WorldWideScience

Sample records for hiv-1 vaccine delivery

  1. HIV-1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  2. Lessons from HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Michael, Nelson L

    2016-11-01

    Only four HIV-1 vaccine concepts have been tested in six efficacy trials with no product licensed to date. Several scientific and programmatic lessons can be learned from these studies generating new hypotheses and guiding future steps. RV144 [ALVAC-HIV (canarypox vector) and AIDSVAX B/E (bivalent gp120 HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE)] remains the only efficacy trial that demonstrated a modest vaccine efficacy, which led to the identification of immune correlates of risk. Progress on subtype-specific, ALVAC (canarypox vector) and gp120 vaccine prime-boost approaches has been slow, but we are finally close to the launch of an efficacy study in Africa in 2016. The quest of a globally effective HIV-1 vaccine has led to the development of new approaches. Efficacy studies of combinations of Adenovirus type 26 (Ad26)/Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)/gp140 vaccines with mosaic designs will enter efficacy studies mid-2017 and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-vectored vaccines begin Phase I studies at the same time. Future HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials face practical challenges as effective nonvaccine prevention programs are projected to decrease HIV-1 incidence. An HIV-1 vaccine is urgently needed. Increased industry involvement, mobilization of resources, expansion of a robust pipeline of new concepts, and robust preclinical challenge studies will be essential to accelerate efficacy testing of next generation HIV-1 vaccine candidates.

  3. A global approach to HIV-1 vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2013-01-01

    Summary A global human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccine will have to elicit immune responses capable of providing protection against a tremendous diversity of HIV-1 variants. In this review, we first describe the current state of the HIV-1 vaccine field, outlining the immune responses that are desired in a global HIV-1 vaccine. In particular, we emphasize the likely importance of Env-specific neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies for protection against HIV-1 acquisition and the likely importance of effector Gag-specific T lymphocytes for virologic control. We then highlight four strategies for developing a global HIV-1 vaccine. The first approach is to design specific vaccines for each geographic region that include antigens tailor-made to match local circulating HIV-1 strains. The second approach is to design a vaccine that will elicit Env-specific antibodies capable of broadly neutralizing all HIV-1 subtypes. The third approach is to design a vaccine that will elicit cellular immune responses that are focused on highly conserved HIV-1 sequences. The fourth approach is to design a vaccine to elicit highly diverse HIV-1-specific responses. Finally, we emphasize the importance of conducting clinical efficacy trials as the only way to determine which strategies will provide optimal protection against HIV-1 in humans. PMID:23772627

  4. Design and pre-clinical evaluation of a universal HIV-1 vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Létourneau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the big roadblocks in development of HIV-1/AIDS vaccines is the enormous diversity of HIV-1, which could limit the value of any HIV-1 vaccine candidate currently under test. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: To address the HIV-1 variation, we designed a novel T cell immunogen, designated HIV(CONSV, by assembling the 14 most conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome into one chimaeric protein. Each segment is a consensus sequence from one of the four major HIV-1 clades A, B, C and D, which alternate to ensure equal clade coverage. The gene coding for the HIV(CONSV protein was inserted into the three most studied vaccine vectors, plasmid DNA, human adenovirus serotype 5 and modified vaccine virus Ankara (MVA, and induced HIV-1-specific T cell responses in mice. We also demonstrated that these conserved regions prime CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell to highly conserved epitopes in humans and that these epitopes, although usually subdominant, generate memory T cells in patients during natural HIV-1 infection. SIGNIFICANCE: Therefore, this vaccine approach provides an attractive and testable alternative for overcoming the HIV-1 variability, while focusing T cell responses on regions of the virus that are less likely to mutate and escape. Furthermore, this approach has merit in the simplicity of design and delivery, requiring only a single immunogen to provide extensive coverage of global HIV-1 population diversity.

  5. Development of an epitope-based HIV-1 vaccine strategy from HIV-1 lipopeptide to dendritic-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surenaud, Mathieu; Lacabaratz, Christine; Zurawski, Gérard; Lévy, Yves; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Development of a safe, effective and globally affordable Human Immunodeficiency Virus strain 1 (HIV-1) vaccine offers the best hope for future control of the HIV-1 pandemic. However, with the exception of the recent RV144 trial, which elicited a modest level of protection against infection, no vaccine candidate has shown efficacy in preventing HIV-1 infection or in controlling virus replication in humans. There is also a great need for a successful immunotherapeutic vaccine since combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) does not eliminate the reservoir of HIV-infected cells. But to date, no vaccine candidate has proven to significantly alter the natural history of an individual with HIV-1 infection. Areas covered: For over 25 years, the ANRS (France Recherche Nord&Sud Sida-HIV hépatites) has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research developing an epitope-based vaccine strategy to induce a multiepitopic cellular response against HIV-1. This review describes the evolution of concepts, based on strategies using HIV-1 lipopeptides towards the use of dendritic cell (DC) manipulation. Expert commentary: Understanding the crucial role of DCs in immune responses allowed moving from the non-specific administration of HIV-1 sequences with lipopeptides to DC-based vaccines. These DC-targeting strategies should improve HIV-1 vaccine efficacy.

  6. Varicella vaccination in HIV-1-infected children after immune reconstitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bekker; G.H.A. Westerlaken; H. Scherpbier; S. Alders; H. Zaaijer; D. van Baarle; T. Kuijper

    2006-01-01

    Background: HIV-1-infected children have an increased risk of severe chickenpox. However, vaccination is not recommended in severely immunocompromised children. Objective: Can the live-attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) Oka strain be safely and effectively given to HIV-1-infected children despi

  7. HIV-1 VACCINES. Diversion of HIV-1 vaccine-induced immunity by gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly E; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, M Juliana; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S; Baden, Lindsey R; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-14

    An HIV-1 DNA prime vaccine, with a recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) boost, failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than to gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells responded to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies were non-neutralizing and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens, including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next-generation sequencing of an immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region repertoire before vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Immunogenicity of a recombinant measles HIV-1 subtype C vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbings, Richard; Li, Bo; Lorin, Clarisse; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Février, Michèle; Mee, Edward T; Page, Mark; Almond, Neil; Tangy, Frédéric; Voss, Gérald

    2013-12-09

    The HIV epidemic is greatest in Sub-Saharan Africa and India where HIV-1 subtype C is predominant. To control the spread of HIV in these parts of the world a preventive HIV-1 subtype C vaccine is urgently required. Here we report the immunogenicity of a candidate HIV-1 subtype C vaccine delivered by a recombinant measles vector carrying an insert encoding HIV-1 subtype C Gag, RT and Nef (MV1-F4), in MHC-typed non-human primates. HIV-1 specific cytokine secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were detected in 15 out of 16 vaccinees. These HIV-specific T cell responses persisted in lymphoid tissues. Anti-HIV-1 antibody responses were detected in 15 out of 16 vaccinees and titres were boosted by a second immunisation carried out 84 days later. These findings support further exploration of the MV1-F4 vector as a candidate HIV-1 subtype C vaccine or as part of a wider vaccine strategy.

  9. Novel directions in HIV-1 vaccines revealed from clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Russell, Nina D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Considerable HIV-1 vaccine development efforts have been deployed over the past decade. Put into perspective, the results from efficacy trials and the identification of correlates of risk have opened large and unforeseen avenues for vaccine development. Recent findings The Thai efficacy trial, RV144, provided the first evidence that HIV-1 vaccine protection against HIV-1 acquisition could be achieved. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop inversely correlated with decreased risk of infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with risk. Further clinical trials will focus on testing new envelope subunit proteins formulated with adjuvants capable of inducing higher and more durable functional antibody responses (both binding and broadly neutralizing antibodies). Moreover, vector-based vaccine regimens that can induce cell-mediated immune responses in addition to humoral responses remain a priority. Summary Future efficacy trials will focus on prevention of HIV-1 transmission in heterosexual population in Africa and men who have sex with men in Asia. The recent successes leading to novel directions in HIV-1 vaccine development are a result of collaboration and commitment among vaccine manufacturers, funders, scientists and civil society stakeholders. Sustained and broad collaborative efforts are required to advance new vaccine strategies for higher levels of efficacy. PMID:23743791

  10. Prospects for a globally effective HIV-1 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2015-11-27

    A globally effective vaccine strategy must cope with the broad genetic diversity of HIV and contend with multiple transmission modalities. Understanding correlates of protection and the role of diversity in limiting protective vaccines with those correlates is key. RV144 was the first HIV-1 vaccine trial to demonstrate efficacy against HIV-1 infection. A correlates analysis compared vaccine-induced immune responses in vaccinated-infected and vaccinated-uninfected volunteers suggested that IgG specific for the V1V2 region of gp120 was associated with reduced risk of HIV-1 infection and that plasma Env IgA was directly correlated with infection risk. RV144 and recent NHP challenge studies suggest that Env is essential and perhaps sufficient to induce protective antibody responses against mucosally acquired HIV-1. Whether RV144 immune correlates can apply to different HIV vaccines, to populations with different modes and intensity of transmission, or to divergent HIV-1 subtypes remains unknown. Newer prime-boost mosaic and conserved sequence immunization strategies aiming at inducing immune responses of greater breadth and depth as well as the development of immunogens inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies should be actively pursued. Efficacy trials are now planned in heterosexual populations in southern Africa and MSM in Thailand. Although NHP challenge studies may guide vaccine development, human efficacy trials remain key to answer the critical questions leading to the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine for licensure. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine and Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. The Quest for an HIV-1 Vaccine Adjuvant: Bacterial Toxins as New Potential Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashar, Toufic O

    2014-06-01

    While tremendous efforts are undergoing towards finding an effective HIV-1 vaccine, the search for an HIV-1 vaccine adjuvant lags behind and is understudied. More recently, however, efforts have focused on testing adjuvant formulations that can boost the immune response and generate broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 ENV (gp160). Despite this, there remain a number of challenges towards achieving this goal. These include safety of adjuvant formulations; stability of the incorporated antigens; maintenance of ENV immunogenicity; optimal inoculation sites; the effective combination of adjuvants; stability of ENV neutralizing epitopes in some adjuvant formulations; mucosal immunity; and long-term maintenance of the immune response. A new class of adjuvants for HIV-1 proteins is suggested to overcome many of the limitations of some other adjuvants. Type 1 (LT-I) and type 2 (LT-II) human E. coli enterotoxins (HLTs) and their non-toxic B-subunits derivatives are strong systemic and mucosal adjuvants and effective carriers for other proteins and epitopes. Their stable molecular structure in the presence of fused proteins and epitopes, and their ability to target surface receptors on antigen presenting cells make them ideal for the delivery of HIV-1 ENV or HIV other proteins. Importantly, unlike some other adjuvants, HLTs and derivatives have well-defined modes of immune system activation. The challenges in finding optimal HIV-1 vaccine adjuvant formulation and the important properties of HLTs are discussed.

  12. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Neubauer, George H; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. HIV-1 Polymorphism: a Challenge for Vaccine Development - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgado MG

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The perspective for the development of anti-HIV/AIDS vaccines became a target sought by several research groups and pharmaceutical companies. However, the complex virus biology in addition to a striking genetic variability and the limited understanding of the immunological correlates of protection have made this an enormous scientific challenge not overcome so far. In this review we presented an updating of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant viruses circulating in South American countries, focusing mainly on Brazil, as one of the challenges for HIV vaccine development. Moreover, we discussed the importance of stimulating developing countries to participate in the process of vaccine evaluation, not only testing vaccines according to already defined protocols, but also working together with them, in order to take into consideration their local information on virus diversity and host genetic background relevant for the vaccine development and testing, as well as including local virus based reagents to evaluate the immunogenicity of the candidate vaccines.

  14. HIV-1 neutralization: mechanisms and relevance to vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Michael B; Burton, Dennis R

    2007-11-01

    Antibody (Ab) mediated neutralization is a crucial means of host resistance to many pathogens and will most likely be required in the development of a vaccine to protect against HIV-1. Here we examine mechanistic aspects of HIV-1 neutralization with attention to recent studies on the stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters involved. Neutralization of HIV-1, as with any microbe, minimally requires an initial molecular encounter with Ab. Ab occupancy of functional heterotrimers of the envelope glycoproteins, gp120 and gp41 (Env), indeed appears to be the dominant mechanism of neutralization for HIV-1. However, the Ab-binding site, the parameters mentioned above, as well as the stages and duration of vulnerability to Ab recognition, prior to and leading up to viral entry, each have a distinct impact on the mechanism of neutralization for any given Ab specificity. With HIV-1, the problems of mutational variation and neutralization resistance, coupled with the lability and conformational heterogeneity in Env, have stimulated the search for rational approaches to Env immunogen design that are unprecedented in vaccinology.

  15. Construction of HIV-1 Virus-like Particle Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dong-hai; ZHANG Xi-zhen; YU Xiang-hui; KONG Wei

    2008-01-01

    The virus-like particle(VLPs) vaccine is an ideal HIV-1 vaccine,which can simultaneously induce a neutralizing antibody reaction and ceil-mediated immunity effectively.In this study,two kinds of plasmids have been used,one can express the HIV-1 main structure proteins,Gagpol and Env,and the other contains an antibiotic gene.The two kinds of plasmids have been cotransfected into 293 cells.A stable cell line that can express Gagpol and Env proteins efficiently and lastingly has been screened.It has been confirmed that Gagpol and Env proteins in the cell culture supernatant can be self-assembled into virus-like particles.The authors have detected the secretion of VLPs in the cell medium,defined the peak of the secretion,and followed and monitored the stability of expression.

  16. HIV-1 DNA vaccine with adjuvant cytokines induces specific immune responses against HIV-1 infection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fu-xiang; SUN Yong-tao; WANG Lin-xu; LIU Juan

    2006-01-01

    @@ There is mounting evidence that the induction of strong mucosal and cell-mediated immune responses is key element to consider in constructing efficacious HIV-1 vaccine. Therapeutic vaccines that induce high levels of CTL specific to HIV are currently being developed worldwide.

  17. Heterologous Prime-Boost HIV-1 Vaccination Regimens in Pre-Clinical and Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L. Hurwitz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are more than 30 million people infected with HIV-1 and thousands more are infected each day. Vaccination is the single most effective mechanism for prevention of viral disease, and after more than 25 years of research, one vaccine has shown somewhat encouraging results in an advanced clinical efficacy trial. A modified intent-to-treat analysis of trial results showed that infection was approximately 30% lower in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group. The vaccine was administered using a heterologous prime-boost regimen in which both target antigens and delivery vehicles were changed during the course of inoculations. Here we examine the complexity of heterologous prime-boost immunizations. We show that the use of different delivery vehicles in prime and boost inoculations can help to avert the inhibitory effects caused by vector-specific immune responses. We also show that the introduction of new antigens into boost inoculations can be advantageous, demonstrating that the effect of ‘original antigenic sin’ is not absolute. Pre-clinical and clinical studies are reviewed, including our own work with a three-vector vaccination regimen using recombinant DNA, virus (Sendai virus or vaccinia virus and protein. Promising preliminary results suggest that the heterologous prime-boost strategy may possibly provide a foundation for the future prevention of HIV-1 infections in humans.

  18. In vivo electroporation enhances the immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Vasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA-based vaccines have been safe but weakly immunogenic in humans to date. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sought to determine the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of ADVAX, a multigenic HIV-1 DNA vaccine candidate, injected intramuscularly by in vivo electroporation (EP in a Phase-1, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial in healthy volunteers. Eight volunteers each received 0.2 mg, 1 mg, or 4 mg ADVAX or saline placebo via EP, or 4 mg ADVAX via standard intramuscular injection at weeks 0 and 8. A third vaccination was administered to eleven volunteers at week 36. EP was safe, well-tolerated and considered acceptable for a prophylactic vaccine. EP delivery of ADVAX increased the magnitude of HIV-1-specific cell mediated immunity by up to 70-fold over IM injection, as measured by gamma interferon ELISpot. The number of antigens to which the response was detected improved with EP and increasing dosage. Intracellular cytokine staining analysis of ELISpot responders revealed both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, with co-secretion of multiple cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first demonstration in healthy volunteers that EP is safe, tolerable, and effective in improving the magnitude, breadth and durability of cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine candidate. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00545987.

  19. Protective efficacy of a global HIV-1 mosaic vaccine against heterologous SHIV challenges in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch, Dan H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Borducchi, Erica N; Smith, Kaitlin; Stanley, Kelly; McNally, Anna G; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Seaman, Michael S; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Alter, Galit; Ferguson, Melissa; Li, Wenjun; Earl, Patricia L; Moss, Bernard; Giorgi, Elena E; Szinger, James J; Eller, Leigh Anne; Billings, Erik A; Rao, Mangala; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Korber, Bette T; Michael, Nelson L

    2013-10-24

    The global diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical challenge facing HIV-1 vaccine development. HIV-1 mosaic antigens are bioinformatically optimized immunogens designed for improved coverage of HIV-1 diversity. However, the protective efficacy of such global HIV-1 vaccine antigens has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of bivalent HIV-1 mosaic antigens to protect rhesus monkeys against acquisition of infection following heterologous challenges with the difficult-to-neutralize simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162P3. Adenovirus/poxvirus and adenovirus/adenovirus vector-based vaccines expressing HIV-1 mosaic Env, Gag, and Pol afforded a significant reduction in the per-exposure acquisition risk following repetitive, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. Protection against acquisition of infection correlated with vaccine-elicited binding, neutralizing, and functional nonneutralizing antibodies, suggesting that the coordinated activity of multiple antibody functions may contribute to protection against difficult-to-neutralize viruses. These data demonstrate the protective efficacy of HIV-1 mosaic antigens and suggest a potential strategy for the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine. PAPERCLIP:

  20. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Moodie

    Full Text Available The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study.HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo were estimated by Cox models.Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67% enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08-2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections. The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001 but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62.The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539.

  1. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus (VV) in a multi-envelope DNA-VV-protein (DVP) HIV-1 vaccine protects macaques from lethal challenge with heterologous SHIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bart G; Sealy, Robert E; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Freiden, Pamela J; Surman, Sherri L; Blanchard, James L.; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2012-01-01

    The pandemic of HIV-1 has continued for decades, yet there remains no licensed vaccine. Previous research has demonstrated the effectiveness of a multi-envelope, multi-vectored HIV-1 vaccine in a macaque-SHIV model, illustrating a potential means of combating HIV-1. Specifically, recombinant DNA, vaccinia virus (VV) and purified protein (DVP) delivery systems were used to vaccinate animals with dozens of antigenically-distinct HIV-1 envelopes for induction of immune breadth. The vaccinated animals controlled disease following challenge with a heterologous SHIV. This demonstration suggested that the antigenic cocktail vaccine strategy, which has succeeded in several other vaccine fields (e.g. pneumococcus), might also succeed against HIV-1. The strategy remains untested in an advanced clinical study, in part due to safety concerns associated with the use of replication-competent VV. To address this concern, we designed a macaque study in which psoralen/ultraviolet light-inactivated VV (UV VV) was substituted for replication-competent VV in the multi-envelope DVP protocol. Control animals received a vaccine encompassing no VV, or no vaccine. All VV vaccinated animals generated an immune response toward VV, and all vaccinated animals generated an immune response toward HIV-1 envelope. After challenge with heterologous SHIV 89.6P, animals that received replication-competent VV or UV VV experienced similar outcomes. They exhibited reduced peak viral loads, maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts and improved survival compared to control animals that received no VV or no vaccine; there were 0/15 deaths among all animals that received VV and 5/9 deaths among controls. Results define a practical means of improving VV safety, and encourage advancement of a promising multi-envelope DVP HIV-1 vaccine candidate. PMID:22425790

  2. How HIV-1 entry mechanism and broadly neutralizing antibodies guide structure-based vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancera, Marie; Changela, Anita; Kwong, Peter D

    2017-05-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) remains to be developed. Here, we review how knowledge of bNAbs and HIV-1 entry mechanism is guiding the structure-based design of vaccine immunogens and immunization regimens. Isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected donors has led to an unprecedented understanding of the sites of vulnerability that these antibodies target on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) as well as of the immunological pathways that these antibody lineages follow to develop broad and potent neutralization. Sites of vulnerability, however, reside in the context of diverse Env conformations required for HIV-1 entry, including a prefusion-closed state, a single-CD4-bound intermediate, a three-CD4-bound intermediate, a prehairpin intermediate and postfusion states, and it is not always clear which structural state optimally presents a particular site of vulnerability in the vaccine context. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of immunological pathways has led to debate among vaccine developers as to how much of the natural antibody-developmental pathway immunogens should mimic, ranging from only the recognized epitope to multiple antigens from the antibody-virus coevolution process. A plethora of information on bNAbs is guiding HIV-1-vaccine development. We highlight consideration of the appropriate structural context from the HIV-1-entry mechanism and extraordinary progress with replicating template B-cell ontogenies.

  3. Immunogenicity of DNA and Recombinant Sendai Virus Vaccines Expressing the HIV-1 gag Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia FENG; Shuang-qing YU; Tsugumine Shu; Tetsuro Matano; Mamoru Hasegawa; Xiao-li WANG; Hong-tao MA; Hong-xia LI; Yi ZENG

    2008-01-01

    Combinations of DNA and recombinant-viral-vector based vaccines are promising AIDS vaccine methods because of their potential for inducing cellular immune responses. It was found that Gag-specific cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) responses were associated with lowering viremia in an untreated HIV-1 infected cohort. The main objectives of our studies were the construction of DNA and recombinant Sendal virus vector (rSeV) vaccines containing a gag gene from the prevalent Thailand subtype B strain in China and trying to use these vaccines for therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines. The candidate plasmid DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1(+)-gag and recombinant Sendai virus vaccine (rSeV-gag) were constructed separately. It was verified by Western blotting analysis that both DNA and rSeV-gag vaccines expressed the HIV-1 Gag protein correctly and efficiently. Balb/c mice were immunized with these two vaccines in different administration schemes. HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL responses and antibody levels were detected by intracellular cytokine staining assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) respectively. Combined vaccines in a DNA prime/rSeV-gag boost vaccination regimen induced the strongest and most long-lasting Gag-specific CTL and antibody responses. It maintained relatively high levels even 9 weeks post immunization. This data indicated that the prime-boost regimen with DNA and rSeV-gag vaccines may offer promising HIV vaccine regimens.

  4. Challenges in the Design of a T Cell Vaccine in the Context of HIV-1 Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Tongo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary variability of HIV-1 poses a major obstacle to vaccine development. The effectiveness of a vaccine is likely to vary dramatically in different populations infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, unless innovative vaccine immunogens are developed to protect against the range of HIV-1 diversity. Immunogen design for stimulating neutralizing antibody responses focuses on “breadth” – the targeting of a handful of highly conserved neutralizing determinants on the HIV-1 Envelope protein that can recognize the majority of viruses across all HIV-1 subtypes. An effective vaccine will likely require the generation of both broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies, as well as broadly cross-reactive T cells. Several approaches have been taken to design such broadly-reactive and cross-protective T cell immunogens. Artificial sequences have been designed that reduce the genetic distance between a vaccine strain and contemporary circulating viruses; “mosaic” immunogens extend this concept to contain multiple potential T cell epitope (PTE variants; and further efforts attempt to focus T cell immunity on highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 genome. Thus far, a number of pre-clinical and early clinical studies have been performed assessing these new immunogens. In this review, the potential use of these new immunogens is explored.

  5. Advancing Toward HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy through the Intersections of Immune Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia D. Tomaras

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Interrogating immune correlates of infection risk for efficacious and non-efficacious HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials have provided hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of induction of protective immunity to HIV-1. To date, there have been six HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials (VAX003, Vaxgen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA, VAX004 (Vaxgen, Inc., HIV-1 Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN 502 (Step, HVTN 503 (Phambili, RV144 (sponsored by the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, MHRP and HVTN 505. Cellular, humoral, host genetic and virus sieve analyses of these human clinical trials each can provide information that may point to potentially protective mechanisms for vaccine-induced immunity. Critical to staying on the path toward development of an efficacious vaccine is utilizing information from previous human and non-human primate studies in concert with new discoveries of basic HIV-1 host-virus interactions. One way that past discoveries from correlate analyses can lead to novel inventions or new pathways toward vaccine efficacy is to examine the intersections where different components of the correlate analyses overlap (e.g., virus sieve analysis combined with humoral correlates that can point to mechanistic hypotheses. Additionally, differences in durability among vaccine-induced T- and B-cell responses indicate that time post-vaccination is an important variable. Thus, understanding the nature of protective responses, the degree to which such responses have, or have not, as yet, been induced by previous vaccine trials and the design of strategies to induce durable T- and B-cell responses are critical to the development of a protective HIV-1 vaccine.

  6. Advancing Toward HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy through the Intersections of Immune Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    Interrogating immune correlates of infection risk for efficacious and non-efficacious HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials have provided hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of induction of protective immunity to HIV-1. To date, there have been six HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials (VAX003, Vaxgen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA), VAX004 (Vaxgen, Inc.), HIV-1 Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) 502 (Step), HVTN 503 (Phambili), RV144 (sponsored by the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, MHRP) and HVTN 505). Cellular, humoral, host genetic and virus sieve analyses of these human clinical trials each can provide information that may point to potentially protective mechanisms for vaccine-induced immunity. Critical to staying on the path toward development of an efficacious vaccine is utilizing information from previous human and non-human primate studies in concert with new discoveries of basic HIV-1 host-virus interactions. One way that past discoveries from correlate analyses can lead to novel inventions or new pathways toward vaccine efficacy is to examine the intersections where different components of the correlate analyses overlap (e.g., virus sieve analysis combined with humoral correlates) that can point to mechanistic hypotheses. Additionally, differences in durability among vaccine-induced T- and B-cell responses indicate that time post-vaccination is an important variable. Thus, understanding the nature of protective responses, the degree to which such responses have, or have not, as yet, been induced by previous vaccine trials and the design of strategies to induce durable T- and B-cell responses are critical to the development of a protective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:24932411

  7. Ex vivo production of autologous whole inactivated HIV-1 for clinical use in therapeutic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Cristina; Climent, Núria; García, Felipe; Hurtado, Carmen; Nieto-Márquez, Sara; León, Agathe; García, M Teresa; Rovira, Cristina; Miralles, Laia; Dalmau, Judith; Pumarola, Tomás; Almela, Manel; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Zamora, Laura; Miró, José M; Brander, Christian; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José M

    2011-08-05

    This study provides a detailed description and characterization of the preparation of individualized lots of autologous heat inactivated HIV-1 virions used as immunogen in a clinical trial designed to test an autologous dendritic-cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine (Clinical Trial DCV-2, NCT00402142). For each participant, ex vivo isolation and expansion of primary virus were performed by co-culturing CD4-enriched PBMCs from the HIV-1-infected patient with PBMC from HIV-seronegative unrelated healthy volunteer donors. The viral supernatants were heat-inactivated and concentrated to obtain 1 mL of autologous immunogen, which was used to load autologous dendritic cells of each patient. High sequence homology was found between the inactivated virus immunogen and the HIV-1 circulating in plasma at the time of HIV-1 isolation. Immunogens contained up to 10⁹ HIV-1 RNA copies/mL showed considerably reduced infectivity after heat inactivation (median of 5.6 log₁₀), and were free of specified adventitious agents. The production of individualized lots of immunogen based on autologous inactivated HIV-1 virus fulfilling clinical-grade good manufacturing practice proved to be feasible, consistent with predetermined specifications, and safe for use in a clinical trial designed to test autologous dendritic cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antigen Gene Cloning and Expression of HIV-1 Toward AIDS Vaccine Design Ⅱ. Subtype Classification and Quasi-species Identification of HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Qingping (曾庆平); YANG Ruiyi (杨瑞仪); FENG Liling (冯丽玲); CHEN Zhuhua (陈竹华); ZENG Changhong (曾常红)

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze subtypes and quasi-species of isolatedviruses from HIV-1 infected individuals among the populationof Guangdong Province, for understanding the molecularepidemioiogical dynamics of local HIV-1 isolates, thus laying afoundation for designing a candidate AIDS vaccine.Methods: By hetero-duplex mobility assay (HMA) andsingle strand conformation poly- morphism (SSCP) analysison amplicons from single-primed polymerase chain reaction(SP-PCR), subtypes and quasi-species of tested HIV-1 isolateswere elucidated, and amplicons were sequenced forconfirmation.Results: Specific amplicons from different subtypes andquasi-species of HIV-1 could be discernible by HMA andSSCP analysis.Conclusion: HIV-1 isolates from different patients might beeither a different subtype or an identical subtype, and HIV-1isolates from an individual were present in a population ofquasi-species.

  9. Modulation of innate and adaptive cellular immunity relevant to HIV-1 vaccine design by seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Kevin J; Kent, Stephen J; Parsons, Matthew S

    2017-01-28

    Mucosal exposure to HIV-1 infection generally occurs in the presence of semen. Immunomodulation by seminal plasma is well described in the reproductive biology literature. Little is known, however, about the impact of seminal plasma on innate and adaptive anti-HIV-1 cellular immunity. The study investigated the effects of seminal plasma on immune responses considered important for prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine development, namely innate and adaptive cellular immunity mediated by natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, respectively. The ability of seminal plasma to modulate direct, antibody-dependent and cytokine-stimulated NK cell activation was assessed utilizing intracellular cytokine staining. Direct and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase release assays. The effects of seminal plasma on T-cell activation upon stimulation with staphylococcus enterotoxin B or HIV-1 Gag peptides were assessed by intracellular cytokine staining. The impact of seminal plasma on redirected cytolysis mediated by T cells was measured using lactate dehydrogenase release assays. Both direct and antibody-dependent NK cell activation were dramatically impaired by the presence of either HIV-1-uninfected or HIV-1-infected seminal plasma in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, seminal plasma suppressed both direct and antibody-dependent NK cell-mediated cytolysis, including anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cytolysis of gp120-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 cells. Finally, seminal plasma attenuated both HIV-1 Gag-specific and staphylococcus enterotoxin B-induced CTL activation. Semen contains potent immunosuppressors of both NK cell and CD8 T-cell-mediated anti-HIV-1 immune responses. This could impede attempts to provide vaccine-induced immunity to HIV-1.

  10. A Therapeutic Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine for HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, Núria; Assoumou, Lambert; Gil, Cristina; González, Nuria; Alcamí, José; León, Agathe; Romeu, Joan; Dalmau, Judith; Martínez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeff; Autran, Brigitte; Costagliola, Dominique; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gatell, Josep M; Plana, Montserrat; Gallart, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    A double-blinded, controlled study of vaccination of untreated patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with 3 doses of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs) pulsed with heat inactivated autologous HIV-1 was performed. Therapeutic vaccinations were feasible, safe, and well tolerated. At week 24 after first vaccination (primary end point), a modest significant decrease in plasma viral load was observed in vaccine recipients, compared with control subjects (P = .03). In addition, the change in plasma viral load after vaccination tended to be inversely associated with the increase in HIV-specific T cell responses in vaccinated patients but tended to be directly correlated with HIV-specific T cell responses in control subjects. Clinical trial.gov NCT00402142 PMID:21233310

  11. Qualitative and quantitative intravaginal targeting: Key to anti-HIV-1 microbicide delivery from test tube to in vivo success

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pillay, V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available employed. We hereby propose a thorough scientific qualitative and quantitative investigation of important aspects involved in HIV-1 transmission as a prerequisite for microbicide delivery. Intravaginal targeting of HIV-1 increases the chances of microbicide...

  12. Improvement in efficacy of DNA vaccine encoding HIV-1 Vif by LIGHT gene adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiani; Wu, Xiaoyu; Long, Fengying; Wen, Jiejun; Hao, Wenli; Chen, Ran; Kong, Xiaobo; Qian, Min; Jiang, Wenzheng

    2013-02-01

    DNA vaccine can induce the prolonged immune responses against the encoded antigen with the appropriate adjuvant. To study the immunogenicity of the HIV-1 vif DNA vaccine in inducing the humoral and cellular immune responses and the immunoadjuvant effect of LIGHT, which is a member of TNF superfamily and can stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells as a co-stimulatory molecule, DNA vaccine plasmid pcDNA-Vif was constructed by inserting HIV-1 vif gene into the downstream of CMV promoter in eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). In vitro expression of HIV-1 Vif in pcDNA-Vif-transfected HeLa cells was confirmed in transcriptional and protein level by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. After BALB/c mice were injected muscularly with DNA vaccines for three times, the specific immune responses were analyzed. The data showed that anti-Vif antibody response, Vif-specific T cell proliferation, and CTL activities were induced in the mice that were inoculated with HIV-1 vif DNA vaccine plasmid. Interestingly, stronger humoral and cellular immune responses were detected in mice that were immunized with plasmid pcDNA-Vif and pcDNA-LIGHT together compared to the single immunization with plasmid pcDNA-Vif alone. Together, the results of the study suggest that candidate HIV-1 DNA vaccine can elicit HIV-1 Vif-specific immune responses in mice and that LIGHT plays the role of immunoadjuvant in co-immunization with DNA vaccine.

  13. The HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins: folding, function and vaccin design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Rogier W.

    2003-01-01

    The need for a vaccine against HIV is obvious, but the development of an effective vaccine has met with frustrations. The HIV envelope glycoproteins, residing in the viral membrane, are the sole viral proteins exposed on the outside of virus particles and are therefore major targets for vaccine

  14. Safety and immunogenicity of an adjuvanted protein therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine in subjects with HIV-1 infection: a randomised placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Thomas; Plettenberg, Andreas; Arastéh, Keikawus; Van Lunzen, Jan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Jaeger, Hans; Janssens, Michel; Burny, Wivine; Collard, Alix; Roman, François; Loeliger, Alfred; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Bourguignon, Patricia; Lavreys, Ludo; Voss, Gerald

    2014-05-07

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine candidate F4/AS01 has previously been shown to induce potent and persistent polyfunctional CD4(+) T-cell responses in HIV-1-seronegative volunteers. This placebo-controlled study evaluated two doses of F4/AS01 1-month apart in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-experienced and ART-naïve HIV-1-infected subjects (1:1 randomisation in each cohort). Safety, HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, absolute CD4(+) T-cell counts and HIV-1 viral load were monitored for 12 months post-vaccination. Reactogenicity was clinically acceptable and no vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. The frequency of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells 2 weeks post-dose 2 was significantly higher in the vaccine group than in the placebo group in both cohorts (pVaccine-induced HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells exhibited a polyfunctional phenotype, expressing at least CD40L and IL-2. No increase in HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T-cells or change in CD8(+) T-cell activation marker expression profile was detected. Absolute CD4(+) T-cell counts were variable over time in both cohorts. Viral load remained suppressed in ART-experienced subjects. In ART-naïve subjects, a transient reduction in viral load from baseline was observed 2 weeks after the second F4/AS01 dose, which was concurrent with a higher frequency of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells expressing at least IL-2 in this cohort. In conclusion, F4/AS01 showed a clinically acceptable reactogenicity and safety profile, and induced polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in ART-experienced and ART-naïve subjects. These findings support further clinical investigation of F4/AS01 as a potential HIV-1 vaccine for therapeutic use in individuals with HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase I randomized clinical trial of VRC DNA and rAd5 HIV-1 vaccine delivery by intramuscular (i.m., subcutaneous (s.c. and intradermal (i.d. administration (VRC 011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Enama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phase 1 evaluation of the VRC HIV DNA and rAd5 vaccines delivered intramuscularly (i.m. supported proceeding to a Phase 2 b efficacy study. Here we report comparison of the i.m., subcutaneous (s.c. and intradermal (i.d. routes of administration. METHODS: Sixty subjects were randomized to 6 schedules to evaluate the i.m., s.c. or i.d. route for prime injections. Three schedules included DNA primes (Wks 0,4,8 and 3 schedules included rAd5 prime (Wk0; all included rAd5 i.m. boost (Wk24. DNA vaccine dosage was 4 mg i.m. or s.c., but 0.4 mg i.d., while all rAd5 vaccinations were 1010 PU. All injections were administered by needle and syringe. RESULTS: Overall, 27/30 subjects completed 3 DNA primes; 30/30 subjects completed rAd5 primes. Mild local pruritus (itchiness, superficial skin lesions and injection site nodules were associated with i.d. and s.c., but not i.m. injections. All routes induced T-cell and antibody immune responses after rAd5 boosting. Overall, >95% had Env antibody and >80% had Env T-cell responses. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of local reactogenicity following i.d. and s.c. injections differed from i.m. injections but all routes were well-tolerated. There was no evidence of an immunogenicity advantage following s.c. or i.d. delivery, supporting i.m. delivery as the preferred route of administration. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00321061.

  16. Three Candidate Epitope-Vaccines in Combination Inducing High Levels of Multiantibodies Against HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祖强; 田海军; 王颖; 陈应华

    2003-01-01

    HIV-1 mutation results in immune evasion, which presents a serious challenge for conventional strategies for developing effective vaccines.So far, much experimental evidence indicates that HIV-1 particles in the blood of patients can be cleaned principally by neutralizing antibodies.Based on these facts, we prepared triple combination of epitope-vaccines with the objective of inducing antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity against HIV-1.According to the sequences of three neutralizing epitopes (RILAVERYLKD, ELDKWA and GPGRAFY, designated E1, E2, and E3, respectively) on HIV-1 envelope proteins, three epitope-peptides ((E1)2: C-(RILAVERYLKDG)2; (E2)4: C-(ELDKWAG)4; and (E3)2: C-(GPGRAFY)2) were synthesized and then conjugated with carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or bovine serum albumin (BSA), and used for immunizing rabbits.After the vaccine course, the triple combination of epitope-vaccines induced high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies.An immunoblotting-analysis demonstrated that the antibodies could recognize the native epitopes on both gp41 protein and V3 loop peptide.Furthermore, we compared the immune responses of three doses of epitope-peptides in the candidate epitope-vaccine.Strong antibody responses to three epitopes were observed in a dose dependent manner, with increasing dose raising the immune response.This result indicated that immunotolerance did not occur using an epitope vaccine dose of 80 μg.Thus, our results demonstrate that epitope-vaccines in combination can synchronously induce high levels of antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity against HIV-1, and may be used to develop effective vaccines against HIV as a new strategy.

  17. HIV-1重组病毒载体疫苗研究进展%Development of HIV-1 recombinant viral vector vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海波; 郭潮潭; 吴南屏

    2010-01-01

    研制有效的疫苗是预防和控制HIV-1的理想途径.重组活病毒载体疫苗能诱导广泛的细胞和体液免疫应答,并在临床试验中展现出良好的应用前景,已成为当前HIV-1疫苗研究的一个热点.此文就近年来针对HIV-1的各种重组病毒载体疫苗研究进展作了综述.%Developing effective vaccine is the ideal way to prevent and control HIV-1. Recombinant live viral vector vaccine can induce a wide range of cellular and humoral immune response, and shows a good prospect in clinical trials. Therefore, it becomes focus of HIV-1 vaccine research. In this paper, the research advance of HIV-1 recombinant viral vector vaccines in recent years is reviewed.

  18. Polyurethane intravaginal ring for controlled delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kavita M; Pearce, Serena M; Poursaid, Azadeh E; Aliyar, Hyder A; Tresco, Patrick A; Mitchnik, Mark A; Kiser, Patrick F

    2008-10-01

    Women-controlled methods for prevention of male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV-1 are urgently needed. Providing inhibitory concentrations of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors to impede the replication of the virus in the female genital tissue offers a mechanism for prophylaxis of HIV-1. To this end, an intravaginal ring device that can provide long duration delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1, was developed utilizing a medical-grade polyether urethane. Monolithic intravaginal rings were fabricated and sustained release with cumulative flux linear with time was demonstrated under sink conditions for a period of 30 days. The release rate was directly proportional to the amount of drug loaded. Another release study conducted for a week utilizing liposome dispersions as sink conditions, to mimic the partitioning of dapivirine into vaginal tissue, also demonstrated release rates constant with time. These results qualify polyether urethanes for development of intravaginal rings for sustained delivery of microbicidal agents.

  19. Comprehensive Sieve Analysis of Breakthrough HIV-1 Sequences in the RV144 Vaccine Efficacy Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlefsen, Paul T.; Rolland, Morgane; Hertz, Tomer; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Gartland, Andrew J.; deCamp, Allan C.; Magaret, Craig A.; Ahmed, Hasan; Gottardo, Raphael; Juraska, Michal; McCoy, Connor; Larsen, Brendan B.; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Carrico, Chris; Menis, Sergey; Bose, Meera; Arroyo, Miguel A.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Kirys, Tatsiana; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Scheffler, Konrad; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Michael, Nelson L.; Schief, William R.; Mullins, James I.; Kim, Jerome H.; Gilbert, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    The RV144 clinical trial showed the partial efficacy of a vaccine regimen with an estimated vaccine efficacy (VE) of 31% for protecting low-risk Thai volunteers against acquisition of HIV-1. The impact of vaccine-induced immune responses can be investigated through sieve analysis of HIV-1 breakthrough infections (infected vaccine and placebo recipients). A V1/V2-targeted comparison of the genomes of HIV-1 breakthrough viruses identified two V2 amino acid sites that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Here we extended the V1/V2 analysis to the entire HIV-1 genome using an array of methods based on individual sites, k-mers and genes/proteins. We identified 56 amino acid sites or “signatures” and 119 k-mers that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Of those, 19 sites and 38 k-mers were located in the regions comprising the RV144 vaccine (Env-gp120, Gag, and Pro). The nine signature sites in Env-gp120 were significantly enriched for known antibody-associated sites (p = 0.0021). In particular, site 317 in the third variable loop (V3) overlapped with a hotspot of antibody recognition, and sites 369 and 424 were linked to CD4 binding site neutralization. The identified signature sites significantly covaried with other sites across the genome (mean = 32.1) more than did non-signature sites (mean = 0.9) (p vaccine immunogens and because most of the associations were insignificant following correction for multiple testing, we predict that few of the genetic differences are strongly linked to the RV144 vaccine-induced immune pressure. In addition to presenting results of the first complete-genome analysis of the breakthrough infections in the RV144 trial, this work describes a set of statistical methods and tools applicable to analysis of breakthrough infection genomes in general vaccine efficacy trials for diverse pathogens. PMID:25646817

  20. Effect of rAd5-Vector HIV-1 Preventive Vaccines on HIV-1 Acquisition: A Participant-Level Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunda Huang

    Full Text Available Three phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trials have tested recombinant Adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5-vector preventive HIV-1 vaccines: MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef in Step and Phambili, and DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 env/gag/pol in HVTN505. Due to efficacy futility observed at the first interim analysis in Step and HVTN505, participants of all three studies were unblinded to their vaccination assignments during the study but continued follow-up. Rigorous meta-analysis can provide crucial information to advise the future utility of rAd5-vector vaccines.We included participant-level data from all three efficacy trials, and three Phase 1-2 trials evaluating the HVTN505 vaccine regimen. We predefined two co-primary analysis cohorts for assessing the vaccine effect on HIV-1 acquisition. The modified-intention-to-treat (MITT cohort included all randomly assigned participants HIV-1 uninfected at study entry, who received at least the first vaccine/placebo, and the Ad5 cohort included MITT participants who received at least one dose of rAd5-HIV vaccine or rAd5-placebo. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of HIV-1 infection (vaccine vs. placebo and evaluate HR variation across vaccine regimens, time since vaccination, and subgroups using interaction tests.Results are similar for the MITT and Ad5 cohorts; we summarize MITT cohort results. Pooled across the efficacy trials, over all follow-up time 403 (n = 224 vaccine; n = 179 placebo of 6266 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in vaccine recipients (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99-1.48, P = 0.06. The HRs significantly differed by vaccine regimen (interaction P = 0.03; MRKAd5 HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.78, P = 0.005 vs. DNA/rAd5 HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61-1.26, P = 0.48. Results were similar when including the Phase 1-2 trials. Exploratory analyses based on the efficacy trials supported that the MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was

  1. Effect of rAd5-Vector HIV-1 Preventive Vaccines on HIV-1 Acquisition: A Participant-Level Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunda; Follmann, Dean; Nason, Martha; Zhang, Lily; Huang, Ying; Mehrotra, Devan V; Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Janes, Holly; Keefer, Michael C; Churchyard, Gavin; Robb, Merlin L; Fast, Patricia E; Duerr, Ann; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Kublin, James G; Robertson, Michael; Hammer, Scott M; Gray, Glenda E; Buchbinder, Susan P; Gilbert, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Three phase 2b, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trials have tested recombinant Adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5)-vector preventive HIV-1 vaccines: MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef in Step and Phambili, and DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 env/gag/pol in HVTN505. Due to efficacy futility observed at the first interim analysis in Step and HVTN505, participants of all three studies were unblinded to their vaccination assignments during the study but continued follow-up. Rigorous meta-analysis can provide crucial information to advise the future utility of rAd5-vector vaccines. We included participant-level data from all three efficacy trials, and three Phase 1-2 trials evaluating the HVTN505 vaccine regimen. We predefined two co-primary analysis cohorts for assessing the vaccine effect on HIV-1 acquisition. The modified-intention-to-treat (MITT) cohort included all randomly assigned participants HIV-1 uninfected at study entry, who received at least the first vaccine/placebo, and the Ad5 cohort included MITT participants who received at least one dose of rAd5-HIV vaccine or rAd5-placebo. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of HIV-1 infection (vaccine vs. placebo) and evaluate HR variation across vaccine regimens, time since vaccination, and subgroups using interaction tests. Results are similar for the MITT and Ad5 cohorts; we summarize MITT cohort results. Pooled across the efficacy trials, over all follow-up time 403 (n = 224 vaccine; n = 179 placebo) of 6266 MITT participants acquired HIV-1, with a non-significantly higher incidence in vaccine recipients (HR 1.21, 95% CI 0.99-1.48, P = 0.06). The HRs significantly differed by vaccine regimen (interaction P = 0.03; MRKAd5 HR 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.78, P = 0.005 vs. DNA/rAd5 HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61-1.26, P = 0.48). Results were similar when including the Phase 1-2 trials. Exploratory analyses based on the efficacy trials supported that the MRKAd5 vaccine-increased risk was concentrated in

  2. Three Candidate Peptide-Vaccines in Combination To Induce High Levels of Multiantibodies Against HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 田海军; 秦莉; 朱梅; 陈应华

    2001-01-01

    N-and C-domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 are demonstrated to play an important role in HIV-entry and prevention. In addition, the V3 loop on gp120 was identified as the principal neutralizing determinant (PND). Based on the fact that a combination of several monoclonal antibodies to different neutralizing epitopes showed great protection against intravenous challenge and vaginal transmission of pathogenic HIV-1/Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) chimeric virus on macaques, three candidate peptide-vaccines were prepared and used in combination to induce high levels of multiantibodies against HIV-1. The three peptides contained important functional regions on HIV-1 gp160. The N-domain peptide (P1: aa550-579) and C-domain peptide (P2: aa633-662) of gp41 and V3 peptide (P3: aa301-328) of gp120 were conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using the glutaraldehyde method. After the vaccination course, each of the three candidate peptide-vaccines induced strong antibody response in rabbits. The three vaccines used in combination induced high levels of multiantibodies against the peptides of the N-and C-domains and the V3 Ioop, with the titer of antibodies up to 1: 6400-1: 25 600 in rabbit sera in comparison with the titer of 1: 800-1:3200 induced by rgp41 or rgp160. Our results indicate that immunogenicities of the N-and C-domains and the V3 loop in these three candidate peptide-vaccines were clearly stronger than those induced by rgp41 or rgp160, and these peptide-vaccines used in combination synchronously induced high levels of multiantibodies against HIV-1, suggesting that used in combination they may provide a new vaccine-strategy to induce strong multi-antiviral activity.

  3. HIV-1/AIDS vaccine development: are we in the darkness before the dawn?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Chao; XU Jian-qing

    2008-01-01

    @@ The pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been devastating for the last two decades in a number of developing countries and constituting a grand challenge to the public health.WHO/UNAIDS estimates that approximately 33.2million people were living with HIV-1 infection by the end of 2007 and almost 2.5 million new infections occurred in 2007. An unprecedented scientifc challenge for the AIDS vaccine community is how to develop an effective HIV vaccine that can block HIV transmission and consequently stop the continuing spread of HIV-1.The recent failure of Merck Phase Ⅱ B trial alerted the HIV vaccine community that new vaccine strategies need to be more exclusively explored. In this review, we outline the basics of HIV vaccine and retrospect the history of the road to HIV vaccine in last two decades,and highlight the challenges we are currently facing and new strategies to develop HIV vaccines in this field.The Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai

  4. Induction of multi-epitope specific antibodies against HIV-1 by multi-epitope vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 envelope proteins were highly effective to inhibit the infection of different strains in vitro, and existed in the infected individuals with very low levels. We suggested multi-epitope-vaccine as a new strategy to increase levels of neutralizing antibodies and the abilities against HIV mutation in vivo. Two candidate multi-epitope-vaccines induced antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity in rhesus macaque. These antibodies recognized corresponding neutralizing epitopes on epitope-peptides, gp41 peptides, V3 loop peptide, rsgp41 and rgp120. Besides, three candidate epitope-vaccines in combination (another kind of multi-epitopevaccines) showed similar potency to induce predefined multiple immune responses in rabbits. These results suggest that multi-epitope-vaccines may be a new strategy to induce multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1 infection and mutafions.

  5. FCGR2C polymorphisms associate with HIV-1 vaccine protection in RV144 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying S.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kijak, Gustavo; Ferrari, Guido; Thomas, Rasmi; Pyo, Chul-Woo; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Nabel, Gary; Pinter, Abraham; Evans, David T.; Gottardo, Raphael; Dai, James Y.; Janes, Holly; Morris, Daryl; Fong, Youyi; Edlefsen, Paul T.; Li, Fusheng; Frahm, Nicole; Alpert, Michael D.; Prentice, Heather; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Robb, Merlin L.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Haynes, Barton F.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Geraghty, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The phase III RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial estimated vaccine efficacy (VE) to be 31.2%. This trial demonstrated that the presence of HIV-1–specific IgG-binding Abs to envelope (Env) V1V2 inversely correlated with infection risk, while the presence of Env-specific plasma IgA Abs directly correlated with risk of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses inversely correlated with risk of infection in vaccine recipients with low IgA; therefore, we hypothesized that vaccine-induced Fc receptor–mediated (FcR-mediated) Ab function is indicative of vaccine protection. We sequenced exons and surrounding areas of FcR-encoding genes and found one FCGR2C tag SNP (rs114945036) that associated with VE against HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE, with lysine at position 169 (169K) in the V2 loop (CRF01_AE 169K). Individuals carrying CC in this SNP had an estimated VE of 15%, while individuals carrying CT or TT exhibited a VE of 91%. Furthermore, the rs114945036 SNP was highly associated with 3 other FCGR2C SNPs (rs138747765, rs78603008, and rs373013207). Env-specific IgG and IgG3 Abs, IgG avidity, and neutralizing Abs inversely correlated with CRF01_AE 169K HIV-1 infection risk in the CT- or TT-carrying vaccine recipients only. These data suggest a potent role of Fc-γ receptors and Fc-mediated Ab function in conferring protection from transmission risk in the RV144 VE trial. PMID:25105367

  6. Two double-blinded, randomized, comparative trials of 4 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccines in HIV-1-infected individuals across a spectrum of disease severity: AIDS Clinical Trials Groups 209 and 214.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, R T; Spino, C; Kuritzkes, D; Walker, B D; Valentine, F A; Hirsch, M S; Cooney, E; Friedland, G; Kundu, S; Merigan, T C; McElrath, M J; Collier, A; Plaeger, S; Mitsuyasu, R; Kahn, J; Haslett, P; Uherova, P; deGruttola, V; Chiu, S; Zhang, B; Jones, G; Bell, D; Ketter, N; Twadell, T; Chernoff, D; Rosandich, M

    2000-11-01

    The potential role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific immune responses in controlling viral replication in vivo has stimulated interest in enhancing virus-specific immunity by vaccinating infected individuals with HIV-1 or its components. These studies were undertaken to define patient populations most likely to respond to vaccination, with the induction of novel HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, and to compare the safety and immunogenicity of several candidate recombinant HIV-1 envelope vaccines and adjuvants. New lymphoproliferative responses (LPRs) developed in 350 cells/mm(3) and were usually strain restricted. Responders tended to be more likely than nonresponders to have an undetectable level of HIV-1 RNA at baseline (P=.067). Induction of new cellular immune responses by HIV-1 envelope vaccines is a function of the immunologic stage of disease and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level and exhibits considerable vaccine strain specificity.

  7. Immunogenicity of a polyvalent HIV-1 candidate vaccine based on fourteen wild type gp120 proteins in golden hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani Masoud

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major obstacles in the design of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 is the hypervariability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Most HIV-1 vaccine candidates have utilized envelope glycoprotein from a single virus isolate, but to date, none of them elicited broadly reactive humoral immunity. Herein, we hypothesised that a cocktail of HIV-1 gp120 proteins containing multiple epitopes may increase the breadth of immune responses against HIV-1. We compared and evaluated the immunogenicity of HIV-1 vaccines containing either gp120 protein alone or in combinations of four or fourteen gp120s from different primary HIV-1 isolates in immunized hamsters. Results We amplified and characterized 14 different gp120s from primary subtype B isolates with both syncytium and non-syncytium inducing properties, and expressed the proteins in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines. Purified proteins were used either alone or in combinations of four or fourteen different gp120s to vaccinate golden hamsters. The polyvalent vaccine showed higher antibody titers to HIV-1 subtype B isolates MN and SF162 compared to the groups that received one or four gp120 proteins. However, the polyvalent vaccine was not able to show higher neutralizing antibody responses against HIV-1 primary isolates. Interestingly, the polyvalent vaccine group had the highest proliferative immune responses and showed a substantial proportion of cross-subtype CD4 reactivity to HIV-1 subtypes B, C, and A/E Conclusion Although the polyvalent approach achieved only a modest increase in the breadth of humoral and cellular immunity, the qualitative change in the vaccine (14 vs. 1 gp120 resulted in a quantitative improvement in vaccine-induced immunity.

  8. Phylodynamics of HIV-1 from a phase III AIDS vaccine trial in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Pérez-Losada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2003, a phase III placebo-controlled trial (VAX003 was completed in Bangkok, Thailand. Of the 2,546 individuals enrolled in the trial based on high risk for infection through injection drug use (IDU, we obtained clinical samples and HIV-1 sequence data (envelope glycoprotein gene gp120 from 215 individuals who became infected during the trial. Here, we used these data in combination with other publicly available gp120 sequences to perform a molecular surveillance and phylodynamic analysis of HIV-1 in Thailand. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Phylogenetic and population genetic estimators were used to assess HIV-1 gp120 diversity as a function of vaccination treatment, viral load (VL and CD4(+ counts, to identify transmission clusters and to investigate the timescale and demographics of HIV-1 in Thailand. Three HIV-1 subtypes were identified: CRF01_AE (85% of the infections, subtype B (13% and CRF15_AE (2%. The Bangkok IDU cohort showed more gp120 diversity than other Asian IDU cohorts and similar diversity to that observed in sexually infected individuals. Moreover, significant differences (P<0.02 in genetic diversity were observed in CRF01_AE IDU with different VL and CD4(+ counts. No phylogenetic structure was detected regarding any of the epidemiological and clinical factors tested, although high proportions (35% to 50% of early infections fell into clusters, which suggests that transmission chains associated with acute infection play a key role on HIV-1 spread among IDU. CRF01_AE was estimated to have emerged in Thailand in 1984.5 (1983-1986, 3-6 years before the first recognition of symptomatic patients (1989. The relative genetic diversity of the HIV-1 population has remained high despite decreasing prevalence rates since the mid 1990s. CONCLUSIONS: Our study and recent epidemiological reports indicate that HIV-1 is still a major threat in Thailand and suggest that HIV awareness and prevention needs to be strengthened to avoid

  9. Phase I randomised clinical trial of an HIV-1(CN54, clade C, trimeric envelope vaccine candidate delivered vaginally.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Lewis

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: We conducted a phase 1 double-blind randomised controlled trial (RCT of a HIV-1 envelope protein (CN54 gp140 candidate vaccine delivered vaginally to assess immunogenicity and safety. It was hypothesised that repeated delivery of gp140 may facilitate antigen uptake and presentation at this mucosal surface. Twenty two healthy female volunteers aged 18-45 years were entered into the trial, the first receiving open-label active product. Subsequently, 16 women were randomised to receive 9 doses of 100 µg of gp140 in 3 ml of a Carbopol 974P based gel, 5 were randomised to placebo solution in the same gel, delivered vaginally via an applicator. Participants delivered the vaccine three times a week over three weeks during one menstrual cycle, and were followed up for two further months. There were no serious adverse events, and the vaccine was well tolerated. No sustained systemic or local IgG, IgA, or T cell responses to the gp140 were detected following vaginal immunisations. Repeated vaginal immunisation with a HIV-1 envelope protein alone formulated in Carbopol gel was safe, but did not induce local or systemic immune responses in healthy women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00637962.

  10. Biologic interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 and possible implications for HSV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Gottlieb, Sami L

    2017-09-25

    Development of a safe and effective vaccine against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) has the potential to limit the global burden of HSV-2 infection and disease, including genital ulcer disease and neonatal herpes, and is a global sexual and reproductive health priority. Another important potential benefit of an HSV-2 vaccine would be to decrease HIV infections, as HSV-2 increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition several-fold. Acute and chronic HSV-2 infection creates ulcerations and draws dendritic cells and activated CD4+ T cells into genital mucosa. These cells are targets for HIV entry and replication. Prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines (to prevent infection) and therapeutic vaccines (to modify or treat existing infections) are currently under development. By preventing or modifying infection, an effective HSV-2 vaccine could limit HSV-associated genital mucosal inflammation and thus HIV risk. However, a vaccine might have competing effects on HIV risk depending on its mechanism of action and cell populations generated in the genital mucosa. In this article, we review biologic interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1, consider HSV-2 vaccine development in the context of HIV risk, and discuss implications and research needs for future HSV vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancement of HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity by BCG-PSN, a novel adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Hou, Jue; Li, Dingfeng; Liu, Yong; Hu, Ningzhu; Hao, Yanling; Fu, Jingjing; Hu, Yunzhang; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-07

    Although the importance of DNA vaccines, especially as a priming immunization has been well established in numerous HIV vaccine studies, the immunogenictiy of DNA vaccines is generally moderate. Novel adjuvant is in urgent need for improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Polysaccharide and nucleic acid fraction extracted by hot phenol method from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, known as BCG-PSN, is a widely used immunomodulatory product in China clinical practice. In this study, we evaluated whether the BCG-PSN could serve as a novel adjuvant of DNA vaccine to trigger better cellular and humoral immune responses against the HIV-1 Env antigen in Balb/C mouse model. The BCG-PSN was mixed with 10 μg or 100 μg of pDRVI1.0gp145 (HIV-1 CN54 gp145 gene) DNA vaccine and intramuscularly immunized two or three times. We found that BCG-PSN could significantly improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine when co-administered with DNA vaccine. Further, at the same vaccination schedule, BCG-PSN co-immunization with 10 μg DNA vaccine could elicit cellular and humoral immune responses which were comparable to that induced by 100 μg DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, our results demonstrate that BCG-PSN can activate TLR signaling pathways and induce Th1-type cytokines secretion. These findings suggest that BCG-PSN can serve as a novel and effective adjuvant for DNA vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  13. Small molecule mimetics of an HIV-1 gp41 fusion intermediate as vaccine leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Michael J; Dudkin, Vadim Y; Ottinger, Elizabeth A; Getty, Krista L; Zuck, Paul D; Kaufhold, Robin M; Hepler, Robert W; McGaughey, Georgia B; Citron, Michael; Hrin, Renee C; Wang, Ying-Jie; Miller, Michael D; Joyce, Joseph G

    2010-12-24

    We describe here a novel platform technology for the discovery of small molecule mimetics of conformational epitopes on protein antigens. As a model system, we selected mimetics of a conserved hydrophobic pocket within the N-heptad repeat region of the HIV-1 envelope protein, gp41. The human monoclonal antibody, D5, binds to this target and exhibits broadly neutralizing activity against HIV-1. We exploited the antigen-binding property of D5 to select complementary small molecules using a high throughput screen of a diverse chemical collection. The resulting small molecule leads were rendered immunogenic by linking them to a carrier protein and were shown to elicit N-heptad repeat-binding antibodies in a fraction of immunized mice. Plasma from HIV-1-infected subjects shown previously to contain broadly neutralizing antibodies was found to contain antibodies capable of binding to haptens represented in the benzylpiperidine leads identified as a result of the high throughput screen, further validating these molecules as vaccine leads. Our results suggest a new paradigm for vaccine discovery using a medicinal chemistry approach to identify lead molecules that, when optimized, could become vaccine candidates for infectious diseases that have been refractory to conventional vaccine development.

  14. Developing Novel Conjugate HIV-1 Subunit Therapeutic Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    received United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for use in adults and infants (i.e., Haemophilus influenzae type B, group B...glycoprotein (gp120) conjugate-based vaccine to induce high, long-lasting anti- HLV -1 envelope antibody titers with group specific neutralizing activity...and HLV -1 gpl20 are mixed at a 2.5:1 ratio in a solution of glutaraldehyde in sodium phosphate, pH 6.0, for 2 hours at room temperature. Excess

  15. "In vitro systems to characterize the immune response to HIV-1 and HIV-1 vaccine candidates", NIAID Workshop Report, Bethesda, August 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Angela; Rinaldo, Charles R; Sekaly, Rafick P; Flores, Jorge; D'Souza, Patricia M

    2011-06-24

    Although clinical trials are the ultimate way to prove vaccine safety and efficacy, the complexity, cost and time required to develop a product to enter human trials demand a serious, long-term investment. Lack of knowledge on immune correlates of protection from HIV infections makes investments in HIV vaccine research significantly risky. Preclinical testing of HIV vaccines is routinely carried out in non-human primate models however these studies have a significant cost and their predictive value is still questionable. The potential value of screening new HIV-1 vaccine candidates on human cells and tissues via high throughput in vitro systems that allow rapid, cost-effective and accurate predictions of in vivo immune responses would be enormous. A one-day workshop was convened by Division of AIDS, National Institutes of Health on August 4, 2010 to address the benefits and challenges of assessing HIV-1 vaccine responses in alternative ways. Consideration was given to the use of various in vitro model systems, human mucosal tissue explants and humanized mouse models as ways to predict immunogenicity and efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines early in the development process, and support decisions on whether a product may be worthy of moving into non-human primates or human trials. This report summarizes the outcome of the workshop.

  16. Comprehensive sieve analysis of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Edlefsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The RV144 clinical trial showed the partial efficacy of a vaccine regimen with an estimated vaccine efficacy (VE of 31% for protecting low-risk Thai volunteers against acquisition of HIV-1. The impact of vaccine-induced immune responses can be investigated through sieve analysis of HIV-1 breakthrough infections (infected vaccine and placebo recipients. A V1/V2-targeted comparison of the genomes of HIV-1 breakthrough viruses identified two V2 amino acid sites that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Here we extended the V1/V2 analysis to the entire HIV-1 genome using an array of methods based on individual sites, k-mers and genes/proteins. We identified 56 amino acid sites or "signatures" and 119 k-mers that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Of those, 19 sites and 38 k-mers were located in the regions comprising the RV144 vaccine (Env-gp120, Gag, and Pro. The nine signature sites in Env-gp120 were significantly enriched for known antibody-associated sites (p = 0.0021. In particular, site 317 in the third variable loop (V3 overlapped with a hotspot of antibody recognition, and sites 369 and 424 were linked to CD4 binding site neutralization. The identified signature sites significantly covaried with other sites across the genome (mean = 32.1 more than did non-signature sites (mean = 0.9 (p < 0.0001, suggesting functional and/or structural relevance of the signature sites. Since signature sites were not preferentially restricted to the vaccine immunogens and because most of the associations were insignificant following correction for multiple testing, we predict that few of the genetic differences are strongly linked to the RV144 vaccine-induced immune pressure. In addition to presenting results of the first complete-genome analysis of the breakthrough infections in the RV144 trial, this work describes a set of statistical methods and tools applicable to analysis of breakthrough infection genomes in general vaccine

  17. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrit, Jeffrey T; Fast, Patricia E; Gieber, Lisa; Kuipers, Hester; Dean, Hansi J; Koff, Wayne C

    2016-06-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the cause of one of the most lethal pandemics in human history, although in recent years access to highly effective anti-retroviral therapy has provided new hope worldwide. Transmission of HIV by sexual contact, childbirth and injection drug use has been reduced, but 2 million are newly infected each year, and much of the transmission is from people who do not know their status. In addition to known methods, a preventive vaccine is needed to end the pandemic. The extraordinary mutability and genetic diversity of HIV is an enormous challenge, but vaccines are being designed for broad coverage. Computer-aided design of mosaic immunogens, incorporating many epitopes from the entire genome or from conserved regions aim to induce CD8+ T cells to kill virus-infected cells or inhibit virus replication, while trimeric envelope proteins or synthetic mimics aim to induce broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies similar to those cloned from some infected patients. Induction of more potent and durable responses may require new adjuvants or replicating chimeric vectors chimeras that bear HIV genes. Passive or genetic delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide broad protection and/or lead to insights for vaccine designers. Proof-of-concept trials in non-human primates and in one human efficacy trial have provided scientific clues for a vaccine that could provide broad and durable protection against HIV. The use of vaccines to destroy HIV reservoirs as part of therapy or cure is now also being explored.

  18. Pentavalent HIV-1 vaccine protects against simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Todd; Pollara, Justin; Santra, Sampa; Vandergrift, Nathan; Pittala, Srivamshi; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Shen, Xiaoying; Parks, Robert; Goodman, Derrick; Eaton, Amanda; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V.; Saunders, Kevin O.; Weiner, Joshua A.; Scearce, Richard; Sutherland, Laura L.; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Reed, Steven G.; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Theis, James F.; Pinter, Abraham; Montefiori, David C.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Peachman, Kristina K.; Rao, Mangala; Michael, Nelson L.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia; Ferrari, Guido; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2017-01-01

    The RV144 Thai trial HIV-1 vaccine of recombinant poxvirus (ALVAC) and recombinant HIV-1 gp120 subtype B/subtype E (B/E) proteins demonstrated 31% vaccine efficacy. Here we design an ALVAC/Pentavalent B/E/E/E/E vaccine to increase the diversity of gp120 motifs in the immunogen to elicit a broader antibody response and enhance protection. We find that immunization of rhesus macaques with the pentavalent vaccine results in protection of 55% of pentavalent-vaccine-immunized macaques from simian–human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. Systems serology of the antibody responses identifies plasma antibody binding to HIV-infected cells, peak ADCC antibody titres, NK cell-mediated ADCC and antibody-mediated activation of MIP-1β in NK cells as the four immunological parameters that best predict decreased infection risk that are improved by the pentavalent vaccine. Thus inclusion of additional gp120 immunogens to a pox-prime/protein boost regimen can augment antibody responses and enhance protection from a SHIV challenge in rhesus macaques. PMID:28593989

  19. Targeted femtosecond laser driven drug delivery within HIV-1 infected cells: in-vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maphanga, Charles; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Manoto, Sello; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection still remains one amongst the world's most challenging infections since its discovery. Antiretroviral therapy is the recommended treatment of choice for HIV-1 infection taken by patients orally. The highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) prevents the replication of HIV-1 and further destruction of the immune system, therefore enabling the body to fight opportunistic life-threatening infections, cancers, and also arrest HIV infection from advancing to AIDS. The major challenge with HAART is the inability to reach the viral reservoirs where the HIV-1 remains latent and persistent, leading to inability to fully eradicate the virus. This study is aimed at initially designing and assembling a fully functional optical translocation setup to optically deliver antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 infected cells in a targeted manner using Gaussian beam mode femtosecond laser pulses in-vitro. The main objective of our study is to define the in-vitro drug photo-translocation parameters to allow future design of an efficient drug delivery device with potential in-vivo drug delivery applications. In our experiments, HEK 293T cells were used to produce HIV-1 enveloped pseudovirus (ZM53) to infect TZM-bl cells which were later treated with laser pulses emitted by a titanium sapphire laser (800 nm, 1KHz, 113 fs, 6.5 μW) to create sub-microscopic pores on the cell membrane enabling influx of extracellular media. Following laser treatment, changes in cellular responses were analysed using cell morphology studies, cytotoxicity, and luciferase assay studies. Controls included laser untreated cells incubated with the drug for 72 hours. The data in this study was statistically analysed using the SigmaPlot software version 13.

  20. Application of SCR priming VLP boosting as a novel vaccination strategy against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Zabihollahi, Rezvan; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Memarnejadian, Arash; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Parivar, Kazem

    2011-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection is a worldwide health problem and a protective vaccine is desperately needed to control the AIDS pandemics. To address this concern, we previously constructed single-cycle replicable (SCR) HIV-1 virions, which completely maintained the antigenic structures of HIV-1. Herein, to optimize a vaccination strategy, we studied the immunogenicity of produced SCR virions and adjuvant-formulated HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) in homologous and heterologous prime-boosting regimens. Accordingly, BALB/c mice received three doses of immunogens in 3-week intervals and their immune responses were evaluated using ELISA, cytokine and IFN-γ ELISpot assays. These analyses not only indicated the superiority of SCR prime-VLP boosting for strong induction of specific IFN-γ producing cells, but also showed the capability of this strategy over the others for better stimulation of humoral response, which was evidenced with the detection of highest titer of total IgG against HIV ENV glycoprotein. Furthermore, determination of IgG subclasses and IFN-γ/IL4 secretion ratio in cultured splenocytes demonstrated the efficient augmentation of mixed responses with the dominancy of Th1 immunity following SCR/VLP immunization strategy. Our results additionally pointed towards the applicability of Montanide ISA 720 + CpG as a potent Th1-directing adjuvant mixture. Overall, this study suggests SCR prime-VLP boosting as a promising approach in HIV vaccine development.

  1. Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzer Fiona L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has infected more than 40 million people worldwide, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa necessitates the development of cheap, effective vaccines. One means of production is the use of plants, for which a number of different techniques have been successfully developed. HIV-1 Pr55Gag is a promising HIV-1 vaccine candidate: we compared the expression of this and a truncated Gag (p17/p24 and the p24 capsid subunit in Nicotiana spp. using transgenic plants and transient expression via Agrobacterium tumefaciens and recombinant tobamovirus vectors. We also investigated the influence of subcellular localisation of recombinant protein to the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER on protein yield. We partially purified a selected vaccine candidate and tested its stimulation of a humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Results Both transient and transgenic expression of the HIV antigens were successful, although expression of Pr55Gag was low in all systems; however, the Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of p24 and p17/p24 yielded best, to more than 1 mg p24/kg fresh weight. Chloroplast targeted protein levels were highest in transient and transgenic expression of p24 and p17/p24. The transiently-expressed p17/p24 was not immunogenic in mice as a homologous vaccine, but it significantly boosted a humoral and T cell immune response primed by a gag DNA vaccine, pTHGagC. Conclusion Transient agroinfiltration was best for expression of all of the recombinant proteins tested, and p24 and p17/p24 were expressed at much higher levels than Pr55Gag. Our results highlight the usefulness of plastid signal peptides in enhancing the production of recombinant proteins meant for use as vaccines. The p17/p24 protein effectively boosted T cell and humoral responses in mice primed by the DNA vaccine pTHGagC, showing that this plant

  2. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fischer, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallstrom, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  3. Buccal and sublingual vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Heleen; Vrieling, Hilde; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Jiskoot, Wim; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2014-09-28

    Because of their large surface area and immunological competence, mucosal tissues are attractive administration and target sites for vaccination. An important characteristic of mucosal vaccination is its ability to elicit local immune responses, which act against infection at the site of pathogen entry. However, mucosal surfaces are endowed with potent and sophisticated tolerance mechanisms to prevent the immune system from overreacting to the many environmental antigens. Hence, mucosal vaccination may suppress the immune system instead of induce a protective immune response. Therefore, mucosal adjuvants and/or special antigen delivery systems as well as appropriate dosage forms are required in order to develop potent mucosal vaccines. Whereas oral, nasal and pulmonary vaccine delivery strategies have been described extensively, the sublingual and buccal routes have received considerably less attention. In this review, the characteristics of and approaches for sublingual and buccal vaccine delivery are described and compared with other mucosal vaccine delivery sites. We discuss recent progress and highlight promising developments in the search for vaccine formulations, including adjuvants and suitable dosage forms, which are likely critical for designing a successful sublingual or buccal vaccine. Finally, we outline the challenges, hurdles to overcome and formulation issues relevant for sublingual or buccal vaccine delivery.

  4. Why Does the Molecular Structure of Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Individuals Infected with HIV-1 not Inform the Rational Design of an HIV-1 Vaccine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc H V Van Regenmortel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly assumed that neutralizing Mabs that bind to the HIV-1 Env glycoprotein are more specific reagents than anti-HIV-1 polyclonal antisera and that knowledge of the structure of these Mabs facilitates the rational design of effective HIV-1 vaccine immunogens. However, after more than ten years of unsuccessful experimentation using the structure-based reverse vaccinology approach, it is now evident that it is not possible to infer from the structure of neutralizing Mabs which HIV immunogens induced their formation nor which vaccine immunogens will elicit similar Abs in an immunized host. The use of Mabs for developing an HIV-1 vaccine was counterproductive because it overlooked the fact that the apparent specificity of a Mab very much depends on the selection procedure used to obtain it and also did not take into account that an antibody is never monospecific for a single epitope but is always polyspecific for many epitopes. When the rationale of the proponents of the unsuccessful rational design strategy is analyzed, it appears that investigators who claim they are designing a vaccine immunogen are only improving the binding reactivity of a single epitope-paratope pair and are not actually designing an immunogen able to generate protective antibodies. The task of a designer consists in imagining what type of immunogen is likely to elicit a protective immune response but in the absence of knowledge regarding which features of the immune system are responsible for producing a functional neutralizing activity in antibodies, it is not feasible to intentionally optimize a potential immunogen candidate in order to obtain the desired outcome. The only available option is actually to test possible solutions by trial-and-error experiments until the preset goal is perhaps attained. Rational design and empirical approaches in HIV vaccine research should thus not be opposed as alternative options since empirical testing is an integral part of a so

  5. HIV-1C疫苗研究进展%Advances in the Research of HIV-1 Subtype C Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晶晶; 寸韡

    2008-01-01

    对于HIV-1,抗逆转录病毒药物能显著改善HIV/AIDS病人的健康并延长其寿命.但高昂的费用和治疗条件令大多数HIV患者望而却步,尤其在感染水平高、公共资源极度匮乏的发展中国家.到2004年底,撒哈拉以南非洲地区有2540万HIV感染者,该地区迄今仍是HIV-1C感染最严重的地区.几种候选HIV-1C疫苗目前正在进行临床前和临床研究.这些候选疫苗的设计主要是来自HIV-1C的HIV-1调控蛋白和结构蛋白.本文重点介绍HIV-1C疫苗的研究进展.

  6. Vpx-containing Dendritic Cell Vaccine Vectors Induce CTLs and Reactivate Latent HIV-1 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Thomas D.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual requires a means of inducing production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulating an immune response against the infected cells. We report the development of lentiviral vectors that transduce dendritic cells (DCs) to both induce production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulate antigen-specific CTLs. The vectors package Vpx, a lentiviral accessory protein that counteracts the SAMHD1-mediated block to DC transduction, allowing for long-term expression of vector-encoded proteins. The vectors encode influenza or HIV-1-derived epitopes fused via a self-cleaving peptide to CD40L that releases the peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum for entry into the antigen presentation pathway. Expression of CD40L caused transduced DCs to mature and produce Th1-skewing cytokines. The DCs presented antigen to CD8 T cells, enhancing antigen-specific CTLs. Coculture of the transduced DCs with latently infected cells induced high level virus production, an effect that was mediated by TNF-α. The ability of a DC vaccine to reactivate latent HIV-1 and stimulate an adaptive immune response provides a means to reduce the size of the latent reservoir in patients. This strategy can also be applied to develop DC vaccines for other diseases. PMID:25567537

  7. HIV-1 vaccine-induced T-cell responses cluster in epitope hotspots that differ from those induced in natural infection with HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Hertz

    Full Text Available Several recent large clinical trials evaluated HIV vaccine candidates that were based on recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd-5 vectors expressing HIV-derived antigens. These vaccines primarily elicited T-cell responses, which are known to be critical for controlling HIV infection. In the current study, we present a meta-analysis of epitope mapping data from 177 participants in three clinical trials that tested two different HIV vaccines: MRKAd-5 HIV and VRC-HIVAD014-00VP. We characterized the population-level epitope responses in these trials by generating population-based epitope maps, and also designed such maps using a large cohort of 372 naturally infected individuals. We used these maps to address several questions: (1 Are vaccine-induced responses randomly distributed across vaccine inserts, or do they cluster into immunodominant epitope hotspots? (2 Are the immunodominance patterns observed for these two vaccines in three vaccine trials different from one another? (3 Do vaccine-induced hotspots overlap with epitope hotspots induced by chronic natural infection with HIV-1? (4 Do immunodominant hotspots target evolutionarily conserved regions of the HIV genome? (5 Can epitope prediction methods be used to identify these hotspots? We found that vaccine responses clustered into epitope hotspots in all three vaccine trials and some of these hotspots were not observed in chronic natural infection. We also found significant differences between the immunodominance patterns generated in each trial, even comparing two trials that tested the same vaccine in different populations. Some of the vaccine-induced immunodominant hotspots were located in highly variable regions of the HIV genome, and this was more evident for the MRKAd-5 HIV vaccine. Finally, we found that epitope prediction methods can partially predict the location of vaccine-induced epitope hotspots. Our findings have implications for vaccine design and suggest a framework by which

  8. The multi-epitope polypeptide approach in HIV-1 vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, C A

    1999-11-01

    The application of a preventive HIV vaccine is the only hope for most developing countries to halt the AIDS pandemic. A project aimed to develop a preventive AIDS vaccine is being carried out since 1992 by three Cuban research institutions: Centro de Ingeniería Genética y Biotecnologia de La Habana, Instituto de Medicina Tropical 'Pedro Kouri' and Laboratorio de Investigaciones de SIDA de La Habana. The project includes two main strategies: (a) generation of recombinant multi-epitope polypeptides (MEPs) bearing several copies of the V3 loop from different HIV-1 isolates; and (b) development of immunogens capable of inducing a cytotoxic T cell response (CTL) specific for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antigens. This article summarizes the work in the first of these strategies. Based on the sequence of the V3 loop of HIV-1 we constructed a series of MEPs and evaluated their immunogenicity in mice, rabbits and macaques. The MEP TAB9, containing six V3 epitopes from isolates LR10, JY1, RF, MN, BRVA and IIIB, was selected together with the oil adjuvant Montanide ISA720 (SEPPIC, France) to perform a Phase I clinical trial in HIV seronegative Cuban volunteers. The trial was double blinded, randomized, and fulfilled all ethical and regulatory requirements. All TAB9 vaccinated volunteers developed a strong immune response and neutralizing antibodies were observed in the 50% of the subjects. However the second and third inoculations of the vaccine were not well tolerated because transient severe local reactions appeared in some individuals. A new formulation of TAB9 is currently in pre-clinical studies and is expected to enter clinical trials in 1999.

  9. Broad HIV-1 inhibition in vitro by vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells in African adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudensia Mutua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We are developing a pan-clade HIV-1 T-cell vaccine HIVconsv, which could complement Env vaccines for prophylaxis and be a key to HIV cure. Our strategy focuses vaccine-elicited effector T-cells on functionally and structurally conserved regions (not full-length proteins and not only epitopes of the HIV-1 proteome, which are common to most global variants and which, if mutated, cause a replicative fitness loss. Our first clinical trial in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Oxford demonstrated the principle that naturally mostly subdominant epitopes, when taken out of the context of full-length proteins/virus and delivered by potent regimens involving combinations of simian adenovirus and poxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara, can induce robust CD8+ T cells of broad specificities and functions capable of inhibiting in vitro HIV-1 replication. Here and for the first time, we tested this strategy in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Africa. We showed that the vaccines were well tolerated and induced high frequencies of broadly HIVconsv-specific plurifunctional T cells, which inhibited in vitro viruses from four major clades A, B, C, and D. Because sub-Saharan Africa is globally the region most affected by HIV-1/AIDS, trial HIV-CORE 004 represents an important stage in the path toward efficacy evaluation of this highly rational and promising vaccine strategy.

  10. HIV-1 vaccines based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia protected Chinese rhesus macaques from simian HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Li, Yue; Luo, Zhenwu; Yang, Guibo; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Sun, Maosheng; Dai, Jiejie; Li, Qihan; Qin, Chuan; Shao, Yiming

    2015-03-27

    To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccines constructed from replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia virus (rTV) alone or combined with DNA in protecting Chinese rhesus macaques from homologous Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV)-CN97001 challenge. The nef, gag, pol, and gp140 genes from strain CRF07_BC HIV-1 CN54 were selected to construct an HIV vaccine using the rTV or rTV/DNA vaccine. After vaccination, the vaccine and control groups were intravenously challenged with SHIV-CN97001 (32 MID50). HIV-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, gp70 V1V2 binding antibodies, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses were measured prospectively after vaccination with an ELISA, a virus infectivity assay in TZM-bl cells, and ELISPOT assays, respectively. Viral RNA was quantified after challenge with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and protection efficacy was determined with an analysis of CD8 lymphocyte depletion in vivo. Both rTV and DNA/rTV vaccine groups developed strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV-1 CN54 antigens, including Gag and Env, and also developed significant and persistent anti-Env antibodies and neutralizing antibodies after immunization. Both the rTV and DNA/rTV groups were significantly protected against SHIV-CN97001 or displayed lower viremia than the controls. After CD8 lymphocyte depletion, no viremia was detectable in the vaccinated monkeys, but rebounded rapidly in the control animals. Protection against infection correlated with vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies specific for homologous HIV-1 viruses. An rTV-based HIV-1 vaccine, with or without a DNA primer, provided protection from SHIV challenge in a macaque model. Replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia is a promising vector and should enable advances in HIV-1 vaccine development.

  11. HIV-1 Reservoir Dynamics after Vaccination and Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Are Associated with Dendritic Cell Vaccine-Induced T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; Guardo, Alberto C; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Climent, Nuria; Gallart, Teresa; León, Agathe; Clotet, Bonaventura; Autran, Brigitte; Chomont, Nicolas; Gatell, Josep M; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; García, Felipe

    2015-09-01

    HIV-1-specific immune responses induced by a dendritic cell (DC)-based therapeutic vaccine might have some effect on the viral reservoir. Patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were randomized to receive DCs pulsed with autologous HIV-1 (n = 24) (DC-HIV-1) or nonpulsed DCs (n = 12) (DC-control). We measured the levels of total and integrated HIV-1 DNA in CD4 T cells isolated from these patients at 6 time points: before any cART; before the first cART interruption, which was at 56 weeks before the first immunization to isolate virus for pulsing DCs; before and after vaccinations (VAC1 and VAC2); and at weeks 12 and 48 after the second cART interruption. The vaccinations did not influence HIV-1 DNA levels in vaccinated subjects. After the cART interruption at week 12 postvaccination, while total HIV-1 DNA increased significantly in both arms, integrated HIV-1 DNA did not change in vaccinees (mean of 1.8 log10 to 1.9 copies/10(6) CD4 T cells, P = 0.22) and did increase in controls (mean of 1.8 log10 to 2.1 copies/10(6) CD4 T cells, P = 0.02) (P = 0.03 for the difference between groups). However, this lack of increase of integrated HIV-1 DNA observed in the DC-HIV-1 group was transient, and at week 48 after cART interruption, no differences were observed between the groups. The HIV-1-specific T cell responses at the VAC2 time point were inversely correlated with the total and integrated HIV-1 DNA levels after cART interruption in vaccinees (r [Pearson's correlation coefficient] = -0.69, P = 0.002, and r = -0.82, P HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses elicited by DC therapeutic vaccines drive changes in HIV-1 DNA after vaccination and cART interruption. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00402142.) There is an intense interest in developing strategies to target HIV-1 reservoirs as they create barriers to curing the disease. The development of therapeutic vaccines aimed at enhancing immune-mediated clearance

  12. Cleavage-Independent HIV-1 Env Trimers Engineered as Soluble Native Spike Mimetics for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Kumar Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral glycoproteins mediate entry by pH-activated or receptor-engaged activation and exist in metastable pre-fusogenic states that may be stabilized by directed rational design. As recently reported, the conformationally fixed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env trimers in the pre-fusion state (SOSIP display molecular homogeneity and structural integrity at relatively high levels of resolution. However, the SOSIPs necessitate full Env precursor cleavage, which requires endogenous furin overexpression. Here, we developed an alternative strategy using flexible peptide covalent linkage of Env subdomains to produce soluble, homogeneous, and cleavage-independent Env mimics, called native flexibly linked (NFL trimers, as vaccine candidates. This simplified design avoids the need for furin co-expression and, in one case, antibody affinity purification to accelerate trimer scale-up for preclinical and clinical applications. We have successfully translated the NFL design to multiple HIV-1 subtypes, establishing the potential to become a general method of producing native-like, well-ordered Env trimers for HIV-1 or other viruses.

  13. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluations of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecker, M; Gilbert, P; Russell, N; Hural, J; Allen, M; Pensiero, M; Chulay, J; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Abdool Karim, S S; Burke, D S

    2012-10-01

    On the basis of positive preclinical data, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine (AVX101), expressing a nonmyristoylated form of Gag, in two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults. Escalating doses of AVX101 or placebo were administered subcutaneously to participants in the United States and Southern Africa. Because of vaccine stability issues, the first trial was halted prior to completion of all dose levels and a second trial was implemented. The second trial was also stopped prematurely due to documentation issues with the contract manufacturer. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated through assessments of reactogenicity, reports of adverse events, and assessment of replication-competent and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viremia. Immunogenicity was measured using the following assays: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-release cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISpot, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and lymphoproliferation assay (LPA). Anti-vector antibodies were also measured. AVX101 was well tolerated and exhibited only modest local reactogenicity. There were 5 serious adverse events reported during the trials; none were considered related to the study vaccine. In contrast to the preclinical data, immune responses in humans were limited. Only low levels of binding antibodies and T-cell responses were seen at the highest doses. This trial also highlighted the difficulties in developing a novel vector for HIV.

  14. Selected HIV-1 Env trimeric formulations act as potent immunogens in a rabbit vaccination model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Heyndrickx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ten to 30% of HIV-1 infected subjects develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs during chronic infection. We hypothesized that immunizing rabbits with viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs from these patients may induce bNAbs, when formulated as a trimeric protein and in the presence of an adjuvant. METHODS: Based on in vitro neutralizing activity in serum, patients with bNAbs were selected for cloning of their HIV-1 Env. Seven stable soluble trimeric gp140 proteins were generated from sequences derived from four adults and two children infected with either clade A or B HIV-1. From one of the clade A Envs both the monomeric and trimeric Env were produced for comparison. Rabbits were immunized with soluble gp120 or trimeric gp140 proteins in combination with the adjuvant dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium/trehalose dibehenate (CAF01. Env binding in rabbit immune serum was determined using ELISAs based on gp120-IIIB protein. Neutralizing activity of IgG purified from rabbit immune sera was measured with the pseudovirus-TZMbl assay and a PBMC-based neutralization assay for selected experiments. RESULTS: It was initially established that gp140 trimers induce better antibody responses over gp120 monomers and that the adjuvant CAF01 was necessary for such strong responses. Gp140 trimers, based on HIV-1 variants from patients with bNAbs, were able to elicit both gp120IIIB specific IgG and NAbs to Tier 1 viruses of different subtypes. Potency of NAbs closely correlated with titers, and an gp120-binding IgG titer above a threshold of 100,000 was predictive of neutralization capability. Finally, peptide inhibition experiments showed that a large fraction of the neutralizing IgG was directed against the gp120 V3 region. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the strategy of reverse immunology based on selected Env sequences is promising when immunogens are delivered as stabilized trimers in CAF01 adjuvant and that the rabbit is a valuable model

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of an HIV-1 gag DNA vaccine with or without IL-12 and/or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvant in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros A Kalams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA vaccines are a promising approach to vaccination since they circumvent the problem of vector-induced immunity. DNA plasmid cytokine adjuvants have been shown to augment immune responses in small animals and in macaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed two first in human HIV vaccine trials in the US, Brazil and Thailand of an RNA-optimized truncated HIV-1 gag gene (p37 DNA derived from strain HXB2 administered either alone or in combination with dose-escalation of IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Vaccinations with both the HIV immunogen and cytokine adjuvant were generally well-tolerated and no significant vaccine-related adverse events were identified. A small number of subjects developed asymptomatic low titer antibodies to IL-12 or IL-15. Cellular immunogenicity following 3 and 4 vaccinations was poor, with response rates to gag of 4.9%/8.7% among vaccinees receiving gag DNA alone, 0%/11.5% among those receiving gag DNA+IL-15, and no responders among those receiving DNA+high dose (1500 ug IL-12 DNA. However, after three doses, 44.4% (4/9 of vaccinees receiving gag DNA and intermediate dose (500 ug of IL-12 DNA demonstrated a detectable cellular immune response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This combination of HIV gag DNA with plasmid cytokine adjuvants was well tolerated. There were minimal responses to HIV gag DNA alone, and no apparent augmentation with either IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Despite the promise of DNA vaccines, newer formulations or methods of delivery will be required to increase their immunogenicity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00115960 NCT00111605.

  16. Successful vaccination of immune suppressed recipients using Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines in helminth infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac; Paterson, Yvonne; Allen, Kelsey; Harn, Donald

    2013-04-12

    Vaccines for HIV, malaria and TB remain high priorities, especially for sub-Saharan populations. The question is: will vaccines currently in development for these diseases function in populations that have a high prevalence of helminth infection? Infection with helminth parasites causes immune suppression and a CD4+ Th2 skewing of the immune system, thereby impairing Th1-type vaccine efficacy. In this study, we conduct HIV vaccine trials in mice with and without chronic helminth infection to mimic the human vaccine recipient populations in Sub-Saharan Africa and other helminth parasite endemic regions of the world, as there is large overlap in global prevalence for HIV and helminth infection. Here, we demonstrate that Listeria monocytogenes functions as a vaccine vector to drive robust and functional HIV-specific cellular immune responses, irrespective of chronic helminth infection. This observation represents a significant advance in the field of vaccine research and underscores the concept that vaccines in the developmental pipeline should be effective in the target populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The porcine circovirus type 1 capsid gene promoter improves antigen expression and immunogenicity in a HIV-1 plasmid vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger Marieta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the promising avenues for development of vaccines against Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and other human pathogens is the use of plasmid-based DNA vaccines. However, relatively large doses of plasmid must be injected for a relatively weak response. We investigated whether genome elements from Porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV-1, an apathogenic small ssDNA-containing virus, had useful expression-enhancing properties that could allow dose-sparing in a plasmid vaccine. Results The linearised PCV-1 genome inserted 5' of the CMV promoter in the well-characterised HIV-1 plasmid vaccine pTHgrttnC increased expression of the polyantigen up to 2-fold, and elicited 3-fold higher CTL responses in mice at 10-fold lower doses than unmodified pTHgrttnC. The PCV-1 capsid gene promoter (Pcap alone was equally effective. Enhancing activity was traced to a putative composite host transcription factor binding site and a "Conserved Late Element" transcription-enhancing sequence previously unidentified in circoviruses. Conclusions We identified a novel PCV-1 genome-derived enhancer sequence that significantly increased antigen expression from plasmids in in vitro assays, and improved immunogenicity in mice of the HIV-1 subtype C vaccine plasmid, pTHgrttnC. This should allow significant dose sparing of, or increased responses to, this and other plasmid-based vaccines. We also report investigations of the potential of other circovirus-derived sequences to be similarly used.

  18. An automated HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped virus production for global HIV vaccine trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Schultz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections with HIV still represent a major human health problem worldwide and a vaccine is the only long-term option to fight efficiently against this virus. Standardized assessments of HIV-specific immune responses in vaccine trials are essential for prioritizing vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical stages of development. With respect to neutralizing antibodies, assays with HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses are a high priority. To cover the increasing demands of HIV pseudoviruses, a complete cell culture and transfection automation system has been developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The automation system for HIV pseudovirus production comprises a modified Tecan-based Cellerity system. It covers an area of 5×3 meters and includes a robot platform, a cell counting machine, a CO(2 incubator for cell cultivation and a media refrigerator. The processes for cell handling, transfection and pseudovirus production have been implemented according to manual standard operating procedures and are controlled and scheduled autonomously by the system. The system is housed in a biosafety level II cabinet that guarantees protection of personnel, environment and the product. HIV pseudovirus stocks in a scale from 140 ml to 1000 ml have been produced on the automated system. Parallel manual production of HIV pseudoviruses and comparisons (bridging assays confirmed that the automated produced pseudoviruses were of equivalent quality as those produced manually. In addition, the automated method was fully validated according to Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP guidelines, including the validation parameters accuracy, precision, robustness and specificity. CONCLUSIONS: An automated HIV pseudovirus production system has been successfully established. It allows the high quality production of HIV pseudoviruses under GCLP conditions. In its present form, the installed module enables the production of 1000 ml of virus-containing cell

  19. Heterologous protection elicited by candidate monomeric recombinant HIV-1 gp120 vaccine in the absence of cross neutralising antibodies in a macaque model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Mark

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current data suggest that an efficacious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 vaccine should elicit both adaptive humoral and cell mediated immune responses. Such a vaccine will also need to protect against infection from a range of heterologous viral variants. Here we have developed a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV based model in cynomolgus macaques to investigate the breadth of protection conferred by HIV-1W61D recombinant gp120 vaccination against SHIVsbg and SHIVSF33 challenge, and to identify correlates of protection. Results High titres of anti-envelope antibodies were detected in all vaccinees. The antibodies reacted with both the homologous HIV-1W61D and heterologous HIV-1IIIB envelope rgp120 which has an identical sequence to the SHIVsbg challenge virus. Significant titres of virus neutralising antibodies were detected against SHIVW61D expressing an envelope homologous with the vaccine, but only limited cross neutralisation against SHIVsbg, SHIV-4 and SHIVSF33 was observed. Protection against SHIVsbg infection was observed in vaccinated animals but none was observed against SHIVSF33 challenge. Transfer of immune sera from vaccinated macaques to naive recipients did not confer protection against SHIVsbg challenge. In a follow-up study, T cell proliferative responses detected after immunisation with the same vaccine against a single peptide present in the second conserved region 2 of HIV-1 W61D and HIV-1 IIIB gp120, but not SF33 gp120. Conclusions Following extended vaccination with a HIV-1 rgp120 vaccine, protection was observed against heterologous virus challenge with SHIVsbg, but not SHIVSF33. Protection did not correlate with serological responses generated by vaccination, but might be associated with T cell proliferative responses against an epitope in the second constant region of HIV-1 gp120. Broader protection may be obtained with recombinant HIV-1 envelope based vaccines formulated with

  20. Expression, purification and crystallization of CTB-MPR, a candidate mucosal vaccine component against HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Hsien Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available CTB-MPR is a fusion protein between the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB and the membrane-proximal region of gp41 (MPR, the transmembrane envelope protein of Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1, and has previously been shown to induce the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies with antiviral functions. To further improve the design of this candidate vaccine, X-ray crystallography experiments were performed to obtain structural information about this fusion protein. Several variants of CTB-MPR were designed, constructed and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The first variant contained a flexible GPGP linker between CTB and MPR, and yielded crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 2.3 Å, but only the CTB region was detected in the electron-density map. A second variant, in which the CTB was directly attached to MPR, was shown to destabilize pentamer formation. A third construct containing a polyalanine linker between CTB and MPR proved to stabilize the pentameric form of the protein during purification. The purification procedure was shown to produce a homogeneously pure and monodisperse sample for crystallization. Initial crystallization experiments led to pseudo-crystals which were ordered in only two dimensions and were disordered in the third dimension. Nanocrystals obtained using the same precipitant showed promising X-ray diffraction to 5 Å resolution in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The results demonstrate the utility of femtosecond X-ray crystallography to enable structural analysis based on nano/microcrystals of a protein for which no macroscopic crystals ordered in three dimensions have been observed before.

  1. Characteristics and outcomes of initial virologic suppressors during analytic treatment interruption in a therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Z Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the placebo-controlled trial ACTG A5197, a trend favoring viral suppression was seen in the HIV-1-infected subjects who received a recombinant Ad5 HIV-1 gag vaccine. OBJECTIVE: To identify individuals with initial viral suppression (plasma HIV-1 RNA set point <3.0 log(10 copies/ml during the analytic treatment interruption (ATI and evaluate the durability and correlates of virologic control and characteristics of HIV sequence evolution. METHODS: HIV-1 gag and pol RNA were amplified and sequenced from plasma obtained during the ATI. Immune responses were measured by flow cytometric analysis and intracellular cytokine expression assays. Characteristics of those with and without initial viral suppression were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests. RESULTS: Eleven out of 104 participants (10.6% were classified as initial virologic suppressors, nine of whom had received the vaccine. Initial virologic suppressors had significantly less CD4+ cell decline by ATI week 16 as compared to non-suppressors (median 7 CD4+ cell gain vs. 247 CD4+ cell loss, P = 0.04. However, of the ten initial virologic suppressors with a pVL at ATI week 49, only three maintained pVL <3.0 log(10 copies/ml. HIV-1 Gag-specific CD4+ interferon-γ responses were not associated with initial virologic suppression and no evidence of vaccine-driven HIV sequence evolution was detected. Participants with initial virologic suppression were found to have a lower percentage of CD4+ CTLA-4+ cells prior to treatment interruption, but a greater proportion of HIV-1 Gag-reactive CD4+ TNF-α+ cells expressing either CTLA-4 or PD-1. CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals participating in a rAd5 therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial, initial viral suppression was found in a subset of patients, but this response was not sustained. The association between CTLA-4 and PD-1 expression on CD4+ T cells and virologic outcome warrants further study in trials of other

  2. HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses induced by Listeria vector vaccines are maintained in mice subsequently infected with a model helminth parasite, Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac T; Paterson, Yvonne; Nyhoff, Lindsay; Harn, Donald A

    2013-11-19

    In areas co-endemic for helminth parasites and HIV/AIDS, infants are often administered vaccines prior to infection with immune modulatory helminth parasites. Systemic Th2 biasing and immune suppression caused by helminth infection reduces cell-mediated responses to vaccines such as tetanus toxoid and BCG. Therefore, we asked if infection with helminthes post-vaccination, alters already established vaccine induced immune responses. In our model, mice are vaccinated against HIV-1 Gag using a Listeria vaccine vector (Lm-Gag) in a prime-boost manner, then infected with the human helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. This allows us to determine if established vaccine responses are maintained or altered after helminth infection. Our second objective asked if helminth infection post-vaccination alters the recipient's ability to respond to a second boost. Here we compared responses between uninfected mice, schistosome infected mice, and infected mice that were given an anthelminthic, which occurred coincident with the boost or four weeks prior, as well as comparing to un-boosted mice. We report that HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses generated by Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines are maintained following subsequent chronic schistosome infection, providing further evidence that Listeria vector vaccines induce potent vaccine-specific responses that can withstand helminth infection. We also were able to demonstrate that administration of a second Listeria boost, which markedly enhanced the immune response, was minimally impacted by schistosome infection, or anthelminthic therapy. Surprisingly, we also observed enhanced antibody responses to HIV Gag in vaccinated mice subsequently infected with schistosomes.

  3. Broader HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses induced by envelope glycoprotein mutants based on the EIAV attenuated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lianxing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to induce a potent and cross-reactive neutralizing antibody (nAb, an effective envelope immunogen is crucial for many viral vaccines, including the vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV attenuated vaccine has controlled the epidemic of this virus after its vaccination in over 70 million equine animals during the last 3 decades in China. Data from our past studies demonstrate that the Env protein of this vaccine plays a pivotal role in protecting horses from both homologous and heterogeneous EIAV challenges. Therefore, the amino acid sequence information from the Chinese EIAV attenuated vaccine, in comparison with the parental wild-type EIAV strains, was applied to modify the corresponding region of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 CN54. The direction of the mutations was made towards the amino acids conserved in the two EIAV vaccine strains, distinguishing them from the two wild-type strains. The purpose of the modification was to enhance the immunogenicity of the HIV Env. Results The induced nAb by the modified HIV Env neutralized HIV-1 B and B'/C viruses at the highest titer of 1:270. Further studies showed that a single amino acid change in the C1 region accounts for the substantial enhancement in induction of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions This study shows that an HIV envelope modified by the information of another lentivirus vaccine induces effective broadly neutralizing antibodies. A single amino acid mutation was found to increase the immunogenicity of the HIV Env.

  4. HIV-1 Immunogen: an overview of almost 30 years of clinical testing of a candidate therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2016-07-01

    Although current antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV infection into a chronic, manageable disease, ART does not cure HIV infection. Furthermore, the majority of the world's infected individuals live in resource-limited countries in which access to ART is limited. Thus, the development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine would be an invaluable treatment alternative. Developed by the late Dr. Jonas Salk, HIV-1 Immunogen (Remune®) is a candidate therapeutic vaccine that has been studied in thousands of HIV-infected individuals in more than a dozen clinical trials during almost three decades. This Drug Evaluation, which summarizes the results of these trials that have shown the vaccine to be safe and immunogenic, also discusses the contradictory and controversial conclusions drawn from the phases 2, 2/3 and 3 trials that assessed the clinical efficacy of this vaccine. Given the lack of unequivocal clinical benefits of HIV-1 Immunogen despite almost 30 years of extensive testing, it does not appear, in our view, that this vaccine is a clinically effective immunotherapy. However, inclusion of this vaccine in the newly proposed 'Kick/Shock and Kill' strategy for HIV eradication, or use as a prophylactic vaccine, could be considered for future trials.

  5. HIV-1 diversity, drug-resistant mutations, and viral evolution among high-risk individuals in phase II HIV vaccine trial sites in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Qi

    Full Text Available HIV-1 prevalence in Guangxi, China, has been growing since 1996, when the first case was reported. Over half of HIV-1 positive patients in Guangxi Province were injecting drug users (IDUs, possibly because of the province's location near drug-trafficking routes. Since a phase II HIV vaccine trial is ongoing there, a current characterization of the subtypes of HIV-1 among IDUs in Guangxi would provide critical information for future HIV vaccine trials, as well as further control and prevention of HIV-1 transmission. Thus, we conducted a molecular epidemiological investigation of HIV-1 samples from 2008-2010 among IDUs in multiple cities in Guangxi Province. Our results, based on the gag/pol fragment, indicated a very high proportion (78.47% of HIV-1 CRF08_BC recombinants, some CRF01_AE (15.38% recombinants, and a low proportion of CRF07_BC (6.15% recombinants among the IDUs. The high proportion of CRF08 HIV-1 strains among recent IDUs matches the vaccine candidate constructs. However, future vaccine development should also incorporate CRF01-targeted vaccine candidates. Distinct Env sequence evolution patterns were observed for CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE, indicating that different local selection pressures have been exerted on these two HIV-1 subtypes. Unique drug-resistant mutations were also detected, and our data indicate that HIV treatment programs should consider pre-existing drug-resistant mutations.

  6. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  7. Randomized phase I: safety, immunogenicity and mucosal antiviral activity in young healthy women vaccinated with HIV-1 Gp41 P1 peptide on virosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Geert Leroux-Roels; Cathy Maes; Frédéric Clement; Frank van Engelenburg; Marieke van den Dobbelsteen; Michael Adler; Mario Amacker; Lucia Lopalco; Morgane Bomsel; Anick Chalifour; Sylvain Fleury

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Mucosal antibodies harboring various antiviral activities may best protect mucosal surfaces against early HIV-1 entry at mucosal sites and they should be ideally induced by prophylactic HIV-1 vaccines for optimal prevention of sexually transmitted HIV-1. A phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in twenty-four healthy HIV-uninfected young women. The study objectives were to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of virosomes harboring ...

  8. DNA and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Vaccines Encoding Multiple Cytotoxic and Helper T-Lymphocyte Epitopes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Are Safe but Weakly Immunogenic in HIV-1-Uninfected, Vaccinia Virus-Naive Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Mark J.; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins. PMID:22398243

  9. Boosters of a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine induce divergent T cell responses related to regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Andreas; Brekke, Kristin; Sommerfelt, Maja; Holmberg, Jens O; Aass, Hans Christian D; Baksaas, Ingebjørg; Sørensen, Birger; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma; Kvale, Dag

    2013-09-23

    Therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines aim to reduce disease progression by inducing HIV-specific T cells. Vacc-4x are peptides derived from conserved domains within HIV-1 p24 Gag. Previously, Vacc-4x induced T cell responses in 90% of patients which were associated with reduced viral loads. Here we evaluate the effects of Vacc-4x boosters on T cell immunity and immune regulation seven years after primary immunization. Twenty-five patients on effective antiretroviral therapy received two Vacc-4x doses four weeks apart and were followed for 16 weeks. Vacc-4x T cell responses were measured by proliferation (CFSE), INF-γ, CD107a, Granzyme B, Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity test (DTH) and cytokines and chemokines (Luminex). Functional regulation of Vacc-4x-specific T cell proliferation was estimated in vitro using anti-IL-10 and anti-TGF-ß monoclonal antibodies. Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation increased in 80% after either the first (64%) or second (16%) booster. Only 40% remained responders after two boosters with permanently increased Vacc-4x-specific proliferative responses (p=0.005) and improved CD8(+) T cell degranulation, IFN-γ production and DTH. At baseline, responders had higher CD8(+) T cell degranulation (p=0.05) and CD4(+) INF-γ production (p=0.01), whereas non-responders had higher production of proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1α and IL-1ß (p<0.045) and regulatory IL-10 (p=0.07). Notably, IL-10 and TGF-ß mediated downregulation of Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation increased only in non-responders (p<0.001). Downregulation during the study correlated to higher PD-1 expression on Vacc-4x-specific CD8(+) T cells (r=0.44, p=0.037), but was inversely correlated to changes in Vacc4x-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation (r=-0.52, p=0.012). These findings show that Vacc-4x boosters can improve T cell responses in selected patients, but also induce vaccine-specific downregulation of T cell responses in others. Broad

  10. Architectural insight into inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs) and development of IAV-based vaccines inducing humoral and cellular responses: implications in HIV-1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassapis, Kyriakos A; Stylianou, Dora C; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-12-01

    Inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs) are engineered, non-lytic, filamentous bacteriophages that are assembled primarily from thousands of copies of the major coat protein gp8 and just five copies of each of the four minor coat proteins gp3, gp6, gp7 and gp9. Inovirus display studies have shown that the architecture of inoviruses makes all coat proteins of the inoviral particle accessible to the outside. This particular feature of IAVs allows foreign antigenic peptides to be displayed on the outer surface of the virion fused to its coat proteins and for more than two decades has been exploited in many applications including antibody or peptide display libraries, drug design, and vaccine development against infectious and non-infectious diseases. As vaccine carriers, IAVs have been shown to elicit both a cellular and humoral response against various pathogens through the display of antibody epitopes on their coat proteins. Despite their high immunogenicity, the goal of developing an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has not yet materialized. One possible limitation of previous efforts was the use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which exhibited autoreactivity properties. In the past five years, however, new, more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that do not exhibit autoreactivity properties have been isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, suggesting that vaccination strategies aimed at producing such broadly neutralizing antibodies may confer protection against infection. The utilization of these new, broadly neutralizing antibodies in combination with the architectural traits of IAVs have driven the current developments in the design of an inovirus-based vaccine against HIV-1. This article reviews the applications of IAVs in vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the design of inoviral-based vaccines against HIV-1.

  11. Architectural Insight into Inovirus-Associated Vectors (IAVs and Development of IAV-Based Vaccines Inducing Humoral and Cellular Responses: Implications in HIV-1 Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos A. Hassapis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs are engineered, non-lytic, filamentous bacteriophages that are assembled primarily from thousands of copies of the major coat protein gp8 and just five copies of each of the four minor coat proteins gp3, gp6, gp7 and gp9. Inovirus display studies have shown that the architecture of inoviruses makes all coat proteins of the inoviral particle accessible to the outside. This particular feature of IAVs allows foreign antigenic peptides to be displayed on the outer surface of the virion fused to its coat proteins and for more than two decades has been exploited in many applications including antibody or peptide display libraries, drug design, and vaccine development against infectious and non-infectious diseases. As vaccine carriers, IAVs have been shown to elicit both a cellular and humoral response against various pathogens through the display of antibody epitopes on their coat proteins. Despite their high immunogenicity, the goal of developing an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has not yet materialized. One possible limitation of previous efforts was the use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which exhibited autoreactivity properties. In the past five years, however, new, more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that do not exhibit autoreactivity properties have been isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, suggesting that vaccination strategies aimed at producing such broadly neutralizing antibodies may confer protection against infection. The utilization of these new, broadly neutralizing antibodies in combination with the architectural traits of IAVs have driven the current developments in the design of an inovirus-based vaccine against HIV-1. This article reviews the applications of IAVs in vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the design of inoviral-based vaccines against HIV-1.

  12. Discovery of novel targets for multi-epitope vaccines: Screening of HIV-1 genomes using association rule mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piontkivska Helen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that in the genome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 regions responsible for interactions with the host's immune system, namely, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL epitopes tend to cluster together in relatively conserved regions. On the other hand, "epitope-less" regions or regions with relatively low density of epitopes tend to be more variable. However, very little is known about relationships among epitopes from different genes, in other words, whether particular epitopes from different genes would occur together in the same viral genome. To identify CTL epitopes in different genes that co-occur in HIV genomes, association rule mining was used. Results Using a set of 189 best-defined HIV-1 CTL/CD8+ epitopes from 9 different protein-coding genes, as described by Frahm, Linde & Brander (2007, we examined the complete genomic sequences of 62 reference HIV sequences (including 13 subtypes and sub-subtypes with approximately 4 representative sequences for each subtype or sub-subtype, and 18 circulating recombinant forms. The results showed that despite inclusion of recombinant sequences that would be expected to break-up associations of epitopes in different genes when two different genomes are recombined, there exist particular combinations of epitopes (epitope associations that occur repeatedly across the world-wide population of HIV-1. For example, Pol epitope LFLDGIDKA is found to be significantly associated with epitopes GHQAAMQML and FLKEKGGL from Gag and Nef, respectively, and this association rule is observed even among circulating recombinant forms. Conclusion We have identified CTL epitope combinations co-occurring in HIV-1 genomes including different subtypes and recombinant forms. Such co-occurrence has important implications for design of complex vaccines (multi-epitope vaccines and/or drugs that would target multiple HIV-1 regions at once and, thus, may be expected to overcome challenges

  13. Immune-correlates analysis of an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial reveals an association of nonspecific interferon-γ secretion with increased HIV-1 infection risk: a cohort-based modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunda Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated risk of HIV-1 infection among recipients of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5-vectored HIV-1 vaccine was previously reported in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial. We assessed pre-infection cellular immune responses measured at 4 weeks after the second vaccination to determine their roles in HIV-1 infection susceptibility among Step study male participants. METHODS: We examined ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using an ELISpot assay in 112 HIV-infected and 962 uninfected participants. In addition, we performed flow cytometric assays to examine T-cell activation, and ex vivo IFN-γ and interleukin-2 secretion from CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. We accounted for the sub-sampling design in Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs of HIV-1 infection per 1-log(e increase of the immune responses. FINDINGS: We found that HIV-specific immune responses were not associated with risk of HIV-1 infection. However, each 1-log(e increase of mock responses measured by the ELISpot assay (i.e., IFN-γ secretion in the absence of antigen-specific stimulation was associated with a 62% increase of HIV-1 infection risk among vaccine recipients (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: (1.28, 2.04, p<0.001. This association remains after accounting for CD4(+ or CD8(+ T-cell activation. We observed a moderate correlation between ELISpot mock responses and CD4(+ T-cells secreting IFN-γ (ρ = 0.33, p = 0.007. In addition, the effect of the Step vaccine on infection risk appeared to vary with ELISpot mock response levels, especially among participants who had pre-existing anti-Ad5 antibodies (interaction p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of cells, likely CD4(+ T-cells, producing IFN-γ without stimulation by exogenous antigen appears to carry information beyond T-cell activation and baseline characteristics that predict risk of HIV-1 infection. These results motivate additional investigation to

  14. A critical analysis of the cynomolgus macaque, Macaca fascicularis, as a model to test HIV-1/SIV vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Joseph M; MacDonald, Kelly S

    2015-06-17

    The use of a number of non-rhesus macaque species, but especially cynomolgus macaques as a model for HIV-1 vaccine development has increased in recent years. Cynomolgus macaques have been used in the United Kingdom, Europe, Canada and Australia as a model for HIV vaccine development for many years. Unlike rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques infected with SIV show a pattern of disease pathogenesis that more closely resembles that of human HIV-1 infection, exhibiting lower peak and set-point viral loads and slower progression to disease with more typical AIDS defining illnesses. Several advances have been made recently in the use of the cynomolgus macaque SIV challenge model that allow the demonstration of vaccine efficacy using attenuated viruses and vectors that are both viral and non-viral in origin. This review aims to probe the details of various vaccination trials carried out in cynomolgus macaques in the context of our modern understanding of the highly diverse immunogenetics of this species with a view to understanding the species-specific immune correlates of protection and the efficacy of vectors that have been used to design vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. MRKAd5 HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine-induced T-cell responses inadequately predict distance of breakthrough HIV-1 sequences to the vaccine or viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Janes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sieve analysis for the Step trial found evidence that breakthrough HIV-1 sequences for MRKAd5/HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine recipients were more divergent from the vaccine insert than placebo sequences in regions with predicted epitopes. We linked the viral sequence data with immune response and acute viral load data to explore mechanisms for and consequences of the observed sieve effect. METHODS: Ninety-one male participants (37 placebo and 54 vaccine recipients were included; viral sequences were obtained at the time of HIV-1 diagnosis. T-cell responses were measured 4 weeks post-second vaccination and at the first or second week post-diagnosis. Acute viral load was obtained at RNA-positive and antibody-negative visits. FINDINGS: Vaccine recipients had a greater magnitude of post-infection CD8+ T cell response than placebo recipients (median 1.68% vs 1.18%; p = 0·04 and greater breadth of post-infection response (median 4.5 vs 2; p = 0·06. Viral sequences for vaccine recipients were marginally more divergent from the insert than placebo sequences in regions of Nef targeted by pre-infection immune responses (p = 0·04; Pol p = 0·13; Gag p = 0·89. Magnitude and breadth of pre-infection responses did not correlate with distance of the viral sequence to the insert (p>0·50. Acute log viral load trended lower in vaccine versus placebo recipients (estimated mean 4·7 vs 5·1 but the difference was not significant (p = 0·27. Neither was acute viral load associated with distance of the viral sequence to the insert (p>0·30. INTERPRETATION: Despite evidence of anamnestic responses, the sieve effect was not well explained by available measures of T-cell immunogenicity. Sequence divergence from the vaccine was not significantly associated with acute viral load. While point estimates suggested weak vaccine suppression of viral load, the result was not significant and more viral load data would be needed to detect

  16. A Phase I Randomized Therapeutic MVA-B Vaccination Improves the Magnitude and Quality of the T Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1-Infected Subjects on HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elena Gómez

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggested that poxvirus-based vaccines might be instrumental in the therapeutic HIV field. A phase I clinical trial was conducted in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, with CD4 T cell counts above 450 cells/mm3 and undetectable viremia. Thirty participants were randomized (2:1 to receive either 3 intramuscular injections of MVA-B vaccine (coding for clade B HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens or placebo, followed by interruption of HAART.The magnitude, breadth, quality and phenotype of the HIV-1-specific T cell response were assayed by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS in 22 volunteers pre- and post-vaccination.MVA-B vaccine induced newly detected HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell responses and expanded pre-existing responses (mostly against Gag, Pol and Nef antigens that were high in magnitude, broadly directed and showed an enhanced polyfunctionality with a T effector memory (TEM phenotype, while maintaining the magnitude and quality of the pre-existing HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses. In addition, vaccination also triggered preferential CD8+ T cell polyfunctional responses to the MVA vector antigens that increase in magnitude after two and three booster doses.MVA-B vaccination represents a feasible strategy to improve T cell responses in individuals with pre-existing HIV-1-specific immunity.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571466.

  17. Soluble multi-trimeric TNF superfamily ligand adjuvants enhance immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavelu, Saravana K; Snarsky, Victoria; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Barzee, Suzanne; Wright, Jacqueline A; Khan, Wasif N; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2012-01-17

    DNA vaccines remain an important component of HIV vaccination strategies, typically as part of a prime/boost vaccination strategy with viral vector or protein boost. A number of DNA prime/viral vector boost vaccines are currently being evaluated for both preclinical studies and in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. These vaccines would benefit from molecular adjuvants that increase correlates of immunity during the DNA prime. While HIV vaccine immune correlates are still not well defined, there are a number of immune assays that have been shown to correlate with protection from viral challenge including CD8+ T cell avidity, antigen-specific proliferation, and polyfunctional cytokine secretion. Recombinant DNA vaccine adjuvants composed of a fusion between Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and either CD40 Ligand (CD40L) or GITR Ligand (GITRL) were previously shown to enhance HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccines. Here we show that similar fusion constructs composed of the TNF superfamily ligands (TNFSFL) 4-1BBL, OX40L, RANKL, LIGHT, CD70, and BAFF can also enhanced immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine. BALB/c mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with plasmids expressing secreted Gag and SP-D-TNFSFL fusions. Initially, mice were analyzed 2 weeks or 7 weeks following vaccination to evaluate the relative efficacy of each SP-D-TNFSFL construct. All SP-D-TNFSFL constructs enhanced at least one Gag-specific immune response compared to the parent vaccine. Importantly, the constructs SP-D-4-1BBL, SP-D-OX40L, and SP-D-LIGHT enhanced CD8+ T cell avidity and CD8+/CD4+ T cell proliferation 7 weeks post vaccination. These avidity and proliferation data suggest that 4-1BBL, OX40L, and LIGHT fusion constructs may be particularly effective as vaccine adjuvants. Constructs SP-D-OX40L, SP-D-LIGHT, and SP-D-BAFF enhanced Gag-specific IL-2 secretion in memory T cells, suggesting these adjuvants can increase the number of self-renewing Gag-specific CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cells. Finally adjuvants SP

  18. [A novel immunization strategy to induce strong humoral responses against HIV-1 using combined DNA, recombinant vaccinia virus and protein vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Shu-hui; Ren, Li; Hao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the immunization strategy against HIV-1, a DNA vaccine was combined with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rTV) vaccine and a protein vaccine. Immune responses against HIV-1 were detected in 30 female guinea pigs divided into six groups. Three groups of guinea pigs were primed with HIV-1 DNA vaccine three times, boosted with rTV at week 14, and then boosted with gp140 protein at intervals of 4, 8 or 12 weeks. Simultaneously, the other three groups of animals were primed with rTV vaccine once, and then boosted with gp140 after 4, 8 or 12 weeks. The HIV-1 specific binding antibody and neutralizing antibody, in addition to the relative affinity of these antibodies, were detected at different time points after the final administration of vaccine in each group. The DNA-rTV-gp140 immune regimen induced higher titers and affinity levels of HIV-1 gp120/gp140 antibodies and stronger V1V2-gp70 antibodies than the rTV-gp140 regimen. In the guinea pigs that underwent the DNA-rTV-gp140 regimen, the highest V1V2-gp70 antibody was induced in the 12-week-interval group. However, the avidity of antibodies was improved in the 4-week-interval group. Using the rTV-gp140 immunization strategy, guinea pigs boosted at 8 or 12 weeks after rTV priming elicited stronger humoral responses than those boosted at 4 weeks after priming. In conclusion, this study shows that the immunization strategy of HIV-1 DNA vaccine priming, followed by rTV and protein vaccine boosting, could strengthen the humoral response against HIV-1. Longer intervals were better to induce V1V2-gp70-specific antibodies, while shorter intervals were more beneficial to enhance the avidity of antibodies.

  19. Superior control of HIV-1 replication by CD8+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes: implications for HIV vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Kunwar

    Full Text Available A successful HIV vaccine will likely induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, however, the enormous diversity of HIV has hampered the development of a vaccine that effectively elicits both arms of the adaptive immune response. To tackle the problem of viral diversity, T cell-based vaccine approaches have focused on two main strategies (i increasing the breadth of vaccine-induced responses or (ii increasing vaccine-induced responses targeting only conserved regions of the virus. The relative extent to which set-point viremia is impacted by epitope-conservation of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early HIV-infection is unknown but has important implications for vaccine design. To address this question, we comprehensively mapped HIV-1 CD8(+ T cell epitope-specificities in 23 ART-naïve individuals during early infection and computed their conservation score (CS by three different methods (prevalence, entropy and conseq on clade-B and group-M sequence alignments. The majority of CD8(+ T cell responses were directed against variable epitopes (p<0.01. Interestingly, increasing breadth of CD8(+ T cell responses specifically recognizing conserved epitopes was associated with lower set-point viremia (r = - 0.65, p = 0.009. Moreover, subjects possessing CD8(+ T cells recognizing at least one conserved epitope had 1.4 log10 lower set-point viremia compared to those recognizing only variable epitopes (p = 0.021. The association between viral control and the breadth of conserved CD8(+ T cell responses may be influenced by the method of CS definition and sequences used to determine conservation levels. Strikingly, targeting variable versus conserved epitopes was independent of HLA type (p = 0.215. The associations with viral control were independent of functional avidity of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the next-generation of T-cell based HIV-1 vaccines should focus

  20. Cholera toxin B subunit acts as a potent systemic adjuvant for HIV-1 DNA vaccination intramuscularly in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Ying; Hsi, Jenny; Wang, Hongzhi; Tao, Ran; Shao, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was investigated as a classical mucosal adjuvant that can increase vaccine immunogenicity. In this study, we found out the in vitro efficacy of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in activating mice bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. In vitro RNA and transcriptional level profiling arrays revealed that CTB guides high levels of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. Based on the robustness of these profiling results, we examined the induction of HIV Env-specific immunity by CTB co-inoculated with HIV Env DNA vaccine intramuscularly in vivo. CTB enhanced HIV-Env specific cellular immune responses in Env-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, compared with DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, CTB induced high levels of Env specific humoral response and promoted antibody maturation after the third round of vaccination. This combination immunization strategy induced a Th2-type bias response which is indicative of a high ratio of IgG1/IgG2a. This study reports that CTB as a classical mucosal adjuvant could enhance HIV-1 DNA-based vaccine immunogenicity intramuscularly; therefore, these findings suggest that CTB could serve as an effective candidate adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  1. First Phase I human clinical trial of a killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine: demonstration of its safety and enhancement of anti-HIV antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsil; Michalski, Chad J; Choo, Seung Ho; Kim, Gyoung Nyoun; Banasikowska, Elizabeth; Lee, Sangkyun; Wu, Kunyu; An, Hwa-Yong; Mills, Anthony; Schneider, Stefan; Bredeek, U Fritz; Coulston, Daniel R; Ding, Shilei; Finzi, Andrés; Tian, Meijuan; Klein, Katja; Arts, Eric J; Mann, Jamie F S; Gao, Yong; Kang, C Yong

    2016-11-28

    Vaccination with inactivated (killed) whole-virus particles has been used to prevent a wide range of viral diseases. However, for an HIV vaccine this approach has been largely negated due to inherent safety concerns, despite the ability of killed whole-virus vaccines to generate a strong, predominantly antibody-mediated immune response in vivo. HIV-1 Clade B NL4-3 was genetically modified by deleting the nef and vpu genes and substituting the coding sequence for the Env signal peptide with that of honeybee melittin signal peptide to produce a less virulent and more replication efficient virus. This genetically modified virus (gmHIV-1NL4-3) was inactivated and formulated as a killed whole-HIV vaccine, and then used for a Phase I human clinical trial (Trial Registration: Clinical Trials NCT01546818). The gmHIV-1NL4-3 was propagated in the A3.01 human T cell line followed by virus purification and inactivation with aldrithiol-2 and γ-irradiation. Thirty-three HIV-1 positive volunteers receiving cART were recruited for this observer-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase I human clinical trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity. Genetically modified and killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine, SAV001, was well tolerated with no serious adverse events. HIV-1NL4-3-specific PCR showed neither evidence of vaccine virus replication in the vaccine virus-infected human T lymphocytes in vitro nor in the participating volunteers receiving SAV001 vaccine. Furthermore, SAV001 with adjuvant significantly increased the pre-existing antibody response to HIV-1 proteins. Antibodies in the plasma of vaccinees were also found to recognize HIV-1 envelope protein on the surface of infected cells as well as showing an enhancement of broadly neutralizing antibodies inhibiting tier I and II of HIV-1 B, D, and A subtypes. The killed whole-HIV vaccine, SAV001, is safe and triggers anti-HIV immune responses. It remains to be determined through an appropriate trial whether this immune response prevents HIV

  2. Indicators of therapeutic effect in FIT-06, a Phase II trial of a DNA vaccine, GTU(®)-Multi-HIVB, in untreated HIV-1 infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardas, Eftyhia; Stanescu, Ioana; Leinonen, Mika; Ellefsen, Kim; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Valtavaara, Minna; Ustav, Mart; Reijonen, Kalevi

    2012-06-08

    Combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly decreased HIV-1 related morbidity and mortality globally transforming HIV into a controllable condition. HAART has a number of limitations though, including limited access in resource constrained countries, which have driven the search for simpler, affordable HIV-1 treatment modalities. Therapeutic HIV-1 vaccines aim to provide immunological support to slow disease progression and decrease transmission. We evaluated the safety, immunogenicity and clinical effect of a novel recombinant plasmid DNA therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine, GTU(®)-multi-HIVB, containing 6 different genes derived from an HIV-1 subtype B isolate. 63 untreated, healthy, HIV-1 infected, adults between 18 and 40 years were enrolled in a single-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase II trial in South Africa. Subjects were HIV-1 subtype C infected, had never received antiretrovirals, with CD4 ≥ 350 cells/mm(3) and pHIV-RNA ≥ 50 copies/mL at screening. Subjects were allocated to vaccine or placebo groups in a 2:1 ratio either administered intradermally (ID) (0.5mg/dose) or intramuscularly (IM) (1mg/dose) at 0, 4 and 12 weeks boosted at 76 and 80 weeks with 1mg/dose (ID) and 2mg/dose (IM), respectively. Safety was assessed by adverse event monitoring and immunogenicity by HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), pHIV-RNA and CD4 counts. Vaccine was safe and well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Significant declines in log pHIV-RNA (p=0.012) and increases in CD4+ T cell counts (p=0.066) were observed in the vaccine group compared to placebo, more pronounced after IM administration and in some HLA haplotypes (B*5703) maintained for 17 months after the final immunisation. The GTU(®)-multi-HIVB plasmid recombinant DNA therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine is safe, well tolerated and favourably affects pHIV-RNA and CD4 counts in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals after IM

  3. The effects of CpG-ODNs and Chitosan adjuvants on the elicitation of immune responses induced by the HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Samira; Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2017-03-01

    HIV1-Tat-based vaccines could elicit broad, durable and neutralizing immune responses and are considered as potential AIDS vaccines. The present study aims to formulate CpG-ODNs adjuvant and Chitosan with Tat protein to enhance the immunogenicity of HIV-1-Tat-based candidate vaccines and to investigate their efficacies in mice. To this end, we added CpG-ODNs, Chitosan and Alum as adjuvants to the Tat-based candidate vaccine formulations. Then, we compared frequency and magnitude of both humoral and cellular immune responses from mice immunized with the adjuvant-formulated Tat candidate vaccines against those obtained from mice immunized with recombinant Tat protein alone. Mice were subcutaneously immunized three times at 2-week intervals with the candidate vaccines. Measurements of anti-Tat immune responses showed that all vaccinated groups had a good immunity compared to the control groups and developed high levels of both humoral and cellular responses. However, immunized mice with CpG-ODNs, and Chitosan-adjuvanted Tat vaccines elicited stronger T-cell responses (both humoral and cellular immunity) compared to the others. These data suggest that co-administration of recombinant Tat protein with CpG-ODNs and Chitosan may serve as a potential formulation for enhancing of the Tat vaccine-induced immunity and might have effects on shaping Th polarization induced by HIV1-Tat protein vaccines. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Nanoparticles for nasal delivery of vaccines : monitoring adaptive immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, C.

    2013-01-01

    The continuous emergence of new pathogens and growing drug resistance of microorganisms asks for innovative vaccination strategies. An alternative to conventional multiple injection vaccines is the nasal route of vaccine delivery. The immune response induced following nasal antigen delivery depends

  5. Selected HIV-1 Env trimeric formulations act as potent immunogens in a rabbit vaccination model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heyndrickx, Leo; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Jansson, Marianne Bendixen

    2013-01-01

    Ten to 30% of HIV-1 infected subjects develop broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) during chronic infection. We hypothesized that immunizing rabbits with viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs) from these patients may induce bNAbs, when formulated as a trimeric protein and in the presence...

  6. The F4/AS01B HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate Is Safe and Immunogenic, But Does Not Show Viral Efficacy in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive, HIV-1-Infected Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, Warren; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Podzamczer, Daniel; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; García, Felipe.; Harrer, Thomas; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Frank, Ian; Colin De Verdière, Nathalie; Yeni, Guy-Patrick; Ortega Gonzalez, Enrique; Rubio, Rafael; Clotet Sala, Bonaventura; DeJesus, Edwin; Pérez-Elias, Maria Jesus; Launay, Odile; Pialoux, Gilles; Slim, Jihad; Weiss, Laurence; Bouchaud, Olivier; Felizarta, Franco; Meurer, Anja; Raffi, François; Esser, Stefan; Katlama, Christine; Koletar, Susan L.; Mounzer, Karam; Swindells, Susan; Baxter, John D.; Schneider, Stefan; Chas, Julie; Molina, Jean-Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Collard, Alix; Bourguignon, Patricia; Roman, François

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of the investigational human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) F4/AS01B vaccine on HIV-1 viral load (VL) was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive HIV-1 infected adults. This phase IIb, observer-blind study (NCT01218113), included ART-naive HIV-1 infected adults aged 18 to 55 years. Participants were randomized to receive 2 (F4/AS01B_2 group, N = 64) or 3 (F4/AS01B_3 group, N = 62) doses of F4/AS01B or placebo (control group, N = 64) at weeks 0, 4, and 28. Efficacy (HIV-1 VL, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, and HIV-related clinical events), safety, and immunogenicity (antibody and T-cell responses) were evaluated during 48 weeks. At week 48, based on a mixed model, no statistically significant difference in HIV-1 VL change from baseline was demonstrated between F4/AS01B_2 and control group (0.073 log10 copies/mL [97.5% confidence interval (CI): −0.088; 0.235]), or F4/AS01B_3 and control group (−0.096 log10 copies/mL [97.5% CI: −0.257; 0.065]). No differences between groups were observed in HIV-1 VL change, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, or HIV-related clinical events at intermediate timepoints. Among F4/AS01B recipients, the most frequent solicited symptoms were pain at injection site (252/300 doses), fatigue (137/300 doses), myalgia (105/300 doses), and headache (90/300 doses). Twelve serious adverse events were reported in 6 participants; 1 was considered vaccine-related (F4/AS01B_2 group: angioedema). F4/AS01B induced polyfunctional F4-specific CD4+ T-cells, but had no significant impact on F4-specific CD8+ T-cell and anti-F4 antibody levels. F4/AS01B had a clinically acceptable safety profile, induced F4-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, but did not reduce HIV-1 VL, impact CD4+ T-cells count, delay ART initiation, or prevent HIV-1 related clinical events. PMID:26871794

  7. A mammalian cell based FACS-panning platform for the selection of HIV-1 envelopes for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim-Henrik Bruun

    Full Text Available An increasing number of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAb against the HIV-1 envelope (Env protein has been discovered recently. Despite this progress, vaccination efforts with the aim to re-elicit bnMAbs that provide protective immunity have failed so far. Herein, we describe the development of a mammalian cell based FACS-panning method in which bnMAbs are used as tools to select surface-exposed envelope variants according to their binding affinity. For that purpose, an HIV-1 derived lentiviral vector was developed to infect HEK293T cells at low multiplicity of infection (MOI in order to link Env phenotype and genotype. For proof of principle, a gp145 Env model-library was established in which the complete V3 domain was substituted by five strain specific V3 loop sequences with known binding affinities to nMAb 447-52D, respectively. Env genes were recovered from selected cells by PCR, subcloned into a lentiviral vector (i to determine and quantify the enrichment nMAb binders and (ii to generate a new batch of transduction competent particles. After 2 selection cycles the Env variant with highest affinity was enriched 20-fold and represented 80% of the remaining Env population. Exploiting the recently described bnMAbs, this procedure might prove useful in selecting Env proteins from large Env libraries with the potential to elicit bnMAbs when used as vaccine candidates.

  8. Relation of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression with antibody response to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigi, Alberto; Pensieroso, Simone; Ruffin, Nicolas; Sammicheli, Stefano; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hejdeman, Bo; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-04-26

    The relevance of CD4+T-cells, viral load and age in the immunological response to influenza infection and vaccination in HIV-1 infected individuals has previously been pointed out. Our study aimed at assessing, in the setting of 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccination, whether quantification of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression in blood B-cells may provide additional indications for predicting antibody response to vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients with similar CD4+T-cell counts and age. Forty-seven healthy controls, 37 ART-treated and 17 treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected prior to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and at 1, 3 and 6 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay while the mRNA expression levels of AID were measured by quantitative real time PCR. Upon B-cell activation in vitro, AID increase correlated to antibody response to the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 1 month after vaccination in all individuals. In addition, the maximum expression levels of AID were significantly higher in those individuals who still carried protective levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies after 6 months from vaccination. No correlation was found between CD4+T-cell counts or age at vaccination or HIV-1 viral load and levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies. Assessing AID expression before vaccination may be an additional useful tool for defining a vaccination strategy in immune-compromised individuals at risk of immunization failure.

  9. Micro- and nanoparticulates for DNA vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Eric; Brown, Deborah M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Pannier, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional protein-based vaccines for the induction of protective immune responses. DNA vaccines offer several advantages over traditional vaccines, including increased stability, rapid and inexpensive production, and flexibility to produce vaccines for a wide variety of infectious diseases. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered as naked plasmid DNA is often weak due to degradation of the DNA by nucleases and inefficient delivery to immune cells. Therefore, biomaterial-based delivery systems based on micro- and nanoparticles that encapsulate plasmid DNA represent the most promising strategy for DNA vaccine delivery. Microparticulate delivery systems allow for passive targeting to antigen presenting cells through size exclusion and can allow for sustained presentation of DNA to cells through degradation and release of encapsulated vaccines. In contrast, nanoparticle encapsulation leads to increased internalization, overall greater transfection efficiency, and the ability to increase uptake across mucosal surfaces. Moreover, selection of the appropriate biomaterial can lead to increased immune stimulation and activation through triggering innate immune response receptors and target DNA to professional antigen presenting cells. Finally, the selection of materials with the appropriate properties to achieve efficient delivery through administration routes conducive to high patient compliance and capable of generating systemic and local (i.e. mucosal) immunity can lead to more effective humoral and cellular protective immune responses. In this review, we discuss the development of novel biomaterial-based delivery systems to enhance the delivery of DNA vaccines through various routes of administration and their implications for generating immune responses.

  10. Mapping HIV-1 vaccine induced T-cell responses: bias towards less-conserved regions and potential impact on vaccine efficacy in the Step study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Li

    Full Text Available T cell directed HIV vaccines are based upon the induction of CD8+ T cell memory responses that would be effective in inhibiting infection and subsequent replication of an infecting HIV-1 strain, a process that requires a match or near-match between the epitope induced by vaccination and the infecting viral strain. We compared the frequency and specificity of the CTL epitope responses elicited by the replication-defective Ad5 gag/pol/nef vaccine used in the Step trial with the likelihood of encountering those epitopes among recently sequenced Clade B isolates of HIV-1. Among vaccinees with detectable 15-mer peptide pool ELISpot responses, there was a median of four (one Gag, one Nef and two Pol CD8 epitopes per vaccinee detected by 9-mer peptide ELISpot assay. Importantly, frequency analysis of the mapped epitopes indicated that there was a significant skewing of the T cell response; variable epitopes were detected more frequently than would be expected from an unbiased sampling of the vaccine sequences. Correspondingly, the most highly conserved epitopes in Gag, Pol, and Nef (defined by presence in >80% of sequences currently in the Los Alamos database www.hiv.lanl.gov were detected at a lower frequency than unbiased sampling, similar to the frequency reported for responses to natural infection, suggesting potential epitope masking of these responses. This may be a generic mechanism used by the virus in both contexts to escape effective T cell immune surveillance. The disappointing results of the Step trial raise the bar for future HIV vaccine candidates. This report highlights the bias towards less-conserved epitopes present in the same vaccine used in the Step trial. Development of vaccine strategies that can elicit a greater breadth of responses, and towards conserved regions of the genome in particular, are critical requirements for effective T-cell based vaccines against HIV-1.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00849680, A Study of Safety, Tolerability

  11. The potential global market size and public health value of an HIV-1 vaccine in a complex global market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetta, Carol A; Lee, Stephen S; Wrobel, Sandra J; Singh, Kanwarjit J; Russell, Nina; Esparza, José

    2010-07-05

    an HIV-1 vaccine to address the worldwide disease burden. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulmonary Vaccine Delivery : A Realistic Approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnis, Wouter F; Kersten, Gideon F; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Boer, Anne H; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary vaccine delivery has gained increasing attention during the last decade because this vaccination method combines potential advantages such as the fact that it omits the use of needles and may elicit immunity at the port of entry for many pathogens. In this review the current status of pulm

  13. Boosting of HIV envelope CD4 binding site antibodies with long variable heavy third complementarity determining region in the randomized double blind RV305 HIV-1 vaccine trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Margaret; Saunders, Kevin O.; Pollara, Justin; Vandergrift, Nathan; Parks, Rob; Michael, Nelson L.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Vasan, Sandhya; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Sinangil, Faruk; Phogat, Sanjay; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David C.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2017-01-01

    The canary pox vector and gp120 vaccine (ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120) in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial conferred an estimated 31% vaccine efficacy. Although the vaccine Env AE.A244 gp120 is antigenic for the unmutated common ancestor of V1V2 broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAbs), no plasma bnAb activity was induced. The RV305 (NCT01435135) HIV-1 clinical trial was a placebo-controlled randomized double-blinded study that assessed the safety and efficacy of vaccine boosting on B cell repertoires. HIV-1-uninfected RV144 vaccine recipients were reimmunized 6–8 years later with AIDSVAX B/E gp120 alone, ALVAC-HIV alone, or a combination of ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120 in the RV305 trial. Env-specific post-RV144 and RV305 boost memory B cell VH mutation frequencies increased from 2.9% post-RV144 to 6.7% post-RV305. The vaccine was well tolerated with no adverse events reports. While post-boost plasma did not have bnAb activity, the vaccine boosts expanded a pool of envelope CD4 binding site (bs)-reactive memory B cells with long third heavy chain complementarity determining regions (HCDR3) whose germline precursors and affinity matured B cell clonal lineage members neutralized the HIV-1 CRF01 AE tier 2 (difficult to neutralize) primary isolate, CNE8. Electron microscopy of two of these antibodies bound with near-native gp140 trimers showed that they recognized an open conformation of the Env trimer. Although late boosting of RV144 vaccinees expanded a novel pool of neutralizing B cell clonal lineages, we hypothesize that boosts with stably closed trimers would be necessary to elicit antibodies with greater breadth of tier 2 HIV-1 strains. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01435135 PMID:28235027

  14. Novel, in-natural-infection subdominant HIV-1 CD8+ T-cell epitopes revealed in human recipients of conserved-region T-cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Nicola; Lin, Zhansong; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Llano, Anuska; Silva-Arrieta, Sandra; Ahmed, Tina; Dorrell, Lucy; Brander, Christian; Murakoshi, Hayato; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Hanke, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Fine definition of targeted CD8+ T-cell epitopes and their human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I restriction informs iterative improvements of HIV-1 T-cell vaccine designs and may predict early vaccine success or failure. Here, lymphocytes from volunteers, who had received candidate HIVconsv vaccines expressing conserved sub-protein regions of HIV-1, were used to define the optimum-length target epitopes and their HLA restriction. In HIV-1-positive patients, CD8+ T-cell responses predominantly recognize immunodominant, but hypervariable and therefore less protective epitopes. The less variable, more protective epitopes in conserved regions are typically subdominant. Therefore, induction of strong responses to conserved regions by vaccination provides an opportunity to discover novel important epitopes. Cryopreserved lymphocytes from vaccine recipients were expanded by stimulation with 15-mer responder peptides for 10 days to establish short term-cell-line (STCL) effector cells. These were subjected to intracellular cytokine staining using serially truncated peptides and peptide-pulsed 721.221 cells expressing individual HLA class I alleles to define minimal epitope length and HLA restriction by stimulation of IFN-γ and TNF-α production and surface expression of CD107a. Using lymphocyte samples of 12 vaccine recipients, we defined 14 previously unreported optimal CD8+ T-cell HIV-1 epitopes and their four-digit HLA allele restriction (6 HLA-A, 7 HLA-B and 1 HLA-C alleles). Further 13 novel targets with incomplete information were revealed. The high rate of discovery of novel CD8+ T-cell effector epitopes warrants further epitope mining in recipients of the conserved-region vaccines in other populations and informs development of HIV-1/AIDS vaccines. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01151319.

  15. Boosting of HIV envelope CD4 binding site antibodies with long variable heavy third complementarity determining region in the randomized double blind RV305 HIV-1 vaccine trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterhoff, David; Moody, M Anthony; Fera, Daniela; Cheng, Hao; Ackerman, Margaret; Wiehe, Kevin; Saunders, Kevin O; Pollara, Justin; Vandergrift, Nathan; Parks, Rob; Kim, Jerome; Michael, Nelson L; O'Connell, Robert J; Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Vasan, Sandhya; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Sinangil, Faruk; Tartaglia, James; Phogat, Sanjay; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Seaman, Michael S; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Harrison, Stephen C; Haynes, Barton F

    2017-02-01

    The canary pox vector and gp120 vaccine (ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120) in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial conferred an estimated 31% vaccine efficacy. Although the vaccine Env AE.A244 gp120 is antigenic for the unmutated common ancestor of V1V2 broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAbs), no plasma bnAb activity was induced. The RV305 (NCT01435135) HIV-1 clinical trial was a placebo-controlled randomized double-blinded study that assessed the safety and efficacy of vaccine boosting on B cell repertoires. HIV-1-uninfected RV144 vaccine recipients were reimmunized 6-8 years later with AIDSVAX B/E gp120 alone, ALVAC-HIV alone, or a combination of ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E gp120 in the RV305 trial. Env-specific post-RV144 and RV305 boost memory B cell VH mutation frequencies increased from 2.9% post-RV144 to 6.7% post-RV305. The vaccine was well tolerated with no adverse events reports. While post-boost plasma did not have bnAb activity, the vaccine boosts expanded a pool of envelope CD4 binding site (bs)-reactive memory B cells with long third heavy chain complementarity determining regions (HCDR3) whose germline precursors and affinity matured B cell clonal lineage members neutralized the HIV-1 CRF01 AE tier 2 (difficult to neutralize) primary isolate, CNE8. Electron microscopy of two of these antibodies bound with near-native gp140 trimers showed that they recognized an open conformation of the Env trimer. Although late boosting of RV144 vaccinees expanded a novel pool of neutralizing B cell clonal lineages, we hypothesize that boosts with stably closed trimers would be necessary to elicit antibodies with greater breadth of tier 2 HIV-1 strains. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01435135.

  16. Immunogenicity of Lyophilized MVA Vaccine for HIV-1 in Mice Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-zhe; JIANG Chun-lai; YU Xiang-hui; LOU Chao-ping; ZHAO Dong-hai; WU Yong-ge; JIN Ying-hua; LIU Cheng-shan; KONG Wei

    2007-01-01

    Highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara(MVA) is sensitive to repeat freeze-thaw cycle and easy to lose activity. In order to make the activity of MVA vaccine remain stable during its manufacturing, storage, and administration, the lyophilization as a good option could be resorted to; through screening, the right stabilizer composition and its production procedure were obtained. The final moisture content of freezing-dried recombinant MVA-HIV vaccine was lower than 3%. It can be reconstituted quickly and shows regular physical appearance and stable potency. In vivo functional experiment, mice were divided randomly into the liquid vaccination group, the lyophilized vaccination group, and the control group. Having been DNA vaccine priming, the mice were boosted with a dose of 107 pfu MVA-HIV vaccine, which produced indistinguishable antibody titer and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte(CTL) level compared with those of liquid vaccination group(P>0.05). These results demonstrate that lyophilized MVA vaccine can induce high immunogenicity in mice.

  17. Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, A

    2008-06-23

    Full Text Available highest in transient and transgenic expression of p24 and p17/p24. The transiently-expressed p17/p24 was not immunogenic in mice as a homologous vaccine, but it significantly boosted a humoral and T cell immune response primed by a gag DNA vaccine, pTHGagC...

  18. Integrated Delivery of Antiretroviral Treatment and Pre-exposure Prophylaxis to HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples: A Prospective Implementation Study in Kenya and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Jared M.; Heffron, Renee; Kidoguchi, Lara; Mugo, Nelly R.; Katabira, Elly; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Asiimwe, Stephen; Haberer, Jessica E.; Ngure, Kenneth; Bulya, Nulu; Odoyo, Josephine; Hendrix, Craig; Marzinke, Mark A.; Ware, Norma C.; Wyatt, Monique A.; Morrison, Susan; Mujugira, Andrew; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral-based interventions for HIV-1 prevention, including antiretroviral therapy (ART) to reduce the infectiousness of HIV-1 infected persons and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to reduce the susceptibility of HIV-1 uninfected persons, showed high efficacy for HIV-1 protection in randomized clinical trials. We conducted a prospective implementation study to understand the feasibility and effectiveness of these interventions in delivery settings. Methods and Findings Between November 5, 2012, and January 5, 2015, we enrolled and followed 1,013 heterosexual HIV-1-serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda in a prospective implementation study. ART and PrEP were offered through a pragmatic strategy, with ART promoted for all couples and PrEP offered until 6 mo after ART initiation by the HIV-1 infected partner, permitting time to achieve virologic suppression. One thousand thirteen couples were enrolled, 78% of partnerships initiated ART, and 97% used PrEP, during a median follow-up of 0.9 years. Objective measures of adherence to both prevention strategies demonstrated high use (≥85%). Given the low HIV-1 incidence observed in the study, an additional analysis was added to compare observed incidence to incidence estimated under a simulated counterfactual model constructed using data from a prior prospective study of HIV-1-serodiscordant couples. Counterfactual simulations predicted 39.7 HIV-1 infections would be expected in the population at an incidence of 5.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 3.7–6.9). However, only two incident HIV-1 infections were observed, at an incidence of 0.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.0–0.9, p 5% per year. PMID:27552090

  19. DNA vaccine molecular adjuvants SP-D-BAFF and SP-D-APRIL enhance anti-gp120 immune response and increase HIV-1 neutralizing antibody titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sachin; Clark, Emily S; Termini, James M; Boucher, Justin; Kanagavelu, Saravana; LeBranche, Celia C; Abraham, Sakhi; Montefiori, David C; Khan, Wasif N; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) specific for conserved epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) are believed to be essential for protection against multiple HIV-1 clades. However, vaccines capable of stimulating the production of bNAbs remain a major challenge. Given that polyreactivity and autoreactivity are considered important characteristics of anti-HIV bNAbs, we designed an HIV vaccine incorporating the molecular adjuvants BAFF (B cell activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) with the potential to facilitate the maturation of polyreactive and autoreactive B cells as well as to enhance the affinity and/or avidity of Env-specific antibodies. We designed recombinant DNA plasmids encoding soluble multitrimers of BAFF and APRIL using surfactant protein D as a scaffold, and we vaccinated mice with these molecular adjuvants using DNA and DNA-protein vaccination strategies. We found that immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine encoding BAFF or APRIL multitrimers, together with interleukin 12 (IL-12) and membrane-bound HIV-1 Env gp140, induced neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 and tier 2 (vaccine strain) viruses. The APRIL-containing vaccine was particularly effective at generating tier 2 neutralizing antibodies following a protein boost. These BAFF and APRIL effects coincided with an enhanced germinal center (GC) reaction, increased anti-gp120 antibody-secreting cells, and increased anti-gp120 functional avidity. Notably, BAFF and APRIL did not cause indiscriminate B cell expansion or an increase in total IgG. We propose that BAFF and APRIL multitrimers are promising molecular adjuvants for vaccines designed to induce bNAbs against HIV-1. Recent identification of antibodies that neutralize most HIV-1 strains has revived hopes and efforts to create novel vaccines that can effectively stimulate HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. However, the multiple immune evasion properties of HIV have hampered these efforts. These include the instability of

  20. A mouse model based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia expressing luciferase/HIV-1 Gag fusion protein for the evaluation of protective efficacy of HIV vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yang; QIU Chao; LIU Lian-xing; FENG Yan-meng; ZHU Ting; XU Jian-qing

    2009-01-01

    Background Developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a grand challenge after more than two decades of intensive effort. It is partially due to the lack of suitable animal models for screening and prioritizing vaccine candidates. In this study, we aim to develop a mice model to test HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. Methods We constructed a recombinant vaccinia expressing firefly luciferase and HIV-1 Gag fusion protein based on Tiantan strain, an attenuated but replication-competent poxvirus (rTTV-lucgag). By quantifying the luciferase activity as its read out, we defined the biodistribution of Tiantan strain poxvirus in mice inoculated intraperitoneally and attempted to apply this model to evaluate the HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. Results Our data demonstrated that the rTTV-lucgag was able to express high level of luciferase (≤106 relative luciferase units (RLU)/mg protein) and HIV-1 Gag (>3 folds increase comparing to the control). After intraperitoneal inoculation, this virus had dominant replication in the ovary, uterus, and cervix of mice and the luciferase activities in those organs are significantly correlated with viral titers (r2=0.71, P <0.01). Pre-immunization with an HIV gag DNA vaccine reduced the luciferase activity in ovary from (6006+3141) RLU/mg protein in control group to (1538±463) RLU/mg protein in vaccine group (P=0.1969). Conclusions The luciferase activity in ovary could represent viral replication in vivo;, this rTTV-lucgag/mice model may be suitable to assess the protective efficacy of cytotoxic T-cell responses to HIV Gag with less tedious work and high through-put.

  1. HIV-1疫苗诱导广泛中和抗体应答%Induction of Broadly Reactive Neutralizing Antibody Responses with HIV-1 Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莹; 寸韡

    2008-01-01

    诱导中和抗体是许多有效疫苗的关键特征,也是在动物模型中唯一证明能完全阻断HIV感染的免疫应答.但是,HIV-1广泛的遗传变异性和复杂的免疫逃避机制,已经使得迄今为止所有利用HIv-1疫苗免疫原诱导有效中和抗体应答的尝试受到阻碍.最近对病毒免疫逃避机制有了进一步了解,同时对病毒包膜糖蛋白结构和免疫生物学特性的研究也不断深入,这些都将有助于克服困难,设计出新的免疫原诱导产生保护性抗HIV-1抗体.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Heterologous HIV-1gp120 Gene Expression Disruption in Mycobacterium bovis BCG Host Strain: A Critical Issue for Engineering Mycobacterial Based-Vaccine Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG as a live vector of recombinant bacterial vaccine is a promising system to be used. In this study, we evaluate the disrupted expression of heterologous HIV-1gp120 gene in BCG Pasteur host strain using replicative vectors pMV261 and pJH222. pJH222 carries a lysine complementing gene in BCG lysine auxotrophs. The HIV-1 gp120 gene expression was regulated by BCG hsp60 promoter (in plasmid pMV261 and Mycobacteria spp. α-antigen promoter (in plasmid pJH222. Among 14 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pMV261 colonies screened, 12 showed a partial deletion and two showed a complete deletion. However, deletion was not observed in all 10 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pJH222 colonies screened. In this study, we demonstrated that E. coli/Mycobacterial expression vectors bearing a weak promoter and lysine complementing gene in a recombinant lysine auxotroph of BCG could prevent genetic rearrangements and disruption of HIV 1gp120 gene expression, a key issue for engineering Mycobacterial based vaccine vectors.

  3. Targeted femtosecond laser driven drug delivery within HIV-1 infected cells: In-vitro studies [conference paper

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maphanga, Charles P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection still remains one amongst the world’s most challenging infections since its discovery. Antiretroviral therapy is the recommended treatment of choice for HIV-1 infection taken by patients orally...

  4. Enhancement of HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity with CpG adjuvant%一种CpG佐剂增强HIV-1DNA疫苗免疫原性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯爵; 刘颖; 刘勇; 邵一鸣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the capacity of CpG as adjuvant in improving HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity in animal models. Methods Balb/c mice were administrated thrice intramuscularly with CpG oligonucleotide adjuvanted HIV-1 DNA vaccine. pDRVI1. 0-gp1455m· Cellular immune response was evaluated by detecting IFN-γ and IL-2 with ELISPOT. Humoral immune response was evaluated with Env-specific ELISA and avidity ELISA. The activation efficacy of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) was measured by the expression of surface molecules and the secretion of several cytokines after being exposed to CpG adjuvant in vitro. Results The results demonstrated that CpG increased HIV specific cellular response and reduced the dosage of DNA vaccine. In vitro. CpG adjuvant activated BMDC and up-regulated the expression of CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-I. CpG adjuvanted HIV DNA vaccine also promoted Th1-type immunological response and induced inflammation. Conclusion CpG is a promising adjuvant for the development of HIV DNA vaccine.%目的 以一种CpG寡聚核苷酸为HIV-1 DNA疫苗候选佐剂,研究该CpG佐剂增强DNA疫苗免疫原性,体外促进DC细胞成熟等特点.方法 在Balb/c小鼠模型上连续3次联合免疫HIV-1DNA疫苗及CpG佐剂,通过IFN-γ、IL-2 ELISPOT及ELISA检测HIV特异性细胞免疫反应及体液免疫应答强度;体外制备小鼠骨髓来源的树突状细胞,通过FACS技术、高通量细胞因子检测等方法评价CpG佐剂刺激活化DC的能力.结果 CpG能够增强HIV-1 DNA疫苗诱导的特异性细胞免疫反应水平,降低DNA疫苗使用剂量;CpG体外刺激原代小鼠骨髓来源的树突状细胞(BMDC),能显著上调CD40、CD80、CD86等BMDC表面共刺激分子的表达,活化BMDC并分泌各型细胞因子IL-5、IL-12p70,促炎症因子IL-1α、IL-1β、IL-6、IL-10、MIP-2、KC、MIG、Eotaxin、GM-CSF等以发挥佐剂效应.结论 综合体内体外实验数据,证实该型CpG能够充分活化BMDC,显著提高HIV-1

  5. Randomized Phase I: Safety, Immunogenicity and Mucosal Antiviral Activity in Young Healthy Women Vaccinated with HIV-1 Gp41 P1 Peptide on Virosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Leroux-Roels

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Mucosal antibodies harboring various antiviral activities may best protect mucosal surfaces against early HIV-1 entry at mucosal sites and they should be ideally induced by prophylactic HIV-1 vaccines for optimal prevention of sexually transmitted HIV-1. A phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in twenty-four healthy HIV-uninfected young women. The study objectives were to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of virosomes harboring surface HIV-1 gp41-derived P1 lipidated peptides (MYM-V101. Participants received placebo or MYM-V101 vaccine at 10 μg/dose or 50 μg/dose intramuscularly at week 0 and 8, and intranasally at week 16 and 24. MYM-V101 was safe and well-tolerated at both doses administered by the intramuscular and intranasal routes, with the majority of subjects remaining free of local and general symptoms. P1-specific serum IgGs and IgAs were induced in all high dose recipients after the first injection. After the last vaccination, vaginal and rectal P1-specific IgGs could be detected in all high dose recipients. Approximately 63% and 43% of the low and high dose recipients were respectively tested positive for vaginal P1-IgAs, while 29% of the subjects from the high dose group tested positive for rectal IgAs. Serum samples had total specific IgG and IgA antibody concentrations ≥ 0.4 μg/mL, while mucosal samples were usually below 0.01 μg/mL. Vaginal secretions from MYM-V101 vaccinated subjects were inhibiting HIV-1 transcytosis but had no detectable neutralizing activity. P1-specific Th1 responses could not be detected on PBMC. This study demonstrates the excellent safety and tolerability of MYM-V101, eliciting systemic and mucosal antibodies in the majority of subjects. Vaccine-induced mucosal anti-gp41 antibodies toward conserved gp41 motifs were harboring HIV-1 transcytosis inhibition activity and may contribute to reduce sexually-transmitted HIV-1. TRIAL

  6. Microneedle-mediated vaccine delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaden, Koen van der

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccines are administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously via hypodermic needles, causing pain and stress. Since the skin is a powerful immune organ, it is not surprising that intradermal injections result in potent immune responses. However, they are relatively difficult to perform a

  7. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    -administrable, can be distributed independently of functioning freezers and refrigerators, and can be designed to induce mucosal and/or cell-mediated immunity, which is attractive for a number of diseases requiring stimulation of local mucosal immunity for protection. However, the design and delivery of thermostable...... dry powder-based vaccines represents a technological challenge: It calls for careful formulation and dosage form design, combined with cheap and efficient delivery devices, which must be engineered via a thorough understanding of the physiological barrier and the requirements for induction of mucosal...... immunity. Here, I review state of the art and perspectives in formulation design and processing methods for powder-based subunit vaccines intended for pulmonary administration, and present dry powder inhaler technologies suitable for translating these vaccines into clinical trials....

  8. Vaccine Focusing to Cross-Subtype HIV-1 gp120 Variable Loop Epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Cardozo, Timothy; Wang, Shixia; Jiang, Xunqing; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina; Krachmarov, Chavdar

    2014-01-01

    We designed synthetic, epitope-focused immunogens that preferentially display individual neutralization epitopes targeted by cross-subtype anti-HIV V3 loop neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Vaccination of rabbits with these immunogens resulted in the elicitation of distinct polyclonal serum Abs that exhibit cross-subtype neutralization specificities mimicking the mAbs that guided the design. Our results prove the principle that a predictable range of epitope-specific polyclonal cross...

  9. Preliminary Report on HIV-1 Vaccine Preparedness in Nigeria: Advantages of Recruiting University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Guyit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The national HIV seroprevalence in Nigeria has risen steeply from about 3% in 1993 to 5-8% in 2001 and now stands at 4.4%. HIV epidemic continues to be a serious threat to the most populous country in Africa with a population of 140 million, with limited use of antiviral drugs that is taken for life since it only suppresses the virus without completely eliminating the virus or leading to cure. Only a change in social behavior and an affordable vaccine can halt the epidemic in Africa. We report here results of a pilot study on the recruitment strategies, sociodemographic aspects and HIV risk behavior of a cohort of normal volunteers recruited at the University of Jos, Nigeria. Our study recorded a high degree of interest and zeal to participate in HIV vaccine studies by volunteers, and demonstrated the superiority of snowballing over invitation by mail, as a recruitment strategy. A cohort of university students may be particularly suitable for conducting HIV vaccine trials because of the assurance of prospective follow-up for up to four years (time to graduation, and a good understanding of the risks and benefits of participation as outlined in the informed consent. We had 100% retention during a follow-up period of two years. Most importantly, the cohort reflected a relatively low HIV seroprevalence, which gives preventive programs the potential to blunt or halt the epidemic.

  10. Oral vaccination with a recombinant Salmonella vaccine vector provokes systemic HIV-1 subtype C Gag-specific CD4+ Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Anna-Lise

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant Salmonella vaccine vectors may potentially be used to induce specific CD4+ T cell responses against foreign viral antigens. Such immune responses are required features of vaccines against pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. The aim of this study was to investigate the induction of systemic HIV-1-specific CD4+ T helper (Th responses in mice after oral immunization with a live attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector that expressed HIV-1 subtype C Gag. Groups of BALB/c mice were vaccinated orally three times (4 weeks apart with this recombinant Salmonella. At sacrifice, 28 days after the last immunization, systemic CD4+ Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunospot assay and cytometric bead array. HIV-1 Gag-specific IgG1 and IgG2a humoral responses in the serum were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Mice vaccinated with the recombinant Salmonella elicited both HIV-1-specific Th1 (interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and Th2 (interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-5 (IL-5 cytokine responses. The vaccine induced 70 (IFN-γ spot-forming units (SFUs/10e6 splenocytes and 238 IL-4 SFUs/10e6 splenocytes. Splenocytes from vaccinated mice also produced high levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines upon stimulation with a Gag CD4 peptide. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-5 were 7.5-, 29.1-, 26.2- and 89.3-fold above the background, respectively. Both HIV-1 Gag-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were detected in the sera of vaccinated mice. Conclusion The study highlights the potential of orally-delivered attenuated Salmonella as mucosal vaccine vectors for HIV-1 Subtype C Gag to induce Gag-specific CD4+ Th1 and Th2 cellular immune responses and antibodies which may be important characteristics required for protection against HIV-1 infection.

  11. In silico vaccine design based on molecular simulations of rhinovirus chimeras presenting HIV-1 gp41 epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Arnold, Gail Ferstandig; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-01-16

    A cluster of promising epitopes for the development of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines is located in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the HIV envelope spike structure. The crystal structure of the peptide corresponding to the so-called ELDKWA epitope (HIV-1 HxB2 gp41 residues 662-668), in complex with the corresponding broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5, provides a target for structure-based vaccine design strategies aimed at finding macromolecular carriers that are able to present this MPER-derived epitope with optimal antigenic activity. To this end, a series of replica exchange molecular dynamics computer simulations was conducted to characterize the distributions of conformations of ELDKWA-based epitopes inserted into a rhinovirus carrier and to identify those with the highest fraction of conformations that are able to bind 2F5. The length, hydrophobic character, and precise site of insertion were found to be critical for achieving structural similarity to the target crystal structure. A construct with a high degree of complementarity to the corresponding determinant region of 2F5 was obtained. This construct was employed to build a high-resolution structural model of the complex between the 2F5 antibody and the chimeric human rhinovirus type 14:HIV-1 ELDKWA virus particle. Additional simulations, which were conducted to study the conformational propensities of the ELDKWA region in solution, confirm the hypothesis that the ELDKWA region of gp41 is highly flexible and capable of assuming helical conformations (as in the postfusion helical bundle structure) and beta-turn conformations (as in the complex with the 2F5 antibody). These results also suggest that the ELDKWA epitope can be involved in intramolecular--and likely intermolecular--hydrophobic interactions. This tendency offers an explanation for the observation that mutations decreasing the hydrophobic character of the MPER in many cases result

  12. A phase IIA randomized clinical trial of a multiclade HIV-1 DNA prime followed by a multiclade rAd5 HIV-1 vaccine boost in healthy adults (HVTN204.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin J Churchyard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The safety and immunogenicity of a vaccine regimen consisting of a 6-plasmid HIV-1 DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB boosted by a recombinant adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5 HIV-1 with matching inserts was evaluated in HIV-seronegative participants from South Africa, United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. METHODS: 480 participants were evenly randomized to receive either: DNA (4 mg i.m. by Biojector at 0, 1 and 2 months, followed by rAd5 (10(10 PU i.m. by needle/syringe at 6 months; or placebo. Participants were monitored for reactogenicity and adverse events throughout the 12-month study. Peak and duration of HIV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated after the prime and boost. RESULTS: The vaccine was well tolerated and safe. T-cell responses, detected by interferon-γ (IFN-γ ELISpot to global potential T-cell epitopes (PTEs were observed in 70.8% (136/192 of vaccine recipients overall, most frequently to Gag (54.7% and to Env (54.2%. In U.S. vaccine recipients T-cell responses were less frequent in Ad5 sero-positive versus sero-negative vaccine recipients (62.5% versus 85.7% respectively, p = 0.035. The frequency of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses detected by intracellular cytokine staining were similar (41.8% and 47.2% respectively and most secreted ≥2 cytokines. The vaccine induced a high frequency (83.7%-94.6% of binding antibody responses to consensus Group M, and Clades A, B and C gp140 Env oligomers. Antibody responses to Gag were elicited in 46% of vaccine recipients. CONCLUSION: The vaccine regimen was well-tolerated and induced polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and multi-clade anti-Env binding antibodies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00125970.

  13. A recombinant mimetics of the HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate fused with human IgG Fc fragment elicits neutralizing antibody response in the vaccinated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Zhi; Pan, Chungen; Lu, Hong; Shui, Yuan [Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Li, Lin [Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xueqing; Liu, Shuwen [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Jiang, Shibo, E-mail: sjiang@nybloodcenter.org [Lindsley F. Kimball Research Institute, New York Blood Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} One recombinant mimetics of gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) consisting of gp41 N46 sequence, foldon and IgG Fc, designated N46FdFc, was expressed. {yields} N46FdFc-induced antibodies in mice that neutralized HIV-1 infection, inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. {yields} These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines. -- Abstract: HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) composed of three N-terminal heptad repeats (NHR) plays a crucial role in viral fusion and entry and represents an attractive target for anti-HIV therapeutics (e.g., enfuvirtide) and vaccines. In present study, we constructed and expressed two recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics, designated N46Fd and N46FdFc. N46Fd consists of N46 (residues 536-581) in gp41 NHR and foldon (Fd), a trimerization motif. N46FdFc is composed of N46Fd fused with human IgG Fc fragment as an immunoenhancer. We immunized mice with N46 peptide, N46Fd and N46FdFc, respectively, and found that only N46FdFc elicited neutralizing antibody response in mice against infection by HIV-1 strains IIIB (clade B, X4), 92US657 (clade B, R5), and 94UG103 (clade A, X4R5). Anti-N46FdFc antibodies inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines.

  14. Immunogenicity of a novel Clade B HIV-1 vaccine combination: Results of phase 1 randomized placebo controlled trial of an HIV-1 GM-CSF-expressing DNA prime with a modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine boost in healthy HIV-1 uninfected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Susan P; Grunenberg, Nicole A; Sanchez, Brittany J; Seaton, Kelly E; Ferrari, Guido; Moody, M Anthony; Frahm, Nicole; Montefiori, David C; Hay, Christine M; Goepfert, Paul A; Baden, Lindsey R; Robinson, Harriet L; Yu, Xuesong; Gilbert, Peter B; McElrath, M Juliana; Huang, Yunda; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2017-01-01

    A phase 1 trial of a clade B HIV vaccine in HIV-uninfected adults evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of a DNA prime co-expressing GM-CSF (Dg) followed by different numbers and intervals of modified vaccinia Ankara Boosts (M). Both vaccines produce virus-like particles presenting membrane-bound Env. Four US sites randomized 48 participants to receiving 1/10th the DNA dose as DgDgMMM given at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, or full dose DgDgM_M or DgDgMM_M regimens, given at 0, 2, 4, and 8 months, and 0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 months, respectively. Peak immunogenicity was measured 2 weeks post-last vaccination. All regimens were well tolerated and safe. Full dose DgDgM_M and DgDgMM_M regimens generated Env-specific IgG to HIV-1 Env in >90%, IgG3 in >80%, and IgA in vaccine without GM-CSF. This DNA/MVA prime-boost regimen induced durable, functional humoral responses that included ADCC, high antibody avidity, and Env IgG1 and IgG3 binding responses to the immunodominant region of gp41. The third, spaced MVA boost improved the overall quality of the antibody response. These products without co-expressed GM-CSF but combined with protein boosts will be considered for efficacy evaluation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571960.

  15. Priming with a simplified intradermal HIV-1 DNA vaccine regimen followed by boosting with recombinant HIV-1 MVA vaccine is safe and immunogenic: a phase IIa randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Munseri

    Full Text Available Intradermal priming with HIV-1 DNA plasmids followed by HIV-1MVA boosting induces strong and broad cellular and humoral immune responses. In our previous HIVIS-03 trial, we used 5 injections with 2 pools of HIV-DNA at separate sites for each priming immunization. The present study explores whether HIV-DNA priming can be simplified by reducing the number of DNA injections and administration of combined versus separated plasmid pools.In this phase IIa, randomized trial, priming was performed using 5 injections of HIV-DNA, 1000 μg total dose, (3 Env and 2 Gag encoding plasmids compared to two "simplified" regimens of 2 injections of HIV-DNA, 600 μg total dose, of Env- and Gag-encoding plasmid pools with each pool either administered separately or combined. HIV-DNA immunizations were given intradermally at weeks 0, 4, and 12. Boosting was performed intramuscularly with 108 pfu HIV-MVA at weeks 30 and 46.129 healthy Tanzanian participants were enrolled. There were no differences in adverse events between the groups. The proportion of IFN-γ ELISpot responders to Gag and/or Env peptides after the second HIV-MVA boost did not differ significantly between the groups primed with 2 injections of combined HIV-DNA pools, 2 injections with separated pools, and 5 injections with separated pools (90%, 97% and 97%. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of Gag and/or Env IFN-γ ELISpot responses, in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses measured as IFN-γ/IL-2 production by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS or in response rates and median titers for binding antibodies to Env gp160 between study groups.A simplified intradermal vaccination regimen with 2 injections of a total of 600 μg with combined HIV-DNA plasmids primed cellular responses as efficiently as the standard regimen of 5 injections of a total of 1000 μg with separated plasmid pools after boosting twice with HIV-MVA.World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry

  16. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, a potent adjuvant for polarization to Th-17 pattern: an experience on HIV-1 vaccine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Mehdi; Tajik, Amir Hossein; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Rahimi, Roghieh; Adibzadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Moozarmpour, Hamid Reza; Beikverdi, Mohammad Sadegh; Olfat, Soophie; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Choopani, Mohammad; Kameli, Morteza; Hartoonian, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Cytokines are mediators for polarization of immune response in vaccines. Studies show that co-immunization of DNA vaccines with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can increase immune responses. Here, experimental mice were immunized with HIV-1tat/pol/gag/env DNA vaccine with GM-CSF and boosted with recombinant vaccine. Lymphocyte proliferation with Brdu and CTL activity, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-17 cytokines, total antibody, and IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were assessed with ELISA. Results show that GM-CSF as adjuvant in DNA immunization significantly increased lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ cytokines, but CTL response was tiny increased. Also GM-CSF as adjuvant decreased IL-4 cytokine vs mere vaccine group. IL-17 in the group that immunized with mixture of DNA vaccine/GM-CSF was significantly increased vs DNA vaccine group. Result of total antibody shows that GM-CSF increased antibody response in which both IgG1 and IgG2a increased. Overall, results confirmed the beneficial effect of GM-CSF as adjuvant to increase vaccine immunogenicity. The hallmark result of this study was to increase IL-17 cytokine with DNA vaccine/GM-CSF immunized group. This study for the first time provides the evidence of the potency of GM-CSF in the induction of IL-17 in response to a vaccine, which is important for control of infection such as HIV-1. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    The gp120-derived V3 loop of HIV-1 is involved in co-receptor interaction, it guides cell tropism, and contains an epitope for antibody neutralization. Thus, HIV-1 V3 is an attractive vaccine candidate. The V3 of the MN strain (MN V3) contains both B- and T-cell epitopes, including a known mouse ...

  18. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Gong

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649-683 and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684-705 of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1's envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662-683 of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649-705, in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP. MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM. Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41.

  19. Diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis, yellow fever and hepatitis B seroprevalence among HIV1-infected migrants. Results from the ANRS VIHVO vaccine sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaert, Jimmy; Abgrall, Sophie; Lele, Nathalie; Batteux, Frederic; Slama, Lilia Ben; Meritet, Jean-Francois; Lebon, Pierre; Bouchaud, Olivier; Grabar, Sophie; Launay, Odile

    2015-09-11

    Few data are available on the seroprotection status of HIV1-infected patients with respect to vaccine-preventable diseases. To describe, in a population of HIV1-infected migrants on stable, effective ART therapy, the seroprevalence of diphtheria, poliomyelitis, tetanus, yellow fever antibodies and serostatus for hepatitis B, and to identify factors associated with seroprotection. Vaccine responses against diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis and yellow fever were also studied. Sub-Saharan African patients participating in the ANRS-VIHVO cohort were enrolled prior to travel to their countries of origin. Serologic analyses were performed in a central laboratory before and after the trip. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with initial seroprotection. 250 patients (99 men and 151 women) were included in the seroprevalence study. Median age was 45 years (IQR 39-52), median CD4 cell count was 440/μL (IQR 336-571), and 237 patients (95%) had undetectable HIV1 viral load. The initial seroprevalence rates were 69.0% (95%CI 63.2-74.7) for diphtheria, 70.7% (95%CI 65.0-76.3) for tetanus, and 85.9% (95%CI 81.6-90.2) for yellow fever. Only 64.4% (95%CI 58.5-70.3) of patients had protective antibody titers against all three poliomyelitis vaccine strains before travel. No serological markers of hepatitis B were found in 18.6% of patients (95%CI 13.7-23.3). Patient declaration of prior vaccination was the only factor consistently associated with initial seroprotection. We found a low prevalence of seroprotection against diphtheria, poliomyelitis, tetanus and hepatitis B. HIV infected migrants living in France and traveling to their native countries need to have their vaccine schedule completed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Johannes S; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y; Becerra, Juan C; Anderson, Chase T M; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L; Forthal, Donald N; Deeks, Steven G; Wilkin, Timothy J; Casazza, Joseph P; Koup, Richard A; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L; Achenbach, Chad J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir.

  1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and rational design of HIV-1 vaccines%抗人类免疫缺陷病毒广谱中和抗体与疫苗设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王若珂; 郭建影; 张林琦

    2013-01-01

    自发现人类免疫缺陷病毒1型(HIV-1)30年来,科学家们不断探索有效的 HIV-1疫苗,但至今效果不理想。由于“精英患者”的广谱中和血清能起到有效的抗病毒作用,研究人员希望通过对体液保护免疫机制的研究,推动疫苗的设计和优化,为尽早研发成功 HIV疫苗提供关键理论和技术支撑。近几年来,由于技术的突破和改进,从HIV感染者中分离获得广谱中和抗体的概率和数量大大提高。本文针对近几年来分离的有代表性的广谱中和抗体,根据其不同的识别位点分为四大类进行详细介绍,并总结了从研究广谱中和抗体中所获得的疫苗设计创新思路与启示。%Antibody response is a crucial host defense against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection .In recent years , tremendous progress has been made in isolating and characterizing of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs ) from “elite neutralizers” who remain healthy despite of prolonged infection . These bnmAbs were found to target four major vulnerable sites on the envelope glycoprotein .Structural and functional characterization of these bnmAbs has provided critical foundation for our better understanding of protective antibody response in vivo .In the current review ,we summarize the characteristics of these bnmAbs and discuss on their implications for rational design of novel HIV-1 vaccines capable of inducing antibodies similar to those bnmAbs .

  2. Phase 1 safety and immunogenicity evaluation of ADMVA, a multigenic, modified vaccinia Ankara-HIV-1 B'/C candidate vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Vasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a Phase I dose-escalation trial of ADMVA, a Clade-B'/C-based HIV-1 candidate vaccine expressing env, gag, pol, nef, and tat in a modified vaccinia Ankara viral vector. Sequences were derived from a prevalent circulating HIV-1 recombinant form in Yunnan, China, an area of high HIV incidence. The objective was to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of ADMVA in human volunteers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ADMVA or placebo was administered intramuscularly at months 0, 1 and 6 to 50 healthy adult volunteers not at high risk for HIV-1. In each dosage group [1x10(7 (low, 5x10(7 (mid, or 2.5x10(8 pfu (high] volunteers were randomized in a 3:1 ratio to receive ADMVA or placebo in a double-blinded design. Subjects were followed for local and systemic reactogenicity, adverse events including cardiac adverse events, and clinical laboratory parameters. Study follow up was 18 months. Humoral immunogenicity was evaluated by anti-gp120 binding ELISA, immunoflourescent staining, and HIV-1 neutralization. Cellular immunogenicity was assessed by a validated IFNgamma ELISpot assay and intracellular cytokine staining. Anti-vaccinia binding titers were measured by ELISA. ADMVA was generally well-tolerated, with no vaccine-related serious adverse events or cardiac adverse events. Local or systemic reactogenicity events were reported by 77% and 78% of volunteers, respectively. The majority of events were of mild intensity. The IFNgamma ELISpot response rate to any HIV antigen was 0/12 (0% in the placebo group, 3/12 (25% in the low dosage group, 6/12 (50% in the mid dosage group, and 8/13 (62% in the high dosage group. Responses were often multigenic and occasionally persisted up to one year post vaccination. Antibodies to gp120 were detected in 0/12 (0%, 8/13 (62%, 6/12 (50% and 10/13 (77% in the placebo, low, mid, and high dosage groups, respectively. Antibodies persisted up to 12 months after vaccination, with a trend toward agreement

  3. Review of recent literature on microneedle vaccine delivery technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Vrdoljak A

    2013-01-01

    Anto Vrdoljak Development Laboratory, Genera, Rakov Potok, Croatia Abstract: Microneedles (MNs) have been developed as medical devices for enhanced and painless transdermal drug and vaccine delivery. MN-based vaccine application, unlike conventional intramuscular or subcutaneous application using hypodermic needles, delivers vaccine directly into skin, which is known to be an immunologically much more relevant vaccination site than underlying tissue. Vaccination using MN devices targets the ...

  4. HIV-1 envelope trimer fusion proteins and their applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliepen, K.H.E.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a major threat to global health and a vaccine is not yet on the horizon. A successful HIV-1 vaccine should probably induce HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies that target the envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer on the outside of the virion. A possible starting point for such a vaccine are soluble

  5. Generation and Characterization of a Bivalent HIV-1 Subtype C gp120 Protein Boost for Proof-of-Concept HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials in Southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Zambonelli

    Full Text Available The viral envelope glycoprotein (Env is the major target for antibody (Ab-mediated vaccine development against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1. Although several recombinant Env antigens have been evaluated in clinical trials, only the surface glycoprotein, gp120, (from HIV-1 subtype B, MN, and subtype CRF_01AE, A244 used in the ALVAC prime-AIDSVAX gp120 boost RV144 Phase III HIV vaccine trial was shown to contribute to protective efficacy, although modest and short-lived. Hence, for clinical trials in southern Africa, a bivalent protein boost of HIV-1 subtype C gp120 antigens composed of two complementary gp120s, from the TV1.C (chronic and 1086.C (transmitted founder HIV-1 strains, was selected. Stable Chinese Hamster Cell (CHO cell lines expressing these gp120s were generated, scalable purification methods were developed, and a detailed analytical analysis of the purified proteins was conducted that showed differences and complementarity in the antigenicity, glycan occupancy, and glycan content of the two gp120 molecules. Moreover, mass spectrometry revealed some disulfide heterogeneity in the expressed proteins, particularly in V1V2-C1 region and most prominently in the TV1 gp120 dimers. These dimers not only lacked binding to certain key CD4 binding site (CD4bs and V1V2 epitope-directed ligands but also elicited reduced Ab responses directed to those epitopes, in contrast to monomeric gp120, following immunization of rabbits. Both monomeric and dimeric gp120s elicited similarly high titer Tier 1 neutralizing Abs as measured in standard virus neutralization assays. These results provide support for clinical evaluations of bivalent preparations of purified monomeric TV1.C and 1086.C gp120 proteins.

  6. Current progress in pulmonary delivery of measles vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E

    2014-06-01

    Due to the high infectivity of measles virus, achieving sufficient population immunity to interrupt transmission requires two doses of live attenuated measles virus vaccine. Subcutaneous delivery of vaccine by injection requires trained personnel, maintenance of a cold chain and safe disposal of used needles and syringes. Pulmonary vaccine delivery offers the opportunity for cost-savings and improved coverage, but requires re-licensure. Two aerosol vaccine formulations, nebulized liquid and dry powder, and multiple delivery devices have been evaluated in humans and macaques. Nebulized liquid vaccine is effective for a second dose of vaccine in older children, but less effective for primary vaccination of infants. Dry powder vaccine provides solid protection in macaques and boosts responses in immune adults, but has not yet been tested in infants.

  7. Acute hepatitis B virus infection with simultaneous high HBsAg and high anti-HBs signals in a previously HBV vaccinated HIV-1 positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Verbon, Annelies; van Doorn, H Rogier; Goossens, Valère J

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of a clinical manifest hepatitis B virus infection and a potentially misleading HBV serological profile in an HIV-1 positive patient despite previous HBV vaccination. The patient presented with an acute hepatitis B and there was no indication of chronic HBV infection or the presence of a mutation in the 'a' determinant. Remarkably, simultaneously with high HBV surface antigen and HBV viral load, high anti-HBs antibodies were present. If, due to previous HBV vaccination only anti-HBs was tested in this patient, the result of the high anti-HBs antibodies could be very misleading and offering a false sense of security. Our findings contribute to the ongoing discussion on how to assess HBV specific immunological memory and determining the role of HBV booster vaccinations in immunocompromised individuals.

  8. Improvement of different vaccine delivery systems for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaiyan Shima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer vaccines are the promising tools in the hands of the clinical oncologist. Many tumor-associated antigens are excellent targets for immune therapy and vaccine design. Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and/or delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. Various vaccine delivery systems such as different routes of immunization and physical/chemical delivery methods have been used in cancer therapy with the goal to induce immunity against tumor-associated antigens. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs have demonstrated to be effective in animal models. New developments in vaccine delivery systems will improve the efficiency of clinical trials in the near future. Among them, nanoparticles (NPs such as dendrimers, polymeric NPs, metallic NPs, magnetic NPs and quantum dots have emerged as effective vaccine adjuvants for infectious diseases and cancer therapy. Furthermore, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP have been known as attractive carrier having applications in drug delivery, gene transfer and DNA vaccination. This review will focus on the utilization of different vaccine delivery systems for prevention or treatment of cancer. We will discuss their clinical applications and the future prospects for cancer vaccine development.

  9. Regional differences in prevalence of HIV-1 discordance in Africa and enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples into an HIV-1 prevention trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam R Lingappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most HIV-1 transmission in Africa occurs among HIV-1-discordant couples (one partner HIV-1 infected and one uninfected who are unaware of their discordant HIV-1 serostatus. Given the high HIV-1 incidence among HIV-1 discordant couples and to assess efficacy of interventions for reducing HIV-1 transmission, HIV-1 discordant couples represent a critical target population for HIV-1 prevention interventions and prevention trials. Substantial regional differences exist in HIV-1 prevalence in Africa, but regional differences in HIV-1 discordance among African couples, has not previously been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Partners in Prevention HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Trial ("Partners HSV-2 Study", the first large HIV-1 prevention trial in Africa involving HIV-1 discordant couples, completed enrollment in May 2007. Partners HSV-2 Study recruitment data from 12 sites from East and Southern Africa were used to assess HIV-1 discordance among couples accessing couples HIV-1 counseling and testing, and to correlate with enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples. HIV-1 discordance at Partners HSV-2 Study sites ranged from 8-31% of couples tested from the community. Across all study sites and, among all couples with one HIV-1 infected partner, almost half (49% of couples were HIV-1 discordant. Site-specific monthly enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples into the clinical trial was not directly associated with prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, but was modestly correlated with national HIV-1 counseling and testing rates and access to palliative care/basic health care (r = 0.74, p = 0.09. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1 discordant couples are a critical target for HIV-1 prevention in Africa. In addition to community prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, national infrastructure for HIV-1 testing and healthcare delivery and effective community outreach strategies impact recruitment of HIV-1 discordant couples into HIV-1 prevention trials.

  10. Phase 1 safety and immunogenicity evaluation of ADVAX, a multigenic, DNA-based clade C/B' HIV-1 candidate vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Vasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a Phase I dose escalation trial of ADVAX, a DNA-based candidate HIV-1 vaccine expressing Clade C/B' env, gag, pol, nef, and tat genes. Sequences were derived from a prevalent circulating recombinant form in Yunnan, China, an area of high HIV-1 incidence. The objective was to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of ADVAX in human volunteers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ADVAX or placebo was administered intramuscularly at months 0, 1 and 3 to 45 healthy volunteers not at high risk for HIV-1. Three dosage levels [0.2 mg (low, 1.0 mg (mid, and 4.0 mg (high] were tested. Twelve volunteers in each dosage group were assigned to receive ADVAX and three to receive placebo in a double-blind design. Subjects were followed for local and systemic reactogenicity, adverse events, and clinical laboratory parameters. Study follow up was 18 months. Humoral immunogenicity was evaluated by anti-gp120 binding ELISA. Cellular immunogenicity was assessed by a validated IFNgamma ELISpot assay and intracellular cytokine staining. ADVAX was safe and well-tolerated, with no vaccine-related serious adverse events. Local and systemic reactogenicity events were reported by 64% and 42% of vaccine recipients, respectively. The majority of events were mild. The IFNgamma ELISpot response rates to any HIV antigen were 0/9 (0% in the placebo group, 3/12 (25% in the low-dosage group, 4/12 (33% in the mid-dosage group, and 2/12 (17% in the high-dosage group. Overall, responses were generally transient and occurred to each gene product, although volunteers responded to single antigens only. Binding antibodies to gp120 were not detected in any volunteers, and HIV seroconversion did not occur. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ADVAX delivered intramuscularly is safe, well-tolerated, and elicits modest but transient cellular immune responses. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00249106.

  11. Clinical experience of the 23-valent capsular polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccination in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Hsieh, Szu-Min; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Sheng, Wang-Hwei; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2004-05-01

    To assess the impact of vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine on the risks for development of pneumococcal disease, all-cause community-acquired pneumonia, HIV progression, and mortality and immunologic and virologic responses among HIV-1-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), we conducted a 2-year prospective observational cohort study at a university hospital in Taiwan. A total of 305 HIV-1-infected patients who received 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (vaccinees) and 203 patients who did not (non-vaccinees) were prospectively observed between 1 June 2000 and 31 October 2002. Changes of CD4+ and plasma viral load (PVL) from baseline to week 4 of vaccination were assessed in 31 randomly selected vaccinees. The incidence of pneumococcal disease and bacteremia of vaccinees was 2.1 per 1000 patient-years (PY) (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.7-2.5 per 1000 PY) over the median observation of 641 days (range, 37-832 days) following vaccination while that of non-vaccinee was 21.8 per 1000 PY (95% CI, 20.1-23.7 per 1000 PY) and 7.3 per 1000 PY (95% CI, 7.0-7.6 per 1000 PY), respectively, over the observation of 500 days (range, 32-851 days), with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for developing pneumococcal disease of 0.085 (95% CI, 0.010-0.735) and for bacteremia of 0.22 (95% CI, 0.018-2.561). The median CD4+ count increased by 45 x 10(6) l(-1) (P = 0.01) and median PVL change was 0 log(10) copies/ml (range of decrease, -0.74 to 2.47 log(10) copies/ml) after 1 month of pneumococcal vaccination among the subgroup of 31 vaccinees receiving HAART. The median CD4+ count increase from baseline to the end of study was 149 x 10(6) l(-1) for vaccinees and 107 x 10(6) l(-1) for non-vaccinees (P = 0.21). The AOR of developing all-cause community-acquired pneumonia and new AIDS-defining opportunistic illnesses (OI) of vaccinees as compared to non-vaccinees was 1.876 (95% CI, 0.785-4.485) and 0.567 (95% CI, 0

  12. Phage Particles as Vaccine Delivery Vehicles: Concepts, Applications and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Narjes; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The development of new strategies for vaccine delivery for generating protective and long-lasting immune responses has become an expanding field of research. In the last years, it has been recognized that bacteriophages have several potential applications in the biotechnology and medical fields because of their intrinsic advantages, such as ease of manipulation and large-scale production. Over the past two decades, bacteriophages have gained special attention as vehicles for protein/peptide or DNA vaccine delivery. In fact, whole phage particles are used as vaccine delivery vehicles to achieve the aim of enhanced immunization. In this strategy, the carried vaccine is protected from environmental damage by phage particles. In this review, phage-based vaccine categories and their development are presented in detail, with discussion of the potential of phage-based vaccines for protection against microbial diseases and cancer treatment. Also reviewed are some recent advances in the field of phage- based vaccines.

  13. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Carolina G D O; Matassoli, Flavio L; Peçanha, Ligia M T; Santillo, Bruna Tereso; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; Marques, Ernesto T D A; Oxenius, Annette; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-08-01

    The decline in number and function of T cells is a hallmark of HIV infection, and preservation or restoration of HIV-specific cellular immune response is a major goal of AIDS treatment. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response, and their use as a vaccine vehicle is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. We evaluated the potential of DC-mediated immunization with a DNA vaccine consisting of HIV-1-p55gag (gag, group-specific antigen) associated to lysosomal associated protein (LAMP) sequence (LAMP/gag vaccine). Immunization of mice with mouse DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-mDCs) stimulated more potent B- and T-cell responses than naked DNA or DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV. Anti-Gag antibody levels were sustained for at least 3 mo after immunization, and recall T-cell responses were also strongly detected at this time point. Human DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-hDCs) were also activated and able to stimulate greater T-cell response than native gag-transfected DCs. Coculture between Lg-hDCs and T lymphocytes obtained from patients with HIV resulted in upregulation of CD38, CD69, HLA-DR, and granzyme B by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ and TNF-α production. These results indicate that the use of LAMP/gag-DC may be an efficient strategy for enhancing immune function in patients with HIV.-Lucas, C. G. D. O., Matassoli, F. L., Peçanha, L. M. T., Santillo, B. T., Oliveira, L. M. D. S., Oshiro, T. M., Marques, E. T. D. A., Jr., Oxenius, A., de Arruda, L. B. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

  14. Pre-existing adenovirus immunity modifies a complex mixed Th1 and Th2 cytokine response to an Ad5/HIV-1 vaccine candidate in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O Pine

    Full Text Available The results of the recent Step Study highlight a need to clarify the effects of pre-existing natural immunity to a vaccine vector on vaccine-induced T-cell responses. To investigate this interaction, we examined the relationship between pre-existing Ad5 immunity and T-cell cytokine response profiles in healthy, HIV-uninfected recipients of MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine (HVTN 050, ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00849732. Participants were grouped by baseline Ad5 neutralizing antibody titer as either Ad5-seronegative (titer ≤18; n = 36 or Ad5-seropositive (titer >200; n = 34. Samples from vaccine recipients were analyzed for immune responses to either HIV-1 Gag peptide pools or Ad5 empty vector using an ex vivo assay that measures thirty cytokines in the absence of long-term culture. The overall profiles of cytokine responses to Gag and Ad5 had similar combinations of induced Th1- and Th2-type cytokines, including IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IP-10, IL-13, and IL-10, although the Ad5-specific responses were uniformly higher than the Gag-specific responses (p<0.0001 for 9 out of 11 significantly expressed analytes. At the peak response time point, PBMC from Ad5-seronegative vaccinees secreted significantly more IP-10 in response to Gag (p = 0.008, and significantly more IP-10 (p = 0.0009, IL-2 (p = 0.006 and IL-10 (p = 0.05 in response to Ad5 empty vector than PBMC from Ad5-seropositive vaccinees. Additionally, similar responses to the Ad5 vector prior to vaccination were observed in almost all subjects, regardless of Ad5 neutralizing antibody status, and the levels of secreted IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1Ra and GM-CSF were blunted following vaccination. The cytokine response profile of Gag-specific T cells mirrored the Ad5-specific response present in all subjects before vaccination, and included a number of Th1- and Th2-associated cytokines not routinely assessed in current vaccine trials, such as IP-10, IL-10, IL-13, and GM-CSF. Together, these

  15. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery: How Close Are We?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, vaccines have contributed to a significant improvement in global public health by preventing a number of infectious diseases. Despite this, the vaccine field is still facing challenges related to incomplete vaccine coverage and persistent difficult vaccine targets......, such as influenza, tuberculosis, and Ebola, for which no good universal vaccines exist. At least two pharmaceutical improvements are expected to help filling this gap: i) The development of thermostable vaccine dosage forms, and ii) the full exploitation of the adjuvant technology for subunit vaccines to potentiate...... strong immune responses. This review highlights the status and recent advances in formulation and pulmonary delivery of thermostable human subunit vaccines. Such vaccines are very appealing from compliance, distribution and immunological point of view: Being non-invasive, inhalable vaccines are self...

  16. Intradermal delivery of vaccines: potential benefits and current challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, JK; Jones, KR; Friede, M; Chen, D; Kristensen, D

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Delivery of vaccine antigens to the dermis and/or epidermis of human skin (i.e. intradermal delivery) might be more efficient than injection into the muscle or subcutaneous tissue, thereby reducing the volumes of antigen. This is known as dose-sparing and has been demonstrated in clinical trials with some, but not all, vaccines. Dose-sparing could be beneficial to immunization programmes by potentially reducing the costs of purchase, distribution and storage of vaccines; increasing vaccine availability and effectiveness. The data obtained with intradermal delivery of some vaccines are encouraging and warrant further study and development; however significant gaps in knowledge and operational challenges such as reformulation, optimizing vaccine presentation and development of novel devices to aid intradermal vaccine delivery need to be addressed. Modelling of the costs and potential savings resulting from intradermal delivery should be done to provide realistic expectations of the potential benefits and to support cases for investment. Implementation and uptake of intradermal vaccine delivery requires further research and development, which depends upon collaboration between multiple stakeholders in the field of vaccination. PMID:21379418

  17. Modulation of cellular and humoral immune responses to anHIV-1 DNA vaccine by interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 DNA immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永涛; 王福祥; 孙永年; 徐哲; 王临旭; 刘娟; 白雪帆; 黄长形

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-18 (IL-18)DNA immunization on immune response induced by HIV-1 DNA vaccine and to explore new strategies for therapeutic HIV DNA vaccine.Methods: The recombinant expression vector pCI-neoGAG was constructed by inserting HIV Gag gene into the eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo. Balb/c mice were immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone or co-immunized with the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18. Anti-HIV antibody and IFN-γ were tested by ELISA, and splenocytes were isolated for detecting antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses and specific CTL response by MTT assay and LDH assay respectively. Results: The antiHIV antibody titers of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were lower than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone( P < 0.01). In contrast, the IFN-γ level of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 was higher than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone ( P <0.01). Furthermore, compared with mice injected with pCI-neoGAG alone, the specific CTL cytotoxity activity and antigenspecific lymphoproliferative responses of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were significantly enhanced respectively ( P < 0.01). Conclusion: The DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 together with HIV DNA vaccine may enhance specific Th-1 responses and cellular immune response elicited in mice. Hence, the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 are promising immune adjuvants for HIV-1 DNA vaccine.

  18. Comparative Immunogenicity of HIV-1 gp140 Vaccine Delivered by Parenteral, and Mucosal Routes in Female Volunteers; MUCOVAC2, A Randomized Two Centre Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Cosgrove

    Full Text Available Defining optimal routes for induction of mucosal immunity represents an important research priority for the HIV-1 vaccine field. In particular, it remains unclear whether mucosal routes of immunization can improve mucosal immune responses.In this randomized two center phase I clinical trial we evaluated the systemic and mucosal immune response to a candidate HIV-1 Clade C CN54gp140 envelope glycoprotein vaccine administered by intramuscular (IM, intranasal (IN and intravaginal (IVAG routes of administration in HIV negative female volunteers. IM immunizations were co-administered with Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant (GLA, IN immunizations with 0.5% chitosan and IVAG immunizations were administered in an aqueous gel.Three IM immunizations of CN54 gp140 at either 20 or 100 μg elicited significantly greater systemic and mucosal antibodies than either IN or IVAG immunizations. Following additional intramuscular boosting we observed an anamnestic antibody response in nasally primed subjects. Modest neutralizing responses were detected against closely matched tier 1 clade C virus in the IM groups. Interestingly, the strongest CD4 T-cell responses were detected after IN and not IM immunization.These data show that parenteral immunization elicits systemic and mucosal antibodies in women. Interestingly IN immunization was an effective prime for IM boost, while IVAG administration had no detectable impact on systemic or mucosal responses despite IM priming.EudraCT 2010-019103-27 and the UK Clinical Research Network (UKCRN Number 11679.

  19. Review of recent literature on microneedle vaccine delivery technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrdoljak A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Anto Vrdoljak Development Laboratory, Genera, Rakov Potok, Croatia Abstract: Microneedles (MNs have been developed as medical devices for enhanced and painless transdermal drug and vaccine delivery. MN-based vaccine application, unlike conventional intramuscular or subcutaneous application using hypodermic needles, delivers vaccine directly into skin, which is known to be an immunologically much more relevant vaccination site than underlying tissue. Vaccination using MN devices targets the skin's rich immune system, leading to better utilization of the antigen and resulting in superior immune response, often achieved using a lower vaccine dose than required by conventional delivery routes. However, despite the number of advantages and nearly four decades of research, the number of licensed MN-based vaccines remains limited to date. Nevertheless, it is to be expected that on the back of a number of recently developed scalable and robust MN-fabrication methods, more intensive translation into clinical practice will follow. Here, we review the current status and trends in research of MN-related vaccine delivery platforms, focusing on the most promising approaches and clinically relevant applications. Keywords: microneedles, vaccine delivery, skin vaccination

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of recombinant low-dosage HIV-1 A vaccine candidates vectored by plasmid pTHr DNA or modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) in humans in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaoko, Walter; Nakwagala, Frederick N; Anzala, Omu; Manyonyi, Gloria Omosa; Birungi, Josephine; Nanvubya, Annet; Bashir, Farah; Bhatt, Kirana; Ogutu, Hilda; Wakasiaka, Sabina; Matu, Lucy; Waruingi, Wambui; Odada, Jane; Oyaro, Micah; Indangasi, Jackton; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckonia; Konde, Carol; Mugisha, Emmanuel; Fast, Patricia; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Tarragona, Tony; Smith, Carol; Barin, Burc; Dally, Len; Johnson, Bruce; Muluubya, Andrew; Nielsen, Leslie; Hayes, Peter; Boaz, Mark; Hughes, Peter; Hanke, Tomás; McMichael, Andrew; Bwayo, Job; Kaleebu, Pontiano

    2008-05-23

    The safety and immunogenicity of plasmid pTHr DNA, modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine candidates were evaluated in four Phase I clinical trials in Kenya and Uganda. Both vaccines, expressing HIV-1 subtype A gag p24/p17 and a string of CD8 T-cell epitopes (HIVA), were generally safe and well-tolerated. At the dosage levels and intervals tested, the percentage of vaccine recipients with HIV-1-specific cell-mediated immune responses, assessed by a validated ex vivo interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) ELISPOT assay and Cytokine Flow Cytometry (CFC), did not significantly differ from placebo recipients. These trials demonstrated the feasibility of conducting high-quality Phase 1 trials in Africa.

  1. Broadening of the T-cell repertoire to HIV-1 Gag p24 by vaccination of HLA-A2/DR transgenic mice with overlapping peptides in the CAF05 adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Karen S; Karlsson, Ingrid; Tang, Sheila T

    2013-01-01

    Induction of broad T-cell immune responses is regarded as critical for vaccines against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) which exhibit high diversity and, therefore, focus has been on inducing cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses against the more conserved parts of the virus......, such as the Gag protein. Herein, we have used the p24 protein which contains a range of conserved T-cell epitopes. We demonstrate that a vaccine of HIV-1 subtype B consensus group-specific antigen (Gag) p24 protein with the CD8-inducing liposomal cationic adjuvant formulation (CAF) 05, induces both CD4 and CD8 T....../DR-transgenic mouse model. Thus, combining overlapping Gag p24 peptides with CAF05 appears to be a promising and simple strategy for inducing broader T-cell responses to multiple conserved epitopes which will be relevant for both prophylactic and therapeutic HIV-1 vaccines....

  2. Natural killer T cell and TLR9 agonists as mucosal adjuvants for sublingual vaccination with clade C HIV-1 envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Barry, Michael A; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2014-12-05

    The vast majority of HIV-1 infections occur at mucosa during sexual contact. It may therefore be advantageous to provide mucosal barrier protection against this entry by mucosal vaccination. While a number of mucosal routes of vaccination are possible, many like enteric oral vaccines or intranasal vaccines have significant impediments that limit vaccine efficacy or pose safety risks. In contrast, immunogens applied to the sublingual region of the mouth could provide a simple route for mucosal vaccination. While sublingual immunization is appealing, this site does not always drive strong immune responses, particularly when using protein antigens. To address this issue, we have tested the ability of two mucosal adjuvants: alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) that is a potent stimulator of natural killer T cells and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) a TLR9 agonist for their ability to amplify immune responses against clade C gp140 HIV-1 envelope protein antigen. Immunization with envelope protein alone resulted in a weak T cell and antibody responses. In contrast, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells responses in systemic and mucosal tissues were significantly higher in mice immunized with gp140 in the presence of either αGalCer or CpG-ODN and these responses were further augmented when the two adjuvants were used together. While both the adjuvants effectively increased gp140-specific serum IgG and vaginal IgA antibody levels, combining both significantly improved these responses. Memory T cell responses 60 days after immunization revealed αGalCer to be more potent than CpG-ODN and the combination of the αGalCer and CpG-ODN adjuvants was more effective than either alone. Serum and vaginal washes collected 60 days after immunization with gp140 with both αGalCer and CpG-ODN adjuvants had significant neutralization activity against Tier 1 and Tier 2 SHIVs. These data support the utility of the sublingual route for mucosal vaccination particularly in combination with

  3. Use of an in vivo FTA assay to assess the magnitude, functional avidity and epitope variant cross-reactivity of T cell responses following HIV-1 recombinant poxvirus vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danushka K Wijesundara

    Full Text Available Qualitative characteristics of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs are important in measuring the effectiveness of CTLs in controlling HIV-1 infections. Indeed, in recent studies patients who are naturally resistant to HIV-1 infections have been shown to possess CTLs that are of high functional avidity and have a high capacity to recognize HIV epitope variants, when compared to HIV-1 infection progressors. When developing efficacious vaccines, assays that can effectively measure CTL quality specifically in vivo are becoming increasingly important. Here we report the use of a recently developed high-throughput multi-parameter technique, known as the fluorescent target array (FTA assay, to simultaneously measure CTL killing magnitude, functional avidity and epitope variant cross-reactivity in real time in vivo. In the current study we have applied the FTA assay as a screening tool to assess a large cohort of over 20 different HIV-1 poxvirus vaccination strategies in mice. This screen revealed that heterologous poxvirus prime-boost vaccination regimes (i.e., recombinant fowlpox (FPV-HIV prime followed by a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV-HIV booster were the most effective in generating high quality CTL responses in vivo. In conclusion, we have demonstrated how the FTA assay can be utilized as a cost effective screening tool (by reducing the required number of animals by >100 fold, to evaluate a large range of HIV-1 vaccination strategies in terms of CTL avidity and variant cross-reactivity in an in vivo setting.

  4. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluation of MVA-CMDR, a multigenic, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara-HIV-1 vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Currier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a Phase I randomized, dose-escalation, route-comparison trial of MVA-CMDR, a candidate HIV-1 vaccine based on a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara viral vector expressing HIV-1 genes env/gag/pol. The HIV sequences were derived from circulating recombinant form CRF01_AE, which predominates in Thailand. The objective was to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of MVA-CMDR in human volunteers in the US and Thailand. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MVA-CMDR or placebo was administered intra-muscularly (IM; 10(7 or 10(8 pfu or intradermally (ID; 10(6 or 10(7 pfu at months 0, 1 and 3, to 48 healthy volunteers at low risk for HIV-1 infection. Twelve volunteers in each dosage group were randomized to receive MVA-CMDR or placebo (10∶2. Volunteers were actively monitored for local and systemic reactogenicity and adverse events post vaccination. Cellular immunogenicity was assessed by a validated IFNγ Elispot assay, an intracellular cytokine staining assay, lymphocyte proliferation and a (51Cr-release assay. Humoral immunogenicity was assessed by ADCC for gp120 and binding antibody ELISAs for gp120 and p24. MVA-CMDR was safe and well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Cell-mediated immune responses were: (i moderate in magnitude (median IFNγ Elispot of 78 SFC/10(6 PBMC at 10(8 pfu IM, but high in response rate (70% (51Cr-release positive; 90% Elispot positive; 100% ICS positive, at 10(8 pfu IM; (ii predominantly HIV Env-specific CD4(+ T cells, with a high proliferative capacity and durable for at least 6 months (100% LPA response rate by the IM route; (iv dose- and route-dependent with 10(8 pfu IM being the most immunogenic treatment. Binding antibodies against gp120 and p24 were detectable in all vaccination groups with ADCC capacity detectable at the highest dose (40% positive at 10(8 pfu IM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MVA-CMDR delivered both intramuscularly and intradermally was safe, well-tolerated and

  5. A candidate HIV/AIDS vaccine (MVA-B lacking vaccinia virus gene C6L enhances memory HIV-1-specific T-cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan García-Arriaza

    Full Text Available The vaccinia virus (VACV C6 protein has sequence similarities with the poxvirus family Pox_A46, involved in regulation of host immune responses, but its role is unknown. Here, we have characterized the C6 protein and its effects in virus replication, innate immune sensing and immunogenicity in vivo. C6 is a 18.2 kDa protein, which is expressed early during virus infection and localizes to the cytoplasm of infected cells. Deletion of the C6L gene from the poxvirus vector MVA-B expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (MVA-B ΔC6L had no effect on virus growth kinetics; therefore C6 protein is not essential for virus replication. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B ΔC6L in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs are characterized by the up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β and IFN-α/β-inducible genes. In a DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice, flow cytometry analysis revealed that MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell memory immune responses, with most of the HIV-1 responses mediated by the CD8+ T-cell compartment with an effector phenotype. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env- and Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, MVA-B ΔC6L induced more Gag-Pol-Nef-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Furthermore, MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the levels of antibodies against Env in comparison with MVA-B. These findings revealed that C6 can be considered as an immunomodulator and that deleting C6L gene in MVA-B confers an immunological benefit by enhancing IFN-β-dependent responses and increasing the magnitude and quality of the T-cell memory immune responses to HIV-1 antigens. Our observations are relevant for the improvement of MVA vectors as HIV-1 vaccines.

  6. A candidate HIV/AIDS vaccine (MVA-B) lacking vaccinia virus gene C6L enhances memory HIV-1-specific T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Nájera, José Luis; Gómez, Carmen E; Tewabe, Nolawit; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Calandra, Thierry; Roger, Thierry; Esteban, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    The vaccinia virus (VACV) C6 protein has sequence similarities with the poxvirus family Pox_A46, involved in regulation of host immune responses, but its role is unknown. Here, we have characterized the C6 protein and its effects in virus replication, innate immune sensing and immunogenicity in vivo. C6 is a 18.2 kDa protein, which is expressed early during virus infection and localizes to the cytoplasm of infected cells. Deletion of the C6L gene from the poxvirus vector MVA-B expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (MVA-B ΔC6L) had no effect on virus growth kinetics; therefore C6 protein is not essential for virus replication. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B ΔC6L in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) are characterized by the up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β and IFN-α/β-inducible genes. In a DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice, flow cytometry analysis revealed that MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell memory immune responses, with most of the HIV-1 responses mediated by the CD8+ T-cell compartment with an effector phenotype. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env- and Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, MVA-B ΔC6L induced more Gag-Pol-Nef-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Furthermore, MVA-B ΔC6L enhanced the levels of antibodies against Env in comparison with MVA-B. These findings revealed that C6 can be considered as an immunomodulator and that deleting C6L gene in MVA-B confers an immunological benefit by enhancing IFN-β-dependent responses and increasing the magnitude and quality of the T-cell memory immune responses to HIV-1 antigens. Our observations are relevant for the improvement of MVA vectors as HIV-1 vaccines.

  7. Nedd4-mediated increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins and immunity following DNA-vaccination of BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation.

  8. Nedd4-mediated increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins and immunity following DNA-vaccination of BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Lewis

    Full Text Available The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation.

  9. Novel adjuvants & delivery vehicles for vaccines development: a road ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Teena; Verma, Priyanka; Rao, D Nageswara

    2013-11-01

    The pure recombinant and synthetic antigens used in modern day vaccines are generally less immunogenic than older style live/attenuated and killed whole organism vaccines. One can improve the quality of vaccine production by incorporating immunomodulators or adjuvants with modified delivery vehicles viz. liposomes, immune stimulating complexes (ISCOMs), micro/nanospheres apart from alum, being used as gold standard. Adjuvants are used to augment the effect of a vaccine by stimulating the immune system to respond to the vaccine, more vigorously, and thus providing increased immunity to a particular disease. Adjuvants accomplish this task by mimicking specific sets of evolutionary conserved molecules which include lipopolysaccharides (LPS), components of bacterial cell wall, endocytosed nucleic acids such as dsRNA, ssDNA and unmethylated CpG dinucleotide containing DNA. This review provides information on various vaccine adjuvants and delivery vehicles being developed to date. From literature, it seems that the humoral immune responses have been observed for most adjuvants and delivery platforms while viral-vector, ISCOMs and Montanides have shown cytotoxic T-cell response in the clinical trials. MF59 and MPL® have elicited Th1 responses, and virus-like particles (VLPs), non-degradable nanoparticle and liposomes have also generated cellular immunity. Such vaccine components have also been evaluated for alternative routes of administration with clinical success reported for intranasal delivery of viral-vectors and proteosomes and oral delivery of VLP vaccines.

  10. Electroporation-enhanced delivery of nucleic acid vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Kate E; Humeau, Laurent M

    2015-02-01

    The naked delivery of nucleic acid vaccines is notoriously inefficient, and an enabling delivery technology is required to direct efficiently these constructs intracellularly. A delivery technology capable of enhancing nucleic acid uptake in both cells in tissues and in culture is electroporation (EP). EP is a physical delivery mechanism that increases the permeability of mammalian cell membranes and allows the trafficking of large macromolecules into the cell. EP has now been used extensively in the clinic and been shown to be an effective method to increase both the uptake of the construct and the breadth and magnitude of the resulting immune responses. Excitingly, 2014 saw the announcement of the first EP-enhanced DNA vaccine Phase II trial demonstrating clinical efficacy. This review seeks to introduce the reader to EP as a technology to enhance the delivery of DNA and RNA vaccines and highlight several published clinical trials using this delivery modality.

  11. Assessment of transcutaneous vaccine delivery by optical coherence tomography Assessment of transcutaneous vaccine delivery by OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, T.; Doronin, A.; Rattanapak, T.; Hook, S.; Meglinski, I.

    2012-08-01

    Immunization is one of the most efficient and cost-effective means for the prevention of diseases. The latest trend for inducing protective immunity is topical application of vaccines to intact skin rather than invasive administration via injection. Apart from being a non-invasive route of drug delivery, skin itself also offers advantages through the presence of cells of the immune system in both the dermis and epidermis. However, vaccine penetration through the outermost layers of skin is limited by the barrier provided by the Stratum corneum. In the current study utilizing conventional Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) we investigate the transcutaneous delivery of a nano- particulate peptide vaccine into mouse skin in vivo. We demonstrate that a front of molecular diffusion within the skin can be clearly observed by using cross-correlations of successive 2D OCT images. Thus, OCT provides a unique tool for quantitative assessment of dynamics of diffusion of drugs, target compounds, analytes, cosmetics and various chemical agents in biological tissues in vivo.

  12. Delivery of Foreign Antigens by Engineered Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David J. Chen; Nikolaus Osterrieder; Stephan M. Metzger; Elizabeth Buckled; Anne M. Dood; Matthew P. DeLisa; David Putnam; Robert Langer

    2010-01-01

    .... We show here that engineered Escherichia coli outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are an easily purified vaccine-delivery system capable of greatly enhancing the immunogenicity of a low-immunogenicity protein antigen without added adjuvants...

  13. Estimating the impact of plasma HIV-1 RNA reductions on heterosexual HIV-1 transmission risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam R Lingappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of sexual transmission of HIV-1 is strongly associated with the level of HIV-1 RNA in plasma making reduction in HIV-1 plasma levels an important target for HIV-1 prevention interventions. A quantitative understanding of the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 transmission risk could help predict the impact of candidate HIV-1 prevention interventions that operate by reducing plasma HIV-1 levels, such as antiretroviral therapy (ART, therapeutic vaccines, and other non-ART interventions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use prospective data collected from 2004 to 2008 in East and Southern African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to model the relationship of plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and heterosexual transmission risk with confirmation of HIV-1 transmission events by HIV-1 sequencing. The model is based on follow-up of 3381 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples over 5017 person-years encompassing 108 genetically-linked HIV-1 transmission events. HIV-1 transmission risk was 2.27 per 100 person-years with a log-linear relationship to log(10 plasma HIV-1 RNA. The model predicts that a decrease in average plasma HIV-1 RNA of 0.74 log(10 copies/mL (95% CI 0.60 to 0.97 reduces heterosexual transmission risk by 50%, regardless of the average starting plasma HIV-1 level in the population and independent of other HIV-1-related population characteristics. In a simulated population with a similar plasma HIV-1 RNA distribution the model estimates that 90% of overall HIV-1 infections averted by a 0.74 copies/mL reduction in plasma HIV-1 RNA could be achieved by targeting this reduction to the 58% of the cohort with plasma HIV-1 levels ≥4 log(10 copies/mL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This log-linear model of plasma HIV-1 levels and risk of sexual HIV-1 transmission may help estimate the impact on HIV-1 transmission and infections averted from candidate interventions that reduce plasma HIV-1 RNA levels.

  14. A phase I double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study of a multigenic HIV-1 adenovirus subtype 35 vector vaccine in healthy uninfected adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Keefer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of escalating doses of two recombinant replication defective adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35 vectors containing gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase and nef (Ad35-GRIN and env (Ad35-ENV, both derived from HIV-1 subtype A isolates. The trial enrolled 56 healthy HIV-uninfected adults. METHODS: Ad35-GRIN/ENV (Ad35-GRIN and Ad35-ENV mixed in the same vial in equal proportions or Ad35-GRIN was administered intramuscularly at 0 and 6 months. Participants were randomized to receive either vaccine or placebo (10/4 per group, respectively within one of four dosage groups: Ad35-GRIN/ENV 2×10(9 (A, 2×10(10 (B, 2×10(11 (C, or Ad35-GRIN 1×10(10 (D viral particles. RESULTS: No vaccine-related serious adverse event was reported. Reactogenicity events reported were dose-dependent, mostly mild or moderate, some severe in Group C volunteers, all transient and resolving spontaneously. IFN-γ ELISPOT responses to any vaccine antigen were detected in 50, 56, 70 and 90% after the first vaccination, and in 75, 100, 88 and 86% of Groups A-D vaccine recipients after the second vaccination, respectively. The median spot forming cells (SFC per 10(6 PBMC to any antigen was 78-139 across Groups A-C and 158-174 in Group D, after each of the vaccinations with a maximum of 2991 SFC. Four to five HIV proteins were commonly recognized across all the groups and over multiple timepoints. CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were polyfunctional. Env antibodies were detected in all Group A-C vaccinees and Gag antibodies in most vaccinees after the second immunization. Ad35 neutralizing titers remained low after the second vaccination. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Ad35-GRIN/ENV reactogenicity was dose-related. HIV-specific cellular and humoral responses were seen in the majority of volunteers immunized with Ad35-GRIN/ENV or Ad35-GRIN and increased after the second

  15. Resistance mutations and CTL epitopes in archived HIV-1 DNA of patients on antiviral treatment: toward a new concept of vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Papuchon

    Full Text Available Eleven patients responding successfully to first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART were investigated for proviral drug resistance mutations (DRMs in RT by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS. After molecular typing of the class I alleles A and B, the CTL epitopes in the Gag, Nef and Pol regions of the provirus were sequenced and compared to the reference HXB2 HIV-1 epitopes. They were then matched with the HLA alleles with determination of theoretical affinity (TA. For 3 patients, the results could be compared with an RNA sample of the circulating virus at initiation of therapy. Five out of 11 patients exhibited DRMs by UDPS. The issue is whether a therapeutic switch is relevant in these patients by taking into account the identity of the archived resistance mutations. When the archived CTL epitopes were determined on the basis of the HLA alleles, different patterns were observed. Some epitopes were identical to those reported for the reference with the same TA, while others were mutated with a decrease in TA. In 2 cases, an epitope was observed as a combination of subpopulations at entry and was retrieved as a single population with lower TA at success. With regard to immunological stimulation and given the variability of the archived CTL epitopes, we propose a new concept of curative vaccine based on identification of HIV-1 CTL epitopes after prior sequencing of proviral DNA and matching with HLA class I alleles.

  16. UV and X-ray structural studies of a 101-residue long Tat protein from a HIV-1 primary isolate and of its mutated, detoxified, vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Marine; Mayol, Katia; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Bussat, Marie-Claire; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Verrier, Bernard; Beck, Alain; Haser, Richard; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    The 101-residue long Tat protein of primary isolate 133 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), wt-Tat(133) displays a high transactivation activity in vitro, whereas the mutant thereof, STLA-Tat(133), a vaccine candidate for HIV-1, has none. These two proteins were chemically synthesized and their biological activity was validated. Their structural properties were characterized using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence emission, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. SAXS studies revealed that both proteins were extended and belong to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins. CD measurements showed that wt-Tat(133) or STLA-Tat(133) underwent limited structural rearrangements when complexed with specific fragments of antibodies. Crystallization trials have been performed on the two forms, assuming that the Tat(133) proteins might have a better propensity to fold in supersaturated conditions, and small crystals have been obtained. These results suggest that biologically active Tat protein is natively unfolded and requires only a limited gain of structure for its function.

  17. The Influence of Delivery Vectors on HIV Vaccine Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Omusiro Ondondo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine remains a big challenge, largely due to the enormous HIV diversity which propels immune escape. Thus novel vaccine strategies are targeting multiple variants of conserved antibody and T cell epitopic regions which would incur a huge fitness cost to the virus in the event of mutational escape. Besides immunogen design, the delivery modality is critical for vaccine potency and efficacy, and should be carefully selected in order to not only maximise transgene expression, but to also enhance the immuno-stimulatory potential to activate innate and adaptive immune systems. To date, five HIV vaccine candidates have been evaluated for efficacy and protection from acquisition was only achieved in a small proportion of vaccinees in the RV144 study which used a canarypox vector for delivery. Conversely, in the STEP study (HVTN 502 where human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 was used, strong immune responses were induced but vaccination was more associated with increased risk of HIV acquisition than protection in vaccinees with pre-existing Ad5 immunity. The possibility that pre-existing immunity to a highly promising delivery vector may alter the natural course of HIV to increase acquisition risk is quite worrisome and a huge setback for HIV vaccine development. Thus, HIV vaccine development efforts are now geared towards delivery platforms which attain superior immunogenicity while concurrently limiting potential catastrophic effects likely to arise from pre-existing immunity or vector-related immuno-modulation. However, it still remains unclear whether it is poor immunogenicity of HIV antigens or substandard immunological potency of the safer delivery vectors that has limited the success of HIV vaccines. This article discusses some of the promising delivery vectors to be harnessed for improved HIV vaccine efficacy.

  18. The influence of delivery vectors on HIV vaccine efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondondo, Beatrice O.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an effective HIV/AIDS vaccine remains a big challenge, largely due to the enormous HIV diversity which propels immune escape. Thus novel vaccine strategies are targeting multiple variants of conserved antibody and T cell epitopic regions which would incur a huge fitness cost to the virus in the event of mutational escape. Besides immunogen design, the delivery modality is critical for vaccine potency and efficacy, and should be carefully selected in order to not only maximize transgene expression, but to also enhance the immuno-stimulatory potential to activate innate and adaptive immune systems. To date, five HIV vaccine candidates have been evaluated for efficacy and protection from acquisition was only achieved in a small proportion of vaccinees in the RV144 study which used a canarypox vector for delivery. Conversely, in the STEP study (HVTN 502) where human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) was used, strong immune responses were induced but vaccination was more associated with increased risk of HIV acquisition than protection in vaccinees with pre-existing Ad5 immunity. The possibility that pre-existing immunity to a highly promising delivery vector may alter the natural course of HIV to increase acquisition risk is quite worrisome and a huge setback for HIV vaccine development. Thus, HIV vaccine development efforts are now geared toward delivery platforms which attain superior immunogenicity while concurrently limiting potential catastrophic effects likely to arise from pre-existing immunity or vector-related immuno-modulation. However, it still remains unclear whether it is poor immunogenicity of HIV antigens or substandard immunological potency of the safer delivery vectors that has limited the success of HIV vaccines. This article discusses some of the promising delivery vectors to be harnessed for improved HIV vaccine efficacy. PMID:25202303

  19. Intra- and inter-clade cross-reactivity by HIV-1 Gag specific T-cells reveals exclusive and commonly targeted regions: implications for current vaccine trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lycias Zembe

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of HIV-1 across the globe is a major challenge for developing an HIV vaccine. To facilitate immunogen design, it is important to characterize clusters of commonly targeted T-cell epitopes across different HIV clades. To address this, we examined 39 HIV-1 clade C infected individuals for IFN-γ Gag-specific T-cell responses using five sets of overlapping peptides, two sets matching clade C vaccine candidates derived from strains from South Africa and China, and three peptide sets corresponding to consensus clades A, B, and D sequences. The magnitude and breadth of T-cell responses against the two clade C peptide sets did not differ, however clade C peptides were preferentially recognized compared to the other peptide sets. A total of 84 peptides were recognized, of which 19 were exclusively from clade C, 8 exclusively from clade B, one peptide each from A and D and 17 were commonly recognized by clade A, B, C and D. The entropy of the exclusively recognized peptides was significantly higher than that of commonly recognized peptides (p = 0.0128 and the median peptide processing scores were significantly higher for the peptide variants recognized versus those not recognized (p = 0.0001. Consistent with these results, the predicted Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I IC(50 values were significantly lower for the recognized peptide variants compared to those not recognized in the ELISPOT assay (p<0.0001, suggesting that peptide variation between clades, resulting in lack of cross-clade recognition, has been shaped by host immune selection pressure. Overall, our study shows that clade C infected individuals recognize clade C peptides with greater frequency and higher magnitude than other clades, and that a selection of highly conserved epitope regions within Gag are commonly recognized and give rise to cross-clade reactivities.

  20. Rationally Designed Vaccines Targeting the V2 Region of HIV-1 gp120 Induce a Focused, Cross-Clade-Reactive, Biologically Functional Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Powell, Rebecca; Yahyaei, Sara; Williams, Constance; Jiang, Xunqing; Li, Wei; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia; Upadhyay, Chitra; Hioe, Catarina E; Totrov, Max; Kong, Xiangpeng

    2016-12-15

    Strong antibody (Ab) responses against V1V2 epitopes of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope (Env) correlated with reduced infection rates in studies of HIV, simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In order to focus the Ab response on V1V2, we used six V1V2 sequences and nine scaffold proteins to construct immunogens which were tested using various immunization regimens for their ability to induce cross-reactive and biologically active V2 Abs in rabbits. A prime/boost immunization strategy was employed using gp120 DNA and various V1V2-scaffold proteins. The rabbit polyclonal Ab responses (i) were successfully focused on the V1V2 region, with weak or only transient responses to other Env epitopes, (ii) displayed broad cross-reactive binding activity with gp120s and the V1V2 regions of diverse strains from clades B, C, and E, (iii) included V2 Abs with specificities similar to those found in HIV-infected individuals, and (iv) remained detectable ≥1 year after the last boosting dose. Importantly, sera from rabbits receiving V1V2-scaffold immunogens displayed Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis whereas sera from rabbits receiving only gp120 did not. The results represent the first fully successful example of reverse vaccinology in the HIV vaccine field with rationally designed epitope scaffold immunogens inducing Abs that recapitulate the epitope specificity and biologic activity of the human monoclonal Abs from which the immunogens were designed. Moreover, this is the first immunogenicity study using epitope-targeting, rationally designed vaccine constructs that induced an Fc-mediated activity associated with protection from infection with HIV, SIV, and SHIV. Novel immunogens were designed to focus the antibody response of rabbits on the V1V2 epitopes of HIV-1 gp120 since such antibodies were associated with reduced infection rates of HIV, SIV, and SHIV. The vaccine-induced antibodies were broadly

  1. Randomized controlled trial of Hepatitis B virus vaccine in HIV-1-infected patients comparing two different doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Palacios Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is not infrequent as both share same route of exposure. The risk of developing chronic hepatitis B virus is 6%, in general population but can reach 10–20% in HBV/HIV co-infected patients. When compared to general population, the response rate to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected patients is diminished, so previous studies have tried to improve this response using variety of schedules, doses and co-administration of immunomodulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two doses of recombinant HBV vaccine (10 or 40 μg, IM at 0, 1 and 6 months. Vaccination response was measured 30–50 days after last dose; titers of >9.9 IU/L were considered positive. Results Seventy-nine patients were included, 48 patients (60.7% serconverted. Thirty-nine patients (49.3% received 10 μg vaccine dose, 24 patients (61.5% seroconverted. Forty patients (50.7% received 40 μg vaccine dose, 24 (60% seroconverted. There were no differences between two doses. A statistically significant higher seroconversion rate was found for patients with CD4 cell counts at vaccination ≥ 200 cel/mm3 (33 of 38 patients, 86.8%, compared with those with CD4 4 count 3 were significantly associated with non serologic response (p = 0.003. None other variables such as gender, age, risk exposure for HIV, viral load, type or duration of HAART or AIDS-defining illness, were asociated with seroconversion. Conclusion In this study, an increase dose of HBV vaccine did not show to increase the rate of response in HIV infected subjects. The only significant findings associated to the response rate was that a CD4 count ≥ 200 cel/mm3, we suggest this threshold at which HIV patients should be vaccinated.

  2. Leishmaniasis: focus on the design of nanoparticulate vaccine delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroud, Delaram; Rafati, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Although mass vaccination of the entire population of an endemic area would be the most cost-effective tool to diminish Leishmania burden, an effective vaccine is not yet commercially available. Practically, vaccines have failed to achieve the required level of protection, possibly owing to the lack of an appropriate adjuvant and/or delivery system. Therefore, there is still an imperative demand for an improved, safe and efficient delivery system to enhance the immunogenicity of available vaccine candidates. Nanoparticles are proficient in boosting the quality and magnitude of immune responses in a predictable fashion. Herein, we discuss how nanoparticulate vaccine delivery systems can be used to induce appropriate immune responses against leishmaniasis by controlling physicochemical properties of the vaccine. Stability, production reproducibility, low cost per dose and low risk-benefit ratios are desirable characteristics of an ideal vaccine formulation and solid lipid nanoparticles may serve as one of the most promising practical strategies to help to achieve such a leishmanial vaccine, at least in canine species in the developing world.

  3. Human and animal vaccination delivery to remote nomadic families, Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Esther; Bechir, Mahamat; Ahmed, Mahamat Abdoulaye; Wyss, Kaspar; Randolph, Thomas F; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2007-03-01

    Vaccination services for people and livestock often fail to achieve sufficient coverages in Africa's remote rural settings because of financial, logistic, and service delivery constraints. In Chad from 2000 through 2005, we demonstrated the feasibility of combining vaccination programs for nomadic pastoralists and their livestock. Sharing of transport logistics and equipment between physicians and veterinarians reduced total costs. Joint delivery of human and animal health services is adapted to and highly valued by hard-to-reach pastoralists. In intervention zones, for the first time approximately 10% of nomadic children (> 1-11 months of age) were fully immunized annually and more children and women were vaccinated per day during joint vaccination rounds than during vaccination of persons only and not their livestock (130 vs. 100, p < 0.001). By optimizing use of limited logistical and human resources, public health and veterinary services both become more effective, especially at the district level.

  4. Characterization of the HIV-1 subunit vaccine containing the gp41 NHR domain of the HIV-1 CRF01_AE recombinant subtype in China%基于中国HIV-1 CRF01_AE重组亚型gp41 NHR结构域亚单位疫苗的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵继平; 姜世勃; 刘叔文

    2012-01-01

    目的:构建基于中国HIV-1 CRF01_AE重组亚型包膜糖蛋白gp41 NHR结构域N51的亚单位疫苗,并进行免疫原性研究.方法:设计4条引物,运用重叠延伸PCR方法扩增出N51Fd基因,将其插入真核表达载体pFUSE-hIgG1-Fc2,构建重组质粒pFUSE/N51Fd并进行序列测定.Western blot 法检测N51FdFc-AE重组蛋白的表达.用纯化蛋白免疫BALB/c小鼠后,ELISA法检测小鼠的抗体反应.结果:成功构建了pFUSE/N51Fd重组质粒,N51FdFc-AE重组蛋白在真核体系获得了高效表达,Western blot结果显示在相对分子质量(Mr)35000处有目的蛋白条带.小鼠抗血清能特异性识别源于gp41 NHR的抗原,效价高达1∶102400,平均效价为1∶51200.结论:改造后的亚单位疫苗能有效激活机体的免疫响应,可用于HIV候选疫苗的研发.%AIM: To design and construct an HIV-1 subunit vaccine containing the N-terminai heptad repeat (NHR) domain N51 in gp41 of the HIV-1 CRF01_AE recombinant subtype in China and study its immunogenicity. METHODS: Two pairs of primers were designed to amplify DNA fragment encoding N5lFd gene, which was then subcloned into pFUSE-hlgGl-Fc2 vector. The recombinant plasmid pFUSE/N51Fd was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Western blotting was used to measure the correct expression of the recombinant protein N51FdFc-AE. The N51FdFc-AE protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice, and the specific antibody response was measured by ELISA. RESULTS: A recombinant plasmid pFUSE/N51Fd was successfully constructed and the IM5lFdFc-AE recombinant protein was expressed effectively in 293T cells. The purified N51FdFc-AE recombinant protein (35 kD) was detected by Western blotting with rabbit anti-gp41 N/C peptide antibodies. The mouse anti-sera could specifically recognize the antigens derived from gp4l NHR. The titers of the specific antibodies were up to 1:102 400 with an average titer of 1 :51 200. CONCLUSION; The recombinant N51FdFc-AE protein can effectively induce the gp41 NHR

  5. Lipid-based delivery of combinations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for the in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, C; Yelle, J; Sauvé, G; Thierry, A G

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new approach to AIDS therapy by using combinations of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), delivered with a lipid-based carrier system, that target different HIV viral genome sites. We identified some of the factors that seem to influence the effectiveness of a combination strategy in cell cultures including ODN concentrations, type of infection (acute vs chronic), backbone modification of the ODN, and the number of sequences. When delivered by the DLS carrier system, some advantages of using a combination of ODNs over treatment with only one ODN could be observed in acute infection assays but not in the chronic infection model. These results suggest that in the acute infection model, the 3 different antisense ODNs in the "cocktail" might block an early step of virus replication by combined inhibitory effects. Various combinations of phosphorothioate-modified (PS) and unmodified oligonucleotides delivered by the DLS system were compared for their antiviral activity in a long-term acute assay using HIV-1 (IIIB strain)-infected MOLT-3 cells. The most effective combination had 3 phosphorothioate antisense ODNs: Srev, SDIS, and SPac (>99% inhibition at 100 pM). However, the additive effect determined when using ODN combinations was rather low, revealing the high level of nonsequence specificity in HIV-1 cell culture models. Data illustrated the high sequence nonspecific activity of ODNs, especially when comparing activity of antisense ODNs with activity of random control sequence ODNs. The latter exhibited an inhibitory effect similar to that of antisense ODNs under our experimental conditions. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve high anti-HIV activity by using, in combination, picomolar range concentrations of antisense oligonucleotides complexed to a lipid-based carrier system such as the DLS system, without increasing cell toxicity.

  6. Contribution of TLR4 and MyD88 for adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) activity in a DNA prime-protein boost HIV-1 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Kimberly; Buglione-Corbett, Rachel; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Montminy-Paquette, Sara; West, Kim; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Lien, Egil

    2014-09-03

    Recombinant protein vaccines are commonly formulated with an immune-stimulatory compound, or adjuvant, to boost immune responses to a particular antigen. Recent studies have shown that, through recognition of molecular motifs, receptors of the innate immune system are involved in the functions of adjuvants to generate and direct adaptive immune responses. However, it is not clear to which degree those receptors are also important when the adjuvant is used as part of a novel heterologous prime-boost immunization process in which the priming and boosting components are not the same type of vaccines. In the current study, we compared the immune responses elicited by a pentavalent HIV-1 DNA prime-protein boost vaccine in mice deficient in either Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) to wildtype mice. HIV gp120 protein administered in the boost phase was formulated with either monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), QS-21, or Al(OH)3. Endpoint antibody titer, serum cytokine response and T-cell memory response were assessed. Neither TLR4 nor MyD88 deficiency had a significant effect on the immune response of mice given vaccine formulated with QS-21 or Al(OH)3. However, TLR4- and MyD88-deficiency decreased both the antibody and T-cell responses in mice administered HIV gp120 formulated with MPLA. These results further our understanding of the activation of TLR4 and MyD88 by MPLA in the context of a DNA prime/protein boost immunization strategy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Differential induction of anti-V3 crown antibodies with cradle- and ladle-binding modes in response to HIV-1 envelope vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Preetha; Kumar, Rajnish; Williams, Constance; Itri, Vincenza; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Hessell, Ann J; Haigwood, Nancy L; Sinangil, Faruk; Higgins, Keith W; Liu, Lily; Li, Liuzhe; Nyambi, Phillipe; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Totrov, Maxim; Nadas, Arthur; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Hioe, Catarina E

    2017-03-07

    The V3 loop in the HIV envelope gp120 is one of the immunogenic sites targeted by Abs. The V3 crown in particular has conserved structural elements recognized by cross-reactive neutralizing Abs, indicating its potential contribution in protection against HIV. Crystallographic analyses of anti-V3 crown mAbs in complex with the V3 peptides have revealed that these mAbs recognize the conserved sites on the V3 crown via two distinct strategies: a cradle-binding mode (V3C) and a ladle-binding (V3L) mode. However, almost all of the anti-V3 crown mAbs studied in the past were isolated from chronically HIV-infected individuals. The extents to which the two types of anti-V3 crown Abs are generated by vaccination are unknown. This study analyzed the prevalence of V3C-type and V3L-type Ab responses in HIV-infected individuals and in HIV envelope-immunized humans and animals using peptide mimotopes that distinguish the two Ab types. The results show that both V3L-type and V3C-type Abs were generated by the vast majority of chronically HIV-infected humans, although the V3L-type were more prevalent. In contrast, only one of the two V3 Ab types was elicited in vaccinated humans or animal models, irrespective of HIV-1 envelope clades, envelope constructs (oligomeric or monomeric), and protocols (DNA plus protein or protein alone) used for vaccinations. The V3C-type Abs were produced by vaccinated humans, macaques, and rabbits, whereas the V3L-type Abs were made by mice. The V3C-type and V3L-type Abs generated by the vaccinations were able to mediate virus neutralization. These data indicate the restricted repertoires and the species-specific differences in the functional V3-specific Ab responses induced by the HIV envelope vaccines. The study implies the need for improving immunogen designs and vaccination strategies to broaden the diversity of Abs in order to target the different conserved epitopes in the V3 loop and, by extension, in the entire HIV envelope. Published by

  8. HIV-1 Env DNA vaccine plus protein boost delivered by EP expands B- and T-cell responses and neutralizing phenotype in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Muthumani

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP. However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted.

  9. Cyclophilin A as a potential genetic adjuvant to improve HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine immunogenicity by eliciting broad and long-term Gag-specific cellular immunity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Zhang, Qicheng; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Shuhui; Li, Dan; Liu, Chang; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that host Cyclophilin A (CyPA) can promote dendritic cell maturation and the subsequent innate immune response when incorporated into an HIV-1 Gag protein to circumvent the resistance of dendritic cells to HIV-1 infection. This led us to hypothesize that CyPA may improve HIV-1 Gag-specific vaccine immunogenicity via binding with Gag antigen. The adjuvant effect of CyPA was evaluated using a DNA vaccine with single or dual expression cassettes. Mouse studies indicated that CyPA specifically and markedly promoted HIV-1 Gag-specific cellular immunity but not an HIV-1 Env-specific cellular response. The Gag/CyPA dual expression cassettes stimulated a greater Gag-specific cellular immune response, than Gag immunization alone. Furthermore, CyPA induced a broad Gag-specific T cell response and strong cellular immunity that lasted up to 5 months. In addition, CyPA skewed to cellular rather than humoral immunity. To investigate the mechanisms of the adjuvant effect, site-directed mutagenesis in CyPA, including active site residues H54Q and F60A resulted in mutants that were co-expressed with Gag in dual cassettes. The immune response to this vaccine was analyzed in vivo. Interestingly, the wild type CyPA markedly increased Gag cellular immunity, but the H54Q and F60A mutants drastically reduced CyPA adjuvant activation. Therefore, we suggest that the adjuvant effect of CyPA was based on Gag-CyPA-specific interactions. Herein, we report that Cyclophilin A can augment HIV-1 Gag-specific cellular immunity as a genetic adjuvant in multiplex DNA immunization strategies, and that activity of this adjuvant is specific, broad, long-term, and based on Gag-CyPA interaction. PMID:26305669

  10. Formulation and delivery of dermal DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    DNA vaccination is an appealing strategy of active vaccination, leading to the intracellular production of the encoding antigen which results in an efficient activation of an antigen specific immune response. Intradermal DNA tattooing was recently developed as a simple and robust method to induce

  11. Formulation and delivery of dermal DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837016

    2009-01-01

    DNA vaccination is an appealing strategy of active vaccination, leading to the intracellular production of the encoding antigen which results in an efficient activation of an antigen specific immune response. Intradermal DNA tattooing was recently developed as a simple and robust method to induce an

  12. Biodegradable Microspheres as Hepatitis B Vaccine Delivery Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨春; 贾文祥; 陈恬; 曾蔚; 杨远; 杨发龙; 谢轶; 杨维清; 周绍兵; 李孝红

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the immtmogenicity of the controlled-release microencapsulated hepatitis B vaccine in mice, polyethylene glycol-poly-dl-lactide (PELA) microspheres with entrapped HSsAg were prepared by double emulsion W/O/W based on solvent extraction methods. BALB/c mice were immunized with the encapsulated vaccine by oral feeding or injection. Blood samples were collected at 8th, 10th, 14th and 24th weeks, respectively, and the levels of antibody response were detected by EI.ISA. It was found that the scanning electron microscopy showed the prepared microspheres had smoothand spherical surface, suitable for vaccine delivery. Two groups of mice orally fed with the encapsulated or conventional recombinant vaccines, respectively, there sere showed no obvious difference in the IgG levels. At 14th week, the group injected with a single dose of encapsulated vaccine had a similar level of IgG response to the group injected with two doses of the recombination vaccine. At 24th week, the IgG levels of the group injected with two doses of encapsulated vaccine were higher than those of the group injected with two doses of the recombination vaccine. It concludes that Controlled-release microencapsulated hepatitis B vaccine possesses the feature of slowly releasing in v/vo and long times immtmogenicity.

  13. Virally vectored vaccine delivery: medical needs, mechanisms, advantages and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2017-08-14

    Vaccines represent one of the most successful chapters in the history of medicine. Over the past decades, the advent of recombinant cDNA technology has enabled the biomedical community to genetically engineer viruses for vaccine delivery purposes. As a starting point, this review evaluates the unmet medical needs, which drive scientists and industry to exploit such fundamentally new technology for human vaccination. The author discusses the molecular functioning, production and safety profile of replication-competent and -deficient viral vector systems, representing two fundamentally distinct classes of "genetic vaccines". Building upon this knowledge, he dissects the immunological mechanisms rendering immune responses to viral vectors qualitatively and quantitatively distinct from those elicited by non-live vaccination approaches. These mechanisms comprise (1) the vectors' innate immune recognition by the host cell, (2) potent priming of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells as a result of dendritic cell targeting and endogenous protein synthesis, (3) conformational antigen display for protective antibody induction as well as (4) prolonged availability of substantial quantities of antigen. Deduced from these features, preferential indications for virally vectored vaccines are discussed, taking into consideration specific medical needs as well as risk-benefit assessments of replicating vector systems. The limitations and challenges in virally vectored vaccination must also be given careful consideration. Pre-existing and vaccination-induced anti-vector immunity can interfere with vaccine immunogenicity and prime-boost vaccination, respectively. Additionally, the requirement for eukaryotic production systems imposes technological as well as regulatory hurdles. Existing strategies to overcome these challenges are outlined. With the recent licensure of the first virally vectored vaccine this review seems timely to herald the introduction of virally vectored vaccines into daily

  14. Autologous aldrithiol-2-inactivated HIV-1 combined with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose as a vaccine platform for therapeutic dendritic cell immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; Spadaccia, Meredith; Sabado, Rachel; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Trubey, Charles Mac; Holman, Rose Marie; Salazar, Andres; Lifson, Jeffrey; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2015-01-03

    Therapeutic interventions for HIV-1 that successfully augment adaptive immunity to promote killing of infected cells may be a requisite component of strategies to reduce latent cellular reservoirs. Adoptive immunotherapies utilizing autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that have been activated and antigen loaded ex vivo may serve to circumvent defects in DC function that are present during HIV infection in order to enhance adaptive immune responses. Here we detail the clinical preparation of DCs loaded with autologous aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated HIV that have been potently activated with the viral mimic, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-l-lysine carboxymethylcellulose (Poly-ICLC). HIV is first propagated from CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected donors and then rendered non-replicative by chemical inactivation with aldrithiol-2 (AT-2), purified, and quantified. Viral inactivation is confirmed through measurement of Tat-regulated β-galactosidase reporter gene expression following infection of TZM-bl cells. In-process testing for sterility, mycoplasma, LPS, adventitious agents, and removal of AT-2 is performed on viral preparations. Autologous DCs are generated and pulsed with autologous AT-2-inactivated virus and simultaneously stimulated with Poly-ICLC to constitute the final DC vaccine product. Phenotypic identity, maturation, and induction of HIV-specific adaptive immune responses are confirmed via flow cytometric analysis of DCs and cocultured autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Lot release criteria for the DC vaccine have been defined in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) guidelines. The demonstrated feasibility of this approach has resulted in approval by the FDA for investigational use in antiretroviral (ART) suppressed individuals. We discuss how this optimized DC formulation may enhance the quality of anti-HIV adaptive responses beyond what has been previously observed during DC immunotherapy trials for HIV infection.

  15. Autologous Aldrithiol-2-Inactivated HIV-1 Combined with Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid–poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose as a Vaccine Platform for Therapeutic Dendritic Cell Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLER, Elizabeth; SPADACCIA, Meredith; SABADO, Rachel; CHERTOVA, Elena; BESS, Julian; Mac TRUBEY, Charles; HOLMAN, Rose Marie; SALAZAR, Andres; LIFSON, Jeffrey; BHARDWAJ, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions for HIV-1 that successfully augment adaptive immunity to promote killing of infected cells may be a requisite component of strategies to reduce latent cellular reservoirs. Adoptive immunotherapies utilizing autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that have been activated and antigen loaded ex vivo may serve to circumvent defects in DC function that are present during HIV infection in order to enhance adaptive immune responses. Here we detail the clinical preparation of DCs loaded with autologous Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated HIV that have been potently activated with the viral mimic, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid–poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose (Poly-ICLC). HIV is first propagated from CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected donors and then rendered non-replicative by chemical inactivation with aldrithiol-2 (AT-2), purified, and quantified. Viral inactivation is confirmed through measurement of Tat-regulated β-galactosidase reporter gene expression following infection of TZM-bl cells. In-process testing for sterility, mycoplasma, LPS, adventitious agents, and removal of AT-2 is performed on viral preparations. Autologous DCs are generated and pulsed with autologous AT-2-inactivated virus and simultaneously stimulated with Poly-ICLC to constitute the final DC vaccine product. Phenotypic identity, maturation, and induction of HIV-specific adaptive immune responses are confirmed via flow cytometric analysis of DCs and cocultured autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Lot release criteria for the DC vaccine have been defined in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) guidelines. The demonstrated feasibility of this approach has resulted in approval by the FDA for investigational use in antiretroviral (ART) suppressed individuals. We discuss how this optimized DC formulation may enhance the quality of anti-HIV adaptive responses beyond what has been previously observed during DC immunotherapy trials for HIV infection. PMID

  16. Lipid interactions and angle of approach to the HIV-1 viral membrane of broadly neutralizing antibody 10E8: Insights for vaccine and therapeutic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Adriana; Sarkar, Anita; Schiffner, Torben; Tingle, Ryan; Adachi, Yumiko; Deller, Marc C.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2017-01-01

    Among broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV, 10E8 exhibits greater neutralizing breadth than most. Consequently, this antibody is the focus of prophylactic/therapeutic development. The 10E8 epitope has been identified as the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 subunit of the envelope (Env) viral glycoprotein and is a major vaccine target. However, the MPER is proximal to the viral membrane and may be laterally inserted into the membrane in the Env prefusion form. Nevertheless, 10E8 has not been reported to have significant lipid-binding reactivity. Here we report x-ray structures of lipid complexes with 10E8 and a scaffolded MPER construct and mutagenesis studies that provide evidence that the 10E8 epitope is composed of both MPER and lipid. 10E8 engages lipids through a specific lipid head group interaction site and a basic and polar surface on the light chain. In the model that we constructed, the MPER would then be essentially perpendicular to the virion membrane during 10E8 neutralization of HIV-1. As the viral membrane likely also plays a role in selecting for the germline antibody as well as size and residue composition of MPER antibody complementarity determining regions, the identification of lipid interaction sites and the MPER orientation with regard to the viral membrane surface during 10E8 engagement can be of great utility for immunogen and therapeutic design. PMID:28225819

  17. Comparison on virulence and immunogenicity of two recombinant vaccinia vaccines, Tian Tan and Guang9 strains, expressing the HIV-1 envelope gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Wenbo; Liu, Qiang; Nie, Jianhui; Meng, Shufang; Yu, Yongxin; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    The vaccinia virus Guang9 strain (VG9), derived from the vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) has been found to be less virulent than VTT. To investigate whether VG9 could be a potential replicating virus vector, the TK genes in VG9 and VTT were replaced with the HIV-1 envelope gene via homologous recombination, resulting in the recombinant viruses, VG9-E and VTT-E. The biology, virulence, humoral and cellular immunological responses of VG9-E and VTT-E were evaluated. Our results indicated no obvious difference in range of host cells and diffusion between two recombinant viruses. Neurovirulence for VG9-E in weanling and suckling mice, and skin virulence in rabbits, were lower than that of VTT-E. The humoral immune responses, including binding antibody and neutralizing antibody responses, induced by VG9-E were not significantly different from those for VTT-E whilst IFN-γ response which represented cellular immune response induced by VG9-E was significantly higher than that did by VTT-E. Our results indicated that VG9-E was less virulent, yet induced higher cellular immune response than VTT-E. Therefore, it could be an ideal replicating vaccinia vector for HIV vaccine research and development.

  18. Veterinary vaccine nanotechnology: pulmonary and nasal delivery in livestock animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Nieva, Daniella; Goonewardene, Kalhari Bandara; Gomis, Susantha; Foldvari, Marianna

    2017-08-01

    Veterinary vaccine development has several similarities with human vaccine development to improve the overall health and well-being of species. However, veterinary goals lean more toward feasible large-scale administration methods and low cost to high benefit immunization. Since the respiratory mucosa is easily accessible and most infectious agents begin their infection cycle at the mucosa, immunization through the respiratory route has been a highly attractive vaccine delivery strategy against infectious diseases. Additionally, vaccines administered via the respiratory mucosa could lower costs by removing the need of trained medical personnel, and lowering doses yet achieving similar or increased immune stimulation. The respiratory route often brings challenges in antigen delivery efficiency with enough potency to induce immunity. Nanoparticle (NP) technology has been shown to enhance immune activation by producing higher antibody titers and protection. Although specific mechanisms between NPs and biological membranes are still under investigation, physical parameters such as particle size and shape, as well as biological tissue distribution including mucociliary clearance influence the protection and delivery of antigens to the site of action and uptake by target cells. For respiratory delivery, various biomaterials such as mucoadhesive polymers, lipids, and polysaccharides have shown enhanced antibody production or protection in comparison to antigen alone. This review presents promising NPs administered via the nasal or pulmonary routes for veterinary applications specifically focusing on livestock animals including poultry.

  19. Thermostable Subunit Vaccines for Pulmonary Delivery: How Close Are We?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    -administrable, can be distributed independently of functioning freezers and refrigerators, and can be designed to induce mucosal and/or cell-mediated immunity, which is attractive for a number of diseases requiring stimulation of local mucosal immunity for protection. However, the design and delivery of thermostable...... dry powder-based vaccines represents a technological challenge: It calls for careful formulation and dosage form design, combined with cheap and efficient delivery devices, which must be engineered via a thorough understanding of the physiological barrier and the requirements for induction of mucosal...... immunity. Here, I review state of the art and perspectives in formulation design and processing methods for powder-based subunit vaccines intended for pulmonary administration, and present dry powder inhaler technologies suitable for translating these vaccines into clinical trials....

  20. Virus-Like Particles Derived from HIV-1 for Delivery of Nuclear Proteins: Improvement of Production and Activity by Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Marc-André; Lytvyn, Viktoria; Deforet, Francis; Gilbert, Rénald; Gaillet, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from retroviruses and lentiviruses can be used to deliver recombinant proteins without the fear of causing insertional mutagenesis to the host cell genome. In this study we evaluate the potential of an inducible lentiviral vector packaging cell line for VLP production. The Gag gene from HIV-1 was fused to a gene encoding a selected protein and it was transfected into the packaging cells. Three proteins served as model: the green fluorescent protein and two transcription factors-the cumate transactivator (cTA) of the inducible CR5 promoter and the human Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4). The sizes of the VLPs were 120-150 nm in diameter and they were resistant to freeze/thaw cycles. Protein delivery by the VLPs reached up to 100% efficacy in human cells and was well tolerated. Gag-cTA triggered up to 1100-fold gene activation of the reporter gene in comparison to the negative control. Protein engineering was required to detect Gag-KLF4 activity. Thus, insertion of the VP16 transactivation domain increased the activity of the VLPs by eightfold. An additional 2.4-fold enhancement was obtained by inserting nuclear export signal. In conclusion, our platform produced VLPs capable of efficient protein transfer, and it was shown that protein engineering can be used to improve the activity of the delivered proteins as well as VLP production.

  1. Induction of Multifunctional Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific T Cells Capable of Proliferation in Healthy Subjects by Using a Prime-Boost Regimen of DNA- and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara-Vectored Vaccines Expressing HIV-1 Gag Coupled to CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonetilleke, Nilu; Moore, Stephen; Dally, Len; Winstone, Nicola; Cebere, Inese; Mahmoud, Abdul; Pinheiro, Susana; Gillespie, Geraldine; Brown, Denise; Loach, Vanessa; Roberts, Joanna; Guimaraes-Walker, Ana; Hayes, Peter; Loughran, Kelley; Smith, Carole; De Bont, Jan; Verlinde, Carl; Vooijs, Danii; Schmidt, Claudia; Boaz, Mark; Gilmour, Jill; Fast, Pat; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomas; McMichael, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    A double-blind randomized phase I trial was conducted in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-negative subjects receiving vaccines vectored by plasmid DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 p24/p17 gag linked to a string of CD8+ T-cell epitopes. The trial had two groups. One group received either two doses of MVA.HIVA (2× MVA.HIVA) (n = 8) or two doses of placebo (2× placebo) (n = 4). The second group received 2× pTHr.HIVA followed by one dose of MVA.HIVA (n = 8) or 3× placebo (n = 4). In the pTHr.HIVA-MVA.HIVA group, HIV-1-specific T-cell responses peaked 1 week after MVA.HIVA vaccination in both ex vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISPOT (group mean, 210 spot-forming cells/106 cells) and proliferation (group mean stimulation index, 37), with assays detecting positive responses in four out of eight and five out of eight subjects, respectively. No HIV-1-specific T-cell responses were detected in either assay in the 2× MVA.HIVA group or subjects receiving placebo. Using a highly sensitive and reproducible cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assay, positive responses mainly mediated by CD4+ T cells were detected in eight out of eight vaccinees in the pTHr.HIVA-MVA.HIVA group and four out of eight vaccinees in the 2× MVA.HIVA group. Importantly, no false-positive responses were detected in the eight subjects receiving placebo. Of the 12 responders, 11 developed responses to previously identified immunodominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes, with 6 volunteers having responses to more than one epitope. Five out of 12 responders also developed CD8+ T-cell responses to the epitope string. Induced T cells produced a variety of anti-viral cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β. These data demonstrate that prime-boost vaccination with recombinant DNA and MVA vectors can induce multifunctional HIV-1-specific T cells in the majority of vaccinees. PMID:16641265

  2. Recent advancement of gelatin nanoparticles in drug and vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Nityananda; Sahoo, Ranjan Ku; Biswas, Nikhil; Guha, Arijit; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2015-11-01

    Novel drug delivery system using nanoscale materials with a broad spectrum of applications provides a new therapeutic foundation for technological integration and innovation. Nanoparticles are suitable drug carrier for various routes of administration as well as rapid recognition by the immune system. Gelatin, the biological macromolecule is a versatile drug/vaccine delivery carrier in pharmaceutical field due to its biodegradable, biocompatible, non-antigenicity and low cost with easy availability. The surface of gelatin nanoparticles can be modified with site-specific ligands, cationized with amine derivatives or, coated with polyethyl glycols to achieve targeted and sustained release drug delivery. Compared to other colloidal carriers, gelatin nanoparticles are better stable in biological fluids to provide the desired controlled and sustained release of entrapped drug molecules. The current review highlights the different formulation aspects of gelatin nanoparticles which affect the particle characteristics like zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficacy and drug release properties. It has also given emphasis on the major applications of gelatin nanoparticles in drug and vaccine delivery, gene delivery to target tissues and nutraceutical delivery for improving the poor bioavailabity of bioactive phytonutrients.

  3. Effect of prime-boost strategy of interval immunization with HIV-1 vaccine on the immune reponse%HIV-1疫苗prime-boost策略免疫间隔研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张舟; 齐智; 刘颖; 刘莹; 凌大伟; 康延申; 陈仙子; 张其程; 李勋

    2013-01-01

    目的 探索不同的DNA、重组痘苗病毒、蛋白疫苗免疫间隔在HIV-1疫苗prime-boost策略中对免疫效果的影响,为建立最佳免疫方案提供理论支持.方法 对小鼠进行3针DNA初免,之后分别间隔3周、6周、12周、16周免疫重组痘苗病毒VTKgpe;对小鼠或兔子进行3针DNA初免,间隔16周免疫VTKgpe,之后分别间隔4周或8周免疫gp140蛋白.末次免疫后2周检测HIV-1特异性体液或细胞免疫应答.结果 DNA初免-VTKgpe加强间隔16周效果最佳,诱导的HIV-1 Env特异性抗体滴度达到105,分泌IFN-γ的T细胞数为5 966.4/106细胞.DNA初免,间隔16周VTKgpe加强,之后间隔4周或8周gp140蛋白加强效果差异无统计学意义.结论 DNA疫苗初免,16周后VTKgpe加强,4周后gp140蛋白加强可诱导较高的免疫应答,同时更为适宜临床试验及商业化应用的需要.

  4. Parents' attitude toward multiple vaccinations at a single visit with alternative delivery methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Kleijne, Deborah E; Knol, Mirjam J; Harmsen, Irene A; Ophorst, Olga J A E; Rots, Nynke Y

    2014-01-01

    Last decades, the number of routine childhood vaccinations has increased considerably, which consequently has led to multiple vaccine injections per consultation. Implementation of additional vaccines will probably lead to more than 2 vaccine injections per consult, which might be a barrier for parents to vaccinate their child. A decrease in vaccination coverage, however, increases the risk of disease outbreaks. Less stressful alternative methods for vaccine delivery might lead to an increased acceptance of multiple childhood vaccinations by parents. The present questionnaire study was set up to explore the maximum number of vaccine injections per visit that is acceptable for parents, as well as to gauge parents' attitude toward alternative needle-free methods for vaccine delivery. For this purpose, the parents' opinion toward a jet injector, a patch, a microneedle system, and nasal spray device as methods for vaccine delivery was assessed. The majority of the 1154 participating parents indicated that 3 vaccine injections per visit was perceived as too much. Most participants had a positive attitude with respect to the jet injector and the patch as alternative vaccine delivery method, whereas the microneedle device and an intranasal spray device were not perceived as better than the conventional syringe by the parents. Parents indicated that both the jet injector and the patch might increase their acceptance of giving their children more than 2 vaccinations at the same time. This should encourage vaccine developers and manufacturers to put efforts in developing these delivery methods for their vaccines.

  5. Vaccine-Elicited Tier 2 HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Bind to Quaternary Epitopes Involving Glycan-Deficient Patches Proximal to the CD4 Binding Site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema T Crooks

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eliciting broad tier 2 neutralizing antibodies (nAbs is a major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research. Here we investigated the ability of native, membrane-expressed JR-FL Env trimers to elicit nAbs. Unusually potent nAb titers developed in 2 of 8 rabbits immunized with virus-like particles (VLPs expressing trimers (trimer VLP sera and in 1 of 20 rabbits immunized with DNA expressing native Env trimer, followed by a protein boost (DNA trimer sera. All 3 sera neutralized via quaternary epitopes and exploited natural gaps in the glycan defenses of the second conserved region of JR-FL gp120. Specifically, trimer VLP sera took advantage of the unusual absence of a glycan at residue 197 (present in 98.7% of Envs. Intriguingly, removing the N197 glycan (with no loss of tier 2 phenotype rendered 50% or 16.7% (n = 18 of clade B tier 2 isolates sensitive to the two trimer VLP sera, showing broad neutralization via the surface masked by the N197 glycan. Neutralizing sera targeted epitopes that overlap with the CD4 binding site, consistent with the role of the N197 glycan in a putative "glycan fence" that limits access to this region. A bioinformatics analysis suggested shared features of one of the trimer VLP sera and monoclonal antibody PG9, consistent with its trimer-dependency. The neutralizing DNA trimer serum took advantage of the absence of a glycan at residue 230, also proximal to the CD4 binding site and suggesting an epitope similar to that of monoclonal antibody 8ANC195, albeit lacking tier 2 breadth. Taken together, our data show for the first time that strain-specific holes in the glycan fence can allow the development of tier 2 neutralizing antibodies to native spikes. Moreover, cross-neutralization can occur in the absence of protecting glycan. Overall, our observations provide new insights that may inform the future development of a neutralizing antibody vaccine.

  6. HIV-1 Continues To Replicate and Evolve in Patients with Natural Control of HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Kearney, Mary; Wiegand, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms leading to the natural control of HIV-1 infection is of great importance for vaccine design and for understanding viral pathogenesis. Rare HIV-1-infected individuals, termed HIV-1 controllers, have plasma HIV-1 RNA levels below the limit of detection by standard clinical...

  7. An Outdated Notion of Antibody Specificity is One of the Major Detrimental Assumptions of the Structure-Based Reverse Vaccinology Paradigm, Which Prevented It from Helping to Develop an Effective HIV-1 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Regenmortel, Marc H V

    2014-01-01

    The importance of paradigms for guiding scientific research is explained with reference to the seminal work of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn. A prevalent paradigm, followed for more than a decade in HIV-1 vaccine research, which gave rise to the strategy known as structure-based reverse vaccinology is described in detail. Several reasons why this paradigm did not allow the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine are analyzed. A major reason is the belief shared by many vaccinologists that antibodies possess a narrow specificity for a single epitope and are not polyspecific for a diverse group of potential epitopes. When this belief is abandoned, it becomes obvious that the one particular epitope structure observed during the crystallographic analysis of a neutralizing antibody-antigen complex does not necessarily reveal, which immunogenic structure should be used to elicit the same type of neutralizing antibody. In the physical sciences, scientific explanations are usually presented as logical deductions derived from a relevant law of nature together with certain initial conditions. In immunology, causal explanations in terms of a single cause acting according to a law of nature are not possible because numerous factors always play a role in bringing about an effect. The implications of this state of affairs for the rational design of HIV vaccines are outlined. An alternative approach to obtain useful scientific understanding consists in intervening empirically in the immune system and it is suggested that manipulating the system experimentally is needed to learn to control it and achieve protective immunity by vaccination.

  8. Microneedle technologies for (trans)dermal drug and vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maaden, Koen; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke

    2012-07-20

    Microneedles have been used for the dermal and transdermal delivery of a broad range of drugs, such as small molecular weight drugs, oligonucleotides, DNA, peptides, proteins and inactivated viruses. However, until now there are no microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery systems on the market. In the past decade various types of microneedles have been developed by a number of production processes. Numerous geometries of microneedles have been designed from various materials. These microneedles have been used for different approaches of microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery. Following a brief introduction about dermal and transdermal drug delivery, this review describes different production methods for solid and hollow microneedles as well as conditions that influence skin penetration. Besides, the four microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery approaches are discussed: "poke and flow", "poke and patch", "poke and release", and "coat and poke". A separate section of this review is devoted to the use of microneedles for the delivery of therapeutic proteins and vaccines. Finally, we give our view on research and development that is needed to render microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery technologies clinically useful in the near future.

  9. Long-term survival after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) among homosexual men in hepatitis B vaccine trial cohorts in Amsterdam, New York City, and San Francisco, 1978-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblin, B A; van Benthem, B H; Buchbinder, S P; Ren, L; Vittinghoff, E; Stevens, C E; Coutinho, R A; van Griensven, G J

    1999-11-15

    Information on long-term survival after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is limited. In hepatitis B vaccine trials in Amsterdam, New York City, and San Francisco, 362 gay men were followed up to 18 years (1978-1995). The median survival time from seroconversion was 12.1 years (95% confidence interval: 11.4, 12.9). The annual risk of dying increased at a constant rate until 8 years after seroconversion and then leveled off, suggesting a group that is relatively resistant to progression. These data provide a picture of the natural history of HIV-1 infection, especially in the era prior to widespread use of highly effective treatments.

  10. Monodisperse, Uniformly-Shaped Particles for Controlled Respiratory Vaccine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromen, Catherine Ann

    The majority of the world's most infectious diseases occur at the air-tissue interface called the mucosa, including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, measles, and bacterial or viral gut and respiratory infections. Despite this, vaccines have generally been developed for the systemic immune system and fail to provide protection at the mucosal site. Vaccine delivery directly to the lung mucosa could provide superior lung protection for many infectious diseases, such as TB or influenza, as well as systemic and therapeutic vaccines for diseases such as Dengue fever, asthma, or cancer. Specifically, precision engineered biomaterials are believed to offer tremendous opportunities for a new generation of vaccines. The goal of this approach is to leverage naturally occurring processes of the immune system to produce memory responses capable of rapidly destroy virulent pathogens without harmful exposure. Considerable knowledge of biomaterial properties and their interaction with the immune system of the lung is required for successful translation. The overall goal of this work was to fabricate and characterize nano- and microparticles using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) fabrication technique and optimize them as pulmonary vaccine carriers. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  11. Breast milk transmission of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduati, R; John, G

    1995-12-01

    Breast milk provides infants and children immunologic, nutritional, and child spacing benefits. Yet it also transmits some viruses, for example, HIV-1. The World Health Organization recommends that, in conditions with poor access to breast milk substitutes, HIV-positive women should still breast feed due to the nutritional and infectious risk of artificial feeding. It appears that breast fed infants experience a slower progression of AIDS and death. Vertical transmission of HIV-1 may occur during pregnancy, at delivery, or through breast milk. The HIV-1 transmission rate via breast milk from acutely infected women is estimated to be 29-36%. A meta-analysis of case reports and small case series of women with chronic HIV-1 infection indicated a breast feeding transmission rate of 14%. Studies suggest that the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk increases as duration of breast feeding increases. Infants with detectable HIV-1 DNA tend to have mothers whose absolute CD4 counts are less than 400 and have severe vitamin A deficiency. Breast milk has HIV-1 specific immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM). It appears that HIV-1 elicits a local immune response. Breast milk of HIV-1 positive mothers with non-infected children tends to still have IgM and IgA until 18 months. Potential risk factors for breast milk transmission of HIV-1 include cracked nipples and mastitis in the mother; oral thrush, malnutrition, inflammation of the lips, and mucosal compromise in the infant; and vigorous suction of the neonate and use of the wrong equipment for suctioning. Inhibiting factors of HIV-1 in breast milk are bovine and human lactoferrin and a membrane associated protein that attaches to the CD4 receptor and thus prevents attachment of the HIV antigen gp120 to the CD4 receptor on T-cells.

  12. Identifying HIV-1 dual infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelissen Marion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is no exception to the phenomenon that a second, productive infection with another strain of the same virus is feasible. Experiments with RNA viruses have suggested that both coinfections (simultaneous infection with two strains of a virus and superinfections (second infection after a specific immune response to the first infecting strain has developed can result in increased fitness of the viral population. Concerns about dual infections with HIV are increasing. First, the frequent detection of superinfections seems to indicate that it will be difficult to develop a prophylactic vaccine. Second, HIV-1 superinfections have been associated with accelerated disease progression, although this is not true for all persons. In fact, superinfections have even been detected in persons controlling their HIV infections without antiretroviral therapy. Third, dual infections can give rise to recombinant viruses, which are increasingly found in the HIV-1 epidemic. Recombinants could have increased fitness over the parental strains, as in vitro models suggest, and could exhibit increased pathogenicity. Multiple drug resistant (MDR strains could recombine to produce a pan-resistant, transmittable virus. We will describe in this review what is presently known about super- and re-infection among ambient viral infections, as well as the first cases of HIV-1 superinfection, including HIV-1 triple infections. The clinical implications, the impact of the immune system, and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy will be covered, as will as the timing of HIV superinfection. The methods used to detect HIV-1 dual infections will be discussed in detail. To increase the likelihood of detecting a dual HIV-1 infection, pre-selection of patients can be done by serotyping, heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA, counting the degenerate base codes in the HIV-1 genotyping sequence, or surveying unexpected increases in the

  13. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Sanders, Rogier W

    2016-01-01

    The long pursuit for a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has recently been boosted by a number of exciting developments. An HIV-1 subunit vaccine ideally should elicit potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), but raising bNAbs by vaccination has proved extremely difficult because of the characteristics of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). However, the isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected patients demonstrates that the human humoral immune system is capable of making such antibodies. Therefore, a focus of HIV-1 vaccinology is the elicitation of bNAbs by engineered immunogens and by using vaccination strategies aimed at mimicking the bNAb maturation pathways in HIV-infected patients. Important clues can also be taken from the successful subunit vaccines against hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus. Here, we review the different types of HIV-1 immunogens and vaccination strategies that are being explored in the search for an HIV-1 vaccine that induces bNAbs.

  14. Stabilization of influenza vaccine enhances protection by microneedle delivery in the mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Shi Quan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simple and effective vaccine administration is particularly important for annually recommended influenza vaccination. We hypothesized that vaccine delivery to the skin using a patch containing vaccine-coated microneedles could be an attractive approach to improve influenza vaccination compliance and efficacy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Solid microneedle arrays coated with inactivated influenza vaccine were prepared for simple vaccine delivery to the skin. However, the stability of the influenza vaccine, as measured by hemagglutination activity, was found to be significantly damaged during microneedle coating. The addition of trehalose to the microneedle coating formulation retained hemagglutination activity, indicating stabilization of the coated influenza vaccine. For both intramuscular and microneedle skin immunization, delivery of un-stabilized vaccine yielded weaker protective immune responses including viral neutralizing antibodies, protective efficacies, and recall immune responses to influenza virus. Immunization using un-stabilized vaccine also shifted the pattern of antibody isotypes compared to the stabilized vaccine. Importantly, a single microneedle-based vaccination using stabilized influenza vaccine was found to be superior to intramuscular immunization in controlling virus replication as well as in inducing rapid recall immune responses post challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The functional integrity of hemagglutinin is associated with inducing improved protective immunity against influenza. Simple microneedle influenza vaccination in the skin produced superior protection compared to conventional intramuscular immunization. This approach is likely to be applicable to other vaccines too.

  15. Hydrogel nanoparticles and nanocomposites for nasal drug/vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatin, Sara; Barar, Jaleh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Adibkia, Khosro; Milani, Mitra Alami; Jelvehgari, Mitra

    2016-09-01

    Over the past few years, nasal drug delivery has attracted more and more attentions, and been recognized as the most promising alternative route for the systemic medication of drugs limited to intravenous administration. Many experiments in animal models have shown that nanoscale carriers have the ability to enhance the nasal delivery of peptide/protein drugs and vaccines compared to the conventional drug solution formulations. However, the rapid mucociliary clearance of the drug-loaded nanoparticles can cause a reduction in bioavailability percentage after intranasal administration. Thus, research efforts have considerably been directed towards the development of hydrogel nanosystems which have mucoadhesive properties in order to maximize the residence time, and hence increase the period of contact with the nasal mucosa and enhance the drug absorption. It is most certain that the high viscosity of hydrogel-based nanosystems can efficiently offer this mucoadhesive property. This update review discusses the possible benefits of using hydrogel polymer-based nanoparticles and hydrogel nanocomposites for drug/vaccine delivery through the intranasal administration.

  16. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  17. Percutaneous Vaccination as an Effective Method of Delivery of MVA and MVA-Vectored Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available The robustness of immune responses to an antigen could be dictated by the route of vaccine inoculation. Traditional smallpox vaccines, essentially vaccinia virus strains, that were used in the eradication of smallpox were administered by percutaneous inoculation (skin scarification. The modified vaccinia virus Ankara is licensed as a smallpox vaccine in Europe and Canada and currently undergoing clinical development in the United States. MVA is also being investigated as a vector for the delivery of heterologous genes for prophylactic or therapeutic immunization. Since MVA is replication-deficient, MVA and MVA-vectored vaccines are often inoculated through the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes. Vaccine inoculation via the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes requires the use of injection needles, and an estimated 10 to 20% of the population of the United States has needle phobia. Following an observation in our laboratory that a replication-deficient recombinant vaccinia virus derived from the New York City Board of Health strain elicited protective immune responses in a mouse model upon inoculation by tail scarification, we investigated whether MVA and MVA recombinants can elicit protective responses following percutaneous administration in mouse models. Our data suggest that MVA administered by percutaneous inoculation, elicited vaccinia-specific antibody responses, and protected mice from lethal vaccinia virus challenge, at levels comparable to or better than subcutaneous or intramuscular inoculation. High titers of specific neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice inoculated with a recombinant MVA expressing the herpes simplex type 2 glycoprotein D after scarification. Similarly, a recombinant MVA expressing the hemagglutinin of attenuated influenza virus rgA/Viet Nam/1203/2004 (H5N1 elicited protective immune responses when administered at low doses by scarification. Taken together, our data suggest that

  18. 中国HIV-1 CRF01_AE流行株结构基因和调节/辅助基因DNA疫苗的构建和免疫原性研究%Immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding structural proteins and regulatory/accessory proteins derived from an HIV-1 CRF01_AE isolate circulating in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁松华; 徐建青; 万延民; 仇超; 张聪优; 黄杨; 乔勇; 叶芮琪; 邱趁丽; 张晓燕

    2010-01-01

    目的 构建表达gag-env融合基因和tat-rev-integrase(c-holf)-vif-nef融合基因的DNA疫苗,并评价其免疫原性.方法 按人源密码子使用频率对AE2f株的gag、env、tat、rev、integrase、vif和nef基因序列进行优化,构建真核表达质粒.用Western blot法验证体外表达情况;用ELISPOT法检测小鼠的细胞免疫反应.结果 限制性酶切及DNA测序结果表明两个融合基因质粒构建正确,可以表达相应的融合蛋白.ELISPOT结果显示,Gag-Env特异性的T细胞反应强度为(3010±566)SFC/10~6脾细胞;Tat-Rev-Integrase(C-half)-Vif-Nef融合蛋白特异性的T细胞反应为(948±737)SFC/10~6脾细胞,均显著高于空载体组.结论 构建的表达HIV-1 CRF01_AE流行株gag-env融合基因和tat-rev-integrase(c-half)-vif-nef融合基因的DNA疫苗可以正确表达所编码的融合蛋白并有效地激活机体的T细胞免疫反应.%Objective To construct two DNA vaccines encoding Gag-Env fusion protein and Tat-Rev-Integrase(C-half)-Vif-Nef fusion protein derived from the first HIV-1 CRF01_AE isolate(AE2f) in Chi-na and to evaluate the immunogenicity in mice. Methods Two DNA vaccines were constructed by inserting the codon optimized and synthesized gag-env fusion gene and tat-rev-integrase(c-half)-vif-nef fusion gene de-rived from AE2f into mammalian expression vector pDRVISV1. 0, the generated DNA vaccines were desig-nated as pSVAE/GE and pSVAE/TRIVN, respectively, and their in vitro expression were determined by Western blot with transfected 293T cells. Mice were i. m. immunized with either pDRVI1.0 as mock control, pSVAE/GE or pSYAE/TRIVN for 4 times at two-week interval. Two weeks following the final im-munization, cellular responses to pool of HIV-1 Env, Gag, Tat, Rev, Intergrase, Vif and Nef peptides were evaluated by ELISPOT assay. Results The construction of DNA vaccine pSVAE/GE and pSVAE/TRIVN was validated by restriction enzyme digestion and bidirectional sequencing. Western blot showed a

  19. Squalene Emulsions for Parenteral Vaccine and Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Fox

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Squalene is a linear triterpene that is extensively utilized as a principal component of parenteral emulsions for drug and vaccine delivery. In this review, the chemical structure and sources of squalene are presented. Moreover, the physicochemical and biological properties of squalene-containing emulsions are evaluated in the context of parenteral formulations. Historical and current parenteral emulsion products containing squalene or squalane are discussed. The safety of squalene-based products is also addressed. Finally, analytica techniques for characterization of squalene emulsions are examined.

  20. Development of dengue virus replicons expressing HIV-1 gp120 and other heterologous genes: a potential future tool for dual vaccination against dengue virus and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayton Andrew I

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toward the goals of providing an additional vector to add to the armamentarium available to HIV vaccinologists and of creating a bivalent vaccine effective against dengue virus and HIV, we have attempted to create vectors which express dengue virus non-structural proteins and HIV immunogens. Previously we reported the successful construction of dengue virus replicons which lack structural genes necessary for virion release and spreading infection in culture but which can replicate intracellularly and abundantly produce dengue non-structural proteins. Here we attempted to express heterologous genetic material from these replicons. Results We cloned into a Δpre-M/E dengue virus replicon genes for either green fluorescent protein (GFP, HIV gp160 or HIV gp120 and tested the ability of these constructs to express dengue virus proteins as well as the heterologous proteins in tissue culture after transfection of replicon RNA. Conclusions Heterologous proteins were readily expressed from these constructs. GFP and gp120 demonstrated minimal or no toxicity. Gp160 expressing replicons were found to express proteins abundantly at 36 hours post transfection, but after 50 hrs of transfection, few replicon positive cells could be found despite the presence of cellular debris positive for replicon proteins. This suggested that gp160 expressed from dengue virus replicons is considerably more toxic than either GFP or gp120. The successful expression of heterologous proteins, including HIV gp120 for long periods in culture suggests this vector system may be useful as a vaccine vector, given appropriate delivery methods.

  1. Antibody function in neutralization and protection against HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessell, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to induce neutralizing antibodies is generally thought to be of great importance for vaccine efficacy. In HIV-1 research this quality has been elusive as the HIV-1 virus has evolved multiple mechanisms to evade neutralizing antibodies. This thesis traces studies with four broadly neutral

  2. Increased, Durable B-Cell and ADCC Responses Associated with T-Helper Cell Responses to HIV-1 Envelope in Macaques Vaccinated with gp140 Occluded at the CD4 Receptor Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogers, Willy M J M; Barnett, Susan W; Oostermeijer, Herman; Nieuwenhuis, Ivonne G; Beenhakker, Niels; Mortier, Daniella; Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Remarque, Edmund; Martin, Gregoire; Lai, Rachel Pei-Jen; Dey, Antu K; Sun, Yide; Burke, Brian; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David; Martin, Loic; Davis, David; Srivastava, Indresh; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2017-10-01

    Strategies are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HIV-1 envelope (Env) antigens (Ag) for more long-lived, efficacious HIV-1 vaccine-induced B-cell responses. HIV-1 Env gp140 (native or uncleaved molecules) or gp120 monomeric proteins elicit relatively poor B-cell responses which are short-lived. We hypothesized that Env engagement of the CD4 receptor on T-helper cells results in anergic effects on T-cell recruitment and consequently a lack of strong, robust, and durable B-memory responses. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp140 by stable cross-linking with a 3-kDa CD4 miniprotein mimetic, serving to block ligation of gp140 on CD4(+) T cells while preserving CD4-inducible (CDi) neutralizing epitopes targeted by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effector responses. Importantly, immunization of rhesus macaques consistently gave superior B-cell (P T-helper enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays of the CD4bs-occluded group increased earlier (P = 0.025) during the inductive phase. Importantly, CD4bs-occluded gp140 antigen induced superior B-cell and ADCC responses, and the elevated B-cell responses proved to be remarkably durable, lasting more than 60 weeks postimmunization.IMPORTANCE Attempts to develop HIV vaccines capable of inducing potent and durable B-cell responses have been unsuccessful until now. Antigen-specific B-cell development and affinity maturation occurs in germinal centers in lymphoid follicles through a critical interaction between B cells and T follicular helper cells. The HIV envelope binds the CD4 receptor on T cells as soluble shed antigen or as antigen-antibody complexes, causing impairment in the activation of these specialized CD4-positive T cells. We proposed that CD4-binding impairment is partly responsible for the relatively poor B-cell responses to HIV envelope-based vaccines. To test this hypothesis, we blocked the CD4 binding site of the envelope antigen and compared it to

  3. An outdated notion of antibody specificity is one of the major detrimental assumptions of the structure-based reverse vaccinology paradigm which prevented it from helping to develop an effective HIV-1 vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc H V Van Regenmortel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of paradigms for guiding scientific research is explained with reference to the seminal work of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn. A prevalent paradigm, followed for more than a decade in HIV-1 vaccine research, which gave rise to the strategy known as structure-based reverse vaccinology is described in detail. Several reasons why this paradigm did not allow the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine are analyzed. A major reason is the belief shared by many vaccinologists that antibodies possess a narrow specificity for a single epitope and are not polyspecific for a diverse group of potential epitopes. When this belief is abandoned, it becomes obvious that the one particular epitope structure observed during the crystallographic analysis of a neutralizing antibody-antigen complex does not necessarily reveal which immunogenic structure should be used to elicit the same type of neutralizing antibody.In the physical sciences, scientific explanations are usually presented as logical deductions derived from a relevant law of nature together with certain initial conditions. In immunology, causal explanations in terms of a single cause acting according to a law of nature are not possible because numerous factors always play a role in bringing about an effect. The implications of this state of affairs for the rational design of HIV vaccines are outlined. An alternative approach to obtain useful scientific understanding consists in intervening empirically in the immune system and it is suggested that manipulating the system experimentally is needed to learn to control it and achieve protective immunity by vaccination.

  4. Characterization of powdered epidermal vaccine delivery with multiphoton microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, William J [PowderJect Centre for Gene and Drug delivery Research, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford OX2 6PE (United Kingdom); Kendall, Mark A F [PowderJect Centre for Gene and Drug delivery Research, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford OX2 6PE (United Kingdom); White, Nick [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE (United Kingdom); Bellhouse, Brian J [PowderJect Centre for Gene and Drug delivery Research, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford OX2 6PE (United Kingdom)

    2004-11-21

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) has been adapted to non-invasively characterize hand-held powdered epidermal vaccine delivery technology. A near infrared femtosecond pulsed laser, wavelength at approximately 920 nm, was used to evoke autofluorescence of endogenous fluorophores within ex vivo porcine and human skin. Consequently, sub cellular resolution three-dimensional images of stratum corneum and viable epidermal cells were acquired and utilized to observe the morphological deformation of these cells as a result of micro-particle penetration. Furthermore, the distributional pattern of micro-particles within the specific skin target volume was quantified by measuring the penetration depth as revealed by serial optical sections in the axial plane obtained with MPLSM. Additionally, endogenous fluorescence contrast images acquired at the supra-basal layer reveal cellular structures that may pertain to dendritic Langerhans cells of the epidermis. These results show that MPLSM has advantages over conventional histological approaches, since three-dimensional functional images with sub-cellular spatial resolution to depths beyond the epidermis can be acquired non-invasively. Accordingly, we propose that MPLSM is ideal for investigations of powdered epidermal vaccine delivery.

  5. HIV-1 CRF07_BC毒株gp41重组DNA-蛋白疫苗的制备及免疫%Preparation and application of HIV-1 CRF07_BC recombinant gp41 DNA-protein vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王妮丹; 罗振武; 孙红岩; 何彦平; 邵一鸣; 郝彦玲

    2014-01-01

    目的 制备中国HIV-1流行株CRF07_BC膜蛋白gp41重组DNA-蛋白疫苗,并观察其在BALB/c小鼠中的免疫效果.方法 从CRF07_BC毒株(CN54)中扩增gp41胞外段,删除抗原决定环loop区(the immune dominant loop region),引入T569A和I675V两个突变位点,制备含N-端七价重复序列(N-terminal heptad repeat,NHR)、C-端七价 重复序列(C-terminal heptad repeat,CHR)和近膜区(membrane proximal external region,MPER)的重组疫苗,以未改造的gp41相应区域为对照免疫原.使用DNA疫苗初免-蛋白疫苗加强的方式免疫BALB/c小鼠,最后一针免疫后4周,经小鼠眼眶采血,分离血清,检测结合抗体水平、中和抗体水平、线性表位抗体水平.结果 CN54 gp41野生型及改造型重组DNA疫苗质粒和原核蛋白表达质粒经双酶切及测序鉴定均构建正确;CN54 gp41W和CN54 gp41M表达蛋白相对分子质量约在12 000 ~ 15 000之间,纯化的重组蛋白可被豚鼠抗gp140阳性血清识别.CN54M组(CN54 gp41改造抗原组)诱导出较高的结合抗体水平,而线性表位抗体水平明显低于CN54W组(CN54 gp41未改造组),两组均未检测出具有保护性的中和抗体水平.结论 CN54 gp41改造抗原经DNA疫苗初免-蛋白疫苗加强免疫小鼠,可产生较高的结合抗体,且主要是针对空间构象表位,但不具有中和能力.

  6. Self-Amplifying Replicon RNA Vaccine Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Synthetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C. McCullough

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play essential roles determining efficacy of vaccine delivery with respect to immune defence development and regulation. This renders DCs important targets for vaccine delivery, particularly RNA vaccines. While delivery of interfering RNA oligonucleotides to the appropriate intracellular sites for RNA-interference has proven successful, the methodologies are identical for RNA vaccines, which require delivery to RNA translation sites. Delivery of mRNA has benefitted from application of cationic entities; these offer value following endocytosis of RNA, when cationic or amphipathic properties can promote endocytic vesicle membrane perturbation to facilitate cytosolic translocation. The present review presents how such advances are being applied to the delivery of a new form of RNA vaccine, replicons (RepRNA carrying inserted foreign genes of interest encoding vaccine antigens. Approaches have been developed for delivery to DCs, leading to the translation of the RepRNA and encoded vaccine antigens both in vitro and in vivo. Potential mechanisms favouring efficient delivery leading to translation are discussed with respect to the DC endocytic machinery, showing the importance of cytosolic translocation from acidifying endocytic structures. The review relates the DC endocytic pathways to immune response induction, and the potential advantages for these self-replicating RNA vaccines in the near future.

  7. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-12-13

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia (Niloticus oreochromis) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy.

  8. An Overview of Vaccination Strategies and Antigen Delivery Systems for Streptococcus agalactiae Vaccines in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Paul, Joydeb; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an emerging infectious disease adversely affecting Nile tilapia (Niloticus oreochromis) production in aquaculture. Research carried out in the last decade has focused on developing protective vaccines using different strategies, although no review has been carried out to evaluate the efficacy of these strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide a synopsis of vaccination strategies and antigen delivery systems currently used for S. agalactiae vaccines in tilapia. Furthermore, as shown herein, current vaccine designs include the use of replicative antigen delivery systems, such as attenuated virulent strains, heterologous vectors and DNA vaccines, while non-replicative vaccines include the inactivated whole cell (IWC) and subunit vaccines encoding different S. agalactiae immunogenic proteins. Intraperitoneal vaccination is the most widely used immunization strategy, although immersion, spray and oral vaccines have also been tried with variable success. Vaccine efficacy is mostly evaluated by use of the intraperitoneal challenge model aimed at evaluating the relative percent survival (RPS) of vaccinated fish. The major limitation with this approach is that it lacks the ability to elucidate the mechanism of vaccine protection at portals of bacterial entry in mucosal organs and prevention of pathology in target organs. Despite this, indications are that the correlates of vaccine protection can be established based on antibody responses and antigen dose, although these parameters require optimization before they can become an integral part of routine vaccine production. Nevertheless, this review shows that different approaches can be used to produce protective vaccines against S. agalactiae in tilapia although there is a need to optimize the measures of vaccine efficacy. PMID:27983591

  9. Ternary particles for effective vaccine delivery to the pulmonary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Treniece La'shay

    Progress in the fields of molecular biology and genomics has provided great insight into the pathogenesis of disease and the defense mechanisms of the immune system. This knowledge has lead to the classification of an array of abnormal genes, for which, treatment relies on cellular expression of proteins. The utility of DNA-based vaccines hold great promise for the treatment of genetically based and infectious diseases, which ranges from hemophilia, cystic fibrosis, and HIV. Synthetic delivery systems consisting of cationic polymers, such as polyethylenimine (PEI), are capable of condensing DNA into compact structures, maximizing cellular uptake of DNA and yielding high levels of protein expression. To date, short term expression is a major obstacle in the development of gene therapies and has halted their expansion in clinical applications. This study intends to develop a sustained release vaccine delivery system using PLA-PEG block copolymers encapsulating PEI:DNA polyplexes. To enhance the effectiveness of such DNA-based vaccines, resident antigen presenting cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, will be targeted within the alveoli regions of the lungs. Porous microspheres will be engineered with aerodynamic properties capable of achieving deep lung deposition. A fabrication technique using concentric nozzles will be developed to produce porous microspheres. It was observed that modifications in the dispersed to continuous phase ratios have the largest influence on particle size distributions, release rates and encapsulation efficiency which ranged form 80--95% with fourteen days of release. Amphiphilic block copolymers were also used to fabricate porous microspheres. The confirmation of PEG within the biodegradable polymer backbone was found to have a tremendous impact on the microsphere morphology and encapsulation efficiency which varied from 50--90%. Porous microspheres were capable of providing sustained gene expression when tested in vitro using the

  10. Comparison of chitosan nanoparticles and chitosan hydrogels for vaccine delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Sarah; Saupe, Anne; McBurney, Warren

    2008-01-01

    In this work the potential of chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) and thermosensitive chitosan hydrogels as particulate and sustained release vaccine delivery systems was investigated. CNP and chitosan hydrogels were prepared, loaded with the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA) and characterised...... of the release of fluorescently-labelled OVA (FITC-OVA) from CNP and chitosan hydrogels in-vitro showed that approximately 50% of the total protein was released from CNP within a period of ten days; release of antigen from chitosan gel occurred in a more sustained manner, with ... released after 10 days. The slow release from gel formulations may be explained by the strong interactions of the protein with chitosan. While OVA-loaded CNP showed no significant immunogenicity, formulations of OVA in chitosan gel were able to stimulate both cell-mediated and humoral immunity in-vivo....

  11. Gene gun delivery systems for cancer vaccine approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindaram, Kandan; Yang, Ning Sun

    2009-01-01

    Gene-based immunization with transgenic DNA vectors expressing tumor-associated antigens (TAA), cytokines, or chemokines, alone or in combination, provides an attractive approach to increase the cytotoxic T cell immunity against various cancer diseases. With this consideration, particle-mediated or gene gun technology has been developed as a nonviral method for gene transfer into various mammalian tissues. It has been shown to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in both small and large experimental animals. A broad range of somatic cell types, including primary cultures and established cell lines, has been successfully transfected ex vivo or in vitro by gene gun technology, either as suspension or adherent cultures. Here, we show that protocols and techniques for use in gene gun-mediated transgene delivery system for skin vaccination against melanoma using tumor-associated antigen (TAA) human gpl00 and reporter gene assays as experimental systems.

  12. HIV-1 Gag-specific exosome-targeted T cell-based vaccine stimulates effector CTL responses leading to therapeutic and long-term immunity against Gag/HLA-A2-expressing B16 melanoma in transgenic HLA-A2 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-specific dendritic cell (DC vaccines have been applied to clinical trials that show only induction of some degree of immune responses, warranting the search of other more efficient vaccine strategies. Since HIV-1-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs have been found to recognize some HIV-1 structural protein Gag conserved and cross-strain epitopes, Gag has become one of the most attractive target candidates for HIV-1 vaccine development. In this study, we generated HIV-1 Gag-specific Gag-Texo vaccine by using ConA-stimulated polyclonal CD8+ T-cells with uptake of Gag-expressing adenoviral vector AdVGag-transfected DC (DCGag-released exosomes (EXOs, and assessed its stimulation of Gag-specific CD8+ CTL responses and antitumor immunity. We demonstrate that Gag-Texo and DCGag vaccines comparably stimulate Gag-specific effector CD8+ CTL responses. Gag-Texo-stimulated CTL responses result in protective immunity against Gag-expressing BL6-10Gag melanoma in 8/8 wild-type C57BL/6 mice. In addition, we show that Gag-Texo vaccine also induces CTL responses leading to protective and long-term immunity against Gag/HLA-A2-expressing BL6-10Gag/A2 melanoma in 8/8 and 2/8 transgenic HLA-A2 mice, respectively. The average number of lung tumor colonies in mice with 30-days post-immunization is only 23, which is significantly less than that (>300 in control ConA-T-immunized HLA-A2 mice. Furthermore, Gag-Texo vaccine also induces some degree of therapeutic immunity. The average number (50 and size (0.23 mm in diameter of lung tumor colonies in Gag-Texo-immunized HLA-A2 mice bearing 6-day-established lung BL6-10Gag/A2 melanoma metastasis are significantly less than the average number (>300 and size (1.02 mm in diameter in control ConA-T-immunized HLA-A2 mice. Taken together, HIV-1 Gag-Texo vaccine capable of stimulating Gag-specific CTL responses and therapeutic immunity may be useful as a new immunotherapeutic

  13. Complete epitopes for vaccine design derived from a crystal structure of the broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 8ANC195 in complex with an HIV-1 Env trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Leopold; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Deller, Marc C; Garces, Fernando; Sliepen, Kwinten; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-10-01

    The HIV-1 envelope gp160 glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120 and gp41 heterodimers that mediates cell entry and is the primary target of the humoral immune response. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV-1 have revealed multiple epitopes or sites of vulnerability, but mapping of most of these sites is incomplete owing to a paucity of structural information on the full epitope in the context of the Env trimer. Here, a crystal structure of the soluble BG505 SOSIP gp140 trimer at 4.6 Å resolution with the bNAbs 8ANC195 and PGT128 reveals additional interactions in comparison to previous antibody-gp120 structures. For 8ANC195, in addition to previously documented interactions with gp120, a substantial interface with gp41 is now elucidated that includes extensive interactions with the N637 glycan. Surprisingly, removal of the N637 glycan did not impact 8ANC195 affinity, suggesting that the antibody has evolved to accommodate this glycan without loss of binding energy. PGT128 indirectly affects the N262 glycan by a domino effect, in which PGT128 binds to the N301 glycan, which in turn interacts with and repositions the N262 glycan, thereby illustrating the important role of neighboring glycans on epitope conformation and stability. Comparisons with other Env trimer and gp120 structures support an induced conformation for glycan N262, suggesting that the glycan shield is allosterically modified upon PGT128 binding. These complete epitopes of two broadly neutralizing antibodies on the Env trimer can now be exploited for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  14. Closing the global immunization gap: delivery of lifesaving vaccines through innovation and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sachin N; Kamat, Deepak

    2014-07-01

    One of every 5 children does not receive basic vaccines because of concerns related to storage and delivery in resource limited countries. Transporting vaccines over long distances in extreme temperatures is a common challenge. Issues that involve production and formulation, delivery technologies, cold chain logistics, and safety factors need to be addressed to properly adapt vaccines to resource constrained settings. Current successful field interventions include United Nation Children's Fund cold boxes, which are used to store and distribute vaccine in disaster struck areas, and vaccine vial monitors, which allow health workers to gauge whether vaccine is still usable in areas with unreliable electricity and refrigeration. This review aims to provide a general overview of innovative approaches and technologies that positively affect vaccine coverage and save more lives. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2014. All rights reserved.

  15. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for effective delivery of malaria DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Deen, Fatin Nawwab; Ho, Jenny; Selomulya, Cordelia; Ma, Charles; Coppel, Ross

    2011-04-05

    Low efficiency is often observed in the delivery of DNA vaccines. The use of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) to deliver genes via magnetofection could improve transfection efficiency and target the vector to its desired locality. Here, magnetofection was used to enhance the delivery of a malaria DNA vaccine encoding Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein MSP1(19) (VR1020-PyMSP1(19)) that plays a critical role in Plasmodium immunity. The plasmid DNA (pDNA) containing membrane associated 19-kDa carboxyl-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (PyMSP1(19)) was conjugated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) polymer, with different molar ratio of PEI nitrogen to DNA phosphate. We reported the effects of SPIONs-PEI complexation pH values on the properties of the resulting particles, including their ability to condense DNA and the gene expression in vitro. By initially lowering the pH value of SPIONs-PEI complexes to 2.0, the size of the complexes decreased since PEI contained a large number of amino groups that became increasingly protonated under acidic condition, with the electrostatic repulsion inducing less aggregation. Further reaggregation was prevented when the pHs of the complexes were increased to 4.0 and 7.0, respectively, before DNA addition. SPIONs/PEI complexes at pH 4.0 showed better binding capability with PyMSP1(19) gene-containing pDNA than those at neutral pH, despite the negligible differences in the size and surface charge of the complexes. This study indicated that the ability to protect DNA molecules due to the structure of the polymer at acidic pH could help improve the transfection efficiency. The transfection efficiency of magnetic nanoparticle as carrier for malaria DNA vaccine in vitro into eukaryotic cells, as indicated via PyMSP1(19) expression, was significantly enhanced under the application of external magnetic field, while the cytotoxicity was comparable to the benchmark nonviral

  16. Safety and reactogenicity of canarypox ALVAC-HIV (vCP1521 and HIV-1 gp120 AIDSVAX B/E vaccination in an efficacy trial in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punnee Pitisuttithum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A prime-boost vaccination regimen with ALVAC-HIV (vCP1521 administered intramuscularly at 0, 4, 12, and 24 weeks and gp120 AIDSVAX B/E at 12 and 24 weeks demonstrated modest efficacy of 31.2% for prevention of HIV acquisition in HIV-uninfected adults participating in a community-based efficacy trial in Thailand. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Reactogenicity was recorded for 3 days following vaccination. Adverse events were monitored every 6 months for 3.5 years, during which pregnancy outcomes were recorded. Of the 16,402 volunteers, 69% of the participants reported an adverse event any time after the first dose. Only 32.9% experienced an AE within 30 days following any vaccination. Overall adverse event rates and attribution of relatedness did not differ between groups. The frequency of serious adverse events was similar in vaccine (14.3% and placebo (14.9% recipients (p = 0.33. None of the 160 deaths (85 in vaccine and 75 in placebo recipients, p = 0.43 was assessed as related to vaccine. The most common cause of death was trauma or traffic accident. Approximately 30% of female participants reported a pregnancy during the study. Abnormal pregnancy outcomes were experienced in 17.1% of vaccine and 14.6% (p = 0.13 of placebo recipients. When the conception occurred within 3 months (estimated of a vaccination, the majority of these abnormal outcomes were spontaneous or elective abortions among 22.2% and 15.3% of vaccine and placebo pregnant recipients, respectively (p = 0.08. Local reactions occurred in 88.0% of vaccine and 61.0% of placebo recipients (p<0.001 and were more frequent after ALVAC-HIV than AIDSVAX B/E vaccination. Systemic reactions were more frequent in vaccine than placebo recipients (77.2% vs. 59.8%, p<0.001. Local and systemic reactions were mostly mild to moderate, resolving within 3 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E vaccine regimen was found to be safe, well tolerated

  17. Vaccination Against Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in HIV-1-Infected Patients With Isolated Anti-HBV Core Antibody: The ANRS HB EP03 CISOVAC Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroth, Lionel; Launay, Odile; Michel, Marie-Louise; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Miailhes, Patrick; Ajana, Faiza; Chirouze, Catherine; Zucman, David; Wendling, Marie-Josee; Nazzal, Dani; Carrat, Fabrice; Rey, David; Binquet, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Although an isolated anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antibody (anti-HBc) serological profile is frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, data on HBV vaccination in these patients are scarce. A prospective multicenter study was conducted to assess the immunogenicity of HBV vaccination in 54 patients with an isolated anti-HBc profile and undetectable HIV load. They were vaccinated with 1 dose (20 µg) of recombinant HBV vaccine. Those with an anti-HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs) level of vaccination received 3 additional double doses (40 µg) at weeks 5, 9, and 24. At week 4, 25 patients (46%) were responders. Only the ratio of CD4(+) T cells to CD8(+) T cells was associated with this response in multivariate analysis (odds ratio for +0.1, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.63; P = .008). At week 28 and month 18, 58% of these patients (14 of 24) and 50% (10 of 20), respectively, maintained anti-HBs level of ≥10 mIU/mL.Among nonresponding patients at week 4, who received further vaccinations, 89% (24 of 27) and 81% (21 of 26) had an anti-HBs level of ≥10 mIU/mL at week 28 and month 18, respectively. The preS2-specific interferon γ T-cell response increased between week 0 and week 28 in patients who finally responded to reinforced vaccination (P = .03). All of the patients with an isolated anti-HBc profile who did not have an anti-HBs titer of >100 mIU/mL 4 weeks after a single recall dose of HBV vaccine should be further vaccinated with a reinforced triple double-dose scheme. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Xu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT. Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents.

  20. Vaccine-Induced Plasma IgA Specific for the C1 Region of the HIV-1 Envelope Blocks Binding and Effector Function of IgG

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    Bangkok 10400, Thailand; iArmed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok 10400, Thailand; jClinical Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University... Bangkok 10400, Thailand; kDepartment of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi 11000, Thailand; and lUS Military HIV Research Program...HIV-vaccine efficacy. J Infect Dis 196(11):1637–1644. 20. Nitayaphan S, et al.; Thai AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group (2004) Safety and immuno- genicity

  1. Assessment of HIV-1 entry inhibitors by MLV/HIV-1 pseudotyped vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaler Sonja

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine leukemia virus (MLV vector particles can be pseudotyped with a truncated variant of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope protein (Env and selectively target gene transfer to human cells expressing both CD4 and an appropriate co-receptor. Vector transduction mimics the HIV-1 entry process and is therefore a safe tool to study HIV-1 entry. Results Using FLY cells, which express the MLV gag and pol genes, we generated stable producer cell lines that express the HIV-1 envelope gene and a retroviral vector genome encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. The BH10 or 89.6 P HIV-1 Env was expressed from a bicistronic vector which allowed the rapid selection of stable cell lines. A codon-usage-optimized synthetic env gene permitted high, Rev-independent Env expression. Vectors generated by these producer cells displayed different sensitivity to entry inhibitors. Conclusion These data illustrate that MLV/HIV-1 vectors are a valuable screening system for entry inhibitors or neutralizing antisera generated by vaccines.

  2. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies for transdermal sustained delivery of drug and vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaoyun; Wei, Liangming; Wu, Fei; Wu, Zaozhan; Chen, Lizhu; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2013-01-01

    Microneedles were first conceptualized for drug delivery many decades ago, overcoming the shortages and preserving the advantages of hypodermic needle and conventional transdermal drug-delivery systems to some extent. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies have been used for transdermal sustained deliveries of different drugs and vaccines. This review describes microneedle geometry and the representative dissolving and biodegradable microneedle delivery methods via the skin, followed by the fabricating methods. Finally, this review puts forward some perspectives that require further investigation.

  3. Live RB51 vaccine lyophilized hydrogel formulations with increased shelf life for practical ballistic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballistic delivery capability is essential to delivering vaccines and other therapeutics effectively to both livestock and wildlife in many global scenarios. Here, lyophilized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-glycolide dimethacrylate crosslinked but degradable hydrogels were assessed as payload vehicles ...

  4. Biodegradable nanoparticles are excellent vehicle for site directed in-vivo delivery of drugs and vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahapatro, Anil; Singh, Dinesh K

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) are gaining increased attention for their ability to serve as a viable carrier for site specific delivery of vaccines, genes, drugs and other biomolecules in the body...

  5. Desarrollo de vacunas contra el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana tipo 1: Relevancia de la inmunidad celular contra subtipos Development of vaccines for HIV-1: Relevance of subtype-specific cellular immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Rodríguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Han pasado casi 30 años de la detección de los primeros casos de infección con HIV-1 y aún no se ha conseguido desarrollar una vacuna efectiva y segura. A pesar del impacto positivo sobre la pandemia que se ha conseguido gracias a los avances en la terapia antirretroviral (TARV, el HIV/sida sigue constituyendo un grave problema para la salud pública, especialmente en los países en desarrollo, donde es difícil el acceso al tratamiento. En el mundo, 33 millones de personas viven con el virus del sida, mientras que en la Argentina se calcula que habría unos 120 000 infectados. Uno de los desafíos para lograr una vacuna contra el HIV es la variabilidad viral. El grupo M, responsable de la pandemia, se encuentra dividido en 10 subtipos y varios sub-subtipos, además de las 48 formas recombinantes circulantes y más de cien formas recombinantes únicas. La epidemia de HIV en nuestro país es tan compleja como en el resto del mundo, con la co-circulación principalmente de virus pertenecientes al subtipo B y recombinantes BF (CRF12_BF y derivadas. A pesar de la cantidad de trabajos dedicados a la caracterización de la respuesta inmune y al desarrollo de vacunas, no queda claro cuál es el impacto de la variabilidad en la elección del antígeno. Trabajos realizados en nuestro laboratorio demuestran el papel que juega la inmunidad celular con respecto a las variantes recombinantes BF, tanto en humanos como en modelos animales. Estos resultados son de importancia en el desarrollo de futuras vacunas para nuestra región.It has been almost 30 years since the detection of the first HIV-1 cases and yet an effective and safe vaccine has not been developed. Although, advances in antiretroviral therapy (HAART have produced a major impact on the pandemic, and even though HIV/aids remains a major concern for developing countries, where access to therapy is limited. The last report from UNAIDS notified 33 million people living with HIV/aids, worldwide

  6. Cluster Randomized Trial of a Toolkit and Early Vaccine Delivery to Improve Childhood Influenza Vaccination Rates in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard K.; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Hannibal, Kristin; Moehling, Krissy K.; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Matambanadzo, Annamore; Troy, Judith; Allred, Norma J.; Gallik, Greg; Reis, Evelyn C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To increase childhood influenza vaccination rates using a toolkit and early vaccine delivery in a randomized cluster trial. Methods Twenty primary care practices treating children (range for n=536-8,183) were randomly assigned to Intervention and Control arms to test the effectiveness of an evidence-based practice improvement toolkit (4 Pillars Toolkit) and early vaccine supplies for use among disadvantaged children on influenza vaccination rates among children 6 months-18 years. Follow-up staff meetings and surveys were used to assess use and acceptability of the intervention strategies in the Intervention arm. Rates for the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 influenza seasons were compared. Two-level generalized linear mixed modeling was used to evaluate outcomes. Results Overall increases in influenza vaccination rates were significantly greater in the Intervention arm (7.9 percentage points) compared with the Control arm (4.4 percentage points; P58% did not significantly increase. In regression analyses, a child's likelihood of being vaccinated was significantly higher with: younger age, white race (Odds ratio [OR]=1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.23-1.34), having commercial insurance (OR=1.30; 95%CI=1.25-1.35), higher pre-intervention practice vaccination rate (OR=1.25; 95%CI=1.16-1.34), and being in the Intervention arm (OR=1.23; 95%CI=1.01-1.50). Early delivery of influenza vaccine was rated by Intervention practices as an effective strategy for raising rates. Conclusions Implementation of a multi-strategy toolkit and early vaccine supplies can significantly improve influenza vaccination rates among children in primary care practices but the effect may be less pronounced in practices with moderate to high existing vaccination rates. PMID:24793941

  7. HIV-1 infection in Zambian children impairs the development and avidity maturation of measles virus-specific immunoglobulin G after vaccination and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nitya; Moss, William J; Scott, Susana; Mugala, Nanthalile; Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Lilo, Kareem; Ryon, Judith J; Monze, Mwaka; Quinn, Thomas C; Cousens, Simon; Cutts, Felicity; Griffin, Diane E

    2009-10-01

    Endemic transmission of measles continues in many countries that have a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden. The effects that HIV infection has on immune responses to measles and to measles vaccine can impact measles elimination efforts. Assays to measure antibody include the enzyme immunoassay (EIA), which measures immunoglobulin G (IgG) to all measles virus (MV) proteins, and the plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assay, which measures antibody to the hemagglutinin and correlates with protection. Antibody avidity may affect neutralizing capacity. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected Zambian children were studied after measles vaccination (n=44) or MV infection (n=57). Laboratory or wild-type MV strains were used to infect Vero or Vero/signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) cells in PRN assays. IgG to MV was measured by EIA, and avidity was determined by ammonium thiocyanate dissociation. HIV infection impaired EIA IgG responses after vaccination and measles but not PRN responses measured using laboratory-adapted MV. Avidity was lower among HIV-infected children 3 months after vaccination and 1 and 3 months after measles. Neutralization of wild-type MV infection of Vero/SLAM cells correlated with IgG avidity. Lower antibody quality and quantity in HIV-infected children after measles vaccination raise challenges for assuring the long-term protection of these children. Antibody quality in children receiving antiretroviral therapy requires assessment.

  8. Controlling chitosan-based encapsulation for protein and vaccine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Smith, Sean G.; Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Kumar, Thallapuranam K.S.; Zaharoff, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan-based nano/microencapsulation is under increasing investigation for the delivery of drugs, biologics and vaccines. Despite widespread interest, the literature lacks a defined methodology to control chitosan particle size and drug/protein release kinetics. In this study, the effects of precipitation-coacervation formulation parameters on chitosan particle size, protein encapsulation efficiency and protein release were investigated. Chitosan particle sizes, which ranged from 300 nm to 3 μm, were influenced by chitosan concentration, chitosan molecular weight and addition rate of precipitant salt. The composition of precipitant salt played a significant role in particle formation with upper Hofmeister series salts containing strongly hydrated anions yielding particles with a low polydispersity index (PDI) while weaker anions resulted in aggregated particles with high PDIs. Sonication power had minimal effect on mean particle size, however, it significantly reduced polydispersity. Protein loading efficiencies in chitosan nano/microparticles, which ranged from 14.3% to 99.2%, was inversely related to the hydration strength of precipitant salts, protein molecular weight and directly related to the concentration and molecular weight of chitosan. Protein release rates increased with particle size and were generally inversely related to protein molecular weight. This study demonstrates that chitosan nano/microparticles with high protein loading efficiencies can be engineered with well-defined sizes and controllable release kinetics through manipulation of specific formulation parameters. PMID:24560459

  9. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by extracts derived from traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Xinming

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART is the current HIV/AIDS treatment modality. Despite the fact that HAART is very effective in suppressing HIV-1 replication and reducing the mortality of HIV/AIDS patients, it has become increasingly clear that HAART does not offer an ultimate cure to HIV/AIDS. The high cost of the HAART regimen has impeded its delivery to over 90% of the HIV/AIDS population in the world. This reality has urgently called for the need to develop inexpensive alternative anti-HIV/AIDS therapy. This need has further manifested by recent clinical trial failures in anti-HIV-1 vaccines and microbicides. In the current study, we characterized a panel of extracts of traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants for their activities against HIV-1 replication. Methods Crude and fractionated extracts were prepared from various parts of nine traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants in Hainan Island, China. These extracts were first screened for their anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity in human CD4+ Jurkat cells. Then, a single-round pseudotyped HIV-luciferase reporter virus system (HIV-Luc was used to identify potential anti-HIV mechanisms of these extracts. Results Two extracts, one from Euphorbiaceae, Trigonostema xyphophylloides (TXE and one from Dipterocarpaceae, Vatica astrotricha (VAD inhibited HIV-1 replication and syncytia formation in CD4+ Jurkat cells, and had little adverse effects on host cell proliferation and survival. TXE and VAD did not show any direct inhibitory effects on the HIV-1 RT enzymatic activity. Treatment of these two extracts during the infection significantly blocked infection of the reporter virus. However, pre-treatment of the reporter virus with the extracts and treatment of the extracts post-infection had little effects on the infectivity or gene expression of the reporter virus. Conclusion These results demonstrate that TXE and VAD inhibit HIV-1 replication likely by blocking

  10. Identification of effective subdominant anti-HIV-1 CD8+ T cells within entire post-infection and post-vaccination immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Hancock

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Defining the components of an HIV immunogen that could induce effective CD8+ T cell responses is critical to vaccine development. We addressed this question by investigating the viral targets of CD8+ T cells that potently inhibit HIV replication in vitro, as this is highly predictive of virus control in vivo. We observed broad and potent ex vivo CD8+ T cell-mediated viral inhibitory activity against a panel of HIV isolates among viremic controllers (VC, viral loads <5000 copies/ml, in contrast to unselected HIV-infected HIV Vaccine trials Network (HVTN participants. Viral inhibition of clade-matched HIV isolates was strongly correlated with the frequency of CD8+ T cells targeting vulnerable regions within Gag, Pol, Nef and Vif that had been identified in an independent study of nearly 1000 chronically infected individuals. These vulnerable and so-called "beneficial" regions were of low entropy overall, yet several were not predicted by stringent conservation algorithms. Consistent with this, stronger inhibition of clade-matched than mismatched viruses was observed in the majority of subjects, indicating better targeting of clade-specific than conserved epitopes. The magnitude of CD8+ T cell responses to beneficial regions, together with viral entropy and HLA class I genotype, explained up to 59% of the variation in viral inhibitory activity, with magnitude of the T cell response making the strongest unique contribution. However, beneficial regions were infrequently targeted by CD8+ T cells elicited by vaccines encoding full-length HIV proteins, when the latter were administered to healthy volunteers and HIV-positive ART-treated subjects, suggesting that immunodominance hierarchies undermine effective anti-HIV CD8+ T cell responses. Taken together, our data support HIV immunogen design that is based on systematic selection of empirically defined vulnerable regions within the viral proteome, with exclusion of immunodominant decoy epitopes that are

  11. Microneedle arrays delivery of the conventional vaccines based on nonvirulent viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Ning; Wang, Xueting; Zhen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ting

    2016-11-01

    Recently, microneedle arrays (MAs) have been developed for painless inoculation of vaccines and possess many prominent advantages, including convenience for inoculation, and exact delivery of vaccine to the exact epidermal and dermal or mucosal compartments which teem with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Among different types of MAs, while the micro-environmental stimulus-responsive MAs represent one of the developmental trends in the field, the MAs combined with the conventional vaccines that are based on nonvirulent viruses, such as live attenuated or whole inactivated viruses, and antigen-encoding DNA viral vectors, have developed rapidly into the advanced stages, with certain products already on clinical trials. The pre- and clinical research outcomes showed that the painless MA delivery of the conventional vaccines through mammalian skin or mucosa can not only elicit robust systemic and even mucosal immunity to pathogens but also, in certain circumstances, redirect the immune response toward a specific Th1 pathway, resulting in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to erase the cell-hidden pathogens, thanks to the robust adjuvant function of MAs exerted through damaging the contacted cells to release dangerous signals. This paper focuses on reviewing the latest research and advancements in MA delivery of the conventional vaccines that are based on nonvirulent viruses, underlining MA enhancement of the overall vaccine performance and the most advanced MA vaccine products that are relatively close to markets.

  12. Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccines as bivalent or antigen delivery vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in reverse genetics techniques make it possible to manipulate the genome of RNA viruses such as Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Several NDV vaccine strains have been used as vaccine vectors in poultry, mammals, and humans to express antigens of different pathogens. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of these NDV-vectored vaccines have been evaluated in pre-clinical and clinical studies. The vaccines are safe in mammals, humans, and poultry. Bivalent NDV-vectored vaccines against pathogens of economic importance to the poultry industry have been developed. These bivalent vaccines confer solid protective immunity against NDV and other foreign antigens. In most cases, NDV-vectored vaccines induce strong local and systemic immune responses against the target foreign antigen. This review summarizes the development of NDV-vectored vaccines and their potential use as a base for designing other effective vaccines for veterinary and human use. PMID:28775971

  13. Alternative administration routes and delivery technologies for polio vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, H.; Stel, van der W.; Kersten, G.F.A.; Amorij, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Global polio eradication is closer than ever. Replacement of the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) by inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is recommended to achieve complete eradication. Limited global production capacity and relatively high IPV costs compared to OPV spur the need for im

  14. Towards tailored vaccine delivery : Needs, challenges and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Kersten, Gideon F. A.; Saluja, Vinay; Tonnis, Wouter F.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Slutter, Bram; Bal, Suzanne M.; Bouwstra, Joke A.; Huckriede, Anke; Jiskoot, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The ideal vaccine is a simple and stable formulation which can be conveniently administered and provides life-long immunity against a given pathogen. The development of such a vaccine, which should trigger broad and strong B-cell and T-cell responses against antigens of the pathogen in question, is

  15. Development of adjuvanted influenza vaccines for pulmonary delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Harshad Padmanabh

    2014-01-01

    Tijdens jaarlijkse epidemiën en tijdens pandemiën kan het griep virus flink huishouden hetgeen grote effecten kan hebben op economie en maatschappij. Griep vaccins kunnen bescherming bieden tegen griep infecties. De huidige geïnactiveerde vaccins hebben echter een aantal tekortkomingen: ze zijn erg

  16. HIV-1–Infected Individuals in Antiretroviral Therapy React Specifically With Polyfunctional T-Cell Responses to Gag p24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Lea; Benfield, Thomas; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    Still no effective HIV-1 prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines are available. However, as the proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral treatment is increasing, knowledge about the residual immune response is important for the possible development of an HIV-1 vaccine....

  17. High HIV-1 prevalence, risk behaviours, and willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials in fishing communities on Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Kiwanuka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa are generalized, but high-risk subgroups exist within these epidemics. A recent study among fisher-folk communities (FFC in Uganda showed high HIV prevalence (28.8% and incidence (4.9/100 person-years. However, those findings may not reflect population-wide HIV rates in FFC since the study population was selected for high-risk behaviour. Methods: Between September 2011 and March 2013, we conducted a community-based cohort study to determine the population representative HIV rates and willingness to participate (WTP in hypothetical vaccine trials among FFC, Uganda. At baseline (September 2011–January 2012, a household enumeration census was done in eight fishing communities (one lakeshore and seven islands, after which a random sample of 2200 participants aged 18–49 years was selected from 5360 individuals. Interviewer-administered questionnaire data were collected on HIV risk behaviours and WTP, and venous blood was collected for HIV testing using rapid HIV tests with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA confirmation. Adjusted prevalence proportion ratios (adj.PPRs of HIV prevalence were determined using log-binomial regression models. Results: Overall baseline HIV prevalence was 26.7% and was higher in women than men (32.6% vs. 20.8%, p<0.0001. Prevalence was lower among fishermen (22.4% than housewives (32.1%, farmers (33.1% and bar/lodge/restaurant workers (37%. The adj.PPR of HIV was higher among women than men (adj.PPR =1.50, 95%; 1.20, 1.87 and participants aged 30–39 years (adj.PPR=1.40, 95%; 1.10, 1.79 and 40–49 years (adj.PPR=1.41, 95%; 1.04, 1.92 compared to those aged 18–24 years. Other factors associated with HIV prevalence included low education, previous marriage, polygamous marriage, alcohol and marijuana use before sex. WTP in hypothetical vaccine trials was 89.3% and was higher in men than women (91.2% vs. 87.3%, p=0.004 and among island communities compared to

  18. Use of a risk scoring tool to identify higher-risk HIV-1 serodiscordant couples for an antiretroviral-based HIV-1 prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irungu, Elizabeth M; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Ngure, Kenneth; Katabira, Elly; Bulya, Nulu; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Odoyo, Josephine; Asiimwe, Stephen; Tindimwebwa, Edna; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-10-17

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) reduce HIV-1 transmission within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Prioritizing couples at highest HIV-1 transmission risk for ART and PrEP would maximize impact and minimize costs. The Partners Demonstration Project is an open-label, delivery study of integrated PrEP and ART for HIV-1 prevention among high risk HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda. We evaluated the feasibility of using a validated risk score that weighs a combination of easily measurable factors (age, children, marital status, male circumcision status, condom use, plasma HIV-1 levels) to identify couples at highest risk for HIV-1 transmission for enrollment. Couples scoring ≥5 met the risk score eligibility criteria. We screened 1694 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples and enrolled 1013. Of the screened couples, 1331 (78.6 %) scored ≥5 (with an expected incidence >3 % per year) and 76 % of these entered the study. The median age of the HIV-1 uninfected partner was 29 years [IQR 26, 36] and 20 % were 50,000 copies/ml. A risk scoring tool identified HIV-1 serodiscordant couples for a demonstration project of PrEP and ART with high HIV-1 risk. The tool may be feasible for research and public health settings to maximize efficiency and minimize HIV-1 prevention costs.

  19. Synthetic polyacrylate polymers as particulate intranasal vaccine delivery systems for the induction of mucosal immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Mehfuz; Simerska, Pavla; Toth, Istvan

    2010-04-01

    The nasal route as a site of vaccine delivery for both local and systemic effect is currently of considerable interest. The administration of vaccines to mucosal surfaces such as the nasopharynx associated lymphoid tissues confers many advantages since the nasal mucosa is a primary site through which most inhaled antigens are encountered. However, the success of intranasally delivered mucosal vaccines is limited by lack of effective vaccine formulations or delivery systems suitable for use in humans. This review provides a brief overview of the mucosal immune system at the nasal surface, enhancement techniques for induction of mucosal immune response after intranasal administration of particulate systems and an explanation of the inherent properties of polyacrylate polymer-based particulate systems that may facilitate mucosal immune responses.

  20. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  1. Immunogenicities of Env glycoproteins from circulating HIV-1 isolates in China focusing on the strategy of "DNA prime plus protein boost"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng; WANG Shi-xia; LIU Si-yang; BAO Zuo-yi; ZHUANG Dao-min; LI Lin; ZHANG Chun-hua; ZHANG Lu; LI Jing-yun; LU Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background The adenovirus-based HIV-1 vaccine developed by Merck Company suffered from an unexpected failure in September 2007. This generated a big shift in the strategy of HIV vaccine development with renewed focus on the induction of neutralizing antibodies. A major challenge in developing an HIV-1 vaccine is to identify immunogens and adopt delivery methods that can elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates of different genetic subtypes.Methods Most circulating HIV-1 isolates in China are composed of clades Thai-B, CRF_BC and CRF01_AE. In order to construct DNA vaccines against these 3 HIV-1 subtypes, DNA vaccines carrying the gp120 regions from HIV-1 isolates of GX48(AE), GX79(AE), NX22(BC), GS22(BC), HN24(Thai-B) were constructed. Expression of gp120 from these DNA vaccines was detected by Western blotting in transiently transfected 293T cells. Pilot immunizations of New Zealand white rabbits were performed using the strategy of "DNA prime plus protein boost" and the neutralizing antibody response was detected in a Tzm-bl cell based assay against different HIV-1 strains.Results Response of gp120-specific antibody was relatively low after DNA primes (mean titer=10~(4.72)); however, the titer of gp120-specific antibody went up with 2 protein boosts (mean titer=10~(6.81)). Above all, neutralizing antibody (Nab) titers induced by this combined approach were much better than those elicited by DNA or protein used alone (P <0.01). Neutralizing activities of immunized rabbit sera against several pseudoviruses and laboratorial strains were evaluated, most rabbit sera primed with monovalent vaccine were capable of neutralizing only 1 of 5 viruses, however, sera primed with the polyvalent DNA vaccines were able to neutralize at least 2 of 5 viruses.Conclusion Polyvalent DNA prime plus protein boost is an effective immunization strategy to broaden the neutralization breadth and further research should be performed on the basis of this pilot study.

  2. Estimating the cost of cholera-vaccine delivery from the societal point of view: A case of introduction of cholera vaccine in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Abdur Razzaque; Islam, Ziaul; Khan, Iqbal Ansary; Saha, Amit; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Cravioto, Alejandro; Clemens, John David; Qadri, Firdausi; Khan, Jahangir A M

    2015-09-11

    Cholera is a major global public health problem that causes both epidemic and endemic disease. The World Health Organization recommends oral cholera vaccines as a public health tool in addition to traditional prevention practices and treatments in both epidemic and endemic settings. In many developing countries like Bangladesh, the major issue concerns the affordability of this vaccine. In February 2011, a feasibility study entitled, "Introduction of Cholera Vaccine in Bangladesh (ICVB)", was conducted for a vaccination campaign using inactivated whole-cell cholera vaccine (Shanchol) in a high risk area of Mirpur, Dhaka. Empirical data obtained from this trial was used to determine the vaccination cost for a fully immunized person from the societal perspective. A total of 123,661 people were fully vaccinated receiving two doses of the vaccine, while 18,178 people received one dose of the same vaccine. The total cost for vaccine delivery was US$ 492,238 giving a total vaccination cost per fully-vaccinated individual of US$ 3.98. The purchase cost of the vaccine accounted for 58% of the overall cost of vaccination. Attempts to reduce the per-dose cost of the vaccine are likely to have a large impact on the cost of similar vaccination campaigns in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. C-Terminal Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin-Mediated Antigen Delivery for Nasal Pneumococcal Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko Suzuki

    Full Text Available Efficient vaccine delivery to mucosal tissues including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. We previously reported that claudin-4 was highly expressed on the epithelium of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT and thus claudin-4-targeting using C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE effectively delivered fused antigen to NALT and consequently induced antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we applied the C-CPE-based vaccine delivery system to develop a nasal pneumococcal vaccine. We fused C-CPE with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA, an important antigen for the induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, (PspA-C-CPE. PspA-C-CPE binds to claudin-4 and thus efficiently attaches to NALT epithelium, including antigen-sampling M cells. Nasal immunization with PspA-C-CPE induced PspA-specific IgG in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF as well as IgA in the nasal wash and BALF. These immune responses were sufficient to protect against pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that C-CPE is an efficient vaccine delivery system for the development of nasal vaccines against pneumococcal infection.

  4. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  5. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang’andu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  6. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wall, Stephanie; Walczak, Mateusz; van Rooij, Nienke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2015-01-01

    The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo

  7. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Kamel; Kaminski, Rafal; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-06-01

    Current therapy for controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection and preventing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells, which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or "sterile" cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS.

  8. An exploratory trial of cyclooxygenase type 2 inhibitor in HIV-1 infection: downregulated immune activation and improved T cell-dependent vaccine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Frank O; Torheim, Eirik A; Dahm, Anders E A; Aaberge, Ingeborg S; Lind, Andreas; Holm, Malin; Aandahl, Einar M; Sandset, Per M; Taskén, Kjetil; Kvale, Dag

    2011-07-01

    Chronic HIV infection is characterized by chronic immune activation and dysfunctional T cells with elevated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), which inhibits the T cell activation capability. cAMP may be induced by prostaglandin E(2) following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) in monocytes due to the elevated LPS levels in patients with chronic HIV infection. This hypothesis was tested using celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, for 12 weeks in HIV-infected patients without antiretroviral treatment in a prospective, open, randomized exploratory trial. Thirty-one patients were randomized in the trial; 27 completed the study, including 13 patients on celecoxib. Celecoxib reduced chronic immune activation in terms of CD38 density on CD8(+) T cells (-24%; P = 0.04), IgA levels (P = 0.04), and a combined score for inflammatory markers (P < 0.05). Celecoxib further reduced the inhibitory surface receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1) on CD8(+) T cells (P = 0.01), including PD-1 on the HIV Gag-specific subset (P = 0.02), enhanced the number of CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo/-) Treg or activated cells (P = 0.02), and improved humoral memory recall responses to a T cell-dependent vaccine (P = 0.04). HIV RNA (P = 0.06) and D dimers (P = 0.07) tended to increase in the controls, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6) possibly decreased in the treatment arm (P = 0.10). In conclusion, celecoxib downmodulated the immune activation related to clinical progression of chronic HIV infection and improved T cell-dependent functions in vivo.

  9. Immune System Regulation in the Induction of Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garnett Kelsoe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review, we discuss immune tolerance as a factor that determines the magnitude and quality of serum antibody responses to HIV-1 infection and vaccination in the context of recent work. We propose that many conserved, neutralizing epitopes of HIV-1 are weakly immunogenic because they mimic host antigens. In consequence, B cells that strongly bind these determinants are removed by the physiological process of immune tolerance. This structural mimicry may represent a significant impediment to designing protective HIV-1 vaccines, but we note that several vaccine strategies may be able to mitigate this evolutionary adaptation of HIV and other microbial pathogens.

  10. Development of a Multivalent Subunit Vaccine against Tularemia Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) Based Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Sukalyani; Mansour, Ahd Ahmed; Suresh, Ragavan Varadharajan; Wykoff-Clary, Sherri; Malik, Meenakshi; McCormick, Alison A; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, and is the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia. F. tularensis is classified as a Category A Biothreat agent by the CDC based on its use in bioweapon programs by several countries in the past and its potential to be used as an agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia. In this study, we used a novel approach for development of a multivalent subunit vaccine against tularemia by using an efficient tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) based delivery platform. The multivalent subunit vaccine was formulated to contain a combination of F. tularensis protective antigens: OmpA-like protein (OmpA), chaperone protein DnaK and lipoprotein Tul4 from the highly virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 strain. Two different vaccine formulations and immunization schedules were used. The immunized mice were challenged with lethal (10xLD100) doses of F. tularensis LVS on day 28 of the primary immunization and observed daily for morbidity and mortality. Results from this study demonstrate that TMV can be used as a carrier for effective delivery of multiple F. tularensis antigens. TMV-conjugate vaccine formulations are safe and multiple doses can be administered without causing any adverse reactions in immunized mice. Immunization with TMV-conjugated F. tularensis proteins induced a strong humoral immune response and protected mice against respiratory challenges with very high doses of F. tularensis LVS. This study provides a proof-of-concept that TMV can serve as a suitable platform for simultaneous delivery of multiple protective antigens of F. tularensis. Refinement of vaccine formulations coupled with TMV-targeting strategies developed in this study will provide a platform for development of an effective tularemia subunit vaccine as well as a vaccination approach that may broadly be applicable to many other bacterial pathogens.

  11. Development of a Multivalent Subunit Vaccine against Tularemia Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV Based Delivery System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukalyani Banik

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, and is the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia. F. tularensis is classified as a Category A Biothreat agent by the CDC based on its use in bioweapon programs by several countries in the past and its potential to be used as an agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of tularemia. In this study, we used a novel approach for development of a multivalent subunit vaccine against tularemia by using an efficient tobacco mosaic virus (TMV based delivery platform. The multivalent subunit vaccine was formulated to contain a combination of F. tularensis protective antigens: OmpA-like protein (OmpA, chaperone protein DnaK and lipoprotein Tul4 from the highly virulent F. tularensis SchuS4 strain. Two different vaccine formulations and immunization schedules were used. The immunized mice were challenged with lethal (10xLD100 doses of F. tularensis LVS on day 28 of the primary immunization and observed daily for morbidity and mortality. Results from this study demonstrate that TMV can be used as a carrier for effective delivery of multiple F. tularensis antigens. TMV-conjugate vaccine formulations are safe and multiple doses can be administered without causing any adverse reactions in immunized mice. Immunization with TMV-conjugated F. tularensis proteins induced a strong humoral immune response and protected mice against respiratory challenges with very high doses of F. tularensis LVS. This study provides a proof-of-concept that TMV can serve as a suitable platform for simultaneous delivery of multiple protective antigens of F. tularensis. Refinement of vaccine formulations coupled with TMV-targeting strategies developed in this study will provide a platform for development of an effective tularemia subunit vaccine as well as a vaccination approach that may broadly be applicable to many other bacterial pathogens.

  12. Mechanism of HIV-1 recombination%HIV-1重组机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚瑾; 李佩璐; 张驰宇

    2013-01-01

    HIV is a retrovirus, which contains two copies of plus-strand RNA genome. During synthesis of provirus DNA, the reverse transcriptase template switching that causes HIV genetic recombination occurs between two genomic RNAs. This genetic recombination plays a central role in shaping HIV diversity, and brings great challenges in HIV diagnosis, therapy and vaccine development. Here, we review the recent advances on HIV-1 recombination and discuss the effects on HIV-1 prevention and control.%人类免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)属于逆转录病毒,包含2个正链的RNA基因组.其复制过程需要逆转录酶发生模板转换,这样极容易导致重组.重组是导致HIV多样性的重要原因,给病毒的诊断、治疗以及疫苗研发带来巨大困难.本文综述了HIV-1重组的条件、机制、特性以及重组对于HIV-1防控和疫苗研究的影响.

  13. Global Vaccine and Immunization Research Forum: Opportunities and challenges in vaccine discovery, development, and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Andrew Q; Touchette, Nancy; Hall, B Fenton; Hwang, Angela; Hombach, Joachim

    2016-03-18

    The World Health Organization, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened the first Global Vaccine and Immunization Research Forum (GVIRF) in March 2014. This first GVIRF aimed to track recent progress of the Global Vaccine Action Plan research and development agenda, identify opportunities and challenges, promote partnerships in vaccine research, and facilitate the inclusion of all stakeholders in vaccine research and development. Leading scientists, vaccine developers, and public health officials from around the world discussed scientific and technical challenges in vaccine development, research to improve the impact of immunization, and regulatory issues. This report summarizes the discussions and conclusions from the forum participants.

  14. Nanobiotechnological approaches to delivery of DNA vaccine against fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A M; Souza, A C O; Amaral, A C; Vasconcelos, N M; Jeronimo, M S; Carneiro, F P; Faccioli, L H; Felipe, M S S; Silva, C L; Bocca, A L

    2013-02-01

    Vaccines play an essential role in keeping humans healthy. Innovative approaches to their use include the utilization of plasmid DNA encoding sequences to express foreign antigens. DNAhsp65 from Mycobacterium leprae is suitable for this purpose due to its ability to elicit a powerful immune response. Controlled release systems represent a promising approach to delivering vaccines. In this work, we used liposomes or PLGA systems to deliver DNAhsp65 to treat the pulmonary fungal infection Paracoccidioidomycosis. Both formulations modulated a protective immune response and reduced the pulmonary fungal burden even in the groups receiving less than four times the amount of the DNAhps65 entrapped within the nanoparticles. Although both systems had the same effective therapeutic results, the advantage of the liposome formulation was that it was administered intranasally, which may be more easily accepted by patients. These systems are a great alternative to be considered as adjuvant vaccine therapy for systemic mycosis.

  15. E2 multimeric scaffold for vaccine formulation: immune response by intranasal delivery and transcriptome profile of E2-pulsed dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Maria; Maurano, Francesco; D'Apice, Luciana; Costa, Valerio; Sartorius, Rossella; Cuccaro, Fausta; McBurney, Sean P; Krebs, Shelly J; Prisco, Antonella; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Rossi, Mauro; Haigwood, Nancy L; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2016-07-16

    The E2 multimeric scaffold represents a powerful delivery system able to elicit robust humoral and cellular immune responses upon systemic administrations. Here recombinant E2 scaffold displaying the third variable loop of HIV-1 Envelope gp120 glycoprotein was administered via mucosa, and the mucosal and systemic immune responses were analysed. To gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms that orchestrate the immune response upon E2 vaccination, we analysed the transcriptome profile of dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to the E2 scaffold with the aim to define a specific gene expression signature for E2-primed immune responses. The in vivo immunogenicity and the potential of E2 scaffold as a mucosal vaccine candidate were investigated in BALB/c mice vaccinated via the intranasal route. Fecal and systemic antigen-specific IgA antibodies, cytokine-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were induced assessing the immunogenicity of E2 particles via intranasal administration. The cytokine analysis identified a mixed T-helper cell response, while the systemic antibody response showed a prevalence of IgG1 isotype indicative of a polarized Th2-type immune response. RNA-Sequencing analysis revealed that E2 scaffold up-regulates in DCs transcriptional regulators of the Th2-polarizing cell response, defining a type 2 DC transcriptomic signature. The current study provides experimental evidence to the possible application of E2 scaffold as antigen delivery system for mucosal immunization and taking advantages of genome-wide approach dissects the type of response induced by E2 particles.

  16. Maintaining vaccine delivery following the introduction of the rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Y Lee

    Full Text Available Although the substantial burdens of rotavirus and pneumococcal disease have motivated many countries to consider introducing the rotavirus vaccine (RV and heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7 to their National Immunization Programs (EPIs, these new vaccines could affect the countries' vaccine supply chains (i.e., the series of steps required to get a vaccine from their manufacturers to patients. We developed detailed computational models of the Trang Province, Thailand, vaccine supply chain to simulate introducing various RV and PCV-7 vaccine presentations and their combinations. Our results showed that the volumes of these new vaccines in addition to current routine vaccines could meet and even exceed (1 the refrigerator space at the provincial district and sub-district levels and (2 the transport cold space at district and sub-district levels preventing other vaccines from being available to patients who arrive to be immunized. Besides the smallest RV presentation (17.1 cm³/dose, all other vaccine introduction scenarios required added storage capacity at the provincial level (range: 20 L-1151 L per month for the three largest formulations, and district level (range: 1 L-124 L per month across all introduction scenarios. Similarly, with the exception of the two smallest RV presentation (17.1 cm³/dose, added transport capacity was required at both district and sub-district levels. Added transport capacity required across introduction scenarios from the provincial to district levels ranged from 1 L-187 L, and district to sub-district levels ranged from 1 L-13 L per shipment. Finally, only the smallest RV vaccine presentation (17.1 cm³/dose had no appreciable effect on vaccine availability at sub-districts. All other RV and PCV-7 vaccines were too large for the current supply chain to handle without modifications such as increasing storage or transport capacity. Introducing these new vaccines to Thailand could have dynamic effects

  17. Designer outer membrane vesicles as immunomodulatory systems - Reprogramming bacteria for vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnopo, Yehou M D; Watkins, Hannah C; Stevenson, Taylor C; DeLisa, Matthew P; Putnam, David

    2017-05-15

    Vaccines often require adjuvants to be effective. Traditional adjuvants, like alum, activate the immune response but in an uncontrolled way. Newer adjuvants help to direct the immune response in a more coordinated fashion. Here, we review the opportunity to use the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of bacteria as a way to modulate the immune response toward making more effective vaccines. This review outlines the different types of OMVs that have been investigated for vaccine delivery and how they are produced. Because OMVs are derived from bacteria, they have compositions that may not be compatible with parenteral delivery in humans; therefore, we also review the strategies brought to bear to detoxify OMVs while maintaining an adjuvant profile. OMV-based vaccines can be derived from the pathogens themselves, or can be used as surrogate constructs to mimic a pathogen through the heterologous expression of specific antigens in a desired host source strain, and approaches to doing so are reviewed. Additionally, the emerging area of engineered pathogen-specific carbohydrate sequences, or glycosylated OMVs is reviewed and contrasted with protein antigen delivery. Existing OMV-based vaccines as well as their routes of administration round out the text. Overall, this is an exciting time in the OMV field as it matures and leads to more effective and targeted ways to induce desired pathogen-specific immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nano-Delivery Vehicles/Adjuvants for DNA Vaccination Against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yaqiong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jinchao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-03-01

    More than 75 million people has been infected HIV and it is responsible for nearly 36 million deaths on a global scale. As one of the deadliest infectious diseases, HIV is becoming the urgent issue of the global epidemic to tackle. In order to settle this problem from the source, some effective prevention strategies should be developed to control the pandemic of HIV. Vaccines, especially DNA vaccines, could be the optimal way to control the spread of HIV due to the unparalleled superiority that DNA vaccines could generate long-term humoral and cellular immune responses which could provide protective immunity for HIV. But the naked DNA could hardly enter into cells and is easily degraded by DNases and lysosomes, so designing effective delivery system is a promising strategy. Since delivery system could be constructed to promote efficient delivery of DNA into mammalian cells, protect them from degradation, and also could be established to be a target system to arrive at certain position of expectation. The current review discusses the potential of various nano-delivery vehicles/adjuvants such as polymer, lipid, liposome, peptide and inorganic material in improving efficiency of diverse modalities available for HIV DNA vaccines.

  19. Live bacterial delivery systems for development of mucosal vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.E.R.; Dalen, P.J. van; Havenith, C.E.G.; Pouwels, P.H.; Seegers, J.F.M.L.; Tielen, F.D.; Zee, M.D. van der; Zegers, N.D.; Shaw, M.

    2000-01-01

    By expression of foreign antigens in attenuated strains derived from bacterial pathogens and in non-pathogenic commensal bacteria, recombinant vaccines are being developed that aim to stimulate mucosal immunity. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and molecular biology of these bacteria have allowed

  20. Live bacterial delivery systems for development of mucosal vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.E.R.; Dalen, P.J. van; Havenith, C.E.G.; Pouwels, P.H.; Seegers, J.F.M.L.; Tielen, F.D.; Zee, M.D. van der; Zegers, N.D.; Shaw, M.

    2000-01-01

    By expression of foreign antigens in attenuated strains derived from bacterial pathogens and in non-pathogenic commensal bacteria, recombinant vaccines are being developed that aim to stimulate mucosal immunity. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and molecular biology of these bacteria have allowed

  1. Mechanistic studies on transcutaneous vaccine delivery : microneedles, nanoparticles and adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, Suzanne Marleen

    2011-01-01

    Microneedle-based transcutaneous immunisation is an appealing alternative to the classical manner of injecting vaccines by intramuscular or subcutaneous route. Importantly, as a consequence of the fact that the skin is in direct contact with the environment and should protect the body against pathog

  2. Enterotoxin Vaccine Delivery System With Bioadherence. Phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-05

    trade names in this report do not constitute an official Department of Army endorsement or approval of the products or services of these...time in the body and results in greater antibody production . Most current vaccine regimens are administered parenterally. However, parenteral...EX-55, Noveon AA-1), Carboxymethylcellulose , Polycarbopol, Polyacrylic acid, Sodium Alginate and Hydroxypropylcellulose) were evaluated and

  3. Correlates of first dose of measles vaccination delivery and uptake in Indonesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renae Fernandez; Anu Rammohan; Niyi Awofeso

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine health systems-related, familial, and cultural factors which influence the delivery and uptake of measles vaccination in Indonesia.Methods: Logistic regression analysis of data collected during the 2007Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey was undertaken by the authors to investigate these factors. The2007 Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey dataset is a nationally representative, randomly sampled survey containing15 065 children aged between9and59 months.Results: 72.8% of children had received the measles vaccine. Vaccination coverage was similar for males and females; however, coverage was higher amongst urban children,80.1%, compared to68.5% in rural areas. The key findings of the regression analysis were congruent with the results of previous research targeting vaccination coverage. After controlling for all other factors, maternal age, maternal education, wealth, the use of a skilled birth attendant, and postnatal check-ups were positively and significantly (P< 0.01) correlated with measles vaccination. The number of children per household was negatively correlated (P<0.01).Conclusions: In order to enhance measles vaccination coverage in Indonesia, delivery to, and uptake by, rural and low socio-economic populations require substantial improvements. Mass health education and health systems improvements are also required.

  4. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  5. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  6. Liposome-based intranasal delivery of lipopeptide vaccine candidates against group A streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffar, Khairunnisa Abdul; Marasini, Nirmal; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Batzloff, Michael R; Good, Michael F; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2016-09-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS), an exclusively human pathogen, causes a wide range of diseases ranging from trivial to life threatening. Treatment of infection is often ineffective following entry of bacteria into the bloodstream. To date, there is no vaccine available against GAS. In this study, cationic liposomes encapsulating lipopeptide-based vaccine candidates against GAS have been employed for intranasal vaccine delivery. Cationic liposomes were prepared with dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) using the film hydration method. Female Swiss mice were immunized intranasally with the liposomes. In contrast to unmodified peptides, lipopeptides entrapped by liposomes induced both mucosal and systemic immunity, IgA and IgG (IgG1 and IgG2a) production in mice, respectively. High levels of antibody (IgA and IgG) titres were detected even five months post immunization. Thus, the combination of lipopeptides and liposomes generates a very promising delivery system for intranasal vaccines. Group A streptococcus, causing rheumatic heart diseases, kills approximately half a million people annually. There is no vaccine available against the infection. Mucosal immunity is vital in ensuring an individual is protected as this gram positive bacteria initially colonizes at the throat. Herein, we demonstrated that lipopeptides entrapped by liposomes induced both mucosal and systemic immunity. High levels of antibody (IgA and IgG) titres were detected even five months post immunization and lead vaccine candidate was able to induce humoral immune responses even after single immunization. Thus, the combination of lipopeptides and liposomes generates a very promising delivery system for intranasal vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of vaccine efficacy for different antigen delivery systems for infectious pancreatic necrosis virus vaccines in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in a cohabitation challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron M; Fredriksen, Børge N; Mutoloki, Stephen; Brudeseth, Bjørn; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Marjara, Inderjit S; Dalmo, Roy A; Evensen, Øystein

    2012-06-01

    Two strains of IPNV made by reverse genetics on the Norwegian Sp strain NVI-015 (GenBank AY379740) backbone encoding the virulent (T(217)A(221)) and avirulent (P(217)T(221)) motifs were used to prepare inactivated whole virus (IWV), nanoparticle vaccines with whole virus, Escherichia coli subunit encoding truncated VP2-TA and VP2-PT, VP2-TA and VP2-PT fusion antigens with putative translocating domains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin, and plasmid DNA encoding segment A of the TA strain. Post challenge survival percentages (PCSP) showed that IWV vaccines conferred highest protection (PCSP=42-53) while nanoparticle, sub-unit recombinant and DNA vaccines fell short of the IWV vaccines in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) postsmolts challenged with the highly virulent Sp strain NVI-015 (TA strain) of IPNV after 560 degree days post vaccination. Antibody levels induced by these vaccines did not show antigenic differences between the virulent and avirulent motifs for vaccines made with the same antigen dose and delivery system after 8 weeks post vaccination. Our findings show that fish vaccinated with less potent vaccines comprising of nanoparticle, DNA and recombinant vaccines got infected much earlier and yielded to higher infection rates than fish vaccinated with IWV vaccines that were highly potent. Ability of the virulent (T(217)A(221)) and avirulent (P(217)T(221)) motifs to limit establishment of infection showed equal protection for vaccines made of the same antigen dose and delivery systems. Prevention of tissue damage linked to viral infection was eminent in the more potent vaccines than the less protective ones. Hence, there still remains the challenge of developing highly efficacious vaccines with the ability to eliminate the post challenge carrier state in IPNV vaccinology.

  8. Oral Cholera Vaccination Delivery Cost in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An Analysis Based on Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogasale, Vittal; Ramani, Enusa; Wee, Hyeseung; Kim, Jerome H

    2016-12-01

    Use of the oral cholera vaccine (OCV) is a vital short-term strategy to control cholera in endemic areas with poor water and sanitation infrastructure. Identifying, estimating, and categorizing the delivery costs of OCV campaigns are useful in analyzing cost-effectiveness, understanding vaccine affordability, and in planning and decision making by program managers and policy makers. To review and re-estimate oral cholera vaccination program costs and propose a new standardized categorization that can help in collation, analysis, and comparison of delivery costs across countries. Peer reviewed publications listed in PubMed database, Google Scholar and World Health Organization (WHO) websites and unpublished data from organizations involved in oral cholera vaccination. The publications and reports containing oral cholera vaccination delivery costs, conducted in low- and middle-income countries based on World Bank Classification. Limits are humans and publication date before December 31st, 2014. No participants are involved, only costs are collected. Oral cholera vaccination and cost estimation. A systematic review was conducted using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cost items were categorized into four main cost groups: vaccination program preparation, vaccine administration, adverse events following immunization and vaccine procurement; the first three groups constituting the vaccine delivery costs. The costs were re-estimated in 2014 US dollars (US$) and in international dollar (I$). Ten studies were identified and included in the analysis. The vaccine delivery costs ranged from US$0.36 to US$ 6.32 (in US$2014) which was equivalent to I$ 0.99 to I$ 16.81 (in I$2014). The vaccine procurement costs ranged from US$ 0.29 to US$ 29.70 (in US$2014), which was equivalent to I$ 0.72 to I$ 78.96 (in I$2014). The delivery costs in routine immunization systems were lowest from US$ 0.36 (in US$2014) equivalent to I$ 0.99 (in I$2014). The reported cost categories

  9. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties.

  10. Interleukin-1- and type I interferon-dependent enhanced immunogenicity of an NYVAC-HIV-1 Env-Gag-Pol-Nef vaccine vector with dual deletions of type I and type II interferon-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaloye, Julie; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Cameron, Mark J; Haddad, Elias K; Harari, Alexandre; Goulet, Jean-Pierre; Gomez, Carmen E; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Roger, Thierry; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Calandra, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    NYVAC, a highly attenuated, replication-restricted poxvirus, is a safe and immunogenic vaccine vector. Deletion of immune evasion genes from the poxvirus genome is an attractive strategy for improving the immunogenic properties of poxviruses. Using systems biology approaches, we describe herein the enhanced immunological profile of NYVAC vectors expressing the HIV-1 clade C env, gag, pol, and nef genes (NYVAC-C) with single or double deletions of genes encoding type I (ΔB19R) or type II (ΔB8R) interferon (IFN)-binding proteins. Transcriptomic analyses of human monocytes infected with NYVAC-C, NYVAC-C with the B19R deletion (NYVAC-C-ΔB19R), or NYVAC-C with B8R and B19R deletions (NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R) revealed a concerted upregulation of innate immune pathways (IFN-stimulated genes [ISGs]) of increasing magnitude with NYVAC-C-ΔB19R and NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R than with NYVAC-C. Deletion of B8R and B19R resulted in an enhanced activation of IRF3, IRF7, and STAT1 and the robust production of type I IFNs and of ISGs, whose expression was inhibited by anti-type I IFN antibodies. Interestingly, NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R induced the production of much higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-8) than NYVAC-C or NYVAC-C-ΔB19R as well as a strong inflammasome response (caspase-1 and IL-1β) in infected monocytes. Top network analyses showed that this broad response mediated by the deletion of B8R and B19R was organized around two upregulated gene expression nodes (TNF and IRF7). Consistent with these findings, monocytes infected with NYVAC-C-ΔB8RB19R induced a stronger type I IFN-dependent and IL-1-dependent allogeneic CD4(+) T cell response than monocytes infected with NYVAC-C or NYVAC-C-ΔB19R. Dual deletion of type I and type II IFN immune evasion genes in NYVAC markedly enhanced its immunogenic properties via its induction of the increased expression of type I IFNs and IL-1β and make it an attractive candidate HIV

  11. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  12. Potential Cost-Effectiveness of an Influenza Vaccination Program Offering Microneedle Patch for Vaccine Delivery in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carlos; Jiang, Minghuan; You, Joyce H. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The influenza vaccine coverage rate of children is low in Hong Kong. Microneedle patches (MNPs) is a technology under development for painless delivery of vaccines. This study aimed to examine the potential clinical outcomes and direct medical costs of an influenza program offering MNP vaccine to children who have declined intramuscular (IM) vaccine in Hong Kong. Methods A decision model was designed to compare potential outcomes between IM vaccine program and a program offering MNP vaccine to those declined IM vaccine (IM/MNP program) in a hypothetical cohort of children over one-year time horizon. The model outcomes included direct medical cost, influenza infection rate, mortality rate, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) loss. Model inputs were retrieved from published literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the robustness of model results. Results In base-case analysis, IM/MNP program was more costly per child (USD19.13 versus USD13.69; USD1 = HKD7.8) with lower influenza infection rate (98.9 versus 124.8 per 1,000 children), hospitalization rate (0.83 versus 1.05 per 1,000 children) and influenza-related mortality rate (0.00042 versus 0.00052 per 1,000 children) when compared to IM program. The incremental cost per QALY saved (ICER) of IM/MNP program versus IM program was 27,200 USD/QALY. Using gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of Hong Kong (USD40,594) as threshold of willingness-to-pay (WTP) per QALY, one-way sensitivity analysis found ICER of IM/MNP to exceed WTP when duration of illness in outpatient setting was 1.39-time of IM vaccine cost. In 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations, IM/MNP program was the preferred option in 57.28% and 91.68% of the time, using 1x and 3x GDP per capita as WTP threshold, respectively. Conclusion Acceptance of IM/MNP program as the preferred program was subject to the WTP threshold, duration of illness in outpatient settings, and cost of MNP vaccine. PMID:28006012

  13. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  14. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as antigen carriers and adjuvants for vaccine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Karishma T.; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Donna; Cavallaro, Antonino S.; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2013-05-01

    Vaccines have been at the forefront of improving human health for over two centuries. The challenges faced in developing effective vaccines flow from complexities associated with the immune system and requirement of an efficient and safe adjuvant to induce a strong adaptive immune response. Development of an efficient vaccine formulation requires careful selection of a potent antigen, efficient adjuvant and route of delivery. Adjuvants are immunological agents that activate the antigen presenting cells (APCs) and elicit a strong immune response. In the past decade, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) has gained significant attention as potential delivery vehicles for various biomolecules. In this review, we aim to highlight the potential of MSNs as vaccine delivery vehicles and their ability to act as adjuvants. We have provided an overview on the latest progress on synthesis, adsorption and release kinetics and biocompatibility of MSNs as next generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. A comprehensive summary on the ability of MSNs to deliver antigens and elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses is provided. Finally, we give insight on fundamental challenges and some future prospects of these nanoparticles as adjuvants.

  15. Lessons from IAVI-006, a phase I clinical trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of the pTHr.HIVA DNA and MVA.HIVA vaccines in a prime-boost strategy to induce HIV-1 specific T-cell responses in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Walker, A; Mackie, N; McCormack, S; Hanke, T; Schmidt, C; Gilmour, J; Barin, B; McMichael, A; Weber, J; Legg, K; Babiker, A; Hayes, P; Gotch, F; Smith, C; Dally, L; Dorrell, L; Cebere, I; Kay, R; Winstone, N; Moore, S; Goonetilleke, N; Fast, P

    2008-12-02

    IAVI-006 was the first large randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase I clinical trial to systematically investigate the prime-boost strategy for induction of HIV-1 specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) in a factorial trial design using (i) priming with 0.5 mg or 2 mg of pTHr.HIVA DNA vaccine, followed by (ii) two booster vaccinations with 5 x 10(7) MVA.HIVA at weeks 8 and 12 (early boost) or weeks 20 and 24 (late boost). This study set the basis for later clinical trials and demonstrated the safety of these candidate HIV vaccines. The safety and immunogenicity results are presented and the lessons derived from this clinical trial are discussed.

  16. Attenuated Bordetella pertussis BPZE1 as a live vehicle for heterologous vaccine antigens delivery through the nasal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Lim, Annabelle; Alonso, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Whereas the great majority of the current vaccines are delivered through the parenteral route, mucosal administration has been increasingly considered for controlling infection and preventing disease. Mucosal vaccination can trigger both humoral and cell-mediated protection, not only at the targeted mucosal surface, but also systemically. In this regard, nasal vaccination has shown great potential. The live attenuated strain of Bordetella pertussis, BPZE1, is particularly attractive and promising as a nasal vaccine delivery vector of heterologous antigen vaccine candidates. BPZE1 was originally developed as a live nasal pertussis vaccine candidate, and is currently undergoing phase I clinical trial in human (http://www.child-innovac.org). Highly adapted to the human respiratory tract and offering several potential protein carriers for presentation of the heterologous antigen vaccine candidates, BPZE1 represents an appealing platform for the development of live recombinant vaccines delivered via the nasal route that would confer simultaneous protection against pertussis and the targeted infectious disease(s).

  17. Effective nonvaccine interventions to be considered alongside human papilloma virus vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindin, Michelle J; Bloem, Paul; Ferguson, Jane

    2015-01-01

    World Health Organization recommends that girls, ages 9-13 years, get the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Global Alliance for Vaccines Initiative, which provides low-cost vaccine to eligible countries, requires that an additional intervention to be offered alongside the vaccine. We systematically searched and assessed the published literature in lower- and middle-income countries to identify effective interventions. We conducted systematic searches of four databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Global Index Medicus Regional Databases, and Cochrane Reviews for effective adolescent health interventions that could be delivered with the HPV vaccine in the following areas: (1) iron and folic acid supplementation (iron alone or with folic acid); (2) voucher delivery and cash transfer programs; (3) hand washing and soap provision; (4) vision screening; (5) promotion of physical activity/exercise; (6) menstrual hygiene education; (7) sexual and reproductive health education; (8) human immunodeficiency virus prevention activities; and (9) condom promotion, condom use skill building, and demonstration. We found limited evidence of consistent positive impact. Iron supplementation reduced iron-deficiency anemia and raised serum ferritin levels. Promotion of physical activity lowered blood pressure and reduced weight gain. Sexual and reproductive health and human immunodeficiency virus interventions improved adolescent communication with adults but did not influence behavioral outcomes. Countries should consider locally relevant and proven interventions to be offered alongside the HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Virological features associated with the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Penny L; Williamson, Carolyn; Morris, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    The development of a preventative HIV-1 vaccine remains a global public health priority. This will likely require the elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) able to block infection by diverse viral strains from across the world. Understanding the pathway to neutralization breadth in HIV-1 infected humans will provide insights into how bNAb lineages arise, a process that probably involves a combination of host and viral factors. Here, we focus on the role of viral characteristics and evolution in shaping bNAbs during HIV-1 infection, and describe how these findings may be translated into novel vaccine strategies.

  19. A Generic Polymer-Protein Ligation Strategy for Vaccine Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybaert, Lien; Vanparijs, Nane; Fierens, Kaat; Schuijs, Martijn; Nuhn, Lutz; Lambrecht, Bart N; De Geest, Bruno G

    2016-03-14

    Although the field of cancer immunotherapy is intensively investigated, there is still a need for generic strategies that allow easy, mild and efficient formulation of vaccine antigens. Here we report on a generic polymer-protein ligation strategy to formulate protein antigens into reversible polymeric conjugates for enhanced uptake by dendritic cells and presentation to CD8 T-cells. A N-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA)-based copolymer was synthesized via RAFT polymerization followed by introduction of pyridyldisulfide moieties. To enhance ligation efficiency to ovalbumin, which is used as a model protein antigen, protected thiols were introduced onto lysine residues and deprotected in situ in the presence of the polymer. The ligation efficiency was compared for both the thiol-modified versus unmodified ovalbumin, and the reversibility was confirmed. Furthermore, the obtained nanoconjugates were tested in vitro for their interaction and association with dendritic cells, showing enhanced cellular uptake and antigen cross-presentation to CD8 T-cells.

  20. Advances and Potential Applications of Chitosan Nanoparticles as a Delivery Carrier for the Mucosal Immunity of Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Fu, Dongwei; Kang, Hong; Rong, Guangyu; Jin, Zheng; Wang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Drug research and development has entered into the new epoch of innovation formulation, and the drug delivery system has been in the forefront of pharmaceutical innovation. Chitosan, a natural polysaccharide derived from chitin, due to its well-known biocompatibility and biodegradability, it has been widely used in drug delivery, immunostimulation, tissue regeneration, blood coagulation, wound healing, drug delivery and tissue engineering. Chitosan has become a valuable vaccine adjuvant and delivery carrier, which have attracted increasing attention for its applications. In this paper, we reviewed chitosan nanoparticles, which is a promising biomaterial as vaccine adjuvant and delivery carrier, including characteristics, preparation methods and applications, or even its limitations. We also investigated the mucosal immune delivery route for drug loaded chitosan nanoparticles, such as the routes of oral and nasal. Due to the low toxicity, better biodegradability and adhesivity of chitosan nanoparticles, it can be used as the delivery carrier of vaccine antigens and drugs. These promising studies laid a foundation for the applications of chitosan nanoparticles as a delivery carrier in the vaccine or drug. We undertook a structured research of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles of chitosan used as a delivery carrier for the mucosal immunity of vaccine. We have searched the bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature. The outstanding characteristics of the screened papers were described respectively, and a systematic content analysis methodology was used to analyse the findings. Sixty-three papers were included in the review, the majority defined leadership and governance approaches that had impacted upon the polymeric nanoparticles as the delivery carrier for the mucosal immunity of vaccine in therapeutic applications and developments. Thirty-five papers outlined the superiority characteristics of chitosan nanoparticles that applied in the field

  1. Experimental study of immune responses in mice induced by nucleic acid vaccine of gag gene of Chinese HIV-1 strains%中国株HIV-1 gag基因核酸疫苗免疫小鼠的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王福祥; 孙永涛; 孙永年; 徐哲; 刘娟; 王临旭

    2004-01-01

    目的研究开发针对我国人类免疫缺陷病毒-1(HIV-1)流行株的艾滋病治疗性疫苗,构建含中国流行株HIV-1核心蛋白(gag)基因的核酸疫苗,并评价其诱导的体液和细胞免疫反应效果.方法将HIV-1 gag基因插入到真核表达载体pCI-neo中,构建了真核表达质粒pCI-neo GAG,并经XbaⅠ/SalⅠ双酶切及测序鉴定.将pCI-neo GAG和空载体pCI-neo免疫BALB/c小鼠,通过ELISA检测免疫小鼠的特异性抗体和IFN-γ,通过MTT实验检测免疫小鼠脾淋巴细胞增殖实验,通过乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)实验检测小鼠特异性细胞毒性T淋巴细胞(CTL)反应.结果酶切及测序结果表明成功地构建了HIV-1 gag基因核酸疫苗;与空载体pCI-neo组比较,pCI-neo GAG免疫组小鼠血清的抗HIV-1 p24抗体滴度和IFN-γ均升高(P<0.01).pCI-neo GAG免疫组小鼠的脾淋巴细胞增殖实验刺激指数(SI)以及特异性CTL活性均高于空载体pCI-neo组(P<0.01).结论构建的针对我国HIV-1流行株的gag基因核酸疫苗免疫小鼠可以诱导特异性体液和细胞性免疫应答,为进一步研制适用于我国的HIV治疗性疫苗奠定了基础.

  2. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle-based vaccine increases protection against S. pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, Brittney [University of North Texas Health Science Center, Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology (United States); Thamake, Sanjay [Radio-Isotope Therapy of America Foundation (United States); Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P., E-mail: harlan.jones@unthsc.edu [University of North Texas Health Science Center, Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) technologies are becoming commonplace in the development of vaccine delivery systems to protect against various diseases. The current study determined the efficacy of intranasal delivery of a 234 {+-} 87.5 nm poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticle vaccine construct in establishing protection against experimental respiratory pneumococcal infection. Nanoparticles encapsulating heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae (NP-HKSP) were retained in the lungs 11 days following nasal administration compared to empty NP. Immunization with NP-HKSP produced significant resistance against S. pneumoniae infection compared to administration of HKSP alone. Increased protection correlated with a significant increase in antigen-specific Th1-associated IFN-{gamma} cytokine response by pulmonary lymphocytes. This study establishes the efficacy of NP-based technology as a non-invasive and targeted approach for nasal-pulmonary immunization against pulmonary infections.

  3. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle-based vaccine increases protection against S. pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Brittney; Thamake, Sanjay; Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) technologies are becoming commonplace in the development of vaccine delivery systems to protect against various diseases. The current study determined the efficacy of intranasal delivery of a 234 ± 87.5 nm poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticle vaccine construct in establishing protection against experimental respiratory pneumococcal infection. Nanoparticles encapsulating heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae (NP-HKSP) were retained in the lungs 11 days following nasal administration compared to empty NP. Immunization with NP-HKSP produced significant resistance against S. pneumoniae infection compared to administration of HKSP alone. Increased protection correlated with a significant increase in antigen-specific Th1-associated IFN-γ cytokine response by pulmonary lymphocytes. This study establishes the efficacy of NP-based technology as a non-invasive and targeted approach for nasal-pulmonary immunization against pulmonary infections.

  4. Rational Design of Targeted Next-Generation Carriers for Drug and Vaccine Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Balaji; Goodman, Jonathan T; Vela Ramirez, Julia E

    2016-07-11

    Pattern recognition receptors on innate immune cells play an important role in guiding how cells interact with the rest of the organism and in determining the direction of the downstream immune response. Recent advances have elucidated the structure and function of these receptors, providing new opportunities for developing targeted drugs and vaccines to treat infections, cancers, and neurological disorders. C-type lectin receptors, Toll-like receptors, and folate receptors have attracted interest for their ability to endocytose their ligands or initiate signaling pathways that influence the immune response. Several novel technologies are being developed to engage these receptors, including recombinant antibodies, adoptive immunotherapy, and chemically modified antigens and drug delivery vehicles. These active targeting technologies will help address current challenges facing drug and vaccine delivery and lead to new tools to treat human diseases.

  5. Glycosylation in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein and its biological implications

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Yung Shwen

    2013-08-01

    Glycosylation of HIV-1 envelope proteins (Env gp120/gp41) plays a vital role in viral evasion from the host immune response, which occurs through the masking of key neutralization epitopes and the presentation of the Env glycosylation as \\'self\\' to the host immune system. Env glycosylation is generally conserved, yet its continual evolution plays an important role in modulating viral infectivity and Env immunogenicity. Thus, it is believed that Env glycosylation, which is a vital part of the HIV-1 architecture, also controls intra- and inter-clade genetic variations. Discerning intra- and inter-clade glycosylation variations could therefore yield important information for understanding the molecular and biological differences between HIV clades and may assist in effectively designing Env-based immunogens and in clearly understanding HIV vaccines. This review provides an in-depth perspective of various aspects of Env glycosylation in the context of HIV-1 pathogenesis. © 2013 Future Medicine Ltd.

  6. Food-Grade Organisms as Vaccine Biofactories and Oral Delivery Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Angulo, Carlos; Meza, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    The use of food-grade organisms as recombinant vaccine expression hosts and delivery vehicles has been explored during the past 25 years, opening new avenues for vaccinology. Considering that oral immunization is a beneficial approach in terms of costs, patient comfort, and protection of mucosal tissues, the use of food-grade organisms can lead to highly advantageous vaccines in terms of costs, easy administration, and safety. The organisms currently used for this purpose are bacteria (Lactobacillus and Bacillus), yeasts, algae, plants, and insect species. Herein, a comparative and updated scenario on the production of oral vaccines in food-grade organisms is provided and placed in perspective. The status of clinical evaluations and the adoption of this technology by the industry are highlighted.

  7. Highest Vaccine Uptake after School-Based Delivery - A County-Level Evaluation of the Implementation Strategies for HPV Catch-Up Vaccination in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moa Rehn

    channel explained differences in county-level vaccine uptake. Our findings suggest that catch-up vaccination outside the national vaccination program can reach a high uptake at the population level if it is implemented primarily with an organized delivery (e.g. in schools.

  8. Antigen-Displaying Lipid-Enveloped PLGA Nanoparticles as Delivery Agents for a Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, James J.; Heikyung Suh; Polhemus, Mark E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Anjali Yadava; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2011-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium vivax is the most frequent cause of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa, but efforts to develop viable vaccines against P. vivax so far have been inadequate. We recently developed pathogen-mimicking polymeric vaccine nanoparticles composed of the FDA-approved biodegradable polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) “enveloped” by a lipid membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether this vaccine delivery platform could be applied to enhance the immune r...

  9. Priming immunization with DNA augments immunogenicity of recombinant adenoviral vectors for both HIV-1 specific antibody and T-cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Koup

    Full Text Available Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies.The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5 boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination.rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8(+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127(+ central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition.Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654.

  10. Development of an acid-resistant Salmonella Typhi Ty21a attenuated vector for improved oral vaccine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The licensed oral, live-attenuated bacterial vaccine for typhoid fever, Salmonella Typhi strain Ty21a, has also been utilized as a vaccine delivery platform for expression of diverse foreign antigens that stimulate protection against shigellosis, anthrax, plague, or human papilloma virus. However, T...

  11. Vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on nano-sized hepatitis B virus core protein particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanasooraj D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dhananjayan Dhanasooraj, R Ajay Kumar, Sathish MundayoorMycobacterium Research Group, Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Kerala, IndiaAbstract: Nano-sized hepatitis B virus core virus-like particles (HBc-VLP are suitable for uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10 is an important vaccine candidate against tuberculosis. The purified antigen shows low immune response without adjuvant and tends to have low protective efficacy. The present study is based on the assumption that expression of these proteins on HBc nanoparticles would provide higher protection when compared to the native antigen alone. The cfp-10 gene was expressed as a fusion on the major immunodominant region of HBc-VLP, and the immune response in Balb/c mice was studied and compared to pure proteins, a mixture of antigens, and fusion protein-VLP, all without using any adjuvant. The humoral, cytokine, and splenocyte cell proliferation responses suggested that the HBc-VLP bearing CFP-10 generated an antigen-specific immune response in a Th1-dependent manner. By virtue of its self-adjuvant nature and ability to form nano-sized particles, HBc-VLPs are an excellent vaccine delivery system for use with subunit protein antigens identified in the course of recent vaccine research.Keywords: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, VLP, hepatitis B virus core particle, CFP-10, self-adjuvant, vaccine delivery

  12. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy.

  13. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Fan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy.

  14. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination.

  15. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination.

  16. HIV-1, human interaction database: current status and new features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako-Adjei, Danso; Fu, William; Wallin, Craig; Katz, Kenneth S; Song, Guangfeng; Darji, Dakshesh; Brister, J Rodney; Ptak, Roger G; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/retroviruses/hiv-1/interactions, serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. Each HIV-1 human protein interaction can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols and includes: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. In addition to specific HIV-1 protein-human protein interactions, included are interaction effects upon HIV-1 replication resulting when individual human gene expression is blocked using siRNA. A total of 3142 human genes are described participating in 12,786 protein-protein interactions, along with 1316 replication interactions described for each of 1250 human genes identified using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Together the data identifies 4006 human genes involved in 14,102 interactions. With the inclusion of siRNA interactions we introduce a redesigned web interface to enhance viewing, filtering and downloading of the combined data set.

  17. Strategies for Developing Oral Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Induced Cancer using Nanoparticle mediated Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kouzi, Samir A; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are a diverse group of small non-enveloped DNA viruses. Some HPVs are classified as low-risk as they are very rarely associated with neoplasia or cancer in the general population, and cause lenient warts. Other HPVs are considered as high-risk types because they are responsible for several important human cancers, including cervical cancer, a large proportion of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Transmission of HPV occurs primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The risk of contracting genital HPV infection and cervical cancer is influenced by sexual activity. Currently two prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil® (Merck, USA) and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), are available and recommended for mass immunization of adolescents. However, these vaccines have limitations as they are expensive and require cold chain storage and trained personnel to administer them by injection. The use of nano or micro particulate vaccines could address most of these limitations as they are stable at room temperature, inexpensive to produce and distribute to resource poor regions, and can be administered orally without the need for adjuvants in the formulation. Also it is possible to increase the efficiency of these particulate vaccines by decorating the surface of the nano or micro particulates with suitable ligands for targeted delivery. Oral vaccines, which can be delivered using particulate formulations, have the added potential to stimulate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue located in the digestive tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, both of which are important for the induction of effective mucosal response against many viruses. In addition, oral vaccines provide the opportunity to reduce production and administration costs and are very patient compliant. This review elaborately discusses different strategies that can be pursued to develop a nano or micro particulate oral vaccine for HPV induced cancers and

  18. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  19. Degradable polymeric nano-films and particles as delivery platforms for vaccines and immunotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xingfang

    Degradable polymeric materials provide opportunities for the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies by acting as platforms that facilitate the delivery of molecules to appropriate tissue and cellular locations to achieve therapeutic outcomes. To this end, we have designed and characterized nano-films and particles employing a hydrolytically degradable polymer for the delivery of vaccine antigens and immunotherapeutics. We first describe protein- and oligonucleotide-loaded layer-by-layer (LbL)-assembled multilayer thin films constructed based on electrostatic interactions between a cationic poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE, denoted Poly-1) with a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), and/or immunostimulatory CpG oligonucleotides for transcutaneous delivery. Linear growth of nanoscale Poly-I/OVA bilayers was observed. Dried OVA protein-loaded films rapidly deconstructed when rehydrated in saline solutions, releasing OVA as non-aggregated/non-degraded protein, suggesting that the structure of biomolecules integrated into these multilayer films are preserved during release. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and an in vivo murine ear skin model, we demonstrated delivery of OVA from LbL films into barrier-disrupted skin, uptake of the protein by skin-resident antigen-presenting cells (Langerhans cells), and transport of the antigen to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Dual incorporation of OVA and CpG oligonucleotides into the nanolayers of LbL films enabled dual release of the antigen and adjuvant with distinct kinetics for each component; OVA was rapidly released while CpG was released in a relatively sustained manner. Applied as skin patches, these films delivered OVA and CpG to Langerhans Cells in the skin. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of LbL films applied for the delivery of biomolecules into skin. This approach provides a new route for storage of vaccines and other immunotherapeutics in a solid-state thin film for subsequent

  20. Improved quantification of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells using an optimised method of intracellular HIV-1 gag p24 antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongbing; Yorke, Elisabeth; Hancock, Gemma; Clutton, Genevieve; Sande, Nellia; Angus, Brian; Smyth, Redmond; Mak, Johnson; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-05-31

    The capacity of CD8+ T cells to inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro strongly correlates with virus control in vivo. Post-hoc evaluations of HIV-1 vaccine candidates suggest that this immunological parameter is a promising benchmark of vaccine efficacy. Large-scale analysis of CD8+ T cell antiviral activity requires a rapid, robust and economical assay for accurate quantification of HIV-1 infection in primary CD4+ T cells. Detection of intracellular HIV-1 p24 antigen (p24 Ag) by flow cytometry is one such method but it is thought to be less sensitive and quantitative than p24 Ag ELISA. We report that fixation and permeabilisation of HIV-infected cells using paraformaldehyde/50% methanol/Nonidet P-40 instead of a conventional paraformaldehyde/saponin-based protocol improved their detection across multiplicities of infection (MOI) ranging from 10(-2) to 8×10(-5), and by nearly two-fold (pp24 Ag release during culture, thus validating its use as a measure of productive infection. We were also able to quantify infection with a panel of HIV-1 isolates representing the major clades. The protocol described here is rapid and cost-effective compared with ELISA and thus could be a useful component of immune monitoring of HIV-1 vaccines and interventions to reduce viral reservoirs.

  1. Mucosal vaccine delivery of antigens tightly bound to an adjuvant particle made from food-grade bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roosmalen, ML; Kanninga, R; El Khattabi, M; Neef, J; Audouy, S; Bosma, T; Kuipers, A; Post, E; Steen, A; Kok, J; Buist, G; Kuipers, OP; Robillard, G; Leenhouts, K

    2006-01-01

    Mucosal immunization with subunit vaccines requires new types of antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants for optimal immune responses. We have developed a non-living and non-genetically modified gram-positive bacterial delivery particle (GEM) that has built-in adjuvant activity and a high loading ca

  2. BTX AgilePulse(TM) system is an effective electroporation device for intramuscular and intradermal delivery of DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Hayk; Hovakimyan, Armine; Zagorski, Karen; Davtyan, Arpine; Petrushina, Irina; Agdashian, David; Murthy, Vidya; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G; Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines promote immune system activation in small animals and exhibit certain advantages when compared to conventional recombinant protein vaccines. However in clinical trials DNA vaccines are less effective in inducing potent immune responses due to the low delivery efficiency and expression of antigens. Currently, various delivery devices such as gene-guns, bioinjectors and electroporation systems are being used in order to increase the potency of DNA vaccines. However, the optimal delivery parameters are required and must be carefully set to obtain the highest levels of gene expression and strong immune responses in humans. The focus of this study was to optimize electroporation settings (voltage, pulse length, pulse intervals, and number of pulses), as well as the route of administration (intradermal vs. intramuscular) and dosage of the DNA epitope vaccine, AV-1959D, delivered by the BTX AgilePulse(TM) system. As a result, we have chosen the optimal settings for electroporation delivery using different routes of immunization with this vaccine, generating (i) robust antibody production to the B cell epitope (a small peptide, derived from β-amyloid), and (ii) strong cellular immune responses to Th epitopes (a small synthetic peptide and eleven peptides from various pathogens) incorporated into DNA vaccine platform.

  3. Adjuvanted HLA-supertype restricted subdominant peptides induce new T-cell immunity during untreated HIV-1-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Brandt, Lea; Vinner, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    -cell responses specific for one or more vaccine epitopes were induced in 10/10 vaccinees. The responses were dominated by CD107a and MIP1β expression. There were no significant changes in HIV-1 viral load or CD4 T-cell counts. Our study demonstrates that the peptide/CAF01 vaccine is safe and that it is possible......We investigated the potential of inducing additional T-cell immunity during chronic HIV-1 infection directed to subdominant HIV-1 epitopes from common HLA-supertypes. Ten treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals were immunized with peptides in the adjuvant CAF01. One individual received placebo...... to generate new HIV-1 T-cell responses to defined epitopes in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals....

  4. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  5. Poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles as versatile carrier platforms for vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavot, Vincent; Berthet, Morgane; Rességuier, Julien; Legaz, Sophie; Handké, Nadège; Gilbert, Sarah C; Paul, Stéphane; Verrier, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    The development of safe and effective vaccines for cancer and infectious diseases remains a major goal in public health. Over the last two decades, controlled release of vaccine antigens and immunostimulant molecules has been achieved using nanometer or micron-sized delivery vehicles synthesized using biodegradable polymers. In addition to achieving a depot effect, enhanced vaccine efficacy using such delivery vehicles has been attributed to efficient targeting of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers belong to one such family of polymers that have been a popular choice of material used in the design of these delivery vehicles. This review summarizes research findings from ourselves and others highlighting the promise of poly(lactic acid)- and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based vaccine carriers in enhancing immune responses.

  6. HERV-K–specific T cells eliminate diverse HIV-1/2 and SIV primary isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. Brad; Garrison, Keith E.; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Aidarus, Nasra; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; John, Vivek M.; Zhan, Wei; Faruk, Nabil F.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; Priumboom-Brees, Ingrid M.; Goodwin, David A.; Chen, Lianchun; Rieger, Melanie; Muscat-King, Sophie; Loudon, Peter T.; Stanley, Cole; Holditch, Sara J.; Wong, Jessica C.; Clayton, Kiera; Duan, Erick; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Sacha, Jonah B.; Brockman, Mark A.; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HIV-1 represents a major challenge in vaccine development. In this study, we establish a rationale for eliminating HIV-1–infected cells by targeting cellular immune responses against stable human endogenous retroviral (HERV) antigens. HERV DNA sequences in the human genome represent the remnants of ancient infectious retroviruses. We show that the infection of CD4+ T cells with HIV-1 resulted in transcription of the HML-2 lineage of HERV type K [HERV-K(HML-2)] and the expression of Gag and Env proteins. HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cells obtained from HIV-1–infected human subjects responded to HIV-1–infected cells in a Vif-dependent manner in vitro. Consistent with the proposed mode of action, a HERV-K(HML-2)–specific CD8+ T cell clone exhibited comprehensive elimination of cells infected with a panel of globally diverse HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV isolates in vitro. We identified a second T cell response that exhibited cross-reactivity between homologous HIV-1-Pol and HERV-K(HML-2)-Pol determinants, raising the possibility that homology between HIV-1 and HERVs plays a role in shaping, and perhaps enhancing, the T cell response to HIV-1. This justifies the consideration of HERV-K(HML-2)–specific and cross-reactive T cell responses in the natural control of HIV-1 infection and for exploring HERV-K(HML-2)–targeted HIV-1 vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:23143309

  7. Clade A HIV-1 Gag-Specific T Cell Responses Are Frequent but Do Not Correlate with Viral Loads in a Cohort of Treatment-Naive HIV-Infected Individuals Living in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Gómez Román, Victor Raúl; Skov Jensen, Sanne;

    2012-01-01

    In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…......In a phase I clinical trial in Guinea-Bissau, we have tested an immunotherapeutic 33 HIV-1 vaccine candidate in HIV-1-infected subjects (Gómez Román et al., under review).…...

  8. Vaccine potential of plasma bead-based dual antigen delivery system against experimental murine candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ejaj; Zia, Qamar; Fatima, Munazza Tamkeen; Owais, Mohammad; Saleemuddin, Mohammed

    2015-11-01

    The development of prophylactic anti-candidal vaccine comprising the Candida albicans cytosolic proteins (Cp) as antigen and plasma beads (PB) prepared from plasma as sustained delivery system, is described. The immune-prophylactic potential of various PBs-based dual antigen delivery systems, co-entrapping Cp pre-entrapped in PLGA microspheres were tested in the murine model. Induction of cell mediated immunity was measured by assaying DTH and NO production as well as in vitro proliferation of lymphocytes derived from the immunized animals. Expression of surface markers on APCs (CD80, CD86) and T-cells (CD4+, CD8+) was also evaluated. Humoral immune response was studied by measuring circulating anti-Cp antibodies and their subclasses. When the prophylactic efficacy of the vaccines was tested in mice challenged with virulent C. albicans, the PB-based formulation (PB-PLGA-Cp vaccine) was found to be most effective in the generation of desirable immune response, in terms of suppression of fungal load and facilitating the survival of the immunized animals.

  9. A gel delivery system for coccidiosis vaccine: uniformity of distribution of oocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, T; Lee, E H

    2000-01-01

    A patented gel delivery system being used to deliver coccidiosis vaccine to poultry hatchlings is assessed. For effective vaccination, the coccidial oocysts must be uniformly suspended before exposure to birds. The uniformity of distribution within the gel was evaluated by incorporating a culture of chicken gut flora into gel sausages, placing sections of the sausage on culture plates, determining the appearance and distribution of bacterial colonies on culture plates after incubation, and verifying by cell counts. The uniformity of distribution of similarly prepared coccidial oocysts was verified by infecting birds with 40,000 Eimeria tenella oocysts delivered via the gel. Gel-inoculated birds were compared with control birds inoculated PO with 40,000 oocysts suspended in water by using cecal lesion scores. Both the appearance and colony counts of chicken gut flora from the gel were uniform. The standard deviation in the lesion scores for the gel-inoculated group and the water-inoculated groups were 0.51 and 0.69, respectively. The results indicate that a gel delivery system can provide uniform distribution of live organisms and vaccine agents to birds. Images Figure 1a. Figure 1b. PMID:10945126

  10. In vivo investigation of twin-screw extruded lipid implants for vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Marie-Paule; Young, Katie; Winter, Gerhard; Hook, Sarah; Engert, Julia

    2014-07-01

    Sustained release systems have become the focus of attention in vaccine delivery as they may reduce or prevent the need for repeated dosing. In this work, lipid implants were prepared by twin-screw extrusion and investigated as vaccine delivery systems in vivo. The lipid implants consisted of cholesterol, soybean lecithin, and Dynasan 114. Ovalbumin (OVA) was employed as a model antigen and Quil-A (QA) as an adjuvant. In addition, OVA and QA loaded liposomes were prepared by the lipid-film hydration method, freeze-dried and then added to the lipid matrix prior to extrusion. Implants were administered subcutaneously and the kinetics of antigen release as well as the overall immune response stimulated were analysed by measuring CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation, OVA-specific IgG production as well as cytokine (IFN-γ and IL4) secretion. Vaccine release from the implants was completed by 14 days. Inclusion of adjuvant into the implants was required for the generation of cellular and humoral immune responses. Inclusion of liposomes into the implant did not enhance the resulting immune responses generated.

  11. Restricted isotype, distinct variable gene usage, and high rate of gp120 specificity of HIV-1 envelope-specific B cells in colostrum compared with those in blood of HIV-1-infected, lactating African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, C R; Vandergrift, N; Jeffries, T L; McGuire, E; Fouda, G G; Liebl, B; Marshall, D J; Gurley, T C; Stiegel, L; Whitesides, J F; Friedman, J; Badiabo, A; Foulger, A; Yates, N L; Tomaras, G D; Kepler, T B; Liao, H X; Haynes, B F; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2015-03-01

    A successful HIV-1 vaccine must elicit immune responses that impede mucosal virus transmission, though functional roles of protective HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific mucosal antibodies remain unclear. Colostrum is a rich source of readily accessible mucosal B cells that may help define the mucosal antibody response contributing to prevention of postnatal HIV-1 transmission. To examine the HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum B-cell repertoire, single B cells were isolated from 17 chronically HIV-infected, lactating women, producing 51 blood and 39 colostrum HIV-1 Env-specific B-cell antibodies. All HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum-derived antibodies were immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 isotype and had mean heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) lengths and mutation frequencies similar to those isolated from blood. However, variable heavy chain (VH) gene subfamily 1(∼)69 usage was higher among colostrum than blood HIV-1 Env-reactive antibodies (49% vs. 20%, P=0.006, Fisher's exact test). Additionally, more HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum antibodies were gp120 specific than those isolated from blood (44% vs. 16%, P=0.005, Fisher's exact test). One cross-compartment HIV-1 Env-specific clonal B-cell lineage was identified. These unique characteristics of colostrum B-cell antibodies suggest selective homing of HIV-1-specific IgG1-secreting memory B cells to the mammary gland and have implications for targeting mucosal B-cell populations by vaccination.

  12. Immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding regulatory/accessory proteins derived from three different prevalent strains in China%三个不同亚型HIV-1调节/辅助基因DNA疫苗的构建和免疫原性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解晓燕; 万延民; 李斌; 史继静; 仇超; 刘朝奇; 徐建青; 张焕相

    2011-01-01

    目的 构建表达中国主要流行亚型HIV-1 tat-rev-integrase(c-half)-vif-nef(TRIVN)融合基因的DNA疫苗,并比较其免疫原性.方法 按人源密码子使用频率对HIV-1 CN54(B'/C重组亚型)与RL42(B'亚型)的tat、rev、integrase(C端144个氨基酸)、vif和nef基因序列进行优化,构建DNA疫苗.通过Western blot测定上述DNA疫苗与HIV-1 AE2f株来源的tat-rev-integrase(c-half)-vifnef融合基因DNA疫苗的体外表达效率;利用小鼠模型比较3个DNA疫苗单独免疫与混合免疫的免疫原性特征.结果 限制性酶切及DNA测序结果表明两个融合基因重组质粒构建正确;Western blot 检测结果显示:3个DNA疫苗的体外表达效率基本相当.小鼠免疫后ELISPOT检测结果显示:在总T细胞反应强度方面AE2f-TRIVN最强[(948.0±330.0)SFCs/106脾细胞],次之为混合DNA免疫组(500.0±155.0 SFCs/106脾细胞),再者为RL42-TRIVN[(195.1±44.0)SFCs/106脾细胞],CN54-TRIVN最弱[(89.5±17.0)SFCs/106脾细胞].T细胞反应分布情况显示:3个DNA疫苗单独免疫时,T细胞反应主要集中在Integrase和Vif蛋白上;而混合免疫可以部分改善针对Nef蛋白的免疫识别.结论 3个亚型TRIVN DNA疫苗中以AE2f-TRIVN的免疫原性最强;DNA疫苗混合免疫倾向于促进特异性T细胞反应在TRIVN融合抗原上的均匀分布.%0bjective To determine the immunogenicities of DNA vaccines expressing tat-rev-integrase(c-half)-vif-neffusion genes(TRIVN) derived from prevalent B', B'/C and AE recombinant subtypes of HIV-1 in China. Methods Two DNA vaccines were constructed by inserting the codon optimized tat-revintegrase(c-half)-vif-nef fusion genes derived from B' and B'/C subtype of HIV-1 into mammalian expression vector pSVI. 0. DNA vaccine containing tat-rev-integrase (c-half)-vif-nef fusion gene derived from HIV-1AE2f has been constructed previously. In vitro expression efficiencies of three DNA vaccines were determined by Western blot and their immunogenicities were

  13. Maturation Pathways of Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimiter S. Dimitrov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Several human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs and antibody fragments, including the best characterized in terms of structure-function b12 and Fab X5, exhibit relatively potent and broad HIV-1 neutralizing activity. However, the elicitation of b12 or b12-like antibodies in vivo by vaccine immunogens based on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env has not been successful. B12 is highly divergent from the closest corresponding germline antibody while X5 is less divergent. We have hypothesized that the relatively high degree of specific somatic hypermutations may preclude binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env to closest germline antibodies, and that identifying antibodies that are intermediates in the pathways to maturation could help design novel vaccine immunogens to guide the immune system for their enhanced elicitation. In support of this hypothesis we have previously found that a germline-like b12 (monovalent and bivalent scFv as an Fc fusion protein or IgG lacks measurable binding to an Env as measured by ELISA with a sensitivity in the μM range [1]; here we present evidence confirming and expanding these findings for a panel of Envs. In contrast, a germline-like scFv X5 bound Env with high (nM affinity. To begin to explore the maturation pathways of these antibodies we identified several possible b12 intermediate antibodies and tested their neutralizing activity. These intermediate antibodies neutralized only some HIV-1 isolates and with relatively weak potency. In contrast, germline-like scFv X5 neutralized a subset of the tested HIV-1 isolates with comparable efficiencies to that of the mature X5. These results could help explain the relatively high immunogenicity of the coreceptor binding site on gp120 and the abundance of CD4-induced (CD4i antibodies in HIV-1-infected patients (X5 is a CD4i antibody as well as the maturation pathway of X5. They also can help identify antigens that can bind specifically to b12 germline and

  14. Development of an HIV-1 Subtype Panel in China: Isolation and Characterization of 30 HIV-1 Primary Strains Circulating in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwan Han

    Full Text Available The complex epidemic and significant diversity of HIV-1 strains in China pose serious challenges for surveillance and diagnostic assays, vaccine development and clinical management. There is a lack of HIV-1 isolates in current canonical HIV-1 subtype panels that can represent HIV-1 diversity in China; an HIV-1 subtype panel for China is urgently needed.Blood samples were collected from HIV-1 infected patients participating in the drug-resistance surveillance program in China. The samples were isolated, cultured and stored as neat culture supernatant. The HIV-1 isolates were fully characterized. The panel was used to compare 2 viral load assays and 2 p24 assays as the examples of how this panel could be used.An HIV-1 subtype panel for China composed of 30 HIV-1 primary strains of four subtypes (B [including Thai-B], CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and G was established. The samples were isolated and cultured to a high-titer (10(6-10(9 copies/ml/high-volume (40 ml. The HIV-1 isolates were fully characterized by the final viral load, p24 concentration, gag-pol and envC2V3 sequencing, co-receptor prediction, determination of the four amino acids at the tip of the env V3-loop, glycosylation sites in the V3 loop and the drug-resistance mutations. The comparison of two p24 assays and two viral load assays on the isolates illustrated how this panel may be used for the evaluation of diagnostic assay performance. The Pearson value between p24 assays were 0.938. The viral load results showed excellent concordance and agreement for samples of Thai-B, but lower correlations for samples of CRF01_AE.The current panel of 30 HIV-1 isolates served as a basis for the development of a comprehensive panel of fully characterized viral isolates, which could reflect the current dynamic and complex HIV-1 epidemic in China. This panel will be available to support HIV-1 research, assay evaluation, vaccine and drug development.

  15. A Case of Seronegative HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Spivak, Adam M; Brennan, Tim; O'Connell, Karen; Sydnor, Emily; Thomas M Williams; Robert F. Siliciano; Gallant, Joel E.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    Patients infected with HIV-1 typically seroconvert within weeks of primary infection. In rare cases, patients do not develop antibodies against HIV-1 despite demonstrable infection. We describe an HLA-B*5802 positive individual who presented with AIDS despite repeatedly negative HIV-1 antibody screening tests. Phylogenetic analysis of env clones revealed little sequence diversity, and weak HIV-1 specific CD8+ T cell responses were present to Gag epitopes. The patient seroconverted after immun...

  16. Diagnostik af HIV-1 infektionen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, C B; Dickmeiss, E; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1991-01-01

    Different methods have been developed for the diagnosis of HIV infection, i.e. detection of antibodies, antigen and proviral DNA. ELISA methods for detecting HIV-1 antibodies are widely used as screening assays. A sample which is repeatedly positive with ELISA is re-tested with a confirmatory test....... For research purposes, detection of small amounts of proviral DNA can be made with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method is not yet applicable in routine diagnosis of HIV infection......., e.g. western blot. Antibodies to HIV-1 are not detectable until 2-3 months after infection, but antigens may be detectable during the last weeks of this initial period, though they disappear with the appearance of the antibodies. In the later stages of HIV infection, HIV antigen is again detectable...

  17. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  18. V3 peptide binding pattern and HIV-1 transmission route in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica E. Pinto

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available To characterize antibody binding to a panel of V3 loop peptides representing diverse HIV-1 neutralization epitopes, 149 HIV-1 infected individuals from Rio de Janeiro (RJ were investigated. Results were analyzed with respect to risk factors for infection and other epidemiological and clinical data. Peptide reactivity was not associated with sex, clinical status, CD4 counts, antigenemia or ß2-microglobulin serum level. A segregation of peptide reactivity according to route of infection was encountered. This finding suggests that more then one viral strain may be circulating in RJ, in subjects with different risk factors for HIV-1 infection. An investigation of prevalent HIV-1 genotypes, serotypes and immunotypes may be of importance for the design and selection of potential vaccines to be used in Brazil as well as for the selection of populations to be included in future vaccine efficacy trials.

  19. Computational analysis of HIV-1 resistance based on gene expression profiles and the virus-host interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available A very small proportion of people remain negative for HIV infection after repeated HIV-1 viral exposure, which is called HIV-1 resistance. Understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 resistance is important for the development of HIV-1 vaccines and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS therapies. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of CD4+ T cells from HIV-1-resistant individuals and HIV-susceptible individuals. One hundred eighty-five discriminative HIV-1 resistance genes were identified using the Minimum Redundancy-Maximum Relevance (mRMR and Incremental Feature Selection (IFS methods. The virus protein target enrichment analysis of the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes suggested that the HIV-1 protein nef might play an important role in HIV-1 infection. Moreover, we identified 29 infection information exchanger genes from the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes based on a virus-host interaction network analysis. The infection information exchanger genes are located on the shortest paths between virus-targeted proteins and are important for the coordination of virus infection. These proteins may be useful targets for AIDS prevention or therapy, as intervention in these pathways could disrupt communication with virus-targeted proteins and HIV-1 infection.

  20. Could low level laser therapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy lead to complete eradication of HIV-1 in vitro?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection remains a major health problem despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has greatly reduced mortality rates. Due to the unavailability of an effective vaccine or a...

  1. The effects of low level laser therapy on both HIV-1 infected and uninfected TZM-bl cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection remains a major health problem despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has greatly reduced mortality rates. Due to the unavailability of an effective vaccine and treatment...

  2. Driving HIV-1 into a Vulnerable Corner by Taking Advantage of Viral Adaptation and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shigeyoshi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for controlling human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Recently, progress in identifying and characterizing highly potent broadly neutralizing antibodies has provided valuable templates for HIV-1 therapy and vaccine design. Nevertheless, HIV-1, like many RNA viruses, exhibits genetically diverse populations known as quasispecies. Evolution of quasispecies can occur rapidly in response to selective pressures, such as that exerted by ART and the immune system. Hence, rapid viral evolution leading to drug resistance and/or immune evasion is a significant barrier to the development of effective HIV-1 treatments and vaccines. Here, we describe our recent investigations into evolutionary pressure exerted by anti-retroviral drugs and monoclonal neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) on HIV-1 envelope sequences. We also discuss sensitivities of HIV-1 escape mutants to maraviroc, a CCR5 inhibitor, and HIV-1 sensitized to NAbs by small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds. These studies help to develop an understanding of viral evolution and escape from both anti-retroviral drugs and the immune system, and also provide fundamental insights into the combined use of NAbs and entry inhibitors. These findings of the adaptation and evolution of HIV in response to drug and immune pressure will inform the development of more effective antiviral therapeutic strategies. PMID:28360890

  3. Diphtheria Antibodies and T lymphocyte Counts in Patients Infected with HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. B. Speranza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the IgG levels anti-diphtheria (D-Ab and T cell counts (CD4+ and CD8+ in HIV-1 infected subjects undergoing or not highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Approximately 70% of all HIV-1 patients were unprotected against diphtheria. There were no differences in D-Ab according to CD4 counts. Untreated patients had higher D-Ab (geometric mean of 0.62 IU/ml than HAART-patients (geometric mean of 0.39 IU/ml. The data indicated the necessity of keeping all HIV-1 patients up-to-date with their vaccination.

  4. New tools to expand regulatory T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Mathieu; King, Melanie; Addo, Marylyn Martina

    2013-05-30

    CD4+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are potent immune modulators and serve an important function in human immune homeostasis. Depletion of Tregs has led to measurable increases in antigen-specific T cell responses in vaccine settings for cancer and infectious pathogens. However, their role in HIV-1 immuno-pathogenesis remains controversial, as they could either serve to suppress deleterious HIV-1-associated immune activation and thus slow HIV-1 disease progression or alternatively suppress HIV-1-specific immunity and thereby promote virus spread. Understanding and modulating Treg function in the context of HIV-1 could lead to potential new strategies for immunotherapy or HIV vaccines. However, important open questions remain on their role in the context of HIV-1 infection, which needs to be carefully studied. Representing roughly 5% of human CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood, studying the Treg population has proven to be difficult, especially in HIV-1 infected individuals where HIV-1-associated CD4 T cell and with that Treg depletion occurs. The characterization of regulatory T cells in individuals with advanced HIV-1 disease or tissue samples, for which only very small biological samples can be obtained, is therefore extremely challenging. We propose a technical solution to overcome these limitations using isolation and expansion of Tregs from HIV-1-positive individuals. Here we describe an easy and robust method to successfully expand Tregs isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals in vitro. Flow-sorted CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) Tregs were stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 coated beads and cultured in the presence of IL-2. The expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4 and HELIOS compared to conventional T cells and were shown to be highly suppressive. Easier access to large numbers of Tregs will allow researchers to address important questions concerning their role in HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. We believe answering these questions may provide useful

  5. Clinical significance of HIV-1 coreceptor usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusso Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of phenotypically distinct HIV-1 variants with different prevalence during the progression of the disease has been one of the earliest discoveries in HIV-1 biology, but its relevance to AIDS pathogenesis remains only partially understood. The physiological basis for the phenotypic variability of HIV-1 was elucidated with the discovery of distinct coreceptors employed by the virus to infect susceptible cells. The role of the viral phenotype in the variable clinical course and treatment outcome of HIV-1 infection has been extensively investigated over the past two decades. In this review, we summarize the major findings on the clinical significance of the HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  6. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies for transdermal sustained delivery of drug and vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong X

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyun Hong,1,2,* Liangming Wei,3,* Fei Wu,2,* Zaozhan Wu,2 Lizhu Chen,2 Zhenguo Liu,1 Weien Yuan2 1Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Research Institute of Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Microneedles were first conceptualized for drug delivery many decades ago, overcoming the shortages and preserving the advantages of hypodermic needle and conventional transdermal drug-delivery systems to some extent. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies have been used for transdermal sustained deliveries of different drugs and vaccines. This review describes microneedle geometry and the representative dissolving and biodegradable microneedle delivery methods via the skin, followed by the fabricating methods. Finally, this review puts forward some perspectives that require further investigation. Keywords: microneedle, dissolving, biodegradable, sustained release

  7. Co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody and founder virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Lynch, Rebecca; Zhou, Tongqing; Gao, Feng; Alam, S Munir; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Roskin, Krishna M; Schramm, Chaim A; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhu, Jiang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mullikin, James C; Gnanakaran, S; Hraber, Peter; Wiehe, Kevin; Kelsoe, Garnett; Yang, Guang; Xia, Shi-Mao; Montefiori, David C; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Scearce, Richard M; Soderberg, Kelly A; Cohen, Myron; Kamanga, Gift; Louder, Mark K; Tran, Lillian M; Chen, Yue; Cai, Fangping; Chen, Sheri; Moquin, Stephanie; Du, Xiulian; Joyce, M Gordon; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kepler, Thomas B; Korber, Bette T M; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2013-04-25

    Current human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccines elicit strain-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies arise in approximately 20% of HIV-1-infected individuals, and details of their generation could provide a blueprint for effective vaccination. Here we report the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an African donor followed from the time of infection. The mature antibody, CH103, neutralized approximately 55% of HIV-1 isolates, and its co-crystal structure with the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 revealed a new loop-based mechanism of CD4-binding-site recognition. Virus and antibody gene sequencing revealed concomitant virus evolution and antibody maturation. Notably, the unmutated common ancestor of the CH103 lineage avidly bound the transmitted/founder HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and evolution of antibody neutralization breadth was preceded by extensive viral diversification in and near the CH103 epitope. These data determine the viral and antibody evolution leading to induction of a lineage of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies, and provide insights into strategies to elicit similar antibodies by vaccination.

  8. Frequent intra-subtype recombination among HIV-1 circulating in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireen E Kiwelu

    Full Text Available The study estimated the prevalence of HIV-1 intra-subtype recombinant variants among female bar and hotel workers in Tanzania. While intra-subtype recombination occurs in HIV-1, it is generally underestimated. HIV-1 env gp120 V1-C5 quasispecies from 45 subjects were generated by single-genome amplification and sequencing (median (IQR of 38 (28-50 sequences per subject. Recombination analysis was performed using seven methods implemented within the recombination detection program version 3, RDP3. HIV-1 sequences were considered recombinant if recombination signals were detected by at least three methods with p-values of ≤0.05 after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. HIV-1 in 38 (84% subjects showed evidence for intra-subtype recombination including 22 with HIV-1 subtype A1, 13 with HIV-1 subtype C, and 3 with HIV-1 subtype D. The distribution of intra-patient recombination breakpoints suggested ongoing recombination and showed selective enrichment of recombinant variants in 23 (60% subjects. The number of subjects with evidence of intra-subtype recombination increased from 29 (69% to 36 (82% over one year of follow-up, although the increase did not reach statistical significance. Adjustment for intra-subtype recombination is important for the analysis of multiplicity of HIV infection. This is the first report of high prevalence of intra-subtype recombination in the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Tanzania, a region where multiple HIV-1 subtypes co-circulate. HIV-1 intra-subtype recombination increases viral diversity and presents additional challenges for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  9. Identification of HIV-1 specific T lymphocyte responses in highly exposed persistently seronegative Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-wei; SHAO Yi-ming; HONG Kun-xue; MA Jun; YUAN Lin; LIU Sha; CHEN Jian-ping; ZHANG Yuan-zhi; RUAN Yu-hua; XU Jian-qing

    2006-01-01

    Background Studies of highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS) individuals may provide valuable information on mechanisms of protection and on vaccine design. Cellular immune responses play a critical role in containing human immunodeficiency virus. However, the cellular immune responses in HEPS individuals have not been thoroughly assessed at the entire viral genome level.Methods Ten HEPS Chinese with a history of frequent penetrative vaginal intercourse (mean frequency, at least once a week), with some unprotected sexual contact occurring in the weeks or days immediately before enrollment, 25 HIV-1 seropositive individuals, 10 HIV-1-seronegative healthy individuals with low-risk sexual behavior and no history suggestive of exposure to HIV-1 infection were enrolled. HIV-1-specific T cell responses were comprehensively analyzed by an interferon- γ Elispot assay against 770 overlapping peptides spanning all HIV-1 proteins.Results HIV-1-specific T-cell responses of interferon- γ secretion were identified in 3 (30%) out of 10 HEPS individuals; the specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes were targeted at Pol (2/10), Env (2/10), and Tat (1/10).HIV-1-specific T-cell responses of interferon- γ secretion were identified in 20 (80%) out of 25 seropositive intravenous drug users (IDUs), revealing that all HIV-1 proteins and protein subunits could serve as targets for HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses with 85% recognizing Gag, 80% recognizing Nef, 75% recognizing Pol,60% recognizing Env, 55% recognizing Vpu, 45% recognizing Vpr, 20% recognizing Vif, 20% recognizing Tat and 15% recognizing Rev in these seropositive individuals. None of the seronegative healthy individuals gave the positive T-cell responses.Conclusions About 30% of HEPS Chinese mounted HIV-1 specific T cell immune responses. Cell-mediated immunity against HIV-1 may be developed through non-productive infections.

  10. High Maternal HIV-1 Viral Load During Pregnancy Is Associated With Reduced Placental Transfer of Measles IgG Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Carey; Nduati, Ruth; Haigwood, Nancy; Sutton, William; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Richardson, Barbra; John-Stewart, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies among HIV-1–infected women have demonstrated reduced placental transfer of IgG antibodies against measles and other pathogens. As a result, infants born to women with HIV-1 infection may not acquire adequate passive immunity in utero and this could contribute to high infant morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population. Methods To determine factors associated with decreased placental transfer of measles IgG, 55 HIV-1–infected pregnant women who were enrolled in a Nairobi perinatal HIV-1 transmission study were followed. Maternal CD4 count, HIV-1 viral load, and HIV-1–specific gp41 antibody concentrations were measured antenatally and at delivery. Measles IgG concentrations were assayed in maternal blood and infant cord blood obtained during delivery to calculate placental antibody transfer. Results Among 40 women (73%) with positive measles titers, 30 (75%) were found to have abnormally low levels of maternofetal IgG transfer (<95%). High maternal HIV-1 viral load at 32 weeks’ gestation and at delivery was associated with reductions in placental transfer (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0056, respectively) and infant measles IgG concentrations in cord blood (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0073, respectively). High maternal HIV-1–specific gp41 antibody titer was also highly correlated with both decreased placental transfer (P = 0.0080) and decreased infant IgG (P < 0.0001). Conclusions This is the first study to evaluate the relationship between maternal HIV-1 viremia, maternal HIV-1 antibody concentrations, and passive immunity among HIV-1–exposed infants. These data support the hypothesis that high HIV-1 viral load during the last trimester may impair maternofetal transfer of IgG and increases risk of measles and other serious infections among HIV-1–exposed infants. PMID:16280707

  11. Thermo-sensitive hydrogel PLGA-PEG-PLGA as a vaccine delivery system for intramuscular immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yu; Xue, Wei; Wang, Hong; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-11-25

    In this work, we explored the potential of thermo-sensitive PLGA-PEG-PLGA with sol-gel transition temperature around 32℃ as an intramuscular vaccine delivery system by using ovalbumin as a model antigen. First, in vitro release test showed that the PLGA-PEG-PLGA-deriving hydrogels could release ovalbumin in vitro in a more sustainable way. From fluorescence living imaging, 50-200 mg/mL of PLGA-PEG-PLGA formulations could release antigen in a sustainable manner in vivo, suggesting that the PLGA-PEG-PLGA hydrogel worked as an antigen-depot. Further, the sustainable antigen release from the PLGA-PEG-PLGA hydrogels increased antigen availability in the spleens of the immunized mice. The intramuscular immunization results showed that 50-200 mg/mL of PLGA-PEG-PLGA formulations promoted significantly more potent antigen-specific IgG immune response. In addition, 200 mg/mL of PLGA-PEG-PLGA formulation significantly enhanced the secretion of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. From in vitro splenocyte proliferation assay, 50-200 mg/mL of PLGA-PEG-PLGA formulations all initiated significantly higher splenocyte activation. These results indicate that the thermo-sensitive and injectable PLGA-PEG-PLGA hydrogels (particularly, 200 mg/mL of PLGA-PEG-PLGA-based hydrogel) own promising potential as an intramuscular vaccine delivery system.

  12. O-2'-hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan nanoparticles for the delivery of live Newcastle disease vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chunxiao; Kang, Hong; Yang, Wanqiu; Sun, Jinyan; Liu, Chunlong; Cheng, Guogang; Rong, Guangyu; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xin; Jin, Zheng; Zhao, Kai

    2015-10-05

    A novel complex chitosan derivative, O-2'-hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan (O-2'-HACC), was synthesized and used to make nanoparticles as a delivery vehicle for live attenuated Newcastle disease vaccine. We found that O-2'-HACC had high antimicrobial activity, low toxicity, and a high safety level. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was then encapsulated in the O-2'-HACC nanoparticles (NDV/La Sota-O-2'-HACC-NPs) by the ionic crosslinking method, and the properties of the resulting nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy, Zeta potential analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. NDV/La Sota-O-2'-HACC-NPs had regular spherical morphologies and high stability, with an encapsulation efficiency of 95.68 ± 2.2% and a loading capacity of 58.75 ± 4.03%. An in vitro release assay indicated that release of NDV from NDV/La Sota-O-2'-HACC-NPs occurred slowly. Specific pathogen-free chickens immunized with NDV/La Sota-O-2'-HACC-NPs intranasally had much stronger cellular, humoral and mucosal immune responses than did those immunized intramuscularly or with live attenuated Newcastle disease vaccine. NDV/La Sota-O-2'-HACC-NPs are a novel drug delivery carrier with immense potential in medical applications.

  13. Polyacrylate-based delivery system for self-adjuvanting anticancer peptide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tzu-Yu; Hussein, Waleed M; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Jia, Zhongfan; Reiman, Jennifer M; Zaman, Mehfuz; McMillan, Nigel A J; Good, Michael F; Monteiro, Michael J; Toth, Istvan; Skwarczynski, Mariusz

    2015-01-22

    Vaccination can provide a safe alternative to chemotherapy by using the body's natural defense mechanisms to create a potent immune response against tumor cells. Peptide-based therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers are usually designed to elicit cytotoxic T cell responses by targeting the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein. However, peptides alone lack immunogenicity, and an additional adjuvant or external delivery system is required. In this study, we developed new polymer-peptide conjugates to create an efficient self-adjuvanting system for peptide-based therapeutic vaccines. These conjugates reduced tumor growth and eradicated E7-positive TC-1 tumors in mice after a "single shot" immunization, without the help from an external adjuvant. The new conjugates had a significantly higher anticancer efficacy than the antigen formulated with a commercial adjuvant. Furthermore, the polymer-peptide conjugates were promptly taken up by antigen presenting cells, including dendritic cells and macrophages, and efficiently activated CD4(+) T-helper cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte cells.

  14. Physical and immunogenic stability of spray freeze-dried influenza vaccine powder for pulmonary delivery : Comparison of inulin, dextran, or a mixture of dextran and trehalose as protectants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murugappan, Senthil; Patil, Harshad P; Kanojia, Gaurav; ter Veer, Wouter; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Frijlink, Henderik W; Huckriede, Anke; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2013-01-01

    One of the advantages of dry influenza vaccines over conventional liquid influenza vaccines is that they can be used for alternative routes of administration. Previous studies showed that spray freeze-drying is an excellent technique to prepare vaccine containing powders for pulmonary delivery U.P.

  15. Serum and mucosal antibody responses to inactivated polio vaccine after sublingual immunization using a thermoresponsive gel delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jessica A; Blum, Jeremy S; Hosken, Nancy A; Marshak, Joshua O; Duncan, Lauren; Zhu, Changcheng; Norton, Elizabeth B; Clements, John D; Koelle, David M; Chen, Dexiang; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Lal, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Administering vaccines directly to mucosal surfaces can induce both serum and mucosal immune responses. Mucosal responses may prevent establishment of initial infection at the port of entry and subsequent dissemination to other sites. The sublingual route is attractive for mucosal vaccination, but both a safe, potent adjuvant and a novel formulation are needed to achieve an adequate immune response. We report the use of a thermoresponsive gel (TRG) combined with a double mutant of a bacterial heat-labile toxin (dmLT) for sublingual immunization with a trivalent inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) in mice. This TRG delivery system, which changes from aqueous solution to viscous gel upon contact with the mucosa at body temperature, helps to retain the formulation at the site of delivery and has functional adjuvant activity from the inclusion of dmLT. IPV was administered to mice either sublingually in the TRG delivery system or intramuscularly in phosphate-buffered saline. We measured poliovirus type-specific serum neutralizing antibodies as well as polio-specific serum Ig and IgA antibodies in serum, saliva, and fecal samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Mice receiving sublingual vaccination via the TRG delivery system produced both mucosal and serum antibodies, including IgA. Intramuscularly immunized animals produced only serum neutralizing and binding Ig but no detectable IgA. This study provides proof of concept for sublingual immunization using the TRG delivery system, comprising a thermoresponsive gel and dmLT adjuvant.

  16. Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate antigenic structures and engage broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Gregory H; Irimia, Adriana; Ofek, Gilad; Kwong, Peter D; Wilson, Ian A; Walensky, Loren D

    2014-12-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling can restore bioactive α-helical structure to natural peptides, yielding research tools and prototype therapeutics to dissect and target protein interactions. Here we explore the capacity of peptide stapling to generate high-fidelity, protease-resistant mimics of antigenic structures for vaccine development. HIV-1 has been refractory to vaccine technologies thus far, although select human antibodies can broadly neutralize HIV-1 by targeting sequences of the gp41 juxtamembrane fusion apparatus. To develop candidate HIV-1 immunogens, we generated and characterized stabilized α-helices of the membrane-proximal external region (SAH-MPER) of gp41. SAH-MPER peptides were remarkably protease resistant and bound to the broadly neutralizing 4E10 and 10E8 antibodies with high affinity, recapitulating the structure of the MPER epitope when differentially engaged by the two anti-HIV Fabs. Thus, stapled peptides may provide a new opportunity to develop chemically stabilized antigens for vaccination.

  17. Aptamer-targeted RNAi for HIV-1 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J

    2011-01-01

    The highly specific mechanism of RNA (RNAi) that inhibits the expression of disease genes is increasingly being harnessed to develop a new class of therapeutics for a wide variety of human maladies. The successful use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for therapeutic purposes requires safe and efficient delivery to specific cells and tissues. Herein, we demonstrate novel cell type-specific dual inhibitory function anti-gp120 aptamer-siRNA delivery systems for HIV-1 therapy, in which both the aptamer and the siRNA portions have potent anti-HIV activities. The envelope glycoprotein is expressed on the surface of HIV-1 infected cells, allowing binding and internalization of the aptamer-siRNA chimeric molecules. The Dicer substrate siRNA delivered by the aptamers is functionally processed by Dicer, resulting in specific inhibition of HIV-1 replication and infectivity in cultured CEM T-cells and primary blood mononuclear cells. Our results provide a set of novel aptamer-targeted RNAi therapeutics to combat HIV and further validate the use of anti-gp120 aptamers for delivery of Dicer substrate siRNAs.

  18. Efficient Gene Transfer Mediated by HIV-1-based Defective Lentivector and Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have drawn considerable attention recently and show great promise to become important delivery vehicles for future gene transfer manipulation. In the present study we have optimized a protocol for preparation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-based defective lentiviral vectors (DLV) and characterized these vectors in terms of their transduction of different cells. Transient co-transfection of 293T packaging cells with DNA plasmids encoding lentiviral vector constituents resulted in production of high-titer DLV (0.5-1.2 × 107IU/mL), which can be further concentrated over 100-fold through a single step ultracentrifugation. These vectors were capable of transducing a variety of cells from both primate and non-primate sources and high transduction efficiency was achieved using concentrated vectors. Assessment of potential generation of RCV revealed no detection of infection by infectious particles in DLV-transduced CEM, SupT-1 and MT-2 cells. Long-term culture of transduced cells showed a stable expression of transgenes without apparent alteration in cellular morphology and growth kinetics. Vector mobilization to untransduced cells mediated by wild-type HIV-1 infection was confirmed in this test. Challenge of transduced human T-lymphocytes with wild-type HIV-1 showed these cells are totally resistant to the viral infection. Considering the effective gene transfer and stable gene expression, safety and anti-HIV activity, these DLV vectors warrant further exploration for their potential use as a gene transfer vehicle in the development of gene therapy protocols.

  19. A microarray MEMS device for biolistic delivery of vaccine and drug powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirmoradi, Fatemeh Nazly; Pattekar, Ashish V; Linn, Felicia; Recht, Michael I; Volkel, Armin R; Wang, Qian; Anderson, Greg B; Veiseh, Mandana; Kjono, Sandra; Peeters, Eric; Uhland, Scott A; Chow, Eugene M

    2015-01-01

    We report a biolistic technology platform for physical delivery of particle formulations of drugs or vaccines using parallel arrays of microchannels, which generate highly collimated jets of particles with high spatial resolution. Our approach allows for effective delivery of therapeutics sequentially or concurrently (in mixture) at a specified target location or treatment area. We show this new platform enables the delivery of a broad range of particles with various densities and sizes into both in vitro and ex vivo skin models. Penetration depths of ∼1 mm have been achieved following a single ejection of 200 µg high-density gold particles, as well as 13.6 µg low-density polystyrene-based particles into gelatin-based skin simulants at 70 psi inlet gas pressure. Ejection of multiple shots at one treatment site enabled deeper penetration of ∼3 mm in vitro, and delivery of a higher dose of 1 mg gold particles at similar inlet gas pressure. We demonstrate that particle penetration depths can be optimized in vitro by adjusting the inlet pressure of the carrier gas, and dosing is controlled by drug reservoirs that hold precise quantities of the payload, which can be ejected continuously or in pulses. Future investigations include comparison between continuous versus pulsatile payload deliveries. We have successfully delivered plasmid DNA (pDNA)-coated gold particles (1.15 µm diameter) into ex vivo murine and porcine skin at low inlet pressures of ∼30 psi. Integrity analysis of these pDNA-coated gold particles confirmed the preservation of full-length pDNA after each particle preparation and jetting procedures. This technology platform provides distinct capabilities to effectively deliver a broad range of particle formulations into skin with specially designed high-speed microarray ejector nozzles.

  20. The HIV-1 Epidemic: Low- to Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiming; Williamson, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Low- to middle-income countries bear the overwhelming burden of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epidemic in terms of the numbers of their citizens living with HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), the high degrees of viral diversity often involving multiple HIV-1 clades circulating within their populations, and the social and economic factors that compromise current control measures. Distinct epidemics have emerged in different geographical areas. These epidemics differ in their severity, the population groups they affect, their associated risk behaviors, and the viral strains that drive them. In addition to inflicting great human cost, the high burden of HIV infection has a major impact on the social and economic development of many low- to middle-income countries. Furthermore, the high degrees of viral diversity associated with multiclade HIV epidemics impacts viral diagnosis and pathogenicity and treatment and poses daunting challenges for effective vaccine development. PMID:22393534

  1. Intersubtype Genetic Variation of HIV-1 Tat Exon 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Chandra Nath; Khandaker, Irona; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 Tat is a regulatory protein that plays a pivotal role in viral transcription and replication. Our study aims to investigate the genetic variation of Tat exon 1 in all subtypes of HIV-1: A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K. We performed phylogenetic, mutation, and selection pressure analyses on a total of 1,179 sequences of different subtypes of HIV-1 Tat obtained from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The mean nucleotide divergences (%) among the analyzed sequences of subtypes A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, and K were 88, 89, 90, 88, 86, 89, 88, 97, and 97, respectively. We revealed that subtype B evolved relatively faster than other subtypes. The second and fifth domains were found comparatively more variable among all subtypes. Site-by-site tests of positive selection revealed that several positions in all subtypes were under significant positive selection. Positively selected sites were found in the acidic domain at positions 3, 4, and 19, in the cysteine-rich domains at positions 24, 29, 32, and 36, in the core domain at position 40, and in the basic domain for the rest of the positions for all subtypes. Positions 58 and 68 in the basic domain were positively selected in subtypes A, B, C and B, C, F, respectively. We also observed high variability within positively selected sites in amino acid positions. Our study findings on HIV-1 Tat genetic variability may contribute to a better understanding of HIV-1 evolution as well as to the development of effective Tat-targeted therapeutics and vaccines.

  2. Identification of HIV-1 Epitopes that Induce the Synthesis of a R5 HIV-1 Suppression Factor by Human CD4+ T Cells Isolated from HIV-1 Immunized Hu-PBL SCID Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yoshida

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that immunization of the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC (hu-PBL-SCID mice with inactivated human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-pulsed-autologous dendritic cells (HIV-DC elicits HIV-1-reactive CD4+ T cells that produce an as yet to be defined novel soluble factor in vitro with anti-viral properties against CCR5 tropic (R5 HIV-1 infection. These findings led us to perform studies designed to identify the lineage of the cell that synthesizes such a factor in vitro and define the epitopes of HIV-1 protein that have specificity for the induction of such anti-viral factor. Results of our studies show that this property is a function of CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells. Human CD4+ T cells were thus recovered from the HIV-DC-immunized hu-PBL-SCID mice and were re-stimulated in vitro by co-culture for 2 days with autologous adherent PBMC as antigen presenting cells, APC previously pulsed with inactivated HIV in IL-2-containing medium to expand HIV-1-reactive CD4+ T cells. Aliquots of these re-stimulated CD4+ T cells were then co-cultured with similar APC's that were previously pulsed with 10 μg/ml of a panel of HIV peptides for an additional 2 days, and their culture supernatants were examined for the production of both the R5 HIV-1 suppression factor and IFN-Υ. The data presented herein show that the HIV-1 primed CD4+ T cells produced the R5 suppression factor in response to a wide variety of HIV-1 gag, env, pol, nef or vif peptides, depending on the donor of the CD4+ T cells. Simultaneous production of human interferon (IFN-Υ was observed in some cases. These results indicate that human CD4+ T cells in PBMC of HIV-1 naive donors have a wide variety of HIV-1 epitope-specific CD4+ T cell precursors that are capable of producing the R5 HIV-1 suppression factor upon DC-based vaccination with whole inactivated HIV-1.

  3. Identification of HIV-1 epitopes that induce the synthesis of a R5 HIV-1 suppression factor by human CD4+ T cells isolated from HIV-1 immunized hu-PBL SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Atsushi; Tanaka, Reiko; Kodama, Akira; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2005-12-01

    We have previously reported that immunization of the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (hu-PBL-SCID mice) with inactivated human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-pulsed-autologous dendritic cells (HIV-DC) elicits HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cells that produce an as yet to be defined novel soluble factor in vitro with anti-viral properties against CCR5 tropic (R5) HIV-1 infection. These findings led us to perform studies designed to identify the lineage of the cell that synthesizes such a factor in vivo and define the epitopes of HIV-1 protein that have specificity for the induction of such anti-viral factor. Results of our studies show that this property is a function of CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells. Human CD4(+) T cells were thus recovered from the HIV-DC-immunized hu-PBL-SCID mice and were re-stimulated in vitro by co-culture for 2 days with autologous adherent PBMC as antigen presenting cells, APC previously pulsed with inactivated HIV in IL-2-containing medium to expand HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cells. Aliquots of these re-stimulated CD4(+) T cells were then co-cultured with similar APC's that were previously pulsed with 10 microg/ml of a panel of HIV peptides for an additional 2 days, and their culture supernatants were examined for the production of both the R5 HIV-1 suppression factor and IFN-gamma. The data presented herein show that the HIV-1 primed CD4(+) T cells produced the R5 suppression factor in response to a wide variety of HIV-1 gag, env, pol, nef or vif peptides, depending on the donor of the CD4(+) T cells. Simultaneous production of human interferon (IFN)-gamma was observed in some cases. These results indicate that human CD4(+) T cells in PBMC of HIV-1 naive donors have a wide variety of HIV-1 epitope-specific CD4(+) T cell precursors that are capable of producing the R5 HIV-1 suppression factor upon DC-based vaccination with whole inactivated HIV-1.

  4. Use of silver nanoparticles increased inhibition of cell-associated HIV-1 infection by neutralizing antibodies developed against HIV-1 envelope proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garza Treviño Elsa N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS pandemic is a worldwide public health issue. There is a need for new approaches to develop new antiviral compounds or other therapeutic strategies to limit viral transmission. The envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of HIV are the main targets for both silver nanoparticles (AgNPs and neutralizing antibodies. There is an urgency to optimize the efficiency of the neutralizing antibodies (NABs. In this study, we demonstrated that there is an additive effect between the four NABs and AgNPs when combined against cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro Results Four NABs (Monoclonal antibody to HIV-1 gp41 126-7, HIV-1 gp120 Antiserum PB1 Sub 2, HIV-1 gp120 Antiserum PB1, HIV-1 gp120 Monoclonal Antibody F425 B4e8 with or without AgNPs of 30-50 nm in size were tested against cell free and cell-associated HIVIIIB virus. All NABs inhibited HIV-1 cell free infection at a dose response manner, but with AgNPs an antiviral additive effect was not achieved Although there was no inhibition of infection with cell-associated virus by the NABs itself, AgNPs alone were able to inhibit cell associated virus infection and more importantly, when mixed together with NABs they inhibited the HIV-1 cell associated infection in an additive manner. Discussion The most attractive strategies to deal with the HIV problem are the development of a prophylactic vaccine and the development of effective topical vaginal microbicide. For two decades a potent vaccine that inhibits transmission of infection of HIV has been searched. There are vaccines that elicit NABs but none of them has the efficacy to stop transmission of HIV-1 infection. We propose that with the addition of AgNPs, NABs will have an additive effect and become more potent to inhibit cell-associated HIV-1 transmission/infection. Conclusions The addition of AgNPs to NABs has significantly increased the neutralizing potency of NABs in prevention of cell-associated HIV-1 transmission

  5. Abrogation of contaminating RNA activity in HIV-1 Gag VLPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shephard Enid G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Gag virus like particles (VLPs used as candidate vaccines are regarded as inert particles as they contain no replicative nucleic acid, although they do encapsidate cellular RNAs. During HIV-1 Gag VLP production in baculovirus-based expression systems, VLPs incorporate the baculovirus Gp64 envelope glycoprotein, which facilitates their entry into mammalian cells. This suggests that HIV-1 Gag VLPs produced using this system facilitate uptake and subsequent expression of encapsidated RNA in mammalian cells - an unfavourable characteristic for a vaccine. Methods HIV-1 Gag VLPs encapsidating reporter chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT RNA, were made in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. The presence of Gp64 on the VLPs was verified by western blotting and RT-PCR used to detect and quantitate encapsidated CAT RNA. VLP samples were heated to inactivate CAT RNA. Unheated and heated VLPs incubated with selected mammalian cell lines and cell lysates tested for the presence of CAT protein by ELISA. Mice were inoculated with heated and unheated VLPs using a DNA prime VLP boost regimen. Results HIV-1 Gag VLPs produced had significantly high levels of Gp64 (~1650 Gp64 molecules/VLP on their surfaces. The amount of encapsidated CAT RNA/μg Gag VLPs ranged between 0.1 to 7 ng. CAT protein was detected in 3 of the 4 mammalian cell lines incubated with VLPs. Incubation with heated VLPs resulted in BHK-21 and HeLa cell lysates showing reduced CAT protein levels compared with unheated VLPs and HEK-293 cells. Mice inoculated with a DNA prime VLP boost regimen developed Gag CD8 and CD4 T cell responses to GagCAT VLPs which also boosted a primary DNA response. Heating VLPs did not abrogate these immune responses but enhanced the Gag CD4 T cell responses by two-fold. Conclusions Baculovirus-produced HIV-1 Gag VLPs encapsidating CAT RNA were taken up by selected mammalian cell lines. The presence of CAT protein indicates

  6. Antigen-displaying lipid-enveloped PLGA nanoparticles as delivery agents for a Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James J; Suh, Heikyung; Polhemus, Mark E; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Yadava, Anjali; Irvine, Darrell J

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium vivax is the most frequent cause of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa, but efforts to develop viable vaccines against P. vivax so far have been inadequate. We recently developed pathogen-mimicking polymeric vaccine nanoparticles composed of the FDA-approved biodegradable polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) "enveloped" by a lipid membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether this vaccine delivery platform could be applied to enhance the immune response against P. vivax sporozoites. A candidate malaria antigen, VMP001, was conjugated to the lipid membrane of the particles, and an immunostimulatory molecule, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), was incorporated into the lipid membranes, creating pathogen-mimicking nanoparticle vaccines (VMP001-NPs). Vaccination with VMP001-NPs promoted germinal center formation and elicited durable antigen-specific antibodies with significantly higher titers and more balanced Th1/Th2 responses in vivo, compared with vaccines composed of soluble protein mixed with MPLA. Antibodies raised by NP vaccinations also exhibited enhanced avidity and affinity toward the domains within the circumsporozoite protein implicated in protection and were able to agglutinate live P. vivax sporozoites. These results demonstrate that these VMP001-NPs are promising vaccines candidates that may elicit protective immunity against P. vivax sporozoites.

  7. Antigen-displaying lipid-enveloped PLGA nanoparticles as delivery agents for a Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Moon

    Full Text Available The parasite Plasmodium vivax is the most frequent cause of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa, but efforts to develop viable vaccines against P. vivax so far have been inadequate. We recently developed pathogen-mimicking polymeric vaccine nanoparticles composed of the FDA-approved biodegradable polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA "enveloped" by a lipid membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether this vaccine delivery platform could be applied to enhance the immune response against P. vivax sporozoites. A candidate malaria antigen, VMP001, was conjugated to the lipid membrane of the particles, and an immunostimulatory molecule, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA, was incorporated into the lipid membranes, creating pathogen-mimicking nanoparticle vaccines (VMP001-NPs. Vaccination with VMP001-NPs promoted germinal center formation and elicited durable antigen-specific antibodies with significantly higher titers and more balanced Th1/Th2 responses in vivo, compared with vaccines composed of soluble protein mixed with MPLA. Antibodies raised by NP vaccinations also exhibited enhanced avidity and affinity toward the domains within the circumsporozoite protein implicated in protection and were able to agglutinate live P. vivax sporozoites. These results demonstrate that these VMP001-NPs are promising vaccines candidates that may elicit protective immunity against P. vivax sporozoites.

  8. Gold nanocluster-based vaccines for dual-delivery of antigens and immunostimulatory oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yu; Zhang, Yan; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Hui; Ren, Jinsong

    2015-07-01

    We here report a facile one-pot synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) via the peptide biomineralization method, which can elicit specific immunological responses. The as-prepared peptide-protected AuNCs (peptide-AuNCs) display strong red fluorescence, and more importantly, as compared to the peptide alone, the immune stimulatory ability of the resulting peptide-AuNCs can not only be retained, but can also be efficaciously enhanced. Moreover, through a dual-delivery of antigen peptides and cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), the as-prepared peptide-AuNC-CpG conjugates can also act as smart self-vaccines to assist in the generation of high immunostimulatory activity, and be applied as a probe for intracellular imaging. Both in vitro and in vivo studies provide strong evidence that the AuNC-based vaccines may be utilized as safe and efficient immunostimulatory agents that are able to prevent and/or treat a variety of ailments.We here report a facile one-pot synthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) via the peptide biomineralization method, which can elicit specific immunological responses. The as-prepared peptide-protected AuNCs (peptide-AuNCs) display strong red fluorescence, and more importantly, as compared to the peptide alone, the immune stimulatory ability of the resulting peptide-AuNCs can not only be retained, but can also be efficaciously enhanced. Moreover, through a dual-delivery of antigen peptides and cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), the as-prepared peptide-AuNC-CpG conjugates can also act as smart self-vaccines to assist in the generation of high immunostimulatory activity, and be applied as a probe for intracellular imaging. Both in vitro and in vivo studies provide strong evidence that the AuNC-based vaccines may be utilized as safe and efficient immunostimulatory agents that are able to prevent and/or treat a variety of ailments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  9. Assessment of delivery parameters with the multi-electrode array for development of a DNA vaccine against Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate, Amy; Heller, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Gene electrotransfer (GET) enhances delivery of DNA vaccines by increasing both gene expression and immune responses. Our lab has developed the multi-electrode array (MEA) for DNA delivery to skin. The MEA was used at constant pulse duration (150 ms) and frequency (6.67 Hz). In this study, delivery parameters including applied voltage (5-45 V), amount of plasmid (100-300 μg), and number of treatments (2-3) were evaluated for delivery of a DNA vaccine. Mice were intradermally injected with plasmid expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen with or without GET and αPA serum titers measured. Within this experiment no significant differences were noted in antibody levels from varying dose or treatment number. However, significant differences were measured from applied voltages of 25 and 35 V. These voltages generated antibody levels between 20,000 and 25,000. Serum from animals vaccinated with these conditions also resulted in toxin neutralization in 40-60% of animals. Visual damage was noted at MEA conditions of 40 V. No damage was noted either visually or histologically from conditions of 35 V or below. These results reflect the importance of establishing appropriate electrical parameters and the potential for the MEA in non-invasive DNA vaccination against B. anthracis.

  10. Different pattern of immunoglobulin gene usage by HIV-1 compared to non-HIV-1 antibodies derived from the same infected subject.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuzhe Li

    Full Text Available A biased usage of immunoglobulin (Ig genes is observed in human anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs resulting probably from compensation to reduced usage of the VH3 family genes, while the other alternative suggests that this bias usage is due to antigen requirements. If the antigen structure is responsible for the preferential usage of particular Ig genes, it may have certain implications for HIV vaccine development by the targeting of particular Ig gene-encoded B cell receptors to induce neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. To address this issue, we have produced HIV-1 specific and non-HIV-1 mAbs from an infected individual and analyzed the Ig gene usage. Green-fluorescence labeled virus-like particles (VLP expressing HIV-1 envelope (Env proteins of JRFL and BaL and control VLPs (without Env were used to select single B cells for the production of 68 recombinant mAbs. Ten of these mAbs were HIV-1 Env specific with neutralizing activity against V3 and the CD4 binding site, as well as non-neutralizing mAbs to gp41. The remaining 58 mAbs were non-HIV-1 Env mAbs with undefined specificities. Analysis revealed that biased usage of Ig genes was restricted only to anti-HIV-1 but not to non-HIV-1 mAbs. The VH1 family genes were dominantly used, followed by VH3, VH4, and VH5 among anti-HIV-1 mAbs, while non-HIV-1 specific mAbs preferentially used VH3 family genes, followed by VH4, VH1 and VH5 families in a pattern identical to Abs derived from healthy individuals. This observation suggests that the biased usage of Ig genes by anti-HIV-1 mAbs is driven by structural requirements of the virus antigens rather than by compensation to any depletion of VH3 B cells due to autoreactive mechanisms, according to the gp120 superantigen hypothesis.

  11. Potent immunity to low doses of influenza vaccine by probabilistic guided micro-targeted skin delivery in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germain J P Fernando

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over 14 million people die each year from infectious diseases despite extensive vaccine use [1]. The needle and syringe--first invented in 1853--is still the primary delivery device, injecting liquid vaccine into muscle. Vaccines could be far more effective if they were precisely delivered into the narrow layer just beneath the skin surface that contains a much higher density of potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs essential to generate a protective immune response. We hypothesized that successful vaccination could be achieved this way with far lower antigen doses than required by the needle and syringe. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To meet this objective, using a probability-based theoretical analysis for targeting skin APCs, we designed the Nanopatch, which contains an array of densely packed projections (21025/cm(2 invisible to the human eye (110 microm in length, tapering to tips with a sharpness of <1000 nm, that are dry-coated with vaccine and applied to the skin for two minutes. Here we show that the Nanopatches deliver a seasonal influenza vaccine (Fluvax 2008 to directly contact thousands of APCs, in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction. By physically targeting vaccine directly to these cells we induced protective levels of functional antibody responses in mice and also protection against an influenza virus challenge that are comparable to the vaccine delivered intramuscularly with the needle and syringe--but with less than 1/100(th of the delivered antigen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results represent a marked improvement--an order of magnitude greater than reported by others--for injected doses administered by other delivery methods, without reliance on an added adjuvant, and with only a single vaccination. This study provides a proven mathematical/engineering delivery device template for extension into human studies--and we speculate that successful translation of these findings into humans could

  12. Potent Immunity to Low Doses of Influenza Vaccine by Probabilistic Guided Micro-Targeted Skin Delivery in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Crichton, Michael L.; Fairmaid, Emily J.; Roberts, Michael S.; Frazer, Ian H.; Brown, Lorena E.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Over 14 million people die each year from infectious diseases despite extensive vaccine use [1]. The needle and syringe—first invented in 1853—is still the primary delivery device, injecting liquid vaccine into muscle. Vaccines could be far more effective if they were precisely delivered into the narrow layer just beneath the skin surface that contains a much higher density of potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) essential to generate a protective immune response. We hypothesized that successful vaccination could be achieved this way with far lower antigen doses than required by the needle and syringe. Methodology/Principal Findings To meet this objective, using a probability-based theoretical analysis for targeting skin APCs, we designed the Nanopatch™, which contains an array of densely packed projections (21025/cm2) invisible to the human eye (110 µm in length, tapering to tips with a sharpness of <1000 nm), that are dry-coated with vaccine and applied to the skin for two minutes. Here we show that the Nanopatches deliver a seasonal influenza vaccine (Fluvax® 2008) to directly contact thousands of APCs, in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction. By physically targeting vaccine directly to these cells we induced protective levels of functional antibody responses in mice and also protection against an influenza virus challenge that are comparable to the vaccine delivered intramuscularly with the needle and syringe—but with less than 1/100th of the delivered antigen. Conclusions/Significance Our results represent a marked improvement—an order of magnitude greater than reported by others—for injected doses administered by other delivery methods, without reliance on an added adjuvant, and with only a single vaccination. This study provides a proven mathematical/engineering delivery device template for extension into human studies—and we speculate that successful translation of these findings into humans could uniquely assist with

  13. Impact of HIV-1 infection on the feto-maternal crosstalk and consequences for pregnancy outcome and infant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altfeld, Marcus; Bunders, Madeleine J

    2016-11-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune system to establish maternal/fetal equilibrium is required for a successful pregnancy. Viral infections, including HIV-1 infection, can alter this maternal/fetal equilibrium, with significant consequences for pregnancy outcome, including miscarriages, impaired fetal growth, and premature delivery. Furthermore, maternal HIV-1 infection has been shown to have a long-term impact on the developing fetal immune system also when the infant is not infected with the virus. In this review, we discuss the consequences of maternal HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy on pregnancy outcome and the health of the uninfected HIV-1-exposed infant.

  14. Homogeneous PLGA-lipid nanoparticle as a promising oral vaccine delivery system for ovalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongtong Ma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a polymeric lipid nanoparticle (NP (simplified as Lipid NP was reported as a promising oral vaccine delivery system. The Lipid NPs composed of a hydrophobic polymeric poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA core and a surface coating of lipid monolayer. Membrane emulsification technique was used to obtain uniform-sized Lipid NPs. Ovalbumin (OVA was used as a model vaccine. Compared with the pure PLGA NPs, the Lipid NPs achieved higher loading capacity (LC and entrapment efficiency (EE for the encapsulated OVA. An in vitro oral release profile showed that the OVA-Lipid NPs were with lower initial burst and could protect the loaded OVA from the harsh gastrointestinal (GI environment for a long time. In addition, a human microfold cell (M-cell transcytotic assay demonstrated that due to a lipid layer structure on the particle surface, the Lipid NPs showed higher affinity to the M-cells. Since the M-cell in the intestinal epithelium played an important role in particle transportation as well as intimately associated with the underlying immune cells, the OVA-Lipid NPs effectively induced mucosal and humoral immune responses.

  15. HIV-1 Gag-virus-like particles inhibit HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells and T cells through IFN-α-dependent upregulation of APOBEC3G and 3F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Myint Oo; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Norio; Watanabe, Megumi; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic remain global threats in the absence of a protective or a therapeutic vaccine. HIV-1 replication is reportedly inhibited by some cellular factors, including APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F), which are well known inhibitors of HIV-1. Recently, HIV-1 Gag-virus-like particles (Gag-VLPs) have been shown to be safe and potent HIV-1 vaccine candidates that can elicit strong cellular and humoral immunity without need of any adjuvant. In this report, we stimulated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) with Gag-VLPs and we demonstrated that Gag-VLP-treated DCs (VLP-DCs) produced interferon alpha (IFN-α), along with an increase in mRNA and protein expression of A3G and A3F. Gag-VLPs inhibited HIV-1 replication not only in DCs themselves, but also in cocultured T cells in an IFN-α-dependent manner. In addition, A3G/3F content in HIV virions released from VLP-DCs increased. Both the increase in A3G/3F expression and the inhibition of HIV-1 replication were reversed by anti-IFN-α or anti-IFNAR antibodies. Our findings in this study provide insight into the mechanism of Gag-VLP-induced inhibition of HIV-1 replication in DCs and T cells.

  16. Maturation-induced cloaking of neutralization epitopes on HIV-1 particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S Joyner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To become infectious, HIV-1 particles undergo a maturation process involving proteolytic cleavage of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins. Immature particles contain a highly stable spherical Gag lattice and are impaired for fusion with target cells. The fusion impairment is relieved by truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT, indicating that an interaction between the immature viral core and gp41 within the particle represses HIV-1 fusion by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that the conformation of Env on the viral surface is regulated allosterically by interactions with the HIV-1 core during particle maturation. To test this, we quantified the binding of a panel of monoclonal antibodies to mature and immature HIV-1 particles by immunofluorescence imaging. Surprisingly, immature particles exhibited markedly enhanced binding of several gp41-specific antibodies, including two that recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER and neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Several of the differences in epitope exposure on mature and immature particles were abolished by truncation of the gp41 CT, thus linking the immature HIV-1 fusion defect with altered Env conformation. Our results suggest that perturbation of fusion-dependent Env conformational changes contributes to the impaired fusion of immature particles. Masking of neutralization-sensitive epitopes during particle maturation may contribute to HIV-1 immune evasion and has practical implications for vaccine strategies targeting the gp41 MPER.

  17. The Role of Cationic Polypeptides in Modulating HIV-1 Infection of the Cervicovaginal Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Amy Liese; Cole, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    The mucosa and overlying fluid of the female reproductive tract (FRT) are portals for the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. Toward the ongoing development of topically applied microbicides and mucosal vaccines against HIV-1, it is evermore important to understand how the dynamic FRT mucosa is involved in controlling transmission and infection of HIV-1. Cationic peptides and proteins are the principal innate immune effector molecules of mucosal surfaces, and interact in a combinatorial fashion to modulate HIV-1 infection of the cervix and vagina. While cationic peptides and proteins have historically been categorized as antimicrobial or have other host-benefitting roles, an increasing number of these molecules have been found to augment HIV-1 infection and potentially antagonize host defense. Complex environmental factors such as hormonal fluctuations and/or bacterial and viral co-infections provide additional challenges to both experimentation and interpretation of results. In the context of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, this review explores how various cationic peptides and proteins participate in modulating host defense against HIV-1 of the cervicovaginal mucosa. PMID:27025760

  18. The Role of Cationic Polypeptides in Modulating HIV-1 Infection of the Cervicovaginal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Liese Cole

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mucosa and overlying fluid of the female reproductive tract (FRT are portals for the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. Toward the ongoing development of topically applied microbicides and mucosal vaccines against HIV-1, it is evermore important to understand how the dynamic FRT mucosa is involved in controlling transmission and infection of HIV-1. Cationic peptides and proteins are the principal innate immune effector molecules of mucosal surfaces, and interact in a combinatorial fashion to modulate HIV-1 infection of the cervix and vagina. While cationic peptides and proteins have historically been categorized as antimicrobial or have other host-benefitting roles, an increasing number of these molecules have been found to augment HIV-1 infection and potentially antagonize host defense. Complex environmental factors such as hormonal fluctuations and/or bacterial and viral co-infections provide additional challenges to both experimentation and interpretation of results. In the context of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, this review explores how various cationic peptides and proteins participate in modulating host defense against HIV-1 of the cervicovaginal mucosa.

  19. Advances in FIV vaccine technology

    OpenAIRE

    Uhl, Elizabeth W.; Martin, Marcus; Coleman, James K.; Yamamoto, Janet K.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in vaccine technology are occurring in the molecular techniques used to develop vaccines and in the assessment of vaccine efficacy, allowing more complete characterization of vaccine-induced immunity correlating to protection. FIV vaccine development has closely mirrored and occasionally surpassed the development of HIV-1 vaccine, leading to first licensed technology. This review will discuss technological advances in vaccine designs, challenge infection assessment, and characterizat...

  20. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  1. Biocompatible anionic polymeric microspheres as priming delivery system for effetive HIV/AIDS Tat-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Titti

    Full Text Available Here we describe a prime-boost regimen of vaccination in Macaca fascicularis that combines priming with novel anionic microspheres designed to deliver the biologically active HIV-1 Tat protein and boosting with Tat in Alum. This regimen of immunization modulated the IgG subclass profile and elicited a balanced Th1-Th2 type of humoral and cellular responses. Remarkably, following intravenous challenge with SHIV89.6Pcy243, vaccinees significantly blunted acute viremia, as compared to control monkeys, and this control was associated with significantly lower CD4+ T cell depletion rate during the acute phase of infection and higher ability to resume the CD4+ T cell counts in the post-acute and chronic phases of infection. The long lasting control of viremia was associated with the persistence of high titers anti-Tat antibodies whose profile clearly distinguished vaccinees in controllers and viremics. Controllers, as opposed to vaccinated and viremic cynos, exhibited significantly higher pre-challenge antibody responses to peptides spanning the glutamine-rich and the RGD-integrin-binding regions of Tat. Finally, among vaccinees, titers of anti-Tat IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 subclasses had a significant association with control of viremia in the acute and post-acute phases of infection. Altogether these findings indicate that the Tat/H1D/Alum regimen of immunization holds promise for next generation vaccines with Tat protein or other proteins for which maintenance of the native conformation and activity are critical for optimal immunogenicity. Our results also provide novel information on the role of anti-Tat responses in the prevention of HIV pathogenesis and for the design of new vaccine candidates.

  2. Chitosan-Poly (I:C-PADRE Based Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Synthetic Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. Correia-Pinto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The safety and precision of peptide antigens has prompted the search for adjuvants capable of increasing the immune response against these intrinsically poorly immunogenic antigens. The integration of both immunostimulants and peptide antigens within nanometric delivery systems for their co-delivery to immune cells is a promising vaccination strategy. With this in mind, the potential synergistic effect of the immunostimulant poly (I:C (pIC and a T-Helper peptide (PADRE, integrated into a chitosan (CS based nanostructure, was explored. The value of this nanostructured combination of materials was assessed for a peptide antigen (1338aa derived from the HPV-16 L2 protein. These nanoparticles, produced by ionic gelation technique, exhibited a nanometric size (<300 nm, a high positive surface charge (>40 mV and high pIC association efficiency (>96%. They also showed capacity for the association of both the 1338aa and PADRE peptides. The influence of the presence of pIC and PADRE in the nanocomposition, as well as that of the peptide presentation form (encapsulated versus surface adsorbed on the antibody induction was evaluated in a preliminary in vivo study. The data obtained highlights the possibility to engineer nanoparticles through the rational combination of a number of adjuvant molecules together with the antigen.

  3. Chitosan-Poly (I:C)-PADRE Based Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Synthetic Peptide Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Pinto, Jorge F; Csaba, Noemi; Schiller, John T; Alonso, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    The safety and precision of peptide antigens has prompted the search for adjuvants capable of increasing the immune response against these intrinsically poorly immunogenic antigens. The integration of both immunostimulants and peptide antigens within nanometric delivery systems for their co-delivery to immune cells is a promising vaccination strategy. With this in mind, the potential synergistic effect of the immunostimulant poly (I:C) (pIC) and a T-Helper peptide (PADRE), integrated into a chitosan (CS) based nanostructure, was explored. The value of this nanostructured combination of materials was assessed for a peptide antigen (1338aa) derived from the HPV-16 L2 protein. These nanoparticles, produced by ionic gelation technique, exhibited a nanometric size (40 mV) and high pIC association efficiency (>96%). They also showed capacity for the association of both the 1338aa and PADRE peptides. The influence of the presence of pIC and PADRE in the nanocomposition, as well as that of the peptide presentation form (encapsulated versus surface adsorbed) on the antibody induction was evaluated in a preliminary in vivo study. The data obtained highlights the possibility to engineer nanoparticles through the rational combination of a number of adjuvant molecules together with the antigen.

  4. Male reproduction and HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Leeuwen

    2009-01-01

    From its initial presentation in the early nineteen eighties until 1996, HIV-1 infection almost inevitably led to AIDS, which was a death sentence. Because of the short life expectancy, patients were advised against pregnancy. The improved prognosis of patients with HIV-1 infection following the int

  5. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  6. Sexual risk behaviors, circumcision status, and preexisting immunity to adenovirus type 5 among men who have sex with men participating in a randomized HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial: step study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblin, Beryl A; Mayer, Kenneth H; Noonan, Elizabeth; Wang, Ching-Yun; Marmor, Michael; Sanchez, Jorge; Brown, Stephen J; Robertson, Michael N; Buchbinder, Susan P

    2012-08-01

    The Step Study found that men who had sex with men (MSM) who received an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccine and were uncircumcised or had prior Ad5 immunity, had a higher HIV incidence than MSM who received placebo. We investigated whether differences in HIV exposure, measured by reported sexual risk behaviors, may explain the increased risk. Among 1764 MSM in the trial, 726 were uncircumcised, 994 had prior Ad5 immunity, and 563 were both uncircumcised and had prior Ad5 immunity. Analyses compared sexual risk behaviors and perceived treatment assignment among vaccine and placebo recipients, determined risk factors for HIV acquisition, and examined the role of insertive anal intercourse in HIV risk among uncircumcised men. Few sexual risk behaviors were significantly higher in vaccine versus placebo recipients at baseline or during follow-up. Among uncircumcised men, vaccine recipients at baseline were more likely to report unprotected insertive anal intercourse with HIV-negative partners (24.9% vs. 18.1%; P = 0.03). Among uncircumcised men who had prior Ad5 immunity, vaccine recipients were more likely to report unprotected insertive anal intercourse with partners of unknown HIV status (46.0% vs. 37.8%; P = 0.05). Vaccine recipients remained at higher risk of HIV infection compared with placebo recipients (hazard ratio = 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-6.8) controlling for potential confounders. These analyses do not support a behavioral explanation for the increased HIV infection rates observed among uncircumcised men in the Step Study. Identifying biologic mechanisms to explain the increased risk is a priority .

  7. Innate immune activation in primary HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J Judy; Altfeld, Marcus

    2010-10-15

    There is growing evidence that highlights the role of the immune response during acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the control or development of disease. The adaptive immune responses do not appear until after HIV-1 infection is already well established, so the role of earlier and faster-responding innate immunity needs to be more closely scrutinized. In particular, 2 aspects of innate immunity for which there are growing research developments will be examined in this review: the actions of type I interferons and natural killer cells. These two components of the innate immune response contribute to viral control both by killing infected cells and by modulating other immune cells that develop. However, the role of interferon α in immune activation is a double-edged sword, causing recruitment of adaptive immune cells that can assist in viral control but concurrently contributing to immune activation-dependent disease progression. Understanding the complexity of how innate responses affect the outcome of HIV-1 infection will help in the development of vaccines that can use innate immunity to enhance viral control with minimal pathogenesis.

  8. Positron emission tomography in patients suffering from HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike [University Hospital of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Goethals, Ingeborg; Wiele, Christophe van de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Maes, Alex [AZ Groening, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    This paper reviews currently available PET studies performed either to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection or to assess the value of PET imaging in the clinical decision making of patients infected with HIV-1 presenting with AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies. FDG PET has shown that HIV-1 infection progresses by distinct anatomical steps, with involvement of the upper torso preceding involvement of the lower part of the torso, and that the degree of FDG uptake relates to viral load. The former finding suggests that lymphoid tissues are engaged in a predictable sequence and that diffusible mediators of activation might be important targets for vaccine or therapeutic intervention strategies. In lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients, limited available data support the hypothesis that stavudine-related lipodystrophy is associated with increased glucose uptake by adipose tissue as a result of the metabolic stress of adipose tissue in response to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Finally, in early AIDS-related dementia complex (ADC), striatal hypermetabolism is observed, whereas progressive ADC is characterized by a decrease in subcortical and cortical metabolism. In the clinical setting, PET has been shown to allow the differentiation of AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies, and to allow monitoring of side effects of HAART. However, in patients suffering from HIV infection and presenting with extracerebral lymphoma or other human malignancies, knowledge of viraemia is essential when interpreting FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  9. Memory CD8(+) T cells elicited by HIV-1 lipopeptide vaccines display similar phenotypic profiles but differences in term of magnitude and multifunctionality compared with FLU- or EBV-specific memory T cells in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Suzanne; Charmeteau, Benedicte; Surenaud, Mathieu; Salmon, Dominique; Launay, Odile; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Hosmalin, Anne; Gahery, Hanne

    2014-01-16

    Differentiation marker, multifunctionality and magnitude analyses of specific-CD8(+) memory T cells are crucial to improve development of HIV vaccines designed to generate cell-mediated immunity. Therefore, we fully characterized the HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses induced in volunteers vaccinated with HIV lipopeptide vaccines for phenotypic markers, tetramer staining, cytokine secretion, and cytotoxic activities. The frequency of ex vivo CD8(+) T cells elicited by lipopeptide vaccines is very rare and central-memory phenotype and functions of these cells were been shown to be important in AIDS immunity. So, we expanded them using specific peptides to compare the memory T cell responses induced in volunteers by HIV vaccines with responses to influenza (FLU) or Epstein Barr virus (EBV). By analyzing the differentiation state of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells, we found a CCR7(-)CD45RA(-)CD28(+int)/CD28(-) profile (>85%) belonging to a subset of intermediate-differentiated effector T cells for HIV, FLU, and EBV. We then assessed the quality of the response by measuring various T cell functions. The percentage of single IFN-γ T cell producers in response to HIV was 62% of the total of secreting T cells compared with 35% for FLU and EBV, dual and triple (IFN-γ/IL-2/CD107a) T cell producers could also be detected but at lower levels (8% compared with 37%). Finally, HIV-specific T cells secreted IFN-γ and TNF-α, but not the dual combination like FLU- and EBV-specific T cells. Thus, we found that the functional profile and magnitude of expanded HIV-specific CD8(+) T precursors were more limited than those of to FLU- and EBV-specific CD8(+) T cells. These data show that CD8(+) T cells induced by these HIV vaccines have a similar differentiation profile to FLU and EBV CD8(+) T cells, but that the vaccine potency to induce multifunctional T cells needs to be increased in order to improve vaccination strategies.

  10. Initial design and physical characterization of a polymeric device for osmosis-driven delayed burst delivery of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchels, Ferry P W; Fehr, Ingo; Reitz, Annika S; Dunker, Urip; Beagley, Kenneth W; Dargaville, Tim R; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2015-09-01

    Achieving the combination of delayed and immediate release of a vaccine from a delivery device without applying external triggers remains elusive in implementing single administration vaccination strategies. Here a means of vaccine delivery is presented, which exploits osmosis to trigger delayed burst release of an active compound. Poly(ε-caprolactone) capsules of 2 mm diameter were prepared by dip-coating, and their burst pressure and release characteristics were evaluated. Burst pressures (in bar) increased with wall thickness (t in mm) following Pburst  = 131(.) t + 3(.) 4 (R(2)  = 0.93). Upon immersion in PBS, glucose solution-filled capsules burst after 8.7 ± 2.9 days. Copolymers of hydrophobic ε -caprolactone and hydrophilic polyethylene glycol were synthesized and their physico-chemical properties were assessed. With increasing hydrophilic content, the copolymer capsules showed increased water uptake rates and maximum weight increase, while the burst release was earlier: 5.6 ± 2.0 days and 1.9 ± 0.2 days for 5 and 10 wt% polyethylene glycol, respectively. The presented approach enables the reproducible preparation of capsules with high versatility in materials and properties, while these vaccine delivery vehicles can be prepared separately from, and independently of the active compound.

  11. 黏膜疫苗传递系统的研究进展%Progress of Mucosal Vaccine Delivery Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志祥; 陆伟根

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccine is considered as the most suitable type of vaccination agents to combat infectious diseases because of their ability to induce both systemic and local mucosal immune response. However, mucosal vaccines suffer from two main problems: inefficient antigen uptake from the mucosal surfaces and difficulty in eliciting effective immune responses. Therefore, developing new delivery systems for mucosal vaccines must overcome these obstacles.The progress of the mechanism of mucosal immunity, features of mucosal vaccines, and current situation in research of their delivery systems are summarized.%黏膜疫苗能同时诱导系统和局部黏膜免疫应答,是预防感染性疾病最理想的一类疫苗.但黏膜疫苗存在两大障碍:抗原无效摄取和难以引发有效免疫反应.因此,研发新型黏膜疫苗传递系统必须要克服这些障碍.本文综述了黏膜免疫的作用机制、黏膜疫苗的特点及其传递系统的研究现状.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as delivery vehicles enhance the immunoprotective effects of a recombinant vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu-Xin; Zhu, Bin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Liu, Lei; Ling, Fei; Wang, Gao-Xue; Xu, Xin-Gang

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the economic losses caused by diseases in aquaculture industry, more efficient and economic prophylactic measures should be urgently investigated. In this research, the effects of a novel functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) applied as a delivery vehicle for recombinant Aeromonas hydrophila vaccine administration via bath or injection in juvenile grass carp were studied. The results showed that SWCNT as a vector for the recombinant protein aerA, augmented the production of specific antibodies, apparently stimulated the induction of immune-related genes, and induced higher level of survival rate compared with free aerA subunit vaccine. Furthermore, we compared the routes of bath and intramuscular injection immunization by SWCNTs-aerA vaccine, and found that similar antibody levels induced by SWCNTs-aerA were observed in both immunization routes. Meanwhile, a similar relative percentage survival (approximately 80%) was found in both a 40 mg/L bath immunization group, and a 20 μg injection group. The results indicate that functionalized SWCNTs could be a promising delivery vehicle to potentiate the immune response of recombinant vaccines, and might be used to vaccinate juvenile fish by bath administration method.

  13. Metal based nanoparticles as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage based antitumor vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Mandal, Debasis; Das, Balaram; Tripathy, Satyajit; Dey, Aditi; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2016-02-10

    In the present study, we would like to evaluate the efficacy of modified metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage (MФs) based antitumor vaccine. The cobalt oxide nanoparticles (CoO NPs) were promising tools for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells and have induced an antitumor immune response. Synthesized CoO NPs were modified by N-phosphonomethyliminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), facilitated the conjugation of lysate antigen, i.e. cancer antigen derived from lysis of cancer cells. The cancer cell lysate antigen conjugated PMIDA-CoO NPs (Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs) successfully activated macrophage (MФ) evident by the increasing the serum IFN-γ and TNF-α level. Immunization of mice with the Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs constructed an efficient immunological adjuvant induced anticancer IgG responses, and increased the antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) response than only lysate antigen treated group to combat the cancer cell. The nanocomplexes enhanced the anticancer CD4(+)T cell response in mice. The result showed that Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs can stimulate the immune responses over only lysate antigens, which are the most important findings in this study. These NP-mediated Ag deliveries may significantly improve the anticancer immune response by activating MФs and may act as adjuvant and will balance the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immunoresponse. The crosstalk between the activated MФ with other immune competent cells will be monitored by measuring the cytokines which illustrate the total immunological network setups.

  14. Genetic and phylogenetic evolution of HIV-1 in a low subtype heterogeneity epidemic: the Italian example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tornesello Maria

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 is classified into genetic groups, subtypes and sub-subtypes which show a specific geographic distribution pattern. The HIV-1 epidemic in Italy, as in most of the Western Countries, has traditionally affected the Intra-venous drug user (IDU and Homosexual (Homo risk groups and has been sustained by the genetic B subtype. In the last years, however, the HIV-1 transmission rate among heterosexuals has dramatically increased, becoming the prevalent transmission route. In fact, while the traditional risk groups have high levels of knowledge and avoid high-risk practices, the heterosexuals do not sufficiently perceive the risk of HIV-1 infection. This misperception, linked to the growing number of immigrants from non-Western Countries, where non-B clades and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs are prevalent, is progressively introducing HIV-1 variants of non-B subtype in the Italian epidemic. This is in agreement with reports from other Western European Countries. In this context, the Italian HIV-1 epidemic is still characterized by low subtype heterogeneity and represents a paradigmatic example of the European situation. The continuous molecular evolution of the B subtype HIV-1 isolates, characteristic of a long-lasting epidemic, together with the introduction of new subtypes as well as recombinant forms may have significant implications for diagnostic, treatment, and vaccine development. The study and monitoring of the genetic evolution of the HIV-1 represent, therefore, an essential strategy for controlling the local as well as global HIV-1 epidemic and for developing efficient preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  15. Iron oxide nanoparticles as a clinically acceptable delivery platform for a recombinant blood-stage human malaria vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Pusic, Kae; Aguilar, Zoraida; McLoughlin, Jaclyn; Kobuch, Sophie; Xu, Hong; Tsang, Mazie; Wang, Andrew; Hui, George

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the novel use of iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (90%) internalized IO nanoparticles, but only the latter were significantly activated, with elevated expression/secretion of CD86, cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL1-b, IFN-γ, and IL-12), and chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, and CXCL10). Thus, the IO nanoparticles is a novel, safe, and effective vaccine platform, with built-in adjuvancy, that is highly stable and field deployable for cost-effective vaccine delivery.—Pusic,...

  16. Iron oxide nanoparticles as a clinically acceptable delivery platform for a recombinant blood-stage human malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Kae; Aguilar, Zoraida; McLoughlin, Jaclyn; Kobuch, Sophie; Xu, Hong; Tsang, Mazie; Wang, Andrew; Hui, George

    2013-03-01

    This study explored the novel use of iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (90%) internalized IO nanoparticles, but only the latter were significantly activated, with elevated expression/secretion of CD86, cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL1-b, IFN-γ, and IL-12), and chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, and CXCL10). Thus, the IO nanoparticles is a novel, safe, and effective vaccine platform, with built-in adjuvancy, that is highly stable and field deployable for cost-effective vaccine delivery.

  17. Amino Acid Changes in the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane Proximal Region Control Virus Neutralization Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Bradley

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most HIV-1 vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies that are active against highly sensitive (tier-1 viruses or rare cases of vaccine-matched neutralization-resistant (tier-2 viruses, but no vaccine has induced antibodies that can broadly neutralize heterologous tier-2 viruses. In this study, we isolated antibodies from an HIV-1-infected individual that targeted the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER that may have selected single-residue changes in viral variants in the MPER that resulted in neutralization sensitivity to antibodies targeting distal epitopes on the HIV-1 Env. Similarly, a single change in the MPER in a second virus from another infected-individual also conferred enhanced neutralization sensitivity. These gp41 single-residue changes thus transformed tier-2 viruses into tier-1 viruses that were sensitive to vaccine-elicited tier-1 neutralizing antibodies. These data demonstrate that Env amino acid changes within the MPER bnAb epitope of naturally-selected escape viruses can increase neutralization sensitivity to multiple types of neutralizing antibodies, and underscore the critical importance of the MPER for maintaining the integrity of the tier-2 HIV-1 trimer.

  18. TCR clonotypes modulate the protective effect of HLA class I molecules in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huabiao; Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Liu, Dongfang; Porter, Lindsay C; Fang, Justin W; Darko, Sam; Brockman, Mark A; Miura, Toshiyuki; Brumme, Zabrina L; Schneidewind, Arne; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cesa, Kevin T; Sela, Jennifer; Cung, Thai D; Toth, Ildiko; Pereyra, Florencia; Yu, Xu G; Douek, Daniel C; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D

    2012-06-10

    The human leukocyte antigens HLA-B27 and HLA-B57 are associated with protection against progression of disease that results from infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), yet most people with alleles encoding HLA-B27 and HLA-B57 are unable to control HIV-1. Here we found that HLA-B27-restricted CD8(+) T cells in people able to control infection with HIV-1 (controllers) and those who progress to disease after infection with HIV-1 (progressors) differed in their ability to inhibit viral replication through targeting of the immunodominant epitope of group-associated antigen (Gag) of HIV-1. This was associated with distinct T cell antigen receptor (TCR) clonotypes, characterized by superior control of HIV-1 replication in vitro, greater cross-reactivity to epitope variants and enhanced loading and delivery of perforin. We also observed clonotype-specific differences in antiviral efficacy for an immunodominant HLA-B57-restricted response in controllers and progressors. Thus, the efficacy of such so-called 'protective alleles' is modulated by specific TCR clonotypes selected during natural infection, which provides a functional explanation for divergent HIV-1 outcomes.

  19. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  20. High resolution human leukocyte antigen class I allele frequencies and HIV-1 infection associations in Chinese Han and Uyghur cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhou Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Host immunogenetic factors such as HLA class I polymorphism are important to HIV-1 infection risk and AIDS progression. Previous studies using high-resolution HLA class I profile data of Chinese populations appeared insufficient to provide information for HIV-1 vaccine development and clinical trial design. Here we reported HLA class I association with HIV-1 susceptibility in a Chinese Han and a Chinese Uyghur cohort. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our cohort included 327 Han and 161 Uyghur ethnic individuals. Each cohort included HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative subjects. Four-digit HLA class I typing was performed by sequencing-based typing and high-resolution PCR-sequence specific primer. We compared the HLA class I allele and inferred haplotype frequencies between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative groups. A neighbor-joining tree between our cohorts and other populations was constructed based on allele frequencies of HLA-A and HLA-B loci. We identified 58 HLA-A, 75 HLA-B, and 32 HLA-Cw distinct alleles from our cohort and no novel alleles. The frequency of HLA-B*5201 and A*0301 was significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The frequency of HLA-B*5101 was significantly higher in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group. We observed statistically significant increases in expectation-maximization (EM algorithm predicted haplotype frequencies of HLA-A*0201-B*5101 in the Uyghur HIV-1 negative group, and of Cw*0304-B*4001 in the Han HIV-1 negative group. The B62s supertype frequency was found to be significantly higher in the Han HIV-1 negative group than in the Han HIV-1 positive group. CONCLUSIONS: At the four-digit level, several HLA class I alleles and haplotypes were associated with lower HIV-1 susceptibility. Homogeneity of HLA class I and Bw4/Bw6 heterozygosity were not associated with HIV-1 susceptibility in our cohort. These observations contribute to the Chinese HLA database and could prove useful in the

  1. Identification and Characterization of a Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Human Monoclonal Antibody That Binds to Both gp120 and gp41

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Yuan, Tingting; Li, Jingjing; Borges, Andrew Rosa; Watkins, Jennifer D.; Guenaga, Javier; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Yanping; Wilson, Richard; Li, Yuxing; Polonis, Victoria R.; Pincus, Seth H.; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) may assist vaccine immunogen design. Here we report a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated m43, which co-targets the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). M43 bound to recombinant

  2. Proinflammatory responses in the murine brain after intranasal delivery of cholera toxin: implications for the use of AB toxins as adjuvants in intranasal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michelle E; Lavelle, Ed C; Loscher, Christine E; Lynch, Marina A; Mills, Kingston H G

    2005-11-01

    Intranasal delivery of vaccines provides an attractive alternative to parenteral delivery, but it requires appropriate mucosal adjuvants. Cholera toxin (CT) is a powerful mucosal adjuvant, but it can undergo retrograde transport to the brain via the olfactory system after intranasal delivery. We demonstrate that intranasal delivery of CT increases the expression of interleukin-1 beta , cyclooxygenase-2, and chemokine messenger RNA in the murine hypothalamus, whereas parenterally delivered CT has little effect. Our findings suggest that CT can induce proinflammatory mediators in the brain when it is administered intranasally but not parenterally, and they raise concerns about the use of AB toxins as adjuvants in intranasal vaccines.

  3. Evaluation of oral and subcutaneous delivery of an experimental canarypox recombinant canine distemper vaccine in the Siberian polecate (Mustela eversmanni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Biggins, Dean E.; Innes, Kim; Taylor, Bobbi; Garell, Della

    2003-01-01

    the treatment groups. Survival rates were higher in animals with increasing serum neutralization titers (P = 0.027). This study demonstrates the efficacy of oral delivery of a recombinant CDV vaccine in the Siberian polecat. Further studies are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of vectored recombinant vaccines in highly susceptible species and especially in those species in which vaccination with modified live CDV has led to disease.

  4. Improved humoral and cellular immune responses against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatitis B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Nielsen, H V; Bryder, K

    1998-01-01

    with the HIV MN gp160 envelope plasmid induced a slow and low titred anti-MN V3 antibody response at 12 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) and a late appearing (7 weeks), weak and variable CTL response. In contrast, DNA vaccination with the HBsAg-encoding plasmid induced a rapid and high titred anti-HBsAg antibody...... response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V3/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL......-2d-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. In an attempt to improve the immunogenicity of V3 in DNA vaccines, a plasmid expressing MN V3 as a fusion protein with the highly immunogenic middle (pre-S2 + S) surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) was constructed. Epidermal inoculation...

  5. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    MN gp160 envelope plasmid induced a slow and low titred anti-MN V3 antibody response at 12 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) and a late appearing (7 weeks), weak and variable CTL response. In contrast, DNA vaccination with the HBsAg-encoding plasmid induced a rapid and high titred anti-HBsAg antibody...... response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V2/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL......-2d-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. In an attempt to improve the immunogenicity of V3 in DNA vaccines, a plasmid expressing MN V3 as a fusion protein with the highly immunogenic middle (pre-S2+S) surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) was constructed. Epidermal inoculation...

  6. Chitosan-HPMC-blended microspheres as a vaccine carrier for the delivery of tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthanari, Saravanakumar; Mani, Ganesh; Peng, Mei Mei; Jang, Hyun Tae

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a suitable and alternate adjuvant for the tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine that induces long term immunity after a single-dose immunization. In our study, the preformulation studies were carried out by using different ratios (7/3, 8/2, and 9/1) of chitosan-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-blended empty microspheres. Moreover, TT was stabilized with heparin (at heparin concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% w/v) and encapsulated in ideal chitosan - HPMC (CHBMS) microspheres, by the water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion method. The vaccine entrapment and the in vitro release efficiency of the CHBMS was evaluated for a period of 90 days. The release of antigens from the microspheres was determined by ELISA. Antigen integrity was investigated by SDS-PAGE. From the optimization studies, it was found that a chitosan/HPMC ratio of 8/2 produced a good yield, with microspheres that were spherical, regular and uniformly-sized. In the CHBMS, a heparin concentration of 3% w/v resulted in well-sustained antigen delivery for a period of 90 days. It was found that the characteristics of initial release could be observed in 2 days, followed by a constant release, and an almost 100% complete release in 90 days. From the in vitro release characteristics, the ideal batch of CHBMS (3% w/v heparin) was evaluated for in vivo studies by the antibody induction method. The antibody levels were measured for different combinations for the period of 9 months, and finally, with a second booster dose after 1 year. In conclusion, it was observed that CHBMS (combination-1) resulted in the antibody level of 4.5 IU/mL of guinea pig serum, and the level was 3.5 IU/mL for the Central Research Institute's alum-adsorbed tetanus toxoid (CRITT) (combination 2), after 1 year, with a second booster dose. This novel approach of using CHBMS may have potential advantages for single-step immunization with vaccines.

  7. Antiretroviral (HIV-1) activity of azulene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Julia; Selyutina, Anastasia; Bredihhin, Aleksei

    2016-04-15

    The antiretroviral activity of azulene derivatives was detected for the first time. A series of eighteen diversely substituted azulenes was synthesized and tested in vitro using HIV-1 based virus-like particles (VLPs) and infectious HIV-1 virus in U2OS and TZM-bl cell lines. Among the compounds tested, the 2-hydroxyazulenes demonstrated the most significant activity by inhibiting HIV-1 replication with IC50 of 2-10 and 8-20 μM for the VLPs and the infectious virus, respectively. These results indicate that azulene derivatives may be potentially useful candidates for the development of antiretroviral agents.

  8. Delivery route, MyD88 signaling and cross-priming events determine the anti-tumor efficacy of an adenovirus based melanoma vaccine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.; Oosterhoff, D.; Gupta, T.; Groot, J. de; Wijnands, P.G.J.T.B.; Beusechem, V.W. van; Haan, J.; Tuting, T.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Curiel, D.T.; Scheper, R.J.; Gruijl, T.D. de

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad)-based vaccines are considered for cancer immunotherapy, yet, detailed knowledge on their mechanism of action and optimal delivery route for anti-tumor efficacy is lacking. Here, we compared the anti-tumor efficacy of an Ad-based melanoma vaccine after intradermal, intravenous, intran

  9. Addressing health inequalities in the delivery of the human papillomavirus vaccination programme: examining the role of the school nurse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Boyce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HPV immunisation of adolescent girls is expected to have a significant impact in the reduction of cervical cancer. UK The HPV immunisation programme is primarily delivered by school nurses. We examine the role of school nurses in delivering the HPV immunisation programme and their impact on minimising health inequalities in vaccine uptake. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A rapid evidence assessment (REA and semi-structured interviews with health professionals were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. 80 health professionals from across the UK are interviewed, primarily school nurses and HPV immunisation programme coordinators. The REA identified 2,795 articles and after analysis and hand searches, 34 relevant articles were identified and analysed. Interviews revealed that health inequalities in HPV vaccination uptake were mainly related to income and other social factors in contrast to published research which emphasises potential inequalities related to ethnicity and/or religion. Most school nurses interviewed understood local health inequalities and made particular efforts to target girls who did not attend or missed doses. Interviews also revealed maintaining accurate and consistent records influenced both school nurses' understanding and efforts to target inequalities in HPV vaccination uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Despite high uptake in the UK, some girls remain at risk of not being vaccinated with all three doses. School nurses played a key role in reducing health inequalities in the delivery of the HPV programme. Other studies identified religious beliefs and ethnicity as potentially influencing HPV vaccination uptake but interviews for this research found this appeared not to have occurred. Instead school nurses stated girls who were more likely to be missed were those not in education. Improving understanding of the delivery processes of immunisation programmes and this impact on health inequalities can help to inform solutions to

  10. Needle-free jet injector intradermal delivery of fractional dose inactivated poliovirus vaccine: Association between injection quality and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resik, Sonia; Tejeda, Alina; Mach, Ondrej; Sein, Carolyn; Molodecky, Natalie; Jarrahian, Courtney; Saganic, Laura; Zehrung, Darin; Fonseca, Magile; Diaz, Manuel; Alemany, Nilda; Garcia, Gloria; Hung, Lai Heng; Martinez, Yenisleydis; Sutter, Roland W

    2015-10-26

    The World Health Organization recommends that as part of the polio end-game strategy a dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) be introduced by the end of 2015 in all countries currently using only oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Administration of fractional dose (1/5 of full dose) IPV (fIPV) by intradermal (ID) injection may reduce costs, but its conventional administration is with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) needle and syringe (NS), which is time consuming and technically challenging. We compared injection quality achieved with BCG NS and three needle-free jet injectors and assessed ergonomic features of the injectors. Children between 12 and 20 months of age who had previously received OPV were enrolled in the Camaguey, Cuba study. Subjects received a single fIPV dose administered intradermally with BCG NS or one of three needle-free injector devices: Bioject Biojector 2000® (B2000), Bioject ID Pen® (ID Pen), or PharmaJet Tropis® (Tropis). We measured bleb diameter and vaccine loss as indicators of ID injection quality, with desirable injection quality defined as bleb diameter ≥5mm and vaccine loss quality indicators as predictors of immune response, measured by increase in poliovirus neutralizing antibodies in blood between day 0 (pre-IPV) and 21 (post-vaccination). Delivery by BCG NS and Tropis resulted in the highest proportion of subjects with desirable injection quality; health workers ranked Biojector2000 and Tropis highest for ergonomic features. We observed that vaccine loss and desirable injection quality were associated with an immune response for poliovirus type 2 (P=0.02, P=0.01, respectively). Our study demonstrated the feasibility of fIPV delivery using needle-free injector devices with high acceptability among health workers. We did not observe the indicators of injection quality to be uniformly associated with immune response. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The development and utility of a clinical algorithm to predict early HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharghi, Neda; Bosch, Ronald J; Mayer, Kenneth; Essex, Max; Seage, George R

    2005-12-01

    The association between self-reported clinical factors and recent HIV-1 seroconversion was evaluated in a prospective cohort of 4652 high-risk participants in the HIV Network for Prevention Trials (HIVNET) Vaccine Preparedness Study. Eighty-six individuals seroconverted, with an overall annual seroconversion rate of 1.3 per 100 person-years. Four self-reported clinical factors were significantly associated with HIV-1 seroconversion in multivariate analyses: recent history of chlamydia infection or gonorrhea, recent fever or night sweats, belief of recent HIV exposure, and recent illness lasting > or =3 days. Two scoring systems, based on the presence of either 4 or 11 clinical factors, were developed. Sensitivity ranged from 2.3% (with a positive predictive value of 12.5%) to 72.1% (with a positive predictive value of 1%). Seroconversion rates were directly associated with the number of these clinical factors. The use of scoring systems comprised of clinical factors may aid in detecting early and acute HIV-1 infection in vaccine and microbicide trials. Organizers can educate high-risk trial participants to return for testing during interim visits if they develop these clinical factors. Studying individuals during early and acute HIV-1 infection would allow scientists to investigate the impact of the intervention being studied on early transmission or pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  12. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Thang, Pham Hong; Rethi, Bence; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    One important pathogenic feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells was reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  13. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRuffin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is characterized by continuous antigenic stimulation, chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells has previously been reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for mounting and maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development which are impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  14. Readily Accessible Multiplane Microscopy: 3D Tracking the HIV-1 Genome in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itano, Michelle S; Bleck, Marina; Johnson, Daniel S; Simon, Sanford M

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the associated disease AIDS are a major cause of human death worldwide with no vaccine or cure available. The trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs from sites of synthesis in the nucleus, through the cytoplasm, to sites of assembly at the plasma membrane are critical steps in HIV-1 viral replication, but are not well characterized. Here we present a broadly accessible microscopy method that captures multiple focal planes simultaneously, which allows us to image the trafficking of HIV-1 genomic RNAs with high precision. This method utilizes a customization of a commercial multichannel emission splitter that enables high-resolution 3D imaging with single-macromolecule sensitivity. We show with high temporal and spatial resolution that HIV-1 genomic RNAs are most mobile in the cytosol, and undergo confined mobility at sites along the nuclear envelope and in the nucleus and nucleolus. These provide important insights regarding the mechanism by which the HIV-1 RNA genome is transported to the sites of assembly of nascent virions.

  15. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  16. Molecular Understanding of HIV-1 Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been an important breakthrough in the treatment of HIV-1 infection and has also a powerful tool to upset the equilibrium of viral production and HIV-1 pathogenesis. Despite the advent of potent combinations of this therapy, the long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs like cells from monocyte-macrophage lineage and resting memory CD4+ T cells which are established early during primary infection constitute a major obstacle to virus eradication. Further HAART interruption leads to immediate rebound viremia from latent reservoirs. This paper focuses on the essentials of the molecular mechanisms for the establishment of HIV-1 latency with special concern to present and future possible treatment strategies to completely purge and target viral persistence in the reservoirs.

  17. Diphtheria toxoid loaded poly-(epsilon-caprolactone) nanoparticles as mucosal vaccine delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United S