent evaporation/decomposition of in situ generated ammonium nitrate. These reaction steps provide exothermic and endothermic contributions, respectively, to the overall thermal effect. The overall reaction process was deconvoluted into two reaction steps using simultaneously recorded thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) curves by considering the different physical meanings of the kinetic data derived from TG and DSC by P value analysis. The kinetic data thus separated into exothermic and endothermic reaction steps were kinetically characterized using kinetic computation methods including isoconversional method, combined kinetic analysis, and master plot method. The overall kinetic behavior was reproduced as the sum of the kinetic equations for each reaction step considering the contributions to the rate data derived from TG and DSC. During reproduction of the kinetic behavior, the kinetic parameters and contributions of each reaction step were optimized using kinetic deconvolution analysis. As a result, the thermal decomposition of ADN was successfully modeled as partially overlapping exothermic and endothermic reaction steps. The logic of the kinetic modeling was critically examined, and the practical usefulness of phenomenological modeling for the thermal decomposition of ADN was illustrated to demonstrate the validity of the methodology and its applicability to similar complex reaction processes.

  7. Enhancing Children's Language Learning and Cognition Experience through Interactive Kinetic Typography

    Lau, Newman M. L.; Chu, Veni H. T.

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed at investigating the method of using kinetic typography and interactive approach to conduct a design experiment for children to learn vocabularies. Typography is the unique art and technique of arranging type in order to make language visible. By adding animated movement to characters, kinetic typography expresses language…

  8. Novel swirl-flow reactor for kinetic studies of semiconductor photocatalysis

    Ray, A.K; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1997-01-01

    A new two-phase swirl-flow monolithic-type reactor was designed to study the kinetics of heterogeneous photocatalytic processes on immobilized semiconductor catalysts. True kinetic rate constants for destruction of a textile dye were measured as a function of wavelength of light intensity and angle

  9. Intradermal delivery of Shigella IpaB and IpaD type III secretion proteins: kinetics of cell recruitment and antigen uptake, mucosal and systemic immunity, and protection across serotypes.

    Heine, Shannon J; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Andar, Abhay U; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; van de Verg, Lillian; Walker, Richard; Picking, Wendy L; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2014-02-15

    Shigella is one of the leading pathogens contributing to the vast pediatric diarrheal disease burden in low-income countries. No licensed vaccine is available, and the existing candidates are only partially effective and serotype specific. Shigella type III secretion system proteins IpaB and IpaD, which are conserved across Shigella spp., are candidates for a broadly protective, subunit-based vaccine. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of IpaB and IpaD administered intradermally (i.d.) with a double-mutant of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (dmLT) adjuvant using microneedles. Different dosage levels of IpaB and IpaD, with or without dmLT, were tested in mice. Vaccine delivery into the dermis, recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells, and colocalization of vaccine Ag within skin-activated APC were demonstrated through histology and immunofluorescence microscopy. Ag-loaded neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells remained in the tissue at least 1 wk. IpaB, IpaD, and dmLT-specific serum IgG- and IgG-secreting cells were produced following i.d. immunization. The protective efficacy was 70% against Shigella flexneri and 50% against Shigella sonnei. Similar results were obtained when the vaccine was administered intranasally, with the i.d. route requiring 25-40 times lower doses. Distinctively, IgG was detected in mucosal secretions; secretory IgA, as well as mucosal and systemic IgA Ab-secreting cells, were seemingly absent. Vaccine-induced T cells produced IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. These results demonstrate the potential of i.d. vaccination with IpaB and IpaD to prevent Shigella infection and support further studies in humans.

  10. Child–adult differences in the kinetics of torque development

    DOTAN, RAFFY; MITCHELL, CAMERON; COHEN, ROTEM; GABRIEL, DAVID; KLENTROU, PANAGIOTA; FALK, BAREKET

    2013-01-01

    Children have lower size-normalised maximal voluntary force, speed, and power than adults. It has been hypothesised that these and other age-related performance differences are due to lesser type-II motor-unit utilisation in children. This should be manifested as slower force kinetics in explosive muscle contractions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of child–adult force-kinetics differences and whether the latter could support that hypothesis. Untrained boys (n = 20) and men (n = 20) (10.1 ± 1.3 and 22.9 ± 4.4 years, respectively), performed maximal, explosive, isometric elbow flexions and knee extensions on a Biodex dynamometer. Peak torque (MVC), times to 10–100% MVC, and other kinetics parameters were determined. The boys’ body-mass-normalised knee extension MVC, peak rate of torque development, and %MVC at 100 ms were 26, 17 and 23% lower compared with the men and their times to 30% and 80% MVC were 24 and 48% longer, respectively. Elbow flexion kinetics showed similar or greater differences. The findings illuminate boys’ inherent disadvantage in tasks requiring speed or explosive force. It is demonstrated that the extent of the boys–men kinetics disparity cannot be explained by muscle-composition and/or musculo-tendinous-stiffness differences. We suggest therefore that the findings indirectly support children’s lower utilisation of type-II motor units. PMID:23320937

  11. Dynamic kinetic resolution of biaryl atropisomers by chiral dialkylaminopyridine catalysts.

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Deng, Chao; Deng, Jun; Sibi, Mukund P

    2018-05-02

    The acylative dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of configurationally unstable biaryl atropisomers is achieved by using newly developed chiral dialkylaminopyridine catalysts with fluxional chirality. Various types of biaryl substrates containing phenolic structures were subjected to the DKR to obtain a range of acylated biaryl products with enantiomeric ratios up to 90 : 10.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of aliphatic alcohols by ...

    TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid leads to the formation of the corresponding aldehydes. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with respect to alcohols. The reaction failed to induce the ...

  13. Investigation of Chemical Equilibrium Kinetics by the Electromigration Method

    Bozhikov, G A; Bontchev, G D; Maslov, O D; Milanov, M V; Dmitriev, S N

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the complex formation of Hf(IV) and DTPA is determined.

  14. The Kinetics of Carrier Transport Inhibition

    Rosenberg, T.; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1962-01-01

    The kinetical treatment of enzymatic carrier transports as given in previous communications has been extended to conditions of inhibition. Various possible types of inhibitors have been considered differing in the site of attack (enzyme or carrier), in the mode of action (competing with the subst......The kinetical treatment of enzymatic carrier transports as given in previous communications has been extended to conditions of inhibition. Various possible types of inhibitors have been considered differing in the site of attack (enzyme or carrier), in the mode of action (competing...... with the substrate for the enzyme or the carrier or for both, competing with the carrier for the enzyme, or non-competitive) and in the ability of penetrating the membrane. Experiments are reported on the inhibition of glucose and fructose transport across the human red cell membrane by phlorizine, phloretine...... and polyphloretinephosphate. The results of the analysis for these inhibitors indicate a substrate competitive mode of action. The effect of reversing the transport direction by interchanging the substrate concentration has been treated for the case of a non-penetrating substrate competitive inhibitor in the external medium...

  15. Sorption kinetics of cesium on hydrous titanium dioxide

    Altas, Y.; Tel, H.; Yaprak, G.

    2003-01-01

    Two types of hydrous titanium dioxide possessing different surface properties were prepared and characterized to study the sorption kinetics of cesium. The effect of pH on the adsorption capacity were determined in both type sorbents and the maximum adsorption percentage of cesium were observed at pH 12. To elucidate the kinetics of ion-exchange reaction on hydrous titanium dioxide, the isotopic exchange rates of cesium ions between hydrous titanium dioxides and aqueous solutions were measured radiochemically and compared with each other. The diffusion coefficients of Cs + ion for Type1 and Type2 titanium dioxides at pH 12 were calculated as 2.79 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 and 1.52 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 , respectively, under particle diffusion controlled conditions. (orig.)

  16. Fuel cycle kinetics

    Maudlin, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical methodology describing the time dependent growth of large populations of nuclear power reactors of different types is pursued. This methodology is based on the apparent close analogy between the time dependent variations of neutrons and of fuel in nuclear reactors. Methods for the realistic projection of reactor populations, as they develop in a reactor park, are provided using the point park model as kernel in a superposition of reactor deployment elements that form a realistic park scenario. Typical deployment strategy results are presented illustrating the theoretical and computational advantages of the point park model methodology

  17. Assimilation of Biophysical Neuronal Dynamics in Neuromorphic VLSI.

    Wang, Jun; Breen, Daniel; Akinin, Abraham; Broccard, Frederic; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2017-12-01

    Representing the biophysics of neuronal dynamics and behavior offers a principled analysis-by-synthesis approach toward understanding mechanisms of nervous system functions. We report on a set of procedures assimilating and emulating neurobiological data on a neuromorphic very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit. The analog VLSI chip, NeuroDyn, features 384 digitally programmable parameters specifying for 4 generalized Hodgkin-Huxley neurons coupled through 12 conductance-based chemical synapses. The parameters also describe reversal potentials, maximal conductances, and spline regressed kinetic functions for ion channel gating variables. In one set of experiments, we assimilated membrane potential recorded from one of the neurons on the chip to the model structure upon which NeuroDyn was designed using the known current input sequence. We arrived at the programmed parameters except for model errors due to analog imperfections in the chip fabrication. In a related set of experiments, we replicated songbird individual neuron dynamics on NeuroDyn by estimating and configuring parameters extracted using data assimilation from intracellular neural recordings. Faithful emulation of detailed biophysical neural dynamics will enable the use of NeuroDyn as a tool to probe electrical and molecular properties of functional neural circuits. Neuroscience applications include studying the relationship between molecular properties of neurons and the emergence of different spike patterns or different brain behaviors. Clinical applications include studying and predicting effects of neuromodulators or neurodegenerative diseases on ion channel kinetics.

  18. Comparison of one-dimensional and point kinetics for various light water reactor transients

    Naser, J.A.; Lin, C.; Gose, G.C.; McClure, J.A.; Matsui, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The object of this paper is to compare the results from the three kinetics options: 1) point kinetics; 2) point kinetics by not changing the shape function; and 3) one-dimensional kinetics for various transients on both BWRs and PWRs. A systematic evaluation of the one-dimensional kinetics calculation and its alternatives is performed to determine the status of these models and to identify additional development work. In addition, for PWRs, the NODEP-2 - NODETRAN and SIMULATE - SIMTRAN paths for calculating kinetics parameters are compared. This type of comparison has not been performed before and is needed to properly evaluate the RASP methodology of which these codes are a part. It should be noted that RASP is in its early pre-release stage and this is the first serious attempt to examine the consistency between these two similar but different methods of generating physics parameters for the RETRAN computer code

  19. Transformation kinetics for nucleus clusters

    Villa, Elena; Rios, Paulo R.

    2009-01-01

    A rigorous mathematical approach based on stochastic geometry concepts is presented to extend previous Johnson-Mehl, Avrami, Kolmogorov treatment of transformation kinetics to situations in which nuclei are not homogeneously located in space but are located in clusters. An exact analytical solution is presented here for the first time assuming that nucleation sites follow a Matern cluster process. The influence of Matern cluster process parameters on subsequent growth kinetics and the microstructural path are illustrated by means of numerical examples. Moreover, using the superposition principle, exact analytical solutions are also obtained when nucleation takes place by a combination of a Matern cluster process and an inhomogeneous Poisson point process. The new solutions presented here significantly increase the number of exactly solvable cases available to formal kinetics.

  20. Chapter 22. Cell population kinetics

    Tubiana, M.

    1975-01-01

    The main contribution of radioisotopes to the development of a new discipline, cell population kinetics, was shown. The aim of this science is to establish, for each tissue of the organism, the life span of its component cells and the mechanisms governing its growth, its differentiation and its homeostasis with respect to outside attacks. Labelling techniques have been used to follow the cells during these various processes. The case of non-dividing cells was considered first, taking as example, the red blood cells of which the lifetime was studied, after which the case of proliferating cells was examined using 14 C- or tritium-labelled thymidine. The methods used to measure the cell cycle parameters were described: labelled-mitosis curve method, double-labelling and continuous labelling methods, proliferation coefficient measurement. Cell kinetics were shown to allow an interpretation of radiobiological data. Finally the practical value of cell kinetics research was shown [fr

  1. Kinetic theory and transport phenomena

    Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    This textbook presents kinetic theory, which is a systematic approach to describing nonequilibrium systems. The text is balanced between the fundamental concepts of kinetic theory (irreversibility, transport processes, separation of time scales, conservations, coarse graining, distribution functions, etc.) and the results and predictions of the theory, where the relevant properties of different systems are computed. The book is organised in thematic chapters where different paradigmatic systems are studied. The specific features of these systems are described, building and analysing the appropriate kinetic equations. Specifically, the book considers the classical transport of charges, the dynamics of classical gases, Brownian motion, plasmas, and self-gravitating systems, quantum gases, the electronic transport in solids and, finally, semiconductors. Besides these systems that are studied in detail, concepts are applied to some modern examples including the quark–gluon plasma, the motion of bacterial suspen...

  2. Study of the oxidation kinetics of the MA 956 superalloy

    Garcia-Alonso, M.C.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L.; Escudero, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with the oxidation kinetics of the MA 956 superalloy in the temperature range of 800-1,200 degree centigree for up to 200 h exposure. During oxidation the alloy develops a fine, compact and very well adhered α-alumina layer, the thickness of which increases with increasing time and temperature. The oxidation kinetics obeys a sub parabolic type behaviour. The scale growth seems to occur by two different oxidation mechanisms; above 1,050 degree centigree, the oxidation process would be controlled by α-alumina, and below 900 degree centigree by γ-alumina. (Author) 17 refs

  3. Kinetic of martensitic transformations induced by hydrogen in the austenite

    Oliveira, Sergio P. de; Saavedra, A.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray diffractometry technique was used, with an automatic data acquisition system to determine the kinetics of hydrogen induced martensitic phase transformations in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel type, used in nuclear power plants. Hydrogenation was performed cathodically in a 1N sulfuric acid solution, containing 100 mg/l of arsenic trioxide, at 50 0 C, during 2 hours and with a current density of 200 A/m 2 . It was found that the microstructure of the steel plays a role on the generation of hydrogen induced martensitic phases and surface micro cracks. Both kinetics were slower on a pre-cold rolled steel. (Author) [pt

  4. Selected readings in chemical kinetics

    Back, Margaret H

    2013-01-01

    Selected Readings in Chemical Kinetics covers excerpts from 12 papers in the field of general and gas-phase kinetics. The book discusses papers on the laws of connexion between the conditions of a chemical change and its amount; on the reaction velocity of the inversion of the cane sugar by acids; and the calculation in absolute measure of velocity constants and equilibrium constants in gaseous systems. The text then tackles papers on simple gas reactions; on the absolute rate of reactions in condensed phases; on the radiation theory of chemical action; and on the theory of unimolecular reacti

  5. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  6. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  7. Deuteration kinetics of the graphene

    Nefedov, Alexei; Woell, Christof [KIT, Leopoldshafen (Germany); Paris, Alessio; Calliari, Lucia [FBK-CMM, Trento (Italy); Verbitskiy, Nikolay [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Wang, Ying; Irle, Stephan [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Fedorov, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Haberer, Danny; Knupfer, Martin; Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Oetzelt, Martin [BESSY II, Berlin (Germany); Petaccia, Luca [Elettra, Trieste (Italy); Usachov, Dmitry [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, Denis [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Sagdev, Hermann [MPI fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany); Yashina, Lada [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grueneis, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The kinetics of the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction of graphene was studied by time-dependent x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The graphene layer was then exposed to hydrogen or deuterium atomic gas beams, obtained by thermal cracking in a tungsten capillary at T=3000 K. After each step XPS of the C1s line was performed in order to measure H/C and D/C ratios. We have observed a strong kinetic isotope effect for the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction leading to substantially faster adsorption and higher maximum D/C ratios as compared to H/C (D/C 35% vs. H/C 25%).

  8. Vlasov simulations of Kinetic Alfven Waves at proton kinetic scales

    C.L. Vasconez; F. Valentini (Francesco); E. Camporeale (Enrico); P. Veltri

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractKinetic Alfv ́en waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton inertial length d p and beyond). A

  9. Interplay of bistable kinetics of gene expression during cellular growth

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P

    2009-01-01

    In cells, the bistable kinetics of gene expression can be observed on the level of (i) one gene with positive feedback between protein and mRNA production, (ii) two genes with negative mutual feedback between protein and mRNA production, or (iii) in more complex cases. We analyse the interplay of two genes of type (ii) governed by a gene of type (i) during cellular growth. In particular, using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we show that in the case where gene 1, operating in the bistable regime, regulates mutually inhibiting genes 2 and 3, also operating in the bistable regime, the latter genes may eventually be trapped either to the state with high transcriptional activity of gene 2 and low activity of gene 3 or to the state with high transcriptional activity of gene 3 and low activity of gene 2. The probability to get to one of these states depends on the values of the model parameters. If genes 2 and 3 are kinetically equivalent, the probability is equal to 0.5. Thus, our model illustrates how different intracellular states can be chosen at random with predetermined probabilities. This type of kinetics of gene expression may be behind complex processes occurring in cells, e.g., behind the choice of the fate by stem cells

  10. Nodal approximations in space and time for neutron kinetics

    Grossman, L.M.; Hennart, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    A general formalism is described of the nodal type in time and space for the neutron kinetics equations. In space, several nodal methods are given of the Raviart-Thomas type (RT0 and RT1), of the Brezzi-Douglas-Marini type (BDM0 and BDM1) and of the Brezzi-Douglas-Fortin-Marini type (BDFM 1). In time, polynomial and analytical approximations are derived. In the analytical case, they are based on the inclusion of an exponential term in the basis function. They can be continuous or discontinuous in time, leading in particular to the well-known Crank-Nicolson, Backward Euler and θ schemes

  11. A tool model for predicting atmospheric kinetics with sensitivity analysis

    2001-01-01

    A package( a tool model) for program of predicting atmospheric chemical kinetics with sensitivity analysis is presented. The new direct method of calculating the first order sensitivity coefficients using sparse matrix technology to chemical kinetics is included in the tool model, it is only necessary to triangularize the matrix related to the Jacobian matrix of the model equation. The Gear type procedure is used to integrate amodel equation and its coupled auxiliary sensitivity coefficient equations. The FORTRAN subroutines of the model equation, the sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian analytical expressions are generated automatically from a chemical mechanism. The kinetic representation for the model equation and its sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian matrix is presented. Various FORTRAN subroutines in packages, such as SLODE, modified MA28, Gear package, with which the program runs in conjunction are recommended.The photo-oxidation of dimethyl disulfide is used for illustration.

  12. Kinetic study on UV-absorber photodegradation under different conditions

    Bubev, Emil, E-mail: ebubev@my.uctm.edu [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Physical Chemistry (Bulgaria); Georgiev, Anton [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Organic Chemistry (Bulgaria); Machkova, Maria [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Physical Chemistry (Bulgaria)

    2016-09-12

    The photodegradation kinetics of two benzophenone derivative UV-absorbers (UVAs)-BP-4 (benzophenone-4) and 4-HBP (4-hydroxybenzophenone), as additives in polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) films, were studied. Solution-processed PVAc films were irradiated in different environments in order to study oxygen and atmospheric humidity influence on UVA photodegradation. Photodegradation was traced by absorption intensity loss via UV–vis spectroscopy. Both UVAs exhibited excellent photostability in an inert atmosphere. Rate constants showed that BP-4 has better permanence in absence of oxygen. Both film types experienced rapid absorption loss, when irradiated in an oxygen containing atmosphere. UVA degradation was treated as a two-stage process. The photodegradation kinetics in the first stage agreed with the adopted complex rate law, but the second stage was best described by pseudo-first order kinetics. BP-4 exhibited better stability. Oxygen was established as the main accelerating factor for photodegradation of benzophenone derivatives UV-absorbers in thin PVAc films.

  13. On kinetic Boltzmann equations and related hydrodynamic flows with dry viscosity

    Nikolai N. Bogoliubov (Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-component particle model of Boltzmann-Vlasov type kinetic equations in the form of special nonlinear integro-differential hydrodynamic systems on an infinite-dimensional functional manifold is discussed. We show that such systems are naturally connected with the nonlinear kinetic Boltzmann-Vlasov equations for some one-dimensional particle flows with pointwise interaction potential between particles. A new type of hydrodynamic two-component Benney equations is constructed and their Hamiltonian structure is analyzed.

  14. Elements of plasma kinetic theory

    Guasp, J.

    1976-01-01

    The physical foundations of plasma kinetic equations are exposed inside a series of seminars on plasma and fusion physics. The Vlasov and collisional equations with its application range have been discussed. The momenta equations for the macroscopic magnitudes and the more usual approximations have been obtained: two fluid equations for cold and warm plasmas, magnetohydrodynamic equations and the double-adiabatic theory. (author)

  15. Kinetic studies on leucite precursors

    Mrázová, M.; Kloužková, A.; Kohoutková, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2009), s. 205-210 ISSN 1895-1066 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : leucite * crystallization kinetics * hydrothermal Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.065, year: 2009

  16. Some parameters of radionuclide kinetics

    Prokof'ev, O.N.; Smirnov, V.A.; Belen'kij, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical values of the rates of radionuclide absorption into, and elimination from, bovine organs were determined. Kinetic rate constants of radionuclides such as 89 Sr, 99 Mo, 131 I, 132 Tl, and 140 Be were calculated. The calculations were done for muscle, liver, and kidney

  17. Solving Simple Kinetics without Integrals

    de la Pen~a, Lisandro Herna´ndez

    2016-01-01

    The solution of simple kinetic equations is analyzed without referencing any topic from differential equations or integral calculus. Guided by the physical meaning of the rate equation, a systematic procedure is used to generate an approximate solution that converges uniformly to the exact solution in the case of zero, first, and second order…

  18. Robustness Analysis of Kinetic Structures

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic structures in architecture follows a new trend which is emerging in responsive architecture coined by Nicholas Negroponte when he proposed that architecture may benefit from the integration of computing power into built spaces and structures, and that better performing, more rational...

  19. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  20. Kinetic Uptake Studies of Powdered Materials in Solution

    Mohamed H. Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Challenges exist for the study of time dependent sorption processes for heterogeneous systems, especially in the case of dispersed nanomaterials in solvents or solutions because they are not well suited to conventional batch kinetic experiments. In this study, a comparison of batch versus a one-pot setup in two variable configurations was evaluated for the study of uptake kinetics in heterogeneous (solid/solution systems: (i conventional batch method; (ii one-pot system with dispersed adsorbent in solution with a semi-permeable barrier (filter paper or dialysis tubing for in situ sampling; and (iii one-pot system with an adsorbent confined in a semi-permeable barrier (dialysis tubing or filter paper barrier with ex situ sampling. The sorbent systems evaluated herein include several cyclodextrin-based polyurethane materials with two types of phenolic dyes: p-nitrophenol and phenolphthalein. The one-pot kinetics method with in situ (Method ii or ex situ (Method iii sampling described herein offers significant advantages for the study of heterogeneous sorption kinetics of highly dispersed sorbent materials with particles sizes across a range of dimensions from the micron to nanometer scale. The method described herein will contribute positively to the development of advanced studies for heterogeneous sorption processes where an assessment of the relative uptake properties is required at different experimental conditions. The results of this study will be advantageous for the study of nanomaterials with significant benefits over batch kinetic studies for a wide range of heterogeneous sorption processes.

  1. Reactor kinetics revisited: a coefficient based model (CBM)

    Ratemi, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a nuclear reactor kinetics model based on Guelph expansion coefficients calculation ( Coefficients Based Model, CBM), for n groups of delayed neutrons is developed. The accompanying characteristic equation is a polynomial form of the Inhour equation with the same coefficients of the CBM- kinetics model. Those coefficients depend on Universal abc- values which are dependent on the type of the fuel fueling a nuclear reactor. Furthermore, such coefficients are linearly dependent on the inserted reactivity. In this paper, the Universal abc- values have been presented symbolically, for the first time, as well as with their numerical values for U-235 fueled reactors for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons. Simulation studies for constant and variable reactivity insertions are made for the CBM kinetics model, and a comparison of results, with numerical solutions of classical kinetics models for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons are presented. The results show good agreements, especially for single step insertion of reactivity, with the advantage of the CBM- solution of not encountering the stiffness problem accompanying the numerical solutions of the classical kinetics model. (author)

  2. Uniqueness of thermodynamic projector and kinetic basis of molecular individualism

    Gorban, Alexander N.; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2004-05-01

    Three results are presented: First, we solve the problem of persistence of dissipation for reduction of kinetic models. Kinetic equations with thermodynamic Lyapunov functions are studied. Uniqueness of the thermodynamic projector is proven: There exists only one projector which transforms any vector field equipped with the given Lyapunov function into a vector field with the same Lyapunov function for a given anzatz manifold which is not tangent to the Lyapunov function levels. Second, we use the thermodynamic projector for developing the short memory approximation and coarse-graining for general nonlinear dynamic systems. We prove that in this approximation the entropy production increases. ( The theorem about entropy overproduction.) In example, we apply the thermodynamic projector to derive the equations of reduced kinetics for the Fokker-Planck equation. A new class of closures is developed, the kinetic multipeak polyhedra. Distributions of this type are expected in kinetic models with multidimensional instability as universally as the Gaussian distribution appears for stable systems. The number of possible relatively stable states of a nonequilibrium system grows as 2 m, and the number of macroscopic parameters is in order mn, where n is the dimension of configuration space, and m is the number of independent unstable directions in this space. The elaborated class of closures and equations pretends to describe the effects of “molecular individualism”. This is the third result.

  3. Explosive sport training and torque kinetics in children.

    Dotan, Raffy; Mitchell, Cameron J; Cohen, Rotem; Gabriel, David; Klentrou, Panagiota; Falk, Bareket

    2013-07-01

    A high rate of force development (RFD) is often more important than maximal force in daily and sports activities. In children, resistance training has been shown to increase maximal force. It is unclear whether, or to what extent, can children improve RFD and force kinetics. For this study, we compared strength and force kinetics of boy gymnasts with those of untrained boys and untrained men. Eight boy gymnasts (age, 9.5 ± 1.2 y), 20 untrained boys (age, 10.1 ± 1.3 y), and 20 untrained men (age, 22.9 ± 4.4 y) performed maximal, explosive, isometric elbow flexions (EF) and knee flexions (KF). Peak torque (maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)), elapsed times to 10%-100% MVC, peak rate of torque development (RTDpk), and other kinetics parameters were determined. When gymnasts were compared with untrained boys, size-normalized EF MVC was 11%-20% higher, RTDpk was 32% higher, and times to 30% and 80% MVC were 16% and 55% shorter, respectively (p kinetics parameters were similar. These findings highlight the specificity of gymnastics training, which markedly elevated the torque kinetics of young, prepubertal boys to adult levels, but only moderately affected peak torque. It is suggested that neurologic adaptations, such as enhanced firing and activation rates or increased type II motor-unit recruitment, as well as changes in musculotendinous stiffness, could explain these findings.

  4. Kinetics of in situ combustion. SUPRI TR 91

    Mamora, D.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1993-07-01

    Oxidation kinetic experiments with various crude oil types show two reaction peaks at about 250{degree}C (482{degree}F) and 400{degree}C (725{degree}F). These experiments lead to the conclusion that the fuel during high temperature oxidation is an oxygenated hydrocarbon. A new oxidation reaction model has been developed which includes two partially-overlapping reactions: namely, low-temperature oxidation followed by high-temperature oxidation. For the fuel oxidation reaction, the new model includes the effects of sand grain size and the atomic hydrogen-carbon (H/C) and oxygen-carbon (O/C) ratios of the fuel. Results based on the new model are in good agreement with the experimental data. Methods have been developed to calculate the atomic H/C and O/C ratios. These methods consider the oxygen in the oxygenated fuel, and enable a direct comparison of the atomic H/C ratios obtained from kinetic and combustion tube experiments. The finding that the fuel in kinetic tube experiments is an oxygenated hydrocarbon indicates that oxidation reactions are different in kinetic and combustion tube experiments. A new experimental technique or method of analysis will be required to obtain kinetic parameters for oxidation reactions encountered in combustion tube experiments and field operations.

  5. Drift-free kinetic equations for turbulent dispersion

    Bragg, A.; Swailes, D. C.; Skartlien, R.

    2012-11-01

    The dispersion of passive scalars and inertial particles in a turbulent flow can be described in terms of probability density functions (PDFs) defining the statistical distribution of relevant scalar or particle variables. The construction of transport equations governing the evolution of such PDFs has been the subject of numerous studies, and various authors have presented formulations for this type of equation, usually referred to as a kinetic equation. In the literature it is often stated, and widely assumed, that these PDF kinetic equation formulations are equivalent. In this paper it is shown that this is not the case, and the significance of differences among the various forms is considered. In particular, consideration is given to which form of equation is most appropriate for modeling dispersion in inhomogeneous turbulence and most consistent with the underlying particle equation of motion. In this regard the PDF equations for inertial particles are considered in the limit of zero particle Stokes number and assessed against the fully mixed (zero-drift) condition for fluid points. A long-standing question regarding the validity of kinetic equations in the fluid-point limit is answered; it is demonstrated formally that one version of the kinetic equation (derived using the Furutsu-Novikov method) provides a model that satisfies this zero-drift condition exactly in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems. In contrast, other forms of the kinetic equation do not satisfy this limit or apply only in a limited regime.

  6. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Tandem mass spectrometry at low kinetic energy

    Cooks, R.G.; Hand, O.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in mass spectrometry, as applied to molecular analysis, is reviewed with emphasis on tandem mass spectrometry. Tandem instruments use multiple analyzers (sector magnets, quadrupole mass filters and time-of-flight devices) to select particular molecules in ionic form, react them in the gas-phase and then record the mass, momenta or kinetic energies of their products. The capabilities of tandem mass spectrometry for identification of individual molecules or particular classes of compounds in complex mixtures are illustrated. Several different types of experiments can be run using a tandem mass spectrometer; all share the feature of sifting the molecular mixture being analyzed on the basis of chemical properties expressed in terms of ionic mass, kinetic energy or charge state. Applications of mass spectrometry to biological problems often depend upon desorption methods of ionization in which samples are bombarded with particle beams. Evaporation of preformed charged species from the condensed phase into the vacuum is a particularly effective method of ionization. It is suggested that the use of accelerator mass spectrometers be extended to include problems of molecular analysis. In such experiments, low energy tandem mass spectrometry conducted in the eV or keV range of energies, would be followed by further characterization of the production ion beam using high selective MeV collision processes

  8. Kinetics of the generation of the petroleum: Principles and application in the Colombian basins

    Goncalves, F T T; Garcia, D F; Penteado, H L B; Giraldo, B N; Bedregal, R P; Gomez

    2001-01-01

    Most of the mathematical models that describe the conversion of kerogen into petroleum are based on the formulations of first-order kinetics. Although the application of such models requires the knowledge of the kinetic parameters (activation energies and frequency factor) of the kerogen, the usual practice in basin modeling studies is to use kinetic data of standard kerogen types (I, II or III) when measured data are not available. In this study, Rock-Eval pyrolysis under different heating rates and numerical optimization techniques were used to determine the kinetic parameters of cretaceous and tertiary source rocks of the upper Magdalena and llanos basins. The obtained kinetic parameters revealed a significant variability, which appears to be unrelated to the kerogen type classification based on hydrogen and oxygen indices. Modeling exercises under a constant heating rate (1.25 degrades C/M.y., 274.5K/M.y.) using the measured kinetic data indicates that kerogen conversion of organic facies with distinct kinetic parameters may be out of phase by 20-30M.y. therefore, petroleum generation and expulsion history might be longer and more complex than if the kinetic behavior of these rocks was considered homogeneous. These differences are critical in defining the timing between petroleum generations a trap formation/destruction, particularly in the case of the Colombian sedimentary basins, characterized by a highly complex tectonic evolution

  9. Some Aspects of Extended Kinetic Equation

    Dilip Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the pathway model of Mathai introduced in 2005 [Linear Algebra and Its Applications, 396, 317–328] we extend the standard kinetic equations. Connection of the extended kinetic equation with fractional calculus operator is established. The solution of the general form of the fractional kinetic equation is obtained through Laplace transform. The results for the standard kinetic equation are obtained as the limiting case.

  10. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es; Sanchez, Guillermo [Departamento de Matematica y Ciencia de la Computacion, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: gsanchez@usach.cl

    2009-08-31

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c{>=}1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c{>=}1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X)

  11. Logarithmic Exchange Kinetics in Monodisperse Copolymeric Micelles

    García Daza, Fabián A.; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Mackie, Allan D.

    2017-06-01

    Experimental measurements of the relaxation kinetics of copolymeric surfactant exchange for micellar systems unexpectedly show a peculiar logarithmic decay. Several authors use polydispersity as an explanation for this behavior. However, in coarse-grained simulations that preserve microscopic details of the surfactants, we find evidence of the same logarithmic behavior. Since we use a strictly monodisperse distribution of chain lengths such a relaxation process cannot be attributed to polydispersity, but has to be caused by an inherent physical process characteristic of this type of system. This is supported by the fact that the decay is specifically logarithmic and not a power law with an exponent inherited from the particular polydispersity distribution of the sample. We suggest that the degeneracy of the energy states of the hydrophobic block in the core, which is broken on leaving the micelle, can qualitatively explain the broad distribution of energy barriers, which gives rise to the observed nonexponential relaxation.

  12. A kinetic-MHD model for low frequency phenomena

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid kinetic-MHD model for describing low-frequency phenomena in high beta anisotropic plasmas that consist of two components: a low energy core component and an energetic component with low density. The kinetic-MHD model treats the low energy core component by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, the energetic component by kinetic approach such as the gyrokinetic equation, and the coupling between the dynamics of these two components through plasma pressure in the momentum equation. The kinetic-MHD model optimizes both the physics contents and the theoretical efforts in studying low frequency MHD waves and transport phenomena in general magnetic field geometries, and can be easily modified to include the core plasma kinetic effects if necessary. It is applicable to any magnetized collisionless plasma system where the parallel electric field effects are negligibly small. In the linearized limit two coupled eigenmode equations for describing the coupling between the transverse Alfven type and the compressional Alfven type waves are derived. The eigenmode equations are identical to those derived from the full gyrokinetic equation in the low frequency limit and were previously analyzed both analytically nd numerically to obtain the eigenmode structure of the drift mirror instability which explains successfully the multi-satellite observation of antisymmetric field-aligned structure of the compressional magnetic field of Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma. Finally, a quadratic form is derived to demonstrate the stability of the low-frequency transverse and compressional Alfven type instabilities in terms of the pressure anisotropy parameter τ and the magnetic field curvature-pressure gradient parameter. A procedure for determining the stability of a marginally stable MHD wave due to wave-particle resonances is also presented

  13. Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis

    Bednarska, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis – a summary

    K.A. Bednarska

    The dissertation entitled ‘Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis’ describes the enzymatic hydrolysis and kinetic modelling of liquefaction and saccharification of wheat starch.

  14. High temperature oxidation kinetics of dysprosium particles

    Jaques, Brian J.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • The oxidation behavior of dysprosium particles was studied from 500 to 1000 °C. • Activation energy in initial region found as 8–25 kJ/mol, depending on atmosphere. • Activation energy in intermediate region found as 80–95 kJ/mol. • The oxide grows at the metal–oxide interface. • Generally, the formed oxide behaved as a p-type semiconductor. - Abstract: Rare earth elements have been recognized as critical materials for the advancement of many strategic and green technologies. Recently, the United States Department of Energy has invested many millions of dollars to enhance, protect, and forecast their production and management. The work presented here attempts to clarify the limited and contradictory literature on the oxidation behavior of the rare earth metal, dysprosium. Dysprosium particles were isothermally oxidized from 500 to 1000 °C in N{sub 2}–(2%, 20%, and 50%) O{sub 2} and Ar–20% O{sub 2} using simultaneous thermal analysis techniques. Two distinct oxidation regions were identified at each isothermal temperature in each oxidizing atmosphere. Initially, the oxidation kinetics are very fast until the reaction enters a slower, intermediate region of oxidation. The two regions are defined and the kinetics of each are assessed to show an apparent activation energy of 8–25 kJ/mol in the initial region and 80–95 kJ/mol in the intermediate oxidation reaction region. The effects of varying the oxygen partial pressure on the reaction rate constant are used to show that dysprosium oxide (Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) generally acts as a p-type semiconductor in both regions of oxidation (with an exception above 750 °C in the intermediate region)

  15. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity.

    Ebben, William P; Fauth, McKenzie L; Garceau, Luke R; Petushek, Erich J

    2011-12-01

    Ebben, WP, Fauth, ML, Garceau, LR, and Petushek, EJ. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3288-3298, 2011-Quantification of plyometric exercise intensity is necessary to understand the characteristics of these exercises and the proper progression of this mode of exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the kinetic characteristics of a variety of plyometric exercises. This study also sought to assess gender differences in these variables. Twenty-six men and 23 women with previous experience in performing plyometric training served as subjects. The subjects performed a variety of plyometric exercises including line hops, 15.24-cm cone hops, squat jumps, tuck jumps, countermovement jumps (CMJs), loaded CMJs equal to 30% of 1 repetition maximum squat, depth jumps normalized to the subject's jump height (JH), and single leg jumps. All plyometric exercises were assessed with a force platform. Outcome variables associated with the takeoff, airborne, and landing phase of each plyometric exercise were evaluated. These variables included the peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF) during takeoff, the time to takeoff, flight time, JH, peak power, landing rate of force development, and peak vertical GRF during landing. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance with repeated measures for plyometric exercise type demonstrated main effects for exercise type and all outcome variables (p ≤ 0.05) and for the interaction between gender and peak vertical GRF during takeoff (p ≤ 0.05). Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons identified a number of differences between the plyometric exercises for the outcome variables assessed (p ≤ 0.05). These findings can be used to guide the progression of plyometric training by incorporating exercises of increasing intensity over the course of a program.

  16. Ionic currents and charge movements in organ-cultured rat skeletal muscle.

    Hollingworth, S; Marshall, M W; Robson, E

    1984-12-01

    The middle of the fibre voltage-clamp technique was used to measure ionic currents and non-linear charge movements in intact, organ-cultured (in vitro denervated) mammalian fast-twitch (rat extensor digitorum longus) muscle fibres. Muscle fibres organ cultured for 4 days can be used as electrophysiological and morphological models for muscles in vivo denervated for the same length of time. Sodium currents in organ-cultured muscle fibres are similar to innervated fibres except that in the temperature range 0-20 degrees C (a) in the steady state, the voltage distribution of inactivation in cultured fibres is shifted negatively some 20 mV; (b) at the same temperature and membrane potential, the time constant of inactivation in cultured fibres is about twice that of innervated fibres. Potassium currents in innervated and cultured fibres at 15 degrees C can be fitted with the Hodgkin-Huxley n variable raised to the second power. Despite the large range we would estimate that the maximum value of the steady-state potassium conductance of cultured fibres is about one-half that of innervated fibres. The estimated maximum amount of charge moved in cultured fibre is about one-third that in innervated fibres. Compared to innervated fibres, culturing doubles the kinetics of the decay phase of charge movement. The possibility of a negative shift of the voltage distribution of charge movements in cultured fibres is discussed.

  17. Morphogenesis of Kinetic Reciprocal Frames

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category of intera......Kinetic structures in civil engineering and architecture gained considerable more attention in the very recent years as a practical solution to face time dependant performances. Realized projects are mostly bridges, retractable roofs, while in architecture the trend follows the category...... (RF) were studied in the past as a practical solution to span distances with shorter elements. Leonardo da Vinci discovered interesting RF patterns and studied three dimensional arch structures for bridges. RF are generally defined as structures that forms closed circuits of forces, and where elements...

  18. Kinetic approach to relativistic dissipation

    Gabbana, A.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Tripiccione, R.

    2017-08-01

    Despite a long record of intense effort, the basic mechanisms by which dissipation emerges from the microscopic dynamics of a relativistic fluid still elude complete understanding. In particular, several details must still be finalized in the pathway from kinetic theory to hydrodynamics mainly in the derivation of the values of the transport coefficients. In this paper, we approach the problem by matching data from lattice-kinetic simulations with analytical predictions. Our numerical results provide neat evidence in favor of the Chapman-Enskog [The Mathematical Theory of Non-Uniform Gases, 3rd ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., 1970)] procedure as suggested by recent theoretical analyses along with qualitative hints at the basic reasons why the Chapman-Enskog expansion might be better suited than Grad's method [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 2, 331 (1949), 10.1002/cpa.3160020403] to capture the emergence of dissipative effects in relativistic fluids.

  19. Kinetic theory of tearing instability

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Dobrott, D.; Wang, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The guiding-center kinetic equation with Fokker-Planck collision term is used to study, in cylindrical geometry, a class of dissipative instabilities of which the classical tearing mode is an archetype. Variational solution of the kinetic equation obviates the use of an approximate Ohm's law or adiabatic assumption, as used in previous studies, and it provides a dispersive relation which is uniformly valid for any ratio of wave frequency to collision frequency. One result of using the rigorous collision operator is the prediction of a new instability. This instability, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is predicted to occur under the long mean-free path conditions of present tokamak experiments, and has significant features in common with the kink-like oscillations observed in such experiments

  20. Kinetics of cadmium hydroxide precipitation

    Patterson, J.W.; Marani, D.; Luo, B.; Swenson, P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents some preliminary results on the kinetics of Cd(OH)/sub 2/ precipitation, both in the absence and the presence of citric acid as an inhibiting agent. Batch and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) precipitation studies are performed by mixing equal volumes of NaOH and Cd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ solutions, in order to avoid localized supersaturation conditions. The rate of metal removal from the soluble phase is calculated from the mass balance for the CSTR precipitation tests. In addition, precipitation kinetics are studied in terms of nucleation and crystal growth rates, by means of a particle counter that allows a population balance analysis for the precipitation reactor at steady state conditions

  1. Art Engineering and Kinetic Art

    Barış Yılmaz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Performing an art, either by painting or by sculpturing, requires to be interdisciplinary. When an artist creates his/her work of art, the process he/she realizes is supported by different engineering disciplines. Therefore, especially modern artists need to understand engineering science and this results in transforming artists into engineers. Opportunities provided by technology and science enable artists to expand his/her vision and to improve his/her works. Especially kinetic art has become an approach that combines art with engineering. Kinetic art, which is nourished with varied disciplines, is an excellent example to prove that art is interdisciplinary and to show the relationship between artist/art and engineering.

  2. Modeling the isochronal crystallization kinetics

    Sahay, S.S.; Krishnan, Karthik

    2004-01-01

    The classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model, originally formulated for the isothermal condition, is often used in conjunction with additivity principle for modeling the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics. This approach at times results in significant differences between the model prediction and experimental data. In this article, a modification to this approach has been imposed via an additional functional relationship between the activation energy and heating rate. The methodology has been validated with experimental isochronal crystallization kinetic data in Se 71 Te 20 Sb 9 glass and Ge 20 Te 80 systems. It has been shown that the functional relationship between heating rate and activation energy, ascribed to the reduction in apparent activation energy due to increasing non-isothermality, provides better phenomenological description and therefore improves the prediction capability of the JMAK model under isochronal condition

  3. Muscular Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Aged Adults.

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Baum, K; Eichberg, S; Schiffer, T; Latsch, J; Brixius, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary oxygen uptake (V˙O2) kinetics and heart rate kinetics are influenced by age and fitness. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics can be estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V˙O2. In this study the applicability of a test using pseudo-random binary sequences in combination with a model to estimate muscular V˙O2 kinetics was tested. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were expected to be faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics, slowed in aged subjects and correlated with maximum V˙O2 and heart rate kinetics. 27 elderly subjects (73±3 years; 81.1±8.2 kg; 175±4.7 cm) participated. Cardiorespiratory kinetics were assessed using the maximum of cross-correlation functions, higher maxima implying faster kinetics. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics were faster than pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics (0.31±0.1 vs. 0.29±0.1 s; p=0.004). Heart rate kinetics were not correlated with muscular or pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics or maximum V˙O2. Muscular V˙O2 kinetics correlated with maximum V˙O2 (r=0.35; p=0.033). This suggests, that muscular V˙O2 kinetics are faster than estimates from pulmonary V˙O2 and related to maximum V˙O2 in aged subjects. In the future this experimental approach may help to characterize alterations in muscular V˙O2 under various conditions independent of motivation and maximal effort. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Bumetanide kinetics in renal failure

    Pentikaeinen, P.J.P.; Pasternack, A.; Lampainen, E.; Neuvonen, P.J.; Penttilae, A.

    1985-01-01

    To study the effects of renal failure on bumetanide kinetics, the authors administered single intravenous doses of 1.0 mg/3.08 microCi 14 C-bumetanide to six healthy subjects and 22 patients with variable degrees of renal failure. The kinetics of 14 C-bumetanide and total 14 C were adequately described by a two-compartment open model in the control subjects and in the patients. The volume of the central compartment and the distribution t1/2 were of the same order in both groups, whereas the mean (+/- SE) volume at steady state was larger (22.1 +/- 1.6 and 16.9 +/- 1.0 L) and the elimination t1/2 was longer (1.9 +/- 0.2 and 1.4 +/- 0.1 hours) in patients with renal failure than in healthy controls. Bumetanide renal clearance was lower (10 +/- 3 and 90 +/- 13 ml/min) in patients than in subjects and correlated with creatinine clearance (r = 0.784) and log serum creatinine level (r = -0.843), whereas nonrenal clearance was significantly higher in the patients (153 +/- 14 and 99 +/- 6 ml/min). Bumetanide total plasma clearance did not significantly change. The non-protein-bound, free fraction of bumetanide was higher in patients and correlated with plasma albumin levels (r = -0.777). The kinetics of total 14 C showed similar but greater changes than those of 14C-bumetanide. Thus the most important changes in bumetanide kinetics in patients with renal failure are low renal clearance and a high free fraction, with a consequent increase in nonrenal clearance, volume of distribution, and elimination t1/2

  5. Production kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride

    Sudjoko, D.; Masduki, B.; Sunardjo; Sulistyo, B.

    1996-01-01

    This research was intended to study the kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride production. The process was carried out in semi continuous reactor, equipped with heater, temperature controller, sublimator and scrubber. The variables investigated were time, temperature and the pellet forming pressure. Within the range of variables studied, the expression of the process in the chemical reaction controller region and diffusion controller region were both presented. (author)

  6. On the kinetic energy density

    Lombard, R.J.; Mas, D.; Moszkowski, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss two expressions for the density of kinetic energy which differ by an integration by parts. Using the Wigner transform we shown that the arithmetic mean of these two terms is closely analogous to the classical value. Harmonic oscillator wavefunctions are used to illustrate the radial dependence of these expressions. We study the differences they induce through effective mass terms when performing self-consistent calculations. (author)

  7. Kinetics of UO2 sintering

    Ristic, M.M.

    1962-01-01

    Detailed conclusions related to the UO 2 sintering can be drawn from investigating the kinetics of the sintering process. This report gives an thorough analysis of the the data concerned with sintering available in the literature taking into account the Jander and Arrhenius laws. This analysis completes the study of influence of the O/U ratio and the atmosphere on the sintering. Results presented are fundamentals of future theoretical and experimental work related to characterisation of the UO 2 sintering process

  8. KINETIC ALGORITHMS FOR HARBOUR MANAGEMENT

    C. M. Gold

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern harbour management for a busy port needs to resolve a variety of simultaneous problems. Harbour traffic may be busy and the waterways congested, both by the major shipping and by the attendant harbour tugs. The harbour channel may be narrow and tortuous, and rapidly changing tides may require frequent course adjustments. Navigation aids must be clearly specified and immediately identifiable, in order to permit safe passage for the vessels. This requires a GIS with attributes not easily available with traditional products. The GeoVS system is a kinetic GIS with full three-dimensional visualisation, so that ships, bathymetry and landscape may be viewed in a form that is immediately understandable to both harbour pilots and the harbour authority. The system is kinetic because the data structures used to preserve the topological relationships between ships, seafloor and coastline are able to be maintained on a real-time basis, taking account of ship movement recorded on the compulsory AIS (Automatic Information System beacons. Maintenance of this real-time topology allows for easy detection of potential collisions, as well as real-time bathymetric estimations, necessary to prevent ship grounding in highly tidal environments. The system, based on previous research into kinetic Voronoi diagrams, as well as development of a completely new graphical engine, is now in commercial production, where its advantages over simpler twodimensional models without automatic collision and grounding detection are becoming evident. Other applications are readily envisaged, and will be addressed in the near future.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    Sulatsky, A.A., E-mail: andrei314@mail.ru [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Smirnov, S.A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A. [Forschungzentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Karlsruhe (Germany); Bottomley, D. [EUROPÄISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut für Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA Cadarache-DEN/DTN/STRI, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations.

  10. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    Sulatsky, A.A.; Smirnov, S.A.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu.; Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S.; Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A.; Bottomley, D.; Piluso, P.; Barrachin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations

  11. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  12. Transition Dynamics of a Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Neuronal Network during Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Zhang, Liyuan; Fan, Denggui; Wang, Qingyun

    2017-01-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the variation of chemical receptor expression underlies the basis of neural network activity shifts, resulting in neuronal hyperexcitability and epileptiform discharges. However, dynamical mechanisms involved in the transitions of TLE are not fully understood, because of the neuronal diversity and the indeterminacy of network connection. Hence, based on Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) type neurons and Pinsky-Rinzel (PR) type neurons coupling with glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic connections respectively, we propose a computational framework which contains dentate gyrus (DG) region and CA3 region. By regulating the concentration range of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), we demonstrate the pyramidal neuron can generate transitions from interictal to seizure discharges. This suggests that enhanced endogenous activity of NMDAR contributes to excitability in pyramidal neuron. Moreover, we conclude that excitatory discharges in CA3 region vary considerably on account of the excitatory currents produced by the excitatory pyramidal neuron. Interestingly, by changing the backprojection connection, we find that glutamatergic type backprojection can promote the dominant frequency of firings and further motivate excitatory counterpropagation from CA3 region to DG region. However, GABAergic type backprojection can reduce firing rate and block morbid counterpropagation, which may be factored into the terminations of TLE. In addition, neuronal diversity dominated network shows weak correlation with different backprojections. Our modeling and simulation studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of seizures generation and connectionism in local hippocampus, along with the synaptic mechanisms of this disease.

  13. Activity, stability and kinetic parameters for α-chymotrypsin catalysed ...

    Three typical surfactants were selected based on their head group charges: a non-ionic surfactant Triton-X 100 and two zwitterionic sulphobetaine surfactants of the type CH2+1N+Me2 (CH2)3 SO 3 − (n = 10; SB3-10, n = 16; SB3-16). The kinetic parameters (such as cat and M) of the -CT at 27°C were determined ...

  14. Kinetic theory of flocking: derivation of hydrodynamic equations.

    Ihle, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    It is shown how to explicitly coarse-grain the microscopic dynamics of the rule-based Vicsek model for self-propelled agents. The hydrodynamic equations are derived by means of an Enskog-type kinetic theory. Expressions for all transport coefficients are given. The transition from a disordered to a flocking state, which at large particle speeds appears to be a fluctuation-induced first-order phase transition, is studied numerically and analytically.

  15. Fractional Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equation

    Goychuk, Igor

    2017-11-01

    The linear Boltzmann equation (LBE) approach is generalized to describe fractional superdiffusive transport of the Lévy walk type in external force fields. The time distribution between scattering events is assumed to have a finite mean value and infinite variance. It is completely characterized by the two scattering rates, one fractional and a normal one, which defines also the mean scattering rate. We formulate a general fractional LBE approach and exemplify it with a particularly simple case of the Bohm and Gross scattering integral leading to a fractional generalization of the Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook (BGK) kinetic equation. Here, at each scattering event the particle velocity is completely randomized and takes a value from equilibrium Maxwell distribution at a given fixed temperature. We show that the retardation effects are indispensable even in the limit of infinite mean scattering rate and argue that this novel fractional kinetic equation provides a viable alternative to the fractional Kramers-Fokker-Planck (KFP) equation by Barkai and Silbey and its generalization by Friedrich et al. based on the picture of divergent mean time between scattering events. The case of divergent mean time is also discussed at length and compared with the earlier results obtained within the fractional KFP. Also a phenomenological fractional BGK equation without retardation effects is proposed in the limit of infinite scattering rates. It cannot be, however, rigorously derived from a scattering model, being rather clever postulated. It this respect, this retardationless equation is similar to the fractional KFP by Barkai and Silbey. However, it corresponds to the opposite, much more physical limit and, therefore, also presents a viable alternative.

  16. Nonlinear Kinetics on Lattices Based on the Kinetic Interaction Principle

    Giorgio Kaniadakis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Master equations define the dynamics that govern the time evolution of various physical processes on lattices. In the continuum limit, master equations lead to Fokker–Planck partial differential equations that represent the dynamics of physical systems in continuous spaces. Over the last few decades, nonlinear Fokker–Planck equations have become very popular in condensed matter physics and in statistical physics. Numerical solutions of these equations require the use of discretization schemes. However, the discrete evolution equation obtained by the discretization of a Fokker–Planck partial differential equation depends on the specific discretization scheme. In general, the discretized form is different from the master equation that has generated the respective Fokker–Planck equation in the continuum limit. Therefore, the knowledge of the master equation associated with a given Fokker–Planck equation is extremely important for the correct numerical integration of the latter, since it provides a unique, physically motivated discretization scheme. This paper shows that the Kinetic Interaction Principle (KIP that governs the particle kinetics of many body systems, introduced in G. Kaniadakis, Physica A 296, 405 (2001, univocally defines a very simple master equation that in the continuum limit yields the nonlinear Fokker–Planck equation in its most general form.

  17. A kinetics database and scripts for PHREEQC

    Hu, B.; Zhang, Y.; Teng, Y.; Zhu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Kinetics of geochemical reactions has been increasingly used in numerical models to simulate coupled flow, mass transport, and chemical reactions. However, the kinetic data are scattered in the literature. To assemble a kinetic dataset for a modeling project is an intimidating task for most. In order to facilitate the application of kinetics in geochemical modeling, we assembled kinetics parameters into a database for the geochemical simulation program, PHREEQC (version 3.0). Kinetics data were collected from the literature. Our database includes kinetic data for over 70 minerals. The rate equations are also programmed into scripts with the Basic language. Using the new kinetic database, we simulated reaction path during the albite dissolution process using various rate equations in the literature. The simulation results with three different rate equations gave difference reaction paths at different time scale. Another application involves a coupled reactive transport model simulating the advancement of an acid plume in an acid mine drainage site associated with Bear Creek Uranium tailings pond. Geochemical reactions including calcite, gypsum, and illite were simulated with PHREEQC using the new kinetic database. The simulation results successfully demonstrated the utility of new kinetic database.

  18. Sorption kinetics of diuron on volcanic ash derived soils.

    Cáceres-Jensen, Lizethly; Rodríguez-Becerra, Jorge; Parra-Rivero, Joselyn; Escudey, Mauricio; Barrientos, Lorena; Castro-Castillo, Vicente

    2013-10-15

    Diuron sorption kinetic was studied in Andisols, Inceptisol and Ultisols soils in view of their distinctive physical and chemical properties: acidic pH and variable surface charge. Two types of kinetic models were used to fit the experimental dates: those that allow to establish principal kinetic parameters and modeling of sorption process (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order), and some ones frequently used to describe solute transport mechanisms of organic compounds on different sorbents intended for remediation purposes (Elovich equation, intraparticle diffusion, Boyd, and two-site nonequilibrium models). The best fit was obtained with the pseudo-second-order model. The rate constant and the initial rate constant values obtained through this model demonstrated the behavior of Diuron in each soil, in Andisols were observed the highest values for both parameters. The application of the models to describe solute transport mechanisms allowed establishing that in all soils the mass transfer controls the sorption kinetic across the boundary layer and intraparticle diffusion into macropores and micropores. The slowest sorption rate was observed on Ultisols, behavior which must be taken into account when the leaching potential of Diuron is considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kinetics of palm kernel oil and ethanol transesterification

    Ahiekpor, Julius C. [Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development (CEESD), P.O. Box FN 793, Kumasi (Ghana); Kuwornoo, David K. [Faculty of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Private Mail Bag, Kumasi (Ghana)

    2010-07-01

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from renewable sources such as vegetable oils and animal fats, has been identified by government to play a key role in the socio-economic development of Ghana. The utilization of biodiesel is expected to be about 10% of the total liquid fuel mix of the country by the year 2020. Despite this great potential and the numerous sources from which biodiesel could be developed in Ghana, there are no available data on the kinetics and mechanisms of transesterification of local vegetable oils. The need for local production of biodiesel necessitates that the mechanism and kinetics of the process is well understood, since the properties of the biodiesel depends on the type of oil use for the transesterification process. The objective of this work is to evaluate the appropriate kinetics mechanism and to find out the reaction rate constants for palm kernel oil transesterification with ethanol when KOH was used as a catalyst. In this present work, 16 biodiesel samples were prepared at specified times based on reported optimal conditions and the samples analysed by gas chromatography. The experimental mass fractions were calibrated and fitted to mathematical models of different proposed mechanisms in previous works.The rate data fitted well to second-order kinetics without shunt mechanism. It was also observed that, although transesterification reaction of crude palm kernel oil is a reversible reaction, the reaction rate constants indicated that the forward reactions were the most prominent.

  20. Thermodynamic basis for cluster kinetics

    Hu, Lina; Bian, Xiufang; Qin, Xubo

    2006-01-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of the supercooled region of marginal metallic glasses (MMGs) within the experimental time window, we study the cluster kinetics above the liquidus temperature, Tl, to acquire information on the fragility of the MMG systems. Thermodynamic basis for the stability...... of locally ordered structure in the MMG liquids is discussed in terms of the two-order-parameter model. It is found that the Arrhenius activation energy of clusters, h, is proportional to the chemical mixing enthalpy of alloys, Hchem. Fragility of the MMG forming liquids can be described by the ratio...

  1. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  2. Kinetic equations with pairing correlations

    Fauser, R.

    1995-12-01

    The Gorkov equations are derived for a general non-equilibrium system. The Gorkov factorization is generalized by the cumulant expansion of the 2-particle correlation and by a generalized Wick theorem in the case of a perturbation expansion. A stationary solution for the Green functions in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism is presented taking into account pairing correlations. Especially the effects of collisional broadening on the spectral functions and Green functions is discussed. Kinetic equations are derived in the quasi-particle approximation and in the case of particles with width. Explicit expressions for the self-energies are given. (orig.)

  3. Kinetic theory of radiation effects

    Mansur, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    To help achieve the quantitative and mechanistic understanding of these processes, the kinetic theory of radiation effects has been developed in the DOE basic energy sciences radiation effects and fusion reactor materials programs, as well as in corresponding efforts in other countries. This discipline grapples with a very wide range of phenomena and draws on numerous sub-fields of theory such as defect physics, diffusion, elasticity, chemical reaction rates, phase transformations and thermodynamics. The theory is cast in a mathematical framework of continuum dynamics. Issues particularly relevant to the present inquiry can be viewed from the standpoints of applications of the theory and areas requiring further progress

  4. Ordering chaos and synchronization transitions by chemical delay and coupling on scale-free neuronal networks

    Gong Yubing; Xie Yanhang; Lin Xiu; Hao Yinghang; Ma Xiaoguang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Chemical delay and chemical coupling can tame chaotic bursting. → Chemical delay-induced transitions from bursting synchronization to intermittent multiple spiking synchronizations. → Chemical coupling-induced different types of delay-dependent firing transitions. - Abstract: Chemical synaptic connections are more common than electric ones in neurons, and information transmission delay is especially significant for the synapses of chemical type. In this paper, we report a phenomenon of ordering spatiotemporal chaos and synchronization transitions by the delays and coupling through chemical synapses of modified Hodgkin-Huxley (MHH) neurons on scale-free networks. As the delay τ is increased, the neurons exhibit transitions from bursting synchronization (BS) to intermittent multiple spiking synchronizations (SS). As the coupling g syn is increased, the neurons exhibit different types of firing transitions, depending on the values of τ. For a smaller τ, there are transitions from spatiotemporal chaotic bursting (SCB) to BS or SS; while for a larger τ, there are transitions from SCB to intermittent multiple SS. These findings show that the delays and coupling through chemical synapses can tame the chaotic firings and repeatedly enhance the firing synchronization of neurons, and hence could play important roles in the firing activity of the neurons on scale-free networks.

  5. Rate kernel theory for pseudo-first-order kinetics of diffusion-influenced reactions and application to fluorescence quenching kinetics.

    Yang, Mino

    2007-06-07

    Theoretical foundation of rate kernel equation approaches for diffusion-influenced chemical reactions is presented and applied to explain the kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions. A many-body master equation is constructed by introducing stochastic terms, which characterize the rates of chemical reactions, into the many-body Smoluchowski equation. A Langevin-type of memory equation for the density fields of reactants evolving under the influence of time-independent perturbation is derived. This equation should be useful in predicting the time evolution of reactant concentrations approaching the steady state attained by the perturbation as well as the steady-state concentrations. The dynamics of fluctuation occurring in equilibrium state can be predicted by the memory equation by turning the perturbation off and consequently may be useful in obtaining the linear response to a time-dependent perturbation. It is found that unimolecular decay processes including the time-independent perturbation can be incorporated into bimolecular reaction kinetics as a Laplace transform variable. As a result, a theory for bimolecular reactions along with the unimolecular process turned off is sufficient to predict overall reaction kinetics including the effects of unimolecular reactions and perturbation. As the present formulation is applied to steady-state kinetics of fluorescence quenching reactions, the exact relation between fluorophore concentrations and the intensity of excitation light is derived.

  6. A kinetic model for hydrodesulfurisation

    Sau, M.; Narasimhan, C.S.L.; Verma, R.P. [Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Research and Development Centre, Faridabad (India)

    1997-07-01

    Due to stringent environmental considerations and related insistence on low sulfur fuels, hydrodesulfurisation has emerged as an important component of any refining scheme globally. The process is used ranging from Naphta/Kerosine hydrotreating to heavy oil hydrotreating. Processes such as Deep gas oil desulfurisation aiming at reduction of sulfur levels to less than 500 ppm have emerged as major players in the scenario. Hydrodesulfurisation (HDS) involves parallel desulfurisation of different organo-sulfur compounds present in the complex petroleum mixtures. In order to design, monitor, optimise and control the HDS reactor, it is necessary to have a detailed, yet simple model which follows the reaction chemistry accurately. In the present paper, a kinetic model is presented for HDS using continuum theory of lumping. The sulfur distribution in the reaction mixture is treated as continuum and parallel reaction networks are devised for kinetic modelling using continuum theory of lumping approach. The model based on the above approach follows the HDS chemistry reasonably well and hence the model parameters are almost feed invariant. Methods are also devised to incorporate heat and pressure effects into the model. The model has been validated based on commercial kero-HDS data. It is found that the model predictions agree with the experimental/commercial data. 17 refs.

  7. Kinetic Profiles in NSTX Plasmas

    Bell, R.E.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Bourdelle, C.; Ernst, D.R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gates, D.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaye, S.M.; Maingi, R.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peng, M.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.W.; Synakowski, E.J.; Wilson, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio (R/a approximately 1.3) device with auxiliary heating from neutral-beam injection (NBI) and high-harmonic fast-wave heating (HHFW). Typical NSTX parameters are R(subscript ''0'') = 85 cm, a = 67 cm, I(subscript ''p'') = 0.7-1.4 MA, B(subscript ''phi'') = 0.25-0.45 T. Three co-directed deuterium neutral-beam sources have injected P(subscript ''NB'') less than or equal to 4.7 MW. HHFW plasmas typically have delivered P(subscript ''RF'') less than or equal to 3 MW. Important to the understanding of NSTX confinement are the new kinetic profile diagnostics: a multi-pulse Thomson scattering system (MPTS) and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system. The MPTS diagnostic currently measures electron density and temperature profiles at 30 Hz at ten spatial locations. The CHERS system has recently become available to measure carbon ion temperature and toroidal flow at 17 radial positions spanning the outer half of the minor radius with 20 msec time resolution during NBI. Experiments conducted during the last year have produced a wide range of kinetic profiles in NSTX. Some interesting examples are presented below

  8. Conformational kinetics of aliphatic tails

    Ferrarini, Alberta; Moro, Giorgio; Nordio, Pier Luigi

    The master equation describing the random walk between sites identified with the stable conformers of a chain molecule, represents the extension to the time domain of the Rotational Isomeric State model. The asymptotic analysis of the multidimensional diffusion equation in the continuous torsional variables subjected to the configurational potential, provides a rigorous justification for the discrete models, and it supplies, without resorting to phenomenological parameters, molecular definitions of the kinetic rates for the conformational transitions occurring at each segment of the chain. The coupling between the torsional variables is fully taken into account, giving rise to cooperative effects. A complete calculation of the specific correlation functions which describe the time evolution of the angular functions probed by N.M.R. and dielectric relaxation measurements, has been performed for alkyl chains attached to a massive core. The resulting behaviour has been compared with the decay of trans and gauche populations of specific bonds, expressed in terms of suitable correlation functions whose time integrals lead quite naturally to the definition of effective kinetic constants for the conformational transitions.

  9. Blood-organ transfer kinetics

    Skrable, K.W.; Chabot, G.E.; French, C.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Lipsztein, J.; Sasso, T.L.; Durbin, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    Exact and approximate kinetics equations relating to the transfer and elimination of radionuclides from the blood and various organs in the body are presented. These expressions may be used to estimate the instantaneous activity or the total number of disintegrations of a radionuclide in the blood or various organs of reference in the body, hence, also the respective dose rates and doses. The exact kinetics equations may be used to relate measurements of radionuclides in excreta to burdens in the body. They do give better results for exposure intervals long compared to the effective mean lives of the radionuclide in the various organs of reference, and they yield the exact steady state expressions. Fortunately, this condition is often satisfied for the relatively long standard exposure interval of 50 years that is applied to occupational exposure. In addition, the steady state expressions may be used along with metabolic data of the distribution of elements in the body, diet and excreta to estimate values of the rate constants used in both the exact and approximate expressions. A comparison of the exact and approximate expressions is given for the uranium metabolic model of Wrenn et al. and a comparison is made with current ICRP models. (author)

  10. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  11. Tunneling and reflection in unimolecular reaction kinetic energy release distributions

    Hansen, K.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetic energy release distributions in unimolecular reactions is calculated with detailed balance theory, taking into account the tunneling and the reflection coefficient in three different types of transition states; (i) a saddle point corresponding to a standard RRKM-type theory, (ii) an attachment Langevin cross section, and (iii) an absorbing sphere potential at short range, without long range interactions. Corrections are significant in the one dimensional saddle point states. Very light and lightly bound absorbing systems will show measurable effects in decays from the absorbing sphere, whereas the Langevin cross section is essentially unchanged.

  12. Numerical Simulation of the Kinetic Critical Nucleus

    Sanada, Masaaki; Nishioka, Kazumi; Okada, Masahumi; Maksimov, Igor, L.

    1997-01-01

    Our main interest is to see whether the number density indicates a peak at the kinetically stable critical nucleus due to its kinetical stability. We have numerically calculated the time evolution of the number densities of clusters in the case of water vapor nucleation. We employ the condition in which the difference between the size of the thermodynamic crtitical nucleus and that of the kinetic one is appreciable. The results show that the peak does not appear in the number densities of clu...

  13. Drug-Target Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    Tonge, Peter J

    2018-01-17

    The development of therapies for the treatment of neurological cancer faces a number of major challenges including the synthesis of small molecule agents that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Given the likelihood that in many cases drug exposure will be lower in the CNS than in systemic circulation, it follows that strategies should be employed that can sustain target engagement at low drug concentration. Time dependent target occupancy is a function of both the drug and target concentration as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that describe the binding reaction coordinate, and sustained target occupancy can be achieved through structural modifications that increase target (re)binding and/or that decrease the rate of drug dissociation. The discovery and deployment of compounds with optimized kinetic effects requires information on the structure-kinetic relationships that modulate the kinetics of binding, and the molecular factors that control the translation of drug-target kinetics to time-dependent drug activity in the disease state. This Review first introduces the potential benefits of drug-target kinetics, such as the ability to delineate both thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity, and then describes factors, such as target vulnerability, that impact the utility of kinetic selectivity. The Review concludes with a description of a mechanistic PK/PD model that integrates drug-target kinetics into predictions of drug activity.

  14. Tantalum high-temperature oxidation kinetics

    Grigor'ev, Yu.M.; Sarkisyan, A.A.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of heat release and scale growth during tantalum oxidation within 650-1300 deg C temperature range in oxygen-containing media is investigated. Kinetic equations and temperature and pressure dependences of constants are ound Applicability of the kinetic Lorie mechanism for the description of the tantalum oxidation kinetics applicably to rapid-passing processes is shown. It is stated that the process rate (reaction ability) is determined by adsorption desorption factors on the external surface of the ''protective'' oxide for the ''linear'' oxidation stage [ru

  15. Linear stability analysis of retrieval state in associative memory neural networks of spiking neurons

    Yoshioka, Masahiko

    2002-01-01

    We study associative memory neural networks of the Hodgkin-Huxley type of spiking neurons in which multiple periodic spatiotemporal patterns of spike timing are memorized as limit-cycle-type attractors. In encoding the spatiotemporal patterns, we assume the spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity with the asymmetric time window. Analysis for periodic solution of retrieval state reveals that if the area of the negative part of the time window is equivalent to the positive part, then crosstalk among encoded patterns vanishes. Phase transition due to the loss of the stability of periodic solution is observed when we assume fast α function for direct interaction among neurons. In order to evaluate the critical point of this phase transition, we employ Floquet theory in which the stability problem of the infinite number of spiking neurons interacting with α function is reduced to the eigenvalue problem with the finite size of matrix. Numerical integration of the single-body dynamics yields the explicit value of the matrix, which enables us to determine the critical point of the phase transition with a high degree of precision

  16. Synchronization and Inter-Layer Interactions of Noise-Driven Neural Networks.

    Yuniati, Anis; Mai, Te-Lun; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we used the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model of neurons to investigate the phase diagram of a developing single-layer neural network and that of a network consisting of two weakly coupled neural layers. These networks are noise driven and learn through the spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) or the inverse STDP rules. We described how these networks transited from a non-synchronous background activity state (BAS) to a synchronous firing state (SFS) by varying the network connectivity and the learning efficacy. In particular, we studied the interaction between a SFS layer and a BAS layer, and investigated how synchronous firing dynamics was induced in the BAS layer. We further investigated the effect of the inter-layer interaction on a BAS to SFS repair mechanism by considering three types of neuron positioning (random, grid, and lognormal distributions) and two types of inter-layer connections (random and preferential connections). Among these scenarios, we concluded that the repair mechanism has the largest effect for a network with the lognormal neuron positioning and the preferential inter-layer connections.

  17. Popcorn polymerisation of chloroprene. A kinetic investigation

    Brough, Neil

    1997-01-01

    The project was sponsored by Du Font Dow Elastomers Ltd (Maydown, N. Ireland), in whose neoprene plant the popcorn polymers are found. The material itself has no commercial value, but grows rapidly and has the ability to block pipes and halt production. Therefore the production equipment containing monomers is all scheduled for 'popcorn search' inspections at intervals that differ according to the prevailing temperatures and monomer concentrations; a process which adds to costs. Prior work within the Queen's University of Belfast has identified the factors which affect the initiation of chlorobutadiene popcorn polymers, but available published and unpublished kinetic studies are in conflict concerning their rate of growth, and there is no data on the dichlorobutadiene popcorn polymer. In consequence, current relief system design procedures are based on a worst case scenario about popcorn growth rates and thus the design may be unduly expensive. The research obtained reliable kinetic data to allow these 'popcorn search' schedules to be rationalised and relief system designs to be improved and as a result to reduce the company's expenditure and improve operational safety margins. The proposed research was to investigate the kinetic behaviour of chlorinated butadiene monomers in the formation of omega- or 'popcorn' polymers. The growth rates of the chloroprene popcorn polymer were investigated at various temperatures in the liquid phase in the pure chloroprene monomer, mixed with other monomers and diluted with toluene in what we term 'Korean' type experiments. In these experiments the growth of popcorn polymer was terminated in a set of identically prepared ampoules after a fixed time. The growth rates of popcorn polymer seeds were obtained over various time periods, namely 24, 43 and 54 hours, at temperatures ranging from 10 deg C to 60 deg C. It was observed that the results differ greatly from those obtained by J.Op.Li. In particular, in the present work it was

  18. Second-order kinetic model for the sorption of cadmium onto tree fern: a comparison of linear and non-linear methods.

    Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2006-01-01

    A comparison was made of the linear least-squares method and a trial-and-error non-linear method of the widely used pseudo-second-order kinetic model for the sorption of cadmium onto ground-up tree fern. Four pseudo-second-order kinetic linear equations are discussed. Kinetic parameters obtained from the four kinetic linear equations using the linear method differed but they were the same when using the non-linear method. A type 1 pseudo-second-order linear kinetic model has the highest coefficient of determination. Results show that the non-linear method may be a better way to obtain the desired parameters.

  19. Kinetic and thermodynamic modelling of TBP synthesis processes

    Azzouz, A.; Attou, M.

    1989-02-01

    The present paper deals with kinetic and thermodynamic modellisation of tributylphosphate (TBP) synthesis processes. Its aim consists in a purely comparative study of two different synthesis ways i.e. direct and indirect estirification of butanol. The methodology involves two steps. The first step consists in approximating curves which describe the process evolution and their dependence on the main parameters. The results gave a kinetic model of the process rate yielding in TBP. Further, on the basis of thermodynamic data concerning the various involved compounds a theoretical model was achieved. The calculations were carried out in Basic language and an interpolation mathematical method was applied to approximate the kinetic curves. The thermodynamic calculations were achieved on the basis of GIBBS' free energy using a VAX type computer and a VT240 terminal. The calculations accuracy was reasonable and within the norms. For each process, the confrontation of both models leads to an appreciable accord. In the two processes, the thermodynamic models were similar although the kinetic equations present different reaction orders. Hence the reaction orders were determined by a mathematical method which conists in searching the minimal difference between an empiric relation and a kinetic model with fixed order. This corresponds in fact in testing the model proposed at various reaction order around the suspected value. The main idea which results from such a work is that this kind of processes is well fitting with the model without taking into account the side chain reactions. The process behaviour is like that of a single reaction having a quasi linear dependence of the rate yielding and the reaction time for both processes

  20. Kinetics of the thermal decomposition of pine needles

    Dhaundiyal Alok

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic study of the pyrolysis process of pine needles was examined using a thermogravimetric analyser. The weight loss was measured in nitrogen atmosphere at a purge flow rate of 100 ml/min. The samples were heated over a range of temperature of 19°C–600°C with a heating rate of 10°C/min. The results obtained from the thermal decomposition process indicate that there are three main stages: dehydration, active and passive pyrolysis. The kinetic parameters for the different samples, such as activation energy and pre-exponential factor, are obtained by the shrinking core model (reaction-controlled regime, the model-free, and the first-order model. Experimental results showed that the shrinking model is in good agreement and can be successfully used to understand degradation mechanism of loose biomass. The result obtained from the reaction-controlled regime represented actual values of kinetic parameters which are the same for the whole pyrolysis process; whereas the model-free method presented apparent values of kinetic parameters, as they are dependent on the unknown function ϕ(C, on the sum of the parameters of the physical processes, and on the chemical reactions that happen simultaneously during pyrolysis. Experimental results showed that values of kinetic constant from the first-order model and the SCM are in good agreement and can be successfully used to understand the behaviour of loose biomass (pine needles in the presence of inert atmosphere. Using TGA results, the simulating pyrolysis can be done, with the help of computer software, to achieve a comprehensive detail of the devolatilization process of different types of biomasses.

  1. A new kinetic biphasic approach applied to biodiesel process intensification

    Russo, V.; Tesser, R.; Di Serio, M.; Santacesaria, E. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Many different papers have been published on the kinetics of the transesterification of vegetable oil with methanol, in the presence of alkaline catalysts to produce biodiesel. All the proposed approaches are based on the assumption of a pseudo-monophasic system. The consequence of these approaches is that some experimental aspects cannot be described. For the reaction performed in batch conditions, for example, the monophasic approach is not able to reproduce the different plateau obtained by using different amount of catalyst or the induction time observed at low stirring rates. Moreover, it has been observed by operating in continuous reactors that micromixing has a dramatic effect on the reaction rate. At this purpose, we have recently observed that is possible to obtain a complete conversion to biodiesel in less than 10 seconds of reaction time. This observation is confirmed also by other authors using different types of reactors like: static mixers, micro-reactors, oscillatory flow reactors, cavitational reactors, microwave reactors or centrifugal contactors. In this work we will show that a recently proposed biphasic kinetic approach is able to describe all the aspects before mentioned that cannot be described by the monophasic kinetic model. In particular, we will show that the biphasic kinetic model can describe both the induction time observed in the batch reactors, at low stirring rate, and the very high conversions obtainable in a micro-channel reactor. The adopted biphasic kinetic model is based on a reliable reaction mechanism that will be validated by the experimental evidences reported in this work. (orig.)

  2. Estimating kinetic mechanisms with prior knowledge I: Linear parameter constraints.

    Salari, Autoosa; Navarro, Marco A; Milescu, Mirela; Milescu, Lorin S

    2018-02-05

    To understand how ion channels and other proteins function at the molecular and cellular levels, one must decrypt their kinetic mechanisms. Sophisticated algorithms have been developed that can be used to extract kinetic parameters from a variety of experimental data types. However, formulating models that not only explain new data, but are also consistent with existing knowledge, remains a challenge. Here, we present a two-part study describing a mathematical and computational formalism that can be used to enforce prior knowledge into the model using constraints. In this first part, we focus on constraints that enforce explicit linear relationships involving rate constants or other model parameters. We develop a simple, linear algebra-based transformation that can be applied to enforce many types of model properties and assumptions, such as microscopic reversibility, allosteric gating, and equality and inequality parameter relationships. This transformation converts the set of linearly interdependent model parameters into a reduced set of independent parameters, which can be passed to an automated search engine for model optimization. In the companion article, we introduce a complementary method that can be used to enforce arbitrary parameter relationships and any constraints that quantify the behavior of the model under certain conditions. The procedures described in this study can, in principle, be coupled to any of the existing methods for solving molecular kinetics for ion channels or other proteins. These concepts can be used not only to enforce existing knowledge but also to formulate and test new hypotheses. © 2018 Salari et al.

  3. Kinetics of sigma phase formation in a Duplex Stainless Steel

    Rodrigo Magnabosco

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work determines the kinetics of sigma phase formation in UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS, describing the phase transformations that occur in isothermal aging between 700 and 900 ºC for time periods up to 1032 hours, allowing the determination of the Time-Temperature-Precipitation (TTP diagram for sigma phase and proposing a model to predict the kinetics of sigma phase formation using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA type expression. The higher kinetics of sigma phase formation occurs at 850 ºC. However, isothermal aging between 700 and 900 ºC for time periods up to 1032 hours are not sufficient to the establishment of thermodynamic equilibrium. Activation energy for both nucleation and growth of sigma phase is determined (185 kJ.mol-1 and its value is equivalent to the activation energy for Cr diffusion in ferrite, indicating that diffusion of Cr is probably the major thermally activated process involved in sigma phase formation. The determined JMA type expression presents good fit with experimental data between 700 and 850 ºC.

  4. Kinetic effects on the propagation of surface waves and their relevance to the heating of the solar corona

    Kuperus, M.; Heyvaerts, J.

    1980-01-01

    The MHD oscillations of the Alfven type running along surfaces of discontinuity generate motions in the discontinuity region which come rapidly out of phase. It is shown how the mathematical theory of this phase detuning predicts that surface wave should suffer dissipationless damping. Real damping is actually achieved by viscosity or kinetic effects. When detuning has grown to a large enough level, however, oscillations must be described by kinetic theory. Kinetic Alfven waves differ from perfect MHD Alfven waves in that they are able to propagate across the field. A theory of kinetic type oscillations in a finite thickness boundary is described, which predicts that surface waves generate intense kinetic Alfven waves in this boundary. The subsequent dissipation of these waves may be a powerful heating mechanism [fr

  5. One-dimensional reactor kinetics model for RETRAN

    Gose, G.C.; Peterson, C.E.; Ellis, N.L.; McClure, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Previous versions of RETRAN have had only a point kinetics model to describe the reactor core behavior during thermal-hydraulic transients. The principal assumption in deriving the point kinetics model is that the neutron flux may be separated into a time-dependent amplitude funtion and a time-independent shape function. Certain types of transients cannot be correctly analyzed under this assumption, since proper definitions for core average quantities such as reactivity or lifetime include the inner product of the adjoint flux with the perturbed flux. A one-dimensional neutronics model has been included in a preliminary version of RETRAN-02. The ability to account for flux shape changes will permit an improved representation of the thermal and hydraulic feedback effects. This paper describes the neutronics model and discusses some of the analyses

  6. Nonequilibrium electron energy-loss kinetics in metal clusters

    Guillon, C; Fatti, N D; Vallee, F

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafast energy exchanges of a non-Fermi electron gas with the lattice are investigated in silver clusters with sizes ranging from 4 to 26 nm using a femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence for a cluster-size-dependent slowing down of the short-time energy losses of the electron gas when it is strongly athermal. A constant rate is eventually reached after a few hundred femtoseconds, consistent with the electron gas internal thermalization kinetics, this behaviour reflecting evolution from an individual to a collective electron-lattice type of coupling. The timescale of this transient regime is reduced in small nanoparticles, in agreement with speeding up of the electron-electron interactions with size reduction. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron kinetics.

  7. Disordering kinetics in surface overlayers

    Jesina, A.; Tringides, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The disordering kinetics of the O/W(110)-p(2x1)+p(2x2) overlayer, prepared initially in a well-ordered state, are studied with low-energy electron diffraction profile analysis. The decay of the peak intensity, used as a measure of the growing disorder, cannot be fitted to a power law as in the case of ordering processes. The full width at half maximum of the time-dependent structure factor S(q,t) is constant with time, which suggests that the average size remains constant. Diffusion activation energy extracted for the temperature dependence of the disordering is 1.0±0.05 eV, which is different from the value of 0.6 eV measured in ordering processes. The difference can be explained by the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, which contribute differently to the diffusion barrier, in the two experiments

  8. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  9. Method of molybdenum kinetic determination

    Krejngol'd, S.U.; Dzotsenidze, N.E.; Ruseishviyai, T.G.; Nelen', I.M.

    1980-01-01

    The method molybdenum kinetic determination according to oxidation of pyrogallol with bromate in the medium of 0.05-0.15 M perchloric or sulphuric acids is presented. 1 mg of Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn, Cr(3); 100 μg of Ca, Al, Cu, 10 μg of Cr(4), W; 10 μg of Fe in the presence of 22x10 - 4 M solution of EDTA, as well as 10 - 4 M solutions of chlorides and fluorides, 10 - 5 M solutions of bromides do not interfere with molybdenum determination using the given method. The method is rather simple, it takes 30 min to carry out the analysis. Determination limit of molybdenum constitutes 0.01 μg/ml

  10. Quantum-statistical kinetic equations

    Loss, D.; Schoeller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Considering a homogeneous normal quantum fluid consisting of identical interacting fermions or bosons, the authors derive an exact quantum-statistical generalized kinetic equation with a collision operator given as explicit cluster series where exchange effects are included through renormalized Liouville operators. This new result is obtained by applying a recently developed superoperator formalism (Liouville operators, cluster expansions, symmetrized projectors, P q -rule, etc.) to nonequilibrium systems described by a density operator ρ(t) which obeys the von Neumann equation. By means of this formalism a factorization theorem is proven (being essential for obtaining closed equations), and partial resummations (leading to renormalized quantities) are performed. As an illustrative application, the quantum-statistical versions (including exchange effects due to Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein statistics) of the homogeneous Boltzmann (binary collisions) and Choh-Uhlenbeck (triple collisions) equations are derived

  11. Growth kinetics in multicomponent fluids

    Chen, S.; Lookman, T.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrodynamic effects on the late-stage kinetics in spinodal decomposition of multicomponent fluids are examined using a lattice Boltzmann scheme with stochastic fluctuations in the fluid and at the interface. In two dimensions, the three- and four-component immiscible fluid mixture (with a 1024 2 lattice) behaves like an off-critical binary fluid with an estimated domain growth of t 0.4 +/= 0.03 rather than t 1/3 as previously estimated, showing the significant influence of hydrodynamics. In three dimensions (with a 256 3 lattice), we estimate the growth as t 0.96 +/= 0.05 for both critical and off-critical quenches, in agreement with phenomenological theory

  12. NESTLE: A nodal kinetics code

    Al-Chalabi, R.M.; Turinsky, P.J.; Faure, F.-X.; Sarsour, H.N.; Engrand, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    The NESTLE nodal kinetics code has been developed for utilization as a stand-alone code for steady-state and transient reactor neutronic analysis and for incorporation into system transient codes, such as TRAC and RELAP. The latter is desirable to increase the simulation fidelity over that obtained from currently employed zero- and one-dimensional neutronic models and now feasible due to advances in computer performance and efficiency of nodal methods. As a stand-alone code, requirements are that it operate on a range of computing platforms from memory-limited personal computers (PCs) to supercomputers with vector processors. This paper summarizes the features of NESTLE that reflect the utilization and requirements just noted

  13. Human skeletal muscle: transition between fast and slow fibre types.

    Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Zebedin, Michaela; Obermoser, Magdalena; Moser, Gerhard; Tauber, Mark; Niebauer, Josef; Resch, Herbert; Galler, Stefan

    2011-05-01

    Human skeletal muscles consist of different fibre types: slow fibres (slow twitch or type I) containing the myosin heavy chain isoform (MHC)-I and fast fibres (fast twitch or type II) containing MHC-IIa (type IIA) or MHC-IId (type IID). The following order of decreasing kinetics is known: type IID > type IIA > type I. This order is especially based on the kinetics of stretch activation, which is the most discriminative property among fibre types. In this study we tested if hybrid fibres containing both MHC-IIa and MHC-I (type C fibres) provide a transition in kinetics between fast (type IIA) and slow fibres (type I). Our data of stretch activation kinetics suggest that type C fibres, with different ratios of MHC-IIa and MHC-I, do not provide a continuous transition. Instead, a specialized group of slow fibres, which we called "transition fibres", seems to provide a transition. Apart of their kinetics of stretch activation, which is most close to that of type IIA, the transition fibres are characterized by large cross-sectional areas and low maximal tensions. The molecular cause for the mechanical properties of the transition fibres is unknown. It is possible that the transition fibres contain an unknown slow MHC isoform, which cannot be separated by biochemical methods. Alternatively, or in addition, isoforms of myofibrillar proteins, other than MHC, and posttranslational modifications of myofibrillar proteins could play a role regarding the characteristics of the transition fibres.

  14. Kinetics model for lutate dosimetry

    Lima, M.F.; Mesquita, C.H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of compartmental analysis to predict the behavior of drugs in the organism is considered the better option among numerous methods employed in pharmacodynamics. A six compartments model was developed to determinate the kinetic constants of 177Lu-DOTATATO biodistribution using data from one published study with 67 patients treated by PRRT (Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) and followed by CT during 68,25 hours. The compartmental analysis was made using the software AnaComp®. The influence of the time pos-injection over the dose assessment was studied taking into account the renal excretion management by aminoacid coinfusion, whose direct effects persist in the first day. The biodistribution curve was split in five sectors: 0-0.25h; 0-3.25h; 3.25-24.25h; 24.25-68.25h and 3.25-68.25h. After the examination of that influence, the study was concentrated in separate the biodistribution curve in two phases. Phase 1: governed by uptake from the blood, considering the time pos-injection until 3.25h and phase 2: governed by renal excretion, considering the time pos-injection from 3.25h to 68.25h. The model considered the organs and tissues superposition in the CT image acquisition by sampling parameters as the contribution of the the activity concentration in blood and relation between the sizes of the whole body and measured organs. The kinetic constants obtained from each phase (1 and 2) were used in dose assessment to patients in 26 organs and tissues described by MIRD. Dosimetry results were in agreement with the available results from literature, restrict to whole body, kidneys, bone marrow, spleen and liver. The advantage of the proposed model is the compartmental method quickness and power to estimate dose in organs and tissues, including tumor that, in the most part, were not discriminate by voxels of phantoms built using CT images. (author)

  15. Nanoparticle shape, thermodynamics and kinetics

    Marks, L D; Peng, L

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles can be beautiful, as in stained glass windows, or they can be ugly as in wear and corrosion debris from implants. We estimate that there will be about 70 000 papers in 2015 with nanoparticles as a keyword, but only one in thirteen uses the nanoparticle shape as an additional keyword and research focus, and only one in two hundred has thermodynamics. Methods for synthesizing nanoparticles have exploded over the last decade, but our understanding of how and why they take their forms has not progressed as fast. This topical review attempts to take a critical snapshot of the current understanding, focusing more on methods to predict than a purely synthetic or descriptive approach. We look at models and themes which are largely independent of the exact synthetic method whether it is deposition, gas-phase condensation, solution based or hydrothermal synthesis. Elements are old dating back to the beginning of the 20th century—some of the pioneering models developed then are still relevant today. Others are newer, a merging of older concepts such as kinetic-Wulff constructions with methods to understand minimum energy shapes for particles with twins. Overall we find that while there are still many unknowns, the broad framework of understanding and predicting the structure of nanoparticles via diverse Wulff constructions, either thermodynamic, local minima or kinetic has been exceedingly successful. However, the field is still developing and there remain many unknowns and new avenues for research, a few of these being suggested towards the end of the review. (topical review)

  16. Kinetics model for lutate dosimetry

    Lima, M.F.; Mesquita, C.H., E-mail: mflima@ipen.br, E-mail: chmesqui@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The use of compartmental analysis to predict the behavior of drugs in the organism is considered the better option among numerous methods employed in pharmacodynamics. A six compartments model was developed to determinate the kinetic constants of 177Lu-DOTATATO biodistribution using data from one published study with 67 patients treated by PRRT (Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy) and followed by CT during 68,25 hours. The compartmental analysis was made using the software AnaComp Registered-Sign . The influence of the time pos-injection over the dose assessment was studied taking into account the renal excretion management by aminoacid coinfusion, whose direct effects persist in the first day. The biodistribution curve was split in five sectors: 0-0.25h; 0-3.25h; 3.25-24.25h; 24.25-68.25h and 3.25-68.25h. After the examination of that influence, the study was concentrated in separate the biodistribution curve in two phases. Phase 1: governed by uptake from the blood, considering the time pos-injection until 3.25h and phase 2: governed by renal excretion, considering the time pos-injection from 3.25h to 68.25h. The model considered the organs and tissues superposition in the CT image acquisition by sampling parameters as the contribution of the the activity concentration in blood and relation between the sizes of the whole body and measured organs. The kinetic constants obtained from each phase (1 and 2) were used in dose assessment to patients in 26 organs and tissues described by MIRD. Dosimetry results were in agreement with the available results from literature, restrict to whole body, kidneys, bone marrow, spleen and liver. The advantage of the proposed model is the compartmental method quickness and power to estimate dose in organs and tissues, including tumor that, in the most part, were not discriminate by voxels of phantoms built using CT images. (author)

  17. Kinetics of soil dehydrogenase in response to exogenous Cd toxicity

    Tan, Xiangping [College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS 723 Xingke Rd., Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Wang, Ziquan; Lu, Guannan [College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi (China); He, Wenxiang, E-mail: wenxianghe@nwafu.edu.cn [College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi (China); Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition and Agro-environment in Northwest China, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi (China); Wei, Gehong [College of Life Sciences, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, 712100, Shaanxi (China); Huang, Feng; Xu, Xinlan; Shen, Weijun [Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS 723 Xingke Rd., Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • pH explained 30–45% of the dehydrogenase activity (DHA), V{sub max}, and K{sub m} variations across soils. • Different inhibition mechanism of Cd to DHA varied soil types. • Soil properties and inhibition constant affect the toxicity of Cd. • Reaction constant (k) could indicate sensitively the toxicity of Cd to DHA. - Abstract: Soil dehydrogenase plays a role in the biological oxidation of soil organic matter and can be considered a good measure of the change of microbial oxidative activity under environmental pollutions. However, the kinetic characteristic of soil dehydrogenase under heavy metal stresses has not been investigated thoroughly. In this study, we characterized the kinetic characteristic of soil dehydrogenase in 14 soil types, and investigated how kinetic parameters changed under spiked with different concentrations of cadmium (Cd). The results showed that the K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of soil dehydrogenase was among 1.4–7.3 mM and 15.9–235.2 μM h{sup −1} in uncontaminated soils, respectively. In latosolic red soil and brown soil, the inhibitory kinetic mechanism of Cd to soil dehydrogenase was anticompetitive inhibition with inhibition constants (K{sub i}) of 12 and 4.7 mM, respectively; in other soils belonged to linear mixed inhibition, the values of K{sub i} were between 0.7–4.2 mM. Soil total organic carbon and K{sub i} were the major factors affecting the toxicity of Cd to dehydrogenase activity. In addition, the velocity constant (k) was more sensitive to Cd contamination compared to V{sub max} and K{sub m}, which was established as an early indicator of gross changes in soil microbial oxidative activity caused by Cd contamination.

  18. Synaptic Plasticity and Spike Synchronisation in Neuronal Networks

    Borges, Rafael R.; Borges, Fernando S.; Lameu, Ewandson L.; Protachevicz, Paulo R.; Iarosz, Kelly C.; Caldas, Iberê L.; Viana, Ricardo L.; Macau, Elbert E. N.; Baptista, Murilo S.; Grebogi, Celso; Batista, Antonio M.

    2017-12-01

    Brain plasticity, also known as neuroplasticity, is a fundamental mechanism of neuronal adaptation in response to changes in the environment or due to brain injury. In this review, we show our results about the effects of synaptic plasticity on neuronal networks composed by Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We show that the final topology of the evolved network depends crucially on the ratio between the strengths of the inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Excitation of the same order of inhibition revels an evolved network that presents the rich-club phenomenon, well known to exist in the brain. For initial networks with considerably larger inhibitory strengths, we observe the emergence of a complex evolved topology, where neurons sparsely connected to other neurons, also a typical topology of the brain. The presence of noise enhances the strength of both types of synapses, but if the initial network has synapses of both natures with similar strengths. Finally, we show how the synchronous behaviour of the evolved network will reflect its evolved topology.

  19. Biophysically realistic minimal model of dopamine neuron

    Oprisan, Sorinel

    2008-03-01

    We proposed and studied a new biophysically relevant computational model of dopaminergic neurons. Midbrain dopamine neurons are involved in motivation and the control of movement, and have been implicated in various pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug abuse. The model we developed is a single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-type parallel conductance membrane model. The model captures the essential mechanisms underlying the slow oscillatory potentials and plateau potential oscillations. The main currents involved are: 1) a voltage-dependent fast calcium current, 2) a small conductance potassium current that is modulated by the cytosolic concentration of calcium, and 3) a slow voltage-activated potassium current. We developed multidimensional bifurcation diagrams and extracted the effective domains of sustained oscillations. The model includes a calcium balance due to the fundamental importance of calcium influx as proved by simultaneous electrophysiological and calcium imaging procedure. Although there are significant evidences to suggest a partially electrogenic calcium pump, all previous models considered only elecrtogenic pumps. We investigated the effect of the electrogenic calcium pump on the bifurcation diagram of the model and compared our findings against the experimental results.

  20. Multiphasic on/off pheromone signalling in moths as neural correlates of a search strategy.

    Dominique Martinez

    Full Text Available Insects and robots searching for odour sources in turbulent plumes face the same problem: the random nature of mixing causes fluctuations and intermittency in perception. Pheromone-tracking male moths appear to deal with discontinuous flows of information by surging upwind, upon sensing a pheromone patch, and casting crosswind, upon losing the plume. Using a combination of neurophysiological recordings, computational modelling and experiments with a cyborg, we propose a neuronal mechanism that promotes a behavioural switch between surge and casting. We show how multiphasic On/Off pheromone-sensitive neurons may guide action selection based on signalling presence or loss of the pheromone. A Hodgkin-Huxley-type neuron model with a small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK channel reproduces physiological On/Off responses. Using this model as a command neuron and the antennae of tethered moths as pheromone sensors, we demonstrate the efficiency of multiphasic patterning in driving a robotic searcher toward the source. Taken together, our results suggest that multiphasic On/Off responses may mediate olfactory navigation and that SK channels may account for these responses.

  1. Multiphasic on/off pheromone signalling in moths as neural correlates of a search strategy.

    Martinez, Dominique; Chaffiol, Antoine; Voges, Nicole; Gu, Yuqiao; Anton, Sylvia; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Lucas, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Insects and robots searching for odour sources in turbulent plumes face the same problem: the random nature of mixing causes fluctuations and intermittency in perception. Pheromone-tracking male moths appear to deal with discontinuous flows of information by surging upwind, upon sensing a pheromone patch, and casting crosswind, upon losing the plume. Using a combination of neurophysiological recordings, computational modelling and experiments with a cyborg, we propose a neuronal mechanism that promotes a behavioural switch between surge and casting. We show how multiphasic On/Off pheromone-sensitive neurons may guide action selection based on signalling presence or loss of the pheromone. A Hodgkin-Huxley-type neuron model with a small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel reproduces physiological On/Off responses. Using this model as a command neuron and the antennae of tethered moths as pheromone sensors, we demonstrate the efficiency of multiphasic patterning in driving a robotic searcher toward the source. Taken together, our results suggest that multiphasic On/Off responses may mediate olfactory navigation and that SK channels may account for these responses.

  2. Electro-Quasistatic Simulations in Bio-Systems Engineering and Medical Engineering

    U. van Rienen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Slowly varying electromagnetic fields play a key role in various applications in bio-systems and medical engineering. Examples are the electric activity of neurons on neurochips used as biosensors, the stimulating electric fields of implanted electrodes used for deep brain stimulation in patients with Morbus Parkinson and the stimulation of the auditory nerves in deaf patients, respectively. In order to simulate the neuronal activity on a chip it is necessary to couple Maxwell's and Hodgkin-Huxley's equations. First numerical results for a neuron coupling to a single electrode are presented. They show a promising qualitative agreement with the experimentally recorded signals. Further, simulations are presented on electrodes for deep brain stimulation in animal experiments where the question of electrode ageing and energy deposition in the surrounding tissue are of major interest. As a last example, electric simulations for a simple cochlea model are presented comparing the field in the skull bones for different electrode types and stimulations in different positions.

  3. Single or multiple synchronization transitions in scale-free neuronal networks with electrical or chemical coupling

    Hao Yinghang; Gong, Yubing; Wang Li; Ma Xiaoguang; Yang Chuanlu

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Single synchronization transition for gap-junctional coupling. → Multiple synchronization transitions for chemical synaptic coupling. → Gap junctions and chemical synapses have different impacts on synchronization transition. → Chemical synapses may play a dominant role in neurons' information processing. - Abstract: In this paper, we have studied time delay- and coupling strength-induced synchronization transitions in scale-free modified Hodgkin-Huxley (MHH) neuron networks with gap-junctions and chemical synaptic coupling. It is shown that the synchronization transitions are much different for these two coupling types. For gap-junctions, the neurons exhibit a single synchronization transition with time delay and coupling strength, while for chemical synapses, there are multiple synchronization transitions with time delay, and the synchronization transition with coupling strength is dependent on the time delay lengths. For short delays we observe a single synchronization transition, whereas for long delays the neurons exhibit multiple synchronization transitions as the coupling strength is varied. These results show that gap junctions and chemical synapses have different impacts on the pattern formation and synchronization transitions of the scale-free MHH neuronal networks, and chemical synapses, compared to gap junctions, may play a dominant and more active function in the firing activity of the networks. These findings would be helpful for further understanding the roles of gap junctions and chemical synapses in the firing dynamics of neuronal networks.

  4. Single or multiple synchronization transitions in scale-free neuronal networks with electrical or chemical coupling

    Hao Yinghang [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Gong, Yubing, E-mail: gongyubing09@hotmail.co [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Wang Li; Ma Xiaoguang; Yang Chuanlu [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: Single synchronization transition for gap-junctional coupling. Multiple synchronization transitions for chemical synaptic coupling. Gap junctions and chemical synapses have different impacts on synchronization transition. Chemical synapses may play a dominant role in neurons' information processing. - Abstract: In this paper, we have studied time delay- and coupling strength-induced synchronization transitions in scale-free modified Hodgkin-Huxley (MHH) neuron networks with gap-junctions and chemical synaptic coupling. It is shown that the synchronization transitions are much different for these two coupling types. For gap-junctions, the neurons exhibit a single synchronization transition with time delay and coupling strength, while for chemical synapses, there are multiple synchronization transitions with time delay, and the synchronization transition with coupling strength is dependent on the time delay lengths. For short delays we observe a single synchronization transition, whereas for long delays the neurons exhibit multiple synchronization transitions as the coupling strength is varied. These results show that gap junctions and chemical synapses have different impacts on the pattern formation and synchronization transitions of the scale-free MHH neuronal networks, and chemical synapses, compared to gap junctions, may play a dominant and more active function in the firing activity of the networks. These findings would be helpful for further understanding the roles of gap junctions and chemical synapses in the firing dynamics of neuronal networks.

  5. Feedback controlled electrical nerve stimulation: a computer simulation.

    Doruk, R Ozgur

    2010-07-01

    The role of repetitive firing in neurophysiologic or neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson, epilepsy and bipolar type disorders, has always been a topic of medical research as therapies target either the cease of firing or a decrease in its frequency. In electrotherapy, one of the mechanisms to achieve the purpose in point is to apply a low density electric current to the nervous system. In this study, a computer simulation is provided of a treatment in which the stimulation current is computed by nerve fiber cell membrane potential feedback so that the level of the current is automatically instead of manually adjusted. The behavior of the nerve cell is represented by the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model, which is slightly modified into a linear model with state dependent coefficients. Due to this modification, the algebraic and differential Riccati equations can be applied, which allows an optimal controller minimizing a quadratic performance index given by the user. Using a controlled current injection can decrease unnecessarily long current injection times that may be harmful to the neuronal network. This study introduces a prototype for a possible future application to a network of neurons as it is more realistic than a single neuron. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimal physiological structure of small neurons to guarantee stable information processing

    Zeng, S. Y.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Wei, D. Q.; Luo, X. S.; Tang, W. Y.; Zeng, S. W.; Wang, R. F.

    2013-02-01

    Spike is the basic element for neuronal information processing and the spontaneous spiking frequency should be less than 1 Hz for stable information processing. If the neuronal membrane area is small, the frequency of neuronal spontaneous spiking caused by ion channel noise may be high. Therefore, it is important to suppress the deleterious spontaneous spiking of the small neurons. We find by simulation of stochastic neurons with Hodgkin-Huxley-type channels that the leakage system is critical and extremely efficient to suppress the spontaneous spiking and guarantee stable information processing of the small neurons. However, within the physiological limit the potassium system cannot do so. The suppression effect of the leakage system is super-exponential, but that of the potassium system is quasi-linear. With the minor physiological cost and the minimal consumption of metabolic energy, a slightly lower reversal potential and a relatively larger conductance of the leakage system give the optimal physiological structure to suppress the deleterious spontaneous spiking and guarantee stable information processing of small neurons, dendrites and axons.

  7. Conformational Diffusion and Helix Formation Kinetics

    Hummer, Gerhard; Garcia, Angel E.; Garde, Shekhar

    2000-01-01

    The time, temperature, and sequence dependences of helix formation kinetics of fully atomistic peptide models in explicit solvent are described quantitatively by a diffusive search within the coil state with barrierless transitions into the helical state. Conformational diffusion leads to nonexponential kinetics and jump-width dependences in temperature jump experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  8. Towards Free-Form Kinetic Structures

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2012-01-01

    of pin-slot paths starting from the local displacements of element [2] [3]. In the design of kinetic structures, in particular when complex three dimensional and non regular configurations are involved, the functionality is frequently related to a global displacement capability of the assembly rather...... for the generation of free-form kinetic structures....

  9. Modeling composting kinetics: A review of approaches

    Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2004-01-01

    Composting kinetics modeling is necessary to design and operate composting facilities that comply with strict market demands and tight environmental legislation. Current composting kinetics modeling can be characterized as inductive, i.e. the data are the starting point of the modeling process and

  10. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.

    2015-02-23

    © 2015 American Physical Society. The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this "selection" of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  11. A Comprehensive Enzyme Kinetic Exercise for Biochemistry

    Barton, Janice S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a comprehensive treatment of experimental enzyme kinetics strongly coupled to electronic data acquisition and use of spreadsheets to organize data and perform linear and nonlinear least-squares analyses, all in a manner that promotes development of important reasoning skills. Kinetic parameters are obtained for the stable…

  12. Kinetic equations for the collisional plasma model

    Rij, W.I. Van; Meier, H.K.; Beasley, C.O. Jr.; McCune, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Using the Collisional Plasma Model (CPM) representation, expressions are derived for the Vlasov operator, both in its general form and in the drift-kinetic approximation following the recursive derivation by Hazeltine. The expressions for the operators give easily calculated couplings between neighbouring components of the CPM representation. Expressions for various macroscopic observables in the drift-kinetics approximation are also given. (author)

  13. Chemistry and reaction kinetics of biowaste torrefaction

    Stelt, van der M.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses the question of how the chemistry and reaction kinetics of torrefaction are influenced by reaction conditions and the effects occuring during the reaction. This research question can be specified by questions such as, what controls their kinetics during torrefaction and what

  14. Determination of the kinetics of ethene epoxidation

    Schouten, E.P.S.; Schouten, E.P.S.; Borman, P.C.; Borman, P.C.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    Several problems and pitfalls in the use of laboratory reactors for the determination of the kinetics of ethene epoxidation over industrial silver on α-alumina catalyst are discussed. Also, commonly used methodologies for kinetic studies are dealt with because of the general nature of some problems.

  15. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of some fluoroquinolone ...

    A simple and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of some fluoroquinolonea antibiotics; gemifloxacin mesylate, moxifloxacin hydrochloride and gatifloxacin in bulk and in pharmaceutical preparations. The method is based upon a kinetic investigation of the oxidation reaction of ...

  16. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    Gardiner, Bennett P. J.; McCue, Scott W.; Dallaston, Michael C.; Moroney, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Physical Society. The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularization on the interface is not provided by surface tension but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalize high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularized solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this "selection" of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analog with surface tension. We treat the numerical problem of computing these Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling, which turns out to be more subtle than the analog with surface tension, since kinetic undercooling permits finger shapes which are corner-free but not analytic. We provide numerical evidence for the selection mechanism by setting up a problem with both kinetic undercooling and surface tension and numerically taking the limit that the surface tension vanishes.

  17. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantities...

  18. Conformational Diffusion and Helix Formation Kinetics

    Hummer, Gerhard [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Building 5, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520 (United States); Garcia, Angel E. [Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group T-10, MS K710, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Garde, Shekhar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2000-09-18

    The time, temperature, and sequence dependences of helix formation kinetics of fully atomistic peptide models in explicit solvent are described quantitatively by a diffusive search within the coil state with barrierless transitions into the helical state. Conformational diffusion leads to nonexponential kinetics and jump-width dependences in temperature jump experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Inflation Rates, Car Devaluation, and Chemical Kinetics.

    Pogliani, Lionello; Berberan-Santos, Mario N.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the inflation rate problem and offers an interesting analogy with chemical kinetics. Presents and solves the car devaluation problem as a normal chemical kinetic problem where the order of the rate law and the value of the rate constant are derived. (JRH)

  20. Kinetic theory of gases and plasmas

    Schram, P.P.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Kinetic theory provides the link between the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of many-particle systems and macroscopic or phenomenological physics. This volume deals with the derivation of kinetic equations, their limitations and generalizations,and with the applications of kinetic theory to physical phenomena and the calculation of transport coefficients. This book is divided in 12 chapters which discuss a wide range of topics such as balanced equations, the Klimontovich, Vlasov-Maxwell, and Boltzmann equations, Chapman-Enskog theory, the kinetic theory of plasmas, B.G.K. models, linear response theory, Brownian motion and renormalized kinetic theory. Each chapter is concluded with exercises, which not only enable the readers to test their understanding of the theory, but also present additional examples which complement the text. 151 refs.; 35 figs.; 5 tabs

  1. Crystallization Kinetics within a Generic Modeling Framework

    Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; von Solms, Nicolas; Gernaey, Krist V.

    2014-01-01

    of employing a well-structured model library for storage, use/reuse, and analysis of the kinetic models are highlighted. Examples illustrating the application of the modeling framework for kinetic model discrimination related to simulation of specific crystallization scenarios and for kinetic model parameter......A new and extended version of a generic modeling framework for analysis and design of crystallization operations is presented. The new features of this framework are described, with focus on development, implementation, identification, and analysis of crystallization kinetic models. Issues related...... to the modeling of various kinetic phenomena like nucleation, growth, agglomeration, and breakage are discussed in terms of model forms, model parameters, their availability and/or estimation, and their selection and application for specific crystallization operational scenarios under study. The advantages...

  2. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  3. Calculation of Kinetic Parameters of TRIGA Reactor

    Snoj, Luka; Kavcic, Andrej; Zerovnik, Gasper; Ravnik, Matjaz

    2008-01-01

    Modern Monte Carlo transport codes in combination of fast computer clusters enable very accurate calculations of the most important reactor kinetic parameters. Such are the effective delayed neutron fraction, β eff , and mean neutron generation time, Λ. We calculated the β eff and Λ for various realistic and hypothetical annular TRIGA Mark II cores with different types and amount of fuel. It can be observed that the effective delayed neutron fraction strongly depends on the number of fuel elements in the core or on the core size. E.g., for 12 wt. % uranium standard fuel with 20 % enrichment, β eff varies from 0.0080 for a small core (43 fuel rods) to 0.0075 for a full core (90 fuel rods). It is interesting to note that calculated value of β eff strongly depends also on the delayed neutron nuclear data set used in calculations. The prompt neutron life-time mainly depends on the amount (due to either content or enrichment) of 235 U in the fuel as it is approximately inversely proportional to the average absorption cross-section of the fuel. E.g., it varies from 28 μs for 30 wt. % uranium content fuelled core to 48 μs for 8.5 wt. % uranium content LEU fuelled core. The results are especially important for pulse mode operation and analysis of the pulses. (authors)

  4. Kinetic energy recovery systems in motor vehicles

    Śliwiński, C.

    2016-09-01

    The article draws attention to the increasing environmental pollution caused by the development of vehicle transport and motorization. Different types of design solutions used in vehicles for the reduction of fuel consumption, and thereby emission of toxic gasses into the atmosphere, were specified. Historical design solutions concerning energy recovery devices in mechanical vehicles which used flywheels to accumulate kinetic energy were shown. Developmental tendencies in the area of vehicle manufacturing in the form of hybrid electric and electric devices were discussed. Furthermore, designs of energy recovery devices with electrical energy storage from the vehicle braking and shock absorbing systems were presented. A mechanical energy storing device using a flywheel operating under vacuum was presented, as were advantages and disadvantages of both systems, the limitations they impose on individual constructions and safety issues. The paper also discusses a design concept of an energy recovery device in mechanical vehicles which uses torsion springs as the main components of energy accumulation during braking. The desirability of a cooperation of both the mechanical- and electrical energy recovery devices was indicated.

  5. Nonlocal nonlinear coupling of kinetic sound waves

    O. Lyubchyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We study three-wave resonant interactions among kinetic-scale oblique sound waves in the low-frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear eigenmode equation is derived in the framework of a two-fluid plasma model. Because of dispersive modifications at small wavelengths perpendicular to the background magnetic field, these waves become a decay-type mode. We found two decay channels, one into co-propagating product waves (forward decay, and another into counter-propagating product waves (reverse decay. All wavenumbers in the forward decay are similar and hence this decay is local in wavenumber space. On the contrary, the reverse decay generates waves with wavenumbers that are much larger than in the original pump waves and is therefore intrinsically nonlocal. In general, the reverse decay is significantly faster than the forward one, suggesting a nonlocal spectral transport induced by oblique sound waves. Even with low-amplitude sound waves the nonlinear interaction rate is larger than the collisionless dissipation rate. Possible applications regarding acoustic waves observed in the solar corona, solar wind, and topside ionosphere are briefly discussed.

  6. Mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion

    Tay, Kafui A.; Coudert, Francois-Xavier; Boutin, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion. The electron center of mass is found to exhibit Brownian-type behavior with a diffusion coefficient considerably greater than that of the solvent. As previously postulated by both experimental and theoretical works, the instantaneous response of the electron to the librational motions of surrounding water molecules constitutes the principal mode of motion. The diffusive mechanism can be understood within the traditional framework of transfer diffusion processes, where the diffusive step is akin to the exchange of an extramolecular electron between neighboring water molecules. This is a second-order process with a computed rate constant of 5.0 ps -1 at 298 K. In agreement with experiment the electron diffusion exhibits Arrhenius behavior over the temperature range of 298-400 K. We compute an activation energy of 8.9 kJ mol -1 . Through analysis of Arrhenius plots and the application of a simple random walk model it is demonstrated that the computed rate constant for exchange of an excess electron is indeed the phenomenological rate constant associated with the diffusive process

  7. Turbulence generation through intense kinetic energy sources

    Maqui, Agustin F.; Donzis, Diego A.

    2016-06-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to systematically study the development and establishment of turbulence when the flow is initialized with concentrated regions of intense kinetic energy. This resembles both active and passive grids which have been extensively used to generate and study turbulence in laboratories at different Reynolds numbers and with different characteristics, such as the degree of isotropy and homogeneity. A large DNS database was generated covering a wide range of initial conditions with a focus on perturbations with some directional preference, a condition found in active jet grids and passive grids passed through a contraction as well as a new type of active grid inspired by the experimental use of lasers to photo-excite the molecules that comprise the fluid. The DNS database is used to assert under what conditions the flow becomes turbulent and if so, the time required for this to occur. We identify a natural time scale of the problem which indicates the onset of turbulence and a single Reynolds number based exclusively on initial conditions which controls the evolution of the flow. It is found that a minimum Reynolds number is needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, velocity as well as spectral dynamics and anisotropy measures is presented to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence.

  8. Diamagnetic boundary layers: a kinetic theory

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma such as those observed in the solar wind is presented. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary, one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers, in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases in which the magnetic field intensity and/or direction changed across the layer were considered. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii and the field changed smoothly , although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. The results are consistent with the observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU. (Auth.)

  9. A kinetic approach to magnetospheric modeling

    Whipple, E.C. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The earth's magnetosphere is caused by the interaction between the flowing solar wind and the earth's magnetic dipole, with the distorted magnetic field in the outer parts of the magnetosphere due to the current systems resulting from this interaction. It is surprising that even the conceptually simple problem of the collisionless interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field has not been solved. A kinetic approach is essential if one is to take into account the dispersion of particles with different energies and pitch angles and the fact that particles on different trajectories have different histories and may come from different sources. Solving the interaction problem involves finding the various types of possible trajectories, populating them with particles appropriately, and then treating the electric and magnetic fields self-consistently with the resulting particle densities and currents. This approach is illustrated by formulating a procedure for solving the collisionless interaction problem on open field lines in the case of a slowly flowing magnetized plasma interacting with a magnetic dipole

  10. A kinetic approach to magnetospheric modeling

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The earth's magnetosphere is caused by the interaction between the flowing solar wind and the earth's magnetic dipole, with the distorted magnetic field in the outer parts of the magnetosphere due to the current systems resulting from this interaction. It is surprising that even the conceptually simple problem of the collisionless interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field has not been solved. A kinetic approach is essential if one is to take into account the dispersion of particles with different energies and pitch angles and the fact that particles on different trajectories have different histories and may come from different sources. Solving the interaction problem involves finding the various types of possible trajectories, populating them with particles appropriately, and then treating the electric and magnetic fields self-consistently with the resulting particle densities and currents. This approach is illustrated by formulating a procedure for solving the collisionless interaction problem on open field lines in the case of a slowly flowing magnetized plasma interacting with a magnetic dipole.

  11. Gas-Kinetic Theory Based Flux Splitting Method for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    A gas-kinetic solver is developed for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. The new scheme is based on the direct splitting of the flux function of the MHD equations with the inclusion of "particle" collisions in the transport process. Consequently, the artificial dissipation in the new scheme is much reduced in comparison with the MHD Flux Vector Splitting Scheme. At the same time, the new scheme is compared with the well-developed Roe-type MHD solver. It is concluded that the kinetic MHD scheme is more robust and efficient than the Roe- type method, and the accuracy is competitive. In this paper the general principle of splitting the macroscopic flux function based on the gas-kinetic theory is presented. The flux construction strategy may shed some light on the possible modification of AUSM- and CUSP-type schemes for the compressible Euler equations, as well as to the development of new schemes for a non-strictly hyperbolic system.

  12. Focuss algorithm application in kinetic compartment modeling for PET tracer

    Huang Xinrui; Bao Shanglian

    2004-01-01

    dynamic data, comparing with the pre-existing data-led technique- spectral analysis. The results showed that our kinetic modeling technique for the quantitative analysis of dynamic in vivo radiotracer studies is a transparent data-driven modeling approach as it returns, not only macro parameter values, but also information on the underlying model structure. Furthermore, FOCUSS algorithm can avoid the over complete problems in spectral analysis and improve the error properties. Since this technique does not require a predefined compartmental structure and it can be used to characterize tracer kinetics in various tissue types or even mixtures of different tissue types, it provides a unique tool for image analysis of complex functional structures where image pixels may contain inhomogeneous tissue types. Moreover, it can make work m imaging probe, tracer and drug development, when their characteristic in vivo isn't known. Therefore, this kinetic modeling technique is of use for PET molecular imaging and drug development. (authors)

  13. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical

  14. Kinetics of solid state phase transformations: Measurement and ...

    Administrator

    heating or cooling rate can also exert a crucial influence on the kinetic outcome is stressed. The kinetic ... A simple and general modelling methodology for understanding the kinetics of ... state is of interest on both basic and applied grounds.

  15. Kinetics parameters of a slurry remediation process in rotating drum bioreactors

    Esquivel-Rios, I.; Rodriguez-Meza, M. A.; Barrera-Cortes, J.

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge of biotransformation pollution dynamics in any systems is important for design and optimization purposes of biochemical processes involved. this is focus to the determination of kinetics parameters such as the maximum specific growth rate (μMAX), saturation constant (Ks), biomass yield (YX/S; X: biomass, S: substrate) and oxygen consumption (YO 2 /S; O 2 : oxygen). Several approximations, based on Monod equation, have been developed for estimating kinetics parameters in terms of concentration and type of substrate, bioprocess type and microflora available. (Author)

  16. Kinetic theory of tearing instabilities

    Drake, J.F.; Lee, Y.C.

    1977-01-01

    The transition of the tearing instability from the collisional to the collisionless regime is investigated kinetically using a Fokker--Planck collision operator to represent electron-ion collisions. As a function of the collisionality of the plasma, the tearing instability falls into three regions, which are referred to as collisionless, semi-collisional, and collisional. The width Δ of the singular layer around kxB 0 =0 is limited by electron thermal motion along B 0 in the collisional and semi-collisional regimes and is typically smaller than rho/sub i/, the ion Larmor radius. Previously accepted theories, which are based on the assumption Δvery-much-greater-thanrho/sub i/, are found to be valid only in the collisional regime. The effects of density and temperature gradients on the instabilities are also studied. The tearing instability is only driven by the temperature gradient in the collisional and semi-collisional regimes. Numerical calculations indicate that the semi-collisional tearing instability is particularly relevant to present day high temperature tokamak discharges

  17. Kinetics of DNA tile dimerization.

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2014-06-24

    Investigating how individual molecular components interact with one another within DNA nanoarchitectures, both in terms of their spatial and temporal interactions, is fundamentally important for a better understanding of their physical behaviors. This will provide researchers with valuable insight for designing more complex higher-order structures that can be assembled more efficiently. In this report, we examined several spatial factors that affect the kinetics of bivalent, double-helical (DH) tile dimerization, including the orientation and number of sticky ends (SEs), the flexibility of the double helical domains, and the size of the tiles. The rate constants we obtained confirm our hypothesis that increased nucleation opportunities and well-aligned SEs accelerate tile-tile dimerization. Increased flexibility in the tiles causes slower dimerization rates, an effect that can be reversed by introducing restrictions to the tile flexibility. The higher dimerization rates of more rigid tiles results from the opposing effects of higher activation energies and higher pre-exponential factors from the Arrhenius equation, where the pre-exponential factor dominates. We believe that the results presented here will assist in improved implementation of DNA tile based algorithmic self-assembly, DNA based molecular robotics, and other specific nucleic acid systems, and will provide guidance to design and assembly processes to improve overall yield and efficiency.

  18. Kinetics of vein graft hyperplasia

    Zwolak, R.M.; Adams, M.C.; Clowes, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Human aortocoronary vein grafts fail due to accelerated occlusive disease. The possibility that this is related to cellular hyperplasia was investigated in a rabbit model where kinetics of vein graft thickening, endothelial (EC) repair, and smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation were measured from 2 days to 24 weeks after implanting jugular vein segments in the carotid artery. Immediately after graft placement focal EC denudation was observed. These defects were repaired within 1 week and did not recur. By 4 weeks intimal area had increased 30 fold from 0.028 +/- 0.004 to 0.705 +/- 0.021 mm 2 , and a 24 weeks was 0.93 +/- 0.21 mm 2 . This response did not produce a reduction in graft lumen area. EC and SMC thymidine-labeling index were measured by en face and cross-section autoradiography after injection of 3 H-thymidine and perfusion fixation. Despite rapid EC surface repair EC labeling index remained elevated and only returned to normal levels at 12 weeks; SMC labeling was 10 fold greater than baseline even at 24 weeks (0.22% vs 0.02%). SMC mass demonstrated morphometrically increased between 2 and 12 weeks. Intimal thickening in vein grafts is due to SMC proliferation and develops after the EC layer has been restored. In contrast, intimal SMC proliferate in damaged arteries when the EC layer is absent and cease when the EC layer is regenerated

  19. Azo compound degradation kinetics and halonitromethane formation kinetics during chlorination.

    Fu, Jing; Wang, Xiaomao; Bai, Weiliang; Yang, Hongwei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2017-05-01

    The chlorination of azo compounds can produce halonitromethanes (HNMs), which have attracted increasing concern due to their high genotoxicity. By impacting the speciation of chlorine and azo compounds, pH impacts apparent second-order rate constants of Methyl Orange (MO, 27.5-1.4 × 10 3  M -1  s -1 ), Acid Orange II (AO, 16.7-99.3 M -1  s -1 ), and Acid Red 1 (AR 1, 3.7-72.5 M -1  s -1 ) (pH range 6.3-9.0). The two-compartment first-order model successfully described the chloropicrin (TCNM) formation kinetics, suggesting that both fast- and slow-reacting precursors of TCNM are generated from the chlorination of azo compounds. The ratios between fast and slow formation rate constants for MO and AO were 15.6-5.4 × 10 2 , while that of AR 1 was 9.8-19.4 (pH range 6.5-9.0). The fraction of the fast-reacting TCNM precursors decreased with increasing pH for MO and AO; while that for AR 1 decreased when pH increased from 6.5 to 8.0, and then increased when pH increased from 8.0 to 9.0. The impact of pH on TCNM formation was also precursor-specific. The highest molar yields of TCNM predicted from the model in this study were 2.4%, 2.5%, and 1.5% for MO, AO, and AR 1, respectively. The study demonstrates that azo compounds are important HNM precursors, and pose a potential threat to drinking water safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Kinetic Model Describing Injury-Burden in Team Sports.

    Fuller, Colin W

    2017-12-01

    Injuries in team sports are normally characterised by the incidence, severity, and location and type of injuries sustained: these measures, however, do not provide an insight into the variable injury-burden experienced during a season. Injury burden varies according to the team's match and training loads, the rate at which injuries are sustained and the time taken for these injuries to resolve. At the present time, this time-based variation of injury burden has not been modelled. To develop a kinetic model describing the time-based injury burden experienced by teams in elite team sports and to demonstrate the model's utility. Rates of injury were quantified using a large eight-season database of rugby injuries (5253) and exposure (60,085 player-match-hours) in English professional rugby. Rates of recovery from injury were quantified using time-to-recovery analysis of the injuries. The kinetic model proposed for predicting a team's time-based injury burden is based on a composite rate equation developed from the incidence of injury, a first-order rate of recovery from injury and the team's playing load. The utility of the model was demonstrated by examining common scenarios encountered in elite rugby. The kinetic model developed describes and predicts the variable injury-burden arising from match play during a season of rugby union based on the incidence of match injuries, the rate of recovery from injury and the playing load. The model is equally applicable to other team sports and other scenarios.

  1. On kinetic description of electromagnetic processes in a quantum plasma

    Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Kompaneets, R.

    2011-01-01

    A nonlinear kinetic equation for nonrelativistic quantum plasma with electromagnetic interaction of particles is obtained in the Hartree's mean-field approximation. It is cast in a convenient form of Vlasov-Boltzmann-type equation with ''quantum interference integral'', which allows for relatively straightforward modification of existing classical Vlasov codes to incorporate quantum effects (quantum statistics and quantum interference of overlapping particles wave functions), without changing the bulk of the codes. Such modification (upgrade) of existing Vlasov codes may provide a direct and effective path to numerical simulations of nonlinear electrostatic and electromagnetic phenomena in quantum plasmas, especially of processes where kinetic effects are important (e.g., modulational interactions and stimulated scattering phenomena involving plasma modes at short wavelengths or high-order kinetic modes, dynamical screening and interaction of charges in quantum plasma, etc.) Moreover, numerical approaches involving such modified Vlasov codes would provide a useful basis for theoretical analyses of quantum plasmas, as quantum and classical effects can be easily separated there.

  2. Blood lactate kinetics in normal and stress-susceptible pigs

    Darrah, P.S.; Beitz, D.C.; Topel, D.G.; Christian, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro rates of lactate metabolism were determined in stress-susceptible (SS) and stress-resistant (SR) pigs. Three SR and three SS pigs were given 20 muCi of [U-/sup 14/C] L-lactate by a single injection method and resting blood lactate kinetics were measured. Seventeen blood samples were taken during the 60 min after injection. Lactate was separated from the deproteinized plasma by silicic acid column chromatography, and specific radioactivity was determined. Kinetic characteristics were calculated from plots of specific activity versus time. Pigs met steady-state requirements during the sampling period. There were no differences in kinetic characteristics of resting SS and SR pigs. Later, a second isotope injection was given after 5 min of electrical stress. Lactate pool sizes increased similarly in both types of pigs after stress; however, SS pigs had greater plasma lactate concentrations after stress. It is concluded that SS and SR pigs respond differently to stress but have similar capacities to metabolize lactate while resting

  3. Bayesian experts in exploring reaction kinetics of transcription circuits.

    Yoshida, Ryo; Saito, Masaya M; Nagao, Hiromichi; Higuchi, Tomoyuki

    2010-09-15

    Biochemical reactions in cells are made of several types of biological circuits. In current systems biology, making differential equation (DE) models simulatable in silico has been an appealing, general approach to uncover a complex world of biochemical reaction dynamics. Despite of a need for simulation-aided studies, our research field has yet provided no clear answers: how to specify kinetic values in models that are difficult to measure from experimental/theoretical analyses on biochemical kinetics. We present a novel non-parametric Bayesian approach to this problem. The key idea lies in the development of a Dirichlet process (DP) prior distribution, called Bayesian experts, which reflects substantive knowledge on reaction mechanisms inherent in given models and experimentally observable kinetic evidences to the subsequent parameter search. The DP prior identifies significant local regions of unknown parameter space before proceeding to the posterior analyses. This article reports that a Bayesian expert-inducing stochastic search can effectively explore unknown parameters of in silico transcription circuits such that solutions of DEs reproduce transcriptomic time course profiles. A sample source code is available at the URL http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/~yoshidar/lisdas/.

  4. Quantum tunneling observed without its characteristic large kinetic isotope effects.

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ueta, Hirokazu; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-06-16

    Classical transition-state theory is fundamental to describing chemical kinetics; however, quantum tunneling is also important in explaining the unexpectedly large reaction efficiencies observed in many chemical systems. Tunneling is often indicated by anomalously large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), because a particle's ability to tunnel decreases significantly with its increasing mass. Here we experimentally demonstrate that cold hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms can add to solid benzene by tunneling; however, the observed H/D KIE was very small (1-1.5) despite the large intrinsic H/D KIE of tunneling (≳ 100). This strong reduction is due to the chemical kinetics being controlled not by tunneling but by the surface diffusion of the H/D atoms, a process not greatly affected by the isotope type. Because tunneling need not be accompanied by a large KIE in surface and interfacial chemical systems, it might be overlooked in other systems such as aerosols or enzymes. Our results suggest that surface tunneling reactions on interstellar dust may contribute to the deuteration of interstellar aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which could represent a major source of the deuterium enrichment observed in carbonaceous meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These findings could improve our understanding of interstellar physicochemical processes, including those during the formation of the solar system.

  5. KINEMATIC AND KINETIC VARIABLES DIFFER BETWEEN KETTLEBELL SWING STYLES.

    Bullock, Garrett S; Schmitt, Abigail C; Shutt, Jason M; Cook, Gray; Butler, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Kettlebell (KB) and indian club swings (ICS) are used diversely for developing strength and power. It has been proposed that multiple swing techniques can be used interchangeably to elicit similar adaptations within performance training. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that there will be not be a difference in peak joint angles between types of swings. Furthermore, given the nature of the overhead kettlebell swing (OKS), it was hypothesized that the OKS will be associated with a greater cycle time and a greater vertical impulse compared to shoulder height swing (SKS) and ICS. The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinematics and kinetics of the SKS, OKS, and ICS. Cross-sectional cohort. Fifteen healthy subjects underwent 3D biomechanical analysis for assessment of kinematic and kinetic data. Subjects performed two trials of ten repetitions at full effort for each swing in a randomized order using either a standard set of 0.45 kg indian clubs or sex specific KB loads (Female = 12kg, Male = 20kg). Lower extremity sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics were analyzed for peak values during the down and up portions of the swing patterns. Statistical analyses were carried out utilizing one-way ANOVAs ( p power training. 2.

  6. Continuum-Kinetic Models and Numerical Methods for Multiphase Applications

    Nault, Isaac Michael

    This thesis presents a continuum-kinetic approach for modeling general problems in multiphase solid mechanics. In this context, a continuum model refers to any model, typically on the macro-scale, in which continuous state variables are used to capture the most important physics: conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A kinetic model refers to any model, typically on the meso-scale, which captures the statistical motion and evolution of microscopic entitites. Multiphase phenomena usually involve non-negligible micro or meso-scopic effects at the interfaces between phases. The approach developed in the thesis attempts to combine the computational performance benefits of a continuum model with the physical accuracy of a kinetic model when applied to a multiphase problem. The approach is applied to modeling a single particle impact in Cold Spray, an engineering process that intimately involves the interaction of crystal grains with high-magnitude elastic waves. Such a situation could be classified a multiphase application due to the discrete nature of grains on the spatial scale of the problem. For this application, a hyper elasto-plastic model is solved by a finite volume method with approximate Riemann solver. The results of this model are compared for two types of plastic closure: a phenomenological macro-scale constitutive law, and a physics-based meso-scale Crystal Plasticity model.

  7. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    Mohamed, Samah Y.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important for investigating the combustion behavior of diesel, gasoline, and aviation fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values and rate rules. These update provides a better agreement with rapid compression machine measurements of ignition delay time, while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  8. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  9. Research in chemical kinetics, v.2

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in a new series, which aims to publish authoritative review articles on a wide range of exciting and contemporary topics in gas and condensed phase kinetics. Research in Chemical Kinetics complements the acclaimed series Comprehensive Chemical Kinetics, and is edited by the same team of professionals. The reviews contained in this volume are concise, topical accounts of specific research written by acknowledged experts. The authors summarize their latest work and place it in a general context. Particular strengths of the volume are the quality of the c

  10. Isoconversional kinetics of thermally stimulated processes

    Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    The use of isoconversional kinetic methods for analysis of thermogravimetric and calorimetric data on thermally stimulated processes is quickly growing in popularity. The purpose of this book is to create the first comprehensive resource on the theory and applications of isoconversional methodology. The book introduces the reader to the kinetics of physical and chemical condensed phase processes that occur as a result of changing temperature and discusses how isoconversional analysis can provide important kinetic insights into them. The book will help the readers to develop a better understanding of the methodology, and promote its efficient usage and successful development.

  11. Research in Chemical Kinetics, v.3

    2012-01-01

    This series of volumes aims to publish authoritative review articles on a wide range of exciting and contemporary topics in gas and condensed phase kinetics. Research in Chemical Kinetics complements the acclaimed series Comprehensive Chemical Kinetics, and is edited by the same team of professionals. The reviews contained in this volume are concise, topical accounts of specific research written by acknowledged experts. The authors summarize their latest work and place it in a general context. Particular strengths of the volume are the quality of the contributions and their top

  12. Kinetics of 15NH4+ assimilation in Zea mays

    Magalhaes, J.R.; Ju, G.C.; Rich, P.J.; Rhodes, D.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative studies of 15 NH 4 + assimilation were undertaken with a GDH1-null mutant of Zea mays and a related (but not strictly isogenic) GDH1-positive wild type from which this mutant was derived. The kinetics of 15 NH 4 + assimilation into free amino acids and total reduced nitrogen were monitored in both roots and shoots of 2-week-old seedlings supplied with 5 millimolar 99% ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 via the aerated root medium in hydroponic culture over a 24-h period. The GDH1-null mutant, with a 10- to 15-fold lower total root GDH activity in comparison to the wild type, was found to exhibit a 40 to 50% lower rate of 15 NH 4 + assimilation into total reduced nitrogen. The lower rates of 15 NH 4 + assimilation in the mutant was associated with lower rates of labeling of several free amino acids (including glutamate, glutamine-amino N, aspartate, asparagine-amino N, and alanine) in both roots and shoots of the mutant in comparison to the wild type. Qualitatively, these labeling kinetics appear consistent with a reduced flux of 15 N via glutamate in the GDH1-null mutant. However, the responses of the two genotypes to the potent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, methionine sulfoximine, and differences in morphology of the two genotypes (particularly a lower shoot:root ratio in the GDH1-null mutant) urge caution in concluding that GDH1 is solely responsible for these differences in ammonia assimilation rate

  13. Kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of potato starch

    Óscar Fernando Castellanos Domínguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the kinetic study of potato starch enzymatic hydrolysis using soluble enzymes (Novo Nordisk. Different assays divided into four groups were used: reaction time (with which it was possible to reduce the 48-72 hour duration reported in the literature to 16 hours with comparable productivity levels; selecting the set of enzymes to be used (different types were evaluated - BAN and Termamyl as alfa-amylases during dextrinisation stage, and AMG, Promozyme and Fungamyl for sacarification reaction- identifying those presenting the best performance during hydrolysis.Reaction conditions were optimised for the process's two stages (destrinisation and sacarification. Enzyme dose, calcium cofactor concentration, pH, temperature and agitation speed were studied for the first stage. Enzyme ratio, pH and agitation speed were studied for sacarification; the latter parameter reported values having no antecedents in the literature (60 rpm and 30 rpm for first and second reactions, respectively. Michaelis Menten kinetics were calculated once conditions had been optimised, varying substrate from 10-50% P/V, obtaining km and Vmax kinetic parameters for each reaction. A kinetic model was found according to local working conditions which was able to explain potato starch conversion to glucose syrup, achieving 96 dextrose equivalents by the end of the reaction, being well within the maximum range reported in the literature (94-98.Laboratory equipment was constructed prior to carrying out assays which was able to reproduce and improve the conditions reported in the literature, making it a useful, reliable tool for use in assays returning good results.

  14. Growth kinetics of dislocation loops in irradiated ceramic materials

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Kinoshita, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic materials are expected to be applied in the future fusion reactor as radio frequency (RF) windows, toroidal insulating breaks and diagnostic probes. The radiation resistance of ceramic materials, degradation of the electrical properties and radiation induced conductivity of these materials under neutron irradiation are determined by the kinetics of the accumulation of point defects in the matrix and point defect cluster formation (dislocation loops, voids, etc.). Under irradiation, due to the ionization process, excitation of electronic subsystem and covalent type of interaction between atoms the point defects in ceramic materials are characterized by the charge state (e.g. an F + center, an oxygen vacancy with a single trapped electron) and the effective charge. For the investigation of radiation resistance of ceramic materials for future fusion applications it is very important to understand the physical mechanisms of formation and growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation taking into account in this system the effective charge of point defects. In the present paper the physical mechanisms of dislocation loop growth in ceramic material are investigated. For this aim a theoretical model is suggested for the description of the kinetics of point defect accumulation in the matrix taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of an electric field on diffusion migration process of charged point defects. A self-consistent system of kinetic equations describing the generation of electrical fields near dislocation loops and diffusion migration of charged point defects in elastic and electrical fields is formulated. The solution of the kinetic equations allows to find the growth rate of dislocation loops in ceramic materials under irradiation taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of electric and elastic stress fields near dislocation loop on the diffusion processes

  15. Kinetic investigation of uranyl-uranophile complexation. 1. Macrocyclic kinetic effect and macrocyclic protection effect

    Tabushi, I.; Yoshizawa, A.

    1986-01-01

    Equilibria and rates of ligand-exchange reactions between uranyl tricarbonate and dithiocarbamates and between uranyl tris-(dithiocarbamates) and carbonate were studied under a variety of conditions. The dithiocarbamates used were acyclic diethyl-dithiocarbamate and macrocyclic tris(dithiocarbamate). The acyclic ligand showed a triphasic (successive three-step) equilibrium with three different equilibrium constants while the macrocyclic ligand showed a clear monophasic (one-step) equilibrium with a much larger stability constant for the dithiocarbamate-uranyl complex. The macrocyclic ligand showed the S/sub N/2-type ligand-exchange rate in the forward as well as reverse process, while the first step of the acyclic ligand-exchange reaction proceeded via the S/sub N/1-type mechanism. This kinetic macrocyclic effect on molecularity is interpreted as the result of a unique topological requirement of uranyl complexation. The macrocyclic ligand also exhibited a clear protection effect, leading to the large stability constant. 19 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  16. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    Markowich, Peter; Jü ngel, Ansgar; Aoki, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  17. Flywheels for Low-Speed Kinetic Energy Storage Systems

    Portnov, G.; Cruz, I.; Arias, F.; Fiffe, R. P.

    2003-07-01

    A brief overview of different steel disc-type flywheels is presented. It contents the analysis of relationship between stress-state and kinetic energy of rotating body, comparison of the main characteristics of flywheels and description of their optimization procedures. It is shown that profiles of the discs calculated on a basis of plane stress-state assumption may be considered only as a starting point for its further improvement using 3-D approach. The aim of the review is to provide a designer for a insight into problem of shaping of steel flywheels. (Author) 19 refs.

  18. Kinetic study of an alcoholic fermentation, using honey like substrate

    Gomez, Jose Angel; Castano, Hader Ivan; Arias Mario

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a kinetic study of an alcoholic fermentation using honey like substrate; for this effect they were carried out nine fermentations in discontinuous process with a volume, of 10 L, following the behavior of the substrate concentrations, biomass and product in the time. It was evaluated the convenience of factors like the agitation and the addition of nutritious, also, it was observed the effect of the initial concentrations of substrate and inoculate and the type of honey looking for the best conditions of the process for the obtaining of an alcoholic drink

  19. Oxidation kinetics of zirconium nitride. I. Planar symmetry

    Desmaison, Jean; Billy, Michel

    1976-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of ZrNsub(0.93) plates was investigated at temperatures in the range 625-800 deg C in oxygen over the pressure range 10-730 torr. The reaction product consists of monoclinic zirconia accompanied with trace amounts of cubic or tetragonal zirconia. Although the kinetic results are well interpreted by a Prout and Tompkins type model. The morphological observations suggest a transformation governed by a phase boundary reaction, this being confirmed by the oxygen pressure dependence on the rate law [fr

  20. Study of the stochastic point reactor kinetic equation

    Gotoh, Yorio

    1980-01-01

    Diagrammatic technique is used to solve the stochastic point reactor kinetic equation. The method gives exact results which are derived from Fokker-Plank theory. A Green's function dressed with the clouds of noise is defined, which is a transfer function of point reactor with fluctuating reactivity. An integral equation for the correlation function of neutron power is derived using the following assumptions: 1) Green's funntion should be dressed with noise, 2) The ladder type diagrams only contributes to the correlation function. For a white noise and the one delayed neutron group approximation, the norm of the integral equation and the variance to mean-squared ratio are analytically obtained. (author)

  1. Flywheels for Low-Speed Kinetic Energy Storage Systems

    Portnov, G.; Cruz, I.; Arias, F.; Fiffe, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    A brief overview of different steel disc-type flywheels is presented. It contents the analysis of relationship between stress-state and kinetic energy of rotating body, comparison of the main characteristics of flywheels and description of their optimization procedures. It is shown that pro files of the discs calculated on a basis of plane stress-state assumption may be considered only as a starting point for its further improvement using 3-D approach. The aim of the review is to provide a designer for a insight into problem of shaping of steel flywheels. (Author) 19 refs

  2. Progress in antenna coupled kinetic inductance detectors

    Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Freni, A.; Gerini, G.; Hoevers, H.F.C.; Iacono, A.; Neto, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the combined Dutch efforts toward the development of large wideband focal plane array receivers based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs). Taking into account strict electromagnetic and detector sensitivity requirements for future ground and space based observatories, this

  3. A mathematical model for iodine kinetics

    Silva, E.A.T. da.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model for the iodine kinetics in thyroid is presented followed by its analytical solution. An eletroanalogical model is also developed for a simplified stage and another is proposed for the main case [pt

  4. Kinetic Study of Curcumin on Modal Fabric

    Abu Naser Md. Ahsanul Haque

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic study of curcumin on modal fabric was carried out using an initial dye concentration of 1 g/L at three different temperatures, 70 °C, 85 °C and 100 °C, at pH 7 and an material to liquor ratio of 1:20. Pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetics were applied, and it was found that the adsorption kinetics of curcumin on modal fabric matched the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The activation energy was found to be equal to 71.14 kJ/mol, while the enthalpy and entropy of activation were 68.16 kJ/mol and –66.02 J/molK respectively.

  5. Kinetic Model of Growth of Arthropoda Populations

    Ershov, Yu. A.; Kuznetsov, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    Kinetic equations were derived for calculating the growth of crustacean populations ( Crustacea) based on the biological growth model suggested earlier using shrimp ( Caridea) populations as an example. The development cycle of successive stages for populations can be represented in the form of quasi-chemical equations. The kinetic equations that describe the development cycle of crustaceans allow quantitative prediction of the development of populations depending on conditions. In contrast to extrapolation-simulation models, in the developed kinetic model of biological growth the kinetic parameters are the experimental characteristics of population growth. Verification and parametric identification of the developed model on the basis of the experimental data showed agreement with experiment within the error of the measurement technique.

  6. Kinetic investigation on enantioselective hydrolytic resolution of ...

    Kinetic investigation on enantioselective hydrolytic resolution of epichlorohydrin by crude epoxide hydrolase from domestic duck liver. X Ling, D Lu, J Wang, J Chen, L Ding, J Chen, H Chai, P Ouyang ...

  7. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    Mohamed, Samah Y.; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values

  8. Kinetics of oxidic phase dissolution in acids

    Gorichev, I.G.; Kipriyanov, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    The critical analysis of the experimental data on dissolution kinetics of metal oxides (BeO, V 2 O 5 , UO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , Ta 2 O 5 etc.) in acid media is carried out. Kinetic peculiarities of oxide dissolution are explained on the basis of the notions of electron- proton theory. It is established that the surface nonstoichiometric ccomposition of oxide phase and potential jump, appearing on the interface of the oxide-electrolyte phase are the important factors, determining the dissolution rate of a solid phase. The dissolution rate of metal oxides is limited by the transition of protons into the solid oxide phase. Morphological models of heterogeneous kinetics are used when explaining kinetic regularities of oxide dissolution process [ru

  9. Thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanistic investigations of ...

    with respect to the rate determining step and the thermodynamic quantities with respect to the equilibrium steps were evaluated and ... are, (1) to establish a rate law through kinetic measure- ments, (2) to ..... second and third equilibrium steps.

  10. Kinetic Theory of the Inner Magnetospheric Plasma

    Khazanov, George V

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a broad introduction to the kinetic theory of space plasma physics with the major focus on the inner magnetospheric plasma. It is designed to provide a comprehensive description of the different kinds of transport equations for both plasma particles and waves with an emphasis on the applicability and limitations of each set of equations. The major topics are: Kinetic Theory of Superthermal Electrons, Kinetic Foundation of the Hydrodynamic Description of Space Plasmas (including wave-particle interaction processes), and Kinetic Theory of the Terrestrial Ring Current. Distinguishable features of this book are the analytical solutions of simplified transport equations. Approximate analytic solutions of transport phenomena are very useful because they help us gain physical insight into how the system responds to varying sources of mass, momentum and energy and also to various external boundary conditions. They also provide us a convenient method to test the validity of complicated numerical mod...

  11. Plasma heating by kinetic Alfven wave

    Assis, A.S. de.

    1982-01-01

    The heating of a nonuniform plasma (electron-ion) due to the resonant excitation of the shear Alfven wave in the low β regime is studied using initially the ideal MHD model and posteriorly using the kinetic model. The Vlasov equation for ions and the drift kinetic equation for electrons have been used. Through the ideal MHD model, it is concluded that the energy absorption is due to the continuous spectrum (phase mixing) which the shear Alfven wave has in a nonuniform plasma. An explicit expression for the energy absorption is derived. Through the kinetic model it is concluded that the energy absorption is due to a resonant mode convertion of the incident wave into the kinetic Alfven wave which propagates away from the resonant region. Its electron Landau damping has been observed. There has been a concordance with the MHD calculations. (Author) [pt

  12. Kinetics from Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Stelzl, Lukas S; Hummer, Gerhard

    2017-08-08

    Transitions between metastable states govern many fundamental processes in physics, chemistry and biology, from nucleation events in phase transitions to the folding of proteins. The free energy surfaces underlying these processes can be obtained from simulations using enhanced sampling methods. However, their altered dynamics makes kinetic and mechanistic information difficult or impossible to extract. Here, we show that, with replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), one can not only sample equilibrium properties but also extract kinetic information. For systems that strictly obey first-order kinetics, the procedure to extract rates is rigorous. For actual molecular systems whose long-time dynamics are captured by kinetic rate models, accurate rate coefficients can be determined from the statistics of the transitions between the metastable states at each replica temperature. We demonstrate the practical applicability of the procedure by constructing master equation (Markov state) models of peptide and RNA folding from REMD simulations.

  13. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  14. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics

    Adelman, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics which have emerged from a recent rigorous statistical mechanical treatment of condensed phase chemical reaction dynamics (S.A. Adelman, Adv. Chem. Phys.53:61 (1983)) are discussed in simple physical terms

  16. MBS Analysis Of Kinetic Structures Using ADAMS

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper considers multibody system (MBS) analysis of kinetic structures using the software package ADAMS. Deployable, foldable, expandable and reconfigurable kinetic structures can provide a change in the geometric morphology of the envelope by contributing to making it adaptable to e.......g. changing external climate factors, in order to improve the indoor climate performance of the building. The derivation of equations of motion for such spatial mechanical systems is a challenging issue in scientific community. However, with new symbolic tools one can automatically derive equations in so......-called multibody system (MBS) formalism. The present paper considers MBS modeling of kinetic architectural structures using the software packages ADAMS. As a result, it is found that symbolic MBS simulation tools facilitate a useful evaluation environment for MBS users during a design phase of responsive kinetic...

  17. Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    Trizac, Emmanuel [Center of Theoretical Biological Physics, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0374 (United States); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2005-11-25

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors-who were among the pioneers in the domain- the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution {epsilon} -a central quantity governing the

  18. Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors-who were among the pioneers in the domain- the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ε -a central quantity governing the inelasticity of

  19. An efficient approach to bioconversion kinetic model generation based on automated microscale experimentation integrated with model driven experimental design

    Chen, B. H.; Micheletti, M.; Baganz, F.

    2009-01-01

    -erythrulose. Experiments were performed using automated microwell studies at the 150 or 800 mu L scale. The derived kinetic parameters were then verified in a second round of experiments where model predictions showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained under conditions not included in the original......Reliable models of enzyme kinetics are required for the effective design of bioconversion processes. Kinetic expressions of the enzyme-catalysed reaction rate however, are frequently complex and establishing accurate values of kinetic parameters normally requires a large number of experiments....... These can be both time consuming and expensive when working with the types of non-natural chiral intermediates important in pharmaceutical syntheses. This paper presents ail automated microscale approach to the rapid and cost effective generation of reliable kinetic models useful for bioconversion process...

  20. NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database

    SRD 159 NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database (Web database for purchase)   This database contains benchmark results for simulation of plasma population kinetics and emission spectra. The data were contributed by the participants of the 4th Non-LTE Code Comparison Workshop who have unrestricted access to the database. The only limitation for other users is in hidden labeling of the output results. Guest users can proceed to the database entry page without entering userid and password.

  1. Hamiltonian kinetic theory of plasma ponderomotive processes

    McDonald, S.W.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear nonresonant interaction of plasma waves and particles is formulated in Hamiltonian kinetic theory which treats the wave-action and particle distributions on an equal footing, thereby displaying reciprocity relations. In the quasistatic limit, a nonlinear wave-kinetic equation is obtained. The generality of the formalism allows for applications to arbitrary geometry, with the nonlinear effects expressed in terms of the linear susceptibility

  2. Thermal decomposition kinetics of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    Kim, E.H.; Park, J.J.; Park, J.H.; Chang, I.S.; Choi, C.S.; Kim, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The thermal decomposition kinetics of AUC [ammonium uranyl carbonate; (NH 4 ) 4 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 [ in an isothermal thermogravimetric (TG) reactor under N 2 atmosphere has been determined. The kinetic data can be represented by the two-dimensional nucleation and growth model. The reaction rate increases and activation energy decreases with increasing particle size and precipitation time which appears in the particle size larger than 30 μm in the mechano-chemical phenomena. (orig.)

  3. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  4. Hamiltonian kinetic theory of plasma ponderomotive processes

    McDonald, S.W.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    The nonlinear nonresonant interaction of plasma waves and particles is formulated in a Hamiltonian kinetic theory which treats the wave-action and particle distributions on an equal footing, thereby displaying reciprocity relations. In the quasistatic limit, a nonlinear wave-kinetic equation is obtained. The generality of the formalism allows for applications to arbitrary geometry, with the nonlinear effects expressed in terms of the linear susceptibility

  5. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics experiments

    Bollyky, L.J.; Beary, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Experiments were conducted at the Hanford Site to determine the most efficient pH and temperature levels for the destruction of complexants in Hanford high-level defense waste. These complexants enhance migration of radionuclides in the soil and inhibit the growth of crystals in the evaporator-crystallizer. Ozone mass transfer and kinetics tests have been outlined for the determination of critical mass transfer and kinetics parameters of the ozone-complexant reaction

  6. Spatial neutron kinetic module of ROSA code

    Cherezov, A.L.; Shchukin, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    A spatial neutron kinetic module was developed for computer code ROSA. The paper describes a numerical scheme used in the module for resolving neutron kinetic equations. Analytical integration for delayed neutrons emitters method and direct numerical integration method (Gear's method) were analyzed. The two methods were compared on their efficiency and accuracy. Both methods were verified with test problems. The results obtained in the verification studies were presented [ru

  7. Kinetic mixing and the supersymmetric gauge hierarchy

    Dienes, K.R.; Kolda, C.; March-Russell, J.

    1997-01-01

    The most general Lagrangian for a model with two U(1) gauge symmetries contains a renormalizable operator which mixes their gauge kinetic terms. Such kinetic mixing can be generated at arbitrarily high scales but will not be suppressed by large masses. In models whose supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking hidden sectors contain U(1) gauge factors, we show that such terms will generically arise and communicate SUSY breaking to the visible sector through mixing with hypercharge. In the context of the usual supergravity- or gauge-mediated communication scenarios with D-terms of order the fundamental scale of SUSY breaking, this effect can destabilize the gauge hierarchy. Even in models for which kinetic mixing is suppressed or the D-terms are arranged to be small, this effect is a potentially large correction to the soft scalar masses and therefore introduces a new measurable low-energy parameter. We calculate the size of kinetic mixing both in field theory and in string theory, and argue that appreciable kinetic mixing is a generic feature of string models. We conclude that the possibility of kinetic mixing effects cannot be ignored in model building and in phenomenological studies of the low-energy SUSY spectra. (orig.)

  8. Neutron inverse kinetics via Gaussian Processes

    Picca, Paolo; Furfaro, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel technique for the interpretation of experiments in ADS is presented. ► The technique is based on Bayesian regression, implemented via Gaussian Processes. ► GPs overcome the limits of classical methods, based on PK approximation. ► Results compares GPs and ANN performance, underlining similarities and differences. - Abstract: The paper introduces the application of Gaussian Processes (GPs) to determine the subcriticality level in accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) through the interpretation of pulsed experiment data. ADSs have peculiar kinetic properties due to their special core design. For this reason, classical – inversion techniques based on point kinetic (PK) generally fail to generate an accurate estimate of reactor subcriticality. Similarly to Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Gaussian Processes can be successfully trained to learn the underlying inverse neutron kinetic model and, as such, they are not limited to the model choice. Importantly, GPs are strongly rooted into the Bayes’ theorem which makes them a powerful tool for statistical inference. Here, GPs have been designed and trained on a set of kinetics models (e.g. point kinetics and multi-point kinetics) for homogeneous and heterogeneous settings. The results presented in the paper show that GPs are very efficient and accurate in predicting the reactivity for ADS-like systems. The variance computed via GPs may provide an indication on how to generate additional data as function of the desired accuracy.

  9. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing, E-mail: wbzhang@whu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  10. Dual kinetic curves in reversible electrochemical systems.

    Michael J Hankins

    Full Text Available We introduce dual kinetic chronoamperometry, in which reciprocal relations are established between the kinetic curves of electrochemical reactions that start from symmetrical initial conditions. We have performed numerical and experimental studies in which the kinetic curves of the electron-transfer processes are analyzed for a reversible first order reaction. Experimental tests were done with the ferrocyanide/ferricyanide system in which the concentrations of each component could be measured separately using the platinum disk/gold ring electrode. It is shown that the proper ratio of the transient kinetic curves obtained from cathodic and anodic mass transfer limited regions give thermodynamic time invariances related to the reaction quotient of the bulk concentrations. Therefore, thermodynamic time invariances can be observed at any time using the dual kinetic curves for reversible reactions. The technique provides a unique possibility to extract the non-steady state trajectory starting from one initial condition based only on the equilibrium constant and the trajectory which starts from the symmetrical initial condition. The results could impact battery technology by predicting the concentrations and currents of the underlying non-steady state processes in a wide domain from thermodynamic principles and limited kinetic information.

  11. Variational estimates of point-kinetics parameters

    Favorite, J.A.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Variational estimates of the effect of flux shifts on the integral reactivity parameter of the point-kinetics equations and on regional power fractions were calculated for a variety of localized perturbations in two light water reactor (LWR) model problems representing a small, tightly coupled core and a large, loosely coupled core. For the small core, the flux shifts resulting from even relatively large localized reactivity changes (∼600 pcm) were small, and the standard point-kinetics approximation estimates of reactivity were in error by only ∼10% or less, while the variational estimates were accurate to within ∼1%. For the larger core, significant (>50%) flux shifts occurred in response to local perturbations, leading to errors of the same magnitude in the standard point-kinetics approximation of the reactivity worth. For positive reactivity, the error in the variational estimate of reactivity was only a few percent in the larger core, and the resulting transient power prediction was 1 to 2 orders of magnitude more accurate than with the standard point-kinetics approximation. For a large, local negative reactivity insertion resulting in a large flux shift, the accuracy of the variational estimate broke down. The variational estimate of the effect of flux shifts on reactivity in point-kinetics calculations of transients in LWR cores was found to generally result in greatly improved accuracy, relative to the standard point-kinetics approximation, the exception being for large negative reactivity insertions with large flux shifts in large, loosely coupled cores

  12. To the problem on formation kinetics of absorption and polylayer films in anodic oxidation of cadmium in alkali hydroxides. Kinetics of irreversible absorption of oxide

    Grachev, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to substantiate the formation of adsorption and polylayer films on cadmium electrode during its oxidation in KOH diluted solutions based on the interpretation of data from methods of the potential control. Using relaxation methods (voltammetry and chronoammetry) the conditions were determined at which irreversible abd sorption kinetics of the passivating oxide turns out to dominate the anodic dissolution process in the KOH 1-0.1 N solutions. Parts of monolayer and polylayer surface filling are shown. Kinetics of monolayer oxide growth is interpreted based on the Temkin-Zeldovich type equation for irreversible adsorption process. Ways of the kinetic equation precision are discussed for its full correspondence with the experiment obtained

  13. Efficient Spike-Coding with Multiplicative Adaptation in a Spike Response Model

    S.M. Bohte (Sander)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractNeural adaptation underlies the ability of neurons to maximize encoded informa- tion over a wide dynamic range of input stimuli. While adaptation is an intrinsic feature of neuronal models like the Hodgkin-Huxley model, the challenge is to in- tegrate adaptation in models of neural

  14. Special issue on Computational Neuroscience - PREFACE

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue of Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering contains ten selected papers presented at the Neural Coding 2012 workshop. Neuroscience is traditionally very close to mathematics which stems from the famous theoretical work of McCulloch--Pitts and Hodgkin--Huxley in the middle...

  15. Modeling removal of accumulated potassium from T-tubules by inward rectifier potassium channels

    Wallinga, W.; Vliek, M.; Wienk, E.D.; Alberink, M.J.; Ypey, D.L.; Ypey, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    The membrane models of Cannon et al. (1993) and Alberink et al. (1995) for mammalian skeletal muscle fibers are based upon Hodgkin-Huxley descriptions of sodium, potassium delayed rectifier and leak conductances and the capacitive current taking into account fast inactivation of sodium channels. Now

  16. Modelled temperature-dependent excitability behaviour of a generalised human peripheral sensory nerve fibre

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine if a recently developed human Ranvier node model, which is based on a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, could predict the excitability behaviour in human peripheral sensory nerve fibres...

  17. Predicting the combustion kinetics of Chinese coals

    Niksa, Stephen [Niksa Energy Associates LLC, Belmont, CA (United States); Fujiwara, Naoki [Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environment Research Lab.

    2013-07-01

    The database on the devolatilization of Chinese coals in the English literature represents coals from all ranks and the major Chinese mines. It was mostly acquired with TGAs. There are sufficient datasets from devices that imposed rapid heating rates to bracket combustor behavior. The domains of heating rate, temperature, pressure, and particle size are either directly relevant to combustion conditions, or close enough to manage with modest extrapolations. Whereas the data on ultimate total yields is sufficient to validate a model for any coal type, more detailed product distributions and char compositions would be desirable. Based on the accurate interpretation of this database, there are few unresolved issues surrounding the applicability of FLASHCHAIN {sup registered} for combustion applications in China. The sub-database on devolatilization under rapid heating conditions represents 34 samples. The predicted yields were within the measurement uncertainties of 4 daf wt. % for 29 of these coals. Among the five ultimate yields that were not accurately predicted, three had measured values less than the proximate volatile matter (PVM), despite the rapid heating rates in the tests. Similarly, the sub-database on devolatilization under slow heating conditions characterizes ultimate devolatilization yields of 30 samples. The predicted yields were within the measurement uncertainties for 22 of these coals. Among the eight that were not accurately predicted, three had measured values that were much lower than the PVM (which is a problem even after accounting for the slow heating rates in the tests) and three were in studies that did not report ultimate analyses for the coals tested. Unfortunately, the database on the combustion behavior of the chars from Chinese coals is insufficient to specify char oxidation kinetics.

  18. Reaction kinetics of dolomite rim growth

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Abart, R.; Morales, L. F. G.; Rhede, D.; Jeřábek, P.; Dresen, G.

    2014-04-01

    Reaction rims of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) were produced by solid-state reactions at the contacts of oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals at 400 MPa pressure, 750-850 °C temperature, and 3-146 h annealing time to determine the reaction kinetics. The dolomite reaction rims show two different microstructural domains. Elongated palisades of dolomite grew perpendicular into the MgCO3 interface with length ranging from about 6 to 41 µm. At the same time, a 5-71 µm wide rim of equiaxed granular dolomite grew at the contact with CaCO3. Platinum markers showed that the original interface is located at the boundary between the granular and palisade-forming dolomite. In addition to dolomite, a 12-80 µm thick magnesio-calcite layer formed between the dolomite reaction rims and the calcite single crystals. All reaction products show at least an axiotactic crystallographic relationship with respect to calcite reactant, while full topotaxy to calcite prevails within the granular dolomite and magnesio-calcite. Dolomite grains frequently exhibit growth twins characterized by a rotation of 180° around one of the equivalent axis. From mass balance considerations, it is inferred that the reaction rim of dolomite grew by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Assuming an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence, activation energies for diffusion of CaO and MgO are E a (CaO) = 192 ± 54 kJ/mol and E a (MgO) = 198 ± 44 kJ/mol, respectively.

  19. Superconducting kinetic inductance detectors for astrophysics

    Vardulakis, G; Withington, S; Goldie, D J; Glowacka, D M

    2008-01-01

    The kinetic inductance detector (KID) is an exciting new device that promises high-sensitivity, large-format, submillimetre to x-ray imaging arrays for astrophysics. KIDs comprise a superconducting thin-film microwave resonator capacitively coupled to a probe transmission line. By exciting the electrical resonance with a microwave probe signal, the transmission phase of the resonator can be monitored, allowing the deposition of energy or power to be detected. We describe the fabrication and low-temperature testing, down to 26 mK, of a number of devices, and confirm the basic principles of operation. The KIDs were fabricated on r-plane sapphire using superconducting niobium and aluminium as the resonator material, and tantalum as the x-ray absorber. KID quality factors of up to Q = (741 ± 15) × 10 3 were measured for niobium at 1 K, and quasiparticle effective recombination times of τ* R = 30 µs after x-ray absorption. Al/Ta quasiparticle traps were combined with resonators to make complete detectors. These devices were operated at 26 mK with quality factors of up Q = (187.7 ± 3.5) × 10 3 and a phase-shift responsivity of ∂θ/∂N qp = (5.06 ± 0.23) × 10 −6 degrees per quasiparticle. Devices were characterized both at thermal equilibrium and as x-ray detectors. A range of different x-ray pulse types was observed. Low phase-noise readout measurements on Al/Ta KIDs gave a minimum NEP = 1.27 × 10 −16 W Hz −1/2 at a readout frequency of 550 Hz and NEP = 4.60 × 10 −17 W Hz −1/2 at 95 Hz, for effective recombination times τ* R = 100 µs and τ* R = 350 µs respectively. This work demonstrates that high-sensitivity detectors are possible, encouraging further development and research into KIDs

  20. Sodium kinetics in hypertonic saline abortion

    Telfer, N.; Ballard, C.S.; McKee, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    The sodium kinetics of hypertonic saline abortions have been followed by measuring the radioactivity and the sodium concentrations in amniotic fluid, maternal plasma, urine, the foetus and placenta after intrauterine installation of 20% hypertonic saline labelled with 22 Na in order to determine the reason for abortion of a dead foetus in 24 to 48 hours, and reasons for sodium reactions. There is dilution of the 300 ml of amniotic fluid to a maximum of 1.5 to 2.0 litres in an exponential fashion, by the influx of mainly maternal water, slowing after 8 hours. There is an exponential type of increase in plasma radioactivity, also slowing after 8 hours. However, equilibration is never reached, the specific activity of the amniotic fluid remaining 10 times that of the plasma, and the sodium concentration 3 times that of the plasma. The urine equilibrates with the plasma, and about 3% of the administered dose is lost in 22 hours. The largest foetus and placenta picked up the least radioactivity. Thus, a more mature foetus may be protected to some degree against the hypertonic saline action; this has been observed clinically. Hyperkaliaemia was found in all four subjects, and hypoglycaemia occurred sporadically. These were not accompanied by any symptoms. Factors associated with expulsion of the dead foetus are dehydration and decreased circulation associated with fibrinoid necrosis of the placenta, which may also account for cessation of equilibration between maternal plasma and amniotic fluid. Although no saline reactions occurred, the role of extrauterine deposition of hypertonic saline, as shown in one subject, might be considered. (author)

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen adsorption on MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite

    Rather, Sami ullah, E-mail: rathersami@gmail.com; Taimoor, Aqeel Ahmad; Muhammad, Ayyaz; Alhamed, Yahia Abobakor; Zaman, Sharif Fakhruz; Ali, Arshid Mahmood

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption comparisons of commercial, milled, and MgH{sub 2} composite. • Hydrogen adsorption capacity and kinetics improves tremendously by CNT embedding. • Unsteady state modeling and simulation of adsorption kinetics. - Abstract: Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2})–carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite has been prepared by high-energy ball milling method and their experimental and kinetic hydrogen adsorption studies was assessed. Hydrogen adsorption studies were performed by Sievert’s volumetric apparatus and kinetic evaluation was conducted by surface chemistry and Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW) type mode. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were performed. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of commercial MgH{sub 2}, milled MgH{sub 2}, and MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite are found to be 0.04, 0.057, and 0.059 g (H{sub 2})/g (MgH{sub 2}) at 673 K and hydrogen pressure of 4.6 MPa. Addition of 5 wt% of CNTs to MgH{sub 2} proved to be very critical to enhance hydrogen adsorption as well as to improve its kinetics. It was observed that hydrogen adsorption is not in quasi-state equilibrium and is modeled using kinetic rate laws.

  2. Comparative evaluation of kinetic, equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models for biomass gasification

    Buragohain, Buljit [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Chakma, Sankar; Kumar, Peeush [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Mahanta, Pinakeswar [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Moholkar, Vijayanand S. [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India)

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of biomass gasification has been an active area of research for past two decades. In the published literature, three approaches have been adopted for the modeling of this process, viz. thermodynamic equilibrium, semi-equilibrium and kinetic. In this paper, we have attempted to present a comparative assessment of these three types of models for predicting outcome of the gasification process in a circulating fluidized bed gasifier. Two model biomass, viz. rice husk and wood particles, have been chosen for analysis, with gasification medium being air. Although the trends in molar composition, net yield and LHV of the producer gas predicted by three models are in concurrence, significant quantitative difference is seen in the results. Due to rather slow kinetics of char gasification and tar oxidation, carbon conversion achieved in single pass of biomass through the gasifier, calculated using kinetic model, is quite low, which adversely affects the yield and LHV of the producer gas. Although equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models reveal relative insensitivity of producer gas characteristics towards temperature, the kinetic model shows significant effect of temperature on LHV of the gas at low air ratios. Kinetic models also reveal volume of the gasifier to be an insignificant parameter, as the net yield and LHV of the gas resulting from 6 m and 10 m riser is same. On a whole, the analysis presented in this paper indicates that thermodynamic models are useful tools for quantitative assessment of the gasification process, while kinetic models provide physically more realistic picture.

  3. Blood typing

    ... detect these minor antigens. It is done before transfusions, except in emergency situations. Alternative Names Cross matching; Rh typing; ABO blood typing; Blood group; Anemia - immune hemolytic blood type; ...

  4. Carbonate mineral dissolution kinetics in high pressure experiments

    Dethlefsen, F.; Dörr, C.; Schäfer, D.; Ebert, M.

    2012-04-01

    The potential CO2 reservoirs in the North German Basin are overlain by a series of Mesozoic barrier rocks and aquifers and finally mostly by Tertiary and Quaternary close-to-surface aquifers. The unexpected rise of stored CO2 from its reservoir into close-to-surface aquifer systems, perhaps through a broken well casing, may pose a threat to groundwater quality because of the acidifying effect of CO2 dissolution in water. The consequences may be further worsening of the groundwater quality due to the mobilization of heavy metals. Buffer mechanisms counteracting the acidification are for instance the dissolution of carbonates. Carbonate dissolution kinetics is comparably fast and carbonates can be abundant in close-to-surface aquifers. The disadvantages of batch experiments compared to column experiments in order to determine rate constants are well known and have for instance been described by v. GRINSVEN and RIEMSDIJK (1992). Therefore, we have designed, developed, tested, and used a high-pressure laboratory column system to simulate aquifer conditions in a flow through setup within the CO2-MoPa project. The calcite dissolution kinetics was determined for CO2-pressures of 6, 10, and 50 bars. The results were evaluated by using the PHREEQC code with a 1-D reactive transport model, applying a LASAGA (1984) -type kinetic dissolution equation (PALANDRI and KHARAKA, 2004; eq. 7). While PALANDRI and KHARAKA (2004) gave calcite dissolution rate constants originating from batch experiments of log kacid = -0.3 and log kneutral = -5.81, the data of the column experiment were best fitted using log kacid = -2.3 and log kneutral = -7.81, so that the rate constants fitted using the lab experiment applying 50 bars pCO2 were approximately 100 times lower than according to the literature data. Rate constants of experiments performed at less CO2 pressure (pCO2 = 6 bars: log kacid = -1.78; log kneutral = -7.29) were only 30 times lower than literature data. These discrepancies in the

  5. Decomposition kinetics of plutonium hydride

    Haschke, J.M.; Stakebake, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic data for decomposition of PuH/sub 1/ /sub 95/ provides insight into a possible mechanism for the hydriding and dehydriding reactions of plutonium. The fact that the rate of the hydriding reaction, K/sub H/, is proportional to P/sup 1/2/ and the rate of the dehydriding process, K/sub D/, is inversely proportional to P/sup 1/2/ suggests that the forward and reverse reactions proceed by opposite paths of the same mechanism. The P/sup 1/2/ dependence of hydrogen solubility in metals is characteristic of the dissociative absorption of hydrogen; i.e., the reactive species is atomic hydrogen. It is reasonable to assume that the rates of the forward and reverse reactions are controlled by the surface concentration of atomic hydrogen, (H/sub s/), that K/sub H/ = c'(H/sub s/), and that K/sub D/ = c/(H/sub s/), where c' and c are proportionality constants. For this surface model, the pressure dependence of K/sub D/ is related to (H/sub s/) by the reaction (H/sub s/) reversible 1/2H/sub 2/(g) and by its equilibrium constant K/sub e/ = (H/sub 2/)/sup 1/2//(H/sub s/). In the pressure range of ideal gas behavior, (H/sub s/) = K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/ and the decomposition rate is given by K/sub D/ = cK/sub e/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. For an analogous treatment of the hydriding process with this model, it can be readily shown that K/sub H/ = c'K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. The inverse pressure dependence and direct temperature dependence of the decomposition rate are correctly predicted by this mechanism which is most consistent with the observed behavior of the Pu--H system.

  6. Thermal dehydration kinetics of phosphogypsum

    López, F. A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phsophogypsum is a by-product from the processing phosphate rock. Before the use of it in cement industry such as setting regulator is necessary a study of dehydration reaction of phosphogypsum to avoid the false setting during the milling. The aim is to study the thermal behavior of two different phosphogypsum sources (Spain and Tunisia under non-isothermal conditions in argon atmosphere by using Thermo-Gravimetriy, Differential Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. DSC experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from ambient to 350 °C at different heating rates. The temperatures of conversion from gypsum to hemihydrate and anhydrite states and heat of dehydration were determined. Various methods were used to analyze the DSC data for reaction kinetics determination. The activation energy and frequency factor were calculated for dehydration of phosphogypsum. Activation energy values of the main dehydration reaction of phosphogypsum were calculated to be approximately 61–118 kJ/mol.El fosfoyeso es un subproducto procedente del procesado de la roca fosfato. Una de las posibles vías de reutilización y revalorización es su uso como regulador del fraguado en la industria cementera. Debido a los posibles problemas de falso fraguado asociado a los procesos de deshidratación que tienen lugar durante la molienda del cemento, esta investigación estudió el comportamiento térmico, bajo condiciones no-isotérmicas en atmósfera de argón, de dos fosfoyesos, mediante TG-DTA y DSC. Los ensayos de DSC se realizaron hasta los 350 °C a diferentes velocidades de calentamiento. La temperatura de conversión del yeso a las formas de hemihidrato y anhidrita y el calor de hidratación fueron determinados. Las cinéticas de reacción fueron obtenidas analizando los datos de DSC mediante varios métodos. Se calculó la energía de activación y el factor de frecuencia para las reacciones de deshidratación del

  7. Quantifying fat, oil, and grease deposit formation kinetics.

    Iasmin, Mahbuba; Dean, Lisa O; Ducoste, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    Fat, oil, and grease (FOG) deposits formed in sanitary sewers are calcium-based saponified solids that are responsible for a significant number of nationwide sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) across United States. In the current study, the kinetics of lab-based saponified solids were determined to understand the kinetics of FOG deposit formation in sewers for two types of fat (Canola and Beef Tallow) and two types of calcium sources (calcium chloride and calcium sulfate) under three pH (7 ± 0.5, 10 ± 0.5, and ≈14) and two temperature conditions (22 ± 0.5 and 45 ± 0.5 °C). The results of this study displayed quick reactions of a fraction of fats with calcium ions to form calcium based saponified solids. Results further showed that increased palmitic fatty acid content in source fats, the magnitude of the pH, and temperature significantly affect the FOG deposit formation and saponification rates. The experimental data of the kinetics were compared with two empirical models: a) Cotte saponification model and b) Foubert crystallization model and a mass-action based mechanistic model that included alkali driven hydrolysis of triglycerides. Results showed that the mass action based mechanistic model was able to predict changes in the rate of formation of saponified solids under the different experimental conditions compared to both empirical models. The mass-action based saponification model also revealed that the hydrolysis of Beef Tallow was slower compared to liquid Canola fat resulting in smaller quantities of saponified solids. This mechanistic saponification model, with its ability to track the saponified solids chemical precursors, may provide an initial framework to predict the spatial formation of FOG deposits in municipal sewers using system wide sewer collection modeling software. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Kinetics and the Permeation Properties of Piezo Channels.

    Gnanasambandam, R; Gottlieb, P A; Sachs, F

    2017-01-01

    Piezo channels are eukaryotic, cation-selective mechanosensitive channels (MSCs), which show rapid activation and voltage-dependent inactivation. The kinetics of these channels are largely consistent across multiple cell types and different stimulation paradigms with some minor variability. No accessory subunits that associate with Piezo channels have been reported. They are homotrimers and each ∼300kD monomer has an N-terminal propeller blade-like mechanosensing module, which can confer mechanosensing capabilities on ASIC-1 (the trimeric non-MSC, acid-sensing ion channel-1) and a C-terminal pore module, which influences conductance, selectivity, and channel inactivation. Repeated stimulation can cause domain fracture and diffusion of these channels leading to synchronous loss of inactivation. The reconstituted channels spontaneously open only in asymmetric bilayers but lack inactivation. Mutations that cause hereditary xerocytosis alter PIEZO1 kinetics. The kinetics of the wild-type PIEZO1 and alterations thereof in mutants (M2225R, R2456K, and DhPIEZO1) are summarized in the form of a quantitative model and hosted online. The pore is permeable to alkali ions although Li + permeates poorly. Divalent cations, notably Ca 2+ , traverse the channel and inhibit the flux of monovalents. The large monovalent organic cations such as tetramethyl ammonium and tetraethyl ammonium can traverse the channel, but slowly, suggesting a pore diameter of ∼8Å, and the estimated in-plane area change upon opening is around 6-20nm 2 . Ruthenium red can enter the channel only from the extracellular side and seems to bind in a pocket close to residue 2496. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. First-order hydrothermal oxidation kinetics of digested sludge compared with raw sludge.

    Shanableh, A; Imteaz, M

    2008-09-01

    This article presents an assessment of the first-order hydrothermal oxidation kinetics of a selected digested sludge at subcritical ( 374 degrees C) temperatures in the range of 250-460 degrees C. Furthermore, the results were compared with reported oxidation kinetics of raw sludge treated under identical experimental conditions. In the assessment, oxidation was considered to proceed in two steps: (1) decomposition of the particulate, or non-filterable, chemical oxygen demand (PCOD); followed by (2) ultimate oxidation and removal of the total, particulate and soluble, COD. The accumulation and removal of soluble COD (SCOD) was determined from the difference between the rates of sludge decomposition and ultimate oxidation. Using results from batch and continuous-flow hydrothermal treatment experiments, the reacting organic ingredients were separated into groups according to the ease or difficulty at which they were decomposed or removed, with Arrhenius-type activation energy levels assigned to the different groups. The analysis confirmed that within the treatment range of 75% to more than 97% COD removal, the oxidation kinetics of the digested and raw sludges were nearly identical despite differences in the proportions of their original organic ingredients. The original organic ingredients were mostly removed above 75% COD removal, and the oxidation kinetics appeared to be dominated by the removal of acetic acid, an intermediate by-product which constituted 50% to more than 80% of the remaining COD. Furthermore, the oxidation kinetics of both sludge types were consistent with reported first-order oxidation kinetics of pure acetic acid solutions. The resulting kinetic models adequately represented hydrothermal oxidation of digested sludge, in terms of COD and PCOD removals, as well as accumulation and removal of the soluble SCOD.

  10. Klebsiella Typing

    Hansen, D S; Skov, R; Benedí, J.V.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing and O:K-serotyping of Klebsiella in two different epidemiological settings. METHODS: One hundred and four bacteremia isolates without known epidemiological relation and 47 isolates from an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care...... unit (NICU) were K-typed by countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis (CCIE), O-typed by an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method, and typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the restriction enzyme XbaI. RESULTS: Typing data for the 104 bacteremia isolates were compared...... with regard to typability, number of types, maximum number of isolates per type, and the Discriminative Index (DI). O-typing combined with K-typing (DI 0.98) as O:K-serotyping (DI 0.99) gave a very discriminative typing system, whereas O-typing alone was not very discriminative (DI 0.76). PFGE (DI 1...

  11. The modelling of direct chemical kinetic effects in turbulent flames

    Lindstet, R.P. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-06-01

    Combustion chemistry-related effects have traditionally been of secondary importance in the design of gas turbine combustors. However, the need to deal with issues such as flame stability, relight and pollutant emissions has served to bring chemical kinetics and the coupling of finite rate chemistry with turbulent flow fields to the centre of combustor design. Indeed, improved cycle efficiency and more stringent environmental legislation, as defined by the ICAO, are current key motivators in combustor design. Furthermore, lean premixed prevaporized (LPP) combustion systems, increasingly used for power generation, often operate close to the lean blow-off limit and are prone to extinction/reignition type phenomena. Thus, current key design issues require that direct chemical kinetic effects be accounted for accurately in any simulation procedure. The transported probability density function (PDF) approach uniquely offers the potential of facilitating the accurate modelling of such effects. The present paper thus assesses the ability of this technique to model kinetically controlled phenomena, such as carbon monoxide emissions and flame blow-off, through the application of a transported PDF method closed at the joint scalar level. The closure for the velocity field is at the second moment level, and a key feature of the present work is the use of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms. The latter are derived from recent work by Lindstedt and co-workers that has resulted in a compact 141 reactions and 28 species mechanism for LNG combustion. The systematically reduced form used here features 14 independent C/H/O scalars, with the remaining species incorporated via steady state approximations. Computations have been performed for hydrogen/carbon dioxide and methane flames. The former (high Reynolds number) flames permit an assessment of the modelling of flame blow-off, and the methane flame has been selected to obtain an indication of the influence of differential

  12. Kinetic data bank for Ramona of the Siemens 9x9-IX

    Alonso V, G.

    1993-12-01

    With the purpose of making the transitory analyses of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station when Siemens fuel of the type 9x9-IX is used, proposed for the cycle 2 of the Unit 2, the kinetic data bank in hot condition for the Ramona code has been generated. (Author)

  13. Efficient integration of stiff kinetics with phase change detection for reactive reservoir processes

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Gerritsen, Margot G.; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2007-01-01

    We propose the use of implicit one-step Explicit Singly Diagonal Implicit Runge-Kutta (ESDIRK) methods for integration of the stiff kinetics in reactive, compositional and thermal processes that are solved using operator-splitting type approaches. To facilitate the algorithmic development we...

  14. Tumor cell proliferation kinetics and tumor growth rate

    Tubiana, M

    1989-01-01

    The present knowledge on the growth rate and the proliferation kinetics of human tumor is based on the measurement of the tumor doubling times (DT) in several hundred patients and on the determination of the proportion of proliferating cells with radioactive thymidine or by flow cytometry in large numbers of patients. The results show that the DT of human tumor varies widely, from less than one week to over one year with a median value of approximately 2 months. The DTs are significantly correlated with the histological type. They depend upon (1) the duration of the cell cycle whose mean duration is 2 days with small variations from tumor to tumor, (2) the proportion of proliferating cells and consequently the cell birth rate which varies widely among tumors and which is significantly correlated to the DT, (3) the cell loss factors which also vary widely and which are the greatest when proliferation is most intensive. These studies have several clinical implications: (a) they have further increased our understanding of the natural history of human tumor, (b) they have therapeutic implications since tumor responsiveness and curability by radiation and drugs are strongly influenced by the cell kinetic parameters of the tumor, (c) the proportion of proliferating cells is of great prognostic value in several types of human cancers. The investigation of the molecular defects, which are correlated with the perturbation of control of cell proliferation, should lead to significant fundamental and therapeutic advances. (orig.).

  15. Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics is formulated. Numerical results of macroscopic phenomenon of lag-burst kinetics is obtained by using a kinetic Monte Carlo approach to single enzyme activity. Highlights: ► An enzyme is attached with the fluid state phospholipid molecules on the Langmuir monolayer. ► Through the diffusion, the enzyme molecule reaches the gel–fluid interface. ► After hydrolysing a phospholipid molecule it predominantly leaves the surface in the lag phase. ► The enzyme is strictly attached to the surface with scooting mode of motion and the burst phase appears. - Abstract: In the spirit of Gillespie’s stochastic approach we have formulated a theory to explore the advancement of the interfacial enzyme kinetics at the single enzyme level which is ultimately utilized to obtain the ensemble average macroscopic feature, lag-burst kinetics. We have provided a theory of the transition from the lag phase to the burst phase kinetics by considering the gradual development of electrostatic interaction among the positively charged enzyme and negatively charged product molecules deposited on the phospholipid surface. It is shown that the different diffusion time scales of the enzyme over the fluid and product regions are responsible for the memory effect in the correlation of successive turnover events of the hopping mode in the single trajectory analysis which again is reflected on the non-Gaussian distribution of turnover times on the macroscopic kinetics in the lag phase unlike the burst phase kinetics.

  16. Thermodynamics and kinetics of solids fragmentation at severe plastic deformation

    A.V. Khomenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The approach of nonequilibrium evolution thermodynamics earlier offered is developed. It helps to describe the processes of defect formation within the adiabatic approximation. The basic equations system depends on the initial defects distribution (dislocations and grain boundaries. The phase diagram is determined with the domains of the realization of different limiting structure types. The interaction effect of several defect types on the formation of limiting structure is investigated in terms of the internal energy. The conditions of the formation of two limiting structures are found. The kinetics of the steady-state values establishment of the defects density is investigated within the scope of the adiabatic approximation. The dislocations density change follows the evolution of the grain boundaries density in this approach. It is shown that grain sizes, in limiting structures, decrease with an increase of the elastic strains.

  17. Testing a dissipative kinetic k-essence model

    Cardenas, Victor H.; Villanueva, J.R. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Valparaiso (Chile); Centro de Astrofisica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Cruz, Norman [Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-04-01

    In thiswork,we present a study of a purely kinetic k-essence model, characterized basically by a parameter α in presence of a bulk dissipative term, whose relationship between viscous pressure Π and energy density ρ of the background follows a polytropic type law, Π ∝ ρ{sup λ+1/2}, where λ, in principle, is a parameter without restrictions. Analytical solutions for the energy density of the k-essence field are found in two specific cases: λ = 1/2 and λ = (1 - α)/2α, and then we show that these solutions possess the same functional form as the non-viscous counterpart. Finally, both approaches are contrasted with observational data from type Ia supernova, and the most recent Hubble parameter measurements, and therefore, the best values for the parameters of the theory are found. (orig.)

  18. A many-particle quantum-kinetic formalism for describing properties of light emitters in frozen dielectrics

    Gladush M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A many particle quantum-kinetic formalism is suggested to derive the Maxwell-Bloch-type equations which describe the interaction of quantum emitters with light in a frozen dielectric. It is shown that the quantum-kinetic formalism can meet the concept of local variations of dielectric properties and their influence on the emitter. The definitions of the local response and the effective refractive index in macroscopically homogeneous media are discussed.

  19. Modeling the degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid.

    Peleg, Micha; Normand, Mark D; Dixon, William R; Goulette, Timothy R

    2018-06-13

    Most published reports on ascorbic acid (AA) degradation during food storage and heat preservation suggest that it follows first-order kinetics. Deviations from this pattern include Weibullian decay, and exponential drop approaching finite nonzero retention. Almost invariably, the degradation rate constant's temperature-dependence followed the Arrhenius equation, and hence the simpler exponential model too. A formula and freely downloadable interactive Wolfram Demonstration to convert the Arrhenius model's energy of activation, E a , to the exponential model's c parameter, or vice versa, are provided. The AA's isothermal and non-isothermal degradation can be simulated with freely downloadable interactive Wolfram Demonstrations in which the model's parameters can be entered and modified by moving sliders on the screen. Where the degradation is known a priori to follow first or other fixed order kinetics, one can use the endpoints method, and in principle the successive points method too, to estimate the reaction's kinetic parameters from considerably fewer AA concentration determinations than in the traditional manner. Freeware to do the calculations by either method has been recently made available on the Internet. Once obtained in this way, the kinetic parameters can be used to reconstruct the entire degradation curves and predict those at different temperature profiles, isothermal or dynamic. Comparison of the predicted concentration ratios with experimental ones offers a way to validate or refute the kinetic model and the assumptions on which it is based.

  20. Kinetic parameters for source driven systems

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.; D'Angelo, A.

    2006-01-01

    The definition of the characteristic kinetic parameters of a subcritical source-driven system constitutes an interesting problem in reactor physics with important consequences for practical applications. Consistent and physically meaningful values of the parameters allow to obtain accurate results from kinetic simulation tools and to correctly interpret kinetic experiments. For subcritical systems a preliminary problem arises for the adoption of a suitable weighting function to be used in the projection procedure to derive a point model. The present work illustrates a consistent factorization-projection procedure which leads to the definition of the kinetic parameters in a straightforward manner. The reactivity term is introduced coherently with the generalized perturbation theory applied to the source multiplication factor ks, which is thus given a physical role in the kinetic model. The effective prompt lifetime is introduced on the assumption that a neutron generation can be initiated by both the fission process and the source emission. Results are presented for simplified configurations to fully comprehend the physical features and for a more complicated highly decoupled system treated in transport theory. (authors)

  1. Kinetic and dynamic kinetic resolution of secondary alcohols with ionic-surfactant-coated Burkholderia cepacia lipase: substrate scope and enantioselectivity.

    Kim, Cheolwoo; Lee, Jusuk; Cho, Jeonghun; Oh, Yeonock; Choi, Yoon Kyung; Choi, Eunjeong; Park, Jaiwook; Kim, Mahn-Joo

    2013-03-15

    Forty-four different secondary alcohols, which can be classified into several types (II-IX), were tested as the substrates of ionic surfactant-coated Burkholderia cepacia lipase (ISCBCL) to see its substrate scope and enantioselectivity in kinetic and dynamic kinetic resolution (KR and DKR). They include 6 boron-containing alcohols, 24 chiral propargyl alcohols, and 14 diarylmethanols. The results from the studies on KR indicate that ISCBCL accepted most of them with high enantioselectivity at ambient temperature and with useful to high enantioselectivity at elevated temperatures. In particular, ISCBCL displayed high enantioselectivity toward sterically demanding secondary alcohols (types VIII and IX) which have two bulky substituents at the hydroxymethine center. DKR reactions were performed by the combination of ISCBCL with a ruthenium-based racemization catalyst at 25-60 °C. Forty-one secondary alcohols were tested for DKR. About half of them were transformed into their acetates of high enantiopurity (>90% ee) with good yields (>80%). It is concluded that ISCBCL appears to be a superb enzyme for the KR and DKR of secondary alcohols.

  2. Kinetic analysis of polyoxometalate (POM) oxidation of non-phenolic lignin model compound

    Tomoya Yokoyama; Hou-min Chang; Ira A. Weinstock; Richard S. Reiner; John F. Kadla

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic and reaction mechanism of non-phenolic lignin model compounds under anaerobic polyoxometalate (POM), Na5(+1.9)[SiV1(-0.1)MoW10(+0.1) 40], bleaching conditions were examined. Analyses using a syringyl type model, 1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)ethanol (1), a guaiacyl type, 1-(3,4- imethoxyphenyl)ethanol (2), and 1- (4-ethoxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)ethanol (3) suggest...

  3. Nonlocal kinetic-energy-density functionals

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present nonlocal kinetic-energy functionals T[n] within the average density approximation (ADA) framework, which do not require any extra input when applied to any electron system and recover the exact kinetic energy and the linear response function of a homogeneous system. In contrast with previous ADA functionals, these present good behavior of the long-range tail of the exact weight function. The averaging procedure for the kinetic functional (averaging the Fermi momentum of the electron gas, instead of averaging the electron density) leads to a functional without numerical difficulties in the calculation of extended systems, and it gives excellent results when applied to atoms and jellium surfaces. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Kinetics model of bainitic transformation with stress

    Zhou, Mingxing; Xu, Guang; Hu, Haijiang; Yuan, Qing; Tian, Junyu

    2018-01-01

    Thermal simulations were conducted on a Gleeble 3800 simulator. The main purpose is to investigate the effects of stress on the kinetics of bainitic transformation in a Fe-C-Mn-Si advanced high strength bainitic steel. Previous studies on modeling the kinetics of stress affected bainitic transformation only considered the stress below the yield strength of prior austenite. In the present study, the stress above the yield strength of prior austenite is taken into account. A new kinetics model of bainitic transformation dependent on the stress (including the stresses below and above the yield strength of prior austenite) and the transformation temperature is proposed. The new model presents a good agreement with experimental results. In addition, it is found that the acceleration degree of stress on bainitic transformation increases with the stress whether its magnitude is below or above the yield strength of austenite, but the increasing rate gradually slows down when the stress is above the yield strength of austenite.

  5. Kinetic mechanism for modeling of electrochemical reactions.

    Cervenka, Petr; Hrdlička, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2012-04-01

    We propose a kinetic mechanism of electrochemical interactions. We assume fast formation and recombination of electron donors D- and acceptors A+ on electrode surfaces. These mediators are continuously formed in the electrode matter by thermal fluctuations. The mediators D- and A+, chemically equivalent to the electrode metal, enter electrochemical interactions on the electrode surfaces. Electrochemical dynamics and current-voltage characteristics of a selected electrochemical system are studied. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with those given by the classical Butler-Volmer kinetics. The proposed model can be used to study fast electrochemical processes in microsystems and nanosystems that are often out of the thermal equilibrium. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism operates only with the surface concentrations of chemical reactants and local electric potentials, which facilitates the study of electrochemical systems with indefinable bulk.

  6. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  7. Kinetic study of solid-state processes

    Malek, Jiri; Mitsuhashi, Takefumi

    2003-01-01

    A simple method for kinetic analysis of solid-state processes has been developed and the criteria capable of classifying different processes are explored. They provide a useful tool for the determination of the most suitable kinetic model. The method has been applied to the analysis of calorimetric data corresponding to the crystallization processes in amorphous ZrO 2 . It is found that the crystallization kinetics of amorphous powder sample exhibits a complex behavior under non-isothermal conditions. A two-parameter model provides a satisfactory description of the crystallization process for isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. This enables better control of crystallization extent in fine ZrO 2 powders that is important for preparation of zirconia ceramics with defined properties. (author)

  8. Kinetic chain abnormalities in the athletic shoulder.

    Sciascia, Aaron; Thigpen, Charles; Namdari, Surena; Baldwin, Keith

    2012-03-01

    Overhead activities require the shoulder to be exposed to and sustain repetitive loads. The segmental activation of the body's links, known as the kinetic chain, allows this to occur effectively. Proper muscle activation is achieved through generation of energy from the central segment or core, which then transfers the energy to the terminal links of the shoulder, elbow, and hand. The kinetic chain is best characterized by 3 components: optimized anatomy, reproducible efficient motor patterns, and the sequential generation of forces. However, tissue injury and anatomic deficits such as weakness and/or tightness in the leg, pelvic core, or scapular musculature can lead to overuse shoulder injuries. These injuries can be prevented and maladaptations can be detected with a thorough understanding of biomechanics of the kinetic chain as it relates to overhead activity.

  9. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  10. Transient processes in cell proliferation kinetics

    Yakovlev, Andrej Yu

    1989-01-01

    A mathematician who has taken the romantic decision to devote himself to biology will doubtlessly look upon cell kinetics as the most simple and natural field of application for his knowledge and skills. Indeed, the thesaurus he is to master is not so complicated as, say, in molecular biology, the structural elements of the system, i. e. ceils, have been segregated by Nature itself, simple considerations of balance may be used for deducing basic equations, and numerous analogies in other areas of science also superficial add to one"s confidence. Generally speaking, this number of impression is correct, as evidenced by the very great theoretical studies on population kinetics, unmatched in other branches of mathematical biology. This, however, does not mean that mathematical theory of cell systems has traversed in its development a pathway free of difficulties or errors. The seeming ease of formalizing the phenomena of cell kinetics not infrequently led to the appearance of mathematical models lacking in adequ...

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics of living copolymerization processes.

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-11-13

    Theoretical advances are reported on the kinetics and thermodynamics of free and template-directed living copolymerizations. Until recently, the kinetic theory of these processes had only been established in the fully irreversible regime, in which the attachment rates are only considered. However, the entropy production is infinite in this regime and the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium cannot be investigated. For this purpose, the detachment rates should also be included. Inspite of this complication, the kinetics can be exactly solved in the regimes of steady growth and depolymerization. In this way, analytical expressions are obtained for the mean growth velocity, the statistical properties of the copolymer sequences, as well as the thermodynamic entropy production. The results apply to DNA replication, transcription and translation, allowing us to understand important aspects of molecular evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Oxidation of phenyl alanine by pyridinium chlorochromate in acidic DMF–water medium: A kinetic study

    B.L. Hiran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of phenyl alanine by pyridinium chlorochromate in DMF–water (70:30% mixture in presence of perchloric acid leads to the formation of corresponding aldehyde. The reaction is of first order each in [PCC], [HClO4] and [AA]. Michaelis–Menten type kinetics was observed with phenyl alanine. The reaction rates were determined at different temperatures [25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 °C] and the activation parameters were calculated. The reaction does not induce polymerization of acrylonitrile. With an increase in the amount of DMF in its aqueous mixture, the rate increases. A suitable mechanism for the reaction was postulated.

  13. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    Cochain, B.

    2009-12-01

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO and Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe 3+ /ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO 4 species in the glass network whereas the BO 3 and BO 4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe 3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe 3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO 3 and BO 4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  14. Relaxation and kinetics in scalar field theories

    Boyanovsky, D.; Lawrie, I.D.; Lee, D.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach to the dynamics of relaxation and kinetics of thermalization in a scalar field theory is presented that incorporates the relevant time scales through the resummation of hard thermal loops. An alternative derivation of the kinetic equations for the open-quote open-quote quasiparticle close-quote close-quote distribution functions is obtained that allows a clear understanding of the different open-quote open-quote coarse-graining close-quote close-quote approximations usually involved in a kinetic description. This method leads to a systematic perturbative expansion to obtain the kinetic equations including hard thermal loop resummation and to an improvement including renormalization, off-shell effects, and contributions that change chemical equilibrium on short time scales. As a by-product of these methods we establish the equivalence between the relaxation time scale in the linearized equation of motion of the quasiparticles and the thermalization time scale of the quasiparticle distribution function in the open-quote open-quote relaxation time approximation close-quote close-quote including hard thermal loop effects. Hard thermal loop resummation dramatically modifies the scattering rate for long wavelength modes as compared to the usual (semi)classical estimate. Relaxation and kinetics are studied both in the unbroken and broken symmetry phases of the theory. The broken symmetry phase also provides the setting to obtain the contribution to the kinetic equations from processes that involve decay of a heavy scalar into light scalar particles in the medium. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  15. Exercise: Kinetic considerations for gas exchange.

    Rossiter, Harry B

    2011-01-01

    The activities of daily living typically occur at metabolic rates below the maximum rate of aerobic energy production. Such activity is characteristic of the nonsteady state, where energy demands, and consequential physiological responses, are in constant flux. The dynamics of the integrated physiological processes during these activities determine the degree to which exercise can be supported through rates of O₂ utilization and CO₂ clearance appropriate for their demands and, as such, provide a physiological framework for the notion of exercise intensity. The rate at which O₂ exchange responds to meet the changing energy demands of exercise--its kinetics--is dependent on the ability of the pulmonary, circulatory, and muscle bioenergetic systems to respond appropriately. Slow response kinetics in pulmonary O₂ uptake predispose toward a greater necessity for substrate-level energy supply, processes that are limited in their capacity, challenge system homeostasis and hence contribute to exercise intolerance. This review provides a physiological systems perspective of pulmonary gas exchange kinetics: from an integrative view on the control of muscle oxygen consumption kinetics to the dissociation of cellular respiration from its pulmonary expression by the circulatory dynamics and the gas capacitance of the lungs, blood, and tissues. The intensity dependence of gas exchange kinetics is discussed in relation to constant, intermittent, and ramped work rate changes. The influence of heterogeneity in the kinetic matching of O₂ delivery to utilization is presented in reference to exercise tolerance in endurance-trained athletes, the elderly, and patients with chronic heart or lung disease. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  16. The coke drum thermal kinetic effects

    Aldescu, Maria M.; Romero, Sim; Larson, Mel [KBC Advanced Technologies plc, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The coke drum thermal kinetic dynamics fundamentally affect the coker unit yields as well as the coke product properties and unit reliability. In the drum the thermal cracking and polymerization or condensation reactions take place in a semi-batch environment. Understanding the fundamentals of the foaming kinetics that occur in the coke drums is key to avoiding a foam-over that could result in a unit shutdown for several months. Although the most dynamic changes with time occur during drum filling, other dynamics of the coker process will be discussed as well. KBC has contributed towards uncovering and modelling the complexities of heavy oil thermal dynamics. (author)

  17. Kinetic Parameters of Thermal Degradation of Polymers

    朱新生; 程嘉祺

    2003-01-01

    The derivative expressions between activation energy (E) and the temperature at the maximum mass loss rate(Tmax) and between activation energy (E) and exponent (N) were deduced in the light of Arrhenius theory. It was found that the increase of activation energy results in the decrease of exponent and the increase of Tmax. The kinetic parameters were involved in the analysis of the thermal degradation of several polymers. The degradation kinetics of these polymers well complied with the prediction of the derivative expressions for the polymer degradation with single mechanism dominated.

  18. Calmodulin-lanthanide ion exchange kinetics

    Buccigross, J.; O'Donnell, C.; Nelson, D.

    1985-01-01

    A flow dialysis apparatus suitable for the study of high affinity metal binding proteins has been utilized to study calmodulin-metal exchange kinetics. Calmodulin labeled with Eu-155 and Gd-153 was dialyzed against buffer containing various competing metal ions. The rate of metal exchange was monitored by a gamma-ray scintillation detector. The kinetics of exchange are first order, and the rates fall into two categories: Ca (II) and CD (II) in one, and the lanthanides Eu (III), Gd (III), and La (III) in the other

  19. Unified kinetic theory in toroidal systems

    Hitchcock, D.A.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1980-12-01

    The kinetic theory of toroidal systems has been characterized by two approaches: neoclassical theory which ignores instabilities and quasilinear theory which ignores collisions. In this paper we construct a kinetic theory for toroidal systems which includes both effects. This yields a pair of evolution equations; one for the spectrum and one for the distribution function. In addition, this theory yields a toroidal generalization of the usual collision operator which is shown to have many similar properties - conservation laws, H theorem - to the usual collision operator

  20. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Compounds.

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-08-10

    Biaryl compounds with axial chirality are very common in synthetic chemistry, especially in catalysis. Axially chiral biaryls are important due to their biological activities and extensive applications in asymmetric catalysis. Thus the development of efficient enantioselective methods for their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. This Minireview discusses the progress made in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl compounds and chronicles significant advances made recently in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.