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Sample records for hive predicting asthma

  1. Hives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cold or sun exposure Excessive perspiration Illness, including lupus , other autoimmune diseases , and leukemia Infections such as mononucleosis Exercise Exposure to water Often, the cause of hives ...

  2. Hives (Urticaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manage Asthma at School Allergies Types of Allergies Drug Allergy Food Allergy Insect Allergy Cockroach Allergy Dust Mite ... and will ask you about your recent medical history. The doctor may do allergy testing . Hives can ...

  3. Hives (Urticaria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rare cases, a doctor may prescribe a steroid pill or liquid to treat chronic hives. Usually, this will only be done for short periods (5 days to 2 weeks). When It's an Emergency Anaphylaxis and severe attacks of hives require immediate ...

  4. Asthma exacerbation prediction: recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Louise

    2018-04-01

    Asthma attacks are frequent in children with asthma and can lead to significant adverse outcomes including time off school, hospital admission and death. Identifying children at risk of an asthma attack affords the opportunity to prevent attacks and improve outcomes. Clinical features, patient behaviours and characteristics, physiological factors, environmental data and biomarkers are all associated with asthma attacks and can be used in asthma exacerbation prediction models. Recent studies have better characterized children at risk of an attack: history of a severe exacerbation in the previous 12 months, poor adherence and current poor control are important features which should alert healthcare professionals to the need for remedial action. There is increasing interest in the use of biomarkers. A number of novel biomarkers, including patterns of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath, show promise. Biomarkers are likely to be of greatest utility if measured frequently and combined with other measures. To date, most prediction models are based on epidemiological data and population-based risk. The use of digital technology affords the opportunity to collect large amounts of real-time data, including clinical and physiological measurements and combine these with environmental data to develop personal risk scores. These developments need to be matched by changes in clinical guidelines away from a focus on current asthma control and stepwise escalation in drug therapy towards inclusion of personal risk scores and tailored management strategies including nonpharmacological approaches. There have been significant steps towards personalized prediction models of asthma attacks. The utility of such models needs to be tested in the ability not only to predict attacks but also to reduce them.

  5. Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Depart...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in Children with Asthma, published in Volume 3,...

  6. Help with Hives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... berries, and nuts ), medicines (such as antibiotics ), and insect stings or bites . Other causes of hives are ... diagnose hives just by looking at you and hearing your story about what happened. The doctor can ...

  7. Apache hive essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    If you are a data analyst, developer, or simply someone who wants to use Hive to explore and analyze data in Hadoop, this is the book for you. Whether you are new to big data or an expert, with this book, you will be able to master both the basic and the advanced features of Hive. Since Hive is an SQL-like language, some previous experience with the SQL language and databases is useful to have a better understanding of this book.

  8. Hives (Urticaria) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rare cases, a doctor may prescribe a steroid pill or liquid to treat chronic hives. Usually this is done for just a short period (5 days to 2 weeks) to prevent harmful steroid side effects. In Case of Emergency Anaphylactic shock and bad attacks of hives or ...

  9. Predicting asthma in preschool children with asthma symptoms: study rationale and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.D. Hafkamp-De Groen (Esther); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Caudri (Daan); A.H. Wijga (Alet); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); H. Raat (Hein)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In well-child care it is difficult to determine whether preschool children with asthma symptoms actually have or will develop asthma at school age. The PIAMA (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy) Risk Score has been proposed as an instrument that predicts

  10. Predicting worsening asthma control following the common cold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, M. J.; Castro, M.; Kunselman, S. J.; Chinchilli, V. M.; Reno, M.; Ramkumar, T. P.; Avila, P. C.; Boushey, H. A.; Ameredes, B. T.; Bleecker, E. R.; Calhoun, W. J.; Cherniack, R. M.; Craig, T. J.; Denlinger, L. C.; Israel, E.; Fahy, J. V.; Jarjour, N. N.; Kraft, M.; Lazarus, S. C.; Lemanske, R. F.; Martin, R. J.; Peters, S. P.; Ramsdell, J. W.; Sorkness, C. A.; Sutherland, E. R.; Szefler, S. J.; Wasserman, S. I.; Wechsler, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    The asthmatic response to the common cold is highly variable, and early characteristics that predict worsening of asthma control following a cold have not been identified. In this prospective multicentric cohort study of 413 adult subjects with asthma, the mini-Asthma Control Questionnaire

  11. Hives and Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water, pressure on the skin, emotional stress and exercise. Underlying medical conditions. Hives and angioedema also occasionally occur in response to blood transfusions, immune system disorders such as lupus, some types of cancer such as lymphoma, certain ...

  12. Predicting asthma in preschool children with asthma symptoms: study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafkamp-de Groen Esther

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In well-child care it is difficult to determine whether preschool children with asthma symptoms actually have or will develop asthma at school age. The PIAMA (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Risk Score has been proposed as an instrument that predicts asthma at school age, using eight easy obtainable parameters, assessed at the time of first asthma symptoms at preschool age. The aim of this study is to present the rationale and design of a study 1 to externally validate and update the PIAMA Risk Score, 2 to develop an Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool to predict asthma at school age in (specific subgroups of preschool children with asthma symptoms and 3 to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Methods and design The study will be performed within the framework of Generation R, a prospective multi-ethnic cohort study. In total, consent for postnatal follow-up was obtained from 7893 children, born between 2002 and 2006. At preschool age the PIAMA Risk Score will be assessed and used to predict asthma at school age. Discrimination (C-index and calibration will be assessed for the external validation. We will study whether the predictive ability of the PIAMA Risk Score can be improved by removing or adding predictors (e.g. preterm birth. The (updated PIAMA Risk Score will be converted to the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool- to predict asthma at school age in preschool children with asthma symptoms. Additionally, we will conduct a pilot study to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Discussion Application of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care will help to distinguish preschool children at high- and low-risk of developing asthma at school age when asthma symptoms appear. This study will increase knowledge about the validity of the PIAMA risk score and might improve risk assessment of developing asthma at school age in (specific subgroups

  13. Predicting asthma in preschool children with asthma symptoms: study rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafkamp-de Groen, Esther; Lingsma, Hester F; Caudri, Daan; Wijga, Alet; Jaddoe, Vincent Wv; Steyerberg, Ewout W; de Jongste, Johan C; Raat, Hein

    2012-10-16

    In well-child care it is difficult to determine whether preschool children with asthma symptoms actually have or will develop asthma at school age. The PIAMA (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy) Risk Score has been proposed as an instrument that predicts asthma at school age, using eight easy obtainable parameters, assessed at the time of first asthma symptoms at preschool age. The aim of this study is to present the rationale and design of a study 1) to externally validate and update the PIAMA Risk Score, 2) to develop an Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool to predict asthma at school age in (specific subgroups of) preschool children with asthma symptoms and 3) to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. The study will be performed within the framework of Generation R, a prospective multi-ethnic cohort study. In total, consent for postnatal follow-up was obtained from 7893 children, born between 2002 and 2006. At preschool age the PIAMA Risk Score will be assessed and used to predict asthma at school age. Discrimination (C-index) and calibration will be assessed for the external validation. We will study whether the predictive ability of the PIAMA Risk Score can be improved by removing or adding predictors (e.g. preterm birth). The (updated) PIAMA Risk Score will be converted to the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool- to predict asthma at school age in preschool children with asthma symptoms. Additionally, we will conduct a pilot study to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Application of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care will help to distinguish preschool children at high- and low-risk of developing asthma at school age when asthma symptoms appear.This study will increase knowledge about the validity of the PIAMA risk score and might improve risk assessment of developing asthma at school age in (specific subgroups of) preschool children, who present with asthma symptoms at well

  14. Can we predict fall asthma exacerbations? Validation of the seasonal asthma exacerbation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Heather E; Calatroni, Agustin; West, Joseph B; Liu, Andrew H; Gergen, Peter J; Gruchalla, Rebecca S; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Kercsmar, Carolyn M; Kim, Haejin; Lamm, Carin I; Makhija, Melanie M; Mitchell, Herman E; Teach, Stephen J; Wildfire, Jeremy J; Busse, William W; Szefler, Stanley J

    2017-10-01

    A Seasonal Asthma Exacerbation Predictive Index (saEPI) was previously reported based on 2 prior National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Inner City Asthma Consortium trials. This study sought to validate the saEPI in a separate trial designed to prevent fall exacerbations with omalizumab therapy. The saEPI and its components were analyzed to characterize those who had an asthma exacerbation during the Preventative Omalizumab or Step-Up Therapy for Fall Exacerbations (PROSE) study. We characterized those inner-city children with and without asthma exacerbations in the fall period treated with guidelines-based therapy (GBT) in the absence and presence of omalizumab. A higher saEPI was associated with an exacerbation in both the GBT alone (P asthma exacerbation in both groups. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  15. Demonstrating HIVE and HIVE-ES: Supporting Term Browsing and Automatic Text Indexing with Linked Open Vocabularies

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Mateos, David; Bueno de la Fuente, Gema; Greenberg, Jane; Melgar Estrada, Liliana María; Gomez, Nancy Diana; Willis, Craig; Méndez Rodríguez, Eva María; Boone, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract y presentación presentados en el Workshop The HIVE (Helping Interdisciplinary Vocabulary Engineering) and HIVE-España (ES) projects both support dynamic, automatic metadata generation using multiple vocabularies. This demonstration will present both the HIVE and HIVE-ES projects and showcase the overarching HIVE framework and functionalities, and give insight into the broader issues relating to linked open vocabularies—LOV. HIVE relies on the Simple Knowledge Organization Sy...

  16. Can exhaled volatile organic compounds predict asthma exacerbations in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Dillys; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Rosias, Philippe; Muris, Jean; Dallinga, Jan; Dompeling, Edward; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan

    2017-03-01

    Asthma control does not yet meet the goals of asthma management guidelines. Non-invasive monitoring of airway inflammation may help to improve the level of asthma control in children. (1) To identify a set of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that is most predictive for an asthma exacerbation in children. (2) To elucidate the chemical identity of predictive biomarkers. In a one-year prospective observational study, 96 asthmatic children participated . During clinical visits at 2 month intervals, asthma control, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, lung function (FEV1, FEV1/VC) and VOCs in exhaled breath were determined by means of gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Random Forrest classification modeling was used to select predictive VOCs, followed by plotting of receiver operating characteristic-curves (ROC-curves). An inverse relationship was found between the predictive power of a set of VOCs and the time between sampling of exhaled breath and the onset of exacerbation. The sensitivity and specificity of the model predicting exacerbations 14 days after sampling were 88% and 75%, respectively. The area under the ROC-curve was 90%. The sensitivity for prediction of asthma exacerbations within 21 days after sampling was 63%. In total, 7 VOCs were selected for the classification model: 3 aldehydes, 1 hydrocarbon, 1 ketone, 1 aromatic compound, and 1 unidentified VOC. VOCs in exhaled breath showed potential for predicting asthma exacerbations in children within 14 days after sampling. Before using this in clinical practice, the validity of predicting asthma exacerbations should be studied in a larger cohort.

  17. Predicting asthma-related emergency department visits using big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Sudha; Zhang, Wenli; Williams, Max; Pengetnze, Yolande

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent and costly chronic conditions in the United States, which cannot be cured. However, accurate and timely surveillance data could allow for timely and targeted interventions at the community or individual level. Current national asthma disease surveillance systems can have data availability lags of up to two weeks. Rapid progress has been made in gathering nontraditional, digital information to perform disease surveillance. We introduce a novel method of using multiple data sources for predicting the number of asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits in a specific area. Twitter data, Google search interests, and environmental sensor data were collected for this purpose. Our preliminary findings show that our model can predict the number of asthma ED visits based on near-real-time environmental and social media data with approximately 70% precision. The results can be helpful for public health surveillance, ED preparedness, and targeted patient interventions.

  18. Predicting the long-term prognosis of children with symptoms suggestive of asthma at preschool age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caudri, D.; Wijga, A.; Schipper, C.M.; Hoekstra, M.O.; Postma, D.; Koppelman, G.H.; Brunekreef, B.; Smit, H.A.; de Jongste, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Clinicians have difficulty in diagnosing asthma in preschool children with suggestive symptoms.Objective. We sought to develop a clinical asthma prediction score for preschool children who have asthma-like symptoms for the first time.Methods The Prevalence and Incidence of Asthma and

  19. Predicting the long-term prognosis of children with symptoms suggestive of asthma at preschool age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caudri, Daan; Wijga, Alet; Schipper, C. Maarten A.; Hoekstra, Maarten; Postma, Dirkje S.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A.; de Jongste, Johan C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinicians have difficulty in diagnosing asthma in preschool children with suggestive symptoms. Objective: We sought to develop a clinical asthma prediction score for preschool children who have asthma-like symptoms for the first time. Methods: The Prevalence and Incidence of Asthma and

  20. Predicting the long-term prognosis of children with symptoms suggestive of asthma at preschool age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caudri, D.; Wijga, A.H.; Schipper, C.M.; Hoekstra, M.O.; Postma, D.S.; Koppelman, G.H.; Brunekreef, B.; Smit, H.A.; Jongste, J.C. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinicians have difficulty in diagnosing asthma in preschool children with suggestive symptoms. OBJECTIVE: We sought to develop a clinical asthma prediction score for preschool children who have asthma-like symptoms for the first time. METHODS: The Prevalence and Incidence of Asthma and

  1. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... babies. Poor asthma control increases the risk of preeclampsia, a condition in which a pregnant woman develops ... other conditions that can interfere with your asthma management. Watch for Signs That Your Asthma Is Getting ...

  2. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Cough How the Lungs Work Oxygen Therapy Pulmonary Function Tests Other Resources NHLBI Resources "Asthma Action Plan" "Asthma and Physical Activity in the School" "At-A-Glance: Asthma" "How Asthma-Friendly Is ...

  3. Discovery of medical Big Data analytics: Improving the prediction of traumatic brain injury survival rates by data mining Patient Informatics Processing Software Hybrid Hadoop Hive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Rodger

    Full Text Available Entering medical encounter data by hand is time-consuming. In addition, data are often not entered into the database in a timely enough fashion to enable their use for subsequent mission planning. The Patient Informatics Processing Software semi-automates the data collection process onboard ships. Then data within these images are captured and used to populate a database, after which multiple ship databases are used for reporting and analysis. In this paper, we used the Patient Informatics Processing Software Hybrid Hadoop Hive to orchestrate database processing via various ships, by marshaling the distributed servers, running the various tasks in parallel, managing all of the communications and data transfers between the various parts of the system, and providing for redundancy and fault tolerance. Then we employed the Apache Hive as a data warehouse infrastructure built on top of Hadoop for data summarization, query, and analysis to identify traumatic brain injury (TBI as well as other injury cases. Finally, a proposed Misdiagnosis Minimization Approach method was used for data analysis. We collected data on three ship variables (Byrd, Boxer, Kearsage and injuries to four body regions (head, torso, extremities, and abrasions to determine how the set of collected variables relates to the body injuries. Two dimensions or canonical variables (survival vs. mortality were necessary to understand the association between the two sets of variables. Our method improved data classification and showed that survival, mortality, and morbidity rates can be derived from the superset of Medical Operations data and used for future decision-making and planning. We suggest that an awareness of procedural errors as well as methods to reduce misclassification should be incorporated into all TBI clinical trials. Keywords: Decision support, Traumatic brain injuries, Apache hive, Symbolic data analysis, Informatics, Data mining

  4. Prediction of asthma exacerbations in children: results of a one-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robroeks, C.M.; Vliet, D. van; Jobsis, Q.; Braekers, R.; Rijkers, G.T.; Wodzig, W.K.; Bast, A.; Zimmermann, L.J.; Dompeling, E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Underdiagnosis and low levels of asthma control are frequent occurring problems in patients with asthma. OBJECTIVE: The study aim was to evaluate the ability of non-invasive inflammatory markers in exhaled breath to predict exacerbations of childhood asthma, and to assess the time course

  5. Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  6. A refined QSAR model for prediction of chemical asthma hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, J; Seed, M J; Stocks, S J; Agius, R M

    2015-11-01

    A previously developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model has been extern ally validated as a good predictor of chemical asthma hazard (sensitivity: 79-86%, specificity: 93-99%). To develop and validate a second version of this model. Learning dataset asthmagenic chemicals with molecular weight (MW) chemicals for which no reported case(s) of occupational asthma had been identified were selected at random from UK and US occupational exposure limit tables. MW banding was used in an attempt to categorically match the control group for MW distribution of the asthmagens. About 10% of chemicals in each MW category were excluded for use as an external validation set. An independent researcher utilized a logistic regression approach to compare the molecular descriptors present in asthmagens and controls. The resulting equation generated a hazard index (HI), with a value between zero and one, as an estimate of the probability that the chemical had asthmagenic potential. The HI was determined for each compound in the external validation set. The model development sets comprised 99 chemical asthmagens and 204 controls. The external validation showed that using a cut-point HI of 0.39, 9/10 asthmagenic (sensitivity: 90%) and 23/24 non-asthmagenic (specificity: 96%) compounds were correctly predicted. The new QSAR model showed a better receiver operating characteristic plot than the original. QSAR refinement by iteration has resulted in an improved model for the prediction of chemical asthma hazard. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A systematic review of predictive models for asthma development in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Nkoy, Flory L; Stone, Bryan L; Schmick, Darell; Johnson, Michael D

    2015-11-28

    Asthma is the most common pediatric chronic disease affecting 9.6 % of American children. Delay in asthma diagnosis is prevalent, resulting in suboptimal asthma management. To help avoid delay in asthma diagnosis and advance asthma prevention research, researchers have proposed various models to predict asthma development in children. This paper reviews these models. A systematic review was conducted through searching in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, the ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, and OpenGrey up to June 3, 2015. The literature on predictive models for asthma development in children was retrieved, with search results limited to human subjects and children (birth to 18 years). Two independent reviewers screened the literature, performed data extraction, and assessed article quality. The literature search returned 13,101 references in total. After manual review, 32 of these references were determined to be relevant and are discussed in the paper. We identify several limitations of existing predictive models for asthma development in children, and provide preliminary thoughts on how to address these limitations. Existing predictive models for asthma development in children have inadequate accuracy. Efforts to improve these models' performance are needed, but are limited by a lack of a gold standard for asthma development in children.

  8. Automated chart review utilizing natural language processing algorithm for asthma predictive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harsheen; Sohn, Sunghwan; Wi, Chung-Il; Ryu, Euijung; Park, Miguel A; Bachman, Kay; Kita, Hirohito; Croghan, Ivana; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A; Voge, Gretchen A; Liu, Hongfang; Juhn, Young J

    2018-02-13

    Thus far, no algorithms have been developed to automatically extract patients who meet Asthma Predictive Index (API) criteria from the Electronic health records (EHR) yet. Our objective is to develop and validate a natural language processing (NLP) algorithm to identify patients that meet API criteria. This is a cross-sectional study nested in a birth cohort study in Olmsted County, MN. Asthma status ascertained by manual chart review based on API criteria served as gold standard. NLP-API was developed on a training cohort (n = 87) and validated on a test cohort (n = 427). Criterion validity was measured by sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the NLP algorithm against manual chart review for asthma status. Construct validity was determined by associations of asthma status defined by NLP-API with known risk factors for asthma. Among the eligible 427 subjects of the test cohort, 48% were males and 74% were White. Median age was 5.3 years (interquartile range 3.6-6.8). 35 (8%) had a history of asthma by NLP-API vs. 36 (8%) by abstractor with 31 by both approaches. NLP-API predicted asthma status with sensitivity 86%, specificity 98%, positive predictive value 88%, negative predictive value 98%. Asthma status by both NLP and manual chart review were significantly associated with the known asthma risk factors, such as history of allergic rhinitis, eczema, family history of asthma, and maternal history of smoking during pregnancy (p value NLP-API and abstractor, and the effect sizes were similar between the reviews with 4.4 vs 4.2 respectively. NLP-API was able to ascertain asthma status in children mining from EHR and has a potential to enhance asthma care and research through population management and large-scale studies when identifying children who meet API criteria.

  9. The Role of Sensitization to Allergen in Asthma Prediction and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Moustaki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The burden of asthma in childhood is considerable worldwide, although some populations are much more affected than others. Many attempts have been made by different investigators to identify the factors that could predict asthma development or persistence in childhood. In this review, the relation between atopic sensitization as an indicator of allergy and asthma in childhood will be discussed. Cross sectional studies, carried out in different countries, failed to show any firm correlation between asthma and atopic sensitization. Birth cohort mainly of infants at high risk for asthma and case–control studies showed that atopic sensitization was a risk factor for current asthma in children older than 6 years. In general, clear relations are observed mostly in affluent Western countries, whereas in less affluent countries, the picture is more heterogeneous. For the prediction of asthma development or persistence in school age children, other prerequisites should also be fulfilled such as family history of asthma and wheezing episodes at preschool age. Despite the conductance of different studies regarding the potential role of allergen avoidance for the primary prevention of childhood asthma, it does not seem that this approach is of benefit for primary prevention purposes. However, the identification of children at risk for asthma is of benefit as these subjects could be provided with the best management practices and with the appropriate secondary prevention measures.

  10. Hives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... benefits Become a member DermCare Team Professionalism and ethics My account Member directory Publications JAAD JAAD Case ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising Public and patients SPOT Skin Cancer™ Community programs & ...

  11. Predicting who will have asthma at school age among preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenije, Olga E M; Kerkhof, Marjan; Koppelman, Gerard H; Postma, Dirkje S

    2012-08-01

    It is difficult to distinguish at preschool age whether a wheezing child will or will not have asthma at school age. A prediction rule for asthma in preschool children might help to determine a prognosis and to study improvements in treatment and prevention. This review discusses (1) the development and use of clinical prediction rules, (2) the European Respiratory Society Task Force classification of wheeze at preschool age, (3) published prediction rules developed to identify preschool children who will have asthma at school age, and (4) recommendations to improve asthma prediction. Prediction rules are currently created more frequently, yet their clinical use remains low. The classification of episodic wheeze and multiple-trigger wheeze in preschool children shows conflicting results as to whether episodic wheeze and multiple-trigger wheeze differ in clinical features and has limited value in predicting asthma at school age. Clearly, more studies are needed to confirm this. Currently available prediction rules aiming to identify preschool children having asthma at school age are of modest clinical value. Prediction can be improved by more precise definitions and measures and, ultimately, by more knowledge of pathophysiologic mechanisms. In the future, biomarkers and genomic risk profiles to develop personalized medicine might further improve asthma prediction, treatment, and prevention. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  12. Predicting the long-term prognosis of children with symptoms suggestive of asthma at preschool age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudri, Daan; Wijga, Alet; A Schipper, C Maarten; Hoekstra, Maarten; Postma, Dirkje S; Koppelman, Gerard H; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A; de Jongste, Johan C

    2009-11-01

    Clinicians have difficulty in diagnosing asthma in preschool children with suggestive symptoms. We sought to develop a clinical asthma prediction score for preschool children who have asthma-like symptoms for the first time. The Prevalence and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort followed 3,963 children for 8 years. Between 0 and 4 years of age, 2,171 (55%) children reported "wheezing," "coughing at night without a cold," or both. In these children possible predictor variables for asthma were assessed at the age respiratory symptoms were first reported. Asthma was defined as wheezing, inhaled steroid prescription, or a doctor's diagnosis of asthma at both age 7 and 8 years of age. Eleven percent of children with symptoms at 0 to 4 years of age had asthma at 7 to 8 years of age. Eight clinical parameters independently predicted asthma at 7 to 8 years of age: male sex, postterm delivery, parental education and inhaled medication, wheezing frequency, wheeze/dyspnea apart from colds, respiratory infections, and eczema. In 72% of the cases, the model accurately discriminated between asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. A clinical risk score was developed (range, 0-55 points). Symptomatic children with a score of less than 10 points had a 3% risk, whereas children with a score of 30 points or greater had a 42% risk of asthma. A risk score based on 8 readily available clinical parameters at the time preschool children first reported asthma-like symptoms predicted the risk of asthma at 7 to 8 years of age.

  13. Predicting who will have asthma at school age among preschool children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, Olga E. M.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Postma, Dirkje S.

    It is difficult to distinguish at preschool age whether a wheezing child will or will not have asthma at school age. A prediction rule for asthma in preschool children might help to determine a prognosis and to study improvements in treatment and prevention. This review discusses (1) the development

  14. Rhinovirus-induced first wheezing episode predicts atopic but not nonatopic asthma at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukkarinen, Minna; Koistinen, Annamari; Turunen, Riitta; Lehtinen, Pasi; Vuorinen, Tytti; Jartti, Tuomas

    2017-10-01

    Persistent childhood asthma is mainly atopy driven. However, limited data exist on the risk factors for childhood asthma phenotypes. We sought to identify risk factors at the first severe wheezing episode for current asthma 7 years later and separately for atopic and nonatopic asthma. One hundred twenty-seven steroid-naive children with the first severe wheezing episode (90% hospitalized/10% emergency department treated) were followed for 7 years. The primary outcome was current asthma at age 8 years, which was also analyzed separately as atopic and nonatopic asthma. Risk factors, including sensitization, viral cause, and other main asthma risk factors, were analyzed. At study entry, median age was 11 months (interquartile range, 6-16 months); 17% were sensitized, and 98% were virus positive. Current asthma (n = 37) at 8 years was divided into atopic (n = 19) and nonatopic (n = 18) asthma. The risk factors for current atopic asthma at study entry were sensitization (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 12; P first severe respiratory syncytial virus/rhinovirus-negative wheezing episode (adjusted OR, 8.0; P = .001), first wheezing episode at age less than 12 months (adjusted OR, 7.3; P = .007), and parental smoking (adjusted OR, 3.8; P = .028). The data suggest diverse asthma phenotypes and mechanisms that can be predicted by using simple clinical markers at the time of the first severe wheezing episode. These findings are important for designing early intervention strategies for secondary prevention of asthma. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of asthma exacerbations in children by innovative exhaled inflammatory markers: results of a longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillys van Vliet

    Full Text Available In asthma management guidelines the primary goal of treatment is asthma control. To date, asthma control, guided by symptoms and lung function, is not optimal in many children and adults. Direct monitoring of airway inflammation in exhaled breath may improve asthma control and reduce the number of exacerbations.1 To study the use of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO and inflammatory markers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC, in the prediction of asthma exacerbations in a pediatric population. 2 To study the predictive power of these exhaled inflammatory markers combined with clinical parameters.96 asthmatic children were included in this one-year prospective observational study, with clinical visits every 2 months. Between visits, daily symptom scores and lung function were recorded using a home monitor. During clinical visits, asthma control and FeNO were assessed. Furthermore, lung function measurements were performed and EBC was collected. Statistical analysis was performed using a test dataset and validation dataset for 1 conditionally specified models, receiver operating characteristic-curves (ROC-curves; 2 k-nearest neighbors algorithm.Three conditionally specified predictive models were constructed. Model 1 included inflammatory markers in EBC alone, model 2 included FeNO plus clinical characteristics and the ACQ score, and model 3 included all the predictors used in model 1 and 2. The area under the ROC-curves was estimated as 47%, 54% and 59% for models 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The k-nearest neighbors predictive algorithm, using the information of all the variables in model 3, produced correct predictions for 52% of the exacerbations in the validation dataset.The predictive power of FeNO and inflammatory markers in EBC for prediction of an asthma exacerbation was low, even when combined with clinical characteristics and symptoms. Qualitative improvement of the chemical analysis of EBC may lead to a better non-invasive prediction of

  16. Predicting Asthma Outcome Using Partial Least Square Regression and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chatzimichail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term solution to the asthma epidemic is believed to be prevention and not treatment of the established disease. Most cases of asthma begin during the first years of life; thus the early determination of which young children will have asthma later in their life counts as an important priority. Artificial neural networks (ANN have been already utilized in medicine in order to improve the performance of the clinical decision-making tools. In this study, a new computational intelligence technique for the prediction of persistent asthma in children is presented. By employing partial least square regression, 9 out of 48 prognostic factors correlated to the persistent asthma have been chosen. Multilayer perceptron and probabilistic neural networks topologies have been investigated in order to obtain the best prediction accuracy. Based on the results, it is shown that the proposed system is able to predict the asthma outcome with a success of 96.77%. The ANN, with which these high rates of reliability were obtained, will help the doctors to identify which of the young patients are at a high risk of asthma disease progression. Moreover, this may lead to better treatment opportunities and hopefully better disease outcomes in adulthood.

  17. Predicting admissions for childhood asthma based on proximity to major roadways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Patricia; Li, Jianling

    2008-01-01

    This retrospective study is an investigation of the relationship between traffic exposure and childhood asthma exacerbations in a previously unstudied geographic area. We hypothesized that, controlling for selected demographic and social factors, exposure to traffic emissions would allow the prediction of hospital utilization for children with asthma. Using hospital and emergency department (ED) records, we investigated the relationship between proximity to major roadways and admissions for asthma exacerbations in the Fort Worth metropolitan area, designated as not attaining federal air health standards. The sample included 2,357 children from 1 to 12 years of age admitted for emergency or inpatient treatment in a 288-bed, nonprofit children's medical center in Fort Worth, Texas from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2005. Data were analyzed using GIS mapping and logistic regression. Deidentification data were collected from hospital databases after IRB approval and waiver of parental permission or patient consent. Student's t test was used to compare groups with and without primary asthma diagnosis on admission in respect to distance from major roadways. Logistic regression was used to model relationships between asthma admission and patients' characteristics, exposure to traffic, and social environment. Controlling for several demographic factors, asthma occurrences were positively related to traffic exposures. On average, patients with asthma lived closer to major roadways than did patients who did not have asthma. Patients with asthma also tended to live in neighborhoods with more roads than did those who did not have asthma; 3/4 of the children admitted for asthma during the study period and less than 1/3 of the children admitted for nonasthma diagnoses lived within 1,500 meters of a major roadway (p=.0001). Controlling for other factors, every meter increase in proximity to major roadways produced 0.1% increase in likelihood of admission. Knowledge of risk

  18. Looking beyond patients: Can parents' quality of life predict asthma control in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Garcinuño, Alfredo; Mora-Gandarillas, Isabel; Bercedo-Sanz, Alberto; Callén-Blecua, María Teresa; Castillo-Laita, José Antonio; Casares-Alonso, Irene; Forns-Serrallonga, Dolors; Tauler-Toro, Eulàlia; Alonso-Bernardo, Luz María; García-Merino, Águeda; Moneo-Hernández, Isabel; Cortés-Rico, Olga; Carvajal-Urueña, Ignacio; Morell-Bernabé, Juan José; Martín-Ibáñez, Itziar; Rodríguez-Fernández-Oliva, Carmen Rosa; Asensi-Monzó, María Teresa; Fernández-Carazo, Carmen; Murcia-García, José; Durán-Iglesias, Catalina; Montón-Álvarez, José Luis; Domínguez-Aurrecoechea, Begoña; Praena-Crespo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Social and family factors may influence the probability of achieving asthma control in children. Parents' quality of life has been insufficiently explored as a predictive factor linked to the probability of achieving disease control in asthmatic children. Determine whether the parents' quality of life predicts medium-term asthma control in children. Longitudinal study of children between 4 and 14 years of age, with active asthma. The parents' quality of life was evaluated using the specific IFABI-R instrument, in which scores were higher for poorer quality of life. Its association with asthma control measures in the child 16 weeks later was analyzed using multivariate methods, adjusting the effect for disease, child and family factors. The data from 452 children were analyzed (median age 9.6 years, 63.3% males). The parents' quality of life was predictive for asthma control; each point increase on the initial IFABI-R score was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.56 (0.37-0.86) for good control of asthma on the second visit, 2.58 (1.62-4.12) for asthma exacerbation, 2.12 (1.33-3.38) for an unscheduled visit to the doctor, and 2.46 (1.18-5.13) for going to the emergency room. The highest quartile for the IFABI-R score had a sensitivity of 34.5% and a specificity of 82.2% to predict poorly controlled asthma. Parents' poorer quality of life is related to poor, medium-term asthma control in children. Assessing the parents' quality of life could aid disease management decisions. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:670-677. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Hive products effect against fermentativ spoilage yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Rogão, Mónica; Moreira, Leandro; Pereira, Ana Paula; Morais, Margarida; Dias, Teresa; Estevinho, Leticia M.

    2009-01-01

    Hive products have recently being in the centre of the international scientific community attention, due to its biological properties.Honey is a sweet aliment produced by honey bees and derived from the nectar of flowers. Propolis is prepared by bees througt the collection of resins from trees and flowers. Bee pollen is the male seed of flowers that is collected by honey bees and mixed with bee secretions. The antimicrobial activity of hive products has been studied namely using pathogenic ye...

  20. Chronic Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Stress Interact to Predict Biologic and Clinical Outcomes in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Edith; Schreier, Hannah M. C.; Strunk, Robert C.; Brauer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research has documented effects of both physical and social environmental exposures on childhood asthma. However, few studies have considered how these two environments might interact to affect asthma. Objective This study aimed to test interactions between chronic exposure to traffic-related air pollution and chronic family stress in predicting biologic and clinical outcomes in children with asthma. Method Children with asthma (n = 73, 9–18 years of age) were interviewed ...

  1. Peripheral airway impairment measured by oscillometry predicts loss of asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yixin; Aledia, Anna S; Galant, Stanley P; George, Steven C

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that impulse oscillometry (IOS) indices of peripheral airway function are associated with asthma control in children. However, little data exist on whether dysfunction in the peripheral airways can predict loss of asthma control. We sought to determine the utility of peripheral airway impairment, as measured by IOS, in predicting loss of asthma control in children. Fifty-four children (age, 7-17 years) with controlled asthma were enrolled in the study. Spirometric and IOS indices of airway function were obtained at baseline and at a follow-up visit 8 to 12 weeks later. Physicians who were blinded to the IOS measurements assessed asthma control (National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines) on both visits and prescribed no medication change between visits. Thirty-eight (70%) patients maintained asthma control between 2 visits (group C-C), and 16 patients had asthma that became uncontrolled on the follow-up visit (group C-UC). There was no difference in baseline spirometric results between the C-C and C-UC groups, except for FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio (86% vs 82%, respectively; P IOS results, including resistance of the respiratory system at 5 Hz (R5; 6.4 vs 4.3 cm H2O · L(-1) · s), frequency dependence of resistance (difference of R5 and resistance of the respiratory system at 20 Hz [R5-20]; 2.0 vs 0.7 cm H2O · L(-1) · s), and reactance area (13.1 vs 4.1 cm H2O · L(-1)), of group C-UC were significantly higher than those of group C-C (P operating characteristic analysis showed baseline R5-20 and reactance area effectively predicted asthma control status at the follow-up visit (area under the curve, 0.91 and 0.90). Children with controlled asthma who have increased peripheral airway IOS indices are at risk of losing asthma control. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomarker Surrogates Do Not Accurately Predict Sputum Eosinophils and Neutrophils in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Annette T.; Moore, Wendy C.; Li, Huashi; Rector, Brian M.; Ortega, Victor E.; Pascual, Rodolfo M.; Peters, Stephen P.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sputum eosinophils (Eos) are a strong predictor of airway inflammation, exacerbations, and aid asthma management, whereas sputum neutrophils (Neu) indicate a different severe asthma phenotype, potentially less responsive to TH2-targeted therapy. Variables such as blood Eos, total IgE, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) or FEV1% predicted, may predict airway Eos, while age, FEV1%predicted, or blood Neu may predict sputum Neu. Availability and ease of measurement are useful characteristics, but accuracy in predicting airway Eos and Neu, individually or combined, is not established. Objectives To determine whether blood Eos, FeNO, and IgE accurately predict sputum eosinophils, and age, FEV1% predicted, and blood Neu accurately predict sputum neutrophils (Neu). Methods Subjects in the Wake Forest Severe Asthma Research Program (N=328) were characterized by blood and sputum cells, healthcare utilization, lung function, FeNO, and IgE. Multiple analytical techniques were utilized. Results Despite significant association with sputum Eos, blood Eos, FeNO and total IgE did not accurately predict sputum Eos, and combinations of these variables failed to improve prediction. Age, FEV1%predicted and blood Neu were similarly unsatisfactory for prediction of sputum Neu. Factor analysis and stepwise selection found FeNO, IgE and FEV1% predicted, but not blood Eos, correctly predicted 69% of sputum Eosasthma duration and blood neutrophils correctly predicted 64% of sputum Neupredict both sputum Eos and Neu accurately assigned only 41% of samples. Conclusion Despite statistically significant associations FeNO, IgE, blood Eos and Neu, FEV1%predicted, and age are poor surrogates, separately and combined, for accurately predicting sputum eosinophils and neutrophils. PMID:23706399

  3. Predicting quality of life in pediatric asthma: the role of emotional competence and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Magali; Van Broeck, Nady; Bodart, Eddy; Luminet, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    The present study examined the predictive value of emotional competence and the five-factor model of personality on the quality of life of children with asthma. Participants were 90 children (M age = 11.73, SD = 2.60) having controlled and partly controlled asthma, undergoing everyday treatment. Children filled in questionnaires assessing emotional competence and quality of life. Parents completed questionnaires assessing the personality of their child. Results showed that two emotional competences, bodily awareness and verbal sharing of emotions, were related to the quality of life of children with asthma. Moreover, one personality trait, benevolence, was associated with children's quality of life. Regression analyses showed that the predictive value of these three dimensions remained significant over and above asthma control and socio-demographic variables frequently associated with the quality of life of children with asthma (age, gender, and educational level of parents). These findings emphasize the importance of alerting the clinician who works with children with asthma to observe and assess the child's expression of emotions, attention to bodily sensations, and benevolence.

  4. Genome-wide prediction of childhood asthma and related phenotypes in a longitudinal birth cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, Ben D.; Henderson, John; Granell, Raquel; Evans, David M.; Smith, George Davey; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood wheezing and asthma vary greatly in clinical presentation and time course. The extent to which phenotypic variation reflects heterogeneity in disease pathways is unclear. Objective To assess the extent to which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with childhood asthma in a genome-wide association study are predictive of asthma-related phenotypes. Methods In 8365 children from a population based birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, allelic scores were derived based on between 10 and 215,443 SNPs ranked according to inverse of the p-value for their association with physician diagnosed asthma in an independent genome-wide association study (6176 cases and 7111 controls). We assessed the predictive value of allelic scores for asthma-related outcomes at age 7-9 years (physician’s diagnosis, longitudinal wheezing phenotypes, and measurements of pulmonary function, bronchial responsiveness and atopy). Results Scores based on the 46 highest-ranked SNPs were associated with the symptom-based phenotypes persistent (Pasthma (Patopy (Pasthma phenotypes. Conclusion The genetic origins of asthma are diverse and: some pathways are specific to wheezing syndromes while others are shared with atopy and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Out study also provides evidence of aetiological differences among wheezing syndromes. PMID:22846752

  5. Predicting an asthma exacerbation in children 2 to 5 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swern, A.S.; Tozzi, C.A.; Knorr, B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma exacerbations in young children are prevalent. Identification of symptoms or other factors that are precursors of asthma exacerbations would be useful for early treatment and prevention. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether diary symptoms and beta2-agonist use before an exacerbation...... could predict an asthma exacerbation in children 2 to 5 years of age. METHODS: Post hoc analyses were conducted on data collected in a study of 689 patients 2 to 5 years of age with asthma symptoms, randomly assigned to montelukast, 4 mg, or placebo daily for 12 weeks. During the study, 196 patients had...... an exacerbation. Caregiver-reported information (daytime cough, breathing difficulties, limitation of activity, nighttime cough or awakening, daytime and nighttime beta2-agonist use) were analyzed using general estimating equations with an exchangeable within-subject log odds ratio regression structure...

  6. Predicting persistence of asthma in preschool wheezers : crystal balls or muddy waters?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouzas, Sotirios; Brand, Paul L. P.

    Since preschool wheezing is the common expression of several heterogeneous disorders, identification of children at risk for persistent asthma is particularly challenging. To date, efforts to predict the outcome of preschool wheeze have mainly relied on predictive rules consisting of simple clinical

  7. A simple asthma prediction tool for preschool children with wheeze or cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, Anina M; Dogaru, Cristian M; Duembgen, Lutz; Silverman, Michael; Gaillard, Erol A; Spycher, Ben D; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2014-01-01

    Many preschool children have wheeze or cough, but only some have asthma later. Existing prediction tools are difficult to apply in clinical practice or exhibit methodological weaknesses. We sought to develop a simple and robust tool for predicting asthma at school age in preschool children with wheeze or cough. From a population-based cohort in Leicestershire, United Kingdom, we included 1- to 3-year-old subjects seeing a doctor for wheeze or cough and assessed the prevalence of asthma 5 years later. We considered only noninvasive predictors that are easy to assess in primary care: demographic and perinatal data, eczema, upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms, and family history of atopy. We developed a model using logistic regression, avoided overfitting with the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator penalty, and then simplified it to a practical tool. We performed internal validation and assessed its predictive performance using the scaled Brier score and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Of 1226 symptomatic children with follow-up information, 345 (28%) had asthma 5 years later. The tool consists of 10 predictors yielding a total score between 0 and 15: sex, age, wheeze without colds, wheeze frequency, activity disturbance, shortness of breath, exercise-related and aeroallergen-related wheeze/cough, eczema, and parental history of asthma/bronchitis. The scaled Brier scores for the internally validated model and tool were 0.20 and 0.16, and the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.76 and 0.74, respectively. This tool represents a simple, low-cost, and noninvasive method to predict the risk of later asthma in symptomatic preschool children, which is ready to be tested in other populations. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Instant Apache Hive essentials how-to

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks.This book provides quick recipes for using Hive to read data in various formats, efficiently querying this data, and extending Hive with any custom functions you may need to insert your own logic into the data pipeline.This book is written for data analysts and developers who want to use their current knowledge of SQL to be more productive with Hadoop. It assumes that readers are comfortable writing SQL queries and are familiar with Hadoop at the level of the classic WordCount exampl

  9. Patterns of aeroallergen sensitization predicting risk for asthma in preschool children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamelli, Elisabetta; Ricci, Giampaolo; Neri, Iria; Ricci, Lorenza; Rondelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2015-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder mostly affecting young children. Although several studies aimed to identify the risk factors for asthma in AD children, many aspects still need to be clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible risk factors for asthma at school age in 99 children with early-onset and IgE-mediated AD. All children performed clinical evaluation and total and specific IgE assay for a panel of inhalant and food allergens at two different times (t1 and t2) during preschool, and asthma diagnosis was assessed at one follow-up visit (t3) at school age. At t3, 39% of children had developed asthma. Of the variables compared, the sensitization to more than one class of inhalant allergens at t2 (mean age = 30 months) was associated with asthma, with grass (OR = 3.24, p = 0.020) and cat sensitization (OR = 2.74, p = 0.043) as independent risk factors. The sensitization pattern of a child with early-onset AD, also within the first 2-3 years of life, can reflect his risk to develop asthma. Therefore, testing these children for the more common allergens during this time frame should be recommended to predict the evolution of atopic diseases.

  10. An Intelligent System Approach for Asthma Prediction in Symptomatic Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chatzimichail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In this study a new method for asthma outcome prediction, which is based on Principal Component Analysis and Least Square Support Vector Machine Classifier, is presented. Most of the asthma cases appear during the first years of life. Thus, the early identification of young children being at high risk of developing persistent symptoms of the disease throughout childhood is an important public health priority. Methods. The proposed intelligent system consists of three stages. At the first stage, Principal Component Analysis is used for feature extraction and dimension reduction. At the second stage, the pattern classification is achieved by using Least Square Support Vector Machine Classifier. Finally, at the third stage the performance evaluation of the system is estimated by using classification accuracy and 10-fold cross-validation. Results. The proposed prediction system can be used in asthma outcome prediction with 95.54 % success as shown in the experimental results. Conclusions. This study indicates that the proposed system is a potentially useful decision support tool for predicting asthma outcome and that some risk factors enhance its predictive ability.

  11. Evaluation of transitional and modern hives for honey production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in Adami Tulu and Arsi Negelle districts from September 2009 to June 2012 to evaluate productivity performance of transitional and modern box bee hives. Based on farmers' capacity, one modern box hive and one transitional hive made from locally available materials were used at each of the ...

  12. Prenatal Maternal Stress Predicts Childhood Asthma in Girls: Project Ice Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Turcotte-Tremblay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how prenatal maternal stress (PNMS influences risks of asthma in humans. In this small study, we sought to determine whether disaster-related PNMS would predict asthma risk in children. In June 1998, we assessed severity of objective hardship and subjective distress in women pregnant during the January 1998 Quebec Ice Storm. Lifetime asthma symptoms, diagnoses, and corticosteroid utilization were assessed when the children were 12 years old (N=68. No effects of objective hardship or timing of the exposure were found. However, we found that, in girls only, higher levels of prenatal maternal subjective distress predicted greater lifetime risk of wheezing (OR=1.11; 90% CI = 1.01–1.23, doctor-diagnosed asthma (OR=1.09; 90% CI = 1.00–1.19, and lifetime utilization of corticosteroids (OR=1.12; 90% CI = 1.01–1.25. Other perinatal and current maternal life events were also associated with asthma outcomes. Findings suggest that stress during pregnancy opens a window for fetal programming of immune functioning. A sex-based approach may be useful to examine how prenatal and postnatal environments combine to program the immune system. This small study needs to be replicated with a larger, more representative sample.

  13. Cloud-based Predictive Modeling System and its Application to Asthma Readmission Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robert; Su, Hang; Khalilia, Mohammed; Lin, Sizhe; Peng, Yue; Davis, Tod; Hirsh, Daniel A; Searles, Elizabeth; Tejedor-Sojo, Javier; Thompson, Michael; Sun, Jimeng

    The predictive modeling process is time consuming and requires clinical researchers to handle complex electronic health record (EHR) data in restricted computational environments. To address this problem, we implemented a cloud-based predictive modeling system via a hybrid setup combining a secure private server with the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Elastic MapReduce platform. EHR data is preprocessed on a private server and the resulting de-identified event sequences are hosted on AWS. Based on user-specified modeling configurations, an on-demand web service launches a cluster of Elastic Compute 2 (EC2) instances on AWS to perform feature selection and classification algorithms in a distributed fashion. Afterwards, the secure private server aggregates results and displays them via interactive visualization. We tested the system on a pediatric asthma readmission task on a de-identified EHR dataset of 2,967 patients. We conduct a larger scale experiment on the CMS Linkable 2008-2010 Medicare Data Entrepreneurs' Synthetic Public Use File dataset of 2 million patients, which achieves over 25-fold speedup compared to sequential execution.

  14. Prediction of asthma in symptomatic preschool children using exhaled nitric oxide, Rint and specific IgE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caudri, Daan; Wijga, Alet H.; Hoekstra, Maarten O.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A.; de Jongste, Johan C.

    Rationale For clinicians it remains very difficult to predict whether preschool children with symptoms suggestive of asthma will develop asthma in later childhood. Objective To investigate whether measurement of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)), interrupter resistance (Rint) or specific

  15. Prediction of asthma in symptomatic preschool children using exhaled nitric oxide, Rint and specific IgE.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caudri, D.; Wijga, A.H.; Hoekstra, M.O.; Kerkhof, M. van de; Koppelman, G.H.; Brunekreef, B.; Smit, H.A.; Jongste, J.C. de

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: For clinicians it remains very difficult to predict whether preschool children with symptoms suggestive of asthma will develop asthma in later childhood. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether measurement of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)), interrupter resistance (Rint) or specific

  16. Predictive value of IL-35 and IL-17 in diagnosis of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Amira Ibrahim; Abd Almonaem, Eman Rateb; Behairy, Ola Galal; Gouda, Tahany Mahmoud

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between serum levels of IL-17 and IL-35 and the presence and severity of childhood asthma. The study was performed on 60 diagnosed asthmatic children, who were further classified into four groups according to the Global Initiative for Asthma Guidelines for Asthma Severity and Control (GINA) 2016, plus 30 age- and sex-matched apparently healthy children. All participants were subjected to full medical history, clinical examination, pulmonary function tests and laboratory evaluation in the form of complete blood count (CBC), serum total IgE, IL-17 and IL-35 by ELISA. Our results revealed that eosinophils count, IgE and IL-17 were significantly higher in the asthmatic group than the control group (p 35 levels were significantly lower in asthmatics than control (p 35; a positive correlation was found between serum IL-17 and both of serum total IgE and eosinophils counts in atopic asthmatic patients, and serum IL-35 showed significant negative correlations with both. ROC analysis of the data showed that the cut-off value of IL-35 level was 13.1 pg/mL; this value could predict childhood asthma with sensitivity of 81.7% and 83.3%, and specificity of 76.7% and 70%, respectively. A combination of both cytokines yielded an increase in sensitivity to 95%. In conclusion, in the current study, IL-17 is upregulated while IL-35 is downregulated in childhood asthma with a significant negative correlation between both. These results suggest that both may play an important role in the pathogenesis of childhood asthma.

  17. Prediction of new-onset asthma and nasal allergy by skin prick test and RAST in a cohort of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallmeier, Kerstin; Becker, Eva; Kirsten, Anne; Wölke, Gabriele; Manuwald, Olaf; Meyer, Heike; Magnussen, Helgo; Nowak, Dennis; Heinrich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Limited information exists regarding the incidence and predictors of asthma and nasal allergy in adulthood. We determined the incidence rate of asthma and nasal allergy in adults and assessed the predictive value of skin prick tests (SPTs) and radioallergosorbent tests (RASTs) for these two outcomes. Two German centres involved in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey conducted a follow-up assessment in 2012 of the baseline participants (1185 adults aged 21-47 years assessed in 1990). The predictive value of SPTs and RASTs on new-onset asthma and nasal allergy was assessed by Cox regression and by calculating the positive or negative predictive value. During the 20 years between baseline and follow-up, 3.1 and 4.4 per 1000 person-years of new-onset asthma and nasal allergy cases were recorded, respectively. The hazard ratios for SPTs of any specific and of all aeroallergens combined were slightly higher than those of RASTs for asthma and nasal allergy. The negative predictive values of both the SPT and RAST were very high and similar (0.94-0.96), whereas the postive predictive values were low (0.09-0.20). Positive SPT results showed a better association with new onset asthma and nasal allergy than positive RAST either to any specific aeroallergens or to all combined.

  18. ANTHROPOMETRIC INDICATORS OF GENERAL AND CENTRAL OBESITY IN THE PREDICTION OF ASTHMA IN ADOLESCENTS; CENTRAL OBESITY IN ASTHMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobim Benedetti, Franceliane; Lúcia Bosa, Vera; Mariante Giesta, Juliana; Bueno Fischer, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    to determine the prevalence of asthma risk associated with anthropometric indicators of excess weight and body fat distribution. cross-sectional study including adolescents between 10 and 19 years of age. The anthropometric indicator used to classify excess weight was the body mass index (BMI-Z); those used for abdominal adiposity were waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and the conicity index (CI). Asthma characteristics were evaluated using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. The significance level was 5%, and the analyses were performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 18.0. adolescent students (n = 1362; 788 [57.9%] female) with a mean age of 15.65 ± 1.24 years were evaluated. A high prevalence of asthma, excess weight (BMI-Z) and excess abdominal adiposity (WC and WHtR) was observed in the females. Only CI values for excess abdominal adiposity were higher for males than for females. Adolescents with excess abdominal adiposity, as shown by the WHtR, had a 1.24 times higher risk of having asthma compared with non-obese adolescents. Boys with excess abdominal adiposity, as classified by CI, presented a 1.8 times greater risk of asthma. The risk of severe asthma was 3 times higher among adolescents who were classified as severely obese via the BMI-Z. this study showed that excess body weight and abdominal obesity are associated with an increased risk of asthma and asthma severity in adolescents. Thus, additional BMI measurements are suggested for asthmatics. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental Factors Affecting Asthma and Allergies: Predicting and Simulating Downwind Exposure to Airborne Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey; Estes, Sue; Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Huete, Alfredo; Solano, Ramon; Ratana, Piyachat; Jiang, Zhangyan; Flowers, Len; Zelicoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the environmental factors that affect asthma and allergies and work to predict and simulate the downwind exposure to airborne pollen. Using a modification of Dust REgional Atmosphere Model (DREAM) that incorporates phenology (i.e. PREAM) the aim was to predict concentrations of pollen in time and space. The strategy for using the model to simulate downwind pollen dispersal, and evaluate the results. Using MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), to get seasonal sampling of Juniper, the pollen chosen for the study, land cover on a near daily basis. The results of the model are reviewed.

  20. The predictive value of asthma medications to identify individuals with asthma--a study in German general practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, W; Hummers-Pradier, E; Schümann, H; Kochen, M M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of prescribing performance by aggregated measures mainly developed from automated databases is often helpful for general practitioners. For asthma treatment, the frequently applied ratio of anti-inflammatory to bronchodilator drugs may, however, be misleading if the specificity of a drug for the treatment of asthma, compared with other diseases, is unknown. AIM: To test the association of specific drugs with the diagnosis of asthma compared with other diagnoses. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional study analysing prescription data from a retrospective chart review. SETTING: Eight general practices and one community respiratory practice in a town in Northern Germany. METHOD: All patients in the participating practices who received at least one of the 50 asthma drugs most frequently prescribed in Germany within the past 12 weeks were identified. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (ClI) were calculated to reveal any association between a specific drug and the diagnosis of asthma. The unit of analysis was the item prescribed. RESULTS: Topical betamimetics (e.g salbutamol, fenoterol) were the most often prescribed asthma drugs in the general practices (52.1 ) and in the respiratory practice (57.6%). Inhaled steroids accounted for 15% and 13%; systemic steroids accounted for 10% and 13%, respectively. In the general practices, inhaled betamimetics had a moderate marker function for asthma (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.14-3.58). A fixed oral combination drug of clenbuterol plus ambroxol was a marker drug against asthma (OR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.20-0.61). In the respiratory practice, the diagnosis of asthma was strongly marked by fixed combinations of cromoglycate plus betamimetics (OR = 29.0; 95% CI = 6.86-122.24) and moderately by inhaled betamimetics (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.28-5.14). In contrast, systemic steroids (OR = 0.24; 95% CI 0.10-0.57) and even inhaled steroids (OR = 0.46; 95% ClI= 0.22-0.96) proved to contradict the diagnosis of asthma

  1. eHive: An Artificial Intelligence workflow system for genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Leo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ensembl project produces updates to its comparative genomics resources with each of its several releases per year. During each release cycle approximately two weeks are allocated to generate all the genomic alignments and the protein homology predictions. The number of calculations required for this task grows approximately quadratically with the number of species. We currently support 50 species in Ensembl and we expect the number to continue to grow in the future. Results We present eHive, a new fault tolerant distributed processing system initially designed to support comparative genomic analysis, based on blackboard systems, network distributed autonomous agents, dataflow graphs and block-branch diagrams. In the eHive system a MySQL database serves as the central blackboard and the autonomous agent, a Perl script, queries the system and runs jobs as required. The system allows us to define dataflow and branching rules to suit all our production pipelines. We describe the implementation of three pipelines: (1 pairwise whole genome alignments, (2 multiple whole genome alignments and (3 gene trees with protein homology inference. Finally, we show the efficiency of the system in real case scenarios. Conclusions eHive allows us to produce computationally demanding results in a reliable and efficient way with minimal supervision and high throughput. Further documentation is available at: http://www.ensembl.org/info/docs/eHive/.

  2. eHive: an artificial intelligence workflow system for genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Jessica; Beal, Kathryn; Vilella, Albert J; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Schuster, Michael; Gordon, Leo; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Flicek, Paul; Herrero, Javier

    2010-05-11

    The Ensembl project produces updates to its comparative genomics resources with each of its several releases per year. During each release cycle approximately two weeks are allocated to generate all the genomic alignments and the protein homology predictions. The number of calculations required for this task grows approximately quadratically with the number of species. We currently support 50 species in Ensembl and we expect the number to continue to grow in the future. We present eHive, a new fault tolerant distributed processing system initially designed to support comparative genomic analysis, based on blackboard systems, network distributed autonomous agents, dataflow graphs and block-branch diagrams. In the eHive system a MySQL database serves as the central blackboard and the autonomous agent, a Perl script, queries the system and runs jobs as required. The system allows us to define dataflow and branching rules to suit all our production pipelines. We describe the implementation of three pipelines: (1) pairwise whole genome alignments, (2) multiple whole genome alignments and (3) gene trees with protein homology inference. Finally, we show the efficiency of the system in real case scenarios. eHive allows us to produce computationally demanding results in a reliable and efficient way with minimal supervision and high throughput. Further documentation is available at: http://www.ensembl.org/info/docs/eHive/.

  3. eHive: An Artificial Intelligence workflow system for genomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Ensembl project produces updates to its comparative genomics resources with each of its several releases per year. During each release cycle approximately two weeks are allocated to generate all the genomic alignments and the protein homology predictions. The number of calculations required for this task grows approximately quadratically with the number of species. We currently support 50 species in Ensembl and we expect the number to continue to grow in the future. Results We present eHive, a new fault tolerant distributed processing system initially designed to support comparative genomic analysis, based on blackboard systems, network distributed autonomous agents, dataflow graphs and block-branch diagrams. In the eHive system a MySQL database serves as the central blackboard and the autonomous agent, a Perl script, queries the system and runs jobs as required. The system allows us to define dataflow and branching rules to suit all our production pipelines. We describe the implementation of three pipelines: (1) pairwise whole genome alignments, (2) multiple whole genome alignments and (3) gene trees with protein homology inference. Finally, we show the efficiency of the system in real case scenarios. Conclusions eHive allows us to produce computationally demanding results in a reliable and efficient way with minimal supervision and high throughput. Further documentation is available at: http://www.ensembl.org/info/docs/eHive/. PMID:20459813

  4. Asthma, Family History of Drug Allergy, and Age Predict Amoxicillin Allergy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faitelson, Yoram; Boaz, Mona; Dalal, Ilan

    2017-12-06

    Suspected adverse reactions to amoxicillin are common, but there are no known factors that can predict amoxicillin allergy in children. In addition, methods used for the diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy are not standardized and their role in diagnosis is not clear. To identify predictive factors and to assess the role of skin test in the diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy in children. Children with a history of immediate (excluding anaphylaxis) or nonimmediate reactions to amoxicillin were tested by skin prick test, followed by oral graded challenge with amoxicillin. Clinical characteristics of the reaction before and after the challenge were recorded, and data of personal and relatives' drug allergies and atopy were collected for statistical analysis. Skin prick tests followed by an oral graded challenge with amoxicillin were performed on 133 children. The skin test result was not of clinical value because it was negative in all children. Three children (2%) had an immediate reaction and 7 children (5%) had a nonimmediate reaction. Asthma (odds ratio [OR], 0.12; 95% CI, 0.017-0.869; P = .03), family history of drug allergy (OR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.026-0.613; P = .01), older age at reaction (OR, 0.837; 95% CI, 0.699-1; P = .05), and angioedema (OR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.043-1.12; marginally significant at P = .069) were associated with reduced chance to pass the oral challenge. Skin prick test did not contribute to the diagnosis of amoxicillin allergy. The presence of asthma, family history of drug allergy, and older age at reaction can be used as predictive factors for true amoxicillin allergy in children. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rediscovering the antibiotics of the hive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukraâ, Laïd; Sulaiman, Siti A

    2009-11-01

    Honey and other bee products were subjected to laboratory and clinical investigations during the past few decades and the most remarkable discovery was their antibacterial activity. Honey has been used since ancient times for the treatment of some diseases and for the healing of wounds but its use as an anti-infective agent was superseded by modern dressings and antibiotic therapy. However, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria has confounded the current use of antibiotic therapy leading to the re-examination of former remedies. Honey, propolis, royal jelly and bee venom have a strong antibacterial activity. Even antibiotic-resistant strains such as epidemic strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycine resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have been found to be as sensitive to honey as the antibiotic-sensitive strains of the same species. Sensitivity of bacteria to bee products varies considerably within the product and the varieties of the same product. Botanical origin plays a major role in its antibacterial activity. Propolis has been found to have the strongest action against bacteria. This is probably due to its richness in flavonoids. The most challenging problems of using hive products for medical purposes are dosage and safety. Honey and royal jelly produced as a food often are not well filtered, and may contain various particles. Processed for use in wound care, they are passed through fine filters which remove most of the pollen and other impurities to prevent allergies. Also, although honey does not allow vegetative bacteria to survive, it does contain viable spores, including clostridia. With the increased availability of licensed medical stuffs containing bee products, clinical use is expected to increase and further evidence will become available. Their use in professional care centres should be limited to those which are safe and with certified antibacterial activities. The present article is a short review

  6. Predicting an asthma exacerbation in children 2 to 5 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swern, Arlene S; Tozzi, Carol A; Knorr, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    an exacerbation. Caregiver-reported information (daytime cough, breathing difficulties, limitation of activity, nighttime cough or awakening, daytime and nighttime beta2-agonist use) were analyzed using general estimating equations with an exchangeable within-subject log odds ratio regression structure...... to identify predictors of an exacerbation. RESULTS: Average symptom scores and beta2-agonist use increased significantly before exacerbation but at different rates. A combination of daytime cough and wheeze and nighttime beta2-agonist use 1 day before the exacerbation was identified as strongly predictive...... of an exacerbation. These methods predicted 149 (66.8%) of the exacerbations with a very low false-positive rate of 14.2%. CONCLUSIONS: No individual symptom was predictive of an imminent asthma exacerbation, but a combination of increased daytime cough, daytime wheeze, and nighttime beta2-agonist use 1 day before...

  7. A model to predict short-time asthma morbidity: what could be the explanatory factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Habibi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increase in the worldwide prevalence, morbidity and mortality of asthma. Therefore, study of the possible factors related to the burden of this disorder could help the health providers to introduce effective initiatives and reduce adverse consequences due to this condition. This study was designed to investigate any relationship between asthma morbidity with inhaler technique and other probable explanatory factors in asthmatic patients.Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study was designed in which asthmatic patients referring to the outpatient respiratory clinic of the Shaheed Labbafinezhad hospital were entered the study using a non-probability sampling method. Their demographic, socio-economic, medical and medication history, inhaler technique (using a 10-step check list, as well as short-term morbidity index (in the past 4 weeks using the Jone’s morbidity questionnaire were determined and recorded in organized data collection forms. These data were entered the Excel and SPSS (version 17.0 worksheets and analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. A step-by-step analysis method was used in order to find out any relationship between possible explanatory factors and the morbidity index of the patients. Results: 199 adult asthmatic patients (94 male and 105 female with mean ± SD age of 54.29 ±15.52 years enrolled the study. In the first step of data analysis only 5 factors out of 20 explanatory factors were eligible to be included in the multivariate analysis leading to the final predictive model. In the multivariate regression analysis, 2 out of 5 factors could remain in the final model, which were “history of systemic steroid usage” and “age” (p=0.007, r=0.32. So that, patients with a positive history of systemic steroid use and those with a younger age had higher asthma morbidity rate. Conclusion: The observed positive relationship between history of systemic steroid usage and asthma morbidity

  8. Prediction of atopy by skin prick tests in patients with asthma and/or persistent rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, G; Ozturk, A B; Kalyoncu, A F

    2012-01-01

    Patient history gives important clues about the likelihood of atopy. However, the accuracy of assessment of atopy based on detailed allergy history is low. The objective of this survey was to determine the successful prediction rate of atopy by a questionnaire and the effect of various factors on the successful prediction. A standard questionnaire including detailed allergy history was filled in by two experienced allergists for 169 patients having bronchial asthma and/or persistent rhinitis symptoms. Skin prick test (SPT) results were predicted based on the clinical data obtained by a questionnaire. Final diagnosis was made after SPT. Sensitivity and specificity analysis of SPT results prediction was investigated using two different cut-off values (3mm and 5mm) for positive tests, and factors associated with successful atopy prediction were analysed. SPT was predicted to be positive in 42.6% and was positive in 36.1%. Depending on SPT results with the cut-off value 3mm, prediction sensitivity was 77%, specificity was 65.3%, positive predictive value was 65%, and negative predictive value was 86%. Successful positive atopy prediction was associated with age; true negative prediction was also associated with age and high education. With the threshold of 5mm for a positive test, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predicted values were 91%, 61%, 14% and 99%, respectively. It seems that the success rate of detailed history is high for negative prediction. However, detailed history alone does not seem to be efficient for atopy prediction. Copyright © 2010 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting occupational asthma and rhinitis in bakery workers referred for clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonaid, Badri Sadat; Rooyackers, Jos; Stigter, Erik; Portengen, Lützen; Krop, Esmeralda; Heederik, Dick

    2017-08-01

    Occupational allergic diseases are a major problem in some workplaces like in the baking industry. Diagnostic rules have been used in surveillance but not yet in the occupational respiratory clinic. To develop diagnostic models predicting baker's asthma and rhinitis among bakery workers at high risk of sensitisation to bakery allergens referred to a specialised clinic. As part of a medical surveillance programme, clinical evaluation was performed on 436 referred Dutch bakery workers at high risk for sensitisation to bakery allergens. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were developed to identify the predictors of onset of baker's asthma and rhinitis using a self-administered questionnaire and compared using a structured medical history. Performance of models was assessed by discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristics curve) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow test). Internal validity of the models was assessed by a bootstrapping procedure. The prediction models included the predictors of work-related upper and lower respiratory symptoms, the presence of allergy and allergic symptoms, use of medication (last year), type of job, type of shift and working years with symptoms (≥10 years). The developed models derived from both self-administered questionnaire and the medical history showed a relatively good discrimination and calibration. The internal validity showed that the models developed had satisfactory discrimination. To improve calibrations of models, shrinkage factors were applied to model coefficients. The probability of allergic asthma and rhinitis in referred bakers could be estimated by diagnostic models based on both a self-administered questionnaire and by taking a structured medical history. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. A new cooling technique for stingless bees hive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Ahmad Syazwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stingless bees are a type of insect that are very sensitive to the changes of their surroundings, especially to severe heat wave. A report stated that at temperature as high as 38°C can cause death of bees especially to the pupae. Therefore, the objective of this research is to evaluate a new method in regulating the temperature in the hive. Greenroof, a type of roof which contains green vegetation and soil, was used as the cooling method in this study. Two units of MUSTAFA-hives were exposed under sunlight, one is without temperature control and another one was fitted greenroof. The temperatures inside each hive was measured at two points and was compared with the hive without temperature control. It was found that, for the hive integrated with greenroof, the average hive temperature was about 3°C and 6°C lower in the honey cassette and brood-cells compartment, respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that the implementation of greenroof could solve the problem of stingless bee hive overheating, and the greenroof has an impressive cooling performance besides being an economic and simple solution.

  11. Bronchial histamine challenge in the diagnosis of asthma. The predictive value of changes in airway resistance determined by the interrupter method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, F; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Frølund, L

    1986-01-01

    The predictive value of a bronchial challenge with histamine was determined in a prospective survey on a population with a high prevalence of asthma (0.62). Without knowledge of the bronchial responsiveness 133 patients were classified as asthmatics (83) or non-asthmatics (50) according....../ml the predictive value of a negative test in the diagnosis of asthma was increased to 0.81. The interrupter technique is suitable for diagnostic purposes in the detection and exclusion of bronchial asthma....

  12. Increased body mass index predicts severity of asthma symptoms but not objective asthma traits in a large sample of asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bildstrup, Line; Backer, Vibeke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and different indicators of asthma severity in a large community-based sample of Danish adolescents and adults. METHODS: A total of 1186 subjects, 14-44 years of age, who in a screening questionnaire had reported a history of airway...

  13. Comparing predictions made by a prediction model, clinical score, and physicians: pediatric asthma exacerbations in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farion, K J; Wilk, S; Michalowski, W; O'Sullivan, D; Sayyad-Shirabad, J

    2013-01-01

    Asthma exacerbations are one of the most common medical reasons for children to be brought to the hospital emergency department (ED). Various prediction models have been proposed to support diagnosis of exacerbations and evaluation of their severity. First, to evaluate prediction models constructed from data using machine learning techniques and to select the best performing model. Second, to compare predictions from the selected model with predictions from the Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure (PRAM) score, and predictions made by ED physicians. A two-phase study conducted in the ED of an academic pediatric hospital. In phase 1 data collected prospectively using paper forms was used to construct and evaluate five prediction models, and the best performing model was selected. In phase 2 data collected prospectively using a mobile system was used to compare the predictions of the selected prediction model with those from PRAM and ED physicians. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and accuracy in phase 1; accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values in phase 2. In phase 1 prediction models were derived from a data set of 240 patients and evaluated using 10-fold cross validation. A naive Bayes (NB) model demonstrated the best performance and it was selected for phase 2. Evaluation in phase 2 was conducted on data from 82 patients. Predictions made by the NB model were less accurate than the PRAM score and physicians (accuracy of 70.7%, 73.2% and 78.0% respectively), however, according to McNemar's test it is not possible to conclude that the differences between predictions are statistically significant. Both the PRAM score and the NB model were less accurate than physicians. The NB model can handle incomplete patient data and as such may complement the PRAM score. However, it requires further research to improve its accuracy.

  14. Prediction and treatment of asthma in preschool children at risk: study design and baseline data of a prospective cohort study in general practice (ARCADE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wonderen, Karina E.; van der Mark, Lonneke B.; Mohrs, Jacob; Geskus, Ronald B.; van der Wal, Willem M.; van Aalderen, Wim M.; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; ter Riet, Gerben

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Asthma is a difficult diagnosis to establish in preschool children. A few years ago, our group presented a prediction rule for young children at risk for asthma in general practice. Before this prediction rule can safely be used in practice, cross-validation is required. In

  15. Identifying patients at risk for severe exacerbations of asthma: development and external validation of a multivariable prediction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loymans, Rik J. B.; Honkoop, Persijn J.; Termeer, Evelien H.; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; Schermer, Tjard R. J.; Chung, Kian Fan; Sousa, Ana R.; Sterk, Peter J.; Reddel, Helen K.; Sont, Jacob K.; ter Riet, Gerben

    2016-01-01

    Preventing exacerbations of asthma is a major goal in current guidelines. We aimed to develop a prediction model enabling practitioners to identify patients at risk of severe exacerbations who could potentially benefit from a change in management. We used data from a 12-month primary care pragmatic

  16. Identifying patients at risk for severe exacerbations of asthma: development and external validation of a multivariable prediction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loymans, R.J.; Honkoop, P.J.; Termeer, E.H.; Snoeck-Stroband, J.B.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Chung, K.F.; Sousa, A.R.; Sterk, P.J.; Reddel, H.K.; Sont, J.K.; Riet, G. Ter

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preventing exacerbations of asthma is a major goal in current guidelines. We aimed to develop a prediction model enabling practitioners to identify patients at risk of severe exacerbations who could potentially benefit from a change in management. METHODS: We used data from a 12-month

  17. Accuracy of specific IgE in the prediction of asthma: development of a scoring formula for general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysink, Petra E. D.; ter Riet, Gerben; Aalberse, Rob C.; van Aalderen, Wim M. C.; Roos, Carel M.; van der Zee, Jaring S.; Bindels, Patrick J. E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the diagnosis of asthma in young children, GPs have to rely on history taking and physical examination, as spirometry is not possible. The additional diagnostic value of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) to inhalent allergens remains unclear. AIM: To assess the predictive accuracy of

  18. Low Variability in Peak Expiratory Flow Predicts Successful Inhaled Corticosteroid Step-Down in Adults with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurikisawa, Naomi; Oshikata, Chiyako; Sato, Toshio; Kimura, Goro; Mizuki, Masami; Tsuburai, Takahiro; Shoji, Shunsuke; Saito, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Terufumi

    2017-12-06

    The prognosis for patients beyond 1 year after reduction of their inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) dose remains unknown. Predictive factors that can be evaluated before the initiation of asthma treatment or at ICS dose reduction are unknown. We prospectively studied 223 patients in 6 hospitals in the National Hospital Organization of Japan during the 36 months after 50% reduction of their daily ICS dose. All patients recorded their morning and evening peak expiratory flows (PEFs) in their diaries. Lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, fractional nitric oxide levels, number of eosinophils in sputum, and serum IgE levels were measured in most patients. Serum levels of IL-10, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin before ICS dose reduction were measured in all patients. During the 36-month study period, asthma control was retained in 127 (59.6%) of the 213 enrolled patients who underwent ICS dose reduction. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that, at the initiation of dose reduction, the factors most predictive of maintenance of asthma control after ICS dose reduction were a low serum IL-33 level (P < .01), low PEF variability over 1 week (P = .014), childhood onset of asthma (at age <10 years) (P = .03), and high serum IL-10 level (P = .035). We demonstrated that low PEF variability over 1 week, high serum IL-10 level, and low serum IL-33 concentration were useful factors for predicting that an adult's asthma will remain in control for months to years after a 50% reduction in the daily ICS dose. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vasculature of the hive: heat dissipation in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) hive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoan, Rachael E; Goldman, Rhyan R; Wong, Peter Y; Starks, Philip T

    2014-06-01

    Eusocial insects are distinguished by their elaborate cooperative behavior and are sometimes defined as superorganisms. As a nest-bound superorganism, individuals work together to maintain favorable nest conditions. Residing in temperate environments, honey bees (Apis mellifera) work especially hard to maintain brood comb temperature between 32 and 36 °C. Heat shielding is a social homeostatic mechanism employed to combat local heat stress. Workers press the ventral side of their bodies against heated surfaces, absorb heat, and thus protect developing brood. While the absorption of heat has been characterized, the dissipation of absorbed heat has not. Our study characterized both how effectively worker bees absorb heat during heat shielding, and where worker bees dissipate absorbed heat. Hives were experimentally heated for 15 min during which internal temperatures and heat shielder counts were taken. Once the heat source was removed, hives were photographed with a thermal imaging camera for 15 min. Thermal images allowed for spatial tracking of heat flow as cooling occurred. Data indicate that honey bee workers collectively minimize heat gain during heating and accelerate heat loss during cooling. Thermal images show that heated areas temporarily increase in size in all directions and then rapidly decrease to safe levels (<37 °C). As such, heat shielding is reminiscent of bioheat removal via the cardiovascular system of mammals.

  20. Vasculature of the hive: heat dissipation in the honey bee ( Apis mellifera) hive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoan, Rachael E.; Goldman, Rhyan R.; Wong, Peter Y.; Starks, Philip T.

    2014-06-01

    Eusocial insects are distinguished by their elaborate cooperative behavior and are sometimes defined as superorganisms. As a nest-bound superorganism, individuals work together to maintain favorable nest conditions. Residing in temperate environments, honey bees ( Apis mellifera) work especially hard to maintain brood comb temperature between 32 and 36 °C. Heat shielding is a social homeostatic mechanism employed to combat local heat stress. Workers press the ventral side of their bodies against heated surfaces, absorb heat, and thus protect developing brood. While the absorption of heat has been characterized, the dissipation of absorbed heat has not. Our study characterized both how effectively worker bees absorb heat during heat shielding, and where worker bees dissipate absorbed heat. Hives were experimentally heated for 15 min during which internal temperatures and heat shielder counts were taken. Once the heat source was removed, hives were photographed with a thermal imaging camera for 15 min. Thermal images allowed for spatial tracking of heat flow as cooling occurred. Data indicate that honey bee workers collectively minimize heat gain during heating and accelerate heat loss during cooling. Thermal images show that heated areas temporarily increase in size in all directions and then rapidly decrease to safe levels (<37 °C). As such, heat shielding is reminiscent of bioheat removal via the cardiovascular system of mammals.

  1. TheHiveDB image data management and analysis framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlboeck, J-Sebastian; Westman, Eric; Simmons, Andrew

    2014-01-06

    The hive database system (theHiveDB) is a web-based brain imaging database, collaboration, and activity system which has been designed as an imaging workflow management system capable of handling cross-sectional and longitudinal multi-center studies. It can be used to organize and integrate existing data from heterogeneous projects as well as data from ongoing studies. It has been conceived to guide and assist the researcher throughout the entire research process, integrating all relevant types of data across modalities (e.g., brain imaging, clinical, and genetic data). TheHiveDB is a modern activity and resource management system capable of scheduling image processing on both private compute resources and the cloud. The activity component supports common image archival and management tasks as well as established pipeline processing (e.g., Freesurfer for extraction of scalar measures from magnetic resonance images). Furthermore, via theHiveDB activity system algorithm developers may grant access to virtual machines hosting versioned releases of their tools to collaborators and the imaging community. The application of theHiveDB is illustrated with a brief use case based on organizing, processing, and analyzing data from the publically available Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

  2. TheHiveDB image data management and analysis framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-Sebastian eMuehlboeck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hive database system (theHiveDB is a web-based brain imaging database, collaboration and activity system which has been designed as an imaging workflow management system capable of handling cross-sectional and longitudinal multi-center studies. It can be used to organize and integrate existing data from heterogeneous projects as well as data from ongoing studies. It has been conceived to guide and assist the researcher throughout the entire research process, integrating all relevant types of data across modalities (i.e. brain imaging, clinical and genetic data. TheHiveDB is a modern activity and resource management system capable of scheduling image processing on both private compute resources and the cloud. The activity component supports common image archival and management tasks as well as established pipeline processing (e.g. Freesurfer for extraction of scalar measures from magnetic resonance images. Furthermore, via theHiveDB activity system algorithm developers may grant access to virtual machines hosting versioned releases of their tools to collaborators and the imaging community. The application of theHiveDB is illustrated with a brief use case based on organizing, processing, and analyzing data from the publically available Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI.

  3. CloudETL: Scalable Dimensional ETL for Hadoop and Hive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiufeng, Liu; Thomsen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) programs process data from sources into data warehouses (DWs). Due to the rapid growth of data volumes, there is an increasing demand for systems that can scale on demand. Recently, much attention has been given to MapReduce which is a framework for highly parallel...... handling of massive data sets in cloud environments. The MapReduce-based Hive has been proposed as a DBMS-like system for DWs and provides good and scalable analytical features. It is,however, still challenging to do proper dimensional ETL processing with Hive; for example, UPDATEs are not supported which...... makes handling of slowly changing dimensions (SCDs) very difficult. To remedy this, we here present the cloud-enabled ETL framework CloudETL. CloudETL uses the open source MapReduce implementation Hadoop to parallelize the ETL execution and to process data into Hive. The user defines the ETL process...

  4. Early identification of atopy in the prediction of persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sly, Peter D; Boner, Attilio L; Björksten, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    The long-term solution to the asthma epidemic is thought to be prevention, and not treatment of established disease. Atopic asthma arises from gene-environment interactions, which mainly take place during a short period in prenatal and postnatal development. These interactions are not completely ...

  5. Early identification of atopy in the prediction of persistent asthma in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sly, Peter D.; Boner, Attilio L.; Bjorksten, Bengt; Bush, Andy; Custovic, Adnan; Eigenmann, Philippe A.; Gern, James E.; Gerritsen, Jorrit; Hamelmann, Eckard; Helms, Peter J.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Martinez, Fernando; Pedersen, Soren; Renz, Harald; Sampson, Hugh; von Mutius, Erika; Wahn, Ulrich; Holt, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    The long-term solution to the asthma epidemic is thought to be prevention, and not treatment of established disease. Atopic asthma arises from gene-environment interactions, which mainly take place during a short period in prenatal and postnatal development. These interactions are not completely

  6. Are high generalised and asthma-specific self-efficacy predictive of adequate self-management behaviour among adult asthma patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seydel, E.R.; van der Palen, Job; Klein, Jakob J.; Klein, J.J.; van der Palen, J.

    1997-01-01

    In asthma self-management training, often self-treatment guidelines are included, because increased knowledge of asthma alone is not sufficient to change behaviour. One way to achieve behavioural changes is by increasing the patient's general and asthma-specific self-efficacy expectancies. This

  7. Evaluation of four apicultural products for hive colonization by honey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four apicultural products (honey, bee wax, slum gum and propolis) were evaluated for their potentials to attract the African honey bee (Apis mellifera adansonii) colony into artificial hives and their effect on infestation by apicultural insect pests. Ten grammes each of propolis, bee wax and slum gum and 10 ml of honey were ...

  8. Asthma predictive index and associated risk factors in under five-year-old children with recurrent wheezes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Silva Rojas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:children under five years old show frequent bronchial obstruction and many of them have transient wheezes without necessarily being asthmatic.Objective: to identify the predictive index criteria of bronchial asthma with recurrent wheezes and their associated risk factors in children under five years of age who were treated in “Aleida Fernández Chardiet” Teaching General Hospital in Güines, Mayabeque province.Methods: a descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out to identify the predictive index criteria of bronchial asthma and their associated risk factors in all the children under five years old who were admitted because of recurrent wheezes in the respiratory diseases ward of the mentioned hospital from April, 2014 to April, 2015.Results: wheeze was most frequent in children under one year old (48,8 %, with a slight predominance of males (54,1 %. First line family history of bronchial asthma (48,1 %, atopic dermatitis (42,7 %, three or more episodes of wheezes not related to acute respiratory infections (60,3 %, and eosinophilia upper than 4 % (44,3 % showed the highest incidence. The most frequent associated risk factors were: nonexclusive breastfeeding up to six months (61 %, recurrent acute respiratory infections (60,3 %, inside home pollutants (90,8 % and environmental pollution (83,2 %.Conclusions: the predictive index criteria of bronchial asthma and their associated risk factors were identified in the children population studied. That will permit an adequate diagnosis, follow-up, therapeutics, and promoting actions to modify them.

  9. Profiling of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as a strategy to find early predictive signatures of asthma in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Smolinska

    Full Text Available Wheezing is one of the most common respiratory symptoms in preschool children under six years old. Currently, no tests are available that predict at early stage who will develop asthma and who will be a transient wheezer. Diagnostic tests of asthma are reliable in adults but the same tests are difficult to use in children, because they are invasive and require active cooperation of the patient. A non-invasive alternative is needed for children. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs excreted in breath could yield such non-invasive and patient-friendly diagnostic. The aim of this study was to identify VOCs in the breath of preschool children (inclusion at age 2-4 years that indicate preclinical asthma. For that purpose we analyzed the total array of exhaled VOCs with Gas Chromatography time of flight Mass Spectrometry of 252 children between 2 and 6 years of age. Breath samples were collected at multiple time points of each child. Each breath-o-gram contained between 300 and 500 VOCs; in total 3256 different compounds were identified across all samples. Using two multivariate methods, Random Forests and dissimilarity Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis, we were able to select a set of 17 VOCs which discriminated preschool asthmatic children from transient wheezing children. The correct prediction rate was equal to 80% in an independent test set. These VOCs are related to oxidative stress caused by inflammation in the lungs and consequently lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, we showed that VOCs in the exhaled breath predict the subsequent development of asthma which might guide early treatment.

  10. Airway inflammation phenotype prediction in asthma patients using lung sound analysis with fractional exhaled nitric oxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Terufumi Shimoda; Yasushi Obase; Yukio Nagasaka; Hiroshi Nakano; Reiko Kishikawa; Tomoaki Iwanaga

    2017-01-01

    Background: We previously reported the results of lung sound analysis in patients with bronchial asthma and demonstrated that the exhalation-to-inhalation sound pressure ratio in the low frequency range between 100 and 200 Hz (E/I LF...

  11. Severe Asthma in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Parikh, Neil G; Maharaj, Sheena K

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize, diagnose, evaluate, and treat severe childhood asthma. Understanding the occurrence of the physiologic and clinical presentations of childhood severe asthma, the treatment and response may be predicted by biomarkers, but the patient's response is highly variable. The onset of severe asthma occurs early and is primarily predicted by severity of viral infection and coexistence of the atopic state.

  12. ARIA 2016: Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Hellings, P W; Agache, I; Bedbrook, A; Bachert, C; Bergmann, K C; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Bucca, C; Caimmi, D P; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Casale, T; Chavannes, N H; Cruz, A A; De Carlo, G; Dahl, R; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Guldemond, N A; Haahtela, T; Illario, M; Just, J; Keil, T; Klimek, L; Kuna, P; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Morais-Almeida, M; Mullol, J; Murray, R; Naclerio, R; O'Hehir, R E; Papadopoulos, N G; Pawankar, R; Potter, P; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Schunemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Simons, F E R; Stellato, C; Todo-Bom, A; Tomazic, P V; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Ventura, M T; Wickman, M; Young, I; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Aberer, W; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ankri, J; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Asarnoj, A; Arshad, H; Avolio, F; Baiardini, I; Barbara, C; Barbagallo, M; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Bel, E H; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Białoszewski, A Z; Bieber, T; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosse, I; Bouchard, J; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bunu, C; Burte, E; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Calderon, M A; Camuzat, T; Cardona, V; Carreiro-Martins, P; Carriazo, A M; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesari, M; Chatzi, L; Chiron, R; Chivato, T; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; de Sousa, J Correia; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Custovic, A; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Denburg, J A; De Vries, G; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Du Toit, G; Dykewicz, M S; Eklund, P; El-Gamal, Y; Ellers, E; Emuzyte, R; Farrell, J; Fink Wagner, A; Fiocchi, A; Fletcher, M; Forastiere, F; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; van Wick, R Gerth; González Diaz, S; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Heinrich, J; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Johnston, S L; Joos, G; Jonquet, O; Jung, K S; Jutel, M; Kaidashev, I; Khaitov, M; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Kardas, P; Keith, P K; Kerkhof, M; Kerstjens, H A M; Khaltaev, N; Kogevinas, M; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kuitunen, M; Kull, I; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; Lupinek, C; MacNee, W; Magar, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Maier, D; Majer, I; Malva, J; Manning, P; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Mathieu-Dupas, E; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Mercier, J; Merk, H; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Millot-Keurinck, J; Mohammad, Y; Momas, I; Mösges, R; Muraro, A; Namazova-Baranova, L; Nadif, R; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Nieto, A; Niggemann, B; Nogueira-Silva, L; Nogues, M; Nyembue, T D; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Olive-Elias, M; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Palkonen, S; Panzner, P; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pedersen, S; Pereira, A M; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Postma, D; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Roberts, G; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Rodenas, F; Rodriguez-Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rottem, M; Sanchez-Borges, M; Sastre-Dominguez, J; Scadding, G K; Scichilone, N; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Serrano, E; Shields, M; Siroux, V; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Strandberg, T; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A; van Eerd, M; van Ganse, E; van Hague, M; Vandenplas, O; Varona, L L; Vellas, B; Vezzani, G; Vazankari, T; Viegi, G; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Werfel, T; Whalley, B; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wilson, N; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M

    2016-01-01

    The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to develop guidelines with all stakeholders that could be used globally for all countries and populations. ARIA-disseminated and implemented in over 70 countries globally-is now focusing on the implementation of emerging technologies for individualized and predictive medicine. MASK [MACVIA ( Contre les Maladies Chroniques pour un Vieillissement Actif )-ARIA Sentinel NetworK] uses mobile technology to develop care pathways for the management of rhinitis and asthma by a multi-disciplinary group and by patients themselves. An app (Android and iOS) is available in 20 countries and 15 languages. It uses a visual analogue scale to assess symptom control and work productivity as well as a clinical decision support system. It is associated with an inter-operable tablet for physicians and other health care professionals. The scaling up strategy uses the recommendations of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. The aim of the novel ARIA approach is to provide an active and healthy life to rhinitis sufferers, whatever their age, sex or socio-economic status, in order to reduce health and social inequalities incurred by the disease.

  13. Mannose binding lectin (MBL levels predict lung function decline in severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka. H. van Veen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that activation of the complement system in asthma contributes to ongoing inflammation, tissue damage and airway remodeling. Mannose binding lectin (MBL is a pattern recognition molecule that serves as the key mediator of the lectin pathway of complement activation. MBL levels are genetically determined and vary widely amongst individuals. In the present study we hypothesized that high MBL levels in asthma are associated with increased loss of lung function over time, as a consequence of inflammatory tissue damage. We measured serum MBL levels by ELISA in 68 patients with severe asthma and prospectively determined the change in post-bronchodilator (pb FEV1 over a mean period of 5.7 years. The relationship between MBL and change in pbFEV1 (FEV1 was analysed using (multiple regression analysis and corrected for possible confounders (age, sex, age of onset, asthma duration, and pbFEV1. The median (range MBL level was 332 (10.8-3587 ng·ml–1. MBL was significantly associated with FEV1 (p<0.04. Patients with a high MBL level (332 ng·ml–1 had an increased risk of lung function decline compared to those with low MBL levels (OR (CI: 3.16 (1.14-8.79, p = 0.027; the excess decline being 42 ml·yr–1 (p = 0.01. We conclude that a high MBL level is associated with an increased decline in lung function in patients with severe asthma. MBL might provide a clue towards better understanding of the pathophysiology of ongoing inflammation and subsequent decline in lung function of patients with severe asthma.

  14. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Print A A A ... Should I Know? en español Asma What Is Asthma? Asthma is a condition that causes breathing problems. ...

  15. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2013: coordinating asthma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-03-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma: moving toward asthma prevention" concluded that "We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma." This year's summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on prenatal and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children, as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention, as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma, as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations, and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists, and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Early-life sensitization to hen's egg predicts asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis at 14 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth Soegaard; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Eller, Esben

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sensitization to both inhalant and food allergens has been shown to be risk factors for development of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis (RC). However, few studies have addressed the role of transient or persistent IgE sensitization to specific allergens in early life for later developme...

  17. Comparative analysis of profitability of honey production using traditional and box hives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Adgaba, Nuru; Herab, Ahmed H; Ansari, Mohammad J

    2017-07-01

    Information on the profitability and productivity of box hives is important to encourage beekeepers to adopt the technology. However, comparative analysis of profitability and productivity of box and traditional hives is not adequately available. The study was carried out on 182 beekeepers using cross sectional survey and employing a random sampling technique. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Cobb-Douglas (CD) production function and partial budgeting. The CD production function revealed that supplementary bee feeds, labor and medication were statistically significant for both box and traditional hives. Generally, labor for bee management, supplementary feeding, and medication led to productivity differences of approximately 42.83%, 7.52%, and 5.34%, respectively, between box and traditional hives. The study indicated that productivity of box hives were 72% higher than traditional hives. The average net incomes of beekeepers using box and traditional hives were 33,699.7 SR/annum and 16,461.4 SR/annum respectively. The incremental net benefit of box hives over traditional hives was nearly double. Our study results clearly showed the importance of adoption of box hives for better productivity of the beekeeping subsector.

  18. Comparative analysis of profitability of honey production using traditional and box hives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Information on the profitability and productivity of box hives is important to encourage beekeepers to adopt the technology. However, comparative analysis of profitability and productivity of box and traditional hives is not adequately available. The study was carried out on 182 beekeepers using cross sectional survey and employing a random sampling technique. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA, the Cobb-Douglas (CD production function and partial budgeting. The CD production function revealed that supplementary bee feeds, labor and medication were statistically significant for both box and traditional hives. Generally, labor for bee management, supplementary feeding, and medication led to productivity differences of approximately 42.83%, 7.52%, and 5.34%, respectively, between box and traditional hives. The study indicated that productivity of box hives were 72% higher than traditional hives. The average net incomes of beekeepers using box and traditional hives were 33,699.7 SR/annum and 16,461.4 SR/annum respectively. The incremental net benefit of box hives over traditional hives was nearly double. Our study results clearly showed the importance of adoption of box hives for better productivity of the beekeeping subsector.

  19. Advances in Pediatric Asthma in 2013: Coordinating Asthma Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Last year’s Advances in Pediatric Asthma: Moving Toward Asthma Prevention concluded that: “We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma.” This year’s summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on pre- and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality. PMID:24581430

  20. Prediction and treatment of asthma in preschool children at risk: study design and baseline data of a prospective cohort study in general practice (ARCADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Aalderen Wim MC

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a difficult diagnosis to establish in preschool children. A few years ago, our group presented a prediction rule for young children at risk for asthma in general practice. Before this prediction rule can safely be used in practice, cross-validation is required. In addition, general practitioners face many therapeutic management decisions in children at risk for asthma. The objectives of the study are: (1 identification of predictors for asthma in preschool children at risk for asthma with the aim of cross-validating an earlier derived prediction rule; (2 compare the effects of different treatment strategies in preschool children. Design In this prospective cohort study one to five year old children at risk of developing asthma were selected from general practices. At risk was defined as 'visited the general practitioner with recurrent coughing (≥ 2 visits, wheezing (≥ 1 or shortness of breath (≥ 1 in the previous 12 months'. All children in this prospective cohort study will be followed until the age of six. For our prediction rule, demographic data, data with respect to clinical history and additional tests (specific immunoglobulin E (IgE, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO, peak expiratory flow (PEF are collected. History of airway specific medication use, symptom severity and health-related quality of life (QoL are collected to estimate the effect of different treatment intensities (as expressed in GINA levels using recently developed statistical techniques. In total, 1,938 children at risk of asthma were selected from general practice and 771 children (40% were enrolled. At the time of writing, follow-up for all 5-year olds and the majority of the 4-year olds is complete. The total and specific IgE measurements at baseline were carried out by 87% of the children. Response rates to the repeated questionnaires varied from 93% at baseline to 73% after 18 months follow-up; 89% and 87% performed PEF and FENO

  1. Pediatric asthma in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Holger Werner

    2014-07-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, asthma is a leading cause of emergency department visits and hospital admissions for children. On the basis of research evidence, implementation of asthma guidelines by medical professionals in not optimal. On the basis of research evidence, the Asthma Predictive Index supports a diagnosis of chronic asthma in children younger than 3 years. On the basis of strong research evidence, premedication with a short-acting β2-agonist is the preferred initial therapy for exercise-induced asthma. On the basis of strong research evidence, anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids is an effective treatment for asthma. On the basis of research and consensus, assessment of impairment and risk followed by scheduled assessment for asthma control is recommended. On the basis of research and consensus, the establishment of a close cooperative relationship among medical professionals, patients with asthma, and their families is an important component of asthma management.

  2. Adrenergic urticaria: a new form of stress-induced hives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, W B; Shelley, E D

    1985-11-09

    A distinctive new type of autonomic-system-dependent urticaria was seen in two patients. This "adrenergic" urticaria is to be contrasted with cholinergic urticaria. Widespread pruritic, urticarial papules developed at times of stress, each papule being surrounded by a striking white halo. Associated with these lesions was an increase in plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations. In severe attacks large plaques of urticaria appeared as well. The halo hives could be replicated with an intradermal injection of noradrenaline, but not with acetylcholine. Treatment with a beta-adrenoreceptor-blocker, propranolol, prevented attacks.

  3. Asthma education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    ). Allergy and Asthma Clinic, Red Cross War Memorial Hospital. Mike Levin runs a secondary level asthma/ allergy clinic and does a tertiary allergy session once a week, focusing on difficult asthma and food allergies. He has ...

  4. Survival and reproduction of small hive beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) on commercial pollen substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    An assay was developed to investigate the small hive beetle’s (Aethina tumida) potential for survival and reproduction when providing artificial food resources in managed European honey bees (Apis mellifera). Supplemental feeding is done to maintain the health of the hive, initiate comb building, ex...

  5. Genetics of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Asthma runs in families, and children of asthmatic parents are at increased risk of asthma. Prediction of disease risk is pivotal for the clinician when counselling atopic families. However, this is not always an easy task bearing in mind the vast and ever-increasing knowledge about asthma genetics....... The advent of new genotyping technologies has made it possible to sequence in great detail the human genome for asthma-associated variants, and accordingly, recent decades have witnessed an explosion in the number of rare and common variants associated with disease risk. This review presents an overview...... of methods and advances in asthma genetics in an attempt to help the clinician keep track of the most important knowledge in the field....

  6. Artificial neural network approach for selection of susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms and construction of prediction model on childhood allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Takeshi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening of various gene markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and correlation between these markers and development of multifactorial disease have previously been studied. Here, we propose a susceptible marker-selectable artificial neural network (ANN for predicting development of allergic disease. Results To predict development of childhood allergic asthma (CAA and select susceptible SNPs, we used an ANN with a parameter decreasing method (PDM to analyze 25 SNPs of 17 genes in 344 Japanese people, and select 10 susceptible SNPs of CAA. The accuracy of the ANN model with 10 SNPs was 97.7% for learning data and 74.4% for evaluation data. Important combinations were determined by effective combination value (ECV defined in the present paper. Effective 2-SNP or 3-SNP combinations were found to be concentrated among the 10 selected SNPs. Conclusion ANN can reliably select SNP combinations that are associated with CAA. Thus, the ANN can be used to characterize development of complex diseases caused by multiple factors. This is the first report of automatic selection of SNPs related to development of multifactorial disease from SNP data of more than 300 patients.

  7. The predictive value of bronchial histamine challenge in the diagnosis of bronchial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, F; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Mosbech, H

    1985-01-01

    A prospective survey aiming to study the predictive value of bronchial histamine challenge was performed on 151 patients with a forced expiratory volume1 (FEV1) above 60% of predicted. According to variations in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and medical history the patients were classified as ...

  8. ARIA 2016 : Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Agache, I.; Bedbrook, A.; Bachert, C.; Bergmann, K. C.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bucca, C.; Caimmi, D. P.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T.; Chavannes, N. H.; Cruz, A. A.; De Carlo, G.; Dahl, R.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Fonseca, J.; Fokkens, W. J.; Guldemond, N. A.; Haahtela, T.; Illario, M.; Just, J.; Keil, T.; Klimek, L.; Kuna, P.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mullol, J.; Murray, R.; Naclerio, R.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Pawankar, R.; Potter, P.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Schunemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Simons, F. E. R.; Stellato, C.; Todo-Bom, A.; Tomazic, P. V.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; Ventura, M. T.; Wickman, M.; Young, I.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zuberbier, T.; Aberer, W.; Akdis, C. A.; Akdis, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ankri, J.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Asarnoj, A.; Arshad, H.; Avolio, F.; Baiardini, I.; Barbara, C.; Barbagallo, M.; Bateman, E. D.; Beghe, B.; Bel, E. H.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bialoszewski, A. Z.; Bieber, T.; Bjermer, L.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Boner, A. L.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Bosse, I.; Bouchard, J.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Braido, F.; Briggs, A. H.; Brightling, C. E.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Bunu, C.; Burte, E.; Bush, A.; Caballero-Fonseca, F.; Calderon, M. A.; Camuzat, T.; Cardona, V.; Carreiro-Martins, P.; Carriazo, A. M.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Cesari, M.; Chatzi, L.; Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Chung, K. F.; Ciprandi, G.; Correia de Sousa, J.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Custovic, A.; Dahlen, S. E.; Darsow, U.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J. A.; de Vries, G.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Du Toit, G.; Dykewicz, M. S.; Eklund, P.; El-Gamal, Y.; Ellers, E.; Emuzyte, R.; Farrell, J.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fiocchi, A.; Fletcher, M.; Forastiere, F.; Gaga, M.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gemicioglu, B.; Gereda, J. E.; van Wick, R. Gerth; Gonzalez Diaz, S.; Grisle, I.; Grouse, L.; Gutter, Z.; Guzman, M. A.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Heinrich, J.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O'. B.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jares, E. J.; Jeandel, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Joos, G.; Jonquet, O.; Jung, K. S.; Jutel, M.; Kaidashev, I.; Khaitov, M.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Kardas, P.; Keith, P. K.; Kerkhof, M.; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Khaltaev, N.; Kogevinas, M.; Kolek, V.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kuitunen, M.; Kull, I.; Kvedariene, V.; Lambrecht, B.; Lau, S.; Laune, D.; Le, L. T. T.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Li, Jiuyi; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Louis, R.; Lupinek, C.; MacNee, W.; Magar, Y.; Magnan, A.; Mahboub, B.; Maier, D.; Majer, I.; Malva, J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; Marshall, G. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Mathieu-Dupas, E.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Melen, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Mercier, J.; Merk, H.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Millot-Keurinck, J.; Mohammad, Y.; Momas, I.; Mosges, R.; Muraro, A.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Nadif, R.; Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; Nieto, A.; Niggemann, B.; Nogueira-Silva, L.; Nogues, M.; Nyembue, T. D.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Olive-Elias, M.; Ouedraogo, S.; Paggiaro, P.; Pali-Schoell, I.; Palkonen, S.; Panzner, P.; Papi, A.; Park, H. S.; Passalacqua, G.; Pedersen, S.; Pereira, A. M.; Pfaar, O.; Picard, R.; Pigearias, B.; Pin, I.; Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Portejoie, F.; Postma, D.; Poulsen, L. K.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Raciborski, F.; Roberts, G.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodenas, F.; Rodriguez-Manas, L.; Rolland, C.; Roman-Rodriguez, Miguel; Romano, A.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Rosario, N.; Rottem, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Sastre-Dominguez, J.; Scadding, G. K.; Scichilone, N.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Serrano, E.; Shields, M.; Siroux, V.; Sisul, J. C.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Sole, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spranger, O.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Strandberg, T.; Sunyer, J.; Thijs, C.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A.; van Eerd, M.; van Ganse, E.; van Hague, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Varona, L. L.; Vellas, B.; Vezzani, G.; Vazankari, T.; Viegi, G.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U.; Werfel, T.; Whalley, B.; Williams, D. M.; Williams, Sian; Wilson, N.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zaidi, A.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to develop

  9. ARIA 2016: Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bousquet (Jean); P.W. Hellings (P.); I. Agache; A. Bedbrook (A.); C. Bachert (Claus); K.-C. Bergmann (Karl-Christian); Bewick, M.; C. Bindslev-Jensen; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bucca, C.; Caimmi, D.P.; P. Camargos; G. Canonica (Gwalter); T.B. Casale (Thomas); N.H. Chavannes (Nicolas); A.A. Cruz; De Carlo, G.; R. Dahl; P. Demoly; Devillier, P.; J. Fonseca; W.J. Fokkens (Wytske); Guldemond, N.A.; T. Haahtela; Illario, M.; P.M. Just; M. Keil (Mark); L. Klimek (Ludger); P. Kuna; D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); M. Morais-Almeida; Mullol, J.; Murray, R.; R. Naclerio; R.E. O'hehir; N. Papadopoulos; R. Pawankar (Ruby); Potter, P.; D. Ryan (Dermot); Samolinski, B.; H.J. Schünemann (Holger); A. Sheikh (Aziz); F.E.R. Simons; Stellato, C.; A. Todo Bom; Tomazic, P.V.; A. Valiulis (Arunas); E. Valovirta (Erkka); Ventura, M.T.; M. Wickman (Magnus); Young, I.; A. Yorgancioglu; T. Zuberbier (Torsten); W. Aberer (W.); C.A. Akdis; C.A. Akdis; I. Annesi-Maesano; Ankri, J.; I.J. Ansotegui (I.); J.M. Antó (Josep M.); Arnavielhe, S.; Asarnoj, A.; Arshad, H.; Avolio, F.; I. Baiardini (Ilaria); Barbara, C.; Barbagallo, M.; E.D. Bateman (Eric); B. Beghe; E.H. Bel; K.S. Bennoor (K.); Benson, M.; Białoszewski, A.Z.; T. Bieber (Thomas); L. Bjermer (Leif); Blain, H.; F. Blasi (Francesco); A.L. Boner; M. Bonini (Matteo); S. Bonini (Sergio); Bosse, I.; J. Bouchard (Jacques); L.P. Boulet; Bourret, R.; J. Bousquet (Jean); F. Braido (Fulvio); A. Briggs (Andrew); C.E. Brightling (C.); J. Brozek; Buhl, R.; Bunu, C.; Burte, E.; A. Bush (Andrew); Caballero-Fonseca, F.; M. Calderon (Moises); Camuzat, T.; D. Cardona (Doris); Carreiro-Martins, P.; Carriazo, A.M.; K.H. Carlsen (Karin); W.W. Carr (Warner); Cepeda Sarabia, A.M.; Cesari, M.; L. Chatzi (Leda); Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; A.G. Chuchalin; Chung, K.F.; G. Ciprandi (G.); De Sousa, J.C. (J. Correia); L. Cox (Linda); Crooks, G.; A. Custovic; S.E. Dahlen; U. Darsow (U.); Dedeu, T.; D. Deleanu (D.); J. Denburg; De Vries, G.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A.T.; D. Dokic (D.); H. Douagui; Dray, G.; R. Dubakiene (R.); S.R. Durham (Stephen); G. Du Toit (George); Dykewicz, M.S.; Eklund, P.; Y. El-Gamal (Y.); Ellers, E.; R. Emuzyte; Farrell, J.; A. Fink-Wagner (A.); A. Fiocchi (Alessandro); M. Fletcher (M.); Forastiere, F.; M. Gaga (Mina); A. Gamkrelidze (Amiran); Gemicioǧlu, B.; J.E. Gereda (J.); Van Wick, R.G. (R. Gerth); S. González Diaz (S.); Grisle, I.; L. Grouse; Gutter, Z.; M.A. Guzmán (M.); B. Hellquist-Dahl (B.); J. Heinrich (Joachim); Horak, F.; J.O.B. Hourihane; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jares, E.J.; Jeandel, C.; S.L. Johnston; G.F. Joos (Guy); Jonquet, O.; Jung, K.S.; M. Jutel (M.); Kaidashev, I.; Khaitov, M.; O. Kalayci; A.F. Kalyoncu (A.); Kardas, P.; P.K. Keith; M. Kerkhof (Marjan); H.A.M. Kerstjens (Huib); N. Khaltaev; M. Kogevinas (Manolis); Kolek, V.; G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); M.L. Kowalski; Kuitunen, M.; C.A. Kull (Christian); V. Kvedariene (V.); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); S. Lau (Susanne); Laune, D.; L.T. Le; A.P. Lieberman (Andrew); B. Lipworth; J. Li (J.); K.C. Lødrup Carlsen (K. C.); R. Louis (Renaud); Lupinek, C.; W. MacNee; Magar, Y.; Magnan, A.; B. Mahboub; Maier, D.; Majer, I.; Malva, J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; G.D. Marshall; M.R. Masjedi (M.); Mathieu-Dupas, E.; Maurer, M.; S. Mavale-Manuel; E. Melén (Erik); Melo-Gomes, E.; E.O. Meltzer; Mercier, J.; J. Merk (Jeroen); Miculinic, N.; F. Mihaltan (F.); B. Milenkovic (Branislava); Millot-Keurinck, J.; Y. Mohammad; I. Momas (I.); R. Mösges; Muraro, A.; L. Namazova-Baranova (L.); R. Nadif (Rachel); Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; A. Nieto (Antonio); B. Niggemann; Nogueira-Silva, L.; Nogues, M.; T.D. Nyembue (T.); K. Ohta; Y. Okamoto; Okubo, K.; Olive-Elias, M.; S. Ouedraogo; P. Paggiaro (Pierluigi); I. Pali-Schöll (I.); S. Palkonen; P. Panzner (P.); Papi, A.; Park, H.S.; G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); S.E. Pedersen (Soren E.); Pereira, A.M.; O. Pfaar (Oliver); Picard, R.; B. Pigearias (B.); I. Pin (Isabelle); Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; T.A. Popov; Portejoie, F.; D.S. Postma (Dirkje); L.K. Poulsen; D. Price (David); K.F. Rabe (Klaus F.); Raciborski, F.; G. Roberts; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodenas, F.; L. Rodríguez-Mañas (Leocadio); Rolland, C.; M. Roman Rodriguez (M.); A. Romano; J. Rosado-Pinto; K. Rosario (Karyna); Rottem, M.; M. Sanchez-Borges; Sastre-Dominguez, J.; G.K. Scadding; Scichilone, N.; P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); Serrano, E.; M.D. Shields; V. Siroux (V.); J.C. Sisul (J.); Skrindo, I.; H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); D. Solé (D.); Sooronbaev, T.; O. Spranger; Stelmach, R.; P.J. Sterk (Peter); Strandberg, T.; J. Sunyer (Jordi); C. Thijs (Carel); M. Triggiani (M.); R. Valenta; A.L. Valero (A.); Van Eerd, M.; Van Ganse, E.; Van Hague, M.; O. Vandenplas (Olivier); Varona, L.L.; Vellas, B.; Vezzani, G.; Vazankari, T.; G. Viegi; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; D.Y. Wang (De Yun); U. Wahn (Ulrich); Werfel, T.; Whalley, B.; D. Williams; Williams, S.; Wilson, N.; J. Wright (Juliet); B.P. Yawn (Barbara); P.K. Yiallouros (P.); O.M. Yusuf (Osman); Zaidi, A.; H.J. Zar; M. Zernotti; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; M. Zidarn (M.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to

  10. [Correlations of IL-4R gene polymorphism and serum IgE levels with asthma predictive index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Feng, Rui-Hua; Muzhapaer, Duolikun

    2015-12-01

    To study the correlations of IL-4R gene polymorphism and serum IgE levels with asthma predictive index (API) in children. One hundred and sixty-seven children with positive API, 187 children with negative API and 203 healthy children (control group) were enrolled. PCR and DNA sequencing were used to identify genotypes of the Arg551Gln locus in IL-4R gene. Serum IgE levels were measured using ELISA. There was no significant difference in the genotype frequencies of the Arg551Gln locus in IL-4R gene among the positive API, negative API and control groups. Serum IgE levels in the positive API group were significantly higher than in the negative API and control groups (P4R gene and API results. API positivity is correlated with elevated serum IgE levels. An older age (>2 years) may be a risk factor for increased serum IgE levels in children with positive API.

  11. AHA syndrome (arthralgia, arthritis, hives, angioneuroticedema in children (literature data and own observations description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Fedorov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. 7 cases of AHA syndrome (arthralgia, arthritis, hives, angioneuroticedema in children described. Literature and own data are presented. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical symptoms and treatment are discussed.

  12. Asthma Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is working to explore the role of common air pollutants in the development and exacerbation of asthma at different life stages as well as other environmental and genetic factors that might make a person more sensitive to developing asthma.

  13. Integration of Dust Prediction Systems and Vegetation Phenology to Track Pollen for Asthma Alerts in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G.; Levetin, E.; Van de water, P.; Myers, O.; Budge, A. M.; Krapfl, H.; hide

    2011-01-01

    greenness, dry-down and pollen release. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. Techniques developed using MOD09 surface reflectance products will be directly applicable to the next generation sensors such as VIIRS. The resulting deterministic model for predicting and simulating pollen emission and downwind concentration to study details of phenology and meteorology and their dependencies. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (EPHT) and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts

  14. Variability of residue concentrations of ciprofloxacin in honey from treated hives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Danny; Macarthur, Roy; Fussell, Richard J; Wilford, Jack; Budge, Giles

    2017-04-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) were treated with a model veterinary drug compound (ciprofloxacin) in a 3-year study (2012-14) to investigate the variability of residue concentration in honey. Sucrose solution containing ciprofloxacin was administered to 45 hives (1 g of ciprofloxacin per hive) at the beginning of the honey flow in late May/mid-June 2012, 2013 and 2014. Buckfast honey bees (A. mellifera - hybrid) were used in years 2012 and 2013. Carniolan honey bees (A. mellifera carnica) were used instead of the Buckfast honey bees as a replacement due to unforeseen circumstances in the final year of the study (2014). Honey was collected over nine scheduled time points from May/June till late October each year. Up to five hives were removed and their honey analysed per time point. Honey samples were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to determine ciprofloxacin concentration. Statistical assessment of the data shows that the inter-hive variation of ciprofloxacin concentrations in 2012/13 is very different compared with that of 2014 with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 138% and 61%, respectively. The average ciprofloxacin concentration for 2014 at the last time point was more than 10 times the concentration compared with samples from 2012/13 at the same time point. The difference between the 2012/13 data compared with the 2014 data is likely due to the different type of honey bees used in this study (2012/13 Buckfast versus 2014 Carniolan). Uncertainty estimates for honey with high ciprofloxacin concentration (upper 95th percentile) across all hives for 55-day withdrawal samples gave residual standard errors (RSEs) of 22%, 20% and 11% for 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively. If the number of hives were to be reduced for future studies, RSEs were estimated to be 52% (2012), 54% (2013) and 26% (2014) for one hive per time point (nine total hives).

  15. How Do Honeybees Attract Nestmates Using Waggle Dances in Dark and Noisy Hives?

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji Hasegawa; Hidetoshi Ikeno

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that honeybees share information related to food sources with nestmates using a dance language that is representative of symbolic communication among non-primates. Some honeybee species engage in visually apparent behavior, walking in a figure-eight pattern inside their dark hives. It has been suggested that sounds play an important role in this dance language, even though a variety of wing vibration sounds are produced by honeybee behaviors in hives. It has been shown that d...

  16. Assessment of biological, psychological and adherence factors in the prediction of step-down treatment for patients with well-controlled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, N; Kamata, A; Itoga, M; Tamaki, M; Kayaba, H; Ritz, T

    2017-04-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and inhaled corticosteroids combined with long-acting beta2-agonist (ICS/LABA) are standard treatments for asthma. However, factors that might help reduce medication in well-controlled asthma are unknown. We classified problems of asthma patients into biological, psychological and adherence factors, and investigated factors associated with the indication and failure of a medication step-down treatment. Two hundred twenty two well-controlled asthma patients receiving ICS or ICS/LABA were assessed for physical and psychiatric problems and followed up for one year from adjustment of their treatment step. Factor B was defined as a presence of chronic upper airway complications. Factor P was defined as presence of psychiatric complications such as sleep disorder, depression, anxiety and somatoform disorders. Factor A was defined as poor adherence to ICS or ICS/LABA inhaler of 75% or less. Success in step-down treatment was defined as maintenance of well-controlled status for over one year after step-down. Factor B was the most important single negative predictive factor for indication for step-down treatment (Odds ratio; 0.19). Factor A increased the risk of failure to maintain step-down treatment most significantly by 23-fold, and factor B increased it by 11-fold. The combination of factors B and A increased failure by 24-fold, factors P and A by 21-fold, all three factors by 36-fold. Factor P only interacted with the other factors to reduce chances of stepping down, but did not constitute a problem factor when present alone. The evaluation of biological, psychological and adherence problems may lead to a more proactive and targeted approach to step-down treatment for patients with well-controlled asthma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. High-Performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE Tools and Applications for Big Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahan Simonyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE is a high-throughput cloud-based infrastructure developed for the storage and analysis of genomic and associated biological data. HIVE consists of a web-accessible interface for authorized users to deposit, retrieve, share, annotate, compute and visualize Next-generation Sequencing (NGS data in a scalable and highly efficient fashion. The platform contains a distributed storage library and a distributed computational powerhouse linked seamlessly. Resources available through the interface include algorithms, tools and applications developed exclusively for the HIVE platform, as well as commonly used external tools adapted to operate within the parallel architecture of the system. HIVE is composed of a flexible infrastructure, which allows for simple implementation of new algorithms and tools. Currently, available HIVE tools include sequence alignment and nucleotide variation profiling tools, metagenomic analyzers, phylogenetic tree-building tools using NGS data, clone discovery algorithms, and recombination analysis algorithms. In addition to tools, HIVE also provides knowledgebases that can be used in conjunction with the tools for NGS sequence and metadata analysis.

  18. High-Performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE) Tools and Applications for Big Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-09-30

    The High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE) is a high-throughput cloud-based infrastructure developed for the storage and analysis of genomic and associated biological data. HIVE consists of a web-accessible interface for authorized users to deposit, retrieve, share, annotate, compute and visualize Next-generation Sequencing (NGS) data in a scalable and highly efficient fashion. The platform contains a distributed storage library and a distributed computational powerhouse linked seamlessly. Resources available through the interface include algorithms, tools and applications developed exclusively for the HIVE platform, as well as commonly used external tools adapted to operate within the parallel architecture of the system. HIVE is composed of a flexible infrastructure, which allows for simple implementation of new algorithms and tools. Currently, available HIVE tools include sequence alignment and nucleotide variation profiling tools, metagenomic analyzers, phylogenetic tree-building tools using NGS data, clone discovery algorithms, and recombination analysis algorithms. In addition to tools, HIVE also provides knowledgebases that can be used in conjunction with the tools for NGS sequence and metadata analysis.

  19. Childhood Lung Function Predicts Adult Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Dinh S; Burgess, John A; Lowe, Adrian J; Perret, Jennifer L; Lodge, Caroline J; Bui, Minh; Morrison, Stephen; Thompson, Bruce R; Thomas, Paul S; Giles, Graham G; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Jarvis, Debbie; Abramson, Michael J; Walters, E Haydn; Matheson, Melanie C; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2017-07-01

    The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing, yet there are limited data on early life risk factors. To investigate the role of childhood lung function in adult COPD phenotypes. Prebronchodilator spirometry was performed for a cohort of 7-year-old Tasmanian children (n = 8,583) in 1968 who were resurveyed at 45 years, and a selected subsample (n = 1,389) underwent prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry. For this analysis, COPD was spirometrically defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV 1 /FVC less than the lower limit of normal. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) was defined as the coexistence of both COPD and current asthma. Associations between childhood lung function and asthma/COPD/ACOS were examined using multinomial regression. At 45 years, 959 participants had neither current asthma nor COPD (unaffected), 269 had current asthma alone, 59 had COPD alone, and 68 had ACOS. The reweighted prevalence of asthma alone was 13.5%, COPD alone 4.1%, and ACOS 2.9%. The lowest quartile of FEV 1 at 7 years was associated with ACOS (odds ratio, 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-6.52), but not COPD or asthma alone. The lowest quartile of FEV 1 /FVC ratio at 7 years was associated with ACOS (odds ratio, 16.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-55.9) and COPD (odds ratio, 5.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-17.4), but not asthma alone. Being in the lowest quartile for lung function at age 7 may have long-term consequences for the development of COPD and ACOS by middle age. Screening of lung function in school age children may identify a high-risk group that could be targeted for intervention. Further research is needed to understand possible modifiers of these associations and develop interventions for children with impaired lung function.

  20. Modeling Effects of Honeybee Behaviors on the Distribution of Pesticide in Nectar within a Hive and Resultant in-Hive Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumkee, Jack C O; Becher, Matthias A; Thorbek, Pernille; Osborne, Juliet L

    2017-06-20

    Recently, the causes of honeybee colony losses have been intensely studied, showing that there are multiple stressors implicated in colony declines, one stressor being the exposure to pesticides. Measuring exposure of individual bees within a hive to pesticide is at least as difficult as assessing the potential exposure of foraging bees to pesticide. We present a model to explore how heterogeneity of pesticide distribution on a comb in the hive can be driven by worker behaviors. The model contains simplified behaviors to capture the extremes of possible heterogeneity of pesticide location/deposition within the hive to compare with exposure levels estimated by averaging values across the comb. When adults feed on nectar containing the average concentration of all pesticide brought into the hive on that particular day, it is likely representative of the worst-case exposure scenario. However, for larvae, clustering of pesticide in the comb can lead to higher exposure levels than taking an average concentration in some circumstances. The potential for extrapolating the model to risk assessment is discussed.

  1. Monitoring the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Coleoptera:Nitidulidae), with baited flight traps: effect of distance from bee hives and shade on the numbers of beetles captured

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small hive beetle is a native of Africa where it is considered a minor pest of honey bees, and until recently it was thought to be limited to that continent. However, it was detected in Florida in 1998, and by 2004, it had spread to 30 states. It now poses a major threat to the beekeeping indu...

  2. How Hives Collapse: Allee Effects, Ecological Resilience, and the Honey Bee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Dennis

    Full Text Available We construct a mathematical model to quantify the loss of resilience in collapsing honey bee colonies due to the presence of a strong Allee effect. In the model, recruitment and mortality of adult bees have substantial social components, with recruitment enhanced and mortality reduced by additional adult bee numbers. The result is an Allee effect, a net per-individual rate of hive increase that increases as a function of adult bee numbers. The Allee effect creates a critical minimum size in adult bee numbers, below which mortality is greater than recruitment, with ensuing loss of viability of the hive. Under ordinary and favorable environmental circumstances, the critical size is low, and hives remain large, sending off viably-sized swarms (naturally or through beekeeping management when hive numbers approach an upper stable equilibrium size (carrying capacity. However, both the lower critical size and the upper stable size depend on many parameters related to demographic rates and their enhancement by bee sociality. Any environmental factors that increase mortality, decrease recruitment, or interfere with the social moderation of these rates has the effect of exacerbating the Allee effect by increasing the lower critical size and substantially decreasing the upper stable size. As well, the basin of attraction to the upper stable size, defined by the model potential function, becomes narrower and shallower, indicating the loss of resilience as the hive becomes subjected to increased risk of falling below the critical size. Environmental effects of greater severity can cause the two equilibria to merge and the basin of attraction to the upper stable size to disappear, resulting in collapse of the hive from any initial size. The model suggests that multiple proximate causes, among them pesticides, mites, pathogens, and climate change, working singly or in combinations, could trigger hive collapse.

  3. Severe eczema in infancy can predict asthma development. A prospective study to the age of 10 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ekbäck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Children with atopic eczema in infancy often develop allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, but the term "atopic march" has been questioned as the relations between atopic disorders seem more complicated than one condition progressing into another. OBJECTIVE: In this prospective multicenter study we followed children with eczema from infancy to the age of 10 years focusing on sensitization to allergens, severity of eczema and development of allergic airway symptoms at 4.5 and 10 years of age. METHODS: On inclusion, 123 children were examined. Hanifin-Rajka criteria and SCORAD index were used to describe the eczema. Episodes of wheezing were registered, skin prick tests and IgE tests were conducted and questionnaires were filled out. Procedures were repeated at 4.5 and 10 years of age with additional examinations for ARC and asthma. RESULTS: 94 out of 123 completed the entire study. High SCORAD points on inclusion were correlated with the risk of developing ARC, (B = 9.86, P = 0.01 and asthma, (B = 10.17, P = 0.01. For infants with eczema and wheezing at the first visit, the OR for developing asthma was 4.05(P = 0.01. ARC at 4.5 years of age resulted in an OR of 11.28(P = 0.00 for asthma development at 10 years. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that infant eczema with high SCORAD points is associated with an increased risk of asthma at 10 years of age. Children with eczema and wheezing episodes during infancy are more likely to develop asthma than are infants with eczema alone. Eczema in infancy combined with early onset of ARC seems to indicate a more severe allergic disease, which often leads to asthma development. The progression from eczema in infancy to ARC at an early age and asthma later in childhood shown in this study supports the relevance of the term "atopic march", at least in more severe allergic disease.

  4. Efffect of Aeroallergen Sensitization on Asthma Control in African-American Teens with Persistent Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In African-American adolescents with persistent asthma, allergic profile predicted the likelihood of having poorly controlled asthma despite guidelines-directed therapies. Our results suggest that tree and weed pollen sensitization are independent risk factors for poorly controll...

  5. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  6. Severe Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzurum, Serpil C.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Dweik, Raed A.; Fain, Sean B.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Israel, Elliot; Hastie, Annette; Hoffman, Eric A.; Holguin, Fernando; Levy, Bruce D.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Moore, Wendy C.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald L.; Teague, W. Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E.; Busse, William W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) has characterized over the past 10 years 1,644 patients with asthma, including 583 individuals with severe asthma. SARP collaboration has led to a rapid recruitment of subjects and efficient sharing of samples among participating sites to conduct independent mechanistic investigations of severe asthma. Enrolled SARP subjects underwent detailed clinical, physiologic, genomic, and radiological evaluations. In addition, SARP investigators developed safe procedures for bronchoscopy in participants with asthma, including those with severe disease. SARP studies revealed that severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease with varying molecular, biochemical, and cellular inflammatory features and unique structure–function abnormalities. Priorities for future studies include recruitment of a larger number of subjects with severe asthma, including children, to allow further characterization of anatomic, physiologic, biochemical, and genetic factors related to severe disease in a longitudinal assessment to identify factors that modulate the natural history of severe asthma and provide mechanistic rationale for management strategies. PMID:22095547

  7. Honey bees (Apis mellifera) visiting flowers of yellow melon (Cucumis melo) using different number of hives

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Márcia de Fátima; Silva,Eva Mônica Sarmento da; Lima Júnior,Ivan de Oliveira; Kiill,Lúcia Helena Piedade

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) pollinate melon (Cucumis melo) and improve production and quality of fruits. However, little is known about bee behavior and number of hives required. The aims of this study were to compare bees visiting flowers in crop areas with different number of hives (0, 1, 2, and 3), and to evaluate which is the best number. Flowers were observed (n=78) from 5 am to 6 pm, for five consecutive days, in four experimental areas (0.5ha each). Comparisons were made for male (MF) ...

  8. Sputum eosinophilia can predict responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroid treatment in patients with overlap syndrome of COPD and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubo K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Kitaguchi1,*, Yoshimichi Komatsu1,*, Keisaku Fujimoto2, Masayuki Hanaoka1, Keishi Kubo1 1First Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 2Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Matsumoto, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma may overlap and converge in older people (overlap syndrome. It was hypothesized that patients with overlap syndrome may have different clinical characteristics such as sputum eosinophilia, and better responsiveness to treatment with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS.Methods: Sixty-three patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤80% underwent pulmonary function tests, including reversibility of airflow limitation, arterial blood gas analysis, analysis of inflammatory cells in induced sputum, and chest high-resolution computed tomography. The inclusion criteria for COPD patients with asthmatic symptoms included having asthmatic symptoms such as episodic breathlessness, wheezing, cough, and chest tightness worsening at night or in the early morning (COPD with asthma group. The clinical features of COPD patients with asthmatic symptoms were compared with those of COPD patients without asthmatic symptoms (COPD without asthma group.Results: The increases in FEV1 in response to treatment with ICS were significantly higher in the COPD with asthma group. The peripheral eosinophil counts and sputum eosinophil counts were significantly higher. The prevalence of patients with bronchial wall thickening on chest high-resolution computed tomography was significantly higher. A significant correlation was observed between the increases in FEV1 in response to treatment with ICS and sputum eosinophil counts, and between the increases in FEV1 in response to treatment with ICS and the grade of bronchial wall thickening. Receiver operating

  9. Non-random nectar unloading interactions between foragers and their receivers in the honeybee hive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyret, Joaquín; Farina, Walter M.

    2005-09-01

    Nectar acquisition in the honeybee Apis mellifera is a partitioned task in which foragers gather nectar and bring it to the hive, where nest mates unload via trophallaxis (i.e. mouth-to-mouth transfer) the collected food for further storage. Because forager mates exploit different feeding places simultaneously, this study addresses the question of whether nectar unloading interactions between foragers and hive-bees are established randomly, as it is commonly assumed. Two groups of foragers were trained to exploit a different scented food source for 5 days. We recorded their trophallaxes with hive-mates, marking the latter ones according to the forager group they were unloading. We found non-random probabilities for the occurrence of trophallaxes between experimental foragers and hive-bees, instead, we found that trophallactic interactions were more likely to involve groups of individuals which had formerly interacted orally. We propose that olfactory cues present in the transferred nectar promoted the observed bias, and we discuss this bias in the context of the organization of nectar acquisition: a partitioned task carried out in a decentralized insect society.

  10. Diagnosing Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content Turn off Animations Turn on Animations Our Sponsors Log in | Register Menu Log in | ... were tried and if they helped Any family history of allergies or asthma It is very important ...

  11. Occupational Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the enzymes of the bacteria Bacillus subtilis, while bakers may develop an allergy and occupational asthma symptoms ... counts Continuing education center Find an allergist / immunologist Journals Login / My membership Search your symptoms Shop the ...

  12. Boron and Coumaphos Residues in Hive Materials Following Treatments for the Control of Aethina tumida Murray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos-Flores, Cesar; Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Heras-Ramírez, María Elena; Lara-Álvarez, Carlos; Dorantes-Ugalde, José Antonio; Saldaña-Loza, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    In the search of alternatives for controlling Aethina tumida Murray, we recently proposed the BAA trap which uses boric acid and an attractant which mimics the process of fermentation caused by Kodamaea ohmeri in the hive. This yeast is excreted in the feces of A. tumida causing the fermentation of pollen and honey of infested hives and releasing compounds that function as aggregation pheromones to A. tumida. Since the boron is the toxic element in boric acid, the aim of this article is to assess the amount of boron residues in honey and beeswax from hives treated with the BAA trap. For this aim, the amount of bioaccumulated boron in products of untreated hives was first determined and then compared with the amount of boron of products from hives treated with the BAA trap in two distinct climatic and soil conditions. The study was conducted in the cities of Padilla, Tamaulipas, and Valladolid, Yucatan (Mexico) from August 2014 to March 2015. The quantity of boron in honey was significantly less in Yucatan than in Tamaulipas; this agrees with the boron deficiency among Luvisol and Leptosol soils found in Yucatan compared to the Vertisol soil found in Tamaulipas. In fact, the honey from Yucatan has lower boron levels than those reported in the literature. The BAA treatment was applied for four months, results show that the BAA trap does not have any residual effect in either honey or wax; i.e., there is no significant difference in boron content before and after treatment. On the other hand, the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos was found in 100% of wax samples and in 64% of honey samples collected from Yucatan. The concentration of coumaphos in honey ranges from 0.005 to 0.040 mg/kg, which are below Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) allowed in the European Union (0.1 mg/kg) but 7.14% of samples exceeded the MRL allowed in Canada (0.02 mg/kg).

  13. Boron and Coumaphos Residues in Hive Materials Following Treatments for the Control of Aethina tumida Murray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos-Flores, Cesar; Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Heras–Ramírez, María Elena; Dorantes-Ugalde, José Antonio; Saldaña-Loza, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    In the search of alternatives for controlling Aethina tumida Murray, we recently proposed the BAA trap which uses boric acid and an attractant which mimics the process of fermentation caused by Kodamaea ohmeri in the hive. This yeast is excreted in the feces of A. tumida causing the fermentation of pollen and honey of infested hives and releasing compounds that function as aggregation pheromones to A. tumida. Since the boron is the toxic element in boric acid, the aim of this article is to assess the amount of boron residues in honey and beeswax from hives treated with the BAA trap. For this aim, the amount of bioaccumulated boron in products of untreated hives was first determined and then compared with the amount of boron of products from hives treated with the BAA trap in two distinct climatic and soil conditions. The study was conducted in the cities of Padilla, Tamaulipas, and Valladolid, Yucatan (Mexico) from August 2014 to March 2015. The quantity of boron in honey was significantly less in Yucatan than in Tamaulipas; this agrees with the boron deficiency among Luvisol and Leptosol soils found in Yucatan compared to the Vertisol soil found in Tamaulipas. In fact, the honey from Yucatan has lower boron levels than those reported in the literature. The BAA treatment was applied for four months, results show that the BAA trap does not have any residual effect in either honey or wax; i.e., there is no significant difference in boron content before and after treatment. On the other hand, the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos was found in 100% of wax samples and in 64% of honey samples collected from Yucatan. The concentration of coumaphos in honey ranges from 0.005 to 0.040 mg/kg, which are below Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) allowed in the European Union (0.1 mg/kg) but 7.14% of samples exceeded the MRL allowed in Canada (0.02 mg/kg). PMID:27092938

  14. Boron and Coumaphos Residues in Hive Materials Following Treatments for the Control of Aethina tumida Murray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Valdovinos-Flores

    Full Text Available In the search of alternatives for controlling Aethina tumida Murray, we recently proposed the BAA trap which uses boric acid and an attractant which mimics the process of fermentation caused by Kodamaea ohmeri in the hive. This yeast is excreted in the feces of A. tumida causing the fermentation of pollen and honey of infested hives and releasing compounds that function as aggregation pheromones to A. tumida. Since the boron is the toxic element in boric acid, the aim of this article is to assess the amount of boron residues in honey and beeswax from hives treated with the BAA trap. For this aim, the amount of bioaccumulated boron in products of untreated hives was first determined and then compared with the amount of boron of products from hives treated with the BAA trap in two distinct climatic and soil conditions. The study was conducted in the cities of Padilla, Tamaulipas, and Valladolid, Yucatan (Mexico from August 2014 to March 2015. The quantity of boron in honey was significantly less in Yucatan than in Tamaulipas; this agrees with the boron deficiency among Luvisol and Leptosol soils found in Yucatan compared to the Vertisol soil found in Tamaulipas. In fact, the honey from Yucatan has lower boron levels than those reported in the literature. The BAA treatment was applied for four months, results show that the BAA trap does not have any residual effect in either honey or wax; i.e., there is no significant difference in boron content before and after treatment. On the other hand, the organophosphate pesticide coumaphos was found in 100% of wax samples and in 64% of honey samples collected from Yucatan. The concentration of coumaphos in honey ranges from 0.005 to 0.040 mg/kg, which are below Maximum Residue Limit (MRL allowed in the European Union (0.1 mg/kg but 7.14% of samples exceeded the MRL allowed in Canada (0.02 mg/kg.

  15. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Voice in Health Care Decisions Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print ... son la causa del asma? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who ...

  16. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions Asthma & Pregnancy Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... mother and child. Making Decisions about Medication During Pregnancy It is important that your asthma be controlled ...

  17. Indicators of asthma control among students in a rural, school-based asthma management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Cheung, Karen; Buckley, Rebekah; Dunville, Richard; Daniels, Brandy; Cook, Deborah; Robin, Leah; Dean, Blair

    2014-10-01

    The evaluation sought to determine if a comprehensive, school-based asthma management program in a small, rural school district helped students improve asthma control. To determine if students in the asthma program demonstrated better asthma control than students in a comparison school district, the evaluation team used a quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design and administered questionnaires assessing asthma control (which included FEV1 measurement) to 456 students with asthma in the intervention and comparison districts. Data were analyzed for differences in asthma control between students in the two districts. To determine if students in the intervention experienced increased asthma control between baseline and follow-up, the evaluation team used a one-group retrospective design. Program records for 323 students were analyzed for differences in percent of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) between baseline and follow-up. Students with asthma in the intervention district exhibited significantly better asthma control than students with asthma in the comparison district. Percent of predicted FEV1 did not change significantly between baseline and follow-up for the intervention participants; however, post hoc analyses revealed students with poorly controlled asthma at baseline had significantly higher FEV1 scores at follow-up, and students with well-controlled asthma at baseline had significantly lower FEV1 scores at follow-up. Findings suggest that the comprehensive school-based program led to improvements in asthma control for students with poorly controlled asthma at baseline, and school-based programs need mechanisms for tracking students with initially well-controlled asthma to ensure they maintain control.

  18. HiveScience: A Citizen Science Project for Beekeepers##

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past decade, beekeepers have been experiencing unacceptably high colony losses while the demand for insect-pollinated crops has tripled during the same time period. Underscoring the need to develop reliable methods for predicting colony health, the United States Departme...

  19. Heterogeneous Systems for Information-Variable Environments (HIVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    predicted where steering mistakes were likely along a future reference trajectory . ................................................................ 119...placed on the outer canthus of each eye and above and below the right orbital fossa to record electro-oculogram (EOG). Continuous EEG data were...This strategy could be unnecessarily sensitive to FPs, and a method that models trajectories , for example,117 might reduce FPs. However, the

  20. Death due to asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert L. Sheffer

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minorities are at increased risk of asthma. The perception of dyspnea may be blunted in asthma sufferers. Slow-onset fatal asthma may be associated with submucosal eosinophilic, whereas sudden-onset may be associated with submucosal neutrophilia. Fatal asthma occurs in patients abusing regular |32-agonist therapy. Peak flow assessment often provides insight into asthma deterioration prior to signs of respiratory distress. Markers of risk of death due to asthma further identify the fatality-prone asthma patient.

  1. The small hive beetle Aethina tumida: A review of its biology and control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G. S. CUTHBERTSON et al

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The small hive beetle Aethina tumida is an endemic parasitic pest and scavenger of colonies of social bees indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa. In this region this species rarely inflicts severe damage on strong colonies since the bees have develo­­ped strategies to combat them. However, A. tumida has since ‘escaped’ from its native home and has recently invaded areas such as North America and Australia where its economic impact on the apiculture industry has been significant. Small hive beetle, should it become established within Europe, represents a real and live threat to the UK bee keeping industry. Here we review the biology and current pest status of A. tumida and up to-date research in terms of both chemical and biological control used against this honey bee pest [Current Zoology 59 (5: 644–653, 2013].

  2. Fungi infection in honeybee hives in regions affected by Brazilian sac brood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M. Keller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Sac Brood is a disease that affects apiaries of Africanized bee hives in Brazil, thereby making them susceptible to high losses. This study investigated the pathogenicity of Africanized bee hives by the entomopathogenic fungi in a Brazilian Sac Brood endemic region. The degree of fungal contamination, presence of mycotoxins in beehive elements, and vulnerability of healthy beehives in environments subjected and not subjected to the disease were investigated. From the contaminating fungal load, species that are mycotoxin producers and pathogenic causing mortality in the bees have been isolated. The analysis of bee pollen and bee bread samples did not show the presence of the toxic pollen of Stryphnodendron (Fabaceae, which has been indicated as the causative agent of mortality in pre-pupal stage larvae. However, bee bread showed the highest correlation between substrate and fungal contamination.

  3. Death due to asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Sheffer, Albert L.

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence and fatality rate of asthma have increased worldwide. Underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthma are central to the occurrence of fatal asthma. Atopy is the principal risk factor associated with asthma. However, consideration of the epidemiologic, physiologic, pharmacologic, pathologic and clinical parameters of asthma assessment may provide valuable insight into death due to asthma. Psychologic and socioeconomic factors may further aggravate the asthma status. Ethnic minoriti...

  4. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. How do honeybees attract nestmates using waggle dances in dark and noisy hives?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Hasegawa

    Full Text Available It is well known that honeybees share information related to food sources with nestmates using a dance language that is representative of symbolic communication among non-primates. Some honeybee species engage in visually apparent behavior, walking in a figure-eight pattern inside their dark hives. It has been suggested that sounds play an important role in this dance language, even though a variety of wing vibration sounds are produced by honeybee behaviors in hives. It has been shown that dances emit sounds primarily at about 250-300 Hz, which is in the same frequency range as honeybees' flight sounds. Thus the exact mechanism whereby honeybees attract nestmates using waggle dances in such a dark and noisy hive is as yet unclear. In this study, we used a flight simulator in which honeybees were attached to a torque meter in order to analyze the component of bees' orienting response caused only by sounds, and not by odor or by vibrations sensed by their legs. We showed using single sound localization that honeybees preferred sounds around 265 Hz. Furthermore, according to sound discrimination tests using sounds of the same frequency, honeybees preferred rhythmic sounds. Our results demonstrate that frequency and rhythmic components play a complementary role in localizing dance sounds. Dance sounds were presumably developed to share information in a dark and noisy environment.

  6. How do honeybees attract nestmates using waggle dances in dark and noisy hives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yuji; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that honeybees share information related to food sources with nestmates using a dance language that is representative of symbolic communication among non-primates. Some honeybee species engage in visually apparent behavior, walking in a figure-eight pattern inside their dark hives. It has been suggested that sounds play an important role in this dance language, even though a variety of wing vibration sounds are produced by honeybee behaviors in hives. It has been shown that dances emit sounds primarily at about 250-300 Hz, which is in the same frequency range as honeybees' flight sounds. Thus the exact mechanism whereby honeybees attract nestmates using waggle dances in such a dark and noisy hive is as yet unclear. In this study, we used a flight simulator in which honeybees were attached to a torque meter in order to analyze the component of bees' orienting response caused only by sounds, and not by odor or by vibrations sensed by their legs. We showed using single sound localization that honeybees preferred sounds around 265 Hz. Furthermore, according to sound discrimination tests using sounds of the same frequency, honeybees preferred rhythmic sounds. Our results demonstrate that frequency and rhythmic components play a complementary role in localizing dance sounds. Dance sounds were presumably developed to share information in a dark and noisy environment.

  7. Asthma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 53. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  8. Childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    atopy, night cough, exercise-induced cough and/or wheeze and seasonal variation in symptoms. Epidemiology. Asthma is on the increase in both the developed and developing countries of the world. In South Africa, its prevalence in children in Cape Town (measured by exercise challenge) was only three per cent in 1979.

  9. Childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prevalence in children in Cape Town (measured by exercise challenge) was only three per ... mortality among the five to 34-year-old age group, and fifth for asthma ... clouded by differences in terminology used by respondents, depending on ...

  10. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... January 2014 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Can Kids and Teens With Asthma Play Sports? Asthma Center When to Go to the ER if Your Child Has Asthma Kids and Exercise Asthma Triggers Word! Exercise-Induced Asthma ...

  11. Recent developments regarding periostin in bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuhara, Kenji; Matsumoto, Hisako; Ohta, Shoichiro; Ono, Junya; Arima, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Although it is currently recognized that bronchial asthma is not a single disease but a syndrome, we have not yet made use of our new understanding of this heterogeneity as we treat asthma patients. To increase the efficacy of anti-asthma drugs and to decrease costs, it is important to stratify asthma patients into subgroups and to develop therapeutic strategies for each subgroup. Periostin has recently emerged as a biomarker for bronchial asthma, unique in that it is useful not in diagnosis but in categorizing asthma patients. We first found that periostin is a novel component of subepithelial fibrosis in bronchial asthma downstream of IL-13 signals. Thereafter, it was shown that periostin can be a surrogate biomarker of type 2 immune responses, the basis of the notion that a detection system of serum periostin is potentially a companion diagnostic for type 2 antagonists. Furthermore, we have recently shown that serum periostin can predict resistance or hyporesponsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids, based on its contribution to tissue remodeling or fibrosis in bronchial asthma. Thus, serum periostin has two characteristics as a biomarker for bronchial asthma: it is both a surrogate biomarker of type 2 immune responses and a biomarker reflecting tissue remodeling or fibrosis. We can take advantage of these characteristics to develop stratified medicine in bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  13. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma. Dogs, cats, rodents (including hamsters and guinea pigs) and other warm-blooded mammals can trigger asthma ... Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. Asthma Indoor Air Quality ...

  14. What Is Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma Awareness National Asthma Awards Federal and Partner Organizations Public Service Announcements & Multimedia Main menu Environmental Topics Air Bed Bugs Chemicals and Toxics Environmental ...

  15. Comparing Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and Asthma Control Test (ACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, B B; Pijnenburg, M W H; Brackel, H J L; Landstra, A M; van den Berg, N J; Merkus, P J F M; Hop, W C J; Vaessen-Verberne, A A P H

    2011-09-01

    Several tools are useful in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. The aim of this study was to compare Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines with the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and the Asthma Control Test (ACT) in detecting uncontrolled asthma in children. 145 children with asthma filled in a web-based daily diary card for 4 weeks on symptoms, use of rescue medication and limitations of activities, followed by either the C-ACT or ACT. For predicting uncontrolled asthma, score cut-off points of 19 were used for C-ACT and ACT. According to GINA guidelines, asthma was uncontrolled in 71 (51%) children and completely controlled in 19 (14%) children. The area under the curve in the receiver operating characteristic curves for C-ACT and ACT versus GINA guidelines were 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. Cut-off points of 19 for C-ACT and ACT resulted in a sensitivity of 33% and 66% in predicting uncontrolled asthma, respectively. C-ACT and ACT correlate well with GINA criteria in predicting uncontrolled asthma, but commonly used cut-off points for C-ACT and ACT seem to underestimate the proportion of children with uncontrolled asthma as defined by GINA.

  16. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jennifer A; Hood, W Michael; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Delaplane, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate) and Check Mite+ (coumaphos) and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  17. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Berry

    Full Text Available In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate and Check Mite+ (coumaphos and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  18. Research on Diagnostics and Regulation of Temperature in the Hive Confined Space With the Use of Mobile Array Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troshkov Aleksandr Mikhaylovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests the diagnostics of air circulation in the hive. The ventilation of enclosed space is achieved by the constant movement of the worker bees’ wings with variable intensity, and hence with a modified air flow. The main place of air flow is notches on which the bees are located, and their flapping wings intensify pressure air circulation. Thus, the air pressure allows creating ventilation in the hive. The possibilities of controlling the temperature in the enclosed space are investigated. The theoretical studies and the analysis of scientific papers, as well as confirmations by practicing beekeepers of the Karachay-Cherkess Republic and Stavropol Territory have proved the correlation between the temperature regime of the hive confined space and the presence of carbon dioxide during winter. In the second half of winter, the correlation coefficient is reduced. This is due to the change in the physiological state of bee colonies, the appearance of larvae and, as a consequence, of oxygen consumption. Hence, there is need in hive ventilation and maintaining the stable temperature, especially in the areas of brood. The authors synthesized the sensor array device of temperature regulation. The use of this sensor improves the quality of sectoral diagnostics of the hive, and the evaluative zone allows to specify displacement estimation characteristics. The temperature control zone was determined. The possibility of temperature monitoring with the construction of the graphic measurements was realized.

  19. Meteorologically estimated exposure but not distance predicts asthma symptoms in schoolchildren in the environs of a petrochemical refinery: a cross-sectional study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    White, N

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available the city wide ISAAC study, exposure to tobacco smoke could be a contributor to the asthma symptom excess in this population. In addition, there has long been a high level of concern among parents about the effect of emissions from the refinery... the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC) written and video questionnaires. Information was collected on potential confounders, e.g. parental history of atopic disease, active and passive smoking by the participant, birth order, number...

  20. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  1. High-performance integrated virtual environment (HIVE): a robust infrastructure for next-generation sequence data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Vahan; Chumakov, Konstantin; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Faison, William; Goldweber, Scott; Golikov, Anton; Gulzar, Naila; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Vinh Nguyen Lam, Phuc; Maudru, Thomas; Muravitskaja, Olesja; Osipova, Ekaterina; Pan, Yang; Pschenichnov, Alexey; Rostovtsev, Alexandre; Santana-Quintero, Luis; Smith, Krista; Thompson, Elaine E; Tkachenko, Valery; Torcivia-Rodriguez, John; Voskanian, Alin; Wan, Quan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Wilson, Carolyn; Mazumder, Raja

    2016-01-01

    The High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE) is a distributed storage and compute environment designed primarily to handle next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. This multicomponent cloud infrastructure provides secure web access for authorized users to deposit, retrieve, annotate and compute on NGS data, and to analyse the outcomes using web interface visual environments appropriately built in collaboration with research and regulatory scientists and other end users. Unlike many massively parallel computing environments, HIVE uses a cloud control server which virtualizes services, not processes. It is both very robust and flexible due to the abstraction layer introduced between computational requests and operating system processes. The novel paradigm of moving computations to the data, instead of moving data to computational nodes, has proven to be significantly less taxing for both hardware and network infrastructure.The honeycomb data model developed for HIVE integrates metadata into an object-oriented model. Its distinction from other object-oriented databases is in the additional implementation of a unified application program interface to search, view and manipulate data of all types. This model simplifies the introduction of new data types, thereby minimizing the need for database restructuring and streamlining the development of new integrated information systems. The honeycomb model employs a highly secure hierarchical access control and permission system, allowing determination of data access privileges in a finely granular manner without flooding the security subsystem with a multiplicity of rules. HIVE infrastructure will allow engineers and scientists to perform NGS analysis in a manner that is both efficient and secure. HIVE is actively supported in public and private domains, and project collaborations are welcomed. Database URL: https://hive.biochemistry.gwu.edu. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Internal hive temperature as a means of monitoring honey bee colony health in a migratory beekeeping operation before and during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal temperatures of honey bee hives kept at different sites in North Dakota were monitored before and during winter to evaluate the effects of treatment, in the form of exposure to commercial pollination, and location on colony health. In October, hives exposed to commercial pollination durin...

  3. Integration for Airborne Dust Prediction Systems and Vegetation Phenology to Track Pollen for Asthma Alerts in Public Health Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Nickovic, S.; Huete, A.; Budge, A.; Flowers, L.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the program is to assess the feasibility of combining a dust transport model with MODIS derived phenology to study pollen transport for integration with a public health decision support system. The use of pollen information has specifically be identified as a critical need by the New Mexico State Health department for inclusion in the Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) program. Material and methods: Pollen can be transported great distances. Local observations of plan phenology may be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) is an integrated modeling system designed to accurately describe the dust cycle in the atmosphere. The dust modules of the entire system incorporate the state of the art parameterization of all the major phases of the atmospheric dust life such as production, diffusion, advection, and removal. These modules also include effects of the particles size distribution on aerosol dispersion. The model was modified to use pollen sources instead of dust. Pollen release was estimated based on satellite-derived phenology of key plan species and vegetation communities. The MODIS surface reflectance product (MOD09) provided information on the start of the plant growing season, growth stage, and pollen release. The resulting deterministic model is useful for predicting and simulating pollen emission and downwind concentration to study details of phenology and meteorology and their dependencies. The proposed linkage in this project provided critical information on the location timing and modeled transport of pollen directly to the EPHT> This information is useful to support the centers for disease control and prevention (CDC)'s National EPHT and the state of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  4. Food consumption and risk of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumia, Mirka; Takkinen, Hanna-Mari; Luukkainen, Päivi; Kaila, Minna; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Nwaru, Bright I; Tuokkola, Jetta; Niemelä, Onni; Haapala, Anna-Maija; Ilonen, Jorma; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael; Veijola, Riitta; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2015-12-01

    The consumption of foods rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been proposed to protect against childhood asthma. This study explores the association of food consumption (including cow's milk (CM)-free diet) in early life and the risk of atopic and non-atopic asthma. Food intake of 182 children with asthma and 728 matched controls was measured using 3-day food records, within the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Nutrition Study cohort. The diagnoses of food allergies came both from the written questionnaire and from the registers of the Social Insurance Institution. Conditional logistic regression with generalized estimating equations framework was used in the analyses. The diagnosis of cow's milk allergy (CMA) led to multiple dietary restrictions still evident at 4 yr of age. Even after adjusting for CMA, higher consumption of CM products was inversely associated with the risk of atopic asthma and higher consumption of breast milk and oats inversely with the risk of non-atopic asthma. Early consumption of fish was associated with a decreased risk of all asthma. Dietary intake in early life combined with atopy history has a clear impact on the risk of developing asthma. Our results indicate that CM restriction due to CMA significantly increases and mediates the association between food consumption and childhood asthma risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Obesity and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese compared with normal weight subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma...... and impaired quality of life compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency...... department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index (BMI) on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy with regard...

  6. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Personal Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma ... A en español Fumar y el asma Does Smoking Make Asthma Worse? Yes. If you have asthma, ...

  7. Data Container Study for Handling Array-based Data Using Rasdaman, Hive, Spark, and MongoDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.; Hu, F.; Yu, M.; Scheele, C.; Liu, K.; Huang, Q.; Yang, C. P.; Little, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Geoscience communities have come up with various big data storage solutions, such as Rasdaman and Hive, to address the grand challenges for massive Earth observation data management and processing. To examine the readiness of current solutions in supporting big Earth observation, we propose to investigate and compare four popular data container solutions, including Rasdaman, Hive, Spark, and MongoDB. Using different types of spatial and non-spatial queries, datasets stored in common scientific data formats (e.g., NetCDF and HDF), and two applications (i.e. dust storm simulation data mining and MERRA data analytics), we systematically compare and evaluate the feature and performance of these four data containers in terms of data discover and access. The computing resources (e.g. CPU, memory, hard drive, network) consumed while performing various queries and operations are monitored and recorded for the performance evaluation. The initial results show that 1) Rasdaman has the best performance for queries on statistical and operational functions, and supports NetCDF data format better than HDF; 2) Rasdaman clustering configuration is more complex than the others; 3) Hive performs better on single pixel extraction from multiple images; and 4) Except for the single pixel extractions, Spark performs better than Hive and its performance is close to Rasdaman. A comprehensive report will detail the experimental results, and compare their pros and cons regarding system performance, ease of use, accessibility, scalability, compatibility, and flexibility.

  8. Prison construction and guarding behaviour by European honeybees is dependent on inmate small hive beetle density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J D; Hepburn, H R; Ellis, A M; Elzen, P J

    2003-08-01

    Increasing small hive beetle (Aethina tumida Murray) density changes prison construction and guarding behaviour in European honeybees (Apis mellifera L.). These changes include more guard bees per imprisoned beetle and the construction of more beetle prisons at the higher beetle density. Despite this, the number of beetles per prison (inmate density) did not change. Beetles solicited food more actively at the higher density and at night. In response, guard bees increased their aggressive behaviour towards beetle prisoners but did not feed beetles more at the higher density. Only 5% of all beetles were found among the combs at the low density but this percentage increased five-fold at the higher one. Successful comb infiltration (and thus reproduction) by beetles is a possible explanation for the significant damage beetles cause to European honeybee colonies in the USA.

  9. T-38 Primary Flight Display Prototyping and HIVE Support Abstract & Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This fall I worked in EV3 within NASA's Johnson Space Center in The HIVE (Human Integrated Vehicles & Environments). The HIVE is responsible for human in the loop testing, getting new technologies in front of astronauts, operators, and users early in the development cycle to make the interfaces more human friendly. Some projects the HIVE is working on includes user interfaces for future spacecraft, wearables to alert astronauts about important information, and test beds to simulate mock missions. During my internship I created a prototype for T-38 aircraft displays using LabVIEW, learned how to use microcontrollers, and helped out with other small tasks in the HIVE. The purpose of developing a prototype for T-38 Displays in LabVIEW is to analyze functions of the display such as navigation in a cost and time effective manner. The LabVIEW prototypes allow Ellington Field AOD to easily make adjustments to the display before hardcoding the final product. LabVIEW was used to create a user interface for simulation almost identical to the real aircraft display. Goals to begin the T-38 PFD (Primary Flight Display) prototype included creating a T-38 PFD hardware display in a software environment, designing navigation for the menu's, incorporating vertical and horizontal navigation bars, and to add a heading bug for compass controls connected to the HSI (Horizontal Situation Indicator). To get started with the project, measurements of the entire display were taken. This enabled an accurate model of the hardware display to be created. Navigation of menu's required some exploration of different buttons on the display. The T-38 simulator and aircraft were used for examining the display. After one piece of the prototype was finished, another trip of to the simulator took place. This was done until all goals for the prototype were complete. Some possible integration ideas for displays in the near future are autopilot selection, touch screen displays, and crew member preferences

  10. Asthma and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, L-P

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of asthma have increased among obese children and adults, particularly among women. Obesity seems to be a predisposing factor for the development of asthma, but the underlying mechanisms of its influence are still uncertain. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the link between obesity and asthma such as a common genetic predisposition, developmental changes, altered lung mechanics, the presence of a systemic inflammatory process, and an increased prevalence of associated comorbid conditions. Over-diagnosis of asthma does not seem to be more frequent in obese compared to non-obese subjects, but the added effects of obesity on respiratory symptoms can affect asthma control assessment. Obesity can make asthma more difficult to control and is associated with a reduced beneficial effect of asthma medications. This could be due to a change in asthma phenotype, particularly evidenced as a less eosinophilic type of airway inflammation combined to the added effects of changes in lung mechanics. Weight loss is associated with a universal improvement of asthma and should be part of asthma management in the obese patient. Additional research should be conducted to better determine how obesity influences the development and clinical expression of asthma, establish the optimal management of asthma in this population and determine how obesity affects long-term asthma outcomes in these patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Allergy in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, S R; Bakirtas, A; Bel, E; Custovic, A; Diamant, Z; Hamelmann, E; Heffler, E; Kalayci, Ö; Saglani, S; Sergejeva, S; Seys, S; Simpson, A; Bjermer, L

    2017-02-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-5 of GINA guidelines to prevent their asthma from becoming 'uncontrolled', or whose disease remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy. Epidemiological studies on emergency room visits and hospital admissions for asthma suggest the important role of allergy in asthma exacerbations. In addition, allergic asthma in childhood is often associated with severe asthma in adulthood. A strong association exists between asthma exacerbations and respiratory viral infections, and interaction between viruses and allergy further increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, fungal allergy has been shown to play an important role in severe asthma. Other contributing factors include smoking, pollution and work-related exposures. The 'Allergy and Asthma Severity' EAACI Task Force examined the current evidence and produced this position document on the role of allergy in severe asthma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. For Parents of Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma > Managing Asthma For Parents of Children with Asthma Your Child's Asthma: A Parent's Guide to Better Breathing This step- ... health considerations you should keep in mind. Diagnosing Asthma in Young Children Most children who have asthma ...

  13. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Asthma among Persons with Current Asthma Asthma and Obesity Percentage of People with Asthma who Smoke Insurance ... Asthma Resources for Professionals National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community ...

  14. Serum decoy receptor 3 is a biomarker for disease severity in nonatopic asthma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Han Chen

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: High serum DcR3 levels are associated with disease severity in nonatopic asthma patients, which suggests that DcR3 is a potential biomarker that can be used to predict the severity of nonatopic asthma.

  15. Response to montelukast among subgroups of children aged 2 to 14 years with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Katie A; Arduino, Jean Marie; Santanello, Nancy C

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Determining who responds to asthma therapies, particularly leukotriene modifiers, continues to be explored. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify patient characteristics predictive of response to montelukast. METHODS: We used data from 2 clinical trials in which children with asthma receiv...

  16. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Association 104 COPD Awareness Month: Connecting with Social Support American Lung Association ... Asthma - Duration: 3:36. Nucleus Medical Media 658,979 views 3:36 What is asthma. ...

  17. Obesity, adipokines and asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jartti, T; Saarikoski, L; Jartti, L; Lisinen, I; Jula, A; Huupponen, R; Viikari, J; Raitakari, O. T

    2009-01-01

    .... Our objective was to examine whether obesity is associated with asthma in three time points of life, and whether immunomodulatory adipokines, leptin and adiponectin are linked to overweight-associated asthma. Methods...

  18. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Association 139 Barbara Tie talks about Alpha 1-caused COPD American Lung Association 140 Judy Pruitt ... American Lung Association 182 Asthma - Theresa Moore PSA 1 American Lung Association 183 Asthma Walk PSA American ...

  19. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  20. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  1. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clubs American Lung Association 146 Angela Abel on exercise and COPD American Lung Association 147 American Lung ... 40 Types of Asthma - Duration: 11:38. Affinity Health Plan 6,222 views 11:38 Asthma Tech - ...

  2. Smoking and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on ... your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger for many people who have ...

  3. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000001.htm Asthma - child - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... care for your child. Take Charge of Your Child's Asthma at Home Make sure you know the ...

  4. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  5. Risk of herpes zoster in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Chung-Il; Kim, Bong-Seong; Mehra, Sonia; Yawn, Barbara P; Park, Miguel A; Juhn, Young J

    2015-01-01

    There is literature that indicates the association of asthma with an increased risk of common and serious microbial infections. We recently reported an increased risk of vaccine-preventable diseases, e.g., herpes zoster (HZ) among children with asthma, defined by predetermined asthma criteria. Little is known about whether this association is persistent if the asthma status is defined by different asthma criteria, e.g., the Asthma Predictive Index, given the heterogeneity of asthma. To assess the consistency of the association between asthma and the risk of HZ in children. This is a population-based case-control study based on all pediatric patients with HZ between 1996 and 2001 in Olmsted County, Minnesota, and 1:1 age- and sex-matched controls without a history of HZ who were enrolled in our previous study. The original Asthma Predictive Index criteria was operationalized by two or more wheezing episodes in a year for the first 3 years of life plus one of the major (physician-diagnosed asthma for a parent or physician-diagnosed eczema for a patient) or two of the minor criteria (physician-diagnosed allergic rhinitis for a patient, wheezing apart from cold, or eosinophilia [≥4%]). Data were fit to traditional logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios and 95% confident intervals. Of the original cohort (n = 554), 95 (17%) did not meet the enrollment criteria for this study, which left 459. Of the 221 patients, 53% were female, with a mean (standard deviation) age of 9.7 ± 4.2 years. The risk of HZ was increased in children with asthma defined by the API controlling for a varicella vaccine history and atopic status (adjusted odds ratio 2.56 [95% confidence interval, 1.08-6.56]). The association between asthma and increased risk of HZ in children and adolescents is consistent, independent of asthma definitions. Asthma might be an important clinical condition to be considered in HZ vaccine studies.

  6. Unique honey bee (Apis mellifera) hive component-based communities as detected by a hybrid of phospholipid fatty-acid and fatty-acid methyl ester analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Kirk J; Scott, Jarrod J; Budsberg, Kevin J; Read, Harry; Balser, Teri C; Currie, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities (microbiomes) are associated with almost all metazoans, including the honey bee Apis mellifera. Honey bees are social insects, maintaining complex hive systems composed of a variety of integral components including bees, comb, propolis, honey, and stored pollen. Given that the different components within hives can be physically separated and are nutritionally variable, we hypothesize that unique microbial communities may occur within the different microenvironments of honey bee colonies. To explore this hypothesis and to provide further insights into the microbiome of honey bees, we use a hybrid of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to produce broad, lipid-based microbial community profiles of stored pollen, adults, pupae, honey, empty comb, and propolis for 11 honey bee hives. Averaging component lipid profiles by hive, we show that, in decreasing order, lipid markers representing fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, and Gram-positive bacteria have the highest relative abundances within honey bee colonies. Our lipid profiles reveal the presence of viable microbial communities in each of the six hive components sampled, with overall microbial community richness varying from lowest to highest in honey, comb, pupae, pollen, adults and propolis, respectively. Finally, microbial community lipid profiles were more similar when compared by component than by hive, location, or sampling year. Specifically, we found that individual hive components typically exhibited several dominant lipids and that these dominant lipids differ between components. Principal component and two-way clustering analyses both support significant grouping of lipids by hive component. Our findings indicate that in addition to the microbial communities present in individual workers, honey bee hives have resident microbial communities associated with different colony components.

  7. Unique honey bee (Apis mellifera hive component-based communities as detected by a hybrid of phospholipid fatty-acid and fatty-acid methyl ester analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk J Grubbs

    Full Text Available Microbial communities (microbiomes are associated with almost all metazoans, including the honey bee Apis mellifera. Honey bees are social insects, maintaining complex hive systems composed of a variety of integral components including bees, comb, propolis, honey, and stored pollen. Given that the different components within hives can be physically separated and are nutritionally variable, we hypothesize that unique microbial communities may occur within the different microenvironments of honey bee colonies. To explore this hypothesis and to provide further insights into the microbiome of honey bees, we use a hybrid of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME and phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA analysis to produce broad, lipid-based microbial community profiles of stored pollen, adults, pupae, honey, empty comb, and propolis for 11 honey bee hives. Averaging component lipid profiles by hive, we show that, in decreasing order, lipid markers representing fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, and Gram-positive bacteria have the highest relative abundances within honey bee colonies. Our lipid profiles reveal the presence of viable microbial communities in each of the six hive components sampled, with overall microbial community richness varying from lowest to highest in honey, comb, pupae, pollen, adults and propolis, respectively. Finally, microbial community lipid profiles were more similar when compared by component than by hive, location, or sampling year. Specifically, we found that individual hive components typically exhibited several dominant lipids and that these dominant lipids differ between components. Principal component and two-way clustering analyses both support significant grouping of lipids by hive component. Our findings indicate that in addition to the microbial communities present in individual workers, honey bee hives have resident microbial communities associated with different colony components.

  8. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...... association between obesity and asthma....

  9. Allergy in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Bakirtas, A.; Bel, E.; Custovic, A.; Diamant, Z.; Hamelmann, E.; Heffler, E.; Kalayci, O.; Saglani, S.; Sergejeva, S.; Seys, S.; Simpson, A.; Bjermer, Leif

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps

  10. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  11. Negative affect, medication adherence, and asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Bruce; Zhang, Lening

    2008-09-01

    Negative affect including depression is known to be associated with asthma control, but whether and how it influences control in children with asthma is not understood. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate whether negative affect and medication nonadherence each predict decreased symptom control, and whether the relationship between negative affect and disease control is explained by children's adherence to asthma medications. Participants included 104 children 8 to 18 years old being treated with an inhaled corticosteroid delivered by metered-dose inhaler for asthma diagnosed by their health care providers. Children and parents independently rated asthma symptoms and completed questionnaires assessing sad and anxious affect. Electronic devices were attached to each participant's metered-dose inhaler to measure adherence. At study completion, records were collected to confirm reports of health events. Both child and parent negative affect scores predicted symptom scores, whether reported by child or parent, and child negative affect scores predicted school absence because of asthma. In a lagged analysis taking into account time sequence, medication adherence predicted prednisone bursts but not subjective symptom scores. Nonadherence did not explain the relationship between negative affect and symptom scores, but parent negative affect predicted prednisone bursts even when controlling for level of adherence. Although both negative affect and adherence were predictive of asthma control, the relationship of each to asthma control was distinctly different. Accuracy of symptom perception may be influenced by patient and parent affect characteristics.

  12. Discovering Pediatric Asthma Phenotypes on the Basis of Response to Controller Medication Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mindy K; Yoon, Jinsung; van der Schaar, Auke; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Pediatric asthma has variable underlying inflammation and symptom control. Approaches to addressing this heterogeneity, such as clustering methods to find phenotypes and predict outcomes, have been investigated. However, clustering based on the relationship between treatment and clinical outcome has not been performed, and machine learning approaches for long-term outcome prediction in pediatric asthma have not been studied in depth. Our objectives were to use our novel machine learning algorithm, predictor pursuit (PP), to discover pediatric asthma phenotypes on the basis of asthma control in response to controller medications, to predict longitudinal asthma control among children with asthma, and to identify features associated with asthma control within each discovered pediatric phenotype. We applied PP to the Childhood Asthma Management Program study data (n = 1,019) to discover phenotypes on the basis of asthma control between assigned controller therapy groups (budesonide vs. nedocromil). We confirmed PP's ability to discover phenotypes using the Asthma Clinical Research Network/Childhood Asthma Research and Education network data. We next predicted children's asthma control over time and compared PP's performance with that of traditional prediction methods. Last, we identified clinical features most correlated with asthma control in the discovered phenotypes. Four phenotypes were discovered in both datasets: allergic not obese (A + /O - ), obese not allergic (A - /O + ), allergic and obese (A + /O + ), and not allergic not obese (A - /O - ). Of the children with well-controlled asthma in the Childhood Asthma Management Program dataset, we found more nonobese children treated with budesonide than with nedocromil (P = 0.015) and more obese children treated with nedocromil than with budesonide (P = 0.008). Within the obese group, more A + /O + children's asthma was well controlled with nedocromil than with budesonide (P = 0.022) or with placebo

  13. Meteorologically estimated exposure but not distance predicts asthma symptoms in schoolchildren in the environs of a petrochemical refinery: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Wesley

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community concern about asthma prompted an epidemiological study of children living near a petrochemical refinery in Cape Town, South Africa. Because of resource constraints and the complexity of refinery emissions, neither direct environmental measurements nor modelling of airborne pollutants was possible. Instead a meteorologically derived exposure metric was calculated with the refinery as the putative point source. The study aimed to determine whether (1 asthma symptom prevalences were elevated compared to comparable areas in Cape Town and (2 whether there was an association between asthma symptom prevalences and the derived exposure metric. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out of all consenting school children aged 11 to 14 years attending schools in a defined area, utilizing the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC written and video questionnaires. Information was collected on potential confounders, e.g. parental history of atopic disease, active and passive smoking by the participant, birth order, number of children in the home and distance from a major road. The exposure metric combined residential distance of each child from the refinery with a wind vector in the form of wind speed, wind direction and proportion of the year blown. Results A total of 2,361 children from 17 schools met the criteria for inclusion. In multivariate analysis, meteorologically estimated exposure (MEE, but not simple distance from the refinery, was positively associated with having to take an inhaler to school [odds ratio per interquartile range (OR 1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.06-1.40], and with a number of video elicited asthma symptoms, including recent waking with wheezing (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.06-1.66 and frequent wheezing at rest (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.05 - 1.54. Symptom prevalences were higher than in other areas of the city, with frequent waking with wheezing being in great excess (OR 8.92, 95% CI

  14. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease.

  15. Obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    There is a global epidemic of asthma and obesity that is concentrated in Westernized and developed countries. A causal association in some people with asthma is suggested by observations that obesity precedes the onset of asthma and that bariatric surgery for morbid obesity can resolve asthma. The obese asthma phenotype features poor asthma control, limited response to corticosteroids, and an exaggeration of the physiological effects of obesity on lung function, which includes a reduction in expiratory reserve volume and airway closure occurring during tidal breathing. Obesity has important implications for asthma treatment. Increasing corticosteroid doses based on poor asthma control, as currently recommended in guidelines, may lead to overtreatment with corticosteroids in obese asthma. Enhanced bronchodilation, particularly of the small airways, may reduce the component of airway closure due to increased bronchomotor tone and suggests that greater emphasis should be placed on long-acting bronchodilators in obese asthma. The societal implications of this are important: with increasing obesity there will be increasing asthma from obesity, and the need to identify successful individual and societal weight-control strategies becomes a key goal.

  16. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  17. Patient's adherence in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillisen, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Nonadherence in asthma treatment results in increasing mortality, morbidity, and it is associated with increasing treatment costs. In asthma, adherence rates are often below 50%. Understanding of the needs and behaviors of asthma patients as well as treatment barriers to comply with asthma guidelines is important in developing programs to promote adherence. This article presents information on common types of nonadherence in asthma patients, the causes, and it reviews the literature on interventions to overcome these factors to maximize adherence rates. Although several interventions are effective in improving medication adherence in asthma, only few significantly enhance adherence rates and clinical outcomes of these patients. An improvement in treatment adherence is a complex task, requiring asthma self-management, education programs coupled with educational reinforcements, simplifying treatment planes and applications forms. Good communications skills among clinicians and patient education are also central for improving adherence. Methods to overcoming physician barriers ensure consistency in implementing guideline recommendations in practice.

  18. Short communication. Platform for bee-hives monitoring based on sound analysis. A perpetual warehouse for swarms daily activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atauri Mezquida, D.; Llorente Martinez, J.

    2009-07-01

    Bees and beekeeping are suffering a global crisis. Constant information on swarms conditions would be a key to study new diseases like colony collapse disorder and to develop new beekeeping tools to improve the hive management and make it more efficient. A platform for beehives monitoring is presented. It is based on the analysis of the colonies buzz which is registered by a bunch of sensors sending the data to a common database. Data obtained through sound processing shows plenty of patterns and tendency lines related to colonies activities and their conditions. It shows the potential of the sound as a swarm activity gauge. The goal of the platform is the possibility to store information about the swarms activity. The objective is to build a global net of monitored hives covering apiaries with different climates, razes and managements. (Author) 21 refs.

  19. Natural Language Processing for Asthma Ascertainment in Different Practice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Chung-Il; Sohn, Sunghwan; Ali, Mir; Krusemark, Elizabeth; Ryu, Euijung; Liu, Hongfang; Juhn, Young J

    2017-06-17

    We developed and validated NLP-PAC, a natural language processing (NLP) algorithm based on predetermined asthma criteria (PAC) for asthma ascertainment using electronic health records at Mayo Clinic. To adapt NLP-PAC in a different health care setting, Sanford Children Hospital, by assessing its external validity. The study was designed as a retrospective cohort study that used a random sample of 2011-2012 Sanford Birth cohort (n = 595). Manual chart review was performed on the cohort for asthma ascertainment on the basis of the PAC. We then used half of the cohort as a training cohort (n = 298) and the other half as a blind test cohort to evaluate the adapted NLP-PAC algorithm. Association of known asthma-related risk factors with the Sanford-NLP algorithm-driven asthma ascertainment was tested. Among the eligible test cohort (n = 297), 160 (53%) were males, 268 (90%) white, and the median age was 2.3 years (range, 1.5-3.1 years). NLP-PAC, after adaptation, and the human abstractor identified 74 (25%) and 72 (24%) subjects, respectively, with 66 subjects identified by both approaches. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the NLP algorithm in predicting asthma status were 92%, 96%, 89%, and 97%, respectively. The known risk factors for asthma identified by NLP (eg, smoking history) were similar to the ones identified by manual chart review. Successful implementation of NLP-PAC for asthma ascertainment in 2 different practice settings demonstrates the feasibility of automated asthma ascertainment leveraging electronic health record data with a potential to enable large-scale, multisite asthma studies to improve asthma care and research. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation inactivation of Paenibacillus larvae and sterilization of American Foul Brood (AFB) infected hives using Co-60 gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Guzman, Zenaida M. [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Cervancia, Cleofas R. [Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines, Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines); Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B.; Tolentino, Mitos M.; Abrera, Gina B.; Cobar, Ma. Lucia C. [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Fajardo, Alejandro C.; Sabino, Noel G.; Manila-Fajardo, Analinda C. [Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines, Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines); Feliciano, Chitho P., E-mail: cpfeliciano@pnri.dost.gov.ph [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2011-10-15

    The effectiveness of gamma radiation in inactivating the Philippine isolate of Paenibacillus larvae was investigated. Spores of P. larvae were irradiated at incremental doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 kGy) of gamma radiation emitted by a {sup 60}Co source. Surviving spores were counted and used to estimate the decimal reduction (D{sub 10}) value. A dose of 0.2 kGy was sufficient to inactivate 90% of the total recoverable spores from an initial count of 10{sup 5}-9x10{sup 3} spores per glass plate. The sterilizing effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the spores of P. larvae in infected hives was determined. In this study, a minimum dose (D{sub min}) of 15 kGy was tested. Beehives with sub-clinical infections of AFB were irradiated and examined for sterility. All the materials were found to be free of P. larvae indicating its susceptibility to {gamma}-rays. After irradiation, there were no visible changes in the physical appearance of the hives' body, wax and frames. Thus, a dose of 15 kGy is effective enough for sterilization of AFB-infected materials. - Highlights: > We characterized Paenibacillus larvae and determined its radiation sensitivity. > We investigated the effectiveness of gamma rays in inactivating P. larvae. > Gamma radiation inactivates P. larvae. > 15 kGy is effective for the sterilization of P. larvae-infected hives. > Irradiation produces no visible changes in the hives' body, waxes and frames.

  1. Commercial bumblebee hives to assess an anthropogenic environment for pollinator support: a case study in the region of Ghent (Belgium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Laurian; Meeus, Ivan; Cheroutre, Lore; Mommaerts, Veerle; Louwye, Stephen; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic changes of the environment influence the distribution and abundance of pollinators such as bumblebees and have been proposed as one of the main causes in their worldwide decline. In order to evaluate the impact of expanding anthropogenic landscapes on supporting pollinator potential, reliable tools are needed. Bombus terrestris is one of the most abundant bumblebee species in Europe, and these bumblebees are known as generalist pollinators of not only wild flowers in nature but also of crops in agriculture. For more than two decades, these bumblebees have been commercially mass reared for biological pollination in greenhouses. In this project, we placed commercial hives of the bumblebee B. terrestris containing one queen and 40 workers, in three different locations in the region of Ghent (Belgium), and the performance of these hives was followed during a 4-week period in spring 2012. In parallel, we determined the floral richness and diversity index in the chosen study sites. The sites consisted of a rich urban environment with patchy green areas opposed to an urban environment with poor landscape metrics; a third rural study site showed average positive landscape metrics. The results demonstrated that the hive biomass and numbers of workers increased significantly in the rich compared to the poor environment, providing a mechanism to discriminate between study sites. In addition, the bumblebee-collected pollen showed that the flowering plants Salix spp. and Rosaceae/Prunus spp. are dominant food sources in all anthropogenic environments during early spring. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to the optimization of the experimental setup and to the use of commercial bumblebee hives in assessing local pollinator support within any given environment.

  2. Killing them with kindness? In-hive medications may inhibit xenobiotic efflux transporters and endanger honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hawthorne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Honey bees (Apis mellifera have recently experienced higher than normal overwintering colony losses. Many factors have been evoked to explain the losses, among which are the presence of residues of pesticides and veterinary products in hives. Multiple residues are present at the same time, though most often in low concentrations so that no single product has yet been associated with losses. Involvement of a combination of residues to losses may however not be excluded. To understand the impact of an exposure to combined residues on honey bees, we propose a mechanism-based strategy, focusing here on Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR transporters as mediators of those interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using whole-animal bioassays, we demonstrate through inhibition by verapamil that the widely used organophosphate and pyrethroid acaricides coumaphos and τ-fluvalinate, and three neonicotinoid insecticides: imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid are substrates of one or more MDR transporters. Among the candidate inhibitors of honey bee MDR transporters is the in-hive antibiotic oxytetracycline. Bees prefed oxytetracycline were significantly sensitized to the acaricides coumaphos and τ-fluvalinate, suggesting that the antibiotic may interfere with the normal excretion or metabolism of these pesticides. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Many bee hives receive regular treatments of oxytetracycline and acaricides for prevention and treatment of disease and parasites. Our results suggest that seasonal co-application of these medicines to bee hives could increase the adverse effects of these and perhaps other pesticides. Our results also demonstrate the utility of a mechanism-based strategy. By identifying pesticides and apicultural medicines that are substrates and inhibitors of xenobiotic transporters we prioritize the testing of those chemical combinations most likely to result in adverse interactions.

  3. Killing them with kindness? In-hive medications may inhibit xenobiotic efflux transporters and endanger honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, David J; Dively, Galen P

    2011-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) have recently experienced higher than normal overwintering colony losses. Many factors have been evoked to explain the losses, among which are the presence of residues of pesticides and veterinary products in hives. Multiple residues are present at the same time, though most often in low concentrations so that no single product has yet been associated with losses. Involvement of a combination of residues to losses may however not be excluded. To understand the impact of an exposure to combined residues on honey bees, we propose a mechanism-based strategy, focusing here on Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) transporters as mediators of those interactions. Using whole-animal bioassays, we demonstrate through inhibition by verapamil that the widely used organophosphate and pyrethroid acaricides coumaphos and τ-fluvalinate, and three neonicotinoid insecticides: imidacloprid, acetamiprid and thiacloprid are substrates of one or more MDR transporters. Among the candidate inhibitors of honey bee MDR transporters is the in-hive antibiotic oxytetracycline. Bees prefed oxytetracycline were significantly sensitized to the acaricides coumaphos and τ-fluvalinate, suggesting that the antibiotic may interfere with the normal excretion or metabolism of these pesticides. Many bee hives receive regular treatments of oxytetracycline and acaricides for prevention and treatment of disease and parasites. Our results suggest that seasonal co-application of these medicines to bee hives could increase the adverse effects of these and perhaps other pesticides. Our results also demonstrate the utility of a mechanism-based strategy. By identifying pesticides and apicultural medicines that are substrates and inhibitors of xenobiotic transporters we prioritize the testing of those chemical combinations most likely to result in adverse interactions.

  4. Age and aggregation trigger mating behaviour in the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Sandra G.; Spooner-Hart, Robert; Duncan, Michael; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Steidle, Johannes L. M.; Rosenkranz, Peter

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the poorly documented reproductive behaviour of the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Nitidulidae), a honey bee ( Apis mellifera) parasite. We described the mating behaviour in detail and tested the hypothesis that beetle aggregation plays a vital role in mating in this species. Gender preference was examined in the context of age-dependency and possible chemical communication. Beetles started mating at a high frequency 18 days after emergence from the soil but only if they were aggregated ( p behaviour was characterised by a short pre-copulation courtship and female aggression towards other females and copulating couples. Both behaviours may be indicative of cryptic female choice. Delayed onset of reproductive behaviour is typical of many polygamous species, whilst the indispensability of aggregation for onset of sexual behaviour seems to be a feature unique to A. tumida. Both strategies support mass reproduction in this parasitic species, enabling A. tumida to overcome its honey bee host colony, and are probably triggered by chemotactic cues.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement in predicting cough-variant asthma and eosinophilic bronchitis in adults with chronic cough: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Shim, Ji-Su; Won, Ha-Kyeong; Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Byung-Keun; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Sang-Heon; Park, Heung-Woo; Kim, Sun-Sin; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Morice, Alyn H; Lee, Byung-Jae; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2017-09-01

    Individual studies have suggested the utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno) measurement in detecting cough-variant asthma (CVA) and eosinophilic bronchitis (EB) in patients with chronic cough. We sought to obtain summary estimates of diagnostic test accuracy of Feno measurement in predicting CVA, EB, or both in adults with chronic cough. Electronic databases were searched for studies published until January 2016, without language restriction. Cross-sectional studies that reported the diagnostic accuracy of Feno measurement for detecting CVA or EB were included. Risk of bias was assessed with Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2. Random effects meta-analyses were performed to obtain summary estimates of the diagnostic accuracy of Feno measurement. A total of 15 studies involving 2187 adults with chronic cough were identified. Feno measurement had a moderate diagnostic accuracy in predicting CVA in patients with chronic cough, showing the summary area under the curve to be 0.87 (95% CI, 0.83-0.89). Specificity was higher and more consistent than sensitivity (0.85 [95% CI, 0.81-0.88] and 0.72 [95% CI, 0.61-0.81], respectively). However, in the nonasthmatic population with chronic cough, the diagnostic accuracy to predict EB was found to be relatively lower (summary area under the curve, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.77-0.84]), and specificity was inconsistent. The present meta-analyses indicated the diagnostic potential of Feno measurement as a rule-in test for detecting CVA in adult patients with chronic cough. However, Feno measurement may not be useful to predict EB in nonasthmatic subjects with chronic cough. These findings warrant further studies to validate the roles of Feno measurement in clinical practice of patients with chronic cough. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors associated to lifestyle and risk of adult onset asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovinen, E; Kaprio, J; Koskenvuo, M

    2003-03-01

    Asthma prevalence has been increasing especially in developed countries. The change seems to be associated with changes in lifestyle. We have made a prospective study to assess the effect of lifestyle factors, including smoking, educational level, physical activity and obesity on adult onset asthma. A population of 10,597 adult twins, initially free of asthma was followed for 9 years. The main outcome measure was questionnaire-based report of physician diagnosed asthma. Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of asthma predicted by lifestyle factors, with adjustment for atopy and respiratory symptoms. Obesity at baseline increased asthma risk (multivariable adjusted OR = 3.00, 95% CI: 1.64-5.50 for those with BMI > or = 30 compared to those with normal weight BMI: 20-24.99). Taller height was associated to lower asthma incidence. Leisure time physical activity had a slightly protective effect on asthma risk among men (P for trend = 0.037) while smoking and education did not have significant effects on the risk of adult onset asthma. Obesity was associated to the risk of adult onset asthma, while short height and low leisure time physical activity can be considered as other potential risk factors.

  7. Metabolic acidosis improves airway conductance in patients with asthma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijker, F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Bosch, F.H.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to investigate whether acute metabolic acidosis could cause bronchodilation in patients with asthma. Twelve patients with asthma (8 females, mean age 39 (+/- SD 12) years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV(1)] 93 [+/-9] % predicted, PC(20) 1.9 (+/-1.0) mg/mL) participated

  8. Monitoring asthma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin C. Lødrup Carlsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of asthma treatment is to obtain clinical control and reduce future risks to the patient. However, to date there is limited evidence on how to monitor patients with asthma. Childhood asthma introduces specific challenges in terms of deciding what, when, how often, by whom and in whom different assessments of asthma should be performed. The age of the child, the fluctuating course of asthma severity, variability in clinical presentation, exacerbations, comorbidities, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors, and environmental exposures may all influence disease activity and, hence, monitoring strategies. These factors will be addressed in herein. We identified large knowledge gaps in the effects of different monitoring strategies in children with asthma. Studies into monitoring strategies are urgently needed, preferably in collaborative paediatric studies across countries and healthcare systems.

  9. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  10. Asthma in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a common problem with enormous medical and economics impacts. It is an inflammatory disease of the airways associated with intermittent episodes of bronchospasm. Asthma is not uncommon in the elderly patients. Prevalence of asthma is similar in older and younger adults. Asthma in the elderly patient is underdiagnosed because of false perceptions by both patient and physician. The high incidence of comorbid conditions in the elderly patient makes the diagnosis and management more difficult. Correct diagnosis is demonstrated with spirometry. The goals of asthma treatment are to achieve and maintain control of symptoms and to prevent development of irreversible airflow limitation. Asthma drugs are preferably inhaled because this route minimizes systemic absorption and, thus, improves the ratio of the therapeutic benefit to the potential side-effects in elderly patients.

  11. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  12. Late-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    , to objectively confirm asthma. If necessary, a trial of oral or inhaled corticosteroid might be necessary. Asthma can be diagnosed when increased airflow variability is identified in a symptomatic patient, and if the patient does not have a history of exposure, primarily smoking, known to cause chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease, the diagnosis is asthma even if the patient does not have fully reversible airflow obstruction. Pharmacological therapy in patients with late-onset asthma follows international guidelines, including treatment with the lowest effective dose of inhaled corticosteroid to minimize...... the risk of systemic effects. However, most recommendations are based on extrapolation from findings in younger patients. Comorbidities are very common in patients with late-onset asthma and need to be taken into account in the management of the disease. In conclusion, late-onset asthma is poorly...

  13. Serum resistin as an asthma marker and predictor of inhaled corticosteroid response in bronchial asthma in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M. Al-Asy

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: From these results we can conclude that resistin can be considered as a marker of asthma and its severity and high resistin levels can predict favourable anti-inflammatory effect of inhaled glucocorticoids suggesting that resistin may be a marker of steroid-sensitive genotype in asthma in children.

  14. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Asthma Learn How to Control Asthma Asthma and Severe Weather ... Working on Asthma Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier ...

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler ... ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... among Children Asthma-related Missed School Days among Children aged 5–17 Years Asthma Severity among Adults with Current Asthma Asthma Severity among Children with Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  20. Respiratory muscle strength in children with mild bronchial asthma disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Neumannová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory muscle strength can be decreased in patients with asthma; however, it is not well-documented whether a mild bronchial asthma disease can affect respiratory muscle strength in children and can be associated with higher presence of breathing difficulties. Objective: The main aim of the present study was to compare respiratory muscle strength between children with asthma and age-matched healthy children. The next aim of this study was to assess the incidence of decreased respiratory muscle strength in children with asthma and healthy children and assess the effect of decreased respiratory muscle strength on the incidence of breathing difficulties. Methods: Children with mild bronchial asthma (n = 167 and age-matched, healthy children (n = 100 were recruited into this study. Pulmonary function tests, maximal inspiratory (PImax and expiratory (PEmax mouth pressures and the incidence of breathing difficulty were evaluated in children with asthma and healthy controls. Results: The inspiratory muscle strength was similar between children with asthma and healthy children. Conversely, the expiratory muscle strength was lower in asthmatic children. There was a statistically significant difference between girls with asthma and healthy girls (PEmax = 81.7 ± 29.8% vs. 100.1 ± 23.7% of predicted, p < .001. PEmax was significantly higher in boys with asthma than in girls with asthma (PEmax = 92.9 ± 26.4 % vs. 81.7 ± 29.8% of predicted, p = .03. A higher incidence of breathing difficulties during physical activity (uphill walking, running, swimming was confirmed in children with asthma with lower respiratory muscle strength. Conclusions: There was a higher prevalence of decreased expiratory muscle strength in children with asthma; therefore, respiratory muscle strength should be tested in these children, especially in those who are symptomatic.

  1. Serum Vitamin D Levels and Vitamin D Supplement in Adult Patients with Asthma Exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    Tadech Boonpiyathad; Teerapol Chantveerawong; Panitan Pradubpongsa; Atik Sangasapaviliya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of asthma exacerbations. Objective. This study aimed to compare vitamin D status during the period of severe asthma exacerbations and investigate if vitamin D supplementation improves asthma control. Methods. A total of 47 asthmatic patients and 40 healthy subjects participated in this study. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), asthma control test (ACT) score, and % predicted peak expiratory flow rate were evaluated in t...

  2. Pathway from central obesity to childhood asthma. Physical fitness and sedentary time are leading factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang-Ching; Tu, Yu-Kang; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chen, Pau-Chung; Chu, Da-Chen; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2014-05-15

    Available prospective studies of obesity and asthma have used only body mass index (BMI) as an indicator for adiposity; studies using detailed obesity measures are lacking, and the role of physical fitness level and sedentary time remains unexplored in the link between obesity and asthma. To compare various anthropometric measures of obesity in relation to childhood asthma, and to further characterize the interrelations among central obesity, physical fitness level, sedentary time, and asthma. The nationwide Taiwan Children Health Study followed 2,758 schoolchildren from fourth to sixth grade, annually collecting data regarding physical fitness, sedentary time, obesity measures (comprising body weight and height, abdominal and hip circumference, skin fold thickness, and body composition), asthma, and pulmonary function tests. The generalized estimating equation was used for 3 years of repeated measurements to analyze the interrelation among obesity, sedentary time, physical fitness level, and asthma; a structural equation model was used to explore the pathogenesis among these factors. Asthma incidence was analyzed during a 2-year follow-up among centrally obese and nonobese groups in baseline children without asthma. Central obesity most accurately predicts asthma. Low physical fitness levels and high screen time increase the risk of central obesity, which leads to asthma development. Obesity-related reduction in pulmonary function is a possible mechanism in the pathway from central obesity to asthma. Central obesity measures should be incorporated in childhood asthma risk predictions. Children are encouraged to increase their physical fitness levels and reduce their sedentary time to prevent central obesity-related asthma.

  3. Linking obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, E Rand

    2014-04-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that obesity has a significant impact on asthma risk, phenotype, and prognosis. Epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that asthma is more likely to occur in obese patients, and health status is impaired in obese individuals with asthma, with obese asthmatics experiencing more symptoms, worse quality of life, increased healthcare use, and increased asthma severity. However, obesity has well-described effects on lung function and mechanics that can lead to symptoms of dyspnea without causing the pathophysiologic changes of asthma. Adding to the challenges of evaluating this association, some studies have failed to demonstrate a robust relationship between obesity and traditional biomarkers of airway inflammation in adult asthmatics, leading to the conclusion that obesity does not necessarily worsen airway inflammation in asthma. In this regard, emerging data suggest that nonatopic mechanisms may be relevant in obese asthmatics, and that these mechanisms may have a direct impact on the response of obese asthmatics to asthma therapies, most notably inhaled glucocorticoids. This article will review selected aspects of the contributions of obesity-related airway and systemic inflammation to asthma, with a focus on the impact of obesity as a modifier of risk, prognosis, and therapeutic response in asthma. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Asthma in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, Sidney S

    2017-11-01

    The older population has seen the greatest increase in the prevalence of current asthma in recent years. Asthma may begin at any age and when it occurs at an advanced as opposed to a young age, it is often nonatopic, severe, and unremitting. Unfortunately, geriatric-specific guidelines are not available for the diagnosis and treatment of asthma. However, with objective monitoring, avoidance of asthma triggers, appropriate pharmacotherapy, and patient education, the disease can be managed successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  6. Neurocognitive functioning in children with mild and moderate asthma in the childhood asthma management program. The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, R D; Aylward, E H; Lapidus, J; Bender, B G; DuHamel, T

    2000-04-01

    The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) is a multicenter double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of two anti-inflammatory agents and placebo in children with mild and moderate asthma. The interrelationship between asthma severity and neurocognitive functioning among 1041 children (age range, 5-12 years) enrolled in the CAMP trial was examined. Asthma severity was established at baseline with a clinical history of asthma symptomatology and measures of lung function (spirometry and methacholine challenge). Diary cards were used in a screening to record nighttime awakenings and doctor contacts caused by asthma symptoms, symptom severity, and number of puffs from a rescue inhaler. All children received a comprehensive neurocognitive assessment at the end of the 28-day screening period (before randomization), including measures of intelligence, attention, memory, and academic achievement. Significant differences were found between children with mild and moderate asthma on lung function and symptom outcome variables (log(e)FEV(1)PC(20), DeltaFEV(1) percent predicted, change in peak flow percent predicted, nighttime awakenings caused by asthma, average symptom severity score, and average daily number of puffs from a rescue inhaler) but not on neurocognitive variables. Multiple regression analyses revealed that asthma outcomes could not be predicted by neurocognitive variables despite controlling for socioeconomic status. The prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction, as indicated by the use of psychostimulant medication, was found to be consistent with that found in the existing literature. Mild and moderate asthma symptoms are not related to neurocognitive functioning in the children enrolled in CAMP. Mean performance on neurocognitive variables was found to be similar to that of national normative data.

  7. The influence of leptin on Th1/Th2 balance in obese children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Mohammed Youssef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In individuals with asthma, obesity induces the production of leptin and is associated with disease severity. Our objective was to evaluate the levels of serum leptin and their effect on Th1/Th2 balance in obese and non-obese children with asthma, as well as to investigate the association between serum leptin levels and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We evaluated 50 atopic children with physician-diagnosed moderate-to-severe persistent asthma and 20 controls. The children with asthma were divided into two groups, by body mass index percentile: obese (n = 25 and non-obese (n = 25. From all subjects, we collected peripheral blood samples in order to determine the levels of leptin, IFN-γ, and IL-4. Asthma severity was assessed by an asthma symptom score, and the results were correlated with the parameters studied. RESULTS: Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group, as well as being significantly higher in the children with asthma than in the controls, whereas IFN-γ levels were significantly higher and IL-4 levels were significantly lower in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group. In addition, the obese asthma group showed higher asthma symptom scores and significantly lower FEV1 (% of predicted than did the non-obese asthma group. There was a significant positive correlation between leptin and IFN-γ levels only in the obese asthma group. CONCLUSIONS: Although leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of asthma in obese and non-obese children, its effect is more pronounced in the former. In the presence of high leptin levels, only obese children with asthma exhibited Th1 polarization, with higher IFN-γ levels and greater asthma severity.

  8. Nutrition and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the asthma prevalence in many countries over the recent decades, highlights the need for a greater understanding of the risk factors for asthma. Be-cause asthma is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental fac-tors, increasing prevalence is certainly the result of changes in environmental fac-tors because of process of wesernization. That is the reason for higher prevalence in countries where a traditional to a westernized lifestyle occurred earlier. This increasing prevalence has affected both rural and urban communities, suggesting that local environmental factors such as exposure to allergens or industrial air pol-lutions are not the sole cause. In the last few years, nutrition has represented an important conditioning factor of many cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and chronic pulmonary diseases. So it has been hypothesized that dietary constituents influence the immune system and thus, may also be actively involved in the onset of asthma and other allergic diseases. Dietary constituents can play beneficial as well as det-rimental role in asthma. The possible role of diet in the development of asthma can be described as follows: first, a food allergen can cause asthma. Second, there is role of breast-feeding for prevention of asthma later in life. Third, a low intake of antioxidative dietary constituents might be a risk factor for asthma. Moreover, role of cations such as sodium, potassium and magnesium has been described in development of asthma. Finally, intake of fatty acids specially the role of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids play important role in cause of asthma.

  9. Prevalence of obesity in asthma and its relations with asthma severity and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Gabriele Carra; Grutcki, Denis Maltz; Menegotto, Samuel Millán; Pereira, Rosemary Petrik; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of obesity in asthmatic patients attending at an outpatient clinic, and to investigate its relationships with asthma severity and level of asthma control. In a cross-sectional study we recruited patients aged 11 years and older with confirmed asthma diagnosis from the outpatient asthma clinic of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil. They underwent an evaluation by a general questionnaire, an asthma control questionnaire and by pulmonary function tests. Nutritional status was classified by body mass index (BMI). 272 patients were included in the study. Mean age was 51.1 ± 16.5 years and there were 206 (74.9%) female patients. Mean BMI was 27.5 ± 5.3kg/m(2), and 96 (35.3%) patients were classified as normal weight, 97 (35.7%) as overweight and 79 (29%) as obesity. There was a significant higher proportion of female than male patients (34.3% vs. 13.2%, p = 0.002) in the obesity group. There were no significant differences with respect to asthma control (p = 0.741) and severity classification (p = 0.506). The FEV1% predicted was significantly higher in the obese than in the non-obese group (73.7% vs. 67.2%, p = 0.037). Logistic regression analysis identified sex (OR = 3.84, p = 0.002) as an independent factor associated with obesity. This study showed a high prevalence of obesity in asthmatic patients. Obese and non-obese subjects were similar in regard to asthma severity and level of asthma control. Female sex was associated with obesity in this asthma population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Spirometry use in children hospitalized with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Chun; McDowell, Karen M; Fenchel, Matthew; Szczesniak, Rhonda; Kercsmar, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disorder of childhood and continues to be a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) recommends that spirometry be obtained for asthma patients upon hospital admission, after bronchodilation during the acute phase of asthma symptoms, and at least one additional time before discharge from the hospital. The objectives of this study were to describe the use of spirometry in children hospitalized with asthma and to determine association of pulmonary function with future exacerbations. A retrospective cohort study design was utilized involving review of medical records of children ≥5 years old admitted with asthma to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from September 1, 2009 to March 31, 2011. Hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visits were identified by the ICD-9-CM codes of having either a primary diagnosis of asthma (493) or a respiratory illness (460-496) plus a secondary diagnosis of asthma. Asthma re-exacerbation was defined as either having an ED visit or hospitalization for asthma that occurred within 3 months after the index hospitalization. All spirometries were performed in a pediatric pulmonary function laboratory. Among 1,037 admissions included in this study, 89 (8.6%) had spirometry that was recommended by a consulting asthma specialist and usually performed on the day of discharge. Spirometries for forty-five of these patients (54.9%) met all acceptability and repeatability criteria of the American Thoracic Society. Patients who performed acceptable spirometry were significantly older (12.4 ± 3.8 vs. 10.7 ± 3.0 years; P = 0.041). The average forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) was 84.4 ± 19.7% predicted; forced vital capacity (FVC) was 98.1 ± 16.0% predicted; FEV1 /FVC was 74.6 ± 9.6%; forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75 ) was 61.2 ± 30.1% predicted. Ten patients (22%) who

  11. What is Asthma?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Association 104 COPD Awareness Month: Connecting with Social Support American Lung Association 105 Ohio Cares about ... 7:59 Asthma - Duration: 3:36. Nucleus Medical Media 658,979 views 3:36 What is asthma. ...

  12. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stress How Cliques Make Kids Feel Left Out Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma Print A A A en español ... handy at all times. So if you're traveling by car, keep them where you can get ...

  13. Examining Profiles of Family Functioning in Pediatric Asthma: Longitudinal Associations With Child Adjustment and Asthma Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al G Hriwati, Nour; Winter, Marcia A; Everhart, Robin S

    2017-05-01

    Identify profiles of functioning in families of children with asthma and examine whether profile membership predicts subsequent child mental and physical well-being. Primary caregivers and children ( N  = 1,030) from the Childhood Asthma Management Program completed questionnaires assessing family functioning and child adaptation at five time points. Asthma severity was also assessed via spirometry. Latent profile analyses identified a four-profile solution as best fitting the data: cohesive, permissive, controlling/disengaged, and controlling/enmeshed families. Distal outcome analyses using Bolck-Croon-Hagenaars techniques suggested that children from families that were more cohesive had fewer internalizing and externalizing symptoms. These associations remained stable across time. Family profiles did not differ with regards to child asthma severity. Results highlight the importance of looking beyond the effects of distinct components of family functioning and instead using pattern-based approaches. Recommendations for incorporating screenings and services for families in pediatric care settings are provided.

  14. Assessment of asthma control using asthma control test in chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... CI 1.06-3.47) and obesity (OR 1.81; 1.01-3.27). Conclusion: Asthma remains poorly controlled in a large proportion of asthma patients under specialist care in Cameroon. Educational programs for asthma patients targeting women and based on weight loss for obese patients may help in improving the control of asthma.

  15. The Common Sense Model in early adolescents with asthma: longitudinal relations between illness perceptions, asthma control and emotional problems mediated by coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggelman, Dana; van de Ven, Monique O M; van Schayck, Onno C P; Kleinjan, Marloes; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined the longitudinal relations between illness perceptions and asthma control and emotional problems (i.e., anxiety, depression, stress), respectively, in adolescents with asthma. Furthermore, the mediating effects of asthma-specific coping strategies on these relations were examined, as specified in the Common Sense Model (CSM). In 2011, 2012, and 2013, adolescents (aged 10-15) with asthma were visited at home (N=253) and completed questionnaires about their illness perceptions, asthma-specific coping strategies, asthma control, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and perceived stress. Path analyses were used to examine the direct relations of illness perceptions with asthma control and emotional problems and the mediating effects of coping strategies cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Perceptions of less perceived control and attributing more complaints to asthma were associated with better asthma control. Perceptions of more concern, less coherence, and increased influence of asthma on emotional well-being were associated with more emotional problems. Longitudinally, perceptions of more treatment control and fewer concerns predicted less emotional problems over time. More worrying mediated the cross-sectional relation between perceiving more concern about asthma and less asthma control and the longitudinal relation between perceiving more concern about asthma and more emotional problems. Illness perceptions were associated with asthma control and emotional problems; however, over time, illness perceptions only predicted changes in emotional problems. Most coping strategies did not mediate the relation between illness perceptions and outcomes. Interventions aimed to change illness perceptions in adolescents with asthma could decrease emotional problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fertility outcomes in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    of fertility treatments, and the number of successful pregnancies differ significantly between women with unexplained infertility with and without asthma.245 women with unexplained infertility (aged 23-45 years) underwent questionnaires and asthma and allergy testing while undergoing fertility treatment. 96...... women entering the study had either a former doctor's diagnosis of asthma or were diagnosed with asthma when included. After inclusion they were followed for a minimum of 12 months in fertility treatment, until they had a successful pregnancy, stopped treatment, or the observation ended.The likelihood...... pregnancies during fertility treatment, 39.6 versus 60.4% (p=0.002). Increasing age was of negative importance for expected time to pregnancy, especially among asthmatic women (interaction between age and asthma on time to pregnancy, p=0.001). Female asthmatics had a longer time to pregnancy and less often...

  17. Serum Anti-TPO and TPO Gene Polymorphism as a Predictive Factor for Hidden Autoimmune Thyroiditis in Patient with Bronchial Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shabrawy, Reham M; Atta, Amal H; Rashad, Nearmeen M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones T3 and T4. Autoimmune thyroiditis is a common disorder affecting 10% of population worldwide. A key feature of autoimmune thyroiditis is the presence of anti TPO antibodies, and some mutation of the TPO gene. Association between autoimmune thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorders has been reported but little is known about association with allergic diseases. In this study, we aimed to evaluate frequency of hidden autoimmune thyroiditis among allergic patient and examine possible relationship between anti-TPO levels and polymorphism at the TPO gene A2173/C exon 12 and different types of allergens. The study included 50 adult Egyptian patients with allergic rhinitis and /or bronchial asthma and 50 controls. For each subject, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxin 4 (T4) and Triiodothyronine (T3) hormones were measured. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) level was detected by ELISA; and TPO gene polymorphism 2173A>C exon 12 was analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Skin prick test was done to assess allergic response in patients. Serum levels of T3, T4 and TSH did not show any statistical significant difference between patients and groups. However, mean serum anti-TPO level was statistically higher in patients than controls, and correlated positively with body mass index, age, diastolic blood pressure, suggesting higher prevalence of hidden autoimmune thyroiditis in allergic patients than in control group. 2173A>C Genotyping revealed that the frequency of C allele is increased in the patient group. C allele represents a risk factor with odds ratio of 2.37 (1.035-5.44) and a significant P value TPO 2173A>C polymorphism may be considered as a risk factor for developing autoimmune thyroiditis in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma and that these patients should regularly be checked for hidden thyroiditis. Copyright© by the Egyptian Association of

  18. The effects of hive types (shield and sword) on wintering ability, survival rates and strength of honeybee colonies (A. mellifera L.) in spring season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeninar, Halil; Akyol, Etem; Sahinler, Nuray

    2010-03-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of shield and sword comb orientation hive types on wintering ability, survival rates (in winter) and population growth of honeybee colonies (A. mellifera anatoliaca) in spring season. In ancient Anatolia beekeeping; honeybee colonies were identified sword and shield (the colonies which build up the combs vertical and horizontal according to positions of the hive entrance) before the uses of top-opened hive with movable frames. Total twenty honeybee colonies, which have similar condition according to queen age, genotype, number of frames covered with adult worker bees, brood areas and food stocks, were used in this study. Average wintering ability of colonies in the shield and sword groups were found to be 98.57% and 69.76%; average survival rates were found to be 100% and 100% in shield and sword group colonies respectively. The average number of frames covered with adult worker bees at mid June in shield and sword group colonies were found to be 15.6 +/- 1.58, 12.00 +/- 1.25 number/colony and the average brood areas were found as 7863.5 +/- 402.9, 5997.0 +/- 373.3 cm(2)/colony respectively. Differences between the group means on wintering ability, sealed brood areas and colony strength were found significant (P 0.05). The colonies living in shield (horizontal) hives have showed better wintering ability and more colony population than colonies living in sword (vertical) hives.

  19. Tracking Climate Effects on Plant-Pollinator Interaction Phenology with Satellites and Honey Bee Hives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaias, Wayne E.; Nickeson, Jaime E.; Tan, Bin; Ma, Peter L.; Nightingale, Joanne M.; Wolfe, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Question/Methods: The complexity of plant-pollinator interactions, the large number of species involved, and the lack of species response functions present challenges to understanding how these critical interactions may be impacted by climate and land cover change on large scales. Given the importance of this interaction for terrestrial ecosystems, it is desirable to develop new approaches. We monitor the daily weight change of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies to record the phenology of the Honey Bee Nectar Flow (HBNF) in a volunteer network (honeybeenet.gsfc.nasa.gov). The records document the successful interaction of a generalist pollinator with a variety of plant resources. We extract useful HBNF phenology metrics for three seasons. Sites currently exist in 35 states/provinces in North America, with a concentration in the Mid-Atlantic region. HBNF metrics are compared to standard phenology metrics derived from remotely sensed vegetation indices from NASA's MODIS sensor and published results from NOAA's A VHRR. At any given time the percentage of plants producing nectar is usually a sma11 fraction of the total satellite sensor signal. We are interested in determining how well the 'bulk' satellite vegetation parameters relate to the phenology of the HBNF, and how it varies spatially on landscape to continental scales. Results/Conclusions: We found the median and peak seasonal HBNF dates to be robust, with variation between replicate scale hives of only a few days. We developed quality assessment protocols to identify abnormal colony artifacts. Temporally, the peak and median of the HBNF in the Mid-Atlantic show a significant advance of 0.58 d/y beginning about 1970, very similar to that observed by the A VHRR since 1982 (0.57 d/y). Spatially, the HBNF metrics are highly correlated with elevation and winter minimum temperature distribution, and exhibit significant but regionally coherent inter-annual variation. The relationship between median of the

  20. The Significance of Asthma Follow-Up Consultations for Adherence to Asthma Medication, Asthma Medication Beliefs, and Asthma Control

    OpenAIRE

    Malin Axelsson; Linda Ekerljung; Bo Lundbäck

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim was to investigate adherence to asthma medication treatment, medication beliefs, and asthma control in relation to asthma follow-up consultations in asthmatics in the general population. A further aim was to describe associations between adherence, medication beliefs, and asthma control. Method. In the population-based West Sweden Asthma Study, data allowing calculation of adherence for 4.5 years based on pharmacy records were obtained from 165 adult asthmatics. Additional ...

  1. Children with Asthma and Sports

    OpenAIRE

    Selda Yuzer; Sevinc Polat

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to the...

  2. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients with ast......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  3. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    studies have added new information about the effects of poorly controlled asthma on a range of important, but less studied outcomes, including risk of obesity, daily physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, stress, concentration and focused attention, learning disabilities and risk of depression. From...... in whom the tests suggest good asthma control may still have poorly controlled asthma when various objective outcomes are included in the assessment. A main reason for that seems to be that none of the tests accurately detects the child's adaptation in lifestyle. If you do not exercise you have fewer...

  4. Genetics, atopy asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William O.C.M. Cookson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex disease which is due to the interaction of an unknown number of genes with strong environmental factors. Segregation analysis suggests the presence of major genes underlying asthma and atopy. Different genetic effects have been recognized which predispose to generalized atopy, or modify the atopic response to particular allergens, or enhance bronchial inflammation, or modify bronchial tone. These known genes or genetic loci do not account for all of the familial clustering of asthma and atopy. Many studies are now under way to identify the remaining genes.

  5. Passive smoking is associated with poor asthma control during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Pernille A; Janner, Julie H; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Asthma and tobacco exposure is common among pregnant women. We investigated the effect of passive and active smoking on asthma control during pregnancy. METHODS: Prospective observational design. Patients had their asthma control, based on symptoms, use of medication, spirometry......: A total of 500 pregnant women with asthma (mean age 30.8 years, range 17 to 44) were consecutively included, of whom 32 (6.4%), 115 (23.0%) and 353 (70.6%), respectively, were current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers [NS]. Sixty-five NS (18.4%) reported passive tobacco exposure. NS with passive...... tobacco exposure had significantly lower FEV1% predicted (ppassive tobacco exposure. The relative risk [RR] of an episode of uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy was 4.5 (95% CI 2.7-7.5: p

  6. Importance of education in bronchial asthma treatment - gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Pleśniak, Justyna; Seń, Mariola; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in understanding mechanisms and effective treatment there are still therapeutic failures in patients treated for bronchial asthma. Education is vital in the therapeutic process. It improves the control of the disease at the individual level by influencing the adherence and compliance. The study included 100 patients suffering from bronchial asthma and treated according to GINA 2002 guidelines in Allergy Clinic. Asthma control test (ACT), analysis of patients' medical documentation and a self-constructed questionnaire concerning health promotion and education were used in the study. Aim of this work was to assess differences in the influence of education on results of bronchial asthma control between sexes. Average duration of asthma was similar in women and men (13.0 ± 11.16 vs.12.7 ± 9.74 years). Weaker asthma control was found in women (ACT 17.7 vs. 20.4), as well as lower FEV1 values (80-50% of predicted value in 60.3% of women vs. 43.25 of men). In women an analysis of correlation concerning patients' knowledge and conducted health education with asthma control revealed a statistically significant positive correlation of knowledge acquired from the allergologist with asthma control, information about proceeding in acute attack, whereas negative correlation with asthma control with knowledge passed on by family doctor was found. Among the male respondents positive correlations of knowledge with asthma control within the scope of knowledge from allergologist and information concerning proceeding in asthmatic attack were found, while negative correlation with information coming from family doctor was revealed. Health education in patients with asthma should be conducted by a specialist in allergic diseases and well-prepared healthcare professionals.

  7. Radiation inactivation of Paenibacillus larvae and sterilization of American Foul Brood (AFB) infected hives using Co-60 gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guzman, Zenaida M; Cervancia, Cleofas R; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B; Tolentino, Mitos M; Abrera, Gina B; Cobar, Ma Lucia C; Fajardo, Alejandro C; Sabino, Noel G; Manila-Fajardo, Analinda C; Feliciano, Chitho P

    2011-10-01

    The effectiveness of gamma radiation in inactivating the Philippine isolate of Paenibacillus larvae was investigated. Spores of P. larvae were irradiated at incremental doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 kGy) of gamma radiation emitted by a ⁶⁰Co source. Surviving spores were counted and used to estimate the decimal reduction (D₁₀) value. A dose of 0.2 kGy was sufficient to inactivate 90% of the total recoverable spores from an initial count of 10⁵- 9 × 10³ spores per glass plate. The sterilizing effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the spores of P. larvae in infected hives was determined. In this study, a minimum dose (D(min)) of 15 kGy was tested. Beehives with sub-clinical infections of AFB were irradiated and examined for sterility. All the materials were found to be free of P. larvae indicating its susceptibility to γ-rays. After irradiation, there were no visible changes in the physical appearance of the hives' body, wax and frames. Thus, a dose of 15 kGy is effective enough for sterilization of AFB-infected materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptomic and functional resources for the small hive beetle Aethina tumida, a worldwide parasite of honey bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Tarver

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The small hive beetle (SHB, Aethina tumida, is a major pest of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera colonies in the United States and Australia, and an emergent threat in Europe. While strong honey bee colonies generally keep SHB populations in check, weak or stressed colonies can succumb to infestations. This parasite has spread from a sub-Saharan Africa to three continents, leading to immense management and regulatory costs. We performed a transcriptomic analysis involving deep sequencing of multiple life stages and both sexes of this species. The assembled transcriptome appears to be nearly complete, as judged by conserved insect orthologs and the ability to find plausible homologs for 11,952 proteins described from the genome of the red flour beetle. Expressed genes include each of the major metabolic, developmental and sensory groups, along with genes for proteins involved with immune defenses and insecticide resistance. We also present a total of 23,085 high-quality SNP's for the assembled contigs. We highlight potential differences between this beetle and its honey bee hosts, and suggest mechanisms of future research into the biology and control of this species. SNP resources will allow functional genetic analyses and analyses of dispersal for this invasive pest. All resources are posted as Supplemental Tables at https://data.nal.usda.gov/dataset/data-transcriptomic-and-functional-resources-small-hive-beetle-aethina-tumida-worldwide, and at NCBI under Bioproject PRJNA256171.

  9. The Home Environment and Family Asthma Management Among Ethnically Diverse Urban Youth with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Amy F.; Kopel, Sheryl J.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Seifer, Ronald; Esteban, Cynthia; Coutinho, Maria Teresa; Klein, Robert; Fritz, Gregory K.; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    While the pediatric psychology literature underscores the importance of illness related aspects of the home environment for optimal family asthma management, little is known about the contribution of more global aspects of the home environment (e.g., family routines/schedule, quality of stimulation provided to child) to asthma management in ethnic minority and urban families. The goals of this study were to: 1) explore ethnic/racial group differences in global and specific dimensions of home environment quality among Latino, non-Latino white (NLW), and African American urban children with asthma; and 2) examine associations between the quality and quantity of support and stimulation within the home environment, as measured by the HOME Inventory, and family asthma management in this sample. Urban, low-income children (N=131) between the ages of 6 and 13 with asthma and a primary caregiver participated in a multi-modal assessment including an in home observation and semi structured interviews to assess aspects of home environment quality and family asthma management practices. While controlling for poverty, no ethnic group differences were found in the global home environment; however, there were significant differences in specific dimensions (e.g. Family Participation in Developmentally Stimulating Experiences, and Aspects of the Physical Environment) of home environment quality. Across the whole sample, home environment quality predicted family asthma management. When examining this association for specific ethnic groups, this finding did not hold for the Latino subsample. The results highlight the need to consider ethnic group differences in non-illness specific aspects of the home environment when addressing families’ asthma management strategies. PMID:23795627

  10. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-pro/resources/lung/naci/discover/action-plans.htm. Accessed Sept. 12, 2014. Mickleborough TD, et al. Exercise-induced asthma: Nutritional management. Current ...

  11. Reflexology and bronchial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, T; Heinig, J H; Collins, P

    2001-01-01

    Many asthma patients seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology, whereby finger pressure is applied to certain parts of the body. The aim of the study was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. Ten weeks of active...... or simulated (placebo) reflexology given by an experienced reflexologist, were compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 20+20 outpatients with asthma. Objective lung function tests (peak flow morning and evening, and weekly spirometry at the clinic) did not change. Subjective scores (describing...... diaries was carried out. It was accompanied by a significant pattern compatible with subconscious unblinding, in that patients tended to guess which treatment they had been receiving. No evidence was found that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond placebo influence....

  12. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of ß2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of ß-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of ß2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  13. Zoneterapi og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, Thor; Heinig, John Hilligsøe; Collins, Philippa

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients with asthma seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology. Our aim was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten weeks of either active or simulated (placebo) reflexology were...... compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 40 patients with asthma. RESULTS: Objective lung function tests did not change. Subjective scores and bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found in the groups receiving active or placebo reflexology....... However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom diaries was carried out. At the same time a significant pattern compatible with subconscious un-blinding was found. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond...

  14. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of β2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  15. Vitamin D and asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Sheena D; Calvert, H. Hardie; Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    .... Vitamin D is of particular interest in asthma since vitamin D concentrations decrease with increased time spent indoors, decreased exposure to sunlight, less exercise, obesity, and inadequate calcium intake...

  16. So You Have Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get all the medicine into your lungs . The best way to learn to use these devices correctly is ... bed. • Take your asthma medicine right after you brush your teeth and keep it with your toothbrush as a ...

  17. Inflammation in Asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ashraf

    Systemic hypersensitivity diseases include, among others, asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, otitis, rhinosinusitis ... hypersensitivity.13 As a medical specialty based on immunology, the allergy specialty (in some countries, called .... In certain countries (the United States, for instance), training in allergy encompasses both pediatrics.

  18. Challenges in identifying asthma subgroups using unsupervised statistical learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; Sahiner, Umit M; Belgrave, Danielle; Sackesen, Cansin; Buchan, Iain E; Simpson, Angela; Yavuz, Tolga S; Kalayci, Omer; Custovic, Adnan

    2013-12-01

    Unsupervised statistical learning techniques, such as exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and hierarchical clustering (HC), have been used to identify asthma phenotypes, with partly consistent results. Some of the inconsistency is caused by the variable selection and demographic and clinical differences among study populations. To investigate the effects of the choice of statistical method and different preparations of data on the clustering results; and to relate these to disease severity. Several variants of EFA and HC were applied and compared using various sets of variables and different encodings and transformations within a dataset of 383 children with asthma. Variables included lung function, inflammatory and allergy markers, family history, environmental exposures, and medications. Clusters and original variables were related to asthma severity (logistic regression and Bayesian network analysis). EFA identified five components (eigenvalues ≥ 1) explaining 35% of the overall variance. Variations of the HC (as linkage-distance functions) did not affect the cluster inference; however, using different variable encodings and transformations did. The derived clusters predicted asthma severity less than the original variables. Prognostic factors of severity were medication usage, current symptoms, lung function, paternal asthma, body mass index, and age of asthma onset. Bayesian networks indicated conditional dependence among variables. The use of different unsupervised statistical learning methods and different variable sets and encodings can lead to multiple and inconsistent subgroupings of asthma, not necessarily correlated with severity. The search for asthma phenotypes needs more careful selection of markers, consistent across different study populations, and more cautious interpretation of results from unsupervised learning.

  19. Onset and persistence of childhood asthma: predictors from infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinnert, M D; Nelson, H S; Price, M R; Adinoff, A D; Leung, D Y; Mrazek, D A

    2001-10-01

    . Children were designated as having asthma when there was documentation in medical records of physician-diagnosed asthma, observed wheezing, and/or prescription of asthma medications during the time period when the child was between 6 and 8 years of age. Parental reports of the occurrence of asthma corroborated the medical record data. Data regarding asthma status were available for 145 children through 8 years of age. Forty (28%) of the children manifested asthma between 6 and 8 years of age. Among variables previously reported to predict asthma onset by age 3, 3 proved to have significant univariate relationships with asthma between ages 6 and 8: elevated IgE levels measured when the children were 6 months of age, global ratings of parenting difficulties measured when infants were 3 weeks old, and higher numbers of respiratory infections in the first year of life. Among these offspring of mothers with asthma, paternal asthma showed a significant association with asthma between ages 6 and 8. Eczema in the first year was not significantly related to later asthma. Multiple logistic regression showed that the model that best predicted asthma at ages 6 to 8 from infancy variables included 2 main effects. The adjusted odds ratio for 6-month IgE was 2.15 (1.51, 3.05) and for parenting difficulties was 2.07 (1.15, 3.71). Although socioeconomic status (SES) was not associated with asthma at ages 6 to 8, families of lower SES were more likely to be rated as having parenting difficulties early in the child's life. The mothers of lower SES breastfed for a shorter period of time and were more likely to smoke during their infant's first year. There were more respiratory infections during the first year of life among infants whose mother was rated as having more parenting difficulties. Mothers who reported smoking breastfed their infants for a shorter length of time. Male gender was significantly associated with higher IgE levels when infants were 6 months of age. Laboratory testing was

  20. Stress and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Shoji Nagata; Masahiro Irie; Norio Mishima

    1999-01-01

    Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma) have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pat...

  1. Update in asthma 2008

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Wendy C

    2009-01-01

    ... between obesity and asthma (8-10). Articles published in 2008 have advanced our understanding of the influence of genetics (11-18), factors in early life (19-21), and the environment (19, 22-24) on the development of asthma or the modification of disease severity. Basic pathobiologic studies in humans (25-35) and mice (36-46) have added to our underst...

  2. Genetics, atopy asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, William O. C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease which is due to the interaction of an unknown number of genes with strong environmental factors. Segregation analysis suggests the presence of major genes underlying asthma and atopy. Different genetic effects have been recognized which predispose to generalized atopy, or modify the atopic response to particular allergens, or enhance bronchial inflammation, or modify bronchial tone. These known genes or genetic loci do not account for all of the familial clustering...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links ... to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. ...

  4. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recent Asthma Data Most Recent Asthma State or Territory Data Previous Most Recent Asthma Data 2014 National Data Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with ...

  5. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page: About CDC.gov . Asthma Learn How to Control Asthma Asthma and Severe Weather Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ...

  6. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking ... people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan ...

  7. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with Current Asthma Asthma and Fair ...

  8. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn How to Control Asthma Asthma and Severe Weather Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors ... CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community ...

  9. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do ...

  10. Asthma Control Essential in Pregnancy, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... were born to mothers with active asthma during pregnancy. Those born to mothers who had mild controlled asthma were less likely to be diagnosed with asthma at an early age than those whose moms had mild uncontrolled asthma, ...

  11. Correlations between pulmonary function and childhood asthma control test results in 5-11-year-old children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Sheng; Kao, Jun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Han; Tsao, Lon-Yen; Chiu, Han-Yao; Tseng, Yu-Ching; Lin, Liang-Mei

    2014-06-01

    We examined correlations between the two asthma assessment tools, pulmonary function tests, and Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) scores, in 5-11-year-old children with asthma to determine if the C-ACT scores could predict pulmonary function test results. A total of 172 children with asthma aged 5-11 years completed C-ACT questionnaires and underwent pulmonary function testing. Correlations between these test results were examined. Patients were also placed into two groups, C-ACT scores ≤19 and >19, to determine if patients with scores >19 had better pulmonary function test results. Weak correlations were found between pulmonary function test results and childhood asthma control test scores in 5-11-year-old children with asthma, with or without the use of an asthma controller. These correlations included: 0.061 for FEV1 [confidence interval (CI): -0.022-0.049] and 0.074 for MMEF (CI: -0.013-0.037). The proportions of children with C-ACT test scores ≤19 group and those with scores >19 group were not significantly different. Correlations between C-ACT scores and pulmonary function test results were poor for children aged 5-11 years with asthma. FEV1, FVC, FEF25, FEF50, FEF75, MMEF, and PEFR were not significantly correlated with C-ACT scores. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Persistent asthma phenotype related with late-onset, high atopy, and low socioeconomic status in school-aged Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun; Lee, Si Hyeon; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Young-Ho; Yoon, Jisun; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Yang, Song-I; Jung, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung Young; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kim, Hyo Bin; Lee, So Yeon; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2017-02-23

    Treatment guidelines for asthma have been established based on asthma severity; there are limitations in the identification of underlying pathophysiology and prediction of prognosis in heterogeneous phenotypes of asthma. Although the complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors affect the development and progression of asthma, studies on asthma phenotypes considering environmental factors are limited. This study aimed to identify asthma phenotypes using latent class analysis including environmental factors in school-age children. We included 235 children (6-8 years) with parent-reported, physician-diagnosed asthma from the Children's HEalth and Environmental Research (CHEER) study, which is a 4-year prospective follow-up study with 2-year intervals. At every survey, pulmonary function tests, methacholine challenge tests and blood tests with questionnaire were conducted. Four asthma phenotypes were identified. Cluster 1 (22% of children) was characterized by high prevalence of atopy and mild symptoms; subjects in cluster 2 (17%) consisted of less atopy and normal lung function, but intermittent troublesome; cluster 3 (29%) experienced late-onset atopic troublesome asthma with decreased lung function in combination with low socioeconomic status; and cluster 4 was associated with early-onset and less-atopic infrequent asthma. Late-onset, high atopy, and low socioeconomic status are associated with troublesome persistent asthma phenotype in school-age children. Environmental factors might be implicated in the clinical heterogeneity of asthma. Asthma phenotypes considering diverse factors might be more helpful in the identification of asthma pathogenesis and its prevention.

  13. Asthma is Different in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in asthma incidence, prevalence and severity have been reported worldwide. After puberty, asthma becomes more prevalent and severe in women, and is highest in women with early menarche or with multiple gestations, suggesting a role for sex hormones in asthma genesis. However, the impact of sex hormones on the pathophysiology of asthma is confounded by and difficult to differentiate from age, obesity, atopy, and other gender associated environmental exposures. There are also gender discrepancies in the perception of asthma symptoms. Understanding gender differences in asthma is important to provide effective education and personalized management plans for asthmatics across the lifecourse. PMID:26141573

  14. Childhood asthma and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochte, Lene; Nielsen, Kim G; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents. The obj......BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is a global problem affecting the respiratory health of children. Physical activity (PA) plays a role in the relationship between asthma and respiratory health. We hypothesized that a low level of PA would be associated with asthma in children and adolescents...

  15. Early childhood wheezers: identifying asthma in later life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasso-Pirot A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Anayansi Lasso-Pirot, Silvia Delgado-Villalta, Adam J Spanier Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Wheeze in young children is common, and asthma is the most common non-communicable disease in children. Prevalence studies of recurrent asthma-like symptoms in children under the age of 5 years have reported that one third of children in the US and Europe are affected, and rates and severity appear to be higher in developing countries. Over the last few decades, significant research efforts have focused on identification of risk factors and predictors of wheeze and on tools to identify which children who wheeze will progress to develop asthma. We reviewed the phenotypes of childhood wheezing, genetic risk factors, environmental factors, testing/predictive indices, and primary prevention. While it is generally agreed that a complex interaction of environmental exposure and genetic susceptibility contributes to the development of asthma, limitations in predictive tools and tests restrict our ability to provide families with guidance as to whether their child with wheeze will ultimately develop asthma. Additional research is needed to clarify childhood wheeze phenotypes, to develop tools to determine which children will develop asthma, and to determine how and when to intervene. If these areas can be addressed, it would help reduce this large burden on children, families, and society. Keywords: asthma, child, wheeze

  16. Physical training for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mônica Corso

    2014-01-01

    People with asthma may show less tolerance to exercise due to worsening asthma symptoms during exercise or other reasons such as deconditioning as a consequence of inactivity. Some may restrict activities as per medical advice or family influence and this might result in reduced physical fitness. Physical training programs aim to improve physical fitness, neuromuscular coordination and self confidence. Subjectively, many people with asthma report that they are symptomatically better when fit, but results from trials have varied and have been difficult to compare because of different designs and training protocols. Also, as exercise can induce asthma, the safety of exercise programmes needs to be considered. To gain a better understanding of the effect of physical training on the respiratory and general health of people with asthma, from randomised trials. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials up to January 2013. We included randomised trials of people over eight years of age with asthma who were randomised to undertake physical training or not. Physical training had to be undertaken for at least 20 minutes, two times a week, over a minimum period of four weeks. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and undertook risk of bias assessment for the included studies. Twenty-one studies (772 participants) were included in this review with two additional 2012 studies identified as 'awaiting classification'. Physical training was well tolerated with no adverse effects reported. None of the studies mentioned worsening of asthma symptoms following physical training. Physical training showed marked improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness as measured by a statistically and clinically significant increase in maximum oxygen uptake (mean difference (MD) 4.92 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.98 to 5.87; P physical training may have positive effects on health-related quality of life, with four of five studies

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Know How ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health File Formats ...

  18. Asthma and allergic rhinitis in childhood: what's new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrorilli, Carla; Posa, Daniela; Cipriani, Francesca; Caffarelli, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Novel approaches are currently offered for the diagnostic workup and therapeutic management of allergic rhinitis and asthma. New predictive biomarkers of allergy and asthma are available. Primary and secondary prevention, earlier intervention, and modification of the natural history of allergic rhinitis and asthma are being intensively investigated. This review highlights advances in the understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of atopic airway diseases in childhood, as well as prenatal and early-life risk factors and strategies for prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Point-of-care blood eosinophil count in a severe asthma clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, Enrico; Terranova, Giovanni; Chessari, Carlo; Frazzetto, Valentina; Crimi, Claudia; Fichera, Silvia; Picardi, Giuseppe; Nicolosi, Giuliana; Porto, Morena; Intravaia, Rossella; Crimi, Nunzio

    2017-07-01

    One of the main severe asthma phenotypes is severe eosinophilic or eosinophilic refractory asthma for which novel biologic agents are emerging as therapeutic options. In this context, blood eosinophil counts are one of the most reliable biomarkers. To evaluate the performance of a point-of-care peripheral blood counter in a patients with severe asthma. The blood eosinophil counts of 76 patients with severe asthma were evaluated by point-of-care and standard analyzers. A significant correlation between blood eosinophils assessed by the 2 devices was found (R2 = 0.854, P asthma and the ELEN index, a composite score useful to predict sputum eosinophilia. The results of our study contribute to the validation of a point-of-care device to assess blood eosinophils and open the possibility of using this device for the management of severe asthma management. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Environmental pollution and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giampaolo, L; Quecchia, C; Schiavone, C; Cavallucci, E; Renzetti, A; Braga, M; Di Gioacchino, M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical evidences and epidemiological studies show that allergic pathologies of the respiratory tract are increasing in the world areas with high pollution impact, demonstrating how many polluting substances favor both allergic sensitization and the bronchial inflammatory changes characteristic of asthma. It has been shown that asthma, as many other diseases, is a complex interaction between genetic predisposition and environmental stimuli that results in clinical expression of various phenotypes of asthma: allergic, intrinsic etc. Many pollutants have such a potential. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) can favor allergic sensitization, induce acute asthma attacks and increase bronchial reactivity, acting both on allergen, on bronchial mucosa and on immune cells. In fact, DEP can favor B lymphocytes to shift to a production of IgE and T cells to produce Th2 cytokines. Asthma can be also induced by high exposure to many other substances as NO2 and first of all ozone (O3): strong oxidizing substance that is synthesized, in absence of ventilation, by photochemical reaction due to the combination of ultraviolet sun radiation on exhaust gases as NO2 and hydrocarbons. Ozone is abundant in cities with minimal concentration in the morning gradually increasing during the day until maximal levels in the afternoon and then decreasing during the night. Epidemiological studies show that the number of access to hospital for acute asthma and even the use of bronchodilator by asthmatics increase during the high level periods when Ozone constitute almost 90 percent of the total oxidants in the environment. Particulate matter of very small diameter have a crucial role in favoring asthma attacks, and smaller the substance deeper the penetration in the bronchial tree, with an inflammatory reaction in the peripheral bronchial mucosa characterized by increased vessel permeability, mucosal edema, inflammatory mediator production by damaged epithelium and inflammatory cells that determines

  1. Prescription of respiratory medication without an asthma diagnosis in children: a population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunekreef Bert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In pre-school children a diagnosis of asthma is not easily made and only a minority of wheezing children will develop persistent atopic asthma. According to the general consensus a diagnosis of asthma becomes more certain with increasing age. Therefore the congruence between asthma medication use and doctor-diagnosed asthma is expected to increase with age. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between prescribing of asthma medication and doctor-diagnosed asthma in children age 0–17. Methods We studied all 74,580 children below 18 years of age, belonging to 95 GP practices within the second Dutch national survey of general practice (DNSGP-2, in which GPs registered all physician-patient contacts during the year 2001. Status on prescribing of asthma medication (at least one prescription for beta2-agonists, inhaled corticosteroids, cromones or montelukast and doctor-diagnosed asthma (coded according to the International Classification of Primary Care was determined. Results In total 7.5% of children received asthma medication and 4.1% had a diagnosis of asthma. Only 49% of all children receiving asthma medication was diagnosed as an asthmatic. Subgroup analyses on age, gender and therapy groups showed that the Positive Predictive Value (PPV differs significantly between therapy groups only. The likelihood of having doctor-diagnosed asthma increased when a child received combination therapy of short acting beta2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (PPV = 0.64 and with the number of prescriptions (3 prescriptions or more, PPV = 0.66. Both prescribing of asthma medication and doctor-diagnosed asthma declined with age but the congruence between the two measures did not increase with age. Conclusion In this study, less than half of all children receiving asthma medication had a registered diagnosis of asthma. Detailed subgroup analyses show that a diagnosis of asthma was present in at most 66%, even in groups of

  2. Efficacy of formic acid in gel for Varroa control in Apis mellifera L.: importance of the dispenser position inside the hive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguaras, Martin; Palacio, Maria Alejandra; Faverin, Claudia; Basualdo, Marina; Del Hoyo, Marcelo Luis; Velis, Gustavo; Bedascarrasbure, Enrique

    2003-02-13

    The efficacy of formic acid in a gel matrix was evaluated in two groups of honeybee colonies. In Group 1, a dispenser with 120 g of formic acid (70%) in gel was placed on the brood combs and another dispenser with the same dose was located on the hive bottom (total dose, 240 g). Group 2 received two doses of 240 g of formic acid (70%) in gel and each application was applied in two dispensers containing 120 g of the formic acid solution each and they were located over the brood chamber (total dose, 480 g). In Group 2, the period between both applications was 15 days, and the efficacies after the first and both applications were calculated. Significant differences were registered for final efficacy between both groups. When final efficacy of Group 1 was compared with efficacy after first application of Group 2, significant differences were found (P=0.0005). Same doses in different positions within the hive have different final efficacy. The higher efficacy was registered when the dispensers were placed over brood combs and on the hive bottom. It is suggested that efficacy is related to dispenser position within the hive.

  3. Innate lymphoid cells and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sanhong; Kim, Hye Young; Chang, Ya-Jen; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H; Umetsu, Dale T

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is a complex and heterogeneous disease with several phenotypes, including an allergic asthma phenotype characterized by TH2 cytokine production and associated with allergen sensitization and adaptive immunity. Asthma also includes nonallergic asthma phenotypes, such as asthma associated with exposure to air pollution, infection, or obesity, that require innate rather than adaptive immunity. These innate pathways that lead to asthma involve macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer T cells, and innate lymphoid cells, newly described cell types that produce a variety of cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-13. We review the recent data regarding innate lymphoid cells and their role in asthma. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Şen, Elif; Oğuzülgen, Kıvılcım; Bavbek, Sevim; Günen, Hakan; Kıyan, Esen; Türktaş, Haluk; Yorgancıoğlu, Arzu; Polatlı, Mehmet; Yıldız, Füsun; Çelik, Gülfem; Demir, Tunçalp; Gemicioğlu, Bilun; Mungan, Dilşad; Saryal, Sevgi; Sayıner, Abdullah; Yıldırım, Nurhayat

    2015-01-01

    .... Among patient with COPD and asthma; there is a group of patients with an overlap between clinical, functional characteristics and airway inflammation patterns, named "Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome" (ACOS...

  5. Psychopathology in difficult asthma : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.J.; van Son, M.A.C.; van Keimpema, A.R.J.; van Ranst, D.; Antonissen-Pommer, A.M.; Meijer, J.W.G.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  6. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living With Lung ... written by Respiratory Experts Like no other health magazine, Allergy & Asthma Health Magazine is published by people ...

  7. Food Allergy and Increased Asthma Morbidity in a School-Based Inner-City Asthma Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, James L.; Sheehan, William J.; Baxi, Sachin N.; Kopel, Lianne S.; Gaffin, Jonathan M.; Ozonoff, Al; Fu, Chunxia; Gold, Diane R.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with asthma have increased prevalence of food allergies. The relationship between food allergy and asthma morbidity is unclear. Objective We aimed to investigate the presence of food allergy as an independent risk factor for increased asthma morbidity using the School Inner-City Asthma (SICAS), a prospective study evaluating risk factors and asthma morbidity among urban children. Methods We prospectively surveyed 300 children from inner-city schools with physician-diagnosed asthma, followed by clinical evaluation. Food allergies were reported including symptoms experienced within one hour of food ingestion. Asthma morbidity, pulmonary function, and resource utilization were compared between children with food allergies and without. Results Seventy-three (24%) of 300 asthmatic children surveyed had physician- diagnosed food allergy, and 36 (12%) had multiple food allergies. Those with any food allergy independently had increased risk of hospitalization (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30–4.24, p=0.005), and use of controller medication (OR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.06–3.74, p=0.03). Those with multiple food allergies also had an independently higher risk of hospitalization in the past year (OR: 4.10 95% CI: 1.47–11.45, p=0.007), asthma-related hospitalization (OR: 3.52, 95% CI: 1.12–11.03, p=0.03), controller medication use (OR: 2.38 95% CI: 1.00–5.66, p=0.05), and more provider visits (median 4.5 versus 3.0, p=0.008). Furthermore, lung function was significantly lower (% predicted FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratios) in both food allergy category groups. Conclusions Food allergy is highly prevalent in inner-city school-aged children with asthma. Children with food allergies have increased asthma morbidity and health resource utilization with decreased lung function, and this association is stronger in those with multiple food allergies. PMID:24058900

  8. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Mathew

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA. The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1. Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipooxygenase pathway involving the enzyme 5-lipooxygenase (5-LO. Leukotriene C4 (LTC4 synthase is the enzyme responsible for the production of leukotriene C4, the chief cysteinyl leukotriene responsible for AEA. There have been familial occurences of AEA. An allele of the LTC4 synthase gene in AEA is known as allele C. Allele C has a higher frequency in AEA. Clinical presentation includes a history of asthma after ingestion of aspirin, nasal congestion, watery rhinorrhea and nasal polyposis. Treatment includes leukotriene receptor antagonists, leukotriene inhibitors, aspirin desinsitaztion and surgery. AEA is the most well-defined phenotype of asthma. Although AEA affects adults and children with physician-diagnosed asthma, in some cases there is no history of asthma and AEA often goes unrecognized and underdiagnosed.

  9. Allergens, germs and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scadding, Glenis Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    To explore asthma pathogenesis using data from upper and lower airways. English-language papers on human asthma and nasal polyp subjects from 1990 onwards. High-quality studies in established journals. The recognition of its inflammatory nature led to a quantum leap in the understanding and treatment of asthma, with lives saved by inhaled corticosteroids. Further work at genetic, molecular, histological and clinical levels has shown that asthma is polymorphic and rarely involves isolated Th2 bronchial inflammation. Viral infections may act as an initiating event in children and adults, showing synergy with atopy. Chronic staphylococcal colonization of the mucosa may act as a promoter, as in atopic dermatitis. These two observations may be linked, with viruses providing an entry for bacteria into the mucosal epithelium. Most asthma begins in the nose and involves allergy and infection: both viral and bacterial. The combination of atopy and infection suggests new possibilities for therapy. © 2014 The Author. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Asthma and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    Medline, government reports and conference proceedings were searched. Case-control, cohort or cross sectional studies were included if they provided relevant and applicable quantitative information on the relation between asthma and caries, had an independent study population and adequate definitions of asthma and caries and appropriate measurement of caries. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers and quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Fixed- and random-effects models were used for the analyses. Heterogeneity and publication bias were evaluated. Eighteen articles were included; 11 provided information on primary dentition and 15 on permanent dentition. Random-effects models showed a significant association between asthma and caries for both primary and permanent dentition, the odds ratios being 2.73 (95% CI: 1.61, 4.64) and 2.04 (95% CI: 1.44, 2.89), respectively. Evidence from this analysis suggests that asthma doubles the risk of caries in both primary and permanent dentition. Publication bias diagnostics and simulation suggested possible overestimation of the summary odds ratio for permanent dentition but not for primary dentition. Physicians and dentists should recommend preventive measures against caries for people with asthma.

  11. [Epigenetics, environment and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Silva-García, Raúl; Oliva-Rico, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract with a complex genetic background influenced by the exposition to a series of environmental factors. Genetic studies can only elucidate part of the heritability and susceptibility of asthma and even though several diseases have an evident genetic etiology, only a fraction of the genes involved in their pathogenicity have been identified. The epigenetic regulation of the latter is a fact one should bear in mind in order to explain the major triggers of diseases whose understanding is complicated, such as allergies and asthma. External stimulus such as nourishment, stress, physical activity, atmospheric pollution, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking can induce either gene silencing or gene expression. In this regard, epigenetics can explain how these environmental factors influence our genetic inheritance. There is growing evidence that backs-up the fact that DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and microRNA expression are influenced by the environment. This helps explaining how several of the risk factors mentioned contribute to the development and inheritance of asthma. In this review, different environmental factors and their relation with the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms will be analyzed, as well as their possible role in the development of asthma.

  12. The pharmacotherapy of the asthma

    OpenAIRE

    BROŽOVÁ, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Asthma bronchiale is a very common chronic disorder of airways with not fully elucidated pathology, which is not fully curable at the moment. It is estimated that 300 millions of persons suffer from asthma. About 8% of adult population and 10% of children are affected in the Czech republic. The aim of this thesis is to give an overview of contemporary modern pharmacotherapy of asthma. Firstly, this work describes asthma from pathophysiological and epidemiological point of view, among others: ...

  13. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngji; Shore, Stephanie A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  14. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Youngji; Shore, Stephanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients.

  15. Obesity, Asthma, and the Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but standard asthma drugs have reduced efficacy in the obese. Obesity alters the gastrointestinal microbial community structure. This change in structure contributes to some obesity-related conditions and also could be contributing to obesity-related asthma. Although currently unexplored, obesity may also be altering lung microbiota. Understanding the role of microbiota in obesity-related asthma could lead to novel treatments for these patients. PMID:26889016

  16. Serum Vitamin D Levels and Vitamin D Supplement in Adult Patients with Asthma Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadech Boonpiyathad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of asthma exacerbations. Objective. This study aimed to compare vitamin D status during the period of severe asthma exacerbations and investigate if vitamin D supplementation improves asthma control. Methods. A total of 47 asthmatic patients and 40 healthy subjects participated in this study. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD, asthma control test (ACT score, and % predicted peak expiratory flow rate were evaluated in the period with and without severe asthma exacerbations. After that, we provided vitamin D2 supplements to the patients with low vitamin D levels for 3 months. Results. At the period of asthma exacerbation, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was 38.29% and 34.04%. There was no significant difference in the levels of serum 25(OHD with and without asthma exacerbations but the levels were significantly higher in the healthy group. Serum 25(OHD levels significantly correlated with ACT score. Moreover, vitamin D2 supplementation improved asthma control in uncontrolled asthma group. Conclusions. Hypovitaminosis D was common in asthmatic patients but was not the leading cause of asthma exacerbations. Serum 25(OHD levels correlated with the ability to control asthma. Improving vitamin D status might be a benefit in uncontrolled asthmatic patients.

  17. Japanese Guideline for Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ohta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma (hereinafter, asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, reversible airway narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling to cause an intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased, while the number of patients who die from asthma has decreased (1.7 per 100,000 patients in 2009. The aim of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to lead a healthy life without any symptoms. A partnership between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management with agents and elimination of causes and risk factors are fundamental to asthma treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate mild to intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS, varying from low to high doses. Long-acting β2 agonists (LABA, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and theophylline sustained-release preparation are recommended as concomitant drugs, while anti-IgE antibody therapy is a new choice for the most severe and persistent asthma. Inhaled β2 agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, etc., are used as needed against acute exacerbations. Allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, aspirin induced asthma, pregnancy, and cough variant asthma are also important factors that need to be considered.

  18. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  19. Rhinitis: a complication to asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J W; Thomsen, S F; Nolte, H

    2010-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis often co-occur, and this potentially increases the disease severity and impacts negatively on the quality of life. We studied disease severity, airway responsiveness, atopy, quality of life and treatment in subjects with both asthma and rhinitis compared to patients with asthma...

  20. Flavonoids and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshio; Takahashi, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease, characterized by airway inflammation, airflow limitation, hyper-reactivity and airway remodeling. It is believed that asthma is caused by the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence of allergic diseases, including asthma, has increased worldwide during the past two decades. Although the precise reasons that have caused this increase remain unknown, dietary change is thought to be one of the environmental factors. Flavonoids, which are polyphenolic plant secondary metabolites ubiquitously present in vegetables, fruits and beverages, possess antioxidant and anti-allergic traits, as well as immune-modulating activities. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and anti-allergic nutrients that inhibit the release of chemical mediators, synthesis of Th2 type cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, and CD40 ligand expression by high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor-expressing cells, such as mast cells and basophils. They also inhibit IL-4-induced signal transduction and affect the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into effector T-cells through their inhibitory effect on the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Various studies of flavonoids in asthmatic animal models have demonstrated their beneficial effects. The results of several epidemiological studies suggest that an increase in flavonoid intake is beneficial for asthma. Moreover, clinical trials of flavonoids have shown their ameliorative effects on symptoms related to asthma. However, these human studies are currently limited; further validation is required to clarify whether an appropriate intake of flavonoids may constitute dietary treatment and for part of a preventive strategy for asthma. PMID:23752494

  1. Can meteorological factors forecast asthma exacerbation in a paediatric population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás, D; Utrera, J F; Hervás-Masip, J; Hervás, J A; García-Marcos, L

    2015-01-01

    Asthma exacerbations attended in emergency departments show a marked seasonality in the paediatric age. This seasonal pattern can change from one population to another and the factors involved are poorly understood. To evaluate the association between meteorological factors and schooling with asthma exacerbations in children attended in the paediatric emergency department of a district hospital. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of children 5-14 years of age attended for asthma exacerbations during a 4-year period (2007-2011). Climatic data were obtained from a weather station located very close to the population studied. The number of asthma exacerbations was correlated to temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, rainfall, wind speed, wind distance, solar radiation, water vapour pressure and schooling, using regression analyses. During the study period, 371 children were attended for asthma exacerbations; median age was eight years (IQR: 6-11), and 59% were males. Asthma exacerbations showed a bimodal pattern with peaks in spring and summer. Maximum annual peak occurred in week 39, within 15 days from school beginning after the summer holidays. A regression model with mean temperature, water vapour pressure, relative humidity, maximum wind speed and schooling could explain 98.4% (pschooling could predict asthma exacerbations in children attended in a paediatric emergency department. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Obesity and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Pranab Baruwa; Kripesh Ranjan Sarmah

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is around 300 million and is expected to increase another 100 million by 2025. Obesity, on the other hand, also affects a large number of individuals. Overweight in adults is defined when body mass index (BMI) is between 25 to 30 kg/m 2 and obesity when the BMI >30 kg/m 2 . It has been a matter of interest for researchers to find a relation between these two conditions. This knowledge will provide a ...

  3. Management of infantile asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasher, G W

    1977-09-01

    Infantile asthama is an important pediatric problem and may cause substantial morbidity and mortality in this age group. The pathophysiology of allergic asthma involves a type I hypersensitivity reaction that is mediated by reaginic antibodies of the IgE class. Various factors predisposing to infantile asthma have been suggested but not confirmed. The differential diagnosis of infantile wheezing is of particular importance in this very young age group. An appreciation of the natural history and clinical characteristics of the disease, and of the important causative factors (foods, environmental inhalants, and respiratory infections), will aid the physician in the management of this problem.

  4. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Asthma prevalence disparities and differences in sociodemographic associations with asthma, between Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Asian, and White adults in Hawaii - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, H; Li, D; Katz, A R; Hurwitz, E L

    2017-03-30

    Despite high asthma prevalence, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of asthma in Hawaii or among Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islanders (NHOPI). We sought to better characterize racial/ethnic differences in asthma prevalence and in sociodemographic factors associated with asthma among Hawaii adults. We conducted multivariable logistic regression using 2001-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from Hawaii, and computed adjusted prevalence and ratios. Asthma prevalence markedly varied between self-identified census categories of race in Hawaii, with NHOPI having the highest estimates of both lifetime (20.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 19.5%-22.4%) and current (12.2%, CI: 11.2%-13.3%) asthma. Highest asthma prevalence among NHOPI persisted after controlling for potential confounders and within most sociodemographic categories. Among females Asians reported the lowest asthma prevalence, whereas among males point estimates of asthma prevalence were often lowest for Whites. Females often had greater asthma prevalence than males of the same race, but the degree to which gender modified asthma prevalence differed by both race and sociodemographic strata. Gender disparities in asthma prevalence were greatest and most frequent among Whites, and for current asthma among all races. Sociodemographic factors potentially predictive of adult asthma prevalence in Hawaii varied by race and gender. Asthma disproportionately affects or is recognized more often among women and NHOPI adults in Hawaii, and occurs less or is under-reported among Asian women. The sociodemographic characteristics included in this study's model did not explain asthma disparities between races and/or gender. This investigation provides a baseline with which to plan additionally needed prevention programs, epidemiological investigations, and surveillance for asthma in Hawaii.

  6. Montelukast for prevention and treatment of asthma exacerbations in adults: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong Ping; Jia, Chun E; Lv, Yan; Gibson, Peter Gerard; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    It has proven efficacy in reducing asthma exacerbations, but the effect size of montelukast (a leukotriene receptor antagonist) for varied severity of asthma exacerbations is not systematically assessed. This study was designed to systematically explore the evidence for montelukast, as first-line or add-on therapy, in preventing and treating asthma exacerbations in adult patients with asthma. Randomized controlled trials were searched in PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science, Embase, and OVID up to March 2013, where montelukast prevented or treated asthma exacerbations in adults. Primary outcomes were the number of patients experiencing exacerbations in chronic asthma and hospitalizations in acute asthma. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), risk difference, and number needed to treat (NNT) were calculated and pooled. Adverse events were also assessed in chronic asthma. Twenty trials for chronic asthma and six for acute asthma were identified. In comparison with placebo, adults with chronic asthma receiving montelukast had significantly reduced number of exacerbations (OR = 0.60 and 95% CI, 0.49, 0.74; NNT = 17 and 95% CI, 12, 29). However, montelukast was inferior to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.29, 2.0) and ICS plus long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA; OR = 3.94; 95% CI, 1.64, 9.48) as the first-line therapies and LABA (OR = 1.22; 95% CI, 1.05, 1.42) as the add-on therapies in reducing asthma exacerbations. In acute asthma, montelukast could statistically improve peak expiratory flow percent predicted (p = 0.008) and reduce systemic corticosteroid intake (p = 0.005). Montelukast had low risk in hoarseness and insomnia. Our meta-analysis suggests that montelukast significantly reduces mild, moderate, and part of severe exacerbations in chronic mild to moderate asthma, but it has inferior efficacy to ICS or ICS plus LABA.

  7. Omalizumab Treatment Response in a Population With Severe Allergic Asthma and Overlapping COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltby, Steven; Gibson, Peter G; Powell, Heather; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2017-01-01

    Asthma and COPD are common airway diseases. Individuals with overlapping asthma and COPD experience increased health impairment and severe disease exacerbations. Efficacious treatment options are required for this population. Omalizumab (anti-IgE) therapy is effective in patients with severe persistent asthma, but limited data are available on efficacy in populations with overlapping asthma and COPD. Data from the Australian Xolair Registry were used to compare treatment responses in individuals with asthma-COPD overlap with responses in patients with severe asthma alone. Participants were assessed at baseline and after 6 months of omalizumab treatment. We used several different definitions of asthma-COPD overlap. First, we compared participants with a previous physician diagnosis of COPD to participants with no COPD diagnosis. We then made comparisons based on baseline lung function, comparing participants with an FEV1 80% predicted after bronchodilator use. In the population with an FEV1asthma control and health-related quality of life in all populations assessed based on the Asthma Control Questionnaire and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire scores. Omalizumab treatment did not improve lung function (FEV1, FVC, or FEV1/FVC ratio) in populations that were enriched for asthma-COPD overlap (diagnosis of COPD or FEV1 asthma control and health-related quality of life in individuals with severe allergic asthma and overlapping COPD. These findings provide real-world efficacy data for this patient population and suggest that omalizumab is useful in the management of severe asthma with COPD overlap. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breastfeeding associated with higher lung function in African American youths with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sam S; Du, Randal; Zeiger, Andrew M; McGarry, Meghan E; Hu, Donglei; Thakur, Neeta; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Galanter, Joshua M; Eng, Celeste; Nishimura, Katherine Keiko; Huntsman, Scott; Farber, Harold J; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro; Serebrisky, Denise; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Lenoir, Michael A; Ford, Jean G; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Thyne, Shannon M; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Williams, Keoki; Kumar, Rajesh; Burchard, Esteban G

    2017-10-01

    In the United States, Puerto Ricans and African Americans have lower prevalence of breastfeeding and worse clinical outcomes for asthma compared with other racial/ethnic groups. We hypothesize that the history of breastfeeding is associated with increased forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) % predicted and reduced asthma exacerbations in Latino and African American youths with asthma. As part of the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) Study and the Study of African Americans, asthma, Genes & Environments (SAGE II), we conducted case-only analyses in children and adolescents aged 8-21 years with asthma from four different racial/ethnic groups: African Americans (n = 426), Mexican Americans (n = 424), mixed/other Latinos (n = 255), and Puerto Ricans (n = 629). We investigated the association between any breastfeeding in infancy and FEV1% predicted using multivariable linear regression; Poisson regression was used to determine the association between breastfeeding and asthma exacerbations. Prevalence of breastfeeding was lower in African Americans (59.4%) and Puerto Ricans (54.9%) compared to Mexican Americans (76.2%) and mixed/other Latinos (66.9%; p asthma exacerbations (p = 0.03) in African Americans only. Breastfeeding was associated with higher FEV1% predicted in asthma and reduced number of asthma exacerbations in African American youths, calling attention to continued support for breastfeeding.

  9. Work-related asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grain dust, welding fumes and wood dust. (Table III).1 Exposure to animal epithelia, hairs and secretions is commonly reported among laboratory animal workers and agricultural workers. Latex allergy-related asthma appears to be less common due to the introduction of latex-free gloves in most health care settings.

  10. Treating childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    played by additional factors, such as patient adherence and administration of medication technique. It is always necessary to treat the child as an individual, but some measures apply in all cases. It is important to allay anxiety about the diagnosis. This is best done by carefully explaining the nature and causes of asthma, ...

  11. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation. EPA 402-F-03-030.

  12. School and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dad to speak to the teacher, school nurse, or principal. Most teachers are glad to help. After all, if you can't breathe, you can't learn! What About Sports? You might think that because you have asthma ...

  13. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to non-Hispanic whites. While all of the causes of asthma remain unclear, children exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are at increased risk for acute lower respiratory tract infections, such as bronchitis. Children living below or near the poverty level are more likely to have high levels ...

  14. Stress and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Nagata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pattern that increases psychological conflict may influence the development or relapse of asthma and influence its clinical course. Depression is known as one of the risk factors of fatal asthmatic attack. In laboratory studies, about 20% of asthmatics were considered reactors who showed an airway change after exposure to emotional stress. Studies regarding the pathway of stress effect on allergy and asthma are reviewed and discussed from the standpoint of psychoneuroimmunology; for example, the enhancement of IgE production and increased susceptibility to respiratory infection by stress, conditioned anaphylaxis and nerve/mast cell interaction, the effect of stress on various bronchial responses and the inhibition of the immediate and late asthmatic response by anterior hypothalamic lesioning.

  15. Vascular remodelling in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Eugene Haydn; Soltani, Amir; Reid, David William; Ward, Chris

    2008-02-01

    We review the recent literature, focusing on 2006 and 2007, to produce an update on the patho-biology of angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor in the asthmatic airway. In terms of conceptual development in asthma research, airway inflammation and remodelling have been regarded as separate processes or perhaps as sequential, with early inflammation leading later to remodelling. Recent insights identify a central role for vascular endothelial growth factor in stimulating both inflammation and vascular remodelling coincidentally, with the full panoply of vascular endothelial growth factor mediated events being complex and wide. Both nitric oxide and matrix metalloproteinase-9 induction may be important downstream pathogenic mechanisms. Virus-mediated exacerbations are a prime manifestation of the oscillating trajectory of clinical asthma. The early stimulation of vascular endothelial growth factor production is probably a central aetiological mechanism, with secondary inflammation and angiogenesis. The time scale of the latter, especially, fits with the time scale of clinico-physiological changes after exacerbation. These vascular endothelial growth factor induced changes are potentially modifiable with therapy. Insights into the importance of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis in asthma pathogenesis now lead to potential new therapeutic possibilities and elucidate why recent advances in asthma therapeutics have been so successful.

  16. Decreasing asthma morbidity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-12-12

    Dec 12, 1994 ... Apart from the optimal use of drugs, various supplementary methods have been tested to decrease asthma morbidity, usually in patients from reiatively affluent socio-economic backgrounds. A study of additional measures taken in a group of moderate to severe adult asthmatics from very poor socio- ...

  17. Severe exacerbations and decline in lung function in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Lamm, Carl Johan

    2009-01-01

    are associated with a persistent decline in lung function. METHODS: The START (inhaled steroid treatment as regular therapy in early asthma) study was a 3-year, randomized, double-blind study of 7,165 patients (5-66 yr) with persistent asthma for less than 2 years, to determine whether early intervention...... with low-dose inhaled budesonide prevents severe asthma-related events (exacerbations requiring hospitalization or emergency treatment) and decline in lung function. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There were 315 patients who experienced at least one severe asthma exacerbation, of which 305 were analyzable...... difference was seen in both children and in adults, but not in adolescents. In the budesonide group, the change in the post-bronchodilator FEV(1) % predicted in patients who did or did not experience a severe exacerbation was -2.48% and -1.72%, respectively (P = 0.57). The difference in magnitude...

  18. Allergy, asthma and the environment; Allergie, Asthma und Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ring, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Gfesser, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Dermatologie und Allergologie am Biederstein, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-10-11

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. Asthma and other allergic diseases have increased in prevalence during the last decades in many industrialized countries. Among other hypotheses, the possible role of environmental pollutants has received much public and scientific attention. Some pollutants may modulate the different phases of allergic reactions. Inflammation is a critical feature in the pathogenesis of asthma and therefore, beside allergen avoidance, anti-inflammatory treatment is the first line therapy of asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes are lipid mediators which appear to play a major role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Based on current data, it appears that leukotrience receptor antagonists have bronchodilative and anti-inflammatory effects and may therefore enrich the pharmacotherapeutic spectrum within the therapeutic concept of patient management in asthma. (orig.) [Deutsch] Asthma bronchiale ist eine entzuendliche Erkrankung der Atemwege. Epidemiologische Studien konnten eine deutliche Zunahme der Erkrankung in den letzten zwei Jahrzehnten aufzeigen. In der Entstehung von Allergien und Asthma bronchiale spielen Umwelteinfluesse eine grosse Rolle. Luftschadstoffe scheinen mit verschiedenen Allergie-Parametern bei der Sensibilisierung, Symptombildung und Chronifizierung zu interferieren. Da beim Asthma bronchiale neben der Bronchokonstriktion die Entzuendung der Bronchialschleimhaut eine besondere Rolle spielt, wird heute neben Allergenkarenz und prophylaktischen Massnahmen eine fruehzeitige antientzuendliche Asthmatherapie angestrebt. Cysteinyl-Leukotriene gehoeren zu den wirksamsten Entzuendungsmediatoren beim Asthma bronchiale. Leukotrien-Rezeptorantagonisten scheinen sowohl bronchodilatatorische als auch antientzuendliche Wirkungen zu haben und koennten so innerhalb eines Gesamtkonzeptes von antiallergischer und antiasthmatischer Therapie das pharmakotherapeutische Spektrum bereichern. (orig.)

  19. Physical training for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin V. Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with asthma may show less tolerance to exercise due to worsening asthma symptoms during exercise or other reasons such as deconditioning as a consequence of inactivity. Some may restrict activities as per medical advice or family influence and this might result in reduced physical fitness. Physical training programs aim to improve physical fitness, neuromuscular coordination and self confidence. Subjectively, many people with asthma report that they are symptomatically better when fit, but results from trials have varied and have been difficult to compare because of different designs and training protocols. Also, as exercise can induce asthma, the safety of exercise programmes needs to be considered.OBJECTIVE: To gain a better understanding of the effect of physical training on the respiratory and general health of people with asthma, from randomised trials.METHODS:Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials up to January 2013. Selection criteria: We included randomised trials of people over eight years of age with asthma who were randomised to undertake physical training or not. Physical training had to be undertaken for at least 20 minutes, two times a week, over a minimum period of four weeks. Data collection and analysis:Two review authors independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and undertook risk of bias assessment for the included studies.MAIN RESULTS: Twenty-one studies (772 participants were included in this review with two additional 2012 studies identified as 'awaiting classification'. Physical training was well tolerated with no adverse effects reported. None of the studies mentioned worsening of asthma symptoms following physical training. Physical training showed marked improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness as measured by a statistically and clinically significant increase in maximum oxygen uptake (mean difference (MD 4.92 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval (CI 3

  20. Understanding mild persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Szefler, Stanley J

    2005-01-01

    Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States...... and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems...... into the true prevalence of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents, and optimal treatment....

  1. A framework for organizing cancer-related variations from existing databases, publications and NGS data using a High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment (HIVE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Jung; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Pan, Yang; Smith, Krista; Crichton, Daniel J; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Years of sequence feature curation by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, PIR-PSD, NCBI-CDD, RefSeq and other database biocurators has led to a rich repository of information on functional sites of genes and proteins. This information along with variation-related annotation can be used to scan human short sequence reads from next-generation sequencing (NGS) pipelines for presence of non-synonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) that affect functional sites. This and similar workflows are becoming more important because thousands of NGS data sets are being made available through projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and researchers want to evaluate their biomarkers in genomic data. BioMuta, an integrated sequence feature database, provides a framework for automated and manual curation and integration of cancer-related sequence features so that they can be used in NGS analysis pipelines. Sequence feature information in BioMuta is collected from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), ClinVar, UniProtKB and through biocuration of information available from publications. Additionally, nsSNVs identified through automated analysis of NGS data from TCGA are also included in the database. Because of the petabytes of data and information present in NGS primary repositories, a platform HIVE (High-performance Integrated Virtual Environment) for storing, analyzing, computing and curating NGS data and associated metadata has been developed. Using HIVE, 31 979 nsSNVs were identified in TCGA-derived NGS data from breast cancer patients. All variations identified through this process are stored in a Curated Short Read archive, and the nsSNVs from the tumor samples are included in BioMuta. Currently, BioMuta has 26 cancer types with 13 896 small-scale and 308 986 large-scale study-derived variations. Integration of variation data allows identifications of novel or common nsSNVs that can be prioritized in validation studies. Database URL: BioMuta: http://hive

  2. Asthma outcomes: Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J.; Wenzel, Sally; Brown, Robert; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Fahy, John V.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Hunt, John F.; Kita, Hirohito; Liu, Andrew H.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Measurement of biomarkers has been incorporated within clinical research studies of asthma to characterize the population and associate the disease with environmental and therapeutic effects. Objective National Institutes of Health institutes and federal agencies convened an expert group to propose which biomarkers should be assessed as standardized asthma outcomes in future clinical research studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of the literature to identify studies that developed and/or tested asthma biomarkers. We identified biomarkers relevant to the underlying disease process progression and response to treatment. We classified the biomarkers as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an National Institutes of Health–organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Ten measures were identified; only 1, multiallergen screening to define atopy, is recommended as a core asthma outcome. Complete blood counts to measure total eosinophils, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno), sputum eosinophils, urinary leukotrienes, and total and allergen-specific IgE are recommended as supplemental measures. Measurement of sputum polymorphonuclear leukocytes and other analytes, cortisol measures, airway imaging, breath markers, and system-wide studies (eg, genomics, proteomics) are considered as emerging outcome measures. Conclusion The working group participants propose the use of multiallergen screening in all asthma clinical trials to characterize study populations with respect to atopic status. Blood, sputum, and urine specimens should be stored in biobanks, and standard procedures should be developed to harmonize sample collection for clinical trial biorepositories. PMID:22386512

  3. Mast cell-nerve interactions in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, Hanneke Paulina Maria van der

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction in the airways. Roughly, asthma can be subdivided into atopic asthma involving elevated levels of serum IgE and a less familiar form, non-atopic asthma. Non-atopic asthma is an increasing problem in the developed world. The mechanisms

  4. Do Written Asthma Action Plans Improve Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, John M

    2016-03-01

    With appropriate management, children with asthma should expect few symptoms, no limits on activity, rare exacerbations, and normal lung function. Appropriate education of parents and other caregivers of children with asthma has clearly been shown to help achieve these goals. Although recommended in asthma guidelines, providing written asthma action plans does not improve outcomes beyond asthma education alone.

  5. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  6. Seasonal Risk Factors for Asthma Exacerbations among Inner City Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teach, Stephen J.; Gergen, Peter J.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Mitchell, Herman E.; Calatroni, Agustin; Wildfire, Jeremy; Bloomberg, Gordon; Kercsmar, Carolyn; Liu, Andrew H.; Makhija, Melanie; Matsui, Elizabeth; Morgan, Wayne; O'Connor, George; Busse, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma remain common even in children and adolescents despite optimal medical management. Identification of host risk factors for exacerbations is incomplete, particularly for seasonal episodes. Objective Define host risk factors for asthma exacerbations unique to their season of occurrence. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients aged 6-20 years who comprised the control groups of the Asthma Control Evaluation trial and the Inner City Anti-IgE Therapy for Asthma trial. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed to determine if patient demographic and historical factors, allergic sensitization, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, spirometric measurements, asthma control, and treatment requirements were associated with seasonal exacerbations. Results The analysis included 400 patients (54.5% male; 59.0% African American; median age 13 years). Exacerbations occurred in 37.5% of participants over the periods of observation and were most common in the fall (28.8% of participants). In univariate analysis, impaired pulmonary function was significantly associated with greater odds of exacerbations for all seasons, as was an exacerbation in the previous season for all seasons except spring. In multivariate analysis, exacerbation in the previous season was the strongest predictor in fall and winter while a higher requirement for inhaled corticosteroids was the strongest predictor in spring and summer. The multivariate models had the best predictive power for fall exacerbations (30.5% variance attributed). Conclusions Among a large cohort of inner city children with asthma, patient risk factors for exacerbations vary by season. Thus, individual patient information may be beneficial in strategies to prevent these seasonal events. Clinical Implications Inner city children remain at risk for asthma exacerbations despite appropriate therapy. Because their risk factors vary by season, strategies to prevent them may need to differ as

  7. Mechanisms of obesity in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Finn; Hancox, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Obesity and asthma are chronic conditions affecting millions of people worldwide. The two conditions also appear to be linked with an increased risk of asthma in people who are obese. The purpose of this review is to describe mechanism(s) that may explain the association between asthma and obesity. Current evidence suggests that the association between asthma and obesity is linked by two major phenotypes and three important pathways of obesity-related asthma: one phenotype with primary (often atopic) asthma that is aggravated by obesity and a second phenotype with late-onset nonatopic asthma, which predominantly affects women and primarily seems to be associated with neutrophilic inflammation. Proposed pathways include the mechanical effects of obesity (fewer deep inspirations leading to increased airway hyperresponsiveness), an inflammatory pathway driven by obesity-related cytokines (adipokines), and finally environment and lifestyle changes that have led to an increasing prevalence of obesity over the past 50 years (including exposures in utero, physical activity, and diet) may also result in asthma in predisposed individuals. How these environmental changes influence the occurrence and expression of asthma may depend on the age of exposure and on interactions with genetic susceptibilities. Future research should be directed to shed light on the associations between obesity and asthma phenotypes, modern lifestyles and environmental exposures and genetic susceptibilities. http://links.lww.com/COAI/A6.

  8. Children with Asthma and Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Yuzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the chronic diseases which have are widely seen among the children. The disease has recently been in the increase all over the world and affects many children. In a study conducted with International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC method, it was found out that prevalence of childhood asthma was 17.1%. Participation in sportive activities by the children with asthma, which is today considered as a part of asthma treatment program, makes contributions to their physical, mental and psychological development and increases their quality of life. The most recommended sports for the children with asthma are swimming and water sports. Sports like tennis and volleyball are too advised. Choice of sports depends on severity of asthma, child and #8217;s choice and whether or not asthma is kept under control. Nursing approaches for the children with asthma include correction of symptoms, training of children and their families, assistance with disease adaptation, continuing asthma care at home and interventions to make children lead healthy activities of daily life of children. With protective measures to be taken by families and children; children should be encourage for sportive activities. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 241-244

  9. Rhinoviruses, Allergic Inflammation, and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavala, Monica; Bertics, Paul J.; Gern, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Viral infections affect wheezing and asthma in children and adults of all ages. In infancy, wheezing illnesses are usually viral in origin, and children with more severe wheezing episodes are more likely to develop recurrent episodes of asthma and to develop asthma later in childhood. Children who develop allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (allergic sensitization), and those who wheeze with rhinoviruses (HRV) are at especially high risk for asthma. In older children and adults, HRV infections generally cause relatively mild respiratory illnesses and yet contribute to acute and potentially severe exacerbations in patients with asthma. These findings underline the importance of understanding the synergistic nature of allergic sensitization and infections with HRV in infants relative to the onset of asthma and in children and adults with respect to exacerbations of asthma. This review discusses clinical and experimental evidence of virus/allergen interactions and evaluates theories which relate immunologic responses to respiratory viruses and allergens to the pathogenesis and disease activity of asthma. Greater understanding of the relationship between viral respiratory infections, allergic inflammation, and asthma is likely to suggest new strategies for the prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:21682739

  10. Cleaning and asthma: A systematic review and approach for effective safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Melissa J; Parker, Ann; Maier, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Research indicates a correlative relationship between asthma and use of consumer cleaning products. We conduct a systematic review of epidemiological literature on persons who use or are exposed to cleaning products, both in occupational and domestic settings, and risk of asthma or asthma-like symptoms to improve understanding of the causal relationship between exposure and asthma. A scoring method for assessing study reliability is presented. Although research indicates an association between asthma and the use of cleaning products, no study robustly investigates exposure to cleaning products or ingredients along with asthma risk. This limits determination of causal relationships between asthma and specific products or ingredients in chemical safety assessment. These limitations, and a lack of robust animal models for toxicological assessment of asthma, create the need for a weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to examine an ingredient or product's asthmatic potential. This proposed WoE method organizes diverse lines of data (i.e., asthma, sensitization, and irritation information) through a systematic, hierarchical framework that provides qualitatively categorized conclusions using hazard bands to predict a specific product or ingredient's potential for asthma induction. This work provides a method for prioritizing chemicals as a first step for quantitative and scenario-specific safety assessments based on their potential for inducing asthmatic effects. Acetic acid is used as a case study to test this framework. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing in children with asthma and its behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Nira A; Aronin, Charlotte; Kantrowitz, Beth; Hershcopf, Ronald; Fishkin, Sherry; Lee, Haesoon; Weaver, Diana E; Yip, Candice; Liaw, Christine; Saadia, Tehila A; Abramowitz, Jason; Weedon, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children with asthma compared to non-asthmatic children and to determine if behavior problems are associated with asthma and SDB. Cross-Sectional. Parents of 263 children with asthma and 266 controls ages 2 to 15 years attending routine pediatric office visits completed the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Child Behavior Checklist. Asthma severity was classified based on NIH guidelines. The prevalence of snoring was significantly higher in asthmatic children (35.5%) than controls (15.7%) and the prevalence of a positive PSQ was significantly higher in asthmatic children (25.9%) than controls (10.6%) (P < 0.001 for both). The effect of asthma was "dose-dependent" as children with more severe asthma had increased odds ratios for snoring and a positive PSQ. On multivariate analysis, there were significant interactions of gender with asthma and age with gender. A positive modified PSQ along with measures of socioeconomic status and age were the only independent predictors of abnormal Child Behavior Checklist scores and score classifications. There was a higher prevalence of SDB in asthmatic children compared to non-asthmatic children and the prevalence of SDB increased with increasing asthma severity. In multivariate analysis the role of asthma was much less clear as it predicted a positive PSQ in girls but not boys. SDB, but not asthma, was an independent predictor of behavioral problems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran. This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ) questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data. The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant ( P=0.046); and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets' skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose) were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038). These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring. In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions.

  13. Systemic Inflammation in Older Adults With Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan-Juan; McDonald, Vanessa M; Gibson, Peter G; Simpson, Jodie L

    2014-07-01

    The role of systemic inflammation on asthma-COPD overlap syndrome is unknown. This study aimed to examine systemic inflammation in asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and to identify associations between clinical characteristics and inflammatory mediators in asthma-COPD overlap syndrome. In 108 adults older than 55 years comprising healthy controls (n=29), asthma (n=16), COPD (n=21) and asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (n=42), serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein and Interleukin 6 (IL-6) were assayed. Spirometry, induced sputum, quality of life, comorbidities and medications were assessed, and their associations with asthma-COPD overlap syndrome were analyzed using logistic regression. Associations between systemic inflammatory mediators and clinical characteristics were tested in multivariate linear regression models. Patients with asthma-COPD overlap syndrome had significantly elevated IL-6 levels compared with healthy controls and asthmatics. Age, comorbidity index and IL-6 level were independently associated with asthma-COPD overlap syndrome. FEV1% predicted was inversely associated with IL-6 level, and cardiovascular disease was associated with an increased IL-6 level. Systemic markers were not associated with airway inflammation. Systemic inflammation is commonly present in asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and asthma-COPD overlap syndrome resembled COPD in terms of systemic inflammation. IL-6 is a pivotal inflammatory mediator that may be involved in airflow obstruction and cardiovascular disease and may be an independent treatment target.

  14. AsthmaVent – Effect of Ventilation on Asthma Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogaard, Nina Viskum; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Halken, Susanne

    sensitive towards. Reducing this exposure may improve the asthma control in these children. Previous studies give conflicting information on the effect of mechanical ventilation on asthma control in children. Objectives We aim at investigating whether mechanical ventilation is capable of improving indoor...... and design of housing. Indoor environment factors that trigger the disease must be controlled as well as possible. The results of this project will be a significant contribution to the potential recommendations regarding the effect of ventilation on indoor air quality and asthma control of HDM allergic...... air quality and thereby asthma symptoms and quality of life, in children with house dust mite allergy and asthma. Materials and Methods Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled intervention study, including 80 children from 3 Danish Pediatric outpatient clinics, with: Verified asthma, requiring...

  15. Are there neurophenotypes for asthma? Functional brain imaging of the interaction between emotion and inflammation in asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Rosenkranz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease noteworthy for its vulnerability to stress and emotion-induced symptom intensification. The fact that psychological stress and mood and anxiety disorders appear to increase expression of asthma symptoms suggests that neural signaling between the brain and lung at least partially modulates the inflammatory response and lung function. However, the precise nature of the neural pathways implicated in modulating asthma symptoms is unknown. Moreover, the extent to which variations in neural signaling predict different phenotypes of disease expression has not been studied. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural signals in response to asthma-specific emotional cues, following allergen exposure, in asthmatics with a dual response to allergen challenge (significant inflammation, asthmatics with only an immediate response (minimal inflammation, and healthy controls. The anterior insular cortex was differentially activated by asthma-relevant cues, compared to general negative cues, during the development of the late phase of the dual response in asthmatics. Moreover, the degree of this differential activation predicted changes in airway inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that neurophenotypes for asthma may be identifiable by neural reactivity of brain circuits known to be involved in processing emotional information. Those with greater activation in the anterior insula, in response to asthma-relevant psychological stimuli, exhibit greater inflammatory signals in the lung and increased severity of disease and may reflect a subset of asthmatics most vulnerable to the development of psychopathology. This approach offers an entirely new target for potential therapeutic intervention in asthma.

  16. Yoga for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Yao Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common chronic inflammatory disorder affecting about 300 million people worldwide. As a holistic therapy, yoga has the potential to relieve both the physical and psychological suffering of people with asthma, and its popularity has expanded globally. A number of clinical trials have been carried out to evaluate the effects of yoga practice, with inconsistent results. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga in people with asthma. METHODS: Search methods: We systematically searched the Cochrane Airways Group Register of Trials, which is derived from systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and handsearching of respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched PEDro. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP search portal. We searched all databases from their inception to 22 July 2015, and used no restriction on language of publication. We checked the reference lists of eligible studies and relevant review articles for additional studies. We attempted to contact investigators of eligible studies and experts in the field to learn of other published and unpublished studies. Selection criteria: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared yoga with usual care (or no intervention or sham intervention in people with asthma and reported at least one of the following outcomes: quality of life, asthma symptom score, asthma control, lung function measures, asthma medication usage, and adverse events. Data collection and analysis: We extracted bibliographic information, characteristics of participants, characteristics of interventions and controls, characteristics of methodology, and results for the outcomes of our interest from eligible studies. For continuous outcomes, we used mean difference (MD with 95% confidence interval (CI to denote the treatment effects, if the

  17. Clinical relevance of IgE-mediated sensitization against the mould Alternaria alternata in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sylvia; Sprünken, Anja; Wagner, Norbert; Tenbrock, Klaus; Ott, Hagen

    2017-01-01

    Asthma in childhood has a prevalence of 5-10% in Germany and severe asthma accounts for about 5% in this patient group. Positive predictive values for severe asthma are atopy, a positive family history and sensitizations against inhalative allergens. Alternaria is an important inhalative allergen and sensitization is suspected to correlate with severe and lethal asthma. We investigated the prevalence and impact of Alternaria sensitization in paediatric asthma. We reviewed paediatric patients with a diagnosis of low-grade, moderate and severe asthma. Data collection included concomitant atopic diseases, sensitization profiles, family history and prior hospitalization for asthma exacerbation. A total of 207 paediatric patients (aged 1-17 years) were included in the study. Overall, 25% had low-grade asthma, 31% moderate and 44% severe asthma and 26% were formerly hospitalized. Alternaria sensitization was the most common in moulds, although without significant correlation with hospitalization and severe asthma. Alternaria sensitization increased with age and was significantly associated with co-sensitization against other moulds, grass pollen and cat epithelia. Allergic rhinitis was significantly correlated with hospitalization, independent of Alternaria sensitization. Alternaria sensitization was common and increased with age. No significant correlation was found between asthma degree, hospitalization rates and sensitization profiles. Alternaria sensitization demonstrated no isolated risk factor for severe asthma and hospitalization.

  18. Accuracy of spirometry for detection of asthma: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Andréa Cristina; Paulino, Ana Carolina Botto; Pereira, Luciano Penha; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease with airway hyperresponsiveness. Spirometry is the most commonly used test among asthmatic patients. Another functional test used for diagnosing asthma is the bronchial challenge test. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of spirometry for detecting asthma in the general population. Cross-sectional study with data analysis to evaluate the accuracy of spirometry through calculating sensitivity, specificity and predictive values and through the kappa agreement test. Subjects who constituted a birth cohort were enrolled at the age of 23 to 25 years. Spirometric abnormality was defined as reduced forced expiratory volume in one second, i.e. lower than 80% of the predicted value. Measurement of bronchial responsiveness was performed by means of the bronchial challenge test with methacholine. The gold-standard diagnosis of asthma was defined as the presence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in association with respiratory symptoms. Asthma was detected in 200 subjects (10.4%) out of the sample of 1922 individuals. Spirometric abnormality was detected in 208 subjects (10.9%) of the sample. The specificity of spirometric abnormality for detecting asthma was 90%, sensitivity was 23%, positive predictive value was 22%, and negative predictive value was 91%. The kappa test revealed weak agreement of 0.13 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.07-0.19) between spirometry and the diagnosis of asthma. Spirometry, as a single test, has limitations for detecting asthma in the general population.

  19. Combination therapy versus monotherapy for gastroesophageal reflux in children with difficult-to-treat bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Salah Bediwy

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Combination of domperidone and esomeprazole was more effective in improving the endoscopic reflux score, childhood-asthma control test (C-ACT and FEV1 (% of predicted and significantly reduced the sputum SP than the use of esomeprazole only in children with difficult-to-treat asthma.

  20. Commentary: The Wright Ross Salk Award: Worker Bees and Benefits to the Hive: Service Contributions to the Profession and Society of Pediatric Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael C

    2016-11-01

    This article reflects on service contributions upon receiving the 2016 Society of Pediatric Psychology Wright Ross Salk Distinguished Service Award. As the title implies, worker bees make service contributions for the overall benefit of the hive and colony. So too, the scientific discipline, clinical profession, and the Society of Pediatric Psychology need the service contributions of multiple individuals to survive and thrive. Many people have made professional contributions to benefit the field and its organizational home; many more worker bees will volunteer in the future to fill important service roles and sustain the hive. The article discusses lessons learned about service. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quick Links Asthma Action Plan America Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical ... Using a metered dose inhaler with a spacer [ PDF - 377 KB] Your browser does not support iframes ...

  2. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? KidsHealth > For ... Affect My Child's Asthma? Print A A A Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma? Yes. Weather ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent ... Archive 2014 State or Territory Data Archive AsthmaStats Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination ...

  4. Treating Asthma in Children under 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... laughing Gastrointestinal reflux Changes or extremes in weather Asthma emergencies Severe asthma attacks can be life-threatening ... Changes in activity levels or sleep patterns Control asthma triggers Depending on the triggers for your child's ...

  5. Managing Asthma: Learning to Breathe Easier

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe June 2014 Print this issue Managing Asthma Learn To Breathe Easier En español Send us ... Allergy Therapy Seeking Allergy Relief Wise Choices Controlling Asthma Get regular checkups for your asthma. Make a ...

  6. Allergies and Asthma: They Often Occur Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A family history of allergies is a major risk factor for allergic asthma. Having hay fever or other allergies yourself also increases your risk of getting asthma. Though allergic asthma is very common, there are other types ...

  7. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with Current Asthma Asthma and Fair or Poor Health Usual Place for Medical Care among Children Number of Visits to a Health Care Provider(s) ...

  8. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... and Publications Related Articles, Publications, and Links Asthma’s Impact on the Nation Fact Sheet State Data Profiles ( ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ...

  9. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Obesity Percentage of People with Asthma who Smoke Insurance coverage and barriers to care for people with ... Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare Professionals Public Health Professionals ...

  10. Asthma & Physical Activity in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Education) How Asthma-Friendly Is Your School? (checklist in English and in Spanish) Is the Asthma ... gov/ asthma/ publications. html U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of ...

  11. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Messages Agencies Working on Asthma Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma ... de boca) [PDF - 276 KB] Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma ...

  12. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

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    Full Text Available ... Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare Professionals Public ...

  13. Violence and Asthma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research shows that exposure to community violence is, directly and indirectly, associated with asthma. This article reviews the findings on the impact of violence on asthma, and the pathways for the association of violence and asthma are suggested: 1 exposure to violence is directly associated with asthma, mainly through dysregulation of sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, 2 exposure to violence is associated with the change of susceptibility of outdoor air pollution on asthma, probably through the change of an immune response, and 3 behavioral change due to exposure to violence (e.g. keeping children indoors leads to more exposure to indoor pollutants. The suggested framework may be useful to develop health policy on asthma in high-violence communities.

  14. Asthma in Children: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF School and Asthma (Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Teaching Your Child about Asthma (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) What's an Asthma Action Plan? (Nemours Foundation) ... Also in Spanish Related Issues Asthma & Physical Activity in the School ( ...

  15. Nasal disease and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, G L; Merli, P; Caimmi, D; Licari, A; Labó, E; Marseglia, A; Ciprandi, G; La Rosa, M

    2011-10-01

    The nose plays a primary role within the airways, working as a filter and air-conditioner, together with other important functions. Thus, it is not surprising that nasal diseases are associated with several other comorbidities, including both upper and lower airways, such as bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and asthma. Several studies have investigated the relationship existing between the upper and the lower airways and new insights are rising. Nevertheless, some uncertainties still remain, mainly because nasal disorders are quite heterogeneous, overlapping (i.e. rhinitis-rhinosinusitis-sinusitis, acute or chronic, allergic or non-allergic) and difficult to diagnose, so that, frequently, many studies don’t differentiate between the various conditions. For this reason, the purpose of this review is to systematically analyze present epidemiological, pathophysiological and clinical data on the relationship between nasal diseases and asthma, splitting up three main conditions: allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis.

  16. Asthma management: important issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barnes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although most attention has been focused on the drugs used to control asthma, it is increasingly recognised that effective delivery of these drugs to the lungs is just as important. The most effective drugs, beta2-agonists and corticosteroids, are given by inhalation so there has been a search for more efficient inhaler devices that are easier for patients to use. A symposium at the European Respiratory Society Annual Meeting in 2005 discussed some of the important issues in inhaler therapy in adults and children. This article summarises the major points of discussion that arose out of this symposium. New more effective inhaler devices are now becoming available and are likely to have an important impact on asthma management.

  17. MANIFEST ANXIETY IN BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

    OpenAIRE

    Sreedhar, Krishna Prasad

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a vernacular adaptation of MAS 50 bronchial asthma patients were compared with 102 normals, 60 hospital general out-patients and 50 neurotics to determine the level of anxiety in asthma. The manifest anxiety scores of the bronchial asthma patients were found to be significantly high showing that their level of anxiety was abnormally higher in comparison with that of the normals and the hospital general out-patients. The bronchial asthmatics and the neurotics did not differ in an...

  18. Morphological and Chemical Characterization of the Invasive Ants in Hives of Apis mellifera scutellata Lepeletier (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, M R; Giannotti, E; Tofolo, V C; Pizano, M A; Firmino, E L B; Antonialli-Junior, W F; Andrade, L H C; Lima, S M

    2016-02-01

    Apiculture in Brazil is quite profitable and has great potential for expansion because of the favorable climate and abundancy of plant diversity. However, the occurrence of pests, diseases, and parasites hinders the growth and profitability of beekeeping. In the interior of the state of São Paulo, apiaries are attacked by ants, especially the species Camponotus atriceps (Smith) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), which use the substances produced by Apis mellifera scutellata (Lepeletier) (Hymenoptera: Apidae), like honey, wax, pollen, and offspring as a source of nourishment for the adult and immature ants, and kill or expel the adult bees during the invasion. This study aimed to understand the invasion of C. atriceps in hives of A. m. scutellata. The individuals were classified into castes and subcastes according to morphometric analyses, and their cuticular chemical compounds were identified using Photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS). The morphometric analyses were able to classify the individuals into reproductive castes (queen and gynes), workers (minor and small ants), and the soldier subcaste (medium and major ants). Identification of cuticular hydrocarbons of these individuals revealed that the eight beehives were invaded by only three colonies of C. atriceps; one of the colonies invaded only one beehive, and the other two colonies underwent a process called sociotomy and were responsible for the invasion of the other seven beehives. The lack of preventive measures and the nocturnal behavior of the ants favored the invasion and attack on the bees.

  19. Aspirin-Exacerbated Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Mathew; Lockey, Richard F

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on aspirin-exacerbated asthma (AEA). The review includes historical perspective of aspirin, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of AEA. The pathogenesis of AEA involves the cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase pathway. Aspirin affects both of these pathways by inhibiting the enzyme cycooxygenase-1 (COX-1). Inhibition of COX-1 leads to a decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The decrease in PGE2 results in an increase in cysteinyl leukotrienes by the lipoo...

  20. Sunny hours and variations in the prevalence of asthma in schoolchildren according to the International Study of Asthma and Allergies (ISAAC) Phase III in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnedo-Pena, Alberto; García-Marcos, Luis; Fernández-Espinar, Jorge Fuertes; Bercedo-Sanz, Alberto; Aguinaga-Ontoso, Ines; González-Díaz, Carlos; Carvajal-Urueña, Ignacio; Busquet-Monge, Rosa; Suárez-Varela, Maria Morales; de Andoin, Nagore García; Batlles-Garrido, Juan; Blanco-Quirós, Alfredo; Varela, Angel López-Silvarrey; García-Hernández, Gloria

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the relationship between the prevalence of asthma in schoolchildren aged 6-7 years and 13-14 years and the mean annual sunny hours (MASH) in Spain, and to explore predictive models for asthma prevalence. The prevalence of asthma was obtained from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies (ISAAC) Phase III 2002-2003, and climate and socio-economic variables from official sources. Nine centres were studied and a further four centres, two of which are in ISAAC, to test the predictive models. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted prevalence rates of asthma for each centre, and multiple regression models to study the effects of MASH and other meteorological and socio-economic variables. The adjusted prevalence rate of asthma decreased 0.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4-0.8%] for the 6-7 years group and 1.1% (95% CI 0.8-1.3%) for the 13-14 years group with an increase in the MASH of 100 h. Relative humidity was negatively associated with asthma in the older age group, and gross province product per capita (GPP) was positively associated with asthma in the younger age group. The predictive models, which included MASH, gender, relative humidity, and GPP, anticipated prevalence rates of asthma without significant differences between the levels observed and those expected in 9 of the11 measurements carried out. The results indicate that sunny hours have a protective effect on the prevalence of asthma in schoolchildren.

  1. Influenza Vaccination Among US Children With Asthma, 2005–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Alan E.; Ahrens, Katherine A.; Akinbami, Lara J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children with asthma face higher risk of complications from influenza. Trends in influenza vaccination among children with asthma are unknown. Methods We used 2005–2013 National Health Interview Survey data for children 2 to 17 years of age. We assessed, separately for children with and without asthma, any vaccination (received August through May) during each of the 2005–2006 through 2012–2013 influenza seasons and, for the 2010–2011 through 2012–2013 seasons only, early vaccination (received August through October). We used April–July interviews each year (n = 31,668) to assess vaccination during the previous influenza season. Predictive margins from logistic regression with time as the independent and vaccination status as the dependent variable were used to assess time trends. We also estimated the association between several sociodemographic variables and the likelihood of influenza vaccination. Results From 2005 to 2013, among children with asthma, influenza vaccination receipt increased about 3 percentage points per year (P children with asthma vaccinated by October (early vaccination) was slightly above 30% in 2012–2013. In 2010–2013, adolescents, the uninsured, children of parents with some college education, and those living in the Midwest, South, and West were less likely to be vaccinated. Conclusions The percentage of children 2 to 17 years of age with asthma receiving influenza vaccination has increased since 2004–2005, reaching approximately 55% in 2012–2013. PMID:26518382

  2. Influenza Vaccination Among US Children With Asthma, 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Alan E; Ahrens, Katherine A; Akinbami, Lara J

    2016-01-01

    Children with asthma face higher risk of complications from influenza. Trends in influenza vaccination among children with asthma are unknown. We used 2005-2013 National Health Interview Survey data for children 2 to 17 years of age. We assessed, separately for children with and without asthma, any vaccination (received August through May) during each of the 2005-2006 through 2012-2013 influenza seasons and, for the 2010-2011 through 2012-2013 seasons only, early vaccination (received August through October). We used April-July interviews each year (n = 31,668) to assess vaccination during the previous influenza season. Predictive margins from logistic regression with time as the independent and vaccination status as the dependent variable were used to assess time trends. We also estimated the association between several sociodemographic variables and the likelihood of influenza vaccination. From 2005 to 2013, among children with asthma, influenza vaccination receipt increased about 3 percentage points per year (P children with asthma vaccinated by October (early vaccination) was slightly above 30% in 2012-2013. In 2010-2013, adolescents, the uninsured, children of parents with some college education, and those living in the Midwest, South, and West were less likely to be vaccinated. The percentage of children 2 to 17 years of age with asthma receiving influenza vaccination has increased since 2004-2005, reaching approximately 55% in 2012-2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Cost of asthma in the Asia-Pacific region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. W. Lai

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The substantial morbidity caused by asthma suggests that the disease is associated with a large economic burden. The current study analysed the burden of asthma in eight countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Responses to questions regarding resource use from a survey of people with asthma were analysed. Unit costs were obtained for each resource use element. Individual patient costs were estimated and means calculated for each country. A multivariate model was developed to identify potential predictors of resource use. Annual per-patient direct costs ranged from US$108 for Malaysia to US$1,010 for Hong Kong. When productivity costs were included, total per-patient societal costs ranged from US$184 in Vietnam to US$1,189 in Hong Kong. Urgent care costs were responsible for 18–90% of total per-patient direct costs. Overall, total per-patient direct costs were equivalent to 13% of per capita gross domestic product and 300% of per capita healthcare spending. Extremes of age, greater severity of asthma, and poorer general health status were predictive of high cost. The per-patient cost of asthma in these countries is high, particularly when seen in the context of overall per-patient healthcare spending. Strategies to improve asthma control are likely to not only improve patient outcomes, but also to decrease societal costs.

  4. Recent advances in chronotherapy for the management of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durrington HJ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hannah J Durrington,1 Stuart N Farrow,2,3 David W Ray2 1Institute of Inflammation and Repair, 2Institute of Human Development, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Respiratory Therapy Area, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, UK Abstract: Asthma is a common inflammatory disease of the airways, with a pronounced circadian variation in symptoms. A number of existing asthma treatments are “chronotherapies” designed to be delivered to coincide with the “morning dip” in lung function and corresponding worsening of symptoms. In the past decade, our knowledge of how circadian rhythms are regulated has increased immensely, and increasing evidence that the molecular clock plays a significant role in the immune system makes asthma an intriguing disease to study. The current trend toward once-daily dosing of asthma therapies reduces the need for careful timing of doses; however, patients are exposed to therapeutic levels of the drug and potential side effects for the entire day. Consequently, improved therapeutic benefit in asthma may be gained by understanding the molecular pathways that drive the predictable, diurnal worsening of symptoms. Furthermore, timing the delivery of therapy to coincide with pathway sensitivity may deliver maximum benefit. Defining the role of the molecular clock in these pathways could therefore lead to novel therapies and improved asthma control. Keywords: anticholinergic, beta agonist, corticosteroids, FEV1, PEFR, theophylline

  5. Japanese Guideline for Childhood Asthma

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    Toshiyuki Nishimuta

    2011-01-01

    JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline (GINA in that the former emphasizes long-term management of childhood asthma based on asthma severity and early diagnosis and intervention at <2 years and 2–5 years of age. However, a management method, including step-up or step-down of long-term management agents based on the status of asthma symptoms, is easy to understand and thus JAGL is suitable for routine medical treatment. JAGL also introduced treatment and management using a control test for children, recommending treatment and management aimed at complete control through avoiding exacerbation factors and appropriate use of antiinflammatory agents.

  6. Acute bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Ramuscello

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the main causes of morbidity worldwide. It affects some 300 million individuals and has risen over the past 20 years, especially in the paediatric population. Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways, subject to periodic exacerbations, characterised by coughing and progressive dyspnoea. Clinical conditions may vary greatly, ranging from moderate exacerbation with an increase in nocturnal awakening and a less than 20% reduction in the flow peak, through to severe respiratory insufficiency that requires immediate intubation of the airways. Pharmacological treatment envisages a step approach that aims to obtain and maintain control over the symptoms, taking into consideration the effectiveness of the treatment available, potential side effects and cost. β2-agonists and corticosteroids are the drugs of election for both maintenance therapy and for treating exacerbations. Other therapeutic devices may prove useful in particular cases. One fundamental key point in treatment over time is the cooperation between patient and attending doctor. The latest review of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA guidelines was published in 2006.

  7. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  8. Asthma Heredity, Cord Blood IgE and Asthma-Related Symptoms and Medication in Adulthood: A Long-Term Follow-Up in a Swedish Birth Cohort.

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    Hartmut Vogt

    Full Text Available Cord blood IgE has previously been studied as a possible predictor of asthma and allergic diseases. Results from different studies have been contradictory, and most have focused on high-risk infants and early infancy. Few studies have followed their study population into adulthood. This study assessed whether cord blood IgE levels and a family history of asthma were associated with, and could predict, asthma medication and allergy-related respiratory symptoms in adults. A follow-up was carried out in a Swedish birth cohort comprising 1,701 consecutively born children. In all, 1,661 individuals could be linked to the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and the Medical Birth Register, and 1,227 responded to a postal questionnaire. Cord blood IgE and family history of asthma were correlated with reported respiratory symptoms and dispensed asthma medication at 32-34 years. Elevated cord blood IgE was associated with a two- to threefold increased risk of pollen-induced respiratory symptoms and dispensed anti-inflammatory asthma medication. Similarly, a family history of asthma was associated with an increased risk of pollen-induced respiratory symptoms and anti-inflammatory medication. However, only 8% of the individuals with elevated cord blood IgE or a family history of asthma in infancy could be linked to current dispensation of anti-inflammatory asthma medication at follow-up. In all, 49 out of 60 individuals with dispensed anti-inflammatory asthma medication at 32-34 years of age had not been reported having asthma at previous check-ups of the cohort during childhood. Among those, only 5% with elevated cord blood IgE and 6% with a family history of asthma in infancy could be linked to current dispensation of anti-inflammatory asthma medication as adults. Elevated cord blood IgE and a positive family history of asthma were associated with reported respiratory symptoms and dispensed asthma medication in adulthood, but their predictive power was poor

  9. Associations Of Atopy And Asthma During Aging Of An Adult Population Over A 20-year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diogenes S; Kaushik, Sonia; Smith, Catherine L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Benke, Geza P; Thompson, Bruce R; Walters, E Haydn; Wolfe, Rory; Abramson, Michael J

    2017-10-04

    Atopy is associated with asthma, but cross-sectional studies suggest this association may be weaker in older adults. It remains unclear if atopy predicts asthma later in adult life. We aimed to investigate whether atopy in young adults predicted asthma 20 years later and to quantify the contemporaneous relationship of atopy and asthma as adults age. Participants of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) in [city; data removed for double-blind peer review] aged 20-44 years were followed for 20 years and completed questionnaires, skin prick tests (SPT) and allergen specific immunoglobulin E measurement at a baseline and two subsequent surveys. Using logistic regression and generalized estimating equations, we tested if atopy at baseline predicted current asthma later in life and estimated the association between current atopy measured at each survey and current asthma, while adjusting for potential confounders. The analysis included 220 participants: 50.9% male. Mean (SD) age at baseline was 35.7 (5.7) years. Asthma and atopy prevalence remained stable over 20 years. Baseline atopy (SPT) was associated with current asthma (OR 9.74, 95%CI 4.22, 22.5) over 20 years, and current atopy (SPT) with concurrent asthma (3.12; 1.70, 5.74). Atopy remains strongly associated with current asthma in 40 to 64 year-old adults, both prospectively and contemporaneously, but the prospective association is stronger.

  10. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Providers CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community Guide—Evidence-based Potentially Effective Interventions ...

  11. Association between severe asthma and changes in the stomatognathic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Carvalho-Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe orofacial muscle function in patients with severe asthma. Methods: This was a descriptive study comparing patients with severe controlled asthma (SCA and severe uncontrolled asthma (SUA. We selected 160 patients, who completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and the 6-item Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-6, as well as undergoing evaluation of orofacial muscle function. Results: Of the 160 patients evaluated, 126 (78.8% and 34 (21.2% presented with SCA and SUA, respectively, as defined by the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria. Regardless of the level of asthma control, the most frequent changes found after evaluation of muscle function were difficulty in chewing, oronasal breathing pattern, below-average or poor dental arch condition, and difficulty in swallowing. When the sample was stratified by FEV1 (% of predicted, was significantly higher proportions of SUA group patients, compared with SCA group patients, showed habitual open-mouth chewing (24.8% vs. 7.7%; p < 0.02, difficulty in swallowing water (33.7% vs. 17.3%; p < 0.04, and voice problems (81.2% vs. 51.9%; p < 0.01. When the sample was stratified by ACQ-6 score, the proportion of patients showing difficulty in swallowing bread was significantly higher in the SUA group than in the SCA group (66.6% vs. 26.6%; p < 0.01. Conclusions: The prevalence of changes in the stomatognathic system appears to be high among adults with severe asthma, regardless of the level of asthma control. We found that some such changes were significantly more common in patients with SUA than in those with SCA.

  12. Application of intelligent systems in asthma disease: designing a fuzzy rule-based system for evaluating level of asthma exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnoori, Maryam; Zarandi, Mohammad Hossein Fazel; Moin, Mostafa

    2012-08-01

    This paper discusses the capacities of artificial intelligence in the process of asthma diagnosing and asthma treatment. Developed intelligent systems for asthma disease have been classified in five categories including diagnosing, evaluating, management, communicative facilities, and prediction. Considering inputs, results, and methodologies of the systems show that by focusing on meticulous analysis of quality of life as an input variable and developing patient-based systems, under-diagnosing and asthma morbidity and mortality would decrease significantly. Regard to the importance of accurate evaluation in accurate prescription and expeditious treatment, the methodology of developing a fuzzy expert system for evaluating level of asthma exacerbation is presented in this paper too. The performance of this system has been tested in Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology Center of Iran using 25 asthmatic patients. Comparison between system's results and physicians' evaluations using Kappa coefficient (K) reinforces the value of K = 1. In addition this system assigns a degree in gradation (0-10) to every patient representing the slight differences between patients assigned to a specific category.

  13. Using structural equation modeling to understand child and parent perceptions of asthma quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Robert D; Turner, Charles; Brody, Janet L; Sedillo, Donna; Dalen, Jeanne

    2010-09-01

    Using structural equation modeling, test a conceptual model of associations between constructs predicting parent and child asthma quality of life. Children with a confirmed asthma diagnosis and their parents completed measures of health status and independently reported on psychological functioning, family functioning, and quality of life. Measurement and structural models for predicting parent and child quality of life provided a good fit of data to the conceptual model. Parent and child independent reports of quality of life are dependent upon family functioning and child psychological functioning. Long-term asthma symptom control is the only health status variable that impacts quality of life. With minor modifications, both parent and child data fit the conceptual model. Child psychological functioning and long-term asthma control jointly contribute to quality of life outcomes. Findings suggest that both acute and long-term asthma health status outcomes have different determinants.

  14. The relation of innate and adaptive immunity with viral-induced acute asthma attacks: Focusing on IP-10 and cathelicidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikoglu, T; Akyilmaz, E; Yildirim, D D; Batmaz, S B; Ulger, S T; Aslan, G; Kuyucu, S

    Despite growing evidence suggesting potential association between innate and adaptive immunity in viral-induced acute asthma, there is paucity of data in this area. This study aimed to investigate the association of innate and adaptive immunity with acute asthma attacks by analysing the role of IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), TLR2, cathelicidin, vitamin D and cytokines. This prospective study included 33 patients with viral-induced acute asthma and 30 children with controlled asthma. Nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected for virus identification and asthma attack scores assessed in acute asthma group. Blood sampling for IP-10, TLR2, cathelicidin, vitamin D levels, and spirometric indices were employed. Serum IP-10 and cathelicidin levels of acute asthma group were significantly higher and vitamin D levels were lower than controlled asthma group (IP-10; p=0.006, cathelicidin; p=0.002, vitamin D; p, TLR2 (p=0.05) and spirometric indices (p=0.002) in all asthmatics and a significant positive correlation with parameters of asthma attack severity (p=0.03) in acute asthma group. Higher cathelicidin values showed significant positive relation to IP-10 (beta coefficient: 33, p=0.02). Serum IP-10 levels higher than 38.9pg/ml (sensitivity: 85%, specificity: 47%, p=0.002) were predictive of virus-induced asthma. Serum IP-10 and vitamin D levels were found to be significantly related to viral-asthma attacks (IP-10; aOR: 8.93, p=0.03 and vitamin D; aOR: 0.82, p=0.001). Innate immunity biomarkers such as serum IP-10 and cathelicidin can be used to predict viral-induced acute asthma. These biomarkers may provide potential new treatment targets for acute asthma. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Can Vitamin D Supplementation in Addition to Asthma Controllers Improve Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Asthma?: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Liu, Dan; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-12-01

    Effects of vitamin D on acute exacerbation, lung function, and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in patients with asthma are controversial. We aim to further evaluate the roles of vitamin D supplementation in addition to asthma controllers in asthmatics. From 1946 to July 2015, we searched the PubMed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ISI Web of Science using "Vitamin D," "Vit D," or "VitD" and "asthma," and manually reviewed the references listed in the identified articles. Randomized controlled trials which reported rate of asthma exacerbations and adverse events, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1, % of predicted value), FeNO, asthma control test (ACT), and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were eligible. We conducted the heterogeneities test and sensitivity analysis of the enrolled studies, and random-effects or fixed-effects model was applied to calculate risk ratio (RR) and mean difference for dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Cochrane systematic review software Review Manager (RevMan) was used to test the hypothesis by Mann-Whitney U test, which were displayed in Forest plots. Seven trials with a total of 903 patients with asthma were pooled in our final studies. Except for asthma exacerbations (I2 = 81%, χ2 = 10.28, P = 0.006), we did not find statistical heterogeneity in outcome measures. The pooled RR of asthma exacerbation was 0.66 (95% confidence interval: 0.32-1.37), but without significant difference (z = 1.12, P = 0.26), neither was in FEV1 (z = 0.30, P = 0.77), FeNO (z = 0.28, P = 0.78), or ACT (z = 0.92, P = 0.36), although serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly increased (z = 6.16, P asthma controllers cannot decrease asthma exacerbation and FeNO, nor improve lung function and asthma symptoms, although it can be safely applied to increase serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

  16. Occupational asthma in apprentice adolescent car painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifan, Aarif Omar; Derman, Orhan; Kanbur, Nuray; Sekerel, Bulent Enis; Kutluk, Tezer

    2005-12-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is one of the leading causes of pulmonary diseases and has been extensively studied in adults. Childhood employment, a significant problem in many developing countries, should be studied to determine and evaluate its effects on psychosocial and lung health. In order to investigate the presence of work-related asthma-like symptoms and OA in apprentice adolescent car painters, 72 adolescents between the ages of 15-20 yr studying in Vocational Training Centres of Ankara were investigated using questionnaire, pulmonary function test (PFT), serial peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements and methacholine inhalation tests. As a control group, 72 adolescents studying in Industrial and Commercial Training Centres located in the same environment were investigated with questionnaire and PFT. Almost 50% of the study group had work-related asthma-like symptoms for which occupational dermatitis history was predictive [odds ratio: 2.9 (1.026-8.13) (95% confidence interval)]. Seventeen of 22 with serial PEF measurements showed a variability of > or =20% and three (4.2%) of 12 tested with methacholine inhalation test had a PC20 car painters clearly indicates the need for routine follow-up of adolescent workers for lung health.

  17. The Future of Asthma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    1995-01-01

    identification and possible correction of genetic abnormalities responsible for the tendency to develop asthma and atopy, and prevention or functional and structural airway changes. This last goal will be achieved by improved environmental control, earlier use of more powerful and safe anti-inflammatory agents, as well as an increased involvement on the part of the asthma patient in treatment.

  18. The Saudi Initiative for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Moamary Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system.

  19. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Kid Who's Bullied? How Do Asthma Medicines Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Do Asthma Medicines Work? Print A A A en español ¿Cómo funcionan ... control medicines (also called controller or maintenance medicines) work over a long period of time by keeping ...

  20. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A What's in ... Antismoking Message en español Fumar y el asma Smoking is an unhealthy habit for anyone, but it's ...

  1. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been recognized that asthma is not a single disease, but comprises several clinical syndromes, which all share respiratory symptoms and lung function abnormalities, associated with different types of airway inflammation. These syndromes are now known as different asthma

  3. Asthma in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, A S; Skov, L; Skytthe, A

    2015-01-01

    We read with interest the report by Fang and colleagues of the relationship between psoriasis and asthma in a large retrospective case-control study from Taiwan [1]. The study found a 1.38-fold increased risk of asthma among patients with psoriasis, and with an increasing risk according to higher...

  4. Associations between asthma, overweight and physical activity in children: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje Willeboordse

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma and obesity are highly prevalent in children, and are interrelated resulting in a difficult-to-treat asthma-obesity phenotype. The exact underlying mechanisms of this phenotype remain unclear, but decreased physical activity (PA could be an important lifestyle factor. We hypothesize that both asthma and overweight/obesity decrease PA levels and interact on PA levels in asthmatic children with overweight/obesity. Methods School-aged children (n = 122 were divided in 4 groups (healthy control, asthma, overweight/obesity and asthma, and overweight/obesity. Children were asked to perform lung function tests and wear an activity monitor for 7 days. PA was determined by: step count, active time, screen time, time spent in organized sports and active transport forms. We used multiple linear regression techniques to investigate whether asthma, body mass index-standard deviation score (BMI-SDS, or the interaction term asthma x BMI-SDS were associated with PA. Additionally, we tested if asthma features (including lung function and medication were related to PA levels in asthmatic children. Results Asthma, BMI-SDS and the interaction between asthma x BMI-SDS were not related to any of the PA variables (p ≥ 0.05. None of the asthma features could predict PA levels (p ≥ 0.05. Less than 1 in 5 children reached the recommended daily step count guidelines of 12,000 steps/day. Conclusion We found no significant associations between asthma, overweight and PA levels in school-aged children in this study. However, as PA levels were worryingly low, effective PA promotion in school-aged children is necessary.

  5. Asthma in pregnancy: association between the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and comparisons with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Georgia Véras; Leite, Débora F B; Rizzo, José A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible association between the assessment of clinical asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to perform comparisons with values of spirometry. Through this cross-sectional study, 103 pregnant women with asthma were assessed in the period from October 2010 to October 2013 in the asthma pregnancy clinic at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Questionnaires concerning the level of asthma control were administered using the Global Initiative for Asthma classification, the Asthma Control Test validated for asthmatic expectant mothers and spirometry; all three methods of assessing asthma control were performed during the same visit between the twenty-first and twenty-seventh weeks of pregnancy. There was a significant association between clinical asthma control assessment using the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification (pTest can be used for asthmatic expectant mothers to assess the clinical control of asthma, especially at the end of the second trimester, which is assumed to be the period of worsening asthma exacerbations during pregnancy. We highlight the importance of the Asthma Control Test as a subjective instrument with easy application, easy interpretation and good reproducibility that does not require spirometry to assess the level of asthma control and can be used in the primary care of asthmatic expectant mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Asthma symptoms in obese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    The association between asthma and obesity is well-described, but not straightforward, and according to current guidelines asthma control is more difficult to achieve in obese patients. The currently available studies evaluating response to pharmacological asthma therapy in obese patients show...... that these patients have an altered, in general less favorable, response to both reliever and controller medication compared to normal weight patients. However, at present, the limited available evidence precludes evidence-based recommendations. The 'obesity-related asthma' phenotype has different characteristics......, including association with atopy and type of airway inflammation, compared to 'classic' asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in patients with this phenotype leads to an improvement in symptoms, lung function, and airway responsiveness, as well as a reduction in medication utilization and hospital admissions...

  7. Influence of asthma definition on the asthma-obesity relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest an association between obesity and asthma in adults and children. Asthma diagnosis criteria are different among studies. The aim of this study was to test the influence of asthma definition on the asthma-obesity relationship. Methods In a cross-sectional analysis of 1922 men and women, subjects completed a translated questionnaire from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey and underwent spirometry and a bronchial challenge test. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured. Multiple logistic regression analysis was carried out to assess the association of variables related to obesity and asthma. Asthma was defined either by the presence of symptoms with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) or by a self-report of a physician-made diagnosis. The following variables were separately tested for associations with asthma: socioeconomic characteristics, schooling, physical activity, smoking status, anthropometry and spirometry. Results No association was detected between asthma confirmed by BHR and obesity indicators, odds ratio (OR) = 1.08 (95% confidence interval: 0.69 - 1.68) for obesity assessed by body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2; OR = 1.02 (0.74 - 1.40) for obesity assessed by abnormal waist-to-height ratio; and, OR = 0.96 (0.69 - 1.33) for abnormal waist circumference. On the contrary, a previous diagnosis of asthma was associated with obesity, OR = 1.48 (1.01 - 2.16) for body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2; OR = 1.48 (1.13 - 1.93) for abnormal waist-to-height ratio; and, OR = 1.32 (1.00 – 1.75) for abnormal waist circumference. Female gender, schooling ≥ 12 years and smoking were associated with BHR-confirmed asthma. Physically inactive subjects were associated with a previous diagnosis of asthma. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the relationship between asthma and obesity in epidemiological studies depends on the definition adopted. Certain components of asthma, for instance, symptoms may be more prone to

  8. Variation in honey yield per hive of Africanized bees depending on the introducing time of young queens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladson Carbonari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this research was to evaluate the honey production per hive and the egg laying rates of queens produced in 2007, 2008 and 2010. Thirty colonies initiated with a queen per colony at each climatic season were used during the three years. The years, started on January (summer, April (autumn, July (winter and October (spring and ended 12 months later, at the same periods related to each season of the later years. Honey supply were weighed before and after centrifugation to evaluate the quantity of the stored honey. Colonies with queens introduced during autumn and winter in the three years produced 57.2±6.0kg and 60.7±7.5kg of honey, respectively. In the first year of production activity, after the introduction of queens in the initial colonies, values were significantly higher than those obtained in colonies with queens introduced in the summer (39.3±7.6kg and spring (41.8±3.7kg. Egg laying rates of queens were higher in spring (98.2±3.9% and summer (88.4±7%, indicating greater food flow (flowerings in these seasons compared to the averages in autumn (30.3±8.1% and winter (24.5±7.2%. Produce and introduce queens of Africanized Apis mellifera in colonies initiated during autumn and winter was found to be economically feasible. Honey production of colonies initiated in these periods were higher and they had greater population stability in times of scarcity of flowerings.

  9. [Asthma drugs and doping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillard, F; Rolland, Y; Rivière, D

    1999-11-01

    Some drugs regularly used in the treatment of asthma (beta-agonists and corticosteroids) are registered on the list of drugs forbidden in sport, because they have a doping action. To avoid penalizing asthmatic sportsmen, some beta-agonists (Salbutamol, Salmeterol, Terbutaline) and corticosteroids are allowed only in inhaled form, with written notification from the prescribing physician, a pneumologist or the team doctor. Considering the increase of doping with increasing involvement of physicians, good and up to date notions about the current rules of prescription in asthmatic sportsmen are needed.

  10. Manual therapy for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondras, M A; Linde, K; Jones, A P

    2002-01-01

    A variety of manual therapies with similar postulated biologic mechanisms of action are commonly used to treat patients with asthma. Manual therapy practitioners are also varied, including physiotherapists, respiratory therapists, chiropractic and osteopathic physicians. A systematic review across disciplines is warranted. To evaluate the evidence for the effects of manual therapies for treatment of patients with bronchial asthma. Trials were searched in computerized general (EMBASE, CINAHL and MEDLINE) and specialized databases (Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, Cochrane Rehabilitation Field, ICL, and MANTIS). In addition, bibliographies from included studies were assessed, and authors of known studies were contacted for additional information about published and unpublished trials. Date of most recent search: February 2002. Trials were included if they: (1) were randomised; (2) included asthmatic children or adults; (3) examined one or more types of manual therapy; and (4) included clinical outcomes. All three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality using a standard form. From 393 unique citations, 59 full text articles were retrieved and evaluated, which resulted in nine citations to five RCTs (290 patients) suitable for inclusion. Trials could not be pooled statistically because studies that addressed similar interventions used disparate patient groups or outcomes. The methodological quality of one of two trials examining chiropractic manipulation was good and neither trial found significant differences between chiropractic spinal manipulation and a sham manoeuvre on any of the outcomes measured. Quality of the remaining three trials was poor. One small trial compared massage therapy with a relaxation control group and found significant differences in many of the lung function measures obtained. However, this trial had poor reporting characteristics and the data have yet to be confirmed. One small trial compared chest

  11. Manual therapy for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondras, M A; Linde, K; Jones, A P

    2005-04-18

    A variety of manual therapies with similar postulated biologic mechanisms of action are commonly used to treat patients with asthma. Manual therapy practitioners are also varied, including physiotherapists, respiratory therapists, chiropractic and osteopathic physicians. A systematic review across disciplines is warranted. To evaluate the evidence for the effects of manual therapies for treatment of patients with bronchial asthma. We searched for trials in computerized general (EMBASE, CINAHL and MEDLINE) and specialized databases (Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, Cochrane Rehabilitation Field, Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL), and Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy (MANTIS)). In addition, we assessed bibliographies from included studies, and contacted authors of known studies for additional information about published and unpublished trials. Date of most recent search: August 2004. Trials were included if they: (1) were randomised; (2) included asthmatic children or adults; (3) examined one or more types of manual therapy; and (4) included clinical outcomes with observation periods of at least two weeks. All three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality using a standard form. From 473 unique citations, 68 full text articles were retrieved and evaluated, which resulted in nine citations to three RCTs (156 patients) suitable for inclusion. Trials could not be pooled statistically because studies that addressed similar interventions used disparate patient groups or outcomes. The methodological quality of one of two trials examining chiropractic manipulation was good and neither trial found significant differences between chiropractic spinal manipulation and a sham manoeuvre on any of the outcomes measured. One small trial compared massage therapy with a relaxation control group and found significant differences in many of the lung function measures obtained. However, this trial had poor reporting characteristics and the data

  12. Early risk factors for pubertal asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, V; Riiser, A; Mowinckel, P; Carlsen, K-H; Lødrup Carlsen, K C

    2015-01-01

    Early life risk factors are previously described for childhood asthma, but less is known related to asthma in adolescence. We aimed to investigate early risk factors (before 2 years) for pubertal asthma and secondarily for pubertal asthma phenotypes based upon allergic comorbidities. Based on data from 550 adolescents in the prospective birth cohort 'Environment and Childhood Asthma' study, subjects were categorized by recurrent bronchial obstruction (rBO) 0-2 years, asthma 2-10 years, and pubertal asthma from 10 to 16 years including incident asthma in puberty and asthma in remission from 10 to 16 years or as never rBO/asthma 0-16 years. Asthma in puberty was further classified based on the comorbidities atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis (AR) from 10 to 16 years. Twenty-three common asthma risk factors identified by 2 years of age, including frequency and persistence of bronchial obstruction (severity score), were analysed by weighted logistic regression for each phenotype. In adjusted models, the risk of pubertal asthma increased significantly with higher severity score, parental rhinitis, being the firstborn child, and familial stress around birth. Pubertal asthma in remission was significantly associated with severity score and number of lower respiratory tract infections and inversely associated with breastfeeding beyond 4 months. Pubertal incident asthma was more common among firstborn children. All asthma phenotypes with allergic diseases were significantly associated with severity score, whereas familial perinatal stress increased the risk of asthma only. Asthma combined with AR was associated with parental asthma and being firstborn, whereas the risk of asthma with both atopic dermatitis and AR increased with higher paternal education, atopic dermatitis, being firstborn, and familial perinatal stress. Important early risk factors for pubertal asthma were early airways obstruction, parental rhinitis, being the firstborn child, and perinatal familial

  13. Global Asthma Network survey suggests more national asthma strategies could reduce burden of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, I; Haahtela, T; Selroos, O; Ellwood, P; Ellwood, E

    Several countries or regions within countries have an effective national asthma strategy resulting in a reduction of the large burden of asthma to individuals and society. There has been no systematic appraisal of the extent of national asthma strategies in the world. The Global Asthma Network (GAN) undertook an email survey of 276 Principal Investigators of GAN centres in 120 countries, in 2013-2014. One of the questions was: "Has a national asthma strategy been developed in your country for the next five years? For children? For adults?". Investigators in 112 (93.3%) countries answered this question. Of these, 26 (23.2%) reported having a national asthma strategy for children and 24 (21.4%) for adults; 22 (19.6%) countries had a strategy for both children and adults; 28 (25%) had a strategy for at least one age group. In countries with a high prevalence of current wheeze, strategies were significantly more common than in low prevalence countries (11/13 (85%) and 7/31 (22.6%) respectively, pasthma strategy was reported. A large reduction in the global burden of asthma could be potentially achieved if more countries had an effective asthma strategy. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to ... PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: ...

  15. Exploring the obesity-asthma link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Vidal, C

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and risk of asthma are linked. Different distributions of adiposity, such as visceral, subcutaneous or ectopic adiposity, may affect asthma risk differently.......Obesity and risk of asthma are linked. Different distributions of adiposity, such as visceral, subcutaneous or ectopic adiposity, may affect asthma risk differently....

  16. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Healthy Food Shopping Healthy Drinks for Kids Asthma Flare-Ups KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Flare-Ups ... español ¿Qué es una crisis asmática? What Are Asthma Flare-Ups? Keeping asthma under control helps kids ...

  17. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Life Spectrum of Asthma Meeting School-based Asthma Management Program – (SAMPRO TM ) This central resource focuses on ... AAAAI is proud to endorse HR 2285, the School-Based Respiratory Health Management Act Read Practice Matters! Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Quality ...

  18. Developing and emerging clinical asthma phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekking, Pieter-Paul W.; Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    For more than a century, clinicians have attempted to subdivide asthma into different phenotypes based on triggers that cause asthma attacks, the course of the disease, or the prognosis. The first phenotypes that were described included allergic asthma, intrinsic or nonallergic asthma, infectious

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine exactly as your doctor or other medical professional ...

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with asthma Tables and Graphs Asthma Call-back Survey Technical Information Prevalence Tables BRFSS Prevalence Data NHIS ... Profiles (2011) Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare ...

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File ...

  2. Eicosanoids in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Wu, Wei-Fong

    2007-01-01

    Eicosanoids belong to a diverse family of bioactive fatty acids that play important roles in regulating airway inflammation and reactivity. They are the key mediators of the pathobiology of asthma. Among the eicosanoids, lipoxins (LXs) were the first agents to be identified and recognized as potential anti-inflammatory endogenous lipid mediators. Lipoxins are biosynthesized in vivo at inflammation sites. They result mainly from the interaction between 5 and 15-lipoxygenases (LOs), which are distinct from leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandins (PGs) in structure and function. Leukotrienes are potent proinflammatory mediators and directly and indirectly stimulate fibroblast chemotaxis, proliferation, and collagen synthesis. Prostaglandins have both bronchoconstrictive and bronchoprotective effects and the bronchoconstriction mediated by PGD2 and PGF2alpha is only occurred in asthmatic patients but not in healthy subjects. Lipoxins counter-regulate the proinflammatory actions of LTs and activate resolution of the inflammatory response. At least two classes of receptors, CysLT1 receptors and Asprin-triggered lipoxin A4 (ALX) receptors, can interact with lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and LXA4 analogs to mediate their biologic actions. Allergen challenge initiates airway biosynthesis of LXA4 and increases expression of its receptor. In addition, LXA4 affects the release of interleukin-8 by blood mononuclear cells, and ALX affects calcium influx into epithelial cells. Therefore, the pivotal role of LXs is mediating airway homeostasis, and LXs may be part of a novel, multipronged approach for treating human asthma.

  3. Evaluation of quality of life according to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Natasha Yumi; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Saad, Ivete Alonso Bredda; Morcillo, André Moreno; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate quality of life according to the level of asthma control and degree of asthma severity in children and adolescents. We selected children and adolescents with asthma (7-17 years of age) from the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Campinas Hospital de Clínicas, located in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Asthma control and asthma severity were assessed by the Asthma Control Test and by the questionnaire based on the Global Initiative for Asthma, respectively. The patients also completed the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), validated for use in Brazil, in order to evaluate their quality of life. The mean age of the patients was 11.22 ± 2.91 years, with a median of 11.20 (7.00-17.60) years. We selected 100 patients, of whom 27, 33, and 40 were classified as having controlled asthma (CA), partially controlled asthma (PCA), and uncontrolled asthma (UA), respectively. As for asthma severity, 34, 19, and 47 were classified as having mild asthma (MiA), moderate asthma (MoA), and severe asthma (SA), respectively. The CA and the PCA groups, when compared with the NCA group, showed higher values for the overall PAQLQ score and all PAQLQ domains (activity limitation, symptoms, and emotional function; p Quality of life appears to be directly related to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents, being better when asthma is well controlled and asthma severity is lower.

  4. Forecasting peak asthma admissions in London: an application of quantile regression models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyiri, Ireneous N.; Reidpath, Daniel D.; Sarran, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Asthma is a chronic condition of great public health concern globally. The associated morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation place an enormous burden on healthcare infrastructure and services. This study demonstrates a multistage quantile regression approach to predicting excess demand for health care services in the form of asthma daily admissions in London, using retrospective data from the Hospital Episode Statistics, weather and air quality. Trivariate quantile regression models (QRM) of asthma daily admissions were fitted to a 14-day range of lags of environmental factors, accounting for seasonality in a hold-in sample of the data. Representative lags were pooled to form multivariate predictive models, selected through a systematic backward stepwise reduction approach. Models were cross-validated using a hold-out sample of the data, and their respective root mean square error measures, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values compared. Two of the predictive models were able to detect extreme number of daily asthma admissions at sensitivity levels of 76 % and 62 %, as well as specificities of 66 % and 76 %. Their positive predictive values were slightly higher for the hold-out sample (29 % and 28 %) than for the hold-in model development sample (16 % and 18 %). QRMs can be used in multistage to select suitable variables to forecast extreme asthma events. The associations between asthma and environmental factors, including temperature, ozone and carbon monoxide can be exploited in predicting future events using QRMs.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshoo, Vikram; Haydel, Robert; Saturno, Emilio

    2006-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs in about two thirds of children with asthma. It may simply represent a concomitant unrelated finding or it may be responsible for provoking or worsening asthma. GERD could also be a byproduct of asthma itself. In any case, aggressive treatment of GERD seems to improve asthma outcomes. GERD should be suspected in asthma patients who do not have any known risk factors or those who are becoming difficult to treat.

  6. Guidelines for severe uncontrolled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros Serrano, Carolina; Melero Moreno, Carlos; Almonacid Sánchez, Carlos; Perpiñá Tordera, Miguel; Picado Valles, César; Martínez Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Soto Campos, José Gregorio; Urrutia Landa, Isabel; García Hernández, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    Since the publication, 9 years ago, of the latest SEPAR (Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery) Guidelines on Difficult-to-Control Asthma (DCA), much progress has been made in the understanding of asthmatic disease. These new data need to be reviewed, analyzed and incorporated into the guidelines according to their level of evidence and recommendation. Recently, consensus documents and clinical practice guidelines (CPG) addressing this issue have been published. In these guidelines, specific mention will be made of what the previous DCA guidelines defined as "true difficult-to-control asthma". This is asthma that remains uncontrolled after diagnosis and a systematic evaluation to rule out factors unrelated to the disease itself that lead to poor control ("false difficult-to-control asthma"), and despite an appropriate treatment strategy (Spanish Guidelines for the Management of Asthma [GEMA] steps 5 and 6): severe uncontrolled asthma. In this respect, the guidelines propose a revised definition, an attempt to classify the various manifestations of this type of asthma, a proposal for a stepwise diagnostic procedure, and phenotype-targeted treatment. A specific section has also been included on DCA in childhood, aimed at assisting healthcare professionals to improve the care of these patients. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, asthma and its treatment in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T; Pedersen, L; Larsson, B

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma and the use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of Danish elite athletes was conducted in 2006. All elite athletes (N=418) financially supported by the national...... organization of elite athletes comprised the study group; 329 (79%) completed the questionnaire concerning their sport, asthma-like symptoms, asthma and use of asthma medication. Asthma-like symptoms at rest were reported by 41% of respondents; 55% reported asthma-like symptoms at rest or at exercise....... Physician-diagnosed asthma was present in 16% and 14% had current asthma. Asthma medication was taken by 7% of the athletes, of whom 79% used inhaled corticosteroids and 21% used inhaled beta(2)-agonists only. Athletes participating in endurance sports had higher prevalences of current asthma (24%) and use...

  8. Physical fitness and amount of asthma and asthma-like symptoms from childhood to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg-Møller, Jørgen; Hancox, Bob; Mikkelsen, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The potential benefits of physical activity on the development of respiratory symptoms are not well known. The present study investigated the longitudinal association between physical fitness and the development of asthma-like symptoms from childhood to adulthood in a longitudinal...... community-based study. METHODS: Participants were assessed at ages 9, 15, 20 and 29 years. Asthma-like symptoms and physical fitness was assessed at each age. RESULTS: Tracking for physical fitness was high from age 9 to 29 years. Using logistic regression, high physical fitness at age 9 predicted a lower...... reduced by 2% from early adolescence to young adulthood (ages 9-29 years) by increasing the maximal workload with 1 W/kg. CONCLUSION: This finding provide further evidence of a possible beneficial effect of physical activity in childhood on the development of respiratory symptoms in adulthood and supports...

  9. Acute asthma exacerbations: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. All patient with asthma are at risk of having exacerbations characterized by worsening symptoms, airflow obstruction, and an increased requirement for rescue bronchodilators. Asthma exacerbations can be classified as mild, moderate, severe, or life threatening. The goals of treatment are correction of severe hypoxemia, rapid reversal of airflow obstruction, and reduction of the risk of relapse.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v5i3.932

  10. Occupational asthma in maritime environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, David; Loddé, Brice; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    In 2006 we published our first review based on the available literature on occupational asthma in maritime environments in the “International Maritime Health” journal. Since then, we have obtained a great deal of new knowledge on asthma in seafood workers and fishermen and on the impact...... of exposures from sulphites preservatives, container fumigants etc. in maritime workers. This review aims to provide an update of the current knowledge base about occupational asthma in a maritime context and to provide recommendations regarding medical surveillance of workers at risk....

  11. Tiotropium improves lung function, exacerbation rate, and asthma control, independent of baseline characteristics including age, degree of airway obstruction, and allergic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerstjens, Huib A M; Moroni-Zentgraf, Petra; Tashkin, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    , compared with placebo, independent of baseline characteristics including gender, age, body mass index, disease duration, age at asthma onset, and FEV1 % predicted at screening and reversibility. CONCLUSION: Once-daily tiotropium 5 μg compared with placebo improved lung function, reduced the risk of asthma...... exacerbations and asthma worsening, and improved asthma symptom control, independent of a broad range of baseline characteristics, as add-on to ICS plus LABAs in patients with severe symptomatic asthma. TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov; numbers NCT00772538 and NCT00776984 URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov....

  12. Biomarkers in Asthma: A Real Hope to Better Manage Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzurum, Serpil C.; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Diagnosis and treatment of asthma are currently based on assessment of patient symptoms and physiologic tests of airway reactivity. The morbidities and costs associated with the over and/or under treatment of this common disease, as well as the growing numbers of biologically-specific targeted strategies for therapy, provide a rationale for development of biomarkers to evaluate the presence and type of inflammation in individuals with asthma in order to optimize treatment plans. Research over the past decade has identified an array of biochemical and cellular biomarkers, which reflect the heterogeneous and multiple mechanistic pathways that may lead to asthma. These mechanistic biomarkers offer hope for optimal design of therapies targeting the specific pathways that lead to inflammation. This article provides an overview of blood, urine and airway biomarkers, summarizes the pathologic pathways that they signify, and begins to describe the utility of biomarkers in the future care of patients with asthma. PMID:22929095

  13. Longitudinal changes in clinical outcomes in older patients with asthma, COPD and asthma-COPD overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan-Juan; Gibson, Peter G; Simpson, Jodie L; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2014-01-01

    The progression of obstructive airway diseases (OADs) including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma-COPD overlap syndrome in older adults is not well understood. To examine the prognosis of OADs and to identify potential determinants for longitudinal changes in clinical outcomes. We consecutively recruited 99 older adults (>55 years) with OADs who underwent a multidimensional assessment at baseline and 4 years which involved spirometry, 6-min walk distance (6MWD), assessments of health status (Saint George's Respiratory Questionnaire, SGRQ), comorbidity, and serum and sputum biomarkers. All-cause mortality and respiratory hospitalisation during the follow-up period were recorded. Clinical outcomes were compared between basal and final visits, and changes in clinical outcomes were compared among asthma, COPD and asthma-COPD overlap groups. Associations between clinical parameters, biomarkers and prognosis were examined. After a median follow-up of 4.2 years, outcome data were available for 75 (75.8%) patients. There were 16 (16.2%) deaths. The BODE index predicted all-cause mortality in older people with OADs. While spirometry, 6MWD and SGRQ deteriorated significantly over the 4 years, there was significant heterogeneity in the longitudinal changes in these clinical outcomes. Participants with COPD had a significant decline in FEV1 (p = 0.003), SGRQ (p = 0.030) and 6MWD [decline of 75.5 (93.4) m, p = 0.024]. The change in 6MWD was lower in the asthma-COPD overlap group. Airflow reversibility was associated with a reduced decline in 6MWD. COPD patients had a poor prognosis compared with asthma and asthma-COPD overlap patients. The BODE index is a useful prognostic indicator in older adults with OADs. Both airway disease diagnosis and BODE index warrant specific attention in clinical practice. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Role of Obesity in Asthma Control, the Obesity-Asthma Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Shannon Novosad; Supriya Khan; Bruce Wolfe; Akram Khan

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a disease with distinct phenotypes that have implications for both prognosis and therapy. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between asthma and obesity. Further studies have shown that obese asthmatics have poor asthma control and more severe asthma. This obese-asthma group may represent a unique phenotype. The mechanisms behind poor asthma control in obese subjects remain unclear, but recent research has focused on adipokines and their effects on the airways as ...

  15. Computational analysis of multimorbidity between asthma, eczema and rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Daniel; Pinart, Mariona; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Saeys, Yvan; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Akdis, Mübeccel; Auffray, Charles; Ballereau, Stéphane; Benet, Marta; García-Aymerich, Judith; González, Juan Ramón; Guerra, Stefano; Keil, Thomas; Kogevinas, Manolis; Lambrecht, Bart; Lemonnier, Nathanael; Melen, Erik; Sunyer, Jordi; Valenta, Rudolf; Valverde, Sergi; Wickman, Magnus; Bousquet, Jean; Oliva, Baldo; Antó, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The mechanisms explaining the co-existence of asthma, eczema and rhinitis (allergic multimorbidity) are largely unknown. We investigated the mechanisms underlying multimorbidity between three main allergic diseases at a molecular level by identifying the proteins and cellular processes that are common to them. Methods An in silico study based on computational analysis of the topology of the protein interaction network was performed in order to characterize the molecular mechanisms of multimorbidity of asthma, eczema and rhinitis. As a first step, proteins associated to either disease were identified using data mining approaches, and their overlap was calculated. Secondly, a functional interaction network was built, allowing to identify cellular pathways involved in allergic multimorbidity. Finally, a network-based algorithm generated a ranked list of newly predicted multimorbidity-associated proteins. Results Asthma, eczema and rhinitis shared a larger number of associated proteins than expected by chance, and their associated proteins exhibited a significant degree of interconnectedness in the interaction network. There were 15 pathways involved in the multimorbidity of asthma, eczema and rhinitis, including IL4 signaling and GATA3-related pathways. A number of proteins potentially associated to these multimorbidity processes were also obtained. Conclusions These results strongly support the existence of an allergic multimorbidity cluster between asthma, eczema and rhinitis, and suggest that type 2 signaling pathways represent a relevant multimorbidity mechanism of allergic diseases. Furthermore, we identified new candidates contributing to multimorbidity that may assist in identifying new targets for multimorbid allergic diseases. PMID:28598986

  16. Vitamin D and atopy and asthma phenotypes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollams, Elysia M

    2012-06-01

    To give an overview of the recent research into whether a lack of vitamin D contributes to the development of atopy and asthma in childhood. I describe here the recent epidemiological studies relating vitamin D status to atopy and asthma in children, focusing on determinants of major asthma phenotypes in childhood. Recent findings include the observations that vitamin D levels are inversely associated with degree of corticosteroid use, worsening airflow limitation and increased exacerbations among asthmatics. Low vitamin D has been associated with atopy and asthma in children and adolescents in a community cohort, predominantly in boys, with vitamin D at age 6 predicting these outcomes at 14. I also detail the mechanistic studies examining relevant vitamin D-regulated processes; recent findings include the demonstration that offspring of mice with vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy show reduced lung volume and function. The current literature suggests that intervention to ensure adequate vitamin D levels during both pregnancy and childhood may reduce the development of atopy and asthma in children. However, important questions need to be answered regarding the levels of vitamin D required, which may vary between the sexes and between individuals, and the optimal timing and duration of such intervention.

  17. Psychological aspects in asthma: do psychological factors affect asthma management?

    OpenAIRE

    Baiardini, Ilaria; Sicuro, Francesca; Balbi, Francesco; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Braido, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Despite the regular treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) or ICS plus long-acting beta2-agonists, permits to control de majority of asthmatics, a significant proportion of patients does not respond to this treatment. This review was aimed to explore the role of psychological factors associated to the unsuccessful fulfilment of optimal levels of asthma control, especially in patients suffering from severe asthma. The results of a Medline search were 5510 articles addressed to different ...

  18. Features of the bronchial bacterial microbiome associated with atopy, asthma, and responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durack, Juliana; Lynch, Susan V; Nariya, Snehal; Bhakta, Nirav R; Beigelman, Avraham; Castro, Mario; Dyer, Anne-Marie; Israel, Elliot; Kraft, Monica; Martin, Richard J; Mauger, David T; Rosenberg, Sharon R; Sharp-King, Tonya; White, Steven R; Woodruff, Prescott G; Avila, Pedro C; Denlinger, Loren C; Holguin, Fernando; Lazarus, Stephen C; Lugogo, Njira; Moore, Wendy C; Peters, Stephen P; Que, Loretta; Smith, Lewis J; Sorkness, Christine A; Wechsler, Michael E; Wenzel, Sally E; Boushey, Homer A; Huang, Yvonne J

    2017-07-01

    Compositional differences in the bronchial bacterial microbiota have been associated with asthma, but it remains unclear whether the findings are attributable to asthma, to aeroallergen sensitization, or to inhaled corticosteroid treatment. We sought to compare the bronchial bacterial microbiota in adults with steroid-naive atopic asthma, subjects with atopy but no asthma, and nonatopic healthy control subjects and to determine relationships of the bronchial microbiota to phenotypic features of asthma. Bacterial communities in protected bronchial brushings from 42 atopic asthmatic subjects, 21 subjects with atopy but no asthma, and 21 healthy control subjects were profiled by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial composition and community-level functions inferred from sequence profiles were analyzed for between-group differences. Associations with clinical and inflammatory variables were examined, including markers of type 2-related inflammation and change in airway hyperresponsiveness after 6 weeks of fluticasone treatment. The bronchial microbiome differed significantly among the 3 groups. Asthmatic subjects were uniquely enriched in members of the Haemophilus, Neisseria, Fusobacterium, and Porphyromonas species and the Sphingomonodaceae family and depleted in members of the Mogibacteriaceae family and Lactobacillales order. Asthma-associated differences in predicted bacterial functions included involvement of amino acid and short-chain fatty acid metabolism pathways. Subjects with type 2-high asthma harbored significantly lower bronchial bacterial burden. Distinct changes in specific microbiota members were seen after fluticasone treatment. Steroid responsiveness was linked to differences in baseline compositional and functional features of the bacterial microbiome. Even in subjects with mild steroid-naive asthma, differences in the bronchial microbiome are associated with immunologic and clinical features of the disease. The specific differences identified

  19. Predictors of perceived asthma control among patients managed in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilayyan, Owis; Gogovor, Amede; Mayo, Nancy; Ernst, Pierre; Ahmed, Sara

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the extent to which symptom status, physical activity, beliefs about medications, self-efficacy, emotional status, and healthcare utilization predict perceived asthma control over a period of 16 months among a primary care population. The current study is a secondary analysis of data from a longitudinal study that examined health outcomes of asthma among participants recruited from primary care clinics. Path analysis, based on the Wilson and Cleary and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health frameworks, was used to estimate the predictors of perceived asthma control. The path analysis identified initial perceived asthma control asthma (β = 0.43, p perceived asthma control (total effects, i.e., direct and indirect), while emotional status (β = 0.08, p = 0.03) was a significant indirect predictor through physical activity. The model explained 24 % of the variance of perceived asthma control. Overall, the model fits the data well (χ (2) = 6.65, df = 6, p value = 0.35, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.02, Comparative Fit Index = 0.999, and weighted root-mean-square residual = 0.27). Initial perceived asthma control, current symptoms status, physical activity, and self-efficacy can be used to identify individuals likely to have good perceived asthma control in the future. Emotional status also has an impact on perceived asthma control mediated through physical activity and should be considered when planning patient management. Identifying these predictors is important to help the care team tailor interventions that will allow individuals to optimally manage their asthma, to prevent exacerbations, to prevent other respiratory-related chronic disease, and to maximize quality of life.

  20. Asthma Early Warning System in New York City (aewsnyc) Using Remote Sensing Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassebo, Yasser; Rahman, Zahidur

    2011-06-01

    Asthma is estimated to affect approximately 17.3 million Americans, including 5 million children less than 18 years of age. Of these 5 million children, 1.3 million are less than 5 years of age. Asthma is a major public health problem in NYC particularly in Bronx. 12.5% of new Yorkers have been diagnosed with asthma. 300,000 children in NYC have been diagnosed with asthma up to year of 2000. NYC children were almost twice as likely to be hospitalized due to asthma attacks as the average of US child in 2000. Queens county's diesel pollution risk ranks as the 10th unhealthiest in the US compared to over than 3000 counties. Asthma symptoms are consistent with exposure to a high level of a respiratory irritant gas, smoke fume, vapor, aerosol, particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), and dust. Some types these environmental gaseous such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) can exacerbate preexisting respiratory symptoms in the short-term. Control of air pollution related diseases such as asthma, cancer, and bronchitis is difficult and inefficient due to the uncertainty in the air pollution transportation. Asthma control relies on air pollution detection and reduction. Asthma control can be improved by applying spatial tools such as Remote Sensing (RS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The project long-term goal is to develop a model to predict an Asthma Early Warning System for NYC (AEWSNYC), using two approaches: (1) satellite data error correction collaboratively with (2) Ground-based multiwavelength lidar measurements and NASA back trajectory tools. The proposed method can be used to create an efficient asthma control model globally.

  1. Blood granulocyte patterns as predictors of asthma phenotypes in adults from the EGEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadif, Rachel; Siroux, Valérie; Boudier, Anne; le Moual, Nicole; Just, Jocelyne; Gormand, Frederic; Pison, Christophe; Matran, Regis; Pin, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    To what extent blood granulocyte patterns may predict asthma control remains under-studied. Our aim was to study associations between blood neutrophilia and eosinophilia and asthma control outcomes in adults.Analyses were conducted in 474 asthmatics from the first follow-up of the Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA2), including 242 asthmatics who were adults a decade earlier (EGEA1). At EGEA2, asthma control was assessed using the Global Initiative for Asthma definition (2015), and asthma exacerbations by use of urgent care or courses of oral corticosteroids in the past year. Blood EOS lo /EOS hi was defined as EGEA2, NEU hi was associated with asthma exacerbations and poor asthma control (OR >2.10). EOS hi was associated with higher bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) (OR (95% CI) 2.21 (1.24-3.97)), poor lung function (p=0.02) and higher total IgE level (p=0.002). Almost 50% of asthmatics had a persistent pattern between surveys. Persistent NEU hi was associated with poor asthma control at EGEA2 (OR (95% CI) 3.09 (1.18-7.05)). EOS hi at EGEA1 and persistent EOS hi were associated with higher BHR (OR (95% CI) 2.36 (1.10-5.07) and 3.85 (1.11-13.34), respectively), poor lung function (pEGEA2.Granulocyte patterns were differently associated with asthma outcomes, suggesting specific roles for each one, which could be tested as predictive signatures. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency and its impact on asthma severity in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiar, Nasrin; Alaei, Fariba; Fallah, Shahrzad; Babaie, Delara; Sedghi, Niloofar

    2016-12-17

    Despite obtaining evidences on association between vitamin D and development of lung in fetus, little is known about vitamin D level and its impact on severity of asthma in children. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between the asthma severity and vitamin D deficiency in asthmatic children. This case-control study was conducted on 106 individuals including asthmatic (n = 53) and healthy children (n = 53) who referred to Mofid hospital in Tehran in 2013. The level of serum vitamin D in both groups was measured by radioimmunoassay method at the reference lab and was categorized as sufficient (> 30 ng/ml), insufficient (20 to 30 ng/ml), or deficient (asthma in patients group was classified as controlled, partially controlled, and uncontrolled. In the groups with and without asthma, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 73.6 and 49.1%, and the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency was 18.9 and 18.9%, while normal vitamin D level was revealed in 7.5 and 32.1%, respectively with a significant difference (p = 0.005). Using the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the presence of asthma was associated with reduced level of vitamin D (OR = 1.068, 95% CI: 1.027-1.110, P = 0.001). In this context, the risk for asthma in the children with vitamin D deficiency was 6.3 times of those with normal vitamin D level. Although the presence of asthma was strongly associated with reduced level of vitamin D in serum, neither severity of asthma nor control status of asthma were associated with vitamin D deficiency. The presence of vitamin D deficiency effectively predict increased risk for childhood asthma; however the severity or control status of this event may not be predicted by confirming vitamin D deficiency.

  3. The correlation between the bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and asthma like symptoms by GINA questionnaires for the diagnosis of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, So Yeon; Jo, Young Joo; Chun, Eun Mi

    2014-10-18

    In epidemiological studies of asthma, questionnaires to differentiate asthmatics from non-asthmatics have proven to be cost-effective and convenient. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and the validity of five items for the asthma like questionnaire recommended by the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). A total of 680 subjects who visited the pulmonology department with suspected symptoms of asthma were enrolled. All participants completed five items questionnaires and underwent methacholine bronchial provocation tests (MBPT). The diagnostic value of the questionnaire was assessed through analysis of the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that questionnaires about wheezing, exercise induced dyspnea and pollution-induced dyspnea were useful for differentiating asthmatics from non-asthmatics (adjusted odds ratio (OR) =2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-3.0; OR =2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.5; OR =2.0, 95% CI 1.3-3.0) respectively. A total symptom score of higher than 1 was associated with the highest sensitivity (98.4%) and lowest specificity (9.4%). In contrast, a total symptom score of more than 5 was associated with the highest specificity (91.9%) and lowest sensitivity (18.5%) Although questionnaires are not a sufficiently accurate method for diagnosing asthma, properly selected questionnaire can be used as effective strategies in situations such as private clinics or large population based epidemiologic studies.

  4. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  5. Stay away from asthma triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 86. Durrani SR, Busse WW. Management of asthma in adolescents and adults. In: Adkinson ...

  6. Mediterranean diet and childhood asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calatayud-Sáez, F M; Calatayud Moscoso Del Prado, B; Gallego Fernández-Pacheco, J G; González-Martín, C; Alguacil Merino, L F

    .... The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of a traditional Mediterranean diet on patients diagnosed with childhood asthma and determine if there is a beneficial effect from this dietary intervention...

  7. Obesity, asthma, and oxidative stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernando Holguin; Anne Fitzpatrick

    2010-01-01

    .... Contrary to what has previously been thought, the combination of obesity and asthma, both chronic inflammatory diseases, does not necessarily result in a synergistic effect, leading to even greater oxidative stress...

  8. Allergy and asthma prevention 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto, Antonio; Wahn, Ulrich; Bufe, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases have become one of the epidemics of the 21st century in developed countries. Much of the success of other areas of medicine, such as infectious diseases, lies on preventive measures. Thus, much effort is also being placed lately in the prevention of asthma and allergy....... This manuscript reviews the current evidence, divided into four areas of activity. Interventions modifying environmental exposure to allergens have provided inconsistent results, with multifaceted interventions being more effective in the prevention of asthma. Regarding nutrition, the use of hydrolyzed formulas...... that antiviral vaccines could be useful in the future. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is effective for the treatment of allergic patients with symptoms; the study of its value for primary and secondary prevention of asthma and allergy is in its very preliminary phases. The lack of success in the prevention...

  9. Asthma in Children - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asthma in Children URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/asthmainchildren.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have another allergic disorder, such as hay fever (allergic rhinitis) or food allergies. Asthma is sometimes part of a series of allergic disorders, referred to as the atopic march. Development ...

  11. Passive smoking is associated with poor asthma control during pregnancy: a prospective study of 500 pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grarup, Pernille A; Janner, Julie H; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and tobacco exposure is common among pregnant women. We investigated the effect of passive and active smoking on asthma control during pregnancy. Prospective observational design. Patients had their asthma control, based on symptoms, use of medication, spirometry, and exhaled nitric oxide [FENO], assessed every four weeks during 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy; data on tobacco exposure were also collected prospectively. The primary outcome was episodes of uncontrolled and partly controlled asthma during pregnancy (defined according to GINA-guidelines). A total of 500 pregnant women with asthma (mean age 30.8 years, range 17 to 44) were consecutively included, of whom 32 (6.4%), 115 (23.0%) and 353 (70.6%), respectively, were current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers [NS]. Sixty-five NS (18.4%) reported passive tobacco exposure. NS with passive tobacco exposure had significantly lower FEV1% predicted (ppassive tobacco exposure. The relative risk [RR] of an episode of uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy was 4.5 (95% CI 2.7-7.5: ppassive tobacco exposure compared with NS-women not reporting passive tobacco exposure. Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids, most likely as a marker of more severe asthma, was also associated with a higher risk (RR 8.1, 95% CI 5.1-13.0; pPassive tobacco exposure in never smokers is associated with an increased risk of episodes of uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy, which is likely to have adverse effects on pregnancy outcome.

  12. Linking Asthma Exacerbation and Air Pollution Data: A Step Toward Public Health and Environmental Data Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, Fazlay; Finley, Richard; Marshall, Gailen; Brackin, Bruce; Li, Hui; Williams, Worth; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Luvall, Jeffrey; Rickman, Doug; Crosson, Bill

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that reducing exposure to triggers such as air pollutants can reduce symptoms and the need for medication in asthma patients. However, systems that track asthma are generally not integrated with those that track environmental hazards related to asthma. Tlvs lack of integration hinders public health awareness and responsiveness to these environmental triggers. The current study is a collaboration between health and environmental professionals to utilize NASA-derived environmental data to develop a decision support system (DSS) for asthma prediction, surveillance, and intervention. The investigators link asthma morbidity data from the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) and Mississippi Department of Health (MDH) with air quality data from the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) and remote sensing data from NASA. Daily ambient environmental hazard data for PM2.5 and ozone are obtained from the MDEQ air quality monitoring locations and are combined with remotely sensed data from NASA to develop a state-wide spatial and time series profile of environmental air quality. These data are then used to study the correlation of these measures of air quality variation with the asthma exacerbation incidence throughout the state over time. The goal is to utilize these readily available measures to allow real-time risk assessment for asthma exacerbations. GeoMedStat, a DSS previously developed for biosurveillance, will integrate these measures to monitor, analyze and report the real-time risk assessment for asthma exacerbation throughout the state.

  13. The association of sedentary lifestyle with childhood asthma. The role of nurse as educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantaki, E; Priftis, K N; Antonogeorgos, G; Papoutsakis, C; Drakouli, M; Matziou, V

    2014-01-01

    To provide a summary of the existing published knowledge on the association between sedentary lifestyle and childhood asthma. Twelve years ago, the first longitudinal studies carried out in children showed a relationship between physical activity and asthma. Several epidemiological studies confirmed these findings, with sedentary lifestyle predicting the onset of asthma. A systematic review of epidemiological studies was conducted within the MEDLINE database. Epidemiological studies on children subjects, published in English were included in the review. A comprehensive literature search yielded 50 studies for further consideration. Following the application of the eligibility criteria, we identified 11 studies. A positive association and an excess risk of asthma during childhood were revealed to sedentary lifestyle. The findings proved the association between childhood asthma and sedentary lifestyle. The correlation between bronchial asthma and sedentary life during childhood and identifying whether preventable or treatable risk factors exist needs to be determined. Further research on the topic is essential for safer and standardised conclusions. Asthma can be controlled when managed properly. The role of the nurse as an educator should establish and maintain a relationship with patients in order to help them manage their disease. The steps towards asthma management will help paediatric patients to guide their approach to the condition. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Prospective Large-Scale Field Study Generates Predictive Model Identifying Major Contributors to Colony Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielmanowicz, Merav Gleit; Inberg, Alex; Lerner, Inbar Maayan; Golani, Yael; Brown, Nicholas; Turner, Catherine Louise; Hayes, Gerald J. R.; Ballam, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV) in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees). The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health. PMID:25875764

  15. Prospective large-scale field study generates predictive model identifying major contributors to colony losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merav Gleit Kielmanowicz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, unusually high losses of colonies have been reported by beekeepers across the USA. Multiple factors such as Varroa destructor, bee viruses, Nosema ceranae, weather, beekeeping practices, nutrition, and pesticides have been shown to contribute to colony losses. Here we describe a large-scale controlled trial, in which different bee pathogens, bee population, and weather conditions across winter were monitored at three locations across the USA. In order to minimize influence of various known contributing factors and their interaction, the hives in the study were not treated with antibiotics or miticides. Additionally, the hives were kept at one location and were not exposed to potential stress factors associated with migration. Our results show that a linear association between load of viruses (DWV or IAPV in Varroa and bees is present at high Varroa infestation levels (>3 mites per 100 bees. The collection of comprehensive data allowed us to draw a predictive model of colony losses and to show that Varroa destructor, along with bee viruses, mainly DWV replication, contributes to approximately 70% of colony losses. This correlation further supports the claim that insufficient control of the virus-vectoring Varroa mite would result in increased hive loss. The predictive model also indicates that a single factor may not be sufficient to trigger colony losses, whereas a combination of stressors appears to impact hive health.

  16. The poorly explored impact of uncontrolled asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Schatz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control; however, despite the availability of effective and safe medications, for many patients asthma remains uncontrolled. One reason for this is the fear of long-term side effects from the regular use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Adverse...... effects of poorly controlled asthma (for example, obesity, pneumonia, and risks to the fetus) can be perceived as side effects of ICSs. Poorly controlled asthma adversely affects children's cardiovascular fitness, while children with well-controlled asthma perform at the same level as their peers....... Children with uncontrolled asthma also have a higher frequency of obesity than children with controlled asthma. Stress can affect asthma control, and children with poorly controlled asthma are more likely to have learning disabilities compared with those with good control. In adults, focused attention...

  17. Coexistence of asthma and polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Louise; Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    Asthma may be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and possibly patients with PCOS have a more severe type of asthma. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to summarize evidence of a coexistense of PCOS and asthma using the available literature. The search was completed...... on 01.01.2016. English language articles were retrieved using the search terms 'Asthma' AND 'PCOS', 'Asthma' AND 'systemic inflammation', 'Asthma' AND 'metabolic syndrome', 'asthma' AND 'gynaecology', 'PCOS' AND 'systemic inflammation', 'PCOS' AND 'metabolic syndrome', 'PCOS' AND 'allergy'. Five papers...... meeting prespecified search criteria were found of which two were registry studies of relevance. The current literature supports a coexistense of PCOS and asthma and gives us an indication of the causes for the possible link between PCOS and asthma. Further research in the area must be conducted...

  18. Japanese Guideline for Adult Asthma 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ohta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma (hereinafter, asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, reversible airway narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling to cause intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased, and that of patients who die from asthma has decreased (1.5 per 100,000 patients in 2012. The aim of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to lead a normal life without any symptoms. A good relationship between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management with antiasthmatic agents and elimination of the causes and risk factors of asthma are fundamental to its treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate between mild and intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid, varying from low to high. Long-acting 02-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and sustained-release theophylline are recommended as concomitant drugs, while anti-immunoglobulin E antibody therapy has been recently developed for the most severe and persistent asthma involving allergic reactions. Inhaled 02-agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, and others are used as needed in acute exacerbations by choosing treatment steps for asthma exacerbations depending on the severity of attacks. Allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aspirin-induced asthma, pregnancy, asthma in athletes, and coughvariant asthma are also important issues that need to be considered.

  19. Tartrazine exclusion for allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardern, K D; Ram, F S

    2001-01-01

    Tartrazine is the best known and one of the most commonly used food additives. Food colorants are also used in many medications as well as foods. There has been conflicting evidence as to whether tartrazine causes exacerbations of asthma with some studies finding a positive association especially in individuals with cross-sensitivity to aspirin. To assess the overall effect of tartrazine (exclusion or challenge) in the management of asthma. A search was carried out using the Cochrane Airways Group specialised register. Bibliographies of each RCT was searched for additional papers. Authors of identified RCTs were contacted for further information for their trials and details of other studies. RCTs of oral administration of tartrazine (as a challenge) versus placebo or dietary avoidance of tartrazine versus normal diet were considered. Studies which focused upon allergic asthma, were also included. Studies of tartrazine exclusion for other allergic conditions such as hay fever, allergic rhinitis and eczema were only considered if the results for subjects with asthma were separately identified. Trials could be in either adults or children with asthma or allergic asthma (e.g. sensitivity to aspirin or food items known to contain tartrazine). Study quality was assessed and data abstracted by two reviewers independently. Outcomes were analysed using RevMan 4.1.1. Ninety abstracts were found, of which 18 were potentially relevant. Six met the inclusion criteria, but only three presented results in a format that permitted analysis and none could be combined in a meta-analysis. In none of the studies did tartrazine challenge or avoidance in diet significantly alter asthma outcomes. Due to the paucity of available evidence, it is not possible to provide firm conclusions as to the effects of tartrazine on asthma control. However, the six RCTs that could be included in this review all arrived at the same conclusion. Routine tartrazine exclusion may not benefit most patients

  20. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-01-01

    that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care...... to these outcomes. In conclusion, asthma exacerbations during pregnancy are associated with complications of pregnancy, labour and delivery. Prevention of exacerbations is essential to reduce the risk of complications and poor outcome....

  1. Childhood Asthma: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim M. van Aalderen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many children suffer from recurrent coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. In preschool children one third of all children have these symptoms before the age of six, but only 40% of these wheezing preschoolers will continue to have asthma. In older school-aged children the majority of the children have asthma. Quality of life is affected by asthma control. Sleep disruption and exercised induced airflow limitation have a negative impact on participation in sports and social activities, and may influence family life. The goal of asthma therapy is to achieve asthma control, but only a limited number of patients are able to reach total control. This may be due to an incorrect diagnosis, co-morbidities or poor inhalation technique, but in the majority of cases non-adherence is the main reason for therapy failures. However, partnership with the parents and the child is important in order to set individually chosen goals of therapy and may be of help to improve control. Non-pharmacological measures aim at avoiding tobacco smoke, and when a child is sensitised, to avoid allergens. In pharmacological management international guidelines such as the GINA guideline and the British Guideline on the Management of Asthma are leading.

  2. Indoor Air Quality and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Golden

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous contaminants in indoor air and their potential to cause or exacerbate asthma continue to be a subject of public health concern. Many agents are causally associated with or can exacerbate asthma, particularly in children. For formaldehyde, an established respiratory irritant based on numerous studies, the evidence for an association with asthma is still considered only limited or suggestive. However, there is no evidence that indicates increased sensitivity to sensory irritation to formaldehyde in people often regarded as susceptible such as asthmatics. Acrolein, but not formaldehyde, was significantly associated with asthma in a large cohort of children. This prompted an evaluation of this highly irritating chemical that had never previously been considered in the context of the indoor air/childhood asthma issue. Because acrolein is more potent than formaldehyde as a respiratory irritant and ubiquitous in indoor air, it is plausible that previous studies on potential risk factors and childhood asthma may be confounded by formaldehyde acting as an unrecognized proxy for acrolein.

  3. Building school health partnerships to improve pediatric asthma care: the School-based Asthma Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakumanu, Sujani; Antos, Nicholas; Szefler, Stanley J; Lemanske, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    Children with asthma require care that is seamlessly coordinated so that asthma symptoms are recognized and managed at home and at school. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent consensus recommendations in school-based asthma care. The School-based Asthma Management Program (SAMPRO) provides a widely endorsed framework to coordinate care with schools and consists of four components: establishing a circle of support around the child with asthma; facilitating bidirectional communication between clinicians and schools; comprehensive asthma education for schools; and assessment and remediation of environmental asthma triggers at school. SAMPRO standardizes recommendations for school-based asthma care coordination and provides a toolkit with websites and resources useful for the care of children with asthma in the school setting. The review will discuss the need for coordinated school asthma partnerships, the inception and development of SAMPRO, and its vision to improve pediatric asthma care coordination within the circle of support, comprising clinicians, school nurses, families, and communities.

  4. [Warning symptoms of asthma attack and asthma self-management: a national asthma control survey from China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J T; Wang, W Q; Zhou, X; Wang, C Z; Huang, M; Cai, S X; Chen, P; Lin, Q C; Zhou, J Y; Gu, Y H; Yuan, Y D; Sun, D J; Yang, X H; Yang, L; Huo, J M; Chen, Z C; Jiang, P; Zhang, J; Ye, X W; Liu, H G; Tang, H P; Liu, R Y; Liu, C T; Zhang, W; Hu, C P; Chen, Y Q; Liu, X J; Dai, L M; Zhou, W; Huang, Y J; Xu, J Y

    2017-08-08

    Objective: To investigate warning symptoms of asthma attack and evaluate asthma self-management status of asthma patients in urban China. Methods: A multi-center, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was carried out from 30 general hospitals dispersed in 30 provinces of mainland China (except for Tibet) during Oct 2015 to May 2016. Information of frequency and warning symptoms of asthma attack, the time from warning symptoms to asthma attack, the impact of asthma attack and asthma self-management were collected from asthma patients of outpatient department. Results: Altogether 3 875 asthmatic outpatients were recruited. 78.1% (3 026/3 875) of the patients reported restriction of exercise and daily activities during asthma exacerbation. 82.5% (3 160/3 829) of the patients had warning symptoms before asthma attack, the most common warning symptoms were cough, chest tightness and shortness of breath. The median time from warning symptoms to asthma attack was 2 h, the mean time was 90 h. Only 4.4% (167/3 829) of the patients had definite confidence to control asthma when symptoms deteriorated. 76.7% (2 937/3 828) of the patients used medications to control asthma when asthma symptoms deteriorated. Medication choice: inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) + formoterol 45.8% (1 776/3 875), short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) 23.9% (927/3 875). Conclusions: Most asthma patients have warning symptoms before asthma attack, the most common symptoms are cough, chest tightness and shortness of breath. The proportion of patients conducting effective asthma self-management remains low.

  5. The relation between paracetamol use and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaheen, S; Potts, J; Gnatiuc, L

    2008-01-01

    with adult asthma across Europe. The network compared 521 cases with a diagnosis of asthma and reporting asthma symptoms in the last 12 months with 507 controls with no diagnosis of asthma and no asthmatic symptoms in the last 12 months across 12 European centres. All cases and controls were selected from.......002. There was no evidence for heterogeneity across centres. No association was seen between use of other analgesics and asthma.These data add to the increasing and consistent epidemiological evidence implicating frequent paracetamol use in asthma in diverse populations...

  6. Relevance of Allergy in Adult Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Sameer K.; Viswanathan, Ravi K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on asthma have demonstrated multiple phenotypes of asthma, based on the clinical characteristics of the disease. With the current interest in personalized medicine, the question arises whether the presence of allergic sensitization has any relevance for these phenotypes and the management of asthma. This review will examine the current knowledge of asthma phenotypes and the impact of atopy on asthma diagnosis and severity in adults. In addition, this review will address whether therapies targeted at the atopic axis help improve asthma outcomes, including lung function indices and exacerbations. PMID:24643812

  7. Native Prey and Invasive Predator Patterns of Foraging Activity: The Case of the Yellow-Legged Hornet Predation at European Honeybee Hives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceau, Karine; Arca, Mariangela; Leprêtre, Lisa; Mougel, Florence; Bonnard, Olivier; Silvain, Jean-François; Maher, Nevile; Arnold, Gérard; Thiéry, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to native predators, which have co-evolved with their prey, alien predators often benefit from native prey naïveté. Vespa velutina, a honeybee predator originating from Eastern China, was introduced into France just before 2004. The present study, based on video recordings of two beehives at an early stage of the invasion process, intends to analyse the alien hornet hunting behaviour on the native prey, Apis mellifera, and to understand the interaction between the activity of the predator and the prey during the day and the season. Chasing hornets spent most of their time hovering facing the hive, to catch flying honeybees returning to the hive. The predation pressure increased during the season confirming previous study based on predator trapping. The number of honeybee captures showed a maximum peak for an intermediate number of V. velutina, unrelated to honeybee activity, suggesting the occurrence of competition between hornets. The number of honeybees caught increased during midday hours while the number of hornets did not vary, suggesting an increase in their efficacy. These results suggest that the impact of V. velutina on honeybees is limited by its own biology and behaviour and did not match the pattern of activity of its prey. Also, it could have been advantageous during the invasion, limiting resource depletion and thus favouring colonisation. This lack of synchronization may also be beneficial for honeybee colonies by giving them an opportunity to increase their activity when the hornets are less effective.

  8. Native Prey and Invasive Predator Patterns of Foraging Activity: The Case of the Yellow-Legged Hornet Predation at European Honeybee Hives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Monceau

    Full Text Available Contrary to native predators, which have co-evolved with their prey, alien predators often benefit from native prey naïveté. Vespa velutina, a honeybee predator originating from Eastern China, was introduced into France just before 2004. The present study, based on video recordings of two beehives at an early stage of the invasion process, intends to analyse the alien hornet hunting behaviour on the native prey, Apis mellifera, and to understand the interaction between the activity of the predator and the prey during the day and the season. Chasing hornets spent most of their time hovering facing the hive, to catch flying honeybees returning to the hive. The predation pressure increased during the season confirming previous study based on predator trapping. The number of honeybee captures showed a maximum peak for an intermediate number of V. velutina, unrelated to honeybee activity, suggesting the occurrence of competition between hornets. The number of honeybees caught increased during midday hours while the number of hornets did not vary, suggesting an increase in their efficacy. These results suggest that the impact of V. velutina on honeybees is limited by its own biology and behaviour and did not match the pattern of activity of its prey. Also, it could have been advantageous during the invasion, limiting resource depletion and thus favouring colonisation. This lack of synchronization may also be beneficial for honeybee colonies by giving them an opportunity to increase their activity when the hornets are less effective.

  9. The sound field generated by tethered stingless bees (Melipona scutellaris): inferences on its potential as a recruitment mechanism inside the hive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrncir, Michael; Schorkopf, Dirk Louis P; Schmidt, Veronika M; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Barth, Friedrich G

    2008-03-01

    In stingless bees, recruitment of hive bees to food sources involves thoracic vibrations by foragers during trophallaxis. The temporal pattern of these vibrations correlates with the sugar concentration of the collected food. One possible pathway for transferring such information to nestmates is through airborne sound. In the present study, we investigated the transformation of thoracic vibrations into air particle velocity, sound pressure, and jet airflows in the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris. Whereas particle velocity and sound pressure were found all around and above vibrating individuals, there was no evidence for a jet airflow as with honey bees. The largest particle velocities were measured 5 mm above the wings (16.0+/-4.8 mm s(-1)). Around a vibrating individual, we found maximum particle velocities of 8.6+/-3.0 mm s(-1) (horizontal particle velocity) in front of the bee's head and of 6.0+/-2.1 mm s(-1) (vertical particle velocity) behind its wings. Wing oscillations, which are mainly responsible for air particle movements in honey bees, significantly contributed to vertically oriented particle oscillations only close to the abdomen in M. scutellaris (distances particle velocity alone is strong enough to be detected by Johnston's organ of the bee antenna. Taking the physiological properties of the honey bee's Johnston's organ as the reference, M. scutellaris hive bees are able to detect the forager vibrations through particle movements at distances of up to 2 cm.

  10. Low eosinophils during bronchiolitis in infancy are associated with lower risk of adulthood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Katri; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Ollikainen, Hertta; Korppi, Matti; Piippo-Savolainen, Eija

    2015-11-01

    Infant bronchiolitis may be the first manifestation of asthma. To evaluate the association of early-childhood risk or protective factors for asthma and lung function reduction in adults 30 years after bronchiolitis in infancy. Forty-seven former bronchiolitis patients attended the clinical study at the median age of 29.5 years, including doctoral examination and measurement of post-bronchodilator lung function with flow-volume spirometry. Data on early-life risk factors including blood eosinophil counts on admission for bronchiolitis and on convalescence 4-6 weeks after bronchiolitis were available. Low blood eosinophil count bronchiolitis was a significant protective factor and high blood eosinophil count >0.45 × 10E9/l on convalescence was a significant risk factor for asthma in adulthood independently from atopic status in infancy. Parental asthma and high blood eosinophil count >0.45 × 10E9/l during bronchiolitis were significant risk factors for irreversible airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC ratio below the 5th percentile lower limit of normality after bronchodilation). Our adjusted analyses confirmed that eosinopenia during infant bronchiolitis predicted low asthma risk and eosinophilia outside infection predicted high asthma risk up to the age of 28-31 years. Parental asthma and eosinophilia during bronchiolitis were recognized as risk factors for irreversible airway obstruction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Longitudinal relationships between family routines and biological profiles among youth with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Hannah M C; Chen, Edith

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether longitudinal trajectories of inflammatory markers of asthma can be predicted by levels of family routines in youth with asthma. Family routines were assessed through parent questionnaires and peripheral blood samples obtained from youth every 6 months throughout the 18-month study period. Longitudinal relationships were evaluated using hierarchical linear modeling. Mitogen-stimulated production of cytokines implicated in asthma, specifically IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. Youth with more family routines in their home environment showed decreases in IL-13 (but not IL-4 or IL-5) over the course of the study period. In turn, within-person analyses indicated that at times when stimulated production of IL-13 was high, asthma symptoms were also high, pointing to the clinical relevance of changes in IL-13 over time. A variety of child and parent psychosocial as well as child behavioral characteristics could not explain these effects. However, medication use eliminated the relationship between family routines and stimulated production of IL-13. Our study suggests that family routines predict asthma outcomes at the biological level, possibly through influencing medication use. Considering daily family behaviors when treating asthma may help improve both biological and clinical profiles in youth with asthma.

  12. Tools in Asthma Evaluation and Management: When and How to Use Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Anna; Ainsworth, Alana; Pillarisetti, Naveen

    2017-11-15

    The goals of asthma management are accurate diagnosis, prompt initiation of treatment and monitoring of disease progression to limit potential morbidity and mortality. While the diagnosis and management is largely based on history taking and clinical examination, there are an increasing number of tools available that could be used to aid diagnosis, define phenotypes, monitor progress and assess response to treatment. Tools such as the Asthma Predictive Index could help in making predictions about the possibility of asthma in childhood based on certain clinical parameters in pre-schoolers. Lung function measurements such as peak expiratory flow, spirometry, bronchodilator responsiveness, and bronchial provocation tests help establish airway obstruction and variability over time. Tools such as asthma questionnaires, lung function measurements and markers of airway inflammation could be used in combination with clinical assessments to assess ongoing asthma control. Recent advances in digital technology, which open up new frontiers in asthma management, need to be evaluated and embraced if proven to be of value. This review summarises the role of currently available tools in asthma diagnosis and management. While many of the tools are readily available in resource rich settings, it becomes more challenging when working in resource poor settings. A rational approach to the use of these tools is recommended.

  13. Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae is not related to asthma control, asthma severity, and location of airway obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansarin, Khalil; Abedi, Siavoush; Ghotaslou, Reza; Soroush, Mohammad Hossein; Ghabili, Kamyar; Chapman, Kenneth R

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an organism that reportedly has a strong relationship to asthma. However, asthma severity and location of airway obstruction have not been compared between asthmatic patients with and without evidence for remote mycoplasma infection. Objectives The aim of this research was to study the relationship between previous M. pneumoniae infections in asthmatic patients and presence of any predilection for the involvement of central or peripheral airways, the severity of the disease, and asthma control. Methods Sixty-two patients with asthma were assessed by a validated asthma control test (ACT). All patients underwent spirometry and lung volume studies by body plethysmography. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC), residual volume (RV), and functional residual capacity (FRC) were measured. An oropharyngeal swab was obtained for polymerase chain reaction analysis to detect the mycoplasma antigen. Moreover, blood samples were obtained to measure the titration of antimycoplasma immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies. The asthmatic patients with a positive IgG for mycoplasma and negative PCR and negative IgM antibody were considered to have remote history of mycoplasma infection. The relationship between the asthma control using ACT score and pulmonary function variables were compared in patients with and without evidence for remote mycoplasma infection. Results The incidence of postnasal drip was higher among the patients with asthma who had no evidence for remote mycoplasma infection (61.3% vs 32%, P = 0.035). The median ACT score was 16.5 (11–22) and 20 (13.75–24) in patients with and without remote M. pneumoniae infection, respectively (P > 0.05). In addition, the medians of the predicted values of the pulmonary function test parameters (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FRC, FRC/TLC, RV/TLC, maximal mean expiratory flow 25%–75%, forced expiratory flow [FEF] 50%, and FEF 75%) and

  14. Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, Didier

    2010-01-01

    This chapter first presents a rather personal view of some different aspects of predictability, going in crescendo from simple linear systems to high-dimensional nonlinear systems with stochastic forcing, which exhibit emergent properties such as phase transitions and regime shifts. Then, a detailed correspondence between the phenomenology of earthquakes, financial crashes and epileptic seizures is offered. The presented statistical evidence provides the substance of a general phase diagram for understanding the many facets of the spatio-temporal organization of these systems. A key insight is to organize the evidence and mechanisms in terms of two summarizing measures: (i) amplitude of disorder or heterogeneity in the system and (ii) level of coupling or interaction strength among the system's components. On the basis of the recently identified remarkable correspondence between earthquakes and seizures, we present detailed information on a class of stochastic point processes that has been found to be particu...

  15. Respiratory viruses in bronchiolitis and their link to recurrent wheezing and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2009-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization for children age bronchiolitis (e.g., an episode requiring hospitalization) will develop recurrent wheezing and/or asthma. Although many environmental and genetic factors may play a role in the pathway from bronchiolitis to asthma, this review focuses on the viruses that have been linked to bronchiolitis and how these viruses may predict or contribute to future wheezing and asthma. The review also discusses vitamin D as an emerging risk factor for respiratory infections and wheezing. PMID:19892232

  16. Montelukast or salmeterol combined with an inhaled steroid in adult asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjermer, L; Bisgaard, H; Bousquet, J

    2000-01-01

    Asthma patients who continue to experience symptoms despite taking regular inhaled corticosteroids represent a management challenge. Leukotrienes play a key role in asthma pathophysiology, and since pro-inflammatory leukotrienes are poorly suppressed by corticosteroids it seems rational to add...... utilization, and safety, in approximately 1200 adult asthmatic patients. The requirements for study enrollment include a history of asthma, FEV1 or PEFR values between 50% and 90% of the predicted value together with > or = 12% improvement in FEV1 after beta-agonist administration, a minimum pre...

  17. Physician specialty influences important aspects of pediatric asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Yin Nwe; Majaesic, Carina; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Mandhane, Piushkumar J

    2014-01-01

    Physician training influences patient care. To compare asthma management and change in the percentage predicted FEV1 among pediatric physician specialties. A retrospective cohort of children 6 years of age or older, seen in a multidisciplinary asthma clinic between 2009 and 2010, and followed to 2012, was completed to examine differences in asthma outcomes by specialty (2 pediatricians, 3 pediatric allergists, 5 pediatric respirologists). Univariate analyses compared investigation, including allergy testing (skin prick or RAST), comorbid conditions, and prescription by specialty. Multivariate regression, which controlled for random effect of the individual physician, examined specialty differences for prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and changes in percentage predicted FEV1. More than 56% of the patients (309/548) were seen by pediatric respirologists, 26% by pediatric allergists, and 18% by pediatricians. Physician specialty influences investigation requested, comorbid diagnoses, treatment, and improvement in FEV1. Pediatric allergists' patients had more allergy tests, were more likely to be diagnosed with allergic rhinitis and, consequently, were more likely to be prescribed nasal steroids than pediatricians and pediatric respirologists. Pediatricians were less likely to prescribe ICS (odds ratio 0.39 [95% CI, 0.15-0.96]; P pediatric allergists, with the greatest difference in ICS prescription among children with a percentage predicted FEV1 ≥ 80%. Improvement in FEV1 among children who received care with pediatric allergists was higher than those seen by pediatricians (13%; P pediatric respirologists (8%; P = .005). Patient management domains with the greatest room for discretion (investigations, comorbid diagnoses, and treatment with ICS among children with normal lung function) are most heavily influenced by physician specialty. These results have implications for asthma management at the patient level and in future practice guidelines. Copyright

  18. Humans as animal sentinels for forecasting asthma events: helping health services become more responsive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneous N Soyiri

    Full Text Available The concept of forecasting asthma using humans as animal sentinels is uncommon. This study explores the plausibility of predicting future asthma daily admissions using retrospective data in London (2005-2006. Negative binomial regressions were used in modeling; allowing the non-contiguous autoregressive components. Selected lags were based on partial autocorrelation function (PACF plot with a maximum lag of 7 days. The model was contrasted with naïve historical and seasonal models. All models were cross validated. Mean daily asthma admission in 2005 was 27.9 and in 2006 it was 28.9. The lags 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7 were independently associated with daily asthma admissions based on their PACF plots. The lag model prediction of peak admissions were often slightly out of synchronization with the actual data, but the days of greater admissions were better matched than the days of lower admissions. A further investigation across various populations is necessary.

  19. Environmental issues in managing asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diette, Gregory B; McCormack, Meredith C; Hansel, Nadia N; Breysse, Patrick N; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2008-05-01

    Management of asthma requires attention to environmental exposures both indoors and outdoors. Americans spend most of their time indoors, where they have a greater ability to modify their environment. The indoor environment contains both pollutants (eg, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, secondhand smoke, and ozone) and allergens from furred pets, dust mites, cockroaches, rodents, and molds. Indoor particulate matter consists of particles generated from indoor sources such as cooking and cleaning activities, and particles that penetrate from the outdoors. Nitrogen dioxide sources include gas stoves, furnaces, and fireplaces. Indoor particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide are linked to asthma morbidity. The indoor ozone concentration is mainly influenced by the outdoor ozone concentration. The health effects of indoor ozone exposure have not been well studied. In contrast, there is substantial evidence of detrimental health effects from secondhand smoke. Guideline recommendations are not specific for optimizing indoor air quality. The 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program asthma guidelines recommend eliminating indoor smoking and improving the ventilation. Though the guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend air cleaners, air cleaners and reducing activities that generate indoor pollutants may be sound practical approaches for improving the health of individuals with asthma. The guidelines are more specific about allergen avoidance; they recommend identifying allergens to which the individual is immunoglobin E sensitized and employing a multifaceted, comprehensive strategy to reduce exposure. Outdoor air pollutants that impact asthma include particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide, and guidelines recommend that individuals with asthma avoid exertion outdoors when these pollutants are elevated. Outdoor allergens include tree, grass, and weed pollens, which vary in concentration by season

  20. Future biologic therapies in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirce, Santiago; Bobolea, Irina; Domínguez-Ortega, Javier; Barranco, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    Despite the administration of appropriate treatment, a high number of patients with asthma remain uncontrolled. This suggests the need for alternative treatments that are effective, safe and selective for the established asthma phenotypes, especially in patients with uncontrolled severe asthma. The most promising options among the new asthma treatments in development are biological therapies, particularly those monoclonal antibodies directed at selective targets. It should be noted that the different drugs, and especially the new biologics, act on very specific pathogenic pathways. Therefore, determination of the individual profile of predominant pathophysiological alterations of each patient will be increasingly important for prescribing the most appropriate treatment in each case. The treatment of severe allergic asthma with anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab) has been shown to be effective in a large number of patients, and new anti-IgE antibodies with improved pharmacodynamic properties are being investigated. Among developing therapies, biologics designed to block certain pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-5 (mepolizumab) and IL-13 (lebrikizumab), have a greater chance of being used in the clinic. Perhaps blocking more than one cytokine pathway (such as IL-4 and IL-13 with dulipumab) might confer increased efficacy of treatment, along with acceptable safety. Stratification of asthma based on the predominant pathogenic mechanisms of each patient (phenoendotypes) is slowly, but probably irreversibly, emerging as a tailored medical approach to asthma, and is becoming a key factor in the development of drugs for this complex respiratory syndrome. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Near Fatal Asthma in an Inner City Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Viral; Shenoy, Sundeep; Ganesh, Aarthi; Lankala, Shilpa; Henkle, Joseph

    Near-fatal asthma (NFA) is highly prevalent in inner city population. Patients who present with NFA require timely intervention, which necessitates knowledge of appropriate associated risk factors. The purpose of the study was to look and identify the salient features of an asthma exacerbation that are more likely to be associated with NFA in inner city population. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who were discharged from the hospital with a diagnosis of acute asthma exacerbation. Two hundred eighteen patients were included in the study. Patients who required intubation during the course of their hospitalization were defined as NFA and the rest were defined as non-near-fatal asthma (NNFA). Multiple patient parameters were compared between the 2 groups; 60 patients met the definition of NFA. There was no difference between NFA and NNFA groups with respect to sex, race, and history of smoking and asthma treatment modalities before presentation. NFA was seen more commonly in heroin (40% vs. 25.9%; P NFA patients (55% vs. 40.5%; P = 0.05). A history of intubation for an exacerbation was more commonly seen in patients presenting with NFA (51.7% vs. 35.4%; P 45 mm Hg, and FiO2 >40% on initial blood gas, NFA was predicted only by PaCO2 >45 [odds ratio (OR = 6.7; P 40% (OR = 3.5; P = 0.002). Use of noninvasive ventilation was a negative predictor of NFA (OR = 0.2; P < 0.001). Asthmatic patients who carry a history of intubation with mechanical ventilation for an asthma exacerbation, admissions to the ICU, or those who indulge in recreational drugs like cocaine or heroin should be closely monitored for clinical deterioration.

  2. The role of trait mindfulness in quality of life and asthma control among adolescents with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cillessen, L.J.G.; Ven, M.O.M. van de; Karremans, J.C.T.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The current study focused on the role of trait mindfulness in asthma-related quality of life (QoL) and asthma control in adolescent asthma patients. Furthermore, potential underlying mechanisms (general and asthma-specific stress) of this relationship were investigated. Methods: In this

  3. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma…

  4. Adherence to asthma medication regimens in urban African American adolescents: application of self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Idalski Carcone, April; Lam, Phebe; Ellis, Deborah A; Naar-King, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    Asthma medication adherence is low, particularly among African American adolescents, a high-risk group with respect to asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. This study tested the utility of self-determination theory (SDT), a theory of motivation, to explain adherence to asthma medication regimens in African American adolescents. We used baseline data from 168 urban African American adolescents (Mage = 13.94 years; 61% male) with poorly controlled asthma who were part of a trial testing the efficacy of interventions to improve adherence. Participants and their caregivers were interviewed using the Family Asthma Management System Scale; this study used the Asthma Medication Adherence subscale. Adolescents completed four asthma-specific scales representing the SDT constructs of autonomous motivation (one importance scale), competence (one confidence scale), and relatedness (two scales--family routines and parental support). Using multiple linear regression, we tested the hypothesis that SDT variables would predict adherence. Adherence was significantly correlated with three SDT variables--importance, confidence, and family routines. In multivariate analysis, family routines was the only significant predictor of asthma adherence (p < .001). Asthma management behaviors integrated into and shared among family members was associated with better adherence. Greater confidence was marginally associated with increased adherence (p = .07). Though several variables representing SDT constructs were correlated with adherence, results demonstrate that family routines may be more relevant for African American adolescents' adherence than other SDT constructs. Thus, helping families to share and better integrate asthma care into daily schedules may be an important intervention strategy to improve medication adherence among high-risk African American adolescents. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Identification and validation of asthma phenotypes in Chinese population using cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liang, Rui; Zhou, Ting; Zheng, Jing; Liang, Bing Miao; Zhang, Hong Ping; Luo, Feng Ming; Gibson, Peter G; Wang, Gang

    2017-10-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous airway disease, so it is crucial to clearly identify clinical phenotypes to achieve better asthma management. To identify and prospectively validate asthma clusters in a Chinese population. Two hundred eighty-four patients were consecutively recruited and 18 sociodemographic and clinical variables were collected. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed by the Ward method followed by k-means cluster analysis. Then, a prospective 12-month cohort study was used to validate the identified clusters. Five clusters were successfully identified. Clusters 1 (n = 71) and 3 (n = 81) were mild asthma phenotypes with slight airway obstruction and low exacerbation risk, but with a sex differential. Cluster 2 (n = 65) described an "allergic" phenotype, cluster 4 (n = 33) featured a "fixed airflow limitation" phenotype with smoking, and cluster 5 (n = 34) was a "low socioeconomic status" phenotype. Patients in clusters 2, 4, and 5 had distinctly lower socioeconomic status and more psychological symptoms. Cluster 2 had a significantly increased risk of exacerbations (risk ratio [RR] 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.25), unplanned visits for asthma (RR 1.98, 95% CI 1.07-3.66), and emergency visits for asthma (RR 7.17, 95% CI 1.26-40.80). Cluster 4 had an increased risk of unplanned visits (RR 2.22, 95% CI 1.02-4.81), and cluster 5 had increased emergency visits (RR 12.72, 95% CI 1.95-69.78). Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that cluster grouping was predictive of time to the first asthma exacerbation, unplanned visit, emergency visit, and hospital admission (P clusters as "allergic asthma," "fixed airflow limitation," and "low socioeconomic status" phenotypes that are at high risk of severe asthma exacerbations and that have management implications for clinical practice in developing countries. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss of Asthma Control in Pediatric Patients after Discontinuation of Long-Acting Beta-Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian R. O'Hagan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent asthma recommendations advocate the use of long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs in uncontrolled asthma, but also stress the importance of stepping down this therapy once asthma control has been achieved. The objective of this study was to evaluate downtitration of LABA therapy in pediatric patients who are well-controlled on combination-inhaled corticosteroid (ICS/LABA therapy. Clinical and physiologic outcomes were studied in children with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma after switching from combination (ICS/LABA to monotherapy with ICS. Of the 54 patients, 34 (63% were determined to have stable asthma after the switch, with a mean followup of 10.7 weeks. Twenty (37% had loss of asthma control leading to addition of leukotriene receptor antagonists, increased ICS, or restarting LABA. There were 2 exacerbations requiring treatment with systemic steroids. In patients with loss of control, there was a statistically significant decline in FEV1 (−8% versus −1.9%, =0.03 and asthma control test (−3.2 versus −0.5, =0.03. This did not approach significance for FEF25-75%, exhaled nitric oxide, lung volumes or airway reactivity. No demographic, asthma control measures, or lung function variables predicted loss of control. Pediatric patients with moderate-to-severe persistent asthma who discontinue LABA therapy have a 37% chance of losing asthma control resulting in augmented maintenance therapies. Recent recommendations of discontinuing LABA therapy as soon as control is achieved should be evaluated in a prospective long-term study.

  7. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Farahmand fard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran.   Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data.   Results: The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant (       P=0.046; and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets’ skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038. These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring.   Conclusion: In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions.

  8. Role of biomarkers in understanding and treating children with asthma: towards personalized care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang JE

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jason E Lang,1 Kathryn V Blake21Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Nemours Children's Hospital, Orlando, FL, USA; 2Center for Pharmacogenomics and Translational Research, Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases affecting children. Despite publicized expert panels on asthma management and the availability of high-potency inhaled corticosteroids, asthma continues to pose an enormous burden on quality of life for children. Research into the genetic and molecular origins of asthma are starting to show how distinct disease entities exist within the syndrome of "asthma". Biomarkers can be used to diagnose underlying molecular mechanisms that can predict the natural course of disease or likely response to drug treatment. The progress of personalized medicine in the care of children with asthma is still in its infancy. We are not yet able to apply stratified asthma treatments based on molecular phenotypes, although that time may be fast approaching. This review discusses some of the recent advances in asthma genetics and the use of current biomarkers that can help guide improved treatment. For example, the fraction of expired nitric oxide and serum Immunoglobulin E (IgE (including allergen-specific IgE, when evaluated in the context of recurrent asthma symptoms, are general predictors of allergic airway inflammation. Biomarker assays for secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and cysteinyl leukotrienes are both promising areas of study that can help personalize management, not just for pharmacologic management, but also education and prevention efforts.Keywords: asthma, biomarkers, children, management

  9. Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Correlation in Palm Tree Workers of Jahrom City in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand Fard, Mohammad Amin; Khanjani, Narges; Arabi Mianroodi, Aliasghar; Ashrafi Asgarabad, Ahad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Allergic rhinitis and asthma can be related to occupation. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between asthma or allergic rhinitis and employment in the palm tree gardens of Jahrom, Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 50 palm tree garden workers and a control group of 50 office employees. Data collection included demographics, as well as standard International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and A New Symptom-Based Questionnaire for Predicting the Presence of Asthma (ASQ) questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS22. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, t-test, and logistics regression were used to analyze data. Results: The correlation between asthma and occupation was significant ( P=0.046); and asthma prevalence was higher in palm tree garden workers. However, no relationship was observed between age, duration of employment, smoking cigarettes, hookah, or opium addiction with asthma. Furthermore, in this study, no significant relation was observed between the prevalence of asthma and contact with dust, contact with pets’ skin and hair, family history of asthma, or the use of perfume and air freshener. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (including sneezing, runny nose, and blocked nose) were significantly greater in palm tree garden workers (P=0.038). These symptoms in both workers and office employees were higher in spring. Conclusion: In our study, allergic rhinitis and asthma were more common in palm tree garden workers than in the general population. According to our study, people working in this occupation should take necessary precautions. PMID:28589108

  10. Clinical applications of exhaled nitric oxide for the diagnosis and management of asthma: a consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitt, Myron

    2005-08-01

    detect inflammation. Studies have confirmed increased levels of FE(NO) in both adults and children with asthma. In most studies, FE(NO) was found to be elevated 2- to 3-fold compared with normal controls. There are many determinants of FE(NO) levels, however, and factors other than inflammation must be considered when FE(NO) measurement is used to diagnose and monitor asthma. FE(NO) measurement alone is not sufficient for diagnosing or monitoring asthma, but it can be a valuable addition to current clinical tools. FE(NO) measurement is a noninvasive and reproducible test that is a surrogate measure of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. The test has demonstrated utility in diagnosing and managing asthma and in predicting response to therapy and, therefore, may be an important tool to incorporate into clinical care.

  11. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, ... physicians’ office Health care providers – Other Parents – Home Case Studies Open Airways for Schools Asthma Care Training ...

  12. Asthma mortality in the Danish child population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Inger Merete; Jensen, V B; Bülow, S

    2003-01-01

    Child death due to asthma is a rare and potentially preventable event. We investigated possible risk factors for death due to asthma in children and adolescents, as a step towards preventing or minimizing asthma death in this age group, and improving asthma management and care. We reviewed all 108...... cases of asthma death in 1-19-year-olds in Denmark, 1973-1994. Copies of death certificates, hospital records, information from general practitioners, and autopsy records were obtained. The information was assessed with particular reference to: features and duration of asthma before death; severity...... of asthma; time and place of death; long-term and ongoing medical treatment; quality of medical care; circumstances of final illness; and medical treatment during the final episode of asthma. Age groups of 1-4 years, 5-14 years, and 15-19 years were analyzed separately and in aggregate. Death occurred...

  13. Obesity-related asthma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Nikunj A; Lazarus, Angeline

    2016-08-01

    Obesity as a risk factor for asthma has been identified in previous studies. Additionally, a disproportionate number of patients with severe or difficult-to-control asthma are obese. Patients with obesity-related asthma tend to have worse asthma control and quality of life disproportionate to their pulmonary function tests, are less responsive to corticosteroid therapy, and are more likely to have obesity-related comorbidities such as obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal disease that complicate asthma treatment. With the increasing prevalence of obesity, the prevalence of asthma is anticipated to grow proportionally. Addressing weight loss and encouraging activity is essential in the management of obesity-related asthma. This article briefly overviews the epidemiology, unique distinguishing features, potential mechanisms, and approach to management of patients with obesity-related asthma in adults.

  14. National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Asthma Awards recognizes health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action that demonstrate an environmental component to address asthma triggers, collaborate with others and save healthcare dollars with their programming.

  15. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDCasthma on Twitter to learn more about helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links ... Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, ...

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... physicians’ office Health care providers – Other Parents – Home Case Studies Open Airways for Schools Asthma Care Training ... Informs Design Other Evaluation Resources Multimedia Messages Agencies Working on Asthma Follow @CDCasthma on Twitter to learn ...

  17. New Asthma Guidelines What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know Past Issues / Fall ... on. If you or a relative suffers from asthma, it is important to know that quality care ...

  18. Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Asthma Research: The NIH–NJRC Connection Past Issues / Fall ... the many ways that NIH supports and promotes asthma research is through its strong relationship with National ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking your medicine ...

  20. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and COPD: differences and similarities Share | Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities This article has been reviewed ... or you could have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Because asthma ...

  1. Sleep Problems in Asthma and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mini Series #5 Sleep Problems in Asthma and COPD NORMAL AIRWAY Good quality sleep is important for ... with asthma and/or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) may have sleep issues that can lead to ...

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Territory Data AsthmaStats Asthma and Fair or Poor Health Usual Place for Medical Care among Children Number of Visits to a Health Care Provider(s) among Children Health Care Coverage among ...

  3. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook ... Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, ...

  4. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack ...

  5. Co-morbidities in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma represent a minority of the total asthma population, but carry a majority of the morbidity and healthcare costs. Achieving better asthma control in this group of patients is therefore of key importance. Systematic assessment of patients with possible severe asthma...... to identify treatment barriers and triggers of asthma symptoms, including co-morbidities, improves asthma control and reduces healthcare costs and is recommended by international guidelines on management of severe asthma. This review provides the clinician with an overview of the prevalence and clinical...... impact of the most common co-morbidities in severe asthma, including chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, allergic rhinitis, dysfunctional breathing, vocal cord dysfunction, anxiety and depression, obesity, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD...

  6. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Case Studies Open Airways for Schools Asthma Care Training Wee Wheezers Adventures of Puff Inner City Asthma YES WE CAN Bibliography Breathing Easier Success Stories State Contacts and Programs Evaluation Evaluation Guide Evaluation Webinars 1. Avoiding Evaluation ...

  7. Near-fatal asthma in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Nydia

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects the elderly as often as other age groups; however, it more often becomes fatal in the elderly. Unfortunately, asthma is often unmanaged or underdiagnosed in the older population. It is important for health care providers to recognize risk factors in the elderly and properly treat them before asthma becomes fatal. This article describes near-fatal asthma and identifies risk factors specifically for the elderly. Symptoms of asthma are reviewed as well as assessments and diagnostic tests to identify asthma severity and complications. Proper management needs to be urgently initiated to prevent worsening respiratory distress; this includes fast-acting drug treatments appropriate for elderly patients. Decompensated acute respiratory failure, secondary to severe asthma, requires the skills of an experienced anesthesiologist because these patients may rapidly deteriorate during induction and intubation. Ventilator management must include strategies to prevent worsening hyperinflation of the lungs. Elderly asthma patients have a higher mortality risk related to ventilator complications and other comorbidities.

  8. Vitamin D and asthma: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Junfang; Castro, Mario

    2015-08-01

    To review the current evidence on the relationship between vitamin D and asthma. The rising morbidity and tremendous socioeconomic burden of asthma have prompted efforts to seek modifiable environmental and nutritional factors that contribute to the asthma epidemic. The association between low levels of vitamin D and asthma has been supported by many, but not all observational and epidemiologic studies. Recently, several controlled clinical trials have been undertaken to explore the effect of vitamin D supplementation on asthma control and respiratory tract infections. While some trials support the beneficial role of vitamin D supplementation in reducing asthma severity in children, several trials have found no beneficial role in adults. Given the high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in children and adults worldwide and recent randomized controlled trials of vitamin D in asthma, supplementation with vitamin D cannot be recommended as adjunctive therapy for asthma.

  9. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Current Asthma Asthma and Fair or Poor Health Usual Place for Medical Care among Children Number of Visits to a Health Care Provider(s) among Children Health Care Coverage among ...

  10. Recent developments regarding periostin in bronchial asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Izuhara, Kenji; Matsumoto, Hisako; Ohta, Shoichiro; Ono, Junya; Arima, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Although it is currently recognized that bronchial asthma is not a single disease but a syndrome, we have not yet made use of our new understanding of this heterogeneity as we treat asthma patients...

  11. Neurotrophins in bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renz Harald

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergic bronchial asthma (BA is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, development of airway hyperreactivity and recurrent reversible airway obstruction. T-helper 2 cells and their products have been shown to play an important role in this process. In contrast, the mechanisms by which immune cells interact with the cells residing in lung and airways, such as neurons, epithelial or smooth muscle cells, still remains uncertain. Sensory and motor neurons innervating the lung exhibit a great degree of functional plasticity in BA defined as 'neuronal plasticity'. These neurons control development of airway hyperresponsiveness and acute inflammatory responses, resulting in the concept of 'neurogenic inflammation'. Such quantitative and/or qualitative changes in neuronal functions are mediated to a great extent by a family of cytokines, the neurotrophins, which in turn are produced by activated immune cells, among others in BA. We have therefore developed the concept that neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor link pathogenic events in BA to dysfunctions of the immune and nervous system.

  12. [Laboratory animal; allergy; asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, M; Romano, C; Mutti, A

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory animal allergy (LAA) may develop when susceptible persons are exposed to allergens produced by laboratory animals. LAA is associated with exposure to urine, fur, and salivae of rats, guinea pigs, dogs and rabbits. Approximately 30% of persons who are exposed to laboratory animals may develop LAA and some will also develop asthma. LAA is most likely to occur in persons with previously known allergies, especially to domestic pets. The majority of LAA sufferers experience symptoms within six months their first exposure to laboratory animals; almost all develop symptoms within three years. The most common symptoms are watery eyes and an itchy, runny nose, although skin symptoms and lower respiratory tract symptoms may also occur. Feeding and handling laboratory animals or cleaning their cages generates ten times the amount of allergens compared with undisturbed conditions. Prevention of animal allergy depends on control of allergenic material in the work environment and on organizational and individual protection measures. Pre-placement evaluation and periodic medical surveillance of workers are important pieces of the overall occupational health programme. The emphasis of these medical evaluations should be on counselling and early disease detection.

  13. The clinical role of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Suguru; Saito, Junpei; Fukuhara, Atsuro; Uematsu, Manabu; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Togawa, Ryuichi; Sato, Yuki; Nikaido, Takefumi; Wang, Xintao; Tanino, Yoshinori; Munakata, Mitsuru

    2017-12-01

    The potential role and characteristics of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) remain unclear in the treatment of asthma. To explore the clinical role of FeNO in asthmatic treatment. We evaluated whether the mean or change of FeNO levels in the treatment period is associated with other conventional control parameters and predicted some clinical outcomes of asthma. We retrospectively analyzed the mean and percentage change of FeNO levels in the first 5 measurements at our hospital. The study found a significantly strong correlation between FeNO level at diagnosis and the largest changes of FeNO values from diagnosis. No significant correlations were observed between FeNO levels and other parameters (Asthma Control Test [ACT] score or forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1]) in mean and percentage change of values under treatment of asthma; however, significant positive correlations were found between ACT scores and FEV1. The mean FeNO level revealed a significant negative correlation with an annual change in FEV1 in individuals with asthma who were followed up for more than 2 years. Both the mean ACT score and percent predicted FEV1 revealed a significant negative correlation with occasional use of systemic corticosteroids. During conventional treatment of asthma, the largest changes of FeNO values from diagnosis were strongly correlated with FeNO levels at diagnosis. As for the unlikely conventional parameters, no significant associations were observed between FeNO levels and deterioration of asthma during the treatment periods. An elevated mean FeNO level may be a marker of decreased lung function in individuals with asthma. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Asthma and atopic dermatitis in children born moderately and late preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haataja, Paula; Korhonen, Päivi; Ojala, Riitta; Hirvonen, Mikko; Paassilta, Marita; Gissler, Mika; Luukkaala, Tiina; Tammela, Outi

    2016-06-01

    This national register study aimed to evaluate the need of asthma medication reimbursement and hospitalization due to asthma and atopic dermatitis up to 7 years of age in moderately preterm (MP) (32-33 weeks) and late preterm (LP) (34-36 weeks) children compared to very preterm (VP) (children. Altogether, 1,018,302 children born in Finland between 1991 and 2008 were assessed. The MP and LP groups received asthma medication reimbursement more frequently than term controls (8.0 and 5.7 vs. 3.8 %), but less frequently than VP children (15.4 %). Hospitalization due to asthma was more common among MP (10.6 %) and LP (7.3 %) children than term children (4.8 %) but less common than in VP children (20.1 %). Hospitalization due to atopic dermatitis was more frequent among term (5.2 %) compared to MP (4.2 %) and LP (4.7 %) children. Male sex, maternal smoking, maternal diabetes, and ventilator therapy predicted asthma medication in the MP and/or LP children. MP and LP children seem to need medication and hospitalization for asthma more often than term controls but less frequently than VP children followed by 7 years of age. Hospitalization due to atopic dermatitis becomes more common with increasing gestational age. • MP and LP infants have an increased risk for early respiratory morbidity and to asthma. • Less is known on the occurrence of atopic dermatitis in this patient group. What is New: • Medication and hospital care due to asthma were more frequent in school-aged MP and LP than in term infants. Male sex, maternal smoking, maternal diabetes and ventilator therapy predicted asthma. • Hospitalization due to atopic dermatitis became more common with increasing gestational age.

  15. Svær asthma bronchiale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health......-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors....

  16. Role of inflammation in nocturnal asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    MacKay, T. W.; Wallace, W A; Howie, S. E.; Brown, P. H.; Greening, A P; Church, M. K.; Douglas, N. J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Nocturnal airway narrowing is a common problem for patients with asthma but the role of inflammation in its pathogenesis is unclear. Overnight changes in airway inflammatory cell populations were studied in patients with nocturnal asthma and in control normal subjects. METHODS--Bronchoscopies were performed at 0400 hours and 1600 hours in eight healthy subjects and in 10 patients with nocturnal asthma (> 15% overnight fall in peak flow plus at least one awakening/week with asthma)...

  17. Obesity and Asthma: Microbiome–Metabolome Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Shore, Stephanie A.; Cho, Youngji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but obese subjects with asthma respond poorly to standard asthma drugs. Obesity also alters gut bacterial community structure. Obesity-related changes in gut bacteria contribute to weight gain and other obesity-related conditions, including insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. Here, we review the rationale for the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in gut bacteria may also play a role in obesity-related asthma. The metabolomes of the liver, s...

  18. Evaluation of the feasibility of a school-based asthma management programme in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maa, Suh-Hwa; Chang, Yue-Cune; Chou, Chun-Liang; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Sheng, Te-Fang; Macdonald, Karen; Wang, Yanping; Shen, Yu-Ming; Abraham, Ivo

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a school-based asthma management programme for middle school children. Asthma rates are increasing among school-aged children. Successful asthma treatment in children depends in part on clear communication and effective education. This feasibility study employed a one-group only longitudinal design with four time points over 18 months. Nineteen female and twelve male (n = 31) seventh-grade children with asthma (13 SD 0·71 years) were identified using a six-stage asthma case-finding approach. Teachers and school staff were trained in the principles and methods of the proposed school-based asthma management programme. An individualised guided asthma self-management programme was developed for each child by a clinical team at a major academic medical centre. We assisted teachers in implementing the school programme; building a support network and monitoring children's activities. Outcome measures included lung function tests (at 0, six, 12 and 18 months), disease-related symptoms, psychosocial status and impact of asthma on learning (at 0 and 18 months). School provided data on academic achievement and school absences at 0, six, 12 and 18 months. Significant improvements were noted at six, 12 and 18 months on forced vital capacity (FVC)% of predicted (p = 0·001, 0·015, 0·015, respectively), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1) )% of predicted (p = 0·001, 0·006, 0·088, respectively) and FEV(1) /FVC% of predicted (p = 0·001, 0·015, 0·099, respectively). There was a trend towards improved asthma symptoms (p = 0·050) and a significant decrease in positive perception of curriculum (p = 0·017) at 18 months after adjustment for covariates. This programme was associated with respiratory benefits on physiological asthma markers commonly, with a trend for symptom control. Academic and psychosocial outcomes are subject of further inquiry. School-based asthma management holds promise as a feasible clinical option for middle

  19. "Association between Asthma Severity and Obesity in Two Asthma Clinics in Tehran "

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaz Tavasoli; Hassan Heidarnazhad; Anooshirvan Kazemnejad; Sara Miri

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of both obesity and asthma has increased in recent years. Thus we decided to investigate the relation between obesity and asthma severity. We undertook a cross-sectional study in outpatient asthma clinics of 2 tertiary hospitals in Tehran. Obesity was defined as a body mass index greater than 30. Asthma severity was defined by using the Guide for Asthma Management and Prevention 2004 guidelines, according to patients’ clinical and/or spirometerical parameters. Active cigare...

  20. Risk of asthma exacerbation associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in childhood asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Pei-Chia; Tsai, Yueh-Ting; Lin,Shun-Ku; Lai, Jung-Nien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients allergic to aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) who develop respiratory reactions such as bronchospasm or asthma exacerbation have aspirin-induced asthma or NSAIDs-exacerbated respiratory disease. However, large-scale studies have not been conducted to investigate the risk of aspirin/NSAIDs exposure in children with asthma. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationship between aspirin/NSAIDs and the risk of asthma exacerbation in children with asthma....