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Sample records for hiv-1 cell-to-cell transmission

  1. Tetherin restricts productive HIV-1 cell-to-cell transmission.

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    Nicoletta Casartelli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The IFN-inducible antiviral protein tetherin (or BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 impairs release of mature HIV-1 particles from infected cells. HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the effect of tetherin. The fate of virions trapped at the cell surface remains poorly understood. Here, we asked whether tetherin impairs HIV cell-to-cell transmission, a major means of viral spread. Tetherin-positive or -negative cells, infected with wild-type or DeltaVpu HIV, were used as donor cells and cocultivated with target lymphocytes. We show that tetherin inhibits productive cell-to-cell transmission of DeltaVpu to targets and impairs that of WT HIV. Tetherin accumulates with Gag at the contact zone between infected and target cells, but does not prevent the formation of virological synapses. In the presence of tetherin, viruses are then mostly transferred to targets as abnormally large patches. These viral aggregates do not efficiently promote infection after transfer, because they accumulate at the surface of target cells and are impaired in their fusion capacities. Tetherin, by imprinting virions in donor cells, is the first example of a surface restriction factor limiting viral cell-to-cell spread.

  2. In Vivo HIV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission Promotes Multicopy Micro-compartmentalized Infection

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    Kenneth M. Law

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is enhanced by adhesive structures that form between infected and uninfected T cells called virological synapses (VSs. This mode of transmission results in the frequent co-transmission of multiple copies of HIV-1 across the VS, which can reduce sensitivity to antiretroviral drugs. Studying HIV-1 infection of humanized mice, we measured the frequency of co-transmission and the spatiotemporal organization of infected cells as indicators of cell-to-cell transmission in vivo. When inoculating mice with cells co-infected with two viral genotypes, we observed high levels of co-transmission to target cells. Additionally, micro-anatomical clustering of viral genotypes within lymphoid tissue indicates that viral spread is driven by local processes and not a diffuse viral cloud. Intravital splenic imaging reveals that anchored HIV-infected cells induce arrest of interacting, uninfected CD4+ T cells to form Env-dependent cell-cell conjugates. These findings suggest that HIV-1 spread between immune cells can be anatomically localized into infectious clusters.

  3. Reduced Potency and Incomplete Neutralization of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies against Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1 with Transmitted Founder Envs

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    Li, Hongru; Zony, Chati; Chen, Ping

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated from HIV-1 patients and can potently block infection of a wide spectrum of HIV-1 subtypes. These antibodies define common epitopes shared by many viral isolates. While bNAbs potently antagonize infection with cell-free virus, inhibition of HIV-1 transmission from infected to uninfected CD4+ T cells through virological synapses (VS) has been found to require greater amounts of antibody. In this study, we examined two well-studied molecular clones and two transmitted/founder (T/F) clones for their sensitivities to a panel of bNAbs in cell-free and cell-to-cell infection assays. We observed resistance of cell-to-cell transmission to antibody neutralization that was reflected not only by reductions of antibody potency but also by decreases in maximum neutralization capacity relative to the levels seen with cell-free infections. BNAbs targeting different epitopes exhibited incomplete neutralization against cell-associated virus with T/F Envs, which was not observed with the cell-free form of the same virus. We further identified the membrane-proximal internal tyrosine-based sorting motif as a determinant that can affect the incomplete neutralization of these T/F clones in cell-to-cell infection. These findings indicate that the signal that affects surface expression and/or internalization of Env from the plasma membrane can modulate the presentation of neutralizing epitopes on infected cells. These results highlight that a fraction of virus can escape from high concentrations of antibody through cell-to-cell infection while remaining sensitive to neutralization in cell-free infection. The ability to fully inhibit cell-to-cell transmission may represent an important consideration in the development of antibodies for treatment or prophylaxis. IMPORTANCE In recent years, isolation of new-generation HIV-1 bNAbs has invigorated HIV vaccine research. These bNAbs display remarkable potency and breadth of

  4. Reduced Potency and Incomplete Neutralization of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies against Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1 with Transmitted Founder Envs.

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    Li, Hongru; Zony, Chati; Chen, Ping; Chen, Benjamin K

    2017-05-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated from HIV-1 patients and can potently block infection of a wide spectrum of HIV-1 subtypes. These antibodies define common epitopes shared by many viral isolates. While bNAbs potently antagonize infection with cell-free virus, inhibition of HIV-1 transmission from infected to uninfected CD4(+) T cells through virological synapses (VS) has been found to require greater amounts of antibody. In this study, we examined two well-studied molecular clones and two transmitted/founder (T/F) clones for their sensitivities to a panel of bNAbs in cell-free and cell-to-cell infection assays. We observed resistance of cell-to-cell transmission to antibody neutralization that was reflected not only by reductions of antibody potency but also by decreases in maximum neutralization capacity relative to the levels seen with cell-free infections. BNAbs targeting different epitopes exhibited incomplete neutralization against cell-associated virus with T/F Envs, which was not observed with the cell-free form of the same virus. We further identified the membrane-proximal internal tyrosine-based sorting motif as a determinant that can affect the incomplete neutralization of these T/F clones in cell-to-cell infection. These findings indicate that the signal that affects surface expression and/or internalization of Env from the plasma membrane can modulate the presentation of neutralizing epitopes on infected cells. These results highlight that a fraction of virus can escape from high concentrations of antibody through cell-to-cell infection while remaining sensitive to neutralization in cell-free infection. The ability to fully inhibit cell-to-cell transmission may represent an important consideration in the development of antibodies for treatment or prophylaxis.IMPORTANCE In recent years, isolation of new-generation HIV-1 bNAbs has invigorated HIV vaccine research. These bNAbs display remarkable potency and breadth of coverage

  5. Protease inhibitors effectively block cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 between T cells.

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    Titanji, Boghuma Kabisen; Aasa-Chapman, Marlen; Pillay, Deenan; Jolly, Clare

    2013-12-24

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) spreads by cell-free diffusion and by direct cell-to-cell transfer, the latter being a significantly more efficient mode of transmission. Recently it has been suggested that cell-to-cell spread may permit ongoing virus replication in the presence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) based on studies performed using Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (RTIs). Protease Inhibitors (PIs) constitute an important component of ART; however whether this class of inhibitors can suppress cell-to-cell transfer of HIV-1 is unexplored. Here we have evaluated the inhibitory effect of PIs during cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 between T lymphocytes. Using quantitative assays in cell line and primary cell systems that directly measure the early steps of HIV-1 infection we find that the PIs Lopinavir and Darunavir are equally potent against both cell-free and cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1. We further show that a protease resistant mutant maintains its resistant phenotype during cell-to-cell spread and is transmitted more efficiently than wild-type virus in the presence of drug. By contrast we find that T cell-T cell spread of HIV-1 is 4-20 fold more resistant to inhibition by the RTIs Nevirapine, Zidovudine and Tenofovir. Notably, varying the ratio of infected and uninfected cells in co-culture impacted on the degree of inhibition, indicating that the relative efficacy of ART is dependent on the multiplicity of infection. We conclude that if the variable effects of antiviral drugs on cell-to-cell virus dissemination of HIV-1 do indeed impact on viral replication and maintenance of viral reservoirs this is likely to be influenced by the antiviral drug class, since PIs appear particularly effective against both modes of HIV-1 spread.

  6. Cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 and evasion of neutralizing antibodies.

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    Schiffner, Torben; Sattentau, Quentin J; Duncan, Christopher J A

    2013-12-02

    Cell-to-cell spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) between immune cells was first observed over 20 years ago. During this time, the question of whether this infection route favours viral evasion of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) targeting the virus envelope glycoprotein (Env) has been repeatedly investigated, but with conflicting results. A clearer picture has formed in the last few years as more broadly neutralizing antibodies have been isolated and we gain further insight into the mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission at virological and infectious synapses. Nevertheless consensus is still lacking, a situation which may be at least partly explained by variability in the experimental approaches used to study the activity of NAbs in the cell-to-cell context. In this review we focus on the most critical question concerning the activity of NAbs against cell-to-cell transmission: is NAb inhibition of cell-to-cell HIV-1 quantitatively or qualitatively different from cell-free infection? Overall, data consistently show that NAbs are capable of blocking HIV-1 infection at synapses, supporting the concept that cell-to-cell infection occurs through directed transfer of virions accessible to the external environment. However, more recent findings suggest that higher concentrations of certain NAbs might be needed to inhibit synaptic infection, with important potential implications for prophylactic vaccine development. We discuss several mechanistic explanations for this relative and selective loss of activity, and highlight gaps in knowledge that are still to be explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tetherin restricts direct cell-to-cell infection of HIV-1

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    Bar-Magen Tamara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetherin (BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 is an interferon (IFN-inducible factor of the innate immune system, recently shown to exert antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses by tethering nascent viral particles to the cell surface, thereby inhibiting viral release. In HIV-1 infection, the viral protein U (Vpu counteracts this antiviral action by down-modulating tetherin from the cell surface. Viral dissemination between T-cells can occur via cell-free transmission or the more efficient direct cell-to-cell route through lipid raft-rich virological synapses, to which tetherin localizes. Results We established a flow cytometry-based co-culture assay to distinguish viral transfer from viral transmission and investigated the influence of tetherin on cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1. Sup-T1 cells inducible for tetherin expression were used to examine the impact of effector and target cell tetherin expression on virus transfer and transmission. Using this assay, we showed that tetherin inhibits direct cell-to-cell virus transfer and transmission. Viral Vpu promoted viral transmission from tetherin-expressing cells by down-modulating tetherin from the effector cell surface. Further, we showed that tetherin on the target cell promotes viral transfer and transmission. Viral infectivity in itself was not affected by tetherin. Conclusion In addition to inhibiting viral release, tetherin also inhibits direct cell-to-cell spread. Viral protein Vpu counteracts this restriction, outweighing its possible cost of fitness in cell-to-cell transmission. The differential role of tetherin in effector and target cells suggest a role for tetherin in cell-cell contacts and virological synapses.

  8. Sexual transmission of HIV-1.

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    Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 transmission occurs in a limited number of ways all of which are preventable. Overall, the risk of HIV-1 transmission following a single sexual exposure is low especially in comparison with other sexually transmitted infections (STIs); with estimates of the average probability of male to female HIV-1 transmission only 0.0005-0.0026 per coital act. The risk of acquiring HIV-1 from a single contact varies enormously and is dependant upon the infectiousness of the HIV-1 positive individual and the susceptibility to HIV-1 of their sexual partner. An understanding of the determinants of HIV-1 transmission is important not only to assess the infection risk to an individual when exposed to the virus (e.g. to determine the provision of post exposure prophylaxis), but also to make accurate predictions on the potential spread of HIV-1 infection in a population and to direct appropriate targeted prevention strategies. In this review article we summarise the current literature on the major worldwide source of HIV-1 acquisition, sexual transmission. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of a stochastic cell-to-cell HIV-1 model with distributed delay

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    Ji, Chunyan; Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a stochastic cell-to-cell HIV-1 model with distributed delay. Firstly, we show that there is a global positive solution of this model before exploring its long-time behavior. Then sufficient conditions for extinction of the disease are established. Moreover, we obtain sufficient conditions for the existence of an ergodic stationary distribution of the model by constructing a suitable stochastic Lyapunov function. The stationary distribution implies that the disease is persistent in the mean. Finally, we provide some numerical examples to illustrate theoretical results.

  10. Asymptotic behaviors of a cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection model perturbed by white noise

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    Liu, Qun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze a mathematical model of cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection to CD4+ T cells perturbed by stochastic perturbations. First of all, we investigate that there exists a unique global positive solution of the system for any positive initial value. Then by using Lyapunov analysis methods, we study the asymptotic property of this solution. Moreover, we discuss whether there is a stationary distribution for this system and if it owns the ergodic property. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  11. Cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread and its implications for immune evasion.

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    Martin, Nicola; Sattentau, Quentin

    2009-03-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to move between cells via direct cell-cell transmission is currently receiving a lot of attention. This review will discuss cell-cell spread of HIV-1 in terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms and will consider the evidence for immune and therapeutic evasion. Recent studies relating to the cell biology of HIV-1 cell-cell spread have sparked considerable renewed interest in the field. However, questions are being raised concerning both the mechanisms of viral spread between immune cells and the implications for immune evasion. The re-emergence of HIV-1 cell-cell spread as a highly efficient mechanism for viral dissemination in vitro has raised the possibility that this finding may be central to viral spread in vivo and may strongly influence pathogenesis.

  12. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

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    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  13. Inhibiting sexual transmission of HIV-1 infection.

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    Shattock, Robin J; Moore, John P

    2003-10-01

    The worldwide infection rate for HIV-1 is estimated to be 14,000 per day, but only now, more than 20 years into the epidemic, are the immediate events between exposure to infectious virus and the establishment of infection becoming clear. Defining the mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission, the target cells involved and how the virus attaches to and fuses with these cells, could reveal ways to block the sexual spread of the virus. In this review, we will discuss how our increasing knowledge of the ways in which HIV-1 is transmitted is shaping the development of new, more sophisticated intervention strategies based on the application of vaginal or rectal microbicides.

  14. Limits on oral transmission of HIV-1.

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    Cohen, M S; Shugars, D C; Fiscus, S A

    2000-07-22

    This article discusses the potential of acquiring an HIV-1 infection through an oral route, with a view of offering clues for its prevention. In a study of adult animals given low concentration cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) orally, histological examination suggested that SIV infected lymphoid tissue through the antigen-transporting crypt epithelium rather than through dendritic cells. The investigators found no evidence of acquiring SIV via the gastrointestinal tract. For humans, HIV transmission from saliva or intimate family contact seems to be extremely rare. This could be because of the low concentration of HIV-1 in saliva. A study of 40 people found that significantly less HIV was found in salivary secretions than in plasma. Another possible explanation for inefficient oral transmission might be that HIV-1 in the oropharynx is inhibited by components found in salivary secretions. Conversely, studies have noted that risk of oral transmission of HIV from contaminated breast milk and semen is higher than from saliva. Breast-feeding by an HIV-infected woman puts the baby at substantial risk of infection and receptive fellatio cannot be considered a safe sex act.

  15. Defining HIV-1 transmission clusters based on sequence data.

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    Hassan, Amin S; Pybus, Oliver G; Sanders, Eduard J; Albert, Jan; Esbjörnsson, Joakim

    2017-06-01

    : Understanding HIV-1 transmission dynamics is relevant to both screening and intervention strategies of HIV-1 infection. Commonly, HIV-1 transmission chains are determined based on sequence similarity assessed either directly from a sequence alignment or by inferring a phylogenetic tree. This review is aimed at both nonexperts interested in understanding and interpreting studies of HIV-1 transmission, and experts interested in finding the most appropriate cluster definition for a specific dataset and research question. We start by introducing the concepts and methodologies of how HIV-1 transmission clusters usually have been defined. We then present the results of a systematic review of 105 HIV-1 molecular epidemiology studies summarizing the most common methods and definitions in the literature. Finally, we offer our perspectives on how HIV-1 transmission clusters can be defined and provide some guidance based on examples from real life datasets.

  16. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Campbell, Mary S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Mullins, James I [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Hughes, James P [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wong, Kim G [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Raugi, Dana N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Scrensen, Stefanie [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  17. Risk factors for perinatal HIV-1 transmission in pregnant women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To estimate the infant HIV-1 transmission rate and to evaluate risk factors for transmission in pregnant women at an Eastern Cape tertiary hospital requiring lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. Pregnant women who initiated lifelong ART during pregnancy and others who conceived on lifelong ART ...

  18. Attachment and Postattachment Receptors Important for Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

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    Fan, Huahao; Qiao, Luhua; Kang, Kyung-Don; Fan, Junfen; Wei, Wensheng; Luo, Guangxiang

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires multiple receptors for its attachment to and entry into cells. Our previous studies found that human syndecan-1 (SDC-1), SDC-2, and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 1 (TIM-1) are HCV attachment receptors. Other cell surface molecules, such as CD81, Claudin-1 (CLDN1), Occludin (OCLN), SR-BI, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), function mainly at postattachment steps and are considered postattachment receptors. The underlying molecular mechanisms of different receptors in HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission remain elusive. In the present study, we used a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 technology, gene-specific small interfering RNAs, and a newly developed luciferase-based reporter system to quantitatively determine the importance of individual receptors in HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. Knockouts of SDC-1 and SDC-2 resulted in remarkable reductions of HCV infection and cell attachment, whereas SDC-3 and SDC-4 knockouts did not affect HCV infection. Defective HCV attachment to SDC-1 and/or SDC-2 knockout cells was completely restored by SDC-1 and SDC-2 but not SDC-4 expression. Knockout of the attachment receptors SDC-1, SDC-2, and TIM-1 also modestly decreased HCV cell-to-cell transmission. In contrast, silencing and knockout of the postattachment receptors CD81, CLDN1, OCLN, SR-BI, and LDLR greatly impaired both HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. Additionally, apolipoprotein E was found to be important for HCV cell-to-cell spread, but very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-containing mouse serum did not affect HCV cell-to-cell transmission, although it inhibited cell-free infection. These findings demonstrate that attachment receptors are essential for initial HCV binding and that postattachment receptors are important for both HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. IMPORTANCE The importance and underlying molecular mechanisms

  19. Increased Risk of HIV-1 Transmission in Pregnancy: A Prospective Study among African HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

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    MUGO, Nelly R.; HEFFRON, Renee; DONNELL, Deborah; WALD, Anna; WERE, Edwin O.; REES, Helen; CELUM, Connie; KIARIE, James N.; COHEN, Craig R.; KAYINTEKORE, Kayitesi; BAETEN, Jared M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Physiologic and behavioral changes during pregnancy may alter HIV-1 susceptibility and infectiousness. Prospective studies exploring pregnancy and HIV-1 acquisition risk in women have found inconsistent results. No study has explored the effect of pregnancy on HIV-1 transmission risk from HIV-1 infected women to male partners. Methods In a prospective study of African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, we evaluated the relationship between pregnancy and the risk of 1) HIV-1 acquisition among women and 2) HIV-1 transmission from women to men. Results 3321 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples were enrolled, 1085 (32.7%) with HIV-1 susceptible female partners and 2236 (67.3%) with susceptible male partners. HIV-1 incidence in women was 7.35 versus 3.01 per 100 person-years during pregnant and non-pregnant periods (hazard ratio [HR] 2.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33–4.09). This effect was attenuated and not statistically significant after adjusting for sexual behavior and other confounding factors (adjusted HR 1.71, 95% CI 0.93–3.12). HIV-1 incidence in male partners of infected women was 3.46 versus 1.58 per 100 person-years when their partners were pregnant versus not pregnant (HR 2.31, 95% CI 1.22–4.39). This effect was not attenuated in adjusted analysis (adjusted HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.26–4.85). Conclusions HIV-1 risk increased two-fold during pregnancy. Elevated risk of HIV-1 acquisition in pregnant women appeared in part to be explained by behavioral and other factors. This is the first study to show pregnancy increased the risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission, which may reflect biological changes of pregnancy that could increase HIV-1 infectiousness. PMID:21785321

  20. Innate immune factors associated with HIV-1 transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollakis, Georgios; Stax, Martijn J.; Paxton, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Relatively little is known with regards to the mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission across a mucosal surface and more specifically what effects host factors have on influencing infection and early viral dissemination. The purpose of this review is to summarize which factors of the innate immune response

  1. HIV-1 transmission during early antiretroviral therapy: evaluation of two HIV-1 transmission events in the HPTN 052 prevention study.

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    Li-Hua Ping

    Full Text Available In the HPTN 052 study, transmission between HIV-discordant couples was reduced by 96% when the HIV-infected partner received suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. We examined two transmission events where the newly infected partner was diagnosed after the HIV-infected partner (index initiated therapy. We evaluated the sequence complexity of the viral populations and antibody reactivity in the newly infected partner to estimate the dates of transmission to the newly infected partners. In both cases, transmission most likely occurred significantly before HIV-1 diagnosis of the newly infected partner, and either just before the initiation of therapy or before viral replication was adequately suppressed by therapy of the index. This study further strengthens the conclusion about the efficacy of blocking transmission by treating the infected partner of discordant couples. However, this study does not rule out the potential for HIV-1 transmission to occur shortly after initiation of ART, and this should be recognized when antiretroviral therapy is used for HIV-1 prevention.

  2. Human immature Langerhans cells restrict CXCR4-using HIV-1 transmission

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    Sarrami-Forooshani, Ramin; Mesman, Annelies W.; van Teijlingen, Nienke H.; Sprokholt, Joris K.; van der Vlist, Michiel; Ribeiro, Carla M. S.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual transmission is the main route of HIV-1 infection and the CCR5-using (R5) HIV-1 is predominantly transmitted, even though CXCR4-using (X4) HIV-1 is often abundant in chronic HIV-1 patients. The mechanisms underlying this tropism selection are unclear. Mucosal Langerhans cells (LCs) are the

  3. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

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    Tongqian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal.

  4. A Delayed Virus Infection Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and CTL Immune Response

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    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Tonghua; Xu, Yancong; Zhou, Jinling

    In this paper, a delayed virus infection model with cell-to-cell transmission and CTL immune response is investigated. In the model, time delay is incorporated into the CTL response. By constructing Lyapunov functionals, global dynamical properties of the two boundary equilibria are established. Our results show that time delay in the CTL response process may lead to sustained oscillation. To further investigate the nature of the oscillation, we apply the method of multiple time scales to calculate the normal form on the center manifold of the model. At the end of the paper, numerical simulations are carried out, which support our theoretical results.

  5. HIV-1 envelope, integrins and co-receptor use in mucosal transmission of HIV

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    Cicala Claudia

    2010-01-01

    4β7 is closely associated with CD4 and CCR5. Furthermore, α4β7 is ~3 times the size of CD4 on the cell surface, that makes it a prominent receptor for an efficient virus capture. gp120-α4β7 interactions mediate the activation of the adhesion-associated integrin LFA-1. LFA-1 facilitates the formation of virological synapses and cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1. gp120 binding to α4β7 is mediated by a tripeptide located in the V1/V2 domain of gp120. Of note, the V1/V2 domain of gp120 has been linked to variations in transmission fitness among viral isolates raising the intriguing possibility that gp120-α4β7 interactions may be linked to transmission fitness. Although many details remain unresolved, we hypothesize that gp120-α4β7 interactions play an important role in the very early events following sexual transmission of HIV and may have important implication in the design of vaccine strategies for the prevention of acquisition of HIV infection

  6. A new cell line for high throughput HIV-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cell-to-cell virus transmission studies.

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    Orlandi, Chiara; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (Wren et al., 2013) is important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Namely, ADCC is induced during natural HIV-1 infection or in HIV-1 vaccine studies, the latter demonstrated by the RV144 vaccine trial. To expedite the assessment of ADCC in studies of HIV, we have developed a high throughput assay. We have optimized the rapid fluorometric antibody-mediated cytotoxicity assay (RFADCC) by transfecting the EGFP-CEM-NKr cell line to constitutively express SNAP-tagged CCR5. This cell line can then serve as a source of HIV-specific targets when coated with monomeric gp120, spinoculated with inactivated intact virions, infected by cell-free viral diffusion or infected by cell-to-cell transmission of virus. The optimized strategy has two significant advantages over the original RFADCC method: First, the preparation of detectable target cells is less labor intensive and faster as it does not rely on multiple staining and washing steps for target cells. Second, because the target cell markers GFP and SNAP are constitutively expressed, the assay provides highly reproducible data. These strengths make the optimized RFADCC assay suitable not only for studies of HIV-1 specific cytotoxicity but also for studies of cell-cell transmission of virus. In conclusion, this assay provides a new generation T cell line that can expedite large clinical studies as well as research studies in humans or non-human primates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

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    G. Natale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-to-cell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs; mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs. The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step.

  8. Characteristics of HIV-1 discordant couples enrolled in a trial of HSV-2 suppression to reduce HIV-1 transmission: the partners study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam R Lingappa

    Full Text Available The Partners HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Study (Partners Study is a phase III, placebo-controlled trial of daily acyclovir for genital herpes (HSV-2 suppression among HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected persons to reduce HIV-1 transmission to their HIV-1 susceptible partners, which requires recruitment of HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples. We describe the baseline characteristics of this cohort.HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partner was HSV-2 seropositive, had a CD4 count >or=250 cells/mcL and was not on antiretroviral therapy, were enrolled at 14 sites in East and Southern Africa. Demographic, behavioral, clinical and laboratory characteristics were assessed.Of the 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled, 67% of the HIV-1 infected partners were women. Couples had cohabitated for a median of 5 years (range 2-9 with 28% reporting unprotected sex in the month prior to enrollment. Among HIV-1 susceptible participants, 86% of women and 59% of men were HSV-2 seropositive. Other laboratory-diagnosed sexually transmitted infections were uncommon (500 relative to <350, respectively, p<0.001.The Partners Study successfully enrolled a cohort of 3408 heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa at high risk for HIV-1 transmission. Follow-up of this cohort will evaluate the efficacy of acyclovir for HSV-2 suppression in preventing HIV-1 transmission and provide insights into biological and behavioral factors determining heterosexual HIV-1 transmission.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519.

  9. Characteristics of HIV-1 Discordant Couples Enrolled in a Trial of HSV-2 Suppression to Reduce HIV-1 Transmission: The Partners Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingappa, Jairam R.; Kahle, Erin; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Magaret, Amalia; Baeten, Jared; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, M.; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth; deBruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda; McIntyre, James; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Coombs, Robert W.; Morrow, Rhoda; Whittington, William; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Background The Partners HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Study (Partners Study) is a phase III, placebo-controlled trial of daily acyclovir for genital herpes (HSV-2) suppression among HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected persons to reduce HIV-1 transmission to their HIV-1 susceptible partners, which requires recruitment of HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples. We describe the baseline characteristics of this cohort. Methods HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partner was HSV-2 seropositive, had a CD4 count ≥250 cells/mcL and was not on antiretroviral therapy, were enrolled at 14 sites in East and Southern Africa. Demographic, behavioral, clinical and laboratory characteristics were assessed. Results Of the 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled, 67% of the HIV-1 infected partners were women. Couples had cohabitated for a median of 5 years (range 2–9) with 28% reporting unprotected sex in the month prior to enrollment. Among HIV-1 susceptible participants, 86% of women and 59% of men were HSV-2 seropositive. Other laboratory-diagnosed sexually transmitted infections were uncommon (500 relative to <350, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions The Partners Study successfully enrolled a cohort of 3408 heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa at high risk for HIV-1 transmission. Follow-up of this cohort will evaluate the efficacy of acyclovir for HSV-2 suppression in preventing HIV-1 transmission and provide insights into biological and behavioral factors determining heterosexual HIV-1 transmission. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519 PMID:19404392

  10. Emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants after triple antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of vertical HIV-1 transmission.

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    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: WHO-guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 in resource-limited settings recommend complex maternal antiretroviral prophylaxis comprising antenatal zidovudine (AZT, nevirapine single-dose (NVP-SD at labor onset and AZT/lamivudine (3TC during labor and one week postpartum. Data on resistance development selected by this regimen is not available. We therefore analyzed the emergence of minor drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in Tanzanian women following complex prophylaxis. METHOD: 1395 pregnant women were tested for HIV-1 at Kyela District Hospital, Tanzania. 87/202 HIV-positive women started complex prophylaxis. Blood samples were collected before start of prophylaxis, at birth and 1-2, 4-6 and 12-16 weeks postpartum. Allele-specific real-time PCR assays specific for HIV-1 subtypes A, C and D were developed and applied on samples of mothers and their vertically infected infants to quantify key resistance mutations of AZT (K70R/T215Y/T215F, NVP (K103N/Y181C and 3TC (M184V at detection limits of <1%. RESULTS: 50/87 HIV-infected women having started complex prophylaxis were eligible for the study. All women took AZT with a median duration of 53 days (IQR 39-64; all women ingested NVP-SD, 86% took 3TC. HIV-1 resistance mutations were detected in 20/50 (40% women, of which 70% displayed minority species. Variants with AZT-resistance mutations were found in 11/50 (22%, NVP-resistant variants in 9/50 (18% and 3TC-resistant variants in 4/50 women (8%. Three women harbored resistant HIV-1 against more than one drug. 49/50 infants, including the seven vertically HIV-infected were breastfed, 3/7 infants exhibited drug-resistant virus. CONCLUSION: Complex prophylaxis resulted in lower levels of NVP-selected resistance as compared to NVP-SD, but AZT-resistant HIV-1 emerged in a substantial proportion of women. Starting AZT in pregnancy week 14 instead of 28 as recommended by the current WHO-guidelines may further increase

  11. Vaccines and microbicides preventing HIV-1, HSV-2, and HPV mucosal transmission.

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    Nikolic, Damjan S; Piguet, Vincent

    2010-02-01

    HIV-1, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and human papillomavirus (HPV), among other sexually transmitted infections, represent a major burden for global health. Initial insights into the mucosal transmission of these viral pathogens have raised optimism with regard to the rapid generation of protective vaccines. Nevertheless, setbacks for HIV-1 and HSV-2 vaccines have seriously challenged the initial enthusiasm. Recently, two new vaccines that efficiently prevented HPV infection have renewed the hope that vaccinal prevention of viral mucosal sexually transmitted infections is possible. HIV-1 and HSV-2 differ from HPV, and each virus needs to be tackled with a distinct approach. However, vaccines are not the only possible answer. Topically applied agents (microbicides) are an attractive alternative in the prevention of HIV-1 and HSV-2 mucosal transmission. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of genital transmission of HIV-1 and HSV-2 is required for successful vaccine or microbicide candidates to emerge from current approaches.

  12. Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Events Are Differentially Impacted by Breast Milk and Its Components from HIV-1-Infected Women.

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    Ruizhong Shen

    Full Text Available Breast milk is a vehicle of infection and source of protection in post-natal mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission (MTCT. Understanding the mechanism by which breast milk limits vertical transmission will provide critical insight into the design of preventive and therapeutic approaches to interrupt HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, characterization of the inhibitory activity of breast milk in human intestinal mucosa, the portal of entry in postnatal MTCT, has been constrained by the limited availability of primary mucosal target cells and tissues to recapitulate mucosal transmission ex vivo. Here, we characterized the impact of skimmed breast milk, breast milk antibodies (Igs and non-Ig components from HIV-1-infected Ugandan women on the major events of HIV-1 mucosal transmission using primary human intestinal cells and tissues. HIV-1-specific IgG antibodies and non-Ig components in breast milk inhibited the uptake of Ugandan HIV-1 isolates by primary human intestinal epithelial cells, viral replication in and transport of HIV-1- bearing dendritic cells through the human intestinal mucosa. Breast milk HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA, as well as innate factors, blocked the uptake and transport of HIV-1 through intestinal mucosa. Thus, breast milk components have distinct and complementary effects in reducing HIV-1 uptake, transport through and replication in the intestinal mucosa and, therefore, likely contribute to preventing postnatal HIV-1 transmission. Our data suggests that a successful preventive or therapeutic approach would require multiple immune factors acting at multiple steps in the HIV-1 mucosal transmission process.

  13. Mutz-3-derived Langerhans cells are a model to study HIV-1 transmission and potential inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.W.P. de Jong (Marein); L. de Witte (Lot); S.J.A.M. Santegoets (Saskia); D. Fluitsma (Donna); M.E. Taylor (Maureen); T.D. de Gruijl (Tanja); T.B.H. Geijtenbeek (Teunis)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSexual transmission is the primary route of HIV-1 infection, and DC subsets are thought to be involved in viral dissemination to T cells. In the genital mucosa, two main subsets of DCs are present: epithelial LCs capture and degrade HIV-1 through C-type lectin Langerin, whereas

  14. Calcitonin gene–related peptide inhibits Langerhans cell–mediated HIV-1 transmission

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    Ganor, Yonatan; Drillet-Dangeard, Anne-Sophie; Lopalco, Lucia; Tudor, Daniela; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Delongchamps, Nicolas Barry; Zerbib, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Upon its mucosal entry, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is internalized by Langerhans cells (LCs) in stratified epithelia and transferred locally to T cells. In such epithelia, LCs are in direct contact with peripheral neurons secreting calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP). Although CGRP has immunomodulatory effects on LC functions, its potential influence on the interactions between LCs and HIV-1 is unknown. We show that CGRP acts via its receptor expressed by LCs and interferes with multiple steps of LC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. CGRP increases langerin expression, decreases selected integrins, and activates NF-κB, resulting in decreased HIV-1 intracellular content, limited formation of LC–T cell conjugates, and elevated secretion of the CCR5-binding chemokine CCL3/MIP-1α. These mechanisms cooperate to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 transfer from LCs to T cells and T cell infection. In vivo, HIV-1 infection decreases CGRP plasma levels in both vaginally SHIV-challenged macaques and HIV-1–infected individuals. CGRP plasma levels return to baseline after highly active antiretroviral therapy. Our results reveal a novel path by which a peripheral neuropeptide acts at the molecular and cellular levels to limit mucosal HIV-1 transmission and suggest that CGRP receptor agonists might be used therapeutically against HIV-1. PMID:24081951

  15. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabatov, Alexey A.; de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an

  16. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis prevents vaginal transmission of HIV-1 in humanized BLT mice.

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    Paul W Denton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, vaginal transmission now accounts for more than half of newly acquired HIV-1 infections. Despite the urgency to develop and implement novel approaches capable of preventing HIV transmission, this process has been hindered by the lack of adequate small animal models for preclinical efficacy and safety testing. Given the importance of this route of transmission, we investigated the susceptibility of humanized mice to intravaginal HIV-1 infection.We show that the female reproductive tract of humanized bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT mice is reconstituted with human CD4+ T and other relevant human cells, rendering these humanized mice susceptible to intravaginal infection by HIV-1. Effects of HIV-1 infection include CD4+ T cell depletion in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT that closely mimics what is observed in HIV-1-infected humans. We also show that pre-exposure prophylaxis with antiretroviral drugs is a highly effective method for preventing vaginal HIV-1 transmission. Whereas 88% (7/8 of BLT mice inoculated vaginally with HIV-1 became infected, none of the animals (0/5 given pre-exposure prophylaxis of emtricitabine (FTC/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF showed evidence of infection (Chi square = 7.5, df = 1, p = 0.006.The fact that humanized BLT mice are susceptible to intravaginal infection makes this system an excellent candidate for preclinical evaluation of both microbicides and pre-exposure prophylactic regimens. The utility of humanized mice to study intravaginal HIV-1 transmission is particularly highlighted by the demonstration that pre-exposure prophylaxis can prevent intravaginal HIV-1 transmission in the BLT mouse model.

  17. Predicting HIV-1 transmission and antibody neutralization efficacy in vivo from stoichiometric parameters.

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    Oliver F Brandenberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential of broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the HIV-1 envelope trimer to prevent HIV-1 transmission has opened new avenues for therapies and vaccines. However, their implementation remains challenging and would profit from a deepened mechanistic understanding of HIV-antibody interactions and the mucosal transmission process. In this study we experimentally determined stoichiometric parameters of the HIV-1 trimer-antibody interaction, confirming that binding of one antibody is sufficient for trimer neutralization. This defines numerical requirements for HIV-1 virion neutralization and thereby enables mathematical modelling of in vitro and in vivo antibody neutralization efficacy. The model we developed accurately predicts antibody efficacy in animal passive immunization studies and provides estimates for protective mucosal antibody concentrations. Furthermore, we derive estimates of the probability for a single virion to start host infection and the risks of male-to-female HIV-1 transmission per sexual intercourse. Our work thereby delivers comprehensive quantitative insights into both the molecular principles governing HIV-antibody interactions and the initial steps of mucosal HIV-1 transmission. These insights, alongside the underlying, adaptable modelling framework presented here, will be valuable for supporting in silico pre-trial planning and post-hoc evaluation of HIV-1 vaccination or antibody treatment trials.

  18. Predicting HIV-1 transmission and antibody neutralization efficacy in vivo from stoichiometric parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusert, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The potential of broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the HIV-1 envelope trimer to prevent HIV-1 transmission has opened new avenues for therapies and vaccines. However, their implementation remains challenging and would profit from a deepened mechanistic understanding of HIV-antibody interactions and the mucosal transmission process. In this study we experimentally determined stoichiometric parameters of the HIV-1 trimer-antibody interaction, confirming that binding of one antibody is sufficient for trimer neutralization. This defines numerical requirements for HIV-1 virion neutralization and thereby enables mathematical modelling of in vitro and in vivo antibody neutralization efficacy. The model we developed accurately predicts antibody efficacy in animal passive immunization studies and provides estimates for protective mucosal antibody concentrations. Furthermore, we derive estimates of the probability for a single virion to start host infection and the risks of male-to-female HIV-1 transmission per sexual intercourse. Our work thereby delivers comprehensive quantitative insights into both the molecular principles governing HIV-antibody interactions and the initial steps of mucosal HIV-1 transmission. These insights, alongside the underlying, adaptable modelling framework presented here, will be valuable for supporting in silico pre-trial planning and post-hoc evaluation of HIV-1 vaccination or antibody treatment trials. PMID:28472201

  19. Cell-free (RNA and cell-associated (DNA HIV-1 and postnatal transmission through breastfeeding.

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    James Ndirangu

    Full Text Available Transmission through breastfeeding remains important for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT in resource-limited settings. We quantify the relationship between cell-free (RNA and cell-associated (DNA shedding of HIV-1 virus in breastmilk and the risk of postnatal HIV-1 transmission in the first 6 months postpartum.Thirty-six HIV-positive mothers who transmitted HIV-1 by breastfeeding were matched to 36 non-transmitting HIV-1 infected mothers in a case-control study nested in a cohort of HIV-infected women. RNA and DNA were quantified in the same breastmilk sample taken at 6 weeks and 6 months. Cox regression analysis assessed the association between cell-free and cell-associated virus levels and risk of postnatal HIV-1 transmission.There were higher median levels of cell-free than cell-associated HIV-1 virus (per ml in breastmilk at 6 weeks and 6 months. Multivariably, adjusting for antenatal CD4 count and maternal plasma viral load, at 6 weeks, each 10-fold increase in cell-free or cell-associated levels (per ml was significantly associated with HIV-1 transmission but stronger for cell-associated than cell-free levels [2.47 (95% CI 1.33-4.59 vs. aHR 1.52 (95% CI, 1.17-1.96, respectively]. At 6 months, cell-free and cell-associated levels (per ml in breastmilk remained significantly associated with HIV-1 transmission but was stronger for cell-free than cell-associated levels [aHR 2.53 (95% CI 1.64-3.92 vs. 1.73 (95% CI 0.94-3.19, respectively].The findings suggest that cell-associated virus level (per ml is more important for early postpartum HIV-1 transmission (at 6 weeks than cell-free virus. As cell-associated virus levels have been consistently detected in breastmilk despite antiretroviral therapy, this highlights a potential challenge for resource-limited settings to achieve the UNAIDS goal for 2015 of eliminating vertical transmission. More studies would further knowledge on mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission and help develop more effective

  20. Antiretroviral treatment of HIV-1 prevents transmission of HIV-1: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Myron S; Smith, M Kumi; Muessig, Kathryn E; Hallett, Timothy B; Powers, Kimberly A; Kashuba, Angela D

    2013-11-02

    Antiretroviral drugs that inhibit viral replication were expected to reduce transmission of HIV by lowering the concentration of HIV in the genital tract. In 11 of 13 observational studies, antiretroviral therapy (ART) provided to an HIV-infected index case led to greatly reduced transmission of HIV to a sexual partner. In the HPTN 052 randomised controlled trial, ART used in combination with condoms and counselling reduced HIV transmission by 96·4%. Evidence is growing that wider, earlier initiation of ART could reduce population-level incidence of HIV. However, the full benefits of this strategy will probably need universal access to very early ART and excellent adherence to treatment. Challenges to this approach are substantial. First, not all HIV-infected individuals can be located, especially people with acute and early infection who are most contagious. Second, the ability of ART to prevent HIV transmission in men who have sex with men (MSM) and people who use intravenous drugs has not been shown. Indeed, the stable or increased incidence of HIV in MSM in some communities where widespread use of ART has been established emphasises the concern that not enough is known about treatment as prevention for this crucial population. Third, although US guidelines call for immediate use of ART, such guidelines have not been embraced worldwide. Some experts do not believe that immediate or early ART is justified by present evidence, or that health-care infrastructure for this approach is sufficient. These concerns are very difficult to resolve. Ongoing community-based prospective trials of early ART are likely to help to establish the population-level benefit of ART, and-if successful-to galvanise treatment as prevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission.

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    Narges Zarrabi

    Full Text Available Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current research either uses genetic information of patients' virus to infer the past infection events or uses statistics of sexual interactions to model the network structure of viral spreading. Methods for a reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 transmission dynamics, taking into account both molecular and societal data are still lacking. The aim of this study is to combine information from both genetic and epidemiological scales to characterize and analyse a transmission network of the HIV-1 epidemic in central Italy.We introduce a novel filter-reduction method to build a network of HIV infected patients based on their social and treatment information. The network is then combined with a genetic network, to infer a hypothetical infection transmission network. We apply this method to a cohort study of HIV-1 infected patients in central Italy and find that patients who are highly connected in the network have longer untreated infection periods. We also find that the network structures for homosexual males and heterosexual populations are heterogeneous, consisting of a majority of 'peripheral nodes' that have only a few sexual interactions and a minority of 'hub nodes' that have many sexual interactions. Inferring HIV-1 transmission networks using this novel combined approach reveals remarkable correlations between high out-degree individuals and longer untreated infection periods. These findings signify the importance of early treatment and support the potential benefit of wide population screening, management of early diagnoses and anticipated antiretroviral treatment to prevent viral transmission and spread. The approach presented here for reconstructing HIV-1

  2. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Prosperi, M.; Belleman, R.G.; Colafigli, M.; De Luca, A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current

  3. Infection of female primary lower genital tract epithelial cells after natural pseudotyping of HIV-1: possible implications for sexual transmission of HIV-1.

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    Yuyang Tang

    Full Text Available The global AIDS pandemic continues to expand and in some regions of the world, such as southern Africa, the prevalence of HIV-1 infection exceeds 20%. The devastating spread of the virus in young women in these countries appears disproportional to overall risk of infection. Regions with high prevalence of HIV-1 are often also highly endemic for other pathogenic viruses including HSV, CMV and HTLV. We propose that acquisition by HIV-1 of the envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, in a process we call "natural pseudotyping," expands the cellular tropism of HIV-1, enabling it to infect female genital epithelial cells directly and thereby dramatically increasing risk of infection during sexual intercourse. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that when HIV-1 co-infects T cells along with the gammaretrovirus xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV, progeny HIV-1 particles are produced capable of infecting primary vaginal, ectocervical and endocervical epithelial cells. These cell types are normally resistant to HIV-1 infection. Infection of primary genital cells was neutralized by antisera against the XMRV glycoprotein, confirming that infection was mediated by the XMRV glycoprotein acquired through pseudotyping of HIV. Inhibition by AZT showed that active replication of HIV-1 occurred in these cells and ruled out non-specific endocytic uptake of the virus. These results demonstrate that natural pseudotyping can expand the tropism of HIV-1 to include genital epithelial cells and have potential implications for sexual transmission of the virus.

  4. Infection of Female Primary Lower Genital Tract Epithelial Cells after Natural Pseudotyping of HIV-1: Possible Implications for Sexual Transmission of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuyang; George, Alvin; Nouvet, Franklin; Sweet, Stephanie; Emeagwali, Nkiruka; Taylor, Harry E.; Simmons, Glenn; Hildreth, James E. K.

    2014-01-01

    The global AIDS pandemic continues to expand and in some regions of the world, such as southern Africa, the prevalence of HIV-1 infection exceeds 20%. The devastating spread of the virus in young women in these countries appears disproportional to overall risk of infection. Regions with high prevalence of HIV-1 are often also highly endemic for other pathogenic viruses including HSV, CMV and HTLV. We propose that acquisition by HIV-1 of the envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, in a process we call “natural pseudotyping,” expands the cellular tropism of HIV-1, enabling it to infect female genital epithelial cells directly and thereby dramatically increasing risk of infection during sexual intercourse. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that when HIV-1 co-infects T cells along with the gammaretrovirus xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), progeny HIV-1 particles are produced capable of infecting primary vaginal, ectocervical and endocervical epithelial cells. These cell types are normally resistant to HIV-1 infection. Infection of primary genital cells was neutralized by antisera against the XMRV glycoprotein, confirming that infection was mediated by the XMRV glycoprotein acquired through pseudotyping of HIV. Inhibition by AZT showed that active replication of HIV-1 occurred in these cells and ruled out non-specific endocytic uptake of the virus. These results demonstrate that natural pseudotyping can expand the tropism of HIV-1 to include genital epithelial cells and have potential implications for sexual transmission of the virus. PMID:25010677

  5. Snapin promotes HIV-1 transmission from dendritic cells by dampening TLR8 signaling.

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    Khatamzas, Elham; Hipp, Madeleine Maria; Gaughan, Daniel; Pichulik, Tica; Leslie, Alasdair; Fernandes, Ricardo A; Muraro, Daniele; Booth, Sarah; Zausmer, Kieran; Sun, Mei-Yi; Kessler, Benedikt; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Simmons, Alison

    2017-10-16

    HIV-1 traffics through dendritic cells (DCs) en route to establishing a productive infection in T lymphocytes but fails to induce an innate immune response. Within DC endosomes, HIV-1 somehow evades detection by the pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8). Using a phosphoproteomic approach, we identified a robust and diverse signaling cascade triggered by HIV-1 upon entry into human DCs. A secondary siRNA screen of the identified signaling factors revealed several new mediators of HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4(+) T cells in DCs, including the dynein motor protein Snapin. Inhibition of Snapin enhanced localization of HIV-1 with TLR8(+) early endosomes, triggered a pro-inflammatory response, and inhibited trans-infection of CD4(+) T cells. Snapin inhibited TLR8 signaling in the absence of HIV-1 and is a general regulator of endosomal maturation. Thus, we identify a new mechanism of innate immune sensing by TLR8 in DCs, which is exploited by HIV-1 to promote transmission. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  6. HLA-G DNA sequence variants and risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission

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    Shamsa Falah

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HLA-G gene is a non-classical MHC class 1 molecule that is highly expressed in the trophoblast at the maternal-fetal interface. In an attempt to elucidate possible immunological mechanisms facilitating protection of infants born to human immunodeficiency virus type (HIV-1 infected mothers, we have been studying genetic variations in the coding and untranslated regions of HLA-G antigen between HIV-1-infected mothers and their infected or uninfected infants. This study investigated whether HLA-G DNA sequence variants are associated with perinatal HIV-1 transmission. Results Genomic DNA samples were obtained from a nested case-control study of 34 mother-child pairs co-enrolled in a cohort of the Perinatal AIDS Collaborative Transmission Study in New York. The samples were from two groups predominantly of African-American and Hispanic origin: In the first group, both mother and child were HIV-1-infected; in the second group, only the mother was infected while the child remained uninfected. Genotyping of HLA-G gene were performed on the extracted DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using PCR based sequencing and restriction fragment-length polymorphism analyses. Among the studied HLA-G exons, dissimilarities in HLA-G DNA sequence variants between the HIV-1 non-transmitting mother child pairs were mostly observed in exon 8-3'-untranslated region at nucleotide positions T3742A, C3743T, G3777C (P = 0.001. Non-transmitting HIV-1 mother child pairs exhibited dissimilarities at nucleotide position C3743T allele with decreased risk of perinatal HIV-1 transmission, compared with HIV-1 transmitting mother-child pairs carrying this allele (odds ratio 0.02 [95% confidence interval 0.00–0.15] P = 0.00001. In addition, heterozygous dissimilarities at nucleotide positions C634G and 714 insT/G in the 5'-upstream regulatory region were observed between the mother child pairs of the HIV-1-non-transmitting group while homozygous

  7. Beta 2-microglobulin, HIV-1 p24 antibody and acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24 antigen levels: predictive markers for vertical transmission of HIV-1 in pregnant Ugandan women.

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    Jackson, J B; Kataaha, P; Hom, D L; Mmiro, F; Guay, L; Ndugwa, C; Marum, L; Piwowar, E; Brewer, K; Toedter, G

    1993-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of plasma beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) levels, acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24 antigen, and HIV-1 p24-antibody titers in predicting HIV-1 vertical transmission in 227 HIV-1-infected Ugandan pregnant women. Plasma beta 2M levels, acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24-antigen positivity, and HIV-1 p24-antibody titers were determined using commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) in a Ugandan cohort of 52 HIV-1-seropositive transmitting mothers, 175 HIV-1-seropositive non-transmitting mothers, and 52 seronegative mothers within 6 weeks prior to delivery. Transmitter mothers had significantly higher plasma concentrations of beta 2M (1.80 +/- 1.13 mg/l) than non-transmitter seropositive mothers (1.32 +/- 0.81 mg/l; P = 0.0013). Similarly, a significantly higher proportion of transmitter mothers had detectable p24 antigen than non-transmitter mothers [six out of 51 (11.8%) versus six out of 173 (3.5%); P = 0.03]. Compared with the vertical transmission rate of 23% in the seropositive group, the positive predictive values of a beta 2M level > 1.5 mg/l or detectable HIV-1 p24 antigen for vertical transmission were 34 and 50%, respectively. Five of six (83.3%) seropositive mothers with both a beta 2M level > 1.5 mg/l and detectable p24 antigenemia transmitted HIV-1 infection to their infants compared with 25 of 124 (20.2%) seropositive mothers with values below the cut-off values for both tests (P = 0.00249). However, beta 2M was not found to be a significant independent predictor of vertical transmission when analyzed in a multivariate model with p24 antigenemia. There was no significant difference in HIV-1 p24-antibody titers in transmitter mothers versus non-transmitter mothers (P = 0.299). beta 2M levels and acid-dissociated HIV-1 p24-antigen assays may be used to predict which HIV-1-infected pregnant women are at greatest risk for vertical transmission. However, only the p24-antigen test was independently predictive of vertical transmission and its

  8. HIV-1 Genetic Variability in Cuba and Implications for Transmission and Clinical Progression.

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    Blanco, Madeline; Machado, Liuber Y; Díaz, Héctor; Ruiz, Nancy; Romay, Dania; Silva, Eladio

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Serological and molecular HIV-1 studies in Cuba have shown very low prevalence of seropositivity, but an increasing genetic diversity attributable to introduction of many HIV-1 variants from different areas, exchange of such variants among HIV-positive people with several coinciding routes of infection and other epidemiologic risk factors in the seropositive population. The high HIV-1 genetic variability observed in Cuba has possible implications for transmission and clinical progression. OBJECTIVE Study genetic variability for the HIV-1 env, gag and pol structural genes in Cuba; determine the prevalence of B and non-B subtypes according to epidemiologic and behavioral variables and determine whether a relationship exists between genetic variability and transmissibility, and between genetic variability and clinical disease progression in people living with HIV/AIDS. METHODS Using two molecular assays (heteroduplex mobility assay and nucleic acid sequencing), structural genes were characterized in 590 people with HIV-1 (480 men and 110 women), accounting for 3.4% of seropositive individuals in Cuba as of December 31, 2013. Nonrandom sampling, proportional to HIV prevalence by province, was conducted. Relationships between molecular results and viral factors, host characteristics, and patients' clinical, epidemiologic and behavioral variables were studied for molecular epidemiology, transmission, and progression analyses. RESULTS Molecular analysis of the three HIV-1 structural genes classified 297 samples as subtype B (50.3%), 269 as non-B subtypes (45.6%) and 24 were not typeable. Subtype B prevailed overall and in men, mainly in those who have sex with men. Non-B subtypes were prevalent in women and heterosexual men, showing multiple circulating variants and recombinant forms. Sexual transmission was the predominant form of infection for all. B and non-B subtypes were encountered throughout Cuba. No association was found between subtypes and

  9. DC-SIGN on B lymphocytes is required for transmission of HIV-1 to T lymphocytes.

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    Giovanna Rappocciolo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection of T cells by HIV-1 can occur through binding of virus to dendritic cell (DC-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN on dendritic cells and transfer of virus to CD4+ T cells. Here we show that a subset of B cells in the blood and tonsils of normal donors expressed DC-SIGN, and that this increased after stimulation in vitro with interleukin 4 and CD40 ligand, with enhanced expression of activation and co-stimulatory molecules CD23, CD58, CD80, and CD86, and CD22. The activated B cells captured and internalized X4 and R5 tropic strains of HIV-1, and mediated trans infection of T cells. Pretreatment of the B cells with anti-DC-SIGN monoclonal antibody blocked trans infection of T cells by both strains of HIV-1. These results indicate that DC-SIGN serves as a portal on B cells for HIV-1 infection of T cells in trans. Transmission of HIV-1 from B cells to T cells through this DC-SIGN pathway could be important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  10. Adherence to extended postpartum antiretrovirals is associated with decreased breast milk HIV-1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nicole L; Miller, William C; Hudgens, Michael G; Chasela, Charles S; Sichali, Dorothy; Kayira, Dumbani; Nelson, Julie A E; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Jamieson, Denise J; van der Horst, Charles

    2014-11-28

    Estimate association between postpartum antiretroviral adherence and breast milk HIV-1 transmission. Prospective cohort study. Mother-infant pairs were randomized after delivery to immediately begin receiving 28 weeks of either triple maternal antiretrovirals (zidovudine, lamivudine, and either nevirapine, nelfinavir, or lopinavir-ritonavir) or daily infant nevirapine as part of the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) study. Associations between postpartum antiretroviral adherence and rate of breast milk HIV-1 transmission were estimated using Cox models. We measured adherence over four postpartum time intervals using pill count, suspension bottle weight, and maternal self-report. Adherence was categorized and lagged by one interval. Missing adherence measures were multiply imputed. Infant HIV-1 infection was determined by DNA PCR every 2-6 weeks. The primary endpoint was infant HIV-1 infection by 38 weeks of age among infants alive and uninfected at 5 weeks. Analyses included 1479 mother-infant pairs and 45 transmission events. Using pill count and bottle weight information, 22-40% of mother-infant pairs at any given interval were less than 90% adherent. Having at least 90% adherence was associated with a 52% [95% confidence interval (CI) 3-76] relative reduction in the rate of breast milk HIV-1 transmission, compared with having less than 90% adherence when controlling for study arm, breastfeeding status, and maternal characteristics. Complete case analysis rendered similar results (n = 501; relative reduction 59%, 95% CI 6-82). Nonadherence to extended postpartum antiretroviral regimens in 'real world' settings is likely to be higher than that seen in BAN. Identifying mothers with difficulty adhering to antiretrovirals, and developing effective adherence interventions, will help maximize benefits of antiretroviral provision throughout breastfeeding.

  11. Assessment of Overlap of Phylogenetic Transmission Clusters and Communities in Simple Sexual Contact Networks: Applications to HIV-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Villandre, Luc; Stephens, David A; Labbe, Aurelie; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    .... In particular, phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) have revealed the existence of large transmission clusters, possibly resulting from within-community transmissions...

  12. Multiple introductions and onward transmission of HIV-1 subtype B strains in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Kexin; Xue, Yile; Wei, Feiran; Gao, Rong; Duerr, Ralf; Fang, Kun; Li, Wei; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Yan, Wenjuan; Musa, Taha Hussein; Ge, You; Ji, Yu; Zhong, Ping; Wei, Pingmin

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the viral genetic evolution, spatial origins and patterns of transmission of HIV-1 subtype B in Shanghai, China. A total of 242 Shanghai subtype B and 1519 reference pol sequences were subjected to phylogenetic inference and genetic transmission network analyses. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that subtype B strains circulating in Shanghai were genetically diverse and closely associated with viral sequence lineages in Beijing (76 of 242 [31.4%]), Central China (Henan/Hebei/Hunan/Hubei) (43 of 242 [17.8%]), Chinese Taiwan (20 of 242 [8.3%]), Japan (6 of 242 [2.5%]), and Korea (7 of 242 [2.9%]), suggesting multiple introductions into Shanghai from mainland China and Taiwan, Japan, and Korea. Interestingly, a monophyletic Shanghai lineage (SH-L) (36 of 242 [14.9%]) of HIV-1 subtype B most likely originated from an Argentine strain, transferred through Liaoning infected individuals. In-depth analyses of 195 Shanghai subtype B sequences revealed that a total of 37.9% (n = 74) sequences contributed to 35 transmission networks, whereof 33.8% (n = 25) of the sequences associated with infected individuals from other provinces. Our new findings reflect the evolution complexity and transmission dynamics of HIV-1 subtype B in Shanghai, which would provide critical information for the design of effective prevention measures against HIV transmission. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Homogenous HIV-1 subtype B quasispecies in Brazilian men and women recently infected via heterosexual transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Nancy Lima; Camargo, Michelle; Caseiro, Marcos Montani; Janini, Luiz Mario Ramos; Sucupira, Maria Cecilia Araripe; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2014-06-01

    HIV has extraordinary genetic mutability, both among individuals and at the population level. However, studies of primary HIV-1 infection and serum-converters indicate that the viral population is homogeneous at the sequence level, which suggests clonal HIV transmission. It remains unclear whether this feature applies to the female population. Ten single genome amplification sequences were generated from ten individuals (five females) with recent heterosexually acquired HIV infection as determined by the serologic testing algorithm for recent HIV seroconversion. Intra-individual genetic diversity was equally low in both genders (selection for sexual transmission of HIV-1 in both genders. Future studies that generate a larger number of clones, preferably by next generation deep sequencing, are needed to confirm these results.

  14. HIV-1 diversity, transmission dynamics and primary drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártolo, Inês; Zakovic, Suzana; Martin, Francisco; Palladino, Claudia; Carvalho, Patrícia; Camacho, Ricardo; Thamm, Sven; Clemente, Sofia; Taveira, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    To assess HIV-1 diversity, transmission dynamics and prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in Angola, five years after ART scale-up. Population sequencing of the pol gene was performed on 139 plasma samples collected in 2009 from drug-naive HIV-1 infected individuals living in Luanda. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using phylogenetic analysis. Drug resistance mutations were identified using the Calibrated Population Resistance Tool (CPR). Transmission networks were determined using phylogenetic analysis of all Angolan sequences present in the databases. Evolutionary trends were determined by comparison with a similar survey performed in 2001. 47.1% of the viruses were pure subtypes (all except B), 47.1% were recombinants and 5.8% were untypable. The prevalence of subtype A decreased significantly from 2001 to 2009 (40.0% to 10.8%, P = 0.0019) while the prevalence of unique recombinant forms (URFs) increased > 2-fold (40.0% to 83.1%, P < 0.0001). The most frequent URFs comprised untypable sequences with subtypes H (U/H, n = 7, 10.8%), A (U/A, n = 6, 9.2%) and G (G/U, n = 4, 6.2%). Newly identified U/H recombinants formed a highly supported monophyletic cluster suggesting a local and common origin. TDR mutation K103N was found in one (0.7%) patient (1.6% in 2001). Out of the 364 sequences sampled for transmission network analysis, 130 (35.7%) were part of a transmission network. Forty eight transmission clusters were identified; the majority (56.3%) comprised sequences sampled in 2008-2010 in Luanda which is consistent with a locally fuelled epidemic. Very low genetic distance was found in 27 transmission pairs sampled in the same year, suggesting recent transmission events. Transmission of drug resistant strains was still negligible in Luanda in 2009, five years after the scale-up of ART. The dominance of small and recent transmission clusters and the emergence of new URFs are consistent with a rising HIV-1 epidemics mainly driven by heterosexual

  15. Tamiflu-resistant but HA-mediated cell-to-cell transmission through apical membranes of cell-associated influenza viruses.

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    Kotaro Mori

    Full Text Available The infection of viruses to a neighboring cell is considered to be beneficial in terms of evasion from host anti-virus defense systems. There are two pathways for viral infection to "right next door": one is the virus transmission through cell-cell fusion by forming syncytium without production of progeny virions, and the other is mediated by virions without virus diffusion, generally designated cell-to-cell transmission. Influenza viruses are believed to be transmitted as cell-free virus from infected cells to uninfected cells. Here, we demonstrated that influenza virus can utilize cell-to-cell transmission pathway through apical membranes, by handover of virions on the surface of an infected cell to adjacent host cells. Live cell imaging techniques showed that a recombinant influenza virus, in which the neuraminidase gene was replaced with the green fluorescence protein gene, spreads from an infected cell to adjacent cells forming infected cell clusters. This type of virus spreading requires HA activation by protease treatment. The cell-to-cell transmission was also blocked by amantadine, which inhibits the acidification of endosomes required for uncoating of influenza virus particles in endosomes, indicating that functional hemagglutinin and endosome acidification by M2 ion channel were essential for the cell-to-cell influenza virus transmission. Furthermore, in the cell-to-cell transmission of influenza virus, progeny virions could remain associated with the surface of infected cell even after budding, for the progeny virions to be passed on to adjacent uninfected cells. The evidence that cell-to-cell transmission occurs in influenza virus lead to the caution that local infection proceeds even when treated with neuraminidase inhibitors.

  16. Fatores protetores e de risco envolvidos na transmissão vertical do HIV-1 Protective and risk factors related to vertical transmission of the HIV-1

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    Rosângela P. Gianvecchio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avalia os fatores maternos e fetais envolvidos na transmissão vertical do HIV-1 em 47 pares de mãe e filho. As variáveis comportamentais, demográficas e obstétricas foram obtidas mediante entrevista; os dados referentes ao parto e ao recém-nascido, dos prontuários das maternidades. Durante o terceiro trimestre de gestação foi realizada a contagem da carga viral materna e dos linfócitos T CD4+. A média de idade foi de 25 anos e 23,4% das gestantes eram primigestas, e o fator comportamental mais prevalente foi não usar preservativos. Dentre as gestantes, 48,9% tinham células CD4+ superior a 500 células/mm³ e 93,6% se enquadravam na categoria clínica A; 95,7% submeteram-se à profilaxia com zidovudina durante a gestação ou no parto, a qual foi ministrada a todos os recém-nascidos; 50,0% delas foram submetidas à cesárea eletiva. Apesar de expostas a vários fatores de risco e protetores, nenhuma criança tornou-se infectada. A transmissão vertical resulta de um desequilíbrio entre os fatores, com predomínio dos de risco sobre os protetores.This study aimed to evaluate maternal and fetal factors related to vertical transmission of HIV-1. Participants included 47 mother-child pairs. Behavioral, demographic, and obstetric data were obtained through interviews. Data related to delivery and newborns were collected from registries in the maternity hospitals. During the third trimester of pregnancy, CD4+ T lymphocytes and maternal viral load were measured. Mean age of the mothers was 25 years and 23.4% of the pregnant women were primigravidae. The most prevalent behavioral factor was lack of condom use. 48.9% of the women presented a CD4+ count greater than 500 cells/ mm³, and 93.6% belonged to clinical category A. 95.7% of the women received zidovudine prophylaxis during pregnancy or childbirth, and the medication was also administered to all the neonates. 50.0% of patients were submitted to elective cesareans. Despite

  17. Systemic administration of antiretrovirals prior to exposure prevents rectal and intravenous HIV-1 transmission in humanized BLT mice.

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    Paul W Denton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for mucosal and intravenous HIV-1 transmission could reduce new infections among targeted high-risk populations including discordant couples, injection drug users, high-risk women and men who have sex with men. Targeted antiretroviral PrEP could be particularly effective at slowing the spread of HIV-1 if a single antiretroviral combination were found to be broadly protective across multiple routes of transmission. Therefore, we designed our in vivo preclinical study to systematically investigate whether rectal and intravenous HIV-1 transmission can be blocked by antiretrovirals administered systemically prior to HIV-1 exposure. We performed these studies using a highly relevant in vivo model of mucosal HIV-1 transmission, humanized Bone marrow/Liver/Thymus mice (BLT. BLT mice are susceptible to HIV-1 infection via three major physiological routes of viral transmission: vaginal, rectal and intravenous. Our results show that BLT mice given systemic antiretroviral PrEP are efficiently protected from HIV-1 infection regardless of the route of exposure. Specifically, systemic antiretroviral PrEP with emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate prevented both rectal (Chi square = 8.6, df = 1, p = 0.003 and intravenous (Chi square = 13, df = 1, p = 0.0003 HIV-1 transmission. Our results indicate that antiretroviral PrEP has the potential to be broadly effective at preventing new rectal or intravenous HIV transmissions in targeted high risk individuals. These in vivo preclinical findings provide strong experimental evidence supporting the potential clinical implementation of antiretroviral based pre-exposure prophylactic measures to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS.

  18. Different requirements for scavenger receptor class B type I in hepatitis C virus cell-free versus cell-to-cell transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanese, Maria Teresa; Loureiro, Joana; Jones, Christopher T; Dorner, Marcus; von Hahn, Thomas; Rice, Charles M

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is believed to initially infect the liver through the basolateral side of hepatocytes, where it engages attachment factors and the coreceptors CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Active transport toward the apical side brings the virus in close proximity of additional entry factors, the tight junction molecules claudin-1 and occludin. HCV is also thought to propagate via cell-to-cell spread, which allows highly efficient virion delivery to neighboring cells. In this study, we compared an adapted HCV genome, clone 2, characterized by superior cell-to cell spread, to its parental genome, J6/JFH-1, with the goal of elucidating the molecular mechanisms of HCV cell-to-cell transmission. We show that CD81 levels on the donor cells influence the efficiency of cell-to-cell spread and CD81 transfer between neighboring cells correlates with the capacity of target cells to become infected. Spread of J6/JFH-1 was blocked by anti-SR-BI antibody or in cells knocked down for SR-BI, suggesting a direct role for this receptor in HCV cell-to-cell transmission. In contrast, clone 2 displayed a significantly reduced dependence on SR-BI for lateral spread. Mutations in E1 and E2 responsible for the enhanced cell-to-cell spread phenotype of clone 2 rendered cell-free virus more susceptible to antibody-mediated neutralization. Our results indicate that although HCV can lose SR-BI dependence for cell-to-cell spread, vulnerability to neutralizing antibodies may limit this evolutionary option in vivo. Combination therapies targeting both the HCV glycoproteins and SR-BI may therefore hold promise for effective control of HCV dissemination.

  19. Determinants of HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission in Southern Brazil

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    Martínez Ana M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 subtypes may have distinct biological, immunological and pathogenic properties. Efficiency of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT may be among those properties, but few and controversial results have been described so far. In this study, 102 children born from HIV-1-infected mothers between 1998 and 2004 in the city of Rio Grande, Brazil were analyzed for potential risk factors associated with MTCT. That geographic region is characterized by a high proportion of subtype C-infected subjects, and it allowed comparison between subtypes B and C and their influence on MTCT. The analysis also included clinical, obstetric and immunological parameters. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence of the parameters on MTCT, and prevalence ratios (PR and 95% confidence intervals (CI95 were also calculated. A surprisingly high prevalence of subtype C of over 70% was found. Only the HIV viral load and the use of ACTG 076 protocol were predictive of MTCT. HIV subtype and CD4 T-cell counts were not associated with increased risk of transmission. Although a clear expansion of subtype C is evident in southern Brazil, it does not seem to correlate with increased risk of vertical transmission.

  20. Inhibition of cell-to-cell transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in vitro by carbohydrate-binding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Ascolani, Arianna; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Oki, Toshikazu; Mastino, Antonio; Balzarini, Jan; Macchi, Beatrice

    2008-08-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals can be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) upon cocultivation of the PBMCs with irradiated HTLV-1-transformed human MT-2 cells. This model system closely mimics HTLV-1 transmission through cell-to-cell contact. Carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) such as the alpha(1,3)/alpha(1,6)mannose-specific Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin and the GlcNAc-specific Urtica dioica agglutinin, and also the small, nonpeptidic alpha(1,2)-mannose-specific antibiotic pradimicin A, were able to efficiently prevent cell-to-cell HTLV-1 transmission at nontoxic concentrations, as evidenced by the lack of appearance of virus-specific mRNA and of the viral protein Tax in the acceptor cells. Consistently, antivirally active doses of CBAs fully prevented HTLV-1-induced stimulation of PBMC growth. The inhibitory effects of CBAs on HTLV-1 transmission were also evident when HTLV-1-infected C5MJ cells were used in place of MT-2 cells as a virus donor cell line. The anti-HTLV-1 properties of the CBAs highlight the importance of the envelope glycans in events underlying HTLV-1 passage from cell to cell and indicate that CBAs should be further investigated for their potential to prevent HTLV-1 infection, including mother-to-child virus transmission by cell-to-cell contact through breast milk feeding.

  1. Relative contribution of free-virus and synaptic transmission to the spread of HIV-1 through target cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L; Anghelina, Daniela; Voznesensky, Igor; Trinité, Benjamin; Levy, David N; Wodarz, Dominik

    2013-02-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus can spread through target cells by transmission of cell-free virus or directly from cell-to-cell via formation of virological synapses. Although cell-to-cell transmission has been described as much more efficient than cell-free infection, the relative contribution of the two transmission pathways to virus growth during multiple rounds of replication remains poorly defined. Here, we fit a mathematical model to previously published and newly generated in vitro data, and determine that free-virus and synaptic transmission contribute approximately equally to the growth of the virus population.

  2. Studies of impedance in cardiac tissue using sucrose gap and computer techniques. II. Circuit simulation of passive electrical properties and cell-to-cell transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibitz, G R; McCann, F V

    1974-02-01

    The impedance measured in a strip of heart tissue from the moth Hyalophora cecropia is fitted by circuit models of several configurations. The circuits include: (a) a single R-C circuit (b) a double R-C circuit (c) terminated transmission lines, and (d) a pattern of cells with cell-to-cell transmission paths. The last of these is found to give the best fit. Calculation of the model impedances and optimization of element values are performed by a computer. The possibility that the mechanism of cell-to-cell transmission may be capacitative rather than conductive is explored using values of capacitance derived from the circuit models to calculate the effect of capacitative coupling alone on signal transmission. The calculations show that sufficient voltage can be transmitted from the excited cell to an adjacent cell to effect excitation.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Iceland: Early introductions, transmission dynamics and recent outbreaks among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Malik; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Baldvinsdóttir, Guðrún; Indriðason, Hlynur; Björnsdóttir, Thora Björg; Widell, Anders; Gottfreðsson, Magnús; Löve, Arthur; Medstrand, Patrik

    2017-04-01

    The molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Iceland has not been described so far. Detailed analyses of the dynamics of HIV-1 can give insights for prevention of virus spread. The objective of the current study was to characterize the genetic diversity and transmission dynamics of HIV-1 in Iceland. Partial HIV-1 pol (1020bp) sequences were generated from 230 Icelandic samples, representing 77% of all HIV-1 infected individuals reported in the country 1985-2012. Maximum likelihood phylogenies were reconstructed for subtype/CRF assignment and determination of transmission clusters. Timing and demographic growth patterns were determined in BEAST. HIV-1 infection in Iceland was dominated by subtype B (63%, n=145) followed by subtype C (10%, n=23), CRF01_AE (10%, n=22), sub-subtype A1 (7%, n=15) and CRF02_AG (7%, n=15). Trend analysis showed an increase in non-B subtypes/CRFs in Iceland over the study period (p=0.003). The highest proportion of phylogenetic clustering was found among injection drug users (IDUs; 89%), followed by heterosexuals (70%) and men who have sex with men (35%). The time to the most recent common ancestor of the oldest subtype B cluster dated back to 1978 (median estimate, 95% highest posterior density interval: 1974-1981) suggesting an early introduction of HIV-1 into Iceland. A previously reported increase in HIV-1 incidence among IDUs 2009-2011 was revealed to be due to two separate outbreaks. Our study showed that a variety of HIV-1 subtypes and CRFs were prevalent in Iceland 1985-2012, with subtype B being the dominant form both in terms of prevalence and domestic spread. The rapid increase of HIV-1 infections among IDUs following a major economic crisis in Iceland raises questions about casual associations between economic factors, drug use and public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transmission selects for HIV-1 strains of intermediate virulence: a modelling approach.

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    George Shirreff

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent data shows that HIV-1 is characterised by variation in viral virulence factors that is heritable between infections, which suggests that viral virulence can be naturally selected at the population level. A trade-off between transmissibility and duration of infection appears to favour viruses of intermediate virulence. We developed a mathematical model to simulate the dynamics of putative viral genotypes that differ in their virulence. As a proxy for virulence, we use set-point viral load (SPVL, which is the steady density of viral particles in blood during asymptomatic infection. Mutation, the dependency of survival and transmissibility on SPVL, and host effects were incorporated into the model. The model was fitted to data to estimate unknown parameters, and was found to fit existing data well. The maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters produced a model in which SPVL converged from any initial conditions to observed values within 100-150 years of first emergence of HIV-1. We estimated the 1 host effect and 2 the extent to which the viral virulence genotype mutates from one infection to the next, and found a trade-off between these two parameters in explaining the variation in SPVL. The model confirms that evolution of virulence towards intermediate levels is sufficiently rapid for it to have happened in the early stages of the HIV epidemic, and confirms that existing viral loads are nearly optimal given the assumed constraints on evolution. The model provides a useful framework under which to examine the future evolution of HIV-1 virulence.

  5. Evidence of HIV-1 adaptation to host HLA alleles following chimp-to-human transmission

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    Scheffler Konrad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response is important in controlling HIV-1 replication in infected humans. In this immune pathway, viral peptides within infected cells are presented to T-lymphocytes by the polymorphic human leukocyte antigens (HLA. HLA alleles exert selective pressure on the peptide regions and immune escape mutations that occur at some of the targeted sites can enable the virus to adapt to the infected host. The pattern of ongoing immune escape and reversion associated with several human HLA alleles has been studied extensively. Such mutations revert upon transmission to a host without the HLA allele because the escape mutation incurs a fitness cost. However, to-date there has been little attempt to study permanent loss of CTL epitopes due to escape mutations without an effect on fitness. Results Here, we set out to determine the extent of adaptation of HIV-1 to three well-characterized HLA alleles during the initial exposure of the virus to the human cytotoxic immune responses following transmission from chimpanzee. We generated a chimpanzee consensus sequence to approximate the virus sequence that was initially transmitted to the human host and used a method based on peptide binding affinity to HLA crystal structures to predict peptides that were potentially targeted by the HLA alleles on this sequence. Next, we used codon-based phylogenetic models to quantify the average selective pressure that acted on these regions during the period immediately following the zoonosis event, corresponding to the branch of the phylogenetic tree leading to the common ancestor of all of the HIV-1 sequences. Evidence for adaptive evolution during this period was observed at regions recognised by HLA A*6801 and A*0201, both of which are common in African populations. No evidence of adaptive evolution was observed at sites targeted by HLA-B*2705, which is a rare allele in African populations. Conclusion Our results suggest

  6. KIR-HLA and maternal-infant HIV-1 transmission in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paximadis

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested a role for natural killer (NK cells in attenuation of HIV-1 disease progression via recognition by killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs of specific HLA class I molecules. The role of KIR and HLA class I has not been addressed in the context of maternal-infant HIV-1 transmission. KIR and HLA class I B and C genes from 224 HIV-1-infected mothers and 222 infants (72 infected and 150 uninfected from South Africa were characterized. Although a number of significant associations were determined in both the total group and in the nevirapine (NVP exposed group, the most significant findings involved KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 and HLA-C. KIR2DL2/KIR2DL3 was underrepresented in intrapartum (IP-transmitting mothers compared to non-transmitting (NT mothers (P = 0.008 and remained significant (P = 0.036 after correction for maternal viral load (MVL. Homozygosity for KIR2DL3 alone and in combination with HLA-C allotype heterozygosity (C1C2 was elevated in IP-transmitting mothers compared to NT mothers (P = 0.034 and P = 0.01 respectively, and after MVL correction (P = 0.033 and P = 0.027, respectively. In infants, KIR2DL3 in combination with its HLA-C1 ligand (C1 as well as homozygosity for KIR2DL3 with C1C2, were both found to be underrepresented in infected infants compared to exposed uninfected infants in the total group (P = 0.06 and P = 0.038, respectively and in the sub-group of infants whose mothers received NVP (P = 0.007 and P = 0.03, respectively. These associations were stronger post MVL adjustment (total group: P = 0.02 and P = 0.009, respectively; NVP group: P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively. Upon stratification according to low and high MVL, all significant associations fell within the low MVL group, suggesting that with low viral load, the effects of genotype can be more easily detected. In conclusion this study has identified a number of significant

  7. Vertical transmission of HIV-1 in the western region of the State of São Paulo

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    Vera Lúcia Maria Alves Gonçalves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of vertical HIV-1 transmission in the western region of the State of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: The study analyzed the medical records of HIV-1-infected mothers and infant pairs living in the municipalities of São Paulo Regional Health Departments DRS II (Araçatuba and DRS XI (Presidente Prudente. From March 2001 to March 2006, blood samples were collected and referred to the Molecular Biology Unit of the Adolfo Lutz Institute (ALI, Presidente Prudente. HIV-1-RNA viral load was determined by bDNA assay. RESULTS: The number of births (109/217, 50.2% and vertical HIV-1 transmissions (6/109, 5.5% that occurred in DRS II was similar to births (108/217, 49.8% and vertical transmissions (7/108, 6.5% in DRS XI (p > 0.05. Although 80% (4/5 of the infected children were male in DRS II, while in DRS XI, 75% (6/8 were female, no differences between sex regarding infected and noninfected children in the regions of Araçatuba and Presidente Prudente were verified. The overall vertical HIV-1 transmission rate was 6%. No consistent reduction in the prevalence of vertical HIV-1 transmission occurred over the years. About 20% of mothers did not know the HIV-1 status of their newborns eight months after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, MTCT prevalence rates were about 70% higher than those previously determined in the State of São Paulo, with noreduction throughout the period.Furthermore, a significant number of mothers did not know the HIV-status of their newborns eight months after delivery.

  8. Pooled individual data analysis of 5 randomized trials of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgens, Michael G; Taha, Taha E; Omer, Saad B; Jamieson, Denise J; Lee, Hana; Mofenson, Lynne M; Chasela, Charles; Kourtis, Athena P; Kumwenda, Newton; Ruff, Andrea; Bedri, Abubaker; Jackson, J Brooks; Musoke, Philippa; Bollinger, Robert C; Gupte, Nikhil; Thigpen, Michael C; Taylor, Allan; van der Horst, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, mothers infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) face a difficult choice: breastfeed their infants but risk transmitting HIV-1 or not breastfeed their infants and risk the infants dying of other infectious diseases or malnutrition. Recent results from observational studies and randomized clinical trials indicate daily administration of nevirapine to the infant can prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission. Data from 5396 mother-infant pairs who participated in 5 randomized trials where the infant was HIV-1 negative at birth were pooled to estimate the efficacy of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission. Four daily regimens were compared: nevirapine for 6 weeks, 14 weeks, or 28 weeks, or nevirapine plus zidovudine for 14 weeks. The estimated 28-week risk of HIV-1 transmission was 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3%-7.9%) for the 6-week nevirapine regimen, 3.7% (95% CI, 2.5%-5.4%) for the 14-week nevirapine regimen, 4.8% (95% CI, 3.5%-6.7%) for the 14-week nevirapine plus zidovudine regimen, and 1.8% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.1%) for the 28-week nevirapine regimen (log-rank test for trend, P < .001). Cox regression models with nevirapine as a time-varying covariate, stratified by trial site and adjusted for maternal CD4 cell count and infant birth weight, indicated that nevirapine reduces the rate of HIV-1 infection by 71% (95% CI, 58%-80%; P < .001) and reduces the rate of HIV infection or death by 58% (95% CI, 45%-69%; P < .001). Extended prophylaxis with nevirapine or with nevirapine and zidovudine significantly reduces postnatal HIV-1 infection. Longer duration of prophylaxis results in a greater reduction in the risk of infection.

  9. Conservation of functional domains and limited heterogeneity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase gene following vertical transmission

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    Ahmad Nafees

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reverse transcriptase (RT enzyme of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 plays a crucial role in the life cycle of the virus by converting the single stranded RNA genome into double stranded DNA that integrates into the host chromosome. In addition, RT is also responsible for the generation of mutations throughout the viral genome, including in its own sequences and is thus responsible for the generation of quasi-species in HIV-1-infected individuals. We therefore characterized the molecular properties of RT, including the conservation of functional motifs, degree of genetic diversity, and evolutionary dynamics from five mother-infant pairs following vertical transmission. Results The RT open reading frame was maintained with a frequency of 87.2% in five mother-infant pairs' sequences following vertical transmission. There was a low degree of viral heterogeneity and estimates of genetic diversity in mother-infant pairs' sequences. Both mothers and infants RT sequences were under positive selection pressure, as determined by the ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions. Phylogenetic analysis of 132 mother-infant RT sequences revealed distinct clusters for each mother-infant pair, suggesting that the epidemiologically linked mother-infant pairs were evolutionarily closer to each other as compared with epidemiologically unlinked mother-infant pairs. The functional domains of RT which are responsible for reverse transcription, DNA polymerization and RNase H activity were mostly conserved in the RT sequences analyzed in this study. Specifically, the active sites and domains required for primer binding, template binding, primer and template positioning and nucleotide recruitment were conserved in all mother-infant pairs' sequences. Conclusion The maintenance of an intact RT open reading frame, conservation of functional domains for RT activity, preservation of several amino acid motifs in epidemiologically

  10. The first 24 h: targeting the window of opportunity for antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George K

    2016-11-01

    I will review evidence that antibodies protect against HIV-1 transmission in a short window of opportunity, involving neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both. The last decade witnessed a dramatic progress in the understanding of antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1, including active and passive immunization studies in nonhuman primates; association between reduced infection risk and the specificities and function of antibodies in the RV144 clinical trial; identification of potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies; high-resolution structural studies of the HIV-1 envelope trimer; and an increasing appreciation that Fc-mediated effector function is critical to protection against transmission for neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Less information is known about how antibodies protect in situ, except that they must do in the first 24 h after exposure. New evidence suggests that antibodies protect in an acute innate immune environment involving the NXLRX1 inflammasome and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) that favors infection and rapid dissemination of CCR6RORγ Th17 cells. These recent findings set the stage for understanding how antibodies can prevent the transmission of HIV-1. In this context, antibodies must prevent infection in an innate immune environment that strongly favors transmission. This information is key for the development of a vaccine against HIV-1.

  11. Functional characteristics of HIV-1 subtype C compatible with increased heterosexual transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Brandon L; Armitage, Andrew E; Graham, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the existence of over 50 subtypes and circulating recombinant forms of HIV-1, subtype C dominates the heterosexual pandemic causing approximately 56% of all infections. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether viral genetic factors may contribute to the observed subtype-C predominance...... mononuclear cell and cell lines with low CCR5 expression. Structural modeling suggested the formation of an additional hydrogen bond between V3 and CCR5. Moreover, we found preferential selection of HIV with 316T and/or extremely short V1-V2 loops in cervices of three women infected with subtypes A/C, B or C....... CONCLUSION: As CD4-CCR5-T cells are key targets for genital HIV infection and cervical selection can favor compact V1-V2 loops and 316T, which increase viral infectivity, we propose that these conserved subtype-C motifs may contribute to transmission and spread of this subtype....

  12. New emerging recombinant HIV-1 strains and close transmission linkage of HIV-1 strains in the Chinese MSM population indicate a new epidemic risk.

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    Jianjun Wu

    Full Text Available In recent years, the population of men who have sex with men (MSM have become the most significant increasing group of HIV-1 transmission in China. To identify new recombinant strains and transmission patterns of HIV-1 in Chinese MSM population, a cross-sectional investigation of MSM in Anhui Province (in south-eastern China was performed in 2011. The diagnosed AIDS case rate, CD4 T-cell counts, HIV subtypes, and origin of the recombinant strains were investigated in 138 collected samples. The phylogenetic and bootscan analyses demonstrated that, apart from three previously reported circulating strains (CRF07_BC, CRF01_AE, subtype B, various recombinant strains among subtype B, subtype C, CRF01_AE, and CRF07_BC were simultaneously identified in Chinese MSM for the first time. The introducing time of B subtype in Chinese MSM populations was estimated in 1985, CRF01_AE in 2000, and CRF07_BC in 2003; the latter two account for more than 85% of MSM infections. Notably, in comparison with B subtype infections in Anhui MSM, CRF01_AE, with the highest prevalence rate, may accelerate AIDS progression. Over half of patients (56% infected with new recombinant strains infection are diagnosed as progression into AIDS. Both Bayes and phylogenetic analyses indicated that there was active HIV transmission among MSM nationwide, which may facilitate the transmission of the new 01B recombinant strains in MSM. In conclusion, new recombinant strains and active transmission were identified in the Chinese MSM population, which may lead to a new alarming HIV pandemic in this population due to the increased pathogenesis of the newly emerging strains.

  13. Assessment of mother-to-child HIV-1 and HIV-2 transmission: an AIDS reference laboratory collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pádua, E; Almeida, C; Nunes, B; Cortes Martins, H; Castela, J; Neves, C; Paixão, M T

    2009-03-01

    A prospective study was carried out to assess HIV-1 and HIV-2 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) rates in Portugal between 1999 and 2005 by analysing the proportion of diagnosed infected children born to HIV-positive mothers. Serial blood samples were collected from 1315 children at risk of HIV-1 infection, 131 children at risk of HIV-2 infection and six children at risk of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections attending 25 Health Institutions. HIV proviral DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and statistical analysis was performed using spss. DNA PCR using HIV-1 and HIV-2 long terminal repeat (LTR) primers amplified 92.5% and 75% of maternal HIV infections, respectively. Overall, MTCT occurred in 3.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5-4.6%] of HIV-1 and 1.5% (95% CI 0.2-5.4%) of HIV-2 mother-child pairs. A significant decrease in HIV-1 MTCT was observed with time, from 7.0% (95% CI 2.6-14.6%) in 1999 to 0.5% (95% CI 0.0-2.5%) in 2005. HIV MTCT was associated with an absence of antiretroviral therapy in infected pregnant women (PHIV-1 and two with HIV-2), the schedule of blood sample collection was followed for only 26 children. In 14 (53.8%) of those 26 children the infections were diagnosed in the first sample collected before they were 48 h old, suggesting in utero transmission. Despite the national recommendations for antenatal HIV testing, a high overall proportion (22.2% for HIV-1 and 44.3% for HIV-2) of mothers did not access any MTCT prevention measures, mostly because of late diagnosis in pregnancy. A small but significant proportion of HIV-2 infection was found in mothers with no identifiable link with West Africa. HIV-2 transmission rates are low (1.5% in this study), and this may have led to a lower uptake of interventions, but in the absence of interventions transmission does occur. HIV-1 transmission was also associated with a lack of intervention, mostly as a result of late presentation. Use of primers restricted to a single sequence

  14. Short Communication: Phylogenetic Evidence of HIV-1 Transmission Between Adult and Adolescent Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Elizabeth; Herbeck, Joshua T; Van Rompaey, Stephen; Kitahata, Mari; Thomas, Katherine; Pepper, Gregory; Frenkel, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1 incidence among youth, especially men who have sex with men (MSM), is increasing in the United States. We aimed to better understand the patterns of adolescent HIV-1 acquisition, to help guide future prevention interventions. We conducted a study combining epidemiologic and HIV-1 pol sequence data from a retrospective cohort of HIV-infected adults and adolescents in Seattle, WA between 2000 and 2013. Adolescents were defined as 13-24 years of age at the time of first HIV-1 care. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees were reconstructed to identify putative viral transmission clusters of two or more individuals, followed by multivariable regression tests of associations between clustering and demographic and clinical parameters. The dataset included 3,102 sequences from 1,953 individuals; 72 putative transmission clusters were identified, representing 168 individuals (8.6%). MSM and MSM/intravenous drug use (IDU) were positively associated with clustering, with aOR 3.18 (95% CI: 1.34-7.55) and 2.59 (95% CI: 1.04-6.49), respectively. African American race was negatively associated with clustering (aOR 0.54 95% CI: 0.32-0.91). Twenty-five clusters contained one adolescent and five clusters contained two adolescents. Other individuals who clustered with adolescents were predominantly male (95%), white (85%), and either MSM (66%) or MSM/IDU (16%), with a greater mean age (34 years vs. 22 years; p < .01). In this Seattle cohort, HIV-1 transmission linkages were identified between white male adolescents and older MSM adults. Interventions aimed at age-discrepant pairs may reduce HIV-1 infections in adolescent males.

  15. Differences in the Selection Bottleneck between Modes of Sexual Transmission Influence the Genetic Composition of the HIV-1 Founder Virus.

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    Damien C Tully

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the stringent population bottleneck that occurs during sexual HIV-1 transmission, systemic infection is typically established by a limited number of founder viruses. Elucidation of the precise forces influencing the selection of founder viruses may reveal key vulnerabilities that could aid in the development of a vaccine or other clinical interventions. Here, we utilize deep sequencing data and apply a genetic distance-based method to investigate whether the mode of sexual transmission shapes the nascent founder viral genome. Analysis of 74 acute and early HIV-1 infected subjects revealed that 83% of men who have sex with men (MSM exhibit a single founder virus, levels similar to those previously observed in heterosexual (HSX transmission. In a metadata analysis of a total of 354 subjects, including HSX, MSM and injecting drug users (IDU, we also observed no significant differences in the frequency of single founder virus infections between HSX and MSM transmissions. However, comparison of HIV-1 envelope sequences revealed that HSX founder viruses exhibited a greater number of codon sites under positive selection, as well as stronger transmission indices possibly reflective of higher fitness variants. Moreover, specific genetic "signatures" within MSM and HSX founder viruses were identified, with single polymorphisms within gp41 enriched among HSX viruses while more complex patterns, including clustered polymorphisms surrounding the CD4 binding site, were enriched in MSM viruses. While our findings do not support an influence of the mode of sexual transmission on the number of founder viruses, they do demonstrate that there are marked differences in the selection bottleneck that can significantly shape their genetic composition. This study illustrates the complex dynamics of the transmission bottleneck and reveals that distinct genetic bottleneck processes exist dependent upon the mode of HIV-1 transmission.

  16. Differences in the Selection Bottleneck between Modes of Sexual Transmission Influence the Genetic Composition of the HIV-1 Founder Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Damien C; Ogilvie, Colin B; Batorsky, Rebecca E; Bean, David J; Power, Karen A; Ghebremichael, Musie; Bedard, Hunter E; Gladden, Adrianne D; Seese, Aaron M; Amero, Molly A; Lane, Kimberly; McGrath, Graham; Bazner, Suzane B; Tinsley, Jake; Lennon, Niall J; Henn, Matthew R; Brumme, Zabrina L; Norris, Philip J; Rosenberg, Eric S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Jessen, Heiko; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Walker, Bruce D; Altfeld, Marcus; Carlson, Jonathan M; Allen, Todd M

    2016-05-01

    Due to the stringent population bottleneck that occurs during sexual HIV-1 transmission, systemic infection is typically established by a limited number of founder viruses. Elucidation of the precise forces influencing the selection of founder viruses may reveal key vulnerabilities that could aid in the development of a vaccine or other clinical interventions. Here, we utilize deep sequencing data and apply a genetic distance-based method to investigate whether the mode of sexual transmission shapes the nascent founder viral genome. Analysis of 74 acute and early HIV-1 infected subjects revealed that 83% of men who have sex with men (MSM) exhibit a single founder virus, levels similar to those previously observed in heterosexual (HSX) transmission. In a metadata analysis of a total of 354 subjects, including HSX, MSM and injecting drug users (IDU), we also observed no significant differences in the frequency of single founder virus infections between HSX and MSM transmissions. However, comparison of HIV-1 envelope sequences revealed that HSX founder viruses exhibited a greater number of codon sites under positive selection, as well as stronger transmission indices possibly reflective of higher fitness variants. Moreover, specific genetic "signatures" within MSM and HSX founder viruses were identified, with single polymorphisms within gp41 enriched among HSX viruses while more complex patterns, including clustered polymorphisms surrounding the CD4 binding site, were enriched in MSM viruses. While our findings do not support an influence of the mode of sexual transmission on the number of founder viruses, they do demonstrate that there are marked differences in the selection bottleneck that can significantly shape their genetic composition. This study illustrates the complex dynamics of the transmission bottleneck and reveals that distinct genetic bottleneck processes exist dependent upon the mode of HIV-1 transmission.

  17. Transmission of HIV-1 minority-resistant variants and response to first-line antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuchant, Olivia; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Capdepont, Sophie; Lavignolle-Aurillac, Valérie; Neau, Didier; Morlat, Philippe; Dabis, François; Fleury, Hervé; Masquelier, Bernard

    2008-07-31

    The transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 can impair the virological response to antiretroviral therapy. Minority-resistant variants have been detected in acute seroconverters. We investigated the clinical relevance of the detection of majority and minority-resistant variants in an observational study in antiretroviral therapy naive, recently infected patients. We included patients infected between 1996 and 2005, with a plasma sample obtained less than 18 months after seroconversion and prior to antiretroviral therapy initiation. Majority-resistant variants were determined by direct population sequencing. Minority-resistant variants were searched by allele-specific PCR for the mutations K103N and M184V in reverse transcriptase and L90M in protease. The association between resistance and viroimmunological response to antiretroviral therapy was estimated by using a piecewise linear mixed model. Majority-resistant variants were detected in 23/172 (13.4%) patients. Patients with majority-resistant variants had a lower mean plasma viral load and higher mean CD4 cell count at baseline compared with those without resistance. The decrease in viral load between 1 and 6 months on antiretroviral therapy was significantly steeper in patients with sensitive viruses compared with those with majority-resistant variants (P = 0.029). Minority-resistant variants were detected in 21/73 (29%) patients with wild-type viruses at sequencing analysis. The presence of minority-resistant variants did not modify baseline viral load and CD4 cell count and did not affect the changes in viral load and CD4 cell count. The transmission of majority-resistant variants, but not minority-resistant variants, influenced the response to antiretroviral therapy in this prospective study. The detection of the transmission of minority-resistant variants warrants further clinical validation.

  18. Hybrid Spreading Mechanisms and T Cell Activation Shape the Dynamics of HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M.; Jolly, Clare

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments’ influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  19. Production of Mucosally Transmissible SHIV Challenge Stocks from HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form 01_AE env Sequences.

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    Lawrence J Tartaglia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV challenge stocks are critical for preclinical testing of vaccines, antibodies, and other interventions aimed to prevent HIV-1. A major unmet need for the field has been the lack of a SHIV challenge stock expressing circulating recombinant form 01_AE (CRF01_AE env sequences. We therefore sought to develop mucosally transmissible SHIV challenge stocks containing HIV-1 CRF01_AE env derived from acutely HIV-1 infected individuals from Thailand. SHIV-AE6, SHIV-AE6RM, and SHIV-AE16 contained env sequences that were >99% identical to the original HIV-1 isolate and did not require in vivo passaging. These viruses exhibited CCR5 tropism and displayed a tier 2 neutralization phenotype. These challenge stocks efficiently infected rhesus monkeys by the intrarectal route, replicated to high levels during acute infection, and established chronic viremia in a subset of animals. SHIV-AE16 was titrated for use in single, high dose as well as repetitive, low dose intrarectal challenge studies. These SHIV challenge stocks should facilitate the preclinical evaluation of vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and other interventions targeted at preventing HIV-1 CRF01_AE infection.

  20. The utility of the new generation of humanized mice to study HIV-1 infection: transmission, prevention, pathogenesis, and treatment

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    Rowan Mark R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Substantial improvements have been made in recent years in the ability to engraft human cells and tissues into immunodeficient mice. The use of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs leads to multi-lineage human hematopoiesis accompanied by production of a variety of human immune cell types. Population of murine primary and secondary lymphoid organs with human cells occurs, and long-term engraftment has been achieved. Engrafted cells are capable of producing human innate and adaptive immune responses, making these models the most physiologically relevant humanized animal models to date. New models have been successfully infected by a variety of strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1, accompanied by virus replication in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, the male and female reproductive tracts, and the brain. Multiple forms of virus-induced pathogenesis are present, and human T cell and antibody responses to HIV-1 are detected. These humanized mice are susceptible to a high rate of rectal and vaginal transmission of HIV-1 across an intact epithelium, indicating the potential to study vaccines and microbicides. Antiviral drugs, siRNAs, and hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy strategies have all been shown to be effective at reducing viral load and preventing or reversing helper T cell loss in humanized mice, indicating that they will serve as an important preclinical model to study new therapeutic modalities. HIV-1 has also been shown to evolve in response to selective pressures in humanized mice, thus showing that the model will be useful to study and/or predict viral evolution in response to drug or immune pressures. The purpose of this review is to summarize the findings reported to date on all new humanized mouse models (those transplanted with human HSCs in regards to HIV-1 sexual transmission, pathogenesis, anti-HIV-1 immune responses, viral evolution, pre- and post

  1. The combination of phylogenetic analysis with epidemiological and serological data to track HIV-1 transmission in a sexual transmission case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the linkage of HIV transmission from a man to a woman through unprotected sexual contact without disclosing his HIV-positive status.Combined with epidemiological information and serological tests, phylogenetic analysis was used to test the a priori hypothesis of HIV transmission from the man to the woman. Control subjects, infected with HIV through heterosexual intercourse, from the same location were also sampled. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the consensus gag, pol and env sequences obtained from blood samples of the man, the woman and the local control subjects. The env quasispecies of the man, the woman, and two controls were also obtained using single genome amplification and sequencing (SGA/S to explore the paraphyletic relationship by phylogenetic analysis.Epidemiological information and serological tests indicated that the man was infected with HIV-1 earlier than the woman. Phylogenetic analyses of the consensus sequences showed a monophyletic cluster for the man and woman in all three genomic regions. Furthermore, gag sequences of the man and woman shared a unique recombination pattern from subtype B and C, which was different from those of CRF07_BC or CRF08_BC observed in the local samples. These indicated that the viral sequences from the two subjects display a high level of similarity. Further, viral quasispecies from the man exhibited a paraphyletic relationship with those from the woman in the Bayesian and maximum-likelihood (ML phylogenetic trees of the env region, which supported the transmission direction from the man to the woman.In the context of epidemiological and serological evidence, the results of phylogenetic analyses support the transmission from the man to the woman.

  2. The combination of phylogenetic analysis with epidemiological and serological data to track HIV-1 transmission in a sexual transmission case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Ma, Yanling; Yang, Chaojun; Yang, Li; Chen, Huichao; Dong, Lijuan; Dai, Jie; Jia, Manhong; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the linkage of HIV transmission from a man to a woman through unprotected sexual contact without disclosing his HIV-positive status. Combined with epidemiological information and serological tests, phylogenetic analysis was used to test the a priori hypothesis of HIV transmission from the man to the woman. Control subjects, infected with HIV through heterosexual intercourse, from the same location were also sampled. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the consensus gag, pol and env sequences obtained from blood samples of the man, the woman and the local control subjects. The env quasispecies of the man, the woman, and two controls were also obtained using single genome amplification and sequencing (SGA/S) to explore the paraphyletic relationship by phylogenetic analysis. Epidemiological information and serological tests indicated that the man was infected with HIV-1 earlier than the woman. Phylogenetic analyses of the consensus sequences showed a monophyletic cluster for the man and woman in all three genomic regions. Furthermore, gag sequences of the man and woman shared a unique recombination pattern from subtype B and C, which was different from those of CRF07_BC or CRF08_BC observed in the local samples. These indicated that the viral sequences from the two subjects display a high level of similarity. Further, viral quasispecies from the man exhibited a paraphyletic relationship with those from the woman in the Bayesian and maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenetic trees of the env region, which supported the transmission direction from the man to the woman. In the context of epidemiological and serological evidence, the results of phylogenetic analyses support the transmission from the man to the woman.

  3. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Dipeptide Repeat Proteins Linked to C9orf72-ALS/FTD

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    Thomas Westergard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common genetic change underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. RNA transcripts containing these expansions undergo repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN-T to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs. DPRs are found as aggregates throughout the CNS of C9orf72-ALS/FTD patients, and some cause degeneration when expressed in vitro in neuronal cultures and in vivo in animal models. The spread of characteristic disease-related proteins drives the progression of pathology in many neurodegenerative diseases. While DPR toxic mechanisms continue to be investigated, the potential for DPRs to spread has yet to be determined. Using different experimental cell culture platforms, including spinal motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from C9orf72-ALS patients, we found evidence for cell-to-cell spreading of DPRs via exosome-dependent and exosome-independent pathways, which may be relevant to disease.

  4. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Dipeptide Repeat Proteins Linked to C9orf72-ALS/FTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergard, Thomas; Jensen, Brigid K; Wen, Xinmei; Cai, Jingli; Kropf, Elizabeth; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2016-10-11

    Aberrant hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common genetic change underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). RNA transcripts containing these expansions undergo repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN-T) to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs). DPRs are found as aggregates throughout the CNS of C9orf72-ALS/FTD patients, and some cause degeneration when expressed in vitro in neuronal cultures and in vivo in animal models. The spread of characteristic disease-related proteins drives the progression of pathology in many neurodegenerative diseases. While DPR toxic mechanisms continue to be investigated, the potential for DPRs to spread has yet to be determined. Using different experimental cell culture platforms, including spinal motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from C9orf72-ALS patients, we found evidence for cell-to-cell spreading of DPRs via exosome-dependent and exosome-independent pathways, which may be relevant to disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV-1 transmission in France (1999-2014) and impact of targeted prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillon, Antoine; Essat, Asma; Frange, Pierre; Smith, Davey M; Delaugerre, Constance; Barin, Francis; Ghosn, Jade; Pialoux, Gilles; Robineau, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Goujard, Cécile; Meyer, Laurence; Chaix, Marie-Laure

    2017-02-21

    Characterizing HIV-1 transmission networks can be important in understanding the evolutionary patterns and geospatial spread of the epidemic. We reconstructed the broad molecular epidemiology of HIV from individuals with primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) enrolled in France in the ANRS PRIMO C06 cohort over 15 years. Sociodemographic, geographic, clinical, biological and pol sequence data from 1356 patients were collected between 1999 and 2014. Network analysis was performed to infer genetic relationships, i.e. clusters of transmission, between HIV-1 sequences. Bayesian coalescent-based methods were used to examine the temporal and spatial dynamics of identified clusters from different regions in France. We also evaluated the use of network information to target prevention efforts. Participants were mostly Caucasian (85.9%) and men (86.7%) who reported sex with men (MSM, 71.4%). Overall, 387 individuals (28.5%) were involved in clusters: 156 patients (11.5%) in 78 dyads and 231 participants (17%) in 42 larger clusters (median size: 4, range 3-41). Compared to individuals with single PHI (n = 969), those in clusters were more frequently men (95.9 vs 83%, p HIV-1 epidemic among MSM. Combined with a short turnaround time for sample processing, targeting prevention efforts based on phylogenetic monitoring may be an efficient way to deliver prevention interventions but would require near real time targeted interventions on the identified index cases and their partners.

  6. Bacterial vaginosis associated with increased risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission: a prospective cohort analysis among African couples.

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    Craig R Cohen

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, a disruption of the normal vaginal flora, has been associated with a 60% increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in women and higher concentration of HIV-1 RNA in the genital tract of HIV-1-infected women. However, whether BV, which is present in up to half of African HIV-1-infected women, is associated with an increase in HIV-1 transmission to male partners has not been assessed in previous studies.We assessed the association between BV on female-to-male HIV-1 transmission risk in a prospective study of 2,236 HIV-1-seropositive women and their HIV-1 uninfected male partners from seven African countries from a randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled heterosexual African adults who were seropositive for both HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus (HSV-2, and their HIV-1-seronegative partners. Participants were followed for up to 24 months; every three months, vaginal swabs were obtained from female partners for Gram stain and male partners were tested for HIV-1. BV and normal vaginal flora were defined as a Nugent score of 7-10 and 0-3, respectively. To reduce misclassification, HIV-1 sequence analysis of viruses from seroconverters and their partners was performed to determine linkage of HIV-1 transmissions. Overall, 50 incident HIV-1 infections occurred in men in which the HIV-1-infected female partner had an evaluable vaginal Gram stain. HIV-1 incidence in men whose HIV-1-infected female partners had BV was 2.91 versus 0.76 per 100 person-years in men whose female partners had normal vaginal flora (hazard ratio 3.62, 95% CI 1.74-7.52. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, sexual behavior, male circumcision, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in female partners, BV was associated with a greater than 3-fold increased risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission (adjusted hazard ratio 3.17, 95% CI 1.37-7.33.This study identified an association between BV and increased risk of HIV

  7. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with a clinical history of sexual transmission of HIV-1 from a single donor reveals transmission of highly distinct variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClure Myra

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To combat the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1, a successful vaccine will need to cope with the variability of transmissible viruses. Human hosts infected with HIV-1 potentially harbour many viral variants but very little is known about viruses that are likely to be transmitted, or even if there are viral characteristics that predict enhanced transmission in vivo. We show for the first time that genetic divergence consistent with a single transmission event in vivo can represent several years of pre-transmission evolution. Results We describe a highly unusual case consistent with a single donor transmitting highly related but distinct HIV-1 variants to two individuals on the same evening. We confirm that the clustering of viral genetic sequences, present within each recipient, is consistent with the history of a single donor across the viral env, gag and pol genes by maximum likelihood and Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo based phylogenetic analyses. Based on an uncorrelated, lognormal relaxed clock of env gene evolution calibrated with other datasets, the time since the most recent common ancestor is estimated as 2.86 years prior to transmission (95% confidence interval 1.28 to 4.54 years. Conclusion Our results show that an effective design for a preventative vaccine will need to anticipate extensive HIV-1 diversity within an individual donor as well as diversity at the population level.

  8. V3 peptide binding pattern and HIV-1 transmission route in Rio de Janeiro

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    Monica E. Pinto

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available To characterize antibody binding to a panel of V3 loop peptides representing diverse HIV-1 neutralization epitopes, 149 HIV-1 infected individuals from Rio de Janeiro (RJ were investigated. Results were analyzed with respect to risk factors for infection and other epidemiological and clinical data. Peptide reactivity was not associated with sex, clinical status, CD4 counts, antigenemia or ß2-microglobulin serum level. A segregation of peptide reactivity according to route of infection was encountered. This finding suggests that more then one viral strain may be circulating in RJ, in subjects with different risk factors for HIV-1 infection. An investigation of prevalent HIV-1 genotypes, serotypes and immunotypes may be of importance for the design and selection of potential vaccines to be used in Brazil as well as for the selection of populations to be included in future vaccine efficacy trials.

  9. Identification of a large, fast-expanding HIV-1 subtype B transmission cluster among MSM in Valencia, Spain.

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    Juan Ángel Patiño-Galindo

    Full Text Available We describe and characterize an exceptionally large HIV-1 subtype B transmission cluster occurring in the Comunidad Valenciana (CV, Spain. A total of 1806 HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase (PR/RT sequences from different patients were obtained in the CV between 2004 and 2014. After subtyping and generating a phylogenetic tree with additional HIV-1 subtype B sequences, a very large transmission cluster which included almost exclusively sequences from the CV was detected (n = 143 patients. This cluster was then validated and characterized with further maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses and Bayesian coalescent reconstructions. With these analyses, the CV cluster was delimited to 113 patients, predominately men who have sex with men (MSM. Although it was significantly located in the city of Valencia (n = 105, phylogenetic analyses suggested this cluster derives from a larger HIV lineage affecting other Spanish localities (n = 194. Coalescent analyses estimated its expansion in Valencia to have started between 1998 and 2004. From 2004 to 2009, members of this cluster represented only 1.46% of the HIV-1 subtype B samples studied in Valencia (n = 5/143, whereas from 2010 onwards its prevalence raised to 12.64% (n = 100/791. In conclusion, we have detected a very large transmission cluster in the CV where it has experienced a very fast growth in the recent years in the city of Valencia, thus contributing significantly to the HIV epidemic in this locality. Its transmission efficiency evidences shortcomings in HIV control measures in Spain and particularly in Valencia.

  10. Contribution of rpfB to cell-to-cell signal synthesis, virulence, and vector transmission of Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Killiny, Nabil; Newman, Karyn L; Chatterjee, Subhadeep; Ionescu, Michael; Lindow, Steven E

    2012-04-01

    In Xylella fastidiosa the fatty acid signal molecule diffusible signaling factor (DSF) is produced and sensed by components of the regulation of pathogenicity factors (rpf) cluster; lack of DSF production in RpfF mutants results in a non-vector-transmissible phenotype yet cells are hypervirulent to grape. rpfB has not been characterized in Xylella fastidiosa, although its homolog has been suggested to be required for DSF synthesis in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. We show that RpfB is involved in DSF processing in both Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas campestris, affecting the profile of DSF-like fatty acids observed in thin-layer chromatography. Although three fatty acids whose production is dependent on RpfF were detected in Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas campestris wild-type strains, their respective rpfB mutants accumulated primarily one chemical species. Although no quantifiable effect of rpfB on plant colonization by Xylella fastidiosa was found, insect colonization and transmission was reduced. Thus, RpfB apparently is involved in DSF processing, and like Xanthomonas campestris, Xylella fastidiosa also produces multiple DSF molecules. It is possible that Xylella fastidiosa coordinates host vector and plant colonization by varying the proportions of different forms of DSF signals via RpfB.

  11. The role of migration and domestic transmission in the spread of HIV-1 non-B subtypes in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wyl, Viktor; Kouyos, Roger D; Yerly, Sabine; Böni, Jürg; Shah, Cyril; Bürgisser, Philippe; Klimkait, Thomas; Weber, Rainer; Hirschel, Bernard; Cavassini, Matthias; Staehelin, Cornelia; Battegay, Manuel; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Ledergerber, Bruno; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2011-10-01

    By analyzing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol sequences from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS), we explored whether the prevalence of non-B subtypes reflects domestic transmission or migration patterns. Swiss non-B sequences and sequences collected abroad were pooled to construct maximum likelihood trees, which were analyzed for Swiss-specific subepidemics, (subtrees including ≥80% Swiss sequences, bootstrap >70%; macroscale analysis) or evidence for domestic transmission (sequence pairs with genetic distance spread of non-B subtypes.

  12. Opposing roles of blood myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in HIV-1 infection of T cells: transmission facilitation versus replication inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Fedde; van Capel, Toni M M; Kapsenberg, Martien L; Berkhout, Ben; de Jong, Esther C

    2006-09-15

    CD11c(+) myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs) and CD11c(-) CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) have been identified as main human DC subsets. MDCs are professional antigen-presenting cells for T cells, and include Langerhans cells, dermal DCs, and interstitial DCs. They have been associated with HIV-1 capture and sexual transmission, whereas PDCs play an important role in the innate immune responses to different types of viruses, including HIV-1. To compare the influence of MDCs and PDCs on HIV-1 infection of T cells, we isolated donor-matched MDCs and PDCs from peripheral blood, activated them by adding different maturation-inducing compounds, and cocultured them with T cells and HIV-1. We found that MDCs enhance HIV-1 infection through capture of the virus and subsequent transmission to T cells, and that differently matured MDC subsets have different HIV-1 transmission efficiencies. These differences were not due to soluble factors, viral capture differences, or the expression of integrins ICAM-1, -2, -3, or LFA-1. In contrast, regardless of their state of maturation, PDCs inhibit HIV-1 replication in T cells through the secretion of IFNalpha and an additional, unidentified small molecule. This study shows that the 2 main types of DCs have opposing roles in HIV-1 infection of T cells.

  13. Cross-border sexual transmission of the newly emerging HIV-1 clade CRF51_01B.

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    Hui Ting Cheong

    Full Text Available A novel HIV-1 recombinant clade (CRF51_01B was recently identified among men who have sex with men (MSM in Singapore. As cases of sexually transmitted HIV-1 infection increase concurrently in two socioeconomically intimate countries such as Malaysia and Singapore, cross transmission of HIV-1 between said countries is highly probable. In order to investigate the timeline for the emergence of HIV-1 CRF51_01B in Singapore and its possible introduction into Malaysia, 595 HIV-positive subjects recruited in Kuala Lumpur from 2008 to 2012 were screened. Phylogenetic relationship of 485 amplified polymerase gene sequences was determined through neighbour-joining method. Next, near-full length sequences were amplified for genomic sequences inferred to be CRF51_01B and subjected to further analysis implemented through Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling and maximum likelihood methods. Based on the near full length genomes, two isolates formed a phylogenetic cluster with CRF51_01B sequences of Singapore origin, sharing identical recombination structure. Spatial and temporal information from Bayesian MCMC coalescent and maximum likelihood analysis of the protease, gp120 and gp41 genes suggest that Singapore is probably the country of origin of CRF51_01B (as early as in the mid-1990s and featured a Malaysian who acquired the infection through heterosexual contact as host for its ancestral lineages. CRF51_01B then spread rapidly among the MSM in Singapore and Malaysia. Although the importation of CRF51_01B from Singapore to Malaysia is supported by coalescence analysis, the narrow timeframe of the transmission event indicates a closely linked epidemic. Discrepancies in the estimated divergence times suggest that CRF51_01B may have arisen through multiple recombination events from more than one parental lineage. We report the cross transmission of a novel CRF51_01B lineage between countries that involved different sexual risk groups. Understanding

  14. PVP-coated silver nanoparticles block the transmission of cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 in human cervical culture

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    Rodriguez-Padilla Cristina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that polyvinylpyrrolidone coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-coated AgNPs have antiviral activity against HIV-1 at non-cytotoxic concentrations. These particles also demonstrate broad spectrum virucidal activity by preventing the interaction of HIV-1 gp120 and cellular CD4, thereby inhibiting fusion or entry of the virus into the host cell. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of PVP-coated AgNPs as a potential topical vaginal microbicide to prevent transmission of HIV-1 infection using human cervical culture, an in vitro model that simulates in vivo conditions. Results When formulated into a non-spermicidal gel (Replens at a concentration of 0.15 mg/mL, PVP-coated AgNPs prevented the transmission of cell-associated HIV-1 and cell-free HIV-1 isolates. Importantly, PVP-coated AgNPs were not toxic to the explant, even when the cervical tissues were exposed continuously to 0.15 mg/mL of PVP-coated AgNPs for 48 h. Only 1 min of PVP-coated AgNPs pretreatment to the explant was required to prevent transmission of HIV-1. Pre-treatment of the cervical explant with 0.15 mg/mL PVP-coated AgNPs for 20 min followed by extensive washing prevented the transmission of HIV-1 in this model for 48 h. Conclusions A formulation of PVP-coated AgNPs homogenized in Replens gel acts rapidly to inhibit HIV-1 transmission after 1 min and offers long-lasting protection of the cervical tissue from infection for 48 h, with no evidence of cytotoxicity observed in the explants. Based on this data, PVP-coated AgNPs are a promising microbicidal candidate for use in topical vaginal/cervical agents to prevent HIV-1 transmission, and further research is warranted.

  15. Transmission network characteristics based on env and gag sequences from MSM during acute HIV-1 infection in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Dai, Lili; Jiang, Yan; Feng, Kaidi; Liu, Lifeng; Xia, Wei; Yu, Fengjiao; Yao, Jun; Xing, Wenge; Sun, Lijun; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Hao; Su, Bin; Qiu, Maofeng

    2017-11-01

    Molecular epidemiology can be used to identify human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission clusters, usually using pol sequence for analysis. In the present study, we explored appropriate parameters to construct a simple network using HIV env and gag sequences instead of pol sequences for constructing a phylogenetic tree and a genetic transmission subnetwork, which were used to identify individuals with many potential transmission links and to explore the evolutionary dynamics of the virus among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beijing. We investigated 70 acute HIV-1 infections, which consisted of HIV-1 subtype B (15.71%), the circulating recombinant forms CRF01_AE (47.14%), CRF07_BC (21.43%), CRF55_01B (1.43%), and CRF65_cpx (4.29%), and an unknown subtype (10.00%). By exploring the similarities and differences among HIV env, gag and pol sequences in describing the dynamics of the HIV-1 CRF01_AE transmission subnetwork among Beijing MSM, we found that four key points of the env sequences (strains E-2011_BJ.CY_16014, E-2011_BJ.FT_16017, E-2011_BJ.TZ_16064, and E-2011_BJ.XW_16035) contained more transmission information than gag sequences (three key points: strains G-2011_BJ.CY_16014, G-2011_BJ.FT_16017, and G-2011_BJ.XW_16035) and pol sequences (two key points: strains P-2011_BJ.CY_16014 and P-2011_BJ.XW_16035). Although the env and gag sequence results were similar to pol sequences in describing the dynamics of the HIV-1 CRF01_AE transmission subnetwork, we were able to obtain more precise information, allowing identification of key points of subnetwork expansion, based on HIV env and gag sequences instead of pol sequences. Taken together, the key points we found will improve our current understanding of how HIV spreads between MSM populations in Beijing and help to better target preventative interventions for promoting public health.

  16. Diverse forms of HIV-1 among Burmese long-distance truck drivers imply their contribution to HIV-1 cross-border transmission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Yan-Heng; Liang, Yue-Bo; Pang, Wei; Qin, Wei-Hong; Yao, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Chiyu; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2014-01-01

    .... Due to the transient nature of their work, long-distance truck drivers (LDTDs) have a comparatively high potential to become infected with HIV-1 and further spread virus to other individuals in the area they travel within...

  17. Avaliação dos fatores associados à transmissão vertical de HIV-1

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    Matheus Costa da Rosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Objetivo Comparar a prevalência e os fatores associados à transmissão vertical de HIV-1 entre grávidas tratadas de 1998-2004 e de 2005-2011 em um serviço de referência de cuidado de pacientes com HIV no sul do Brasil. Métodos Estudo descritivo e analítico que usou as bases de dados de laboratórios da Rede Nacional de Laboratórios de CD4 e Carga Viral de DST/Aids do Ministério da Saúde. As grávidas com HIV-1 foram selecionadas em uma pesquisa ativa de informações clínicas e dados obstétricos e neonatais em seus prontuários médicos entre 1998-2011. Resultados Foram analisadas 102 grávidas entre 1998 e 2004 e 251 entre 2005-2011, no total 353 crianças nascidas de grávidas com HIV-1. Observou-se que a transmissão vertical foi de 11,8% entre 1998 e 2004 e de 3,2% entre 2005-2011 (p < 0,001. O maior uso de medicamentos antirretrovirais (p = 0,02, a redução na carga viral (p < 0,001 e o tempo de ruptura de membranas menor do que quatro horas (p < 0,001 foram associados à redução nos fatores de transmissão vertical quando os dois períodos são comparados. Conclusão Observou-se uma redução na taxa de transmissão vertical nos últimos anos. De acordo com as variáveis estudadas, sugere-se que os fatores de risco de transmissão vertical de HIV-1 foram ausência de terapia antirretroviral, alta carga viral das grávidas e tempo de ruptura maior do que quatro horas.

  18. Neutralizing antibody escape during HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission involves conformational masking of distal epitopes in envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Leslie; Milligan, Caitlin; Simonich, Cassandra A; Nduati, Ruth; Overbaugh, Julie

    2012-09-01

    HIV-1 variants transmitted to infants are often resistant to maternal neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), suggesting that they have escaped maternal NAb pressure. To define the molecular basis of NAb escape that contributes to selection of transmitted variants, we analyzed 5 viruses from 2 mother-to-child transmission pairs, in which the infant virus, but not the maternal virus, was resistant to neutralization by maternal plasma near transmission. We generated chimeric viruses between maternal and infant envelope clones obtained near transmission and examined neutralization by maternal plasma. The molecular determinants of NAb escape were distinct, even when comparing two maternal variants to the transmitted infant virus within one pair, in which insertions in V4 of gp120 and substitutions in HR2 of gp41 conferred neutralization resistance. In another pair, deletions and substitutions in V1 to V3 conferred resistance, but neither V1/V2 nor V3 alone was sufficient. Although the sequence determinants of escape were distinct, all of them involved modifications of potential N-linked glycosylation sites. None of the regions that mediated escape were major linear targets of maternal NAbs because corresponding peptides failed to compete for neutralization. Instead, these regions disrupted multiple distal epitopes targeted by HIV-1-specific monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that escape from maternal NAbs occurred through conformational masking of distal epitopes. This strategy likely allows HIV-1 to utilize relatively limited changes in the envelope to preserve the ability to infect a new host while simultaneously evading multiple NAb specificities present in maternal plasma.

  19. Conserved signatures indicate HIV-1 transmission is under strong selection and thus is not a "stochastic" process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mileidy; DeVico, Anthony L; Spouge, John L

    2017-02-24

    Recently, Oberle et al. published a paper in Retrovirology evaluating the question of whether selection plays a role in HIV transmission. The Oberle study found no obvious genotypic or phenotypic differences between donors and recipients of epidemiologically linked pairs from the Swiss cohort. Thus, Oberle et al. characterized HIV-1 B transmission as largely "stochastic", an imprecise and potentially misleading term. Here, we re-analyzed their data and placed them in the context of transmission data for over 20 other human and animal trials. The present study finds that the transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses from the Swiss cohort show the same non-random genetic signatures conserved in 118 HIV-1, 40 SHIV, and 12 SIV T/F viruses previously published by two independent groups. We provide alternative interpretations of the Swiss cohort data and conclude that the sequences of their donor viruses lacked variability at the specific sites where other studies were able to demonstrate genotypic selection. Oberle et al. observed no phenotypic selection in vitro, so the problem of determining the in vivo phenotypic mechanisms that cause genotypic selection in HIV remains open.

  20. Transmission routes of HIV-1 gp120 from brain to lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, M F; Banks, W A; Bost, K L; Kastin, A J

    1999-03-20

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the entry of antiviral agents into the CNS thereby facilitating the creation of a reservoir of HIV that could potentially reinfect peripheral tissues. We characterized the efflux from brain of radioactively labeled viral coat HIV-1 gp120 (I-gp120) after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. The half-time disappearance rate of I-gp120 from brain was 12.6 min, which was faster than could be explained by the reabsorption of cerebrospinal fluid into blood but could not be explained by a saturable transporter. After i.c.v. injection, I-gp120 appeared in the serum and was sequestered by spleen and the cervical nodes, demonstrating a potential for virus within the CNS to reinfect peripheral tissues. However, the amount of I-gp120 appearing in serum was less than that expected based on the efflux rate, whereas uptake by the cervical nodes was much greater after i. c.v. than after i.v. injection of I-gp120. These findings were explained by drainage from the brain directly to the cervical lymph nodes through the brain's primitive lymphatic system. These lymphatics potentially provide a pathway through which CNS reservoirs of HIV-1 could directly reinfect lymphoid tissue without being exposed to circulating antiviral agents. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Risk group characteristics and viral transmission clusters in South-East Asian patients infected with HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF)01_AE and subtype B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyomopito, Rebecca A; Chen, Yen-Ju; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantor, Rami; Merati, Tuti; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Sirisanthana, Thira; Li, Patrick CK; Kantipong, Pacharee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Lee, Chris KC; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Ditangco, Rossana; Huang, Szu-Wei; Sohn, Annette H; Law, Matthew; Chen, Yi Ming A

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 epidemics in Asian countries are driven by varying exposures. The epidemiology of the regional pandemic has been changing with the spread of HIV-1 to lower-risk populations through sexual transmission. Common HIV-1 genotypes include subtype B and circulating recombinant form (CRF)01_AE. Our objective was to use HIV-1 genotypic data to better quantify local epidemics. TASER-M is a multi-centre prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients. Associations between HIV-exposure, patient gender, country of sample origin and HIV-1 genotype were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. Phylogenetic methods were used on genotypic data to investigate transmission relationships. A total of 1086 patients from Thailand, Hong Kong, Malaysia and the Philippines were included in analyses. Proportions of males within countries varied (Thailand: 55.6%, Hong Kong: 86.1%, Malaysia: 81.4%, Philippines: 93.8%; p <0.001) as did HIV exposures (Heterosexual contact: Thailand: 85.7%, Hong Kong, 46.2%, Malaysia: 47.8%, Philippines: 25.0%; p <0.001). After adjustment, we found increased subtype B infection among men-who-have-sex with-men, relative to heterosexual-reported exposures (OR = 2.4, p <0.001). We further describe four transmission clusters of 8–15 treatment naive, predominantly symptomatic patients (two each for subtype B and CRF01_AE). Risk-group sub-populations differed with respect to the infecting HIV-1 genotype. Homosexual exposure patients had a higher odds of being infected with subtype B. Where HIV-1 genotypes circulate within countries or patient risk-groups, local monitoring of genotype-specific transmissions may play a role in focussing public health prevention strategies. Phylogenetic evaluations provide complementary information for surveillance and monitoring of viruses with high mutation rates such as HIV-1 and Ebola. PMID:26362956

  2. Differential susceptibility of naïve, central memory and effector memory T cells to dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 transmission

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    Schuitemaker Joost HN

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DC have been proposed to facilitate sexual transmission of HIV-1 by capture of the virus in the mucosa and subsequent transmission to CD4+ T cells. Several T cell subsets can be identified in humans: naïve T cells (TN that initiate an immune response to new antigens, and memory T cells that respond to previously encountered pathogens. The memory T cell pool comprises central memory (TCM and effector memory cells (TEM, which are characterized by distinct homing and effector functions. The TEM cell subset, which can be further divided into effector Th1 and Th2 cells, has been shown to be the prime target for viral replication after HIV-1 infection, and is abundantly present in mucosal tissues. Results We determined the susceptibility of TN, TCM and TEM cells to DC-mediated HIV-1 transmission and found that co-receptor expression on the respective T cell subsets is a decisive factor for transmission. Accordingly, CCR5-using (R5 HIV-1 was most efficiently transmitted to TEM cells, and CXCR4-using (X4 HIV-1 was preferentially transmitted to TN cells. Conclusion The highly efficient R5 transfer to TEM cells suggests that mucosal T cells are an important target for DC-mediated transmission. This may contribute to the initial burst of virus replication that is observed in these cells. TN cells, which are the prime target for DC-mediated X4 virus transmission in our study, are considered to inefficiently support HIV-1 replication. Our results thus indicate that DC may play a decisive role in the susceptibility of TN cells to X4 tropic HIV-1.

  3. Assessment of Overlap of Phylogenetic Transmission Clusters and Communities in Simple Sexual Contact Networks: Applications to HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villandre, Luc; Stephens, David A; Labbe, Aurelie; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Transmission patterns of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) could relate to the structure of the underlying sexual contact network, whose features are therefore of interest to clinicians. Conventionally, we represent sexual contacts in a population with a graph, that can reveal the existence of communities. Phylogenetic methods help infer the history of an epidemic and incidentally, may help detecting communities. In particular, phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) have revealed the existence of large transmission clusters, possibly resulting from within-community transmissions. Past studies have explored the association between contact networks and phylogenies, including transmission clusters, producing conflicting conclusions about whether network features significantly affect observed transmission history. As far as we know however, none of them thoroughly investigated the role of communities, defined with respect to the network graph, in the observation of clusters. The present study investigates, through simulations, community detection from phylogenies. We simulate a large number of epidemics over both unweighted and weighted, undirected random interconnected-islands networks, with islands corresponding to communities. We use weighting to modulate distance between islands. We translate each epidemic into a phylogeny, that lets us partition our samples of infected subjects into transmission clusters, based on several common definitions from the literature. We measure similarity between subjects' island membership indices and transmission cluster membership indices with the adjusted Rand index. Analyses reveal modest mean correspondence between communities in graphs and phylogenetic transmission clusters. We conclude that common methods often have limited success in detecting contact network communities from phylogenies. The rarely-fulfilled requirement that network communities correspond to clades in the phylogeny

  4. Assessment of Overlap of Phylogenetic Transmission Clusters and Communities in Simple Sexual Contact Networks: Applications to HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Villandre

    Full Text Available Transmission patterns of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs could relate to the structure of the underlying sexual contact network, whose features are therefore of interest to clinicians. Conventionally, we represent sexual contacts in a population with a graph, that can reveal the existence of communities. Phylogenetic methods help infer the history of an epidemic and incidentally, may help detecting communities. In particular, phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM have revealed the existence of large transmission clusters, possibly resulting from within-community transmissions. Past studies have explored the association between contact networks and phylogenies, including transmission clusters, producing conflicting conclusions about whether network features significantly affect observed transmission history. As far as we know however, none of them thoroughly investigated the role of communities, defined with respect to the network graph, in the observation of clusters.The present study investigates, through simulations, community detection from phylogenies. We simulate a large number of epidemics over both unweighted and weighted, undirected random interconnected-islands networks, with islands corresponding to communities. We use weighting to modulate distance between islands. We translate each epidemic into a phylogeny, that lets us partition our samples of infected subjects into transmission clusters, based on several common definitions from the literature. We measure similarity between subjects' island membership indices and transmission cluster membership indices with the adjusted Rand index.Analyses reveal modest mean correspondence between communities in graphs and phylogenetic transmission clusters. We conclude that common methods often have limited success in detecting contact network communities from phylogenies. The rarely-fulfilled requirement that network communities correspond to clades

  5. Risk factors of HIV-1 vertical transmission (VT) and the influence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Maria F M; de Oliveira, Gisele R; Lobato, Rubens C; Mendoza-Sassi, Raul A; Martínez, Ana M B; Gonçalves, Carla V

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of intervention, the rate of vertical transmission of HIV can range from 15-45%. With the inclusion of antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy and the choice of delivery route this amounts to less than 2%. However ARV use during pregnancy has generated several questions regarding the adverse effects of the gestational and neonatal outcome. This study aims to analyze the risk factors for vertical transmission of HIV-1 seropositive pregnant women living in Rio Grande and the influence of the use of ARVs in pregnancy outcome. Among the 262 pregnant women studied the rate of vertical transmission of HIV was found to be 3.8%. Regarding the VT, there was a lower risk of transmission when antiretroviral drugs were used and prenatal care was conducted at the referral service. However, the use of ART did not influence the outcome of pregnancy. However, initiation of prenatal care after the first trimester had an influence on low birth weight, as well as performance of less than six visits increased the risk of prematurity. Therefore, the risk factors analyzed in this study appear to be related to the realization of inadequate pre-natal and maternal behavior.

  6. RISK FACTORS OF HIV-1 VERTICAL TRANSMISSION (VT AND THE INFLUENCE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY (ART IN PREGNANCY OUTCOME

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    Maria F.M. Barral

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of intervention, the rate of vertical transmission of HIV can range from 15-45%. With the inclusion of antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy and the choice of delivery route this amounts to less than 2%. However ARV use during pregnancy has generated several questions regarding the adverse effects of the gestational and neonatal outcome. This study aims to analyze the risk factors for vertical transmission of HIV-1 seropositive pregnant women living in Rio Grande and the influence of the use of ARVs in pregnancy outcome. Among the 262 pregnant women studied the rate of vertical transmission of HIV was found to be 3.8%. Regarding the VT, there was a lower risk of transmission when antiretroviral drugs were used and prenatal care was conducted at the referral service. However, the use of ART did not influence the outcome of pregnancy. However, initiation of prenatal care after the first trimester had an influence on low birth weight, as well as performance of less than six visits increased the risk of prematurity. Therefore, the risk factors analyzed in this study appear to be related to the realization of inadequate pre-natal and maternal behavior.

  7. Evolutionary history of HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE transmission clusters among men who have sex with men (MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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    Kim Tien Ng

    Full Text Available HIV-1 epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM continue to expand in developed and developing countries. Although HIV infection in MSM is amongst the highest of the key affected populations in many countries in Southeast Asia, comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 among MSM remains inadequate in the region including in Malaysia. Here, we reported the phylodynamic profiles of HIV-1 genotypes circulating among MSM population in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of n = 459 newly-diagnosed treatment-naïve consenting subjects were recruited between March 2006 and August 2012, of whom 87 (18.9% were self-reported MSM. Transmitted drug resistance mutations were absent in these isolates. Cumulatively, phylogenetic reconstructions of the pro-rt gene (HXB2∶2253-3275 showed that HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE were predominant and contributed to approximately 80% of the total HIV-1 infection among MSM. In addition to numerous unique transmission lineages within these genotypes, twelve monophyletic transmission clusters of different sizes (2-7 MSM sequences, supported by posterior probability value of 1 were identified in Malaysia. Bayesian coalescent analysis estimated that the divergence times for these clusters were mainly dated between 1995 and 2005 with four major transmission clusters radiating at least 12 years ago suggesting that active spread of multiple sub-epidemic clusters occurred during this period. The changes in effective population size of subtype B showed an exponential growth within 5 years between 1988 and 1993, while CRF01_AE lineage exhibited similar expansion between 1993 and 2003. Our study provides the first insight of the phylodynamic profile of HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE circulating among MSM population in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, unravelling the importance of understanding transmission behaviours as well as evolutionary history of HIV-1 in assessing the risk of outbreak or epidemic expansion.

  8. Antigen-presenting cells represent targets for R5 HIV-1 infection in the first trimester pregnancy uterine mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Marlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the first trimester of pregnancy, HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission is relatively rare despite the permissivity of placental cells to cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. The placenta interacts directly with maternal uterine cells (decidual cells but the physiological role of the decidua in the control of HIV-1 transmission and whether decidua could be a source of infected cells is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To answer to this question, decidual mononuclear cells were exposed to HIV-1 in vitro. Decidual cells were shown to be more susceptible to infection by an R5 HIV-1, as compared to an X4 HIV-1. Infected cells were identified by flow cytometry analysis. The results showed that CD14(+ cells were the main targets of HIV-1 infection in the decidua. These infected CD14(+ cells expressed DC-SIGN, CD11b, CD11c, the Fc gamma receptor CD16, CD32 and CD64, classical MHC class-I and class-II and maturation and activation molecules CD83, CD80 and CD86. The permissivity of decidual tissue was also evaluated by histoculture. Decidual tissue was not infected by X4 HIV-1 but was permissive to R5 HIV-1. Different profiles of infection were observed depending on tissue localization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of HIV-1 target cells in the decidua in vitro and the low rate of in utero mother-to-child transmission during the first trimester of pregnancy suggest that a natural control occurs in vivo limiting cell-to-cell infection of the placenta and consequently infection of the fetus.

  9. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis prevents vaginal transmission of HIV-1 in humanized BLT mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denton, Paul W; Estes, Jacob D; Sun, Zhifeng; Othieno, Florence A; Wei, Bangdong L; Wege, Anja K; Powell, Daniel A; Payne, Deborah; Haase, Ashley T; Garcia, J Victor

    2008-01-01

    .... Despite the urgency to develop and implement novel approaches capable of preventing HIV transmission, this process has been hindered by the lack of adequate small animal models for preclinical...

  10. Lactobacilli-expressed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) specific for intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) blocks cell-associated HIV-1 transmission across a cervical epithelial monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancey, Caren J; Khanna, Kristen V; Seegers, Jos F M L; Zhang, Guang Wen; Hildreth, James; Langan, Abigail; Markham, Richard B

    2006-05-01

    The vaginal and cervical epithelia provide an initial barrier to sexually acquired HIV-1 infection in women. To study the interactions between HIV-1-infected cells or cell-free HIV-1 and the reproductive epithelium, the transmission of HIV-1 by infected cells or cell-free virus across human cervical epithelial cells was examined using a Transwell culture system. Cell-associated HIV-1 was transmitted more efficiently than cell-free virus, and monocyte-associated virus was transmitted most efficiently. Abs to ICAM-1 added to the apical side of the epithelium blocked cell-mediated transepithelial HIV-1 transmission in vitro. When used in a previously described model of vaginal HIV-1 transmission in human PBL-SCID mice, anti-murine ICAM-1 Abs (0.4 microg/10 microl) also blocked vaginal transmission of cell-associated HIV-1 in vivo. To evaluate a candidate delivery system for the use of this Ab as an anti-HIV-1 microbicide, anti-ICAM single-chain variable fragment Abs secreted by transformed lactobacilli were evaluated for their protective efficacy in the Transwell model. Like the intact Ab and Fab derived from it, the single-chain variable fragment at a concentration of 6.7 microg/100 microl was able to reduce HIV-1 transmission by 70 +/- 5%. These data support the potential efficacy of an anti-ICAM Ab delivered by lactobacilli for use as an anti-HIV-1 microbicide.

  11. Decidual soluble factors participate in the control of HIV-1 infection at the maternofetal interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkane Nadia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternofetal transmission (MFT of HIV-1 is relatively rare during the first trimester of pregnancy despite the permissivity of placental cells for cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. Invasive placental cells interact directly with decidual cells of the uterine mucosa during the first months of pregnancy, but the role of the decidua in the control of HIV-1 transmission is unknown. Results We found that decidual mononuclear cells naturally produce low levels of IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, TNF-α, IFN-α, IFN-γ and CXCL-12 (SDF-1, and large amounts of CCL-2 (MCP1, CCL-3 (MIP-1α, CCL-4 (MIP-1β, CCL-5 (Rantes, CXCL-10 (IP-10, IL-6 and IL-8. CCL-3 and CCL-4 levels were significantly upregulated by in vitro infection with R5 HIV-1 but not X4. Decidual CD14+ antigen presenting cells were the main CCL-3 and CCL-4 producers among decidual leukocytes. R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection was inhibited by decidual cell culture supernatants in vitro. Using HIV-1 pseudotypes, we found that inhibition of the HIV-1 entry step was inhibited by decidual soluble factors. Conclusion Our findings show that decidual innate immunity (soluble factors is involved in the control of HIV-1 infection at the maternofetal interface. The decidua could thus serve as a mucosal model for identifying correlates of protection against HIV-1 infection.

  12. Role of the carbohydrate-binding sites of griffithsin in the prevention of DC-SIGN-mediated capture and transmission of HIV-1.

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    Bart Hoorelbeke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The glycan-targeting C-type DC-SIGN lectin receptor is implicated in the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV by binding the virus and transferring the captured HIV-1 to CD4(+ T lymphocytes. Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs have been reported to block HIV-1 infection. We have now investigated the potent mannose-specific anti-HIV CBA griffithsin (GRFT on its ability to inhibit the capture of HIV-1 to DC-SIGN, its DC-SIGN-directed transmission to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes and the role of the three carbohydrate-binding sites (CBS of GRFT in these processes. FINDINGS: GRFT inhibited HIV-1(IIIB infection of CEM and HIV-1(NL4.3 infection of C8166 CD4(+ T-lymphocytes at an EC50 of 0.059 and 0.444 nM, respectively. The single mutant CBS variants of GRFT (in which a key Asp in one of the CBS was mutated to Ala were about ∼20 to 60-fold less potent to prevent HIV-1 infection and ∼20 to 90-fold less potent to inhibit syncytia formation in co-cultures of persistently HIV-1 infected HuT-78 and uninfected C8166 CD4(+ T-lymphocytes. GRFT prevents DC-SIGN-mediated virus capture and HIV-1 transmission to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes at an EC50 of 1.5 nM and 0.012 nM, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR studies revealed that wild-type GRFT efficiently blocked the binding between DC-SIGN and immobilized gp120, whereas the point mutant CBS variants of GRFT were ∼10- to 15-fold less efficient. SPR-analysis also demonstrated that wild-type GRFT and its single mutant CBS variants have the capacity to expel bound gp120 from the gp120-DC-SIGN complex in a dose dependent manner, a property that was not observed for HHA, another mannose-specific potent anti-HIV-1 CBA. CONCLUSION: GRFT is inhibitory against HIV gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, efficiently prevents DC-SIGN-mediated transfer of HIV-1 to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes and is able to expel gp120 from the gp120-DC-SIGN complex. Functionally intact CBS of GRFT are important for the optimal action of

  13. Dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 transmission to T cells of LAD-1 patients is impaired due to the defect in LFA-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Fedde; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Berkhout, Ben; de Jong, Esther C.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC) have been proposed to mediate sexual HIV-1 transmission by capturing the virus in the mucosa and subsequently presenting it to CD4+ T cells. We have demonstrated before that DC subsets expressing higher levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) are better

  14. Creation of a high yielding recombinant maize hybrid for the production of a microbicide for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barros, E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use conventional breeding to increase the production in maize of the human monoclonal antibody 2G12, known to have potential therapeutic properties in the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. The recombinant antibody...

  15. Mice transgenic for CD4-specific human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 expression: a new model for investigating HIV-1 transmission and treatment efficacy.

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    Kieran Seay

    Full Text Available Mice cannot be used to evaluate HIV-1 therapeutics and vaccines because they are not infectible by HIV-1 due to structural differences between several human and mouse proteins required for HIV-1 entry and replication including CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1. We overcame this limitation by constructing mice with CD4 enhancer/promoter-regulated human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 genes integrated as tightly linked transgenes (hCD4/R5/cT1 mice promoting their efficient co-transmission and enabling the murine CD4-expressing cells to support HIV-1 entry and Tat-mediated LTR transcription. All of the hCD4/R5/cT1 mice developed disseminated infection of tissues that included the spleen, small intestine, lymph nodes and lungs after intravenous injection with an HIV-1 infectious molecular clone (HIV-IMC expressing Renilla reniformis luciferase (LucR. Furthermore, localized infection of cervical-vaginal mucosal leukocytes developed after intravaginal inoculation of hCD4/R5/cT1 mice with the LucR-expressing HIV-IMC. hCD4/R5/cT1 mice reproducibly developed in vivo infection after inoculation with LucR-expressing HIV-IMC which could be bioluminescently quantified and visualized with a high sensitivity and specificity which enabled them to be used to evaluate the efficacy of HIV-1 therapeutics. Treatment with highly active anti-retroviral therapy or one dose of VRC01, a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody, almost completed inhibited acute systemic HIV-1 infection of the hCD4/R5/cT1 mice. hCD4/R5/cT1 mice could also be used to evaluate the capacity of therapies delivered by gene therapy to inhibit in vivo HIV infection. VRC01 secreted in vivo by primary B cells transduced with a VRC01-encoding lentivirus transplanted into hCD4/R5/cT1 mice markedly inhibited infection after intravenous challenge with LucR-expressing HIV-IMC. The reproducible infection of CD4/R5/cT1 mice with LucR-expressing HIV-IMC after intravenous or mucosal inoculation combined with the availability

  16. Lignosulfonic acid exhibits broadly anti-HIV-1 activity--potential as a microbicide candidate for the prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

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    Min Qiu

    Full Text Available Some secondary metabolites from plants show to have potent inhibitory activities against microbial pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV, Treponema pallidum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, etc. Here we report that lignosulfonic acid (LSA, a polymeric lignin derivative, exhibits potent and broad activity against HIV-1 isolates of diverse subtypes including two North America strains and a number of Chinese clinical isolates values ranging from 21.4 to 633 nM. Distinct from other polyanions, LSA functions as an entry inhibitor with multiple targets on viral gp120 as well as on host receptor CD4 and co-receptors CCR5/CXCR4. LSA blocks viral entry as determined by time-of-drug addiction and cell-cell fusion assays. Moreover, LSA inhibits CD4-gp120 interaction by blocking the binding of antibodies specific for CD4-binding sites (CD4bs and for the V3 loop of gp120. Similarly, LSA interacts with CCR5 and CXCR4 via its inhibition of specific anti-CCR5 and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively. Interestingly, the combination of LSA with AZT and Nevirapine exhibits synergism in viral inhibition. For the purpose of microbicide development, LSA displays low in vitro cytotoxicity to human genital tract epithelial cells, does not stimulate NF-κB activation and has no significant up-regulation of IL-1α/β and IL-8 as compared with N-9. Lastly, LSA shows no adverse effect on the epithelial integrity and the junctional protein expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that LSA can be a potential candidate for tropical microbicide.

  17. Epidemiological study of phylogenetic transmission clusters in a local HIV-1 epidemic reveals distinct differences between subtype B and non-B infections

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    Chalmet Kristen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of HIV-1 infected individuals in the Western world continues to rise. More in-depth understanding of regional HIV-1 epidemics is necessary for the optimal design and adequate use of future prevention strategies. The use of a combination of phylogenetic analysis of HIV sequences, with data on patients' demographics, infection route, clinical information and laboratory results, will allow a better characterization of individuals responsible for local transmission. Methods Baseline HIV-1 pol sequences, obtained through routine drug-resistance testing, from 506 patients, newly diagnosed between 2001 and 2009, were used to construct phylogenetic trees and identify transmission-clusters. Patients' demographics, laboratory and clinical data, were retrieved anonymously. Statistical analysis was performed to identify subtype-specific and transmission-cluster-specific characteristics. Results Multivariate analysis showed significant differences between the 59.7% of individuals with subtype B infection and the 40.3% non-B infected individuals, with regard to route of transmission, origin, infection with Chlamydia (p = 0.01 and infection with Hepatitis C virus (p = 0.017. More and larger transmission-clusters were identified among the subtype B infections (p Chlamydia infection (p = 0.013 and primary HIV (p = 0.017. Conclusions Combination of phylogenetics with demographic information, laboratory and clinical data, revealed that HIV-1 subtype B infected Caucasian men-who-have-sex-with-men with high prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, account for the majority of local HIV-transmissions. This finding elucidates observed epidemiological trends through molecular analysis, and justifies sustained focus in prevention on this high risk group.

  18. Recent Transmission Clustering of HIV-1 C and CRF17_BF Strains Characterized by NNRTI-Related Mutations among Newly Diagnosed Men in Central Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Fabeni

    Full Text Available Increased evidence of relevant HIV-1 epidemic transmission in European countries is being reported, with an increased circulation of non-B-subtypes. Here, we present two recent HIV-1 non-B transmission clusters characterized by NNRTI-related amino-acidic mutations among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected men, living in Rome (Central-Italy.Pol and V3 sequences were available at the time of diagnosis for all individuals. Maximum-Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic-trees with bootstrap and Bayesian-probability supports defined transmission-clusters. HIV-1 drug-resistance and V3-tropism were also evaluated.Among 534 new HIV-1 non-B cases, diagnosed from 2011 to 2014, in Central-Italy, 35 carried virus gathering in two distinct clusters, including 27 HIV-1 C and 8 CRF17_BF subtypes, respectively. Both clusters were centralized in Rome, and their origin was estimated to have been after 2007. All individuals within both clusters were males and 37.1% of them had been recently-infected. While C-cluster was entirely composed by Italian men-who-have-sex-with-men, with a median-age of 34 years (IQR:30-39, individuals in CRF17_BF-cluster were older, with a median-age of 51 years (IQR:48-59 and almost all reported sexual-contacts with men and women. All carried R5-tropic viruses, with evidence of atypical or resistance amino-acidic mutations related to NNRTI-drugs (K103Q in C-cluster, and K101E+E138K in CRF17_BF-cluster.These two epidemiological clusters provided evidence of a strong and recent circulation of C and CRF17_BF strains in central Italy, characterized by NNRTI-related mutations among men engaging in high-risk behaviours. These findings underline the role of molecular epidemiology in identifying groups at increased risk of HIV-1 transmission, and in enhancing additional prevention efforts.

  19. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deymier, Martin J., E-mail: mdeymie@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Claiborne, Daniel T., E-mail: dclaibo@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ende, Zachary, E-mail: zende@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ratner, Hannah K., E-mail: hannah.ratner@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Kilembe, William, E-mail: wkilembe@rzhrg-mail.org [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Allen, Susan, E-mail: sallen5@emory.edu [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hunter, Eric, E-mail: eric.hunter2@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  20. Advanced glycation end products inhibit both infection and transmission in trans of HIV-1 from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasreddine, Nadine; Borde, Chloé; Gozlan, Joël; Bélec, Laurent; Maréchal, Vincent; Hocini, Hakim

    2011-05-15

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with carbohydrate metabolic alterations that may lead to diabetes. One consequence of hyperglycemia is the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that are involved in diabetes complications. We investigated the impact of AGEs on the infection of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) by HIV-1 and the ability of MDDCs to transmit the virus to T cells. We showed that AGEs could inhibit infection of MDDCs with primary R5-tropic HIV-1(Ba-L) by up to 85 ± 9.2% and with primary X4-tropic HIV-1(VN44) by up to 60 ± 8.5%. This inhibitory effect of AGEs was not prevented by a neutralizing anti-receptor for advanced glycation end products (anti-RAGE) Ab, demonstrating a RAGE-independent mechanism. Moreover, AGEs inhibited by 70-80% the transmission in trans of the virus to CD4 T cells. Despite the inhibitory effect of AGEs on both MDDC infection and virus transmission in trans, no inhibition of virus attachment to cell membrane was observed, confirming that attachment and transmission of the virus involve independent mechanisms. The inhibitory effect of AGEs on infection was associated with a RAGE-independent downregulation of CD4 at the cell membrane and by a RAGE-dependent repression of the CXCR4 and CCR5 HIV-1 receptors. AGEs induce the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12, but not RANTES or MIP-1α, and did not lead to MDDC maturation as demonstrated by the lack of expression of the CD83 molecule. Taken together, our results suggest that AGEs can play an inhibiting role in HIV-1 infection in patients who accumulate circulating AGEs, including patients treated with protease inhibitors that developed diabetes.

  1. Lopinavir/Ritonavir versus Lamivudine peri-exposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV-1 transmission by breastfeeding: the PROMISE-PEP trial Protocol ANRS 12174

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagot Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal transmission of HIV-1 through breast milk remains an unsolved challenge in many resource-poor settings where replacement feeding is not a safe alternative. WHO now recommends breastfeeding of infants born to HIV-infected mothers until 12 months of age, with either maternal highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART or peri-exposure prophylaxis (PEP in infants using nevirapine. As PEP, lamivudine showed a similar efficacy and safety as nevirapine, but with an expected lower rate of resistant HIV strains emerging in infants who fail PEP, and lower restrictions for future HIV treatment. Lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r is an attractive PEP candidate with presumably higher efficacy against HIV than nevirapine or lamivudine, and a higher genetic barrier to resistance selection. It showed an acceptable safety profile for the treatment of very young HIV-infected infants. The ANRS 12174 study aims to compare the risk of HIV-1 transmission during and safety of prolonged infant PEP with LPV/r (40/10 mg twice daily if 2-4 kg and 80/20 mg twice daily if >4 kg versus Lamivudine (7,5 mg twice daily if 2-4 kg, 25 mg twice daily if 4-8 kg and 50 mg twice daily if >8 kg from day 7 until one week after cessation of BF (maximum 50 weeks of prophylaxis to prevent postnatal HIV-1 acquisition between 7 days and 50 weeks of age. Methods The ANRS 12174 study is a multinational, randomised controlled clinical trial conducted on 1,500 mother-infant pairs in Burkina Faso, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia. We will recommend exclusive breastfeeding (EBF until 26th week of life and cessation of breastfeeding at a maximum of 49 weeks in both trial arms. HIV-uninfected infants at day 7 (± 2 days born to HIV-1 infected mothers not eligible for HAART who choose to breastfeed their infants. The primary endpoint is the acquisition of HIV-1 (as assessed by HIV-1 DNA PCR between day 7 and 50 weeks of age. Secondary endpoints are safety (including resistance

  2. THE PREVALENCE OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFIENCY VIRUS-1 (HIV-1 SUBTYPES AND TRANSMISSION METHOD AMONG HIV/AIDS INFECTION PATIENT IN TULUNGAGUNG, EAST JAVA INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Ardianto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid epidemic growth of HIV is continuing in Indonesia. There are some factors which have influenced the spreading of this epidemic in Indonesia, such as the poor awareness to avoid unsafe free sex attitude and the sharing of needles and syringes among intravenous drug users (IDUs. The sexual transmission of HIV has also apparently increased in Tulungagung. Commercial sex workers play a significant role in the spread of HIV in Tulungagung. People in Tulungagung have worked at other countries as Indonesian migrants. This condition can cause the increase number of HIV-1 case and the possibility of genetic variation (subtype HIV-1 in Tulungagung. This research is aimed to analyze the subtype and to determine estimation of transmission mode on infected patient of HIV-1 and AIDS who came to Seruni clinic Dr. Iskak hospital in Tulungagung. 40 HIV?AIDSpatients were interviewed to determine the subtype and the transmission mode. The results showed that 14 of 40 plasma samples (35% were successfully to amplified and sequenced. OverallCRF01-AE wereidentified as predominant subtype among HIV/AIDS patients in Tulungagung. Based on individual information, 31 of 40 subjects (77% were heterosexual transmission.

  3. A topical microbicide gel formulation of CCR5 antagonist maraviroc prevents HIV-1 vaginal transmission in humanized RAG-hu mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Preston Neff

    Full Text Available For prevention of HIV infection many currently licensed anti-HIV drugs and new ones in the pipeline show potential as topically applied microbicides. While macaque models have been the gold standard for in vivo microbicide testing, they are expensive and sufficient numbers are not available. Therefore, a small animal model that facilitates rapid evaluation of potential candidates for their preliminary efficacy is urgently needed in the microbicide field. We previously demonstrated that RAG-hu humanized mouse model permits HIV-1 mucosal transmission via both vaginal and rectal routes and that oral pre-exposure chemo-prophylactic strategies could be tested in this system. Here in these proof-of-concept studies, we extended this system for topical microbicide testing using HIV-1 as the challenge virus. Maraviroc, a clinically approved CCR5 inhibitor drug for HIV treatment, was formulated as a microbicide gel at 5 mM concentration in 2.2% hydroxyl ethyl cellulose. Female RAG-hu mice were challenged vaginally with HIV-1 an hour after intravaginal application of the maraviroc gel. Our results showed that maraviroc gel treated mice were fully protected against vaginal HIV-1 challenge in contrast to placebo gel treated mice which all became infected. These findings highlight the utility of the humanized mouse models for microbicide testing and, together with the recent data from macaque studies, suggest that maraviroc is a promising candidate for future microbicide clinical trials in the field.

  4. Cost effectiveness of single-dose nevirapine regimen for mothers and babies to decrease vertical HIV-1 transmission in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseille, E; Kahn, J G; Mmiro, F; Guay, L; Musoke, P; Fowler, M G; Jackson, J B

    1999-09-04

    Identification of economical interventions to decrease HIV-1 transmission to children is an urgent public-health priority in sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed the cost effectiveness of the HIVNET 012 nevirapine regimen. We assessed cost effectiveness in a hypothetical cohort of 20,000 pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa. Our main outcome measures were programme cost, paediatric HIV-1 cases averted, cost per case averted, and cost per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY). We compared HIVNET 012 with other short-course antiretroviral regimens. We also compared two implementation strategies: counselling and HIV-1 testing before treatment (targeted treatment), or nevirapine for all pregnant women (universal treatment, no counselling and testing). We did univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. For universal treatment with 30% HIV-1 seroprevalence, the HIVNET 012 regimen would avert 603 cases of HIV-1 in babies, cost US$83,333, and generate 15,862 DALYs. The associated cost-effectiveness ratios were $138 per case averted or $5.25 per DALY. At 15% seroprevalence, the universal treatment option would cost $83,333 and avert 302 cases at $276 per case averted or $10.51 per DALY. For targeted treatment at 30% seroprevalence, HIVNET 012 would cost $141,922 and avert 476 cases at $298 per case averted or $11.29 per DALY. With seroprevalence higher than 3.0% for universal and 4.5% for targeted treatment, the HIVNET 012 regimen was likely to be as cost effective as other public-health interventions. The cost effectiveness of HIVNET 012 was robust under a wide range of parameters in the sensitivity analysis. The HIVNET 012 regimen can be highly cost-effective in high seroprevalence settings. In lower seroprevalence areas, when multidose regimens are not cost effective, nevirapine therapy could have a major public-health impact at a reasonable cost.

  5. Both asymmetric mitotic segregation and cell-to-cell invasion are required for stable germline transmission of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes

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    Frédéric Landmann

    2012-04-01

    Parasitic filarial nematodes that belong to the Onchocercidae family live in mutualism with Wolbachia endosymbionts. We developed whole-mount techniques to follow the segregation patterns of Wolbachia through the somatic and germline lineages of four filarial species. These studies reveal multiple evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that are required for Wolbachia localization to the germline. During the initial embryonic divisions, Wolbachia segregate asymmetrically such that they concentrate in the posteriorly localized P2 blastomere, a precursor to the adult germline and hypodermal lineages. Surprisingly, in the next division they are excluded from the germline precursor lineage. Rather, they preferentially segregate to the C blastomere, a source of posterior hypodermal cells. Localization to the germline is accomplished by a distinct mechanism in which Wolbachia invade first the somatic gonadal cells close to the ovarian distal tip cell, the nematode stem cell niche, from the hypodermis. This tropism is associated with a cortical F-actin disruption, suggesting an active engulfment. Significantly, germline invasion occurs only in females, explaining the lack of Wolbachia in the male germline. Once in the syncytial environment of the ovaries, Wolbachia rely on the rachis to multiply and disperse into the germ cells. The utilization of cell-to-cell invasion for germline colonization may indicate an ancestral mode of horizontal transfer that preceded the acquisition of the mutualism.

  6. Both asymmetric mitotic segregation and cell-to-cell invasion are required for stable germline transmission of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmann, Frédéric; Bain, Odile; Martin, Coralie; Uni, Shigehiko; Taylor, Mark J; Sullivan, William

    2012-06-15

    Parasitic filarial nematodes that belong to the Onchocercidae family live in mutualism with Wolbachia endosymbionts. We developed whole-mount techniques to follow the segregation patterns of Wolbachia through the somatic and germline lineages of four filarial species. These studies reveal multiple evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that are required for Wolbachia localization to the germline. During the initial embryonic divisions, Wolbachia segregate asymmetrically such that they concentrate in the posteriorly localized P(2) blastomere, a precursor to the adult germline and hypodermal lineages. Surprisingly, in the next division they are excluded from the germline precursor lineage. Rather, they preferentially segregate to the C blastomere, a source of posterior hypodermal cells. Localization to the germline is accomplished by a distinct mechanism in which Wolbachia invade first the somatic gonadal cells close to the ovarian distal tip cell, the nematode stem cell niche, from the hypodermis. This tropism is associated with a cortical F-actin disruption, suggesting an active engulfment. Significantly, germline invasion occurs only in females, explaining the lack of Wolbachia in the male germline. Once in the syncytial environment of the ovaries, Wolbachia rely on the rachis to multiply and disperse into the germ cells. The utilization of cell-to-cell invasion for germline colonization may indicate an ancestral mode of horizontal transfer that preceded the acquisition of the mutualism.

  7. The multi-faceted dynamics of HIV-1 transmission in Northern Alberta: A combined analysis of virus genetic and public health data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, B; Adachi, D; Benedet, M; Singh, A; Read, R; Shafran, S; Taylor, G D; Simmonds, K; Sikora, C; Lemey, P; Charlton, C L; Tang, J W

    2017-08-01

    Molecular epidemiology has become a key tool for tracking infectious disease epidemics. Here, the spread of the most prevalent HIV-1 subtypes in Northern Alberta, Canada, was characterized with a Bayesian phylogenetic approach using 1146 HIV-1 pol sequences collected between 2007 and 2013 for routine clinical management purposes. Available patient metadata were qualitatively interpreted and correlated with onwards transmission using Fisher exact tests and logistic regression. Most infections were from subtypes A (n=36), B (n=815) and C (n=211). Africa is the dominant origin location for subtypes A and C while the subtype B epidemic was seeded from the USA and Middle America and, from the early 1990s onwards, mostly by interprovincial spread. Subtypes A (77.8%) and C (74.0%) were usually heterosexually transmitted and circulate predominantly among Blacks (61.1% and 85% respectively). Subtype B was mostly found among Caucasians (48.6%) and First Nations (36.8%), and its modes of transmission were stratified by ethnic origin. Compared to subtypes A (5.6%) and C (3.8-10.0%), a larger portion of subtype B patients were found within putative provincial transmission networks (20.3-29.5%), and this almost doubled when focusing on nationwide transmission clusters (37.9-57.5%). No clear association between cluster membership and particular patient characteristics was found. This study reveals complex and multi-faceted transmission dynamics of the HIV-1 epidemic in this otherwise low HIV prevalence population in Northern Alberta, Canada. These findings can aid public health planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. HIV-1 transmission by dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is regulated by determinants in the carbohydrate recognition domain that are absent in liver/lymph node-SIGN (L-SIGN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Nancy P Y; Breun, Sabine K J; Bashirova, Arman; Baumann, Joerg G; Martin, Thomas D; Karamchandani, Jaideep M; Rausch, Jason W; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Wu, Li; Carrington, Mary; Kewalramani, Vineet N

    2010-01-15

    In this study, we identify determinants in dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) necessary for human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), transmission. Although human B cell lines expressing DC-SIGN efficiently capture and transmit HIV-1 to susceptible target cells, cells expressing the related molecule liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (L-SIGN) do not. To understand the differences between DC-SIGN and L-SIGN that affect HIV-1 interactions, we developed Raji B cell lines expressing different DC-SIGN/L-SIGN chimeras. Testing of the chimeras demonstrated that replacement of the DC-SIGN carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) with that of L-SIGN was sufficient to impair virus binding and prevent transmission. Conversely, the ability to bind and transmit HIV-1 was conferred to L-SIGN chimeras containing the DC-SIGN CRD. We identified Trp-258 in the DC-SIGN CRD to be essential for HIV-1 transmission. Although introduction of a K270W mutation at the same position in L-SIGN was insufficient for HIV-1 binding, an L-SIGN mutant molecule with K270W and a C-terminal DC-SIGN CRD subdomain transmitted HIV-1. These data suggest that DC-SIGN structural elements distinct from the oligosaccharide-binding site are required for HIV-1 glycoprotein selectivity.

  9. HIV-1 transmission patterns in antiretroviral therapy-naive, HIV-infected North Americans based on phylogenetic analysis by population level and ultra-deep DNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa L Ross

    Full Text Available Factors that contribute to the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, especially drug-resistant HIV-1 variants remain a significant public health concern. In-depth phylogenetic analyses of viral sequences obtained in the screening phase from antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected patients seeking enrollment in EPZ108859, a large open-label study in the USA, Canada and Puerto Rico (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00440947 were examined for insights into the roles of drug resistance and epidemiological factors that could impact disease dissemination. Viral transmission clusters (VTCs were initially predicted from a phylogenetic analysis of population level HIV-1 pol sequences obtained from 690 antiretroviral-naïve subjects in 2007. Subsequently, the predicted VTCs were tested for robustness by ultra deep sequencing (UDS using pyrosequencing technology and further phylogenetic analyses. The demographic characteristics of clustered and non-clustered subjects were then compared. From 690 subjects, 69 were assigned to 1 of 30 VTCs, each containing 2 to 5 subjects. Race composition of VTCs were significantly more likely to be white (72% vs. 60%; p = 0.04. VTCs had fewer reverse transcriptase and major PI resistance mutations (9% vs. 24%; p = 0.002 than non-clustered sequences. Both men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM (68% vs. 48%; p = 0.001 and Canadians (29% vs. 14%; p = 0.03 were significantly more frequent in VTCs than non-clustered sequences. Of the 515 subjects who initiated antiretroviral therapy, 33 experienced confirmed virologic failure through 144 weeks while only 3/33 were from VTCs. Fewer VTCs subjects (as compared to those with non-clustering virus had HIV-1 with resistance-associated mutations or experienced virologic failure during the course of the study. Our analysis shows specific geographical and drug resistance trends that correlate well with transmission clusters defined by HIV sequences of similarity

  10. TNF-α and TLR agonists increase susceptibility to HIV-1 transmission by human Langerhans cells ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.A.W.P.; de Witte, L.; Oudhoff, M.J.; Gringhuis, S.I.; Gallay, P.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2008-01-01

    Genital coinfections increase an individual’s risk of becoming infected with HIV-1 by sexual contact. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this, such as the presence of ulceration and bleeding caused by the coinfecting pathogen. Here we demonstrate that Langerhans cells (LCs) are

  11. Carbohydrate-binding agents efficiently prevent dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN)-directed HIV-1 transmission to T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzarini, Jan; Van Herrewege, Yven; Vermeire, Kurt; Vanham, Guido; Schols, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of HIV-1 to dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN)-expressing B-lymphoblast Raji cells (Raji/DC-SIGN) but not to wild-type Raji/0 cells results in the capture of HIV-1 particles to the cells as measured by the quantification of cell-associated p24 antigen. Cocultivation of HIV-1-captured Raji/DC-SIGN cells with uninfected CD4+ T lymphocyte C8166 cells results in abundant formation of syncytia within 36 h after cocultivation. Short preexposure of HIV-1 to carbohydrate-binding agents (CBA) dose dependently prevents the Raji/DC-SIGN cells from efficiently binding the virus particles, and no syncytia formation occurs upon subsequent cocultivation with C8166 cells. Thus, the mannose-specific [i.e., the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Narcissus pseudonarcissus agglutinin; and Cymbidium agglutinin (CA); the procaryotic cyanovirin-N (CV-N); and the monoclonal antibody 2G12) and N-acetylglucosamine-specific (i.e., the plant lectin Urtica dioica agglutinin) CBAs efficiently abrogate the DC-SIGN-directed HIV-1 capture and subsequent transmission to T lymphocytes. In this assay, the CD4-down-regulating cyclotriazodisulfonamide derivative, the CXCR4 and CCR5 coreceptor antagonists 1-[[4-(1,4,8,11-tetrazacyclotetradec-1-ylmethyl)phenyl]methyl] - 1,4,8,11 - tetrazacyclotetradecane (AMD3100) and maraviroc, the gp41-binding enfuvirtide, and the polyanionic substances dextran sulfate (M(r) 5000), sulfated polyvinyl alcohol, and the naphthalene sulfonate polymer PRO-2000 were markedly less efficient or even completely ineffective. Similar observations were made in primary monocyte-derived dendritic cell cultures that were infected with HIV-1 particles that had been shortly pre-exposed to the CBAs CV-N, CA, HHA, and GNA and the polyanions DS-5000 and PRO-2000. The potential of CBAs, but not polyanions and other structural/functional classes of entry inhibitors, to impair

  12. Complement Protein C1q Interacts with DC-SIGN via Its Globular Domain and Thus May Interfere with HIV-1 Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pednekar, Lina; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Paudyal, Basudev; Kaur, Anuvinder; Al-Mozaini, Maha Ahmed; Kouser, Lubna; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Mitchell, Daniel A; Madan, Taruna; Kishore, Uday

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells capable of priming naïve T-cells. Its C-type lectin receptor, DC-SIGN, regulates a wide range of immune functions. Along with its role in HIV-1 pathogenesis through complement opsonization of the virus, DC-SIGN has recently emerged as an adaptor for complement protein C1q on the surface of immature DCs via a trimeric complex involving gC1qR, a receptor for the globular domain of C1q. Here, we have examined the nature of interaction between C1q and DC-SIGN in terms of domain localization, and implications of C1q-DC-SIGN-gC1qR complex formation on HIV-1 transmission. We first expressed and purified recombinant extracellular domains of DC-SIGN and its homologue DC-SIGNR as tetramers comprising of the entire extra cellular domain including the α-helical neck region and monomers comprising of the carbohydrate recognition domain only. Direct binding studies revealed that both DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR were able to bind independently to the recombinant globular head modules ghA, ghB, and ghC, with ghB being the preferential binder. C1q appeared to interact with DC-SIGN or DC-SIGNR in a manner similar to IgG. Mutational analysis using single amino acid substitutions within the globular head modules showed that TyrB175 and LysB136 were critical for the C1q-DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR interaction. Competitive studies revealed that gC1qR and ghB shared overlapping binding sites on DC-SIGN, implying that HIV-1 transmission by DCs could be modulated due to the interplay of gC1qR-C1q with DC-SIGN. Since C1q, gC1qR, and DC-SIGN can individually bind HIV-1, we examined how C1q and gC1qR modulated HIV-1-DC-SIGN interaction in an infection assay. Here, we report, for the first time, that C1q suppressed DC-SIGN-mediated transfer of HIV-1 to activated pooled peripheral blood mononuclear cells, although the globular head modules did not. The protective effect of C1q was negated by the addition of gC1qR. In fact, gC1qR enhanced DC

  13. Multiple transmissions of a stable human leucocyte antigen-B27 cytotoxic T-cell-escape strain of HIV-1 in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Marion; Hoogland, Frederik M; Back, Nicole K T; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Bakker, Margreet; Brinkman, Kees; Prins, Maria; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C

    2009-07-31

    The evolution of HIV-1 is largely shaped by the cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response of the host as encoded by the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes. Certain HLA-B alleles can delay disease progression, but it is uncertain whether this protection will sustain or whether the virus is in the process of adaptation. In The Netherlands, HLA-B27 is moderately prevalent (approximately 8-16% of HLA-B alleles). If adaptation to HLA-B alleles is in progress, virus strains carrying escape mutations to HLA-B27 should appear in the epidemic by now. A subtype B HIV-1 strain carrying a HLA-B27 CTL-escape mutation in the main Gag-p24 KK10 epitope, R264G, together with a compensatory mutation outside this epitope, E260D, was detected in four patients from Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by sequence analysis of the gag gene. The patients were a drug user and three men who have sex with men, and were infected with HIV-1 between 2002 and 2008. Characterization and evolutionary analysis of the HIV-1 CTL-escape strain was done by sequence analysis of serial blood plasma samples. The mutations involved were stable during follow-up and after transmission, also in two individuals lacking HLA-B27. The finding that a stable HLA-B27 CTL-escape strain is circulating in The Netherlands has important implications for the understanding of virus-host interactions and vaccine design alike. Vaccines targeted at inducing a CTL response might easily be circumvented by the virus. Also, patients carrying protective HLA alleles might not be protected anymore from disease progression in the future.

  14. Mother to child transmission of hepatitis C virus: prospective study of risk factors and timing of infection in children born to women seronegative for HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara; Mannelli, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Novembre, Elio; de Martino, Maurizio; Vierucci, Alberto

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk factors for and timing of vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus in women who are not infected with HIV-1. Design: Follow up for a median of 28 (range 24-38) months of babies born to women with antibodies to hepatitis C virus but not HIV-1. Subjects: 442 mothers and babies, of whom 403 completed the study. Main outcome measures: Presence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus and viral RNA and alanine aminotransferase activity in babies. Presence of viral RNA, method of infection with hepatitis C, method of delivery, and type of infant feeding in mothers. Results: 13 of the 403 children had acquired hepatitis C virus infection at the end of follow up. All these children were born to women positive for hepatitis C virus RNA; none of the 128 RNA negative mothers passed on the infection (difference 5%, 95% confidence interval 2% to 7%). 6 children had viral RNA immediately after birth. 111 women had used intravenous drugs and 20 had received blood transfusions. 11 of the infected children were born to these women compared with 2 to the 144 with no known risk factor (difference 7%, 2% to 12%). Conclusions: This study suggests that in women not infected with HIV only those with hepatitis C virus RNA are at risk of infecting their babies. Transmission does seem to occur in utero, and the rate of transmission is higher in women who have had blood transfusions or used intravenous drugs than in women with no known risk factor for infection. Key messages Little information exists on vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus in women not infected with HIV This study in a large unselected population of infants born to HIV-1 negative mothers suggests that intravenous drug use itself is an important risk factor for transmission of hepatitis C virus Maternal post-transfusional hepatitis is also an important risk factor for infection of infants Viral genotype, maternal viraemia, type of delivery (vaginal delivery or caesarean section) and breast

  15. Prevalence of drug resistance among HIV-1 treatment-naive patients in Greece during 2003-2015: Transmitted drug resistance is due to onward transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevis, D; Kostaki, E; Magiorkinis, G; Gargalianos, P; Xylomenos, G; Magiorkinis, E; Lazanas, M; Chini, M; Nikolopoulos, G; Skoutelis, A; Papastamopoulos, V; Antoniadou, A; Papadopoulos, A; Psichogiou, M; Daikos, G L; Oikonomopoulou, M; Zavitsanou, A; Chrysos, G; Paparizos, V; Kourkounti, S; Sambatakou, H; Sipsas, N V; Lada, M; Panagopoulos, P; Maltezos, E; Drimis, S; Hatzakis, A

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance among treatment-naïve patients ranges between 8.3% and 15% in Europe and North America. Previous studies showed that subtypes A and B were the most prevalent in the Greek HIV-1 epidemic. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of resistance among drug naïve patients in Greece and to investigate the levels of transmission networking among those carrying resistant strains. HIV-1 sequences were determined from 3428 drug naïve HIV-1 patients, in Greece sampled during 01/01/2003-30/6/2015. Transmission clusters were estimated by means of phylogenetic analysis including as references sequences from patients failing antiretroviral treatment in Greece and sequences sampled globally. The proportion of sequences with SDRMs was 5.98% (n=205). The most prevalent SDRMs were found for NNRTIs (3.76%), followed by N(t)RTIs (2.28%) and PIs (1.02%). The resistance prevalence was 22.2% based on all mutations associated with resistance estimated using the HIVdb resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance to NNRTIs was the most common (16.9%) followed by PIs (4.9%) and N(t)RTIs (2.8%). The most frequently observed NNRTI resistant mutations were E138A (7.7%), E138Q (4.0%), K103N (2.3%) and V179D (1.3%). The majority of subtype A sequences (89.7%; 245 out of 273) with the dominant NNRTI resistance mutations (E138A, K103N, E138Q, V179D) were found to belong to monophyletic clusters suggesting regional dispersal. For subtype B, 68.1% (139 out of 204) of resistant strains (E138A, K103N, E138Q V179D) belonged to clusters. For N(t)RTI-resistance, evidence for regional dispersal was found for 27.3% and 21.6% of subtype A and B sequences, respectively. The TDR rate based on the prevalence of SDRM is lower than the average rate in Europe. However, the prevalence of NNRTI resistance estimated using the HIVdb approach, is high in Greece and it is mostly due to onward transmissions among drug-naïve patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  16. Phylogeographic Analyses Reveal a Crucial Role of Xinjiang in HIV-1 CRF07_BC and HCV 3a Transmissions in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chiyu

    2011-01-01

    Background China faces an increasing prevalence of two HIV-1 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) 07_BC and 08_BC. Both CRFs_BC were previously demonstrated to originate in Yunnan and spread to Liaoning from Yunnan via injection drug use (IDU) in China. Supposing it is true, we are unable to answer why only CRF07_BC, rather than both CRFs_BC together, was transmitted to Xinjiang. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the phylogeography of CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC using multiple HIV-1 genomic regions with Bayesian phylogeography method. Phylogenetic reconstructions showed that all CRF07_BC sequences were divided into two clades, Yunnan and Xinjiang, and all strains from other regions of mainland China clustered within the Xinjiang clade. Significant geographic diffusion links of Xinjiang with other regions (including Liaoning, Beijing, Jiangsu and Guangdong) were supported by Bayes factor tests. The temporal dynamics analyses showed that CRF07_BC spread from Xinjiang to Liaoning in 1996.10, and to Jiangsu in 2000.9. The analyses of CRF08_BC not only confirmed the previous conclusion on temporal and spatial dynamics of CRF08_BC, but also indicated that the CRF08_BC strains from Guangdong and Shanghai originated from Yunnan. The analyses of HCV 3a showed that it was introduced into Xinjiang in the early 1980s, and spread from Xinjiang to Yunnan in 1990.10 and to Jiangsu in 1999.2, and further from Yunnan to Guangxi in 1995.3. The temporal and spatial dynamics of HCV 3a were similar to some extent to that of HIV-1 CRF07_BC and/or CRF08_BC, suggesting a possible association in migration patterns between HCV and HIV-1 through IDU. In addition, HCV 3a spread from Xinjiang to Pakistan, implying a drug trafficking route linking them. Conclusions/Significance Xinjiang, as the most important transfer station for drug trafficking from Golden Crescent to other regions of China, plays a very crucial role in the transmission of viruses (e.g., HIV-1 and HCV) through IDU in

  17. Risk group characteristics and viral transmission clusters in South-East Asian patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF 01_AE and subtype B

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    Rebecca A. Oyomopito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 epidemics in Asian countries are driven by varying exposures. The epidemiology of the regional pandemic has been changing with the spread of HIV-1 to lower-risk populations through sexual transmission. Common HIV-1 genotypes include subtype B and circulating recombinant form (CRF 01_AE. Our objective was to use HIV-1 genotypic data to better quantify local epidemics. TASER-M is a multicenter prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients. Associations between HIV exposure, patient sex, country of sample origin and HIV-1 genotype were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. Phylogenetic methods were used on genotypic data to investigate transmission relationships. A total of 1086 patients from Thailand, Hong Kong, Malaysia and the Philippines were included in analyses. Proportions of male patients within countries varied (Thailand: 55.6%, Hong Kong: 86.1%, Malaysia: 81.4%, Philippines: 93.8%; p < 0.001 as did HIV exposures (heterosexual contact: Thailand: 85.7%, Hong Kong, 46.2%, Malaysia: 47.8%, Philippines: 25.0%; p < 0.001. After adjustment, we found increased subtype B infection among men who have sex with men, relative to heterosexual-reported exposures (odds ratio = 2.4, p < 0.001. We further describe four transmission clusters of eight to 15 treatment naïve, predominantly symptomatic patients (two each for subtype B and CRF01_AE. Risk-group subpopulations differed with respect to the infecting HIV-1 genotype. Homosexual exposure patients had higher odds of being infected with subtype B. Where HIV-1 genotypes circulate within countries or patient risk-groups, local monitoring of genotype-specific transmissions may play a role in focusing public health prevention strategies. Phylogenetic evaluations provide complementary information for surveillance and monitoring of viruses with high mutation rates such as HIV-1 and Ebola.

  18. Detection of transmission clusters of HIV-1 subtype C over a 21-year period in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Engelbrecht, Susan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in the fight against the HIV/AIDS epidemic within South Africa, the transmission of the virus continues at alarmingly high rates. It is possible, with the use of phylogenetic methods, to uncover transmission events of HIV amongst local communities in order to identify factors that may contribute to the sustained transmission of the virus. The aim of this study was to uncover transmission events of HIV amongst the infected population of Cape Town. We analysed gag p24 and RT-pol sequences which were generated from samples spanning over 21-years with advanced phylogenetic techniques. We identified two transmission clusters over a 21-year period amongst randomly sampled patients from Cape Town and the surrounding areas. We also estimated the origin of each of the identified transmission clusters with the oldest cluster dating back, on average, 30 years and the youngest dating back roughly 20 years. These transmission clusters represent the first identified transmission events among the heterosexual population in Cape Town. By increasing the number of randomly sampled specimens within a dataset over time, it is possible to start to uncover transmission events of HIV amongst local communities in generalized epidemics. This information can be used to produce targeted interventions to decrease transmission of HIV in Africa.

  19. Development of Nevirapine Resistance in Children Exposed to the Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Programme in Maputo, Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Francisco; Zindoga, Pereira; Gomes, Perpétua; Augusto, Orvalho; Mahumane, Isabel; Veloso, Luís; Valadas, Emília; Camacho, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Single-dose nevirapine (sd-NVP) has been the main option for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV-1 in low-resource settings. However, sd-NVP can induce the selection of HIV-1 resistant mutations in mothers and infants. In Mozambique, there are limited data regarding the profile of NVP resistance associated mutations (RAM) in the context of PMTCT. Objectives To assess the prevalence and the factors associated with NVP RAM among children born to HIV-1 infected mothers enrolled in the PMTCT programme adopted in Mozambique. Methods One hundred and fifty seven children aged 6 to 48 weeks were sequentially included (July 2011 to March 2012) at four centres in Maputo. Genotyping of RAM was performed in samples with HIV-1 RNA≥ 100 copies/μL (Viroseq). Sequencing was performed with ABI 3100 (Applied Biosystems). Logistic regression modelling was undertaken to identify the factors associated with NVP RAM. Results Seventy-nine children had their samples genotyped. Their median age was 7.0 (3–12) months and 92.4% received prophylaxis with sd-NVP at birth plus daily NVP. 35.4% of mothers received antiretrovirals (ARVs) for PMTCT. ARV RAM were detected in 43 (54.4%) of the children. 45.6% of these children had at least one NVP RAM. The most common mutations associated with NVP resistance were K103N (n = 16) and Y181C (n = 15). NVP RAM was significantly associated with mother exposure to PMTCT (crude odds ratio [OR] 30.3, 95% CI 4.93–186.34) and with mother’s CD4 count < 350 cells/mm3 (crude OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.02–9.32). In the multivariable analysis the mother’s exposure to PMTCT was the only variable significantly associated with NVP RAM (adjusted OR 48.65, 95% CI 9.33–253.66). Conclusions We found a high prevalence of NVP RAM among children who were exposed to the drug regimen for PMTCT in Mozambique. The mothers’ exposure to PMTCT significantly increased the risk of NVP RAM. PMID:26161559

  20. Development of Nevirapine Resistance in Children Exposed to the Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission Programme in Maputo, Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Antunes

    Full Text Available Single-dose nevirapine (sd-NVP has been the main option for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT of HIV-1 in low-resource settings. However, sd-NVP can induce the selection of HIV-1 resistant mutations in mothers and infants. In Mozambique, there are limited data regarding the profile of NVP resistance associated mutations (RAM in the context of PMTCT.To assess the prevalence and the factors associated with NVP RAM among children born to HIV-1 infected mothers enrolled in the PMTCT programme adopted in Mozambique.One hundred and fifty seven children aged 6 to 48 weeks were sequentially included (July 2011 to March 2012 at four centres in Maputo. Genotyping of RAM was performed in samples with HIV-1 RNA≥ 100 copies/μL (Viroseq. Sequencing was performed with ABI 3100 (Applied Biosystems. Logistic regression modelling was undertaken to identify the factors associated with NVP RAM.Seventy-nine children had their samples genotyped. Their median age was 7.0 (3-12 months and 92.4% received prophylaxis with sd-NVP at birth plus daily NVP. 35.4% of mothers received antiretrovirals (ARVs for PMTCT. ARV RAM were detected in 43 (54.4% of the children. 45.6% of these children had at least one NVP RAM. The most common mutations associated with NVP resistance were K103N (n = 16 and Y181C (n = 15. NVP RAM was significantly associated with mother exposure to PMTCT (crude odds ratio [OR] 30.3, 95% CI 4.93-186.34 and with mother's CD4 count < 350 cells/mm3 (crude OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.02-9.32. In the multivariable analysis the mother's exposure to PMTCT was the only variable significantly associated with NVP RAM (adjusted OR 48.65, 95% CI 9.33-253.66.We found a high prevalence of NVP RAM among children who were exposed to the drug regimen for PMTCT in Mozambique. The mothers' exposure to PMTCT significantly increased the risk of NVP RAM.

  1. Donor-Recipient Identification in Para- and Poly-phyletic Trees Under Alternative HIV-1 Transmission Hypotheses Using Approximate Bayesian Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Severson, Ethan O; Bulla, Ingo; Hengartner, Nick; Bártolo, Inês; Abecasis, Ana; Azevedo-Pereira, José M; Taveira, Nuno; Leitner, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Diversity of the founding population of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) transmissions raises many important biological, clinical, and epidemiological issues. In up to 40% of sexual infections, there is clear evidence for multiple founding variants, which can influence the efficacy of putative prevention methods, and the reconstruction of epidemiologic histories. To infer who-infected-whom, and to compute the probability of alternative transmission scenarios while explicitly taking phylogenetic uncertainty into account, we created an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) method based on a set of statistics measuring phylogenetic topology, branch lengths, and genetic diversity. We applied our method to a suspected heterosexual transmission case involving three individuals, showing a complex monophyletic-paraphyletic-polyphyletic phylogenetic topology. We detected that seven phylogenetic lineages had been transmitted between two of the individuals based on the available samples, implying that many more unsampled lineages had also been transmitted. Testing whether the lineages had been transmitted at one time or over some length of time suggested that an ongoing superinfection process over several years was most likely. While one individual was found unlinked to the other two, surprisingly, when evaluating two competing epidemiological priors, the donor of the two that did infect each other was not identified by the host root-label, and was also not the primary suspect in that transmission. This highlights that it is important to take epidemiological information into account when analyzing support for one transmission hypothesis over another, as results may be nonintuitive and sensitive to details about sampling dates relative to possible infection dates. Our study provides a formal inference framework to include information on infection and sampling times, and to investigate ancestral node-label states, transmission direction, transmitted genetic

  2. Quantifying Ongoing HIV-1 Exposure in HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples to Identify Individuals With Potential Host Resistance to HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Romel D.; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Farquhar, Carey; de Bruyn, Guy; Essex, Max; McElrath, M. Juliana; Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Lingappa, Jairam R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunogenetic correlates of resistance to HIV-1 in HIV-1–exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals with consistently high exposure may inform HIV-1 prevention strategies. We developed a novel approach for quantifying HIV-1 exposure to identify individuals remaining HIV-1 uninfected despite persistent high exposure. Methods. We used longitudinal predictors of HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to score HIV-1 exposure and define HESN clusters with persistently high, low, and decreasing risk trajectories. The model was validated in an independent cohort of serodiscordant couples. We describe a statistical tool that can be applied to other HESN cohorts to identify individuals with high exposure to HIV-1. Results. HIV-1 exposure was best quantified by frequency of unprotected sex with, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels among, and presence of genital ulcer disease among HIV-1–infected partners and by age, pregnancy status, herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus, and male circumcision status among HESN participants. Overall, 14% of HESN individuals persistently had high HIV-1 exposure and exhibited a declining incidence of HIV-1 infection over time. Conclusions. A minority of HESN individuals from HIV-1–discordant couples had persistent high HIV-1 exposure over time. Decreasing incidence of infection in this group suggests these individuals were selected for resistance to HIV-1 and may be most appropriate for identifying biological correlates of natural host resistance to HIV-1 infection. PMID:22926009

  3. The risk of HIV transmission within HIV-1 sero-discordant couples appears to vary across sub-Saharan Africa

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    Hiam Chemaitelly

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: Empirical measures from cohort studies appear to underestimate HIV infectiousness in SSA. The risk of HIV transmission among SDCs appears also to vary across SSA, and this may have contributed to the contrasting HIV epidemic trajectories in this continent.

  4. Patterns of drug resistance among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected patients in Greece during the last decade: the crucial role of transmission networks

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    Dimitrios Paraskevis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of drug resistance is approximately 10% in Europe and North America among newly infected patients. We aim to investigate the temporal patterns of resistance among drug naive HIV-infected individuals in Greece and also to determine transmission networking among those with resistant strains. Materials and Methods: Protease (PR and partial reverse transcriptase (RT sequences were determined from 2499 newly diagnosed HIV-1 patients, in Greece, during 2003–2013. Genotypic drug resistance was estimated using the HIVdb: Genotypic Resistance Interpretation Algorithm. We identified transmission clusters of resistant strains on the basis of a large collection of HIV-1 sequences from 4024 seropositives in Greece. Phylodynamic analysis was performed using a Bayesian method. Results: We estimated drug resistance levels among naïve patients on the basis of all resistance mutations in PR and partial RT. The overall prevalence of resistance was 19.6% (490/2499. Resistance to NNRTIs was the most common (397/2499, 15.9% followed by PIs (116/2499, 4.6% and NRTIs (79/2499, 3.2%. We found a significant trend for decreasing resistance to NRTIs over time (6.7%–1.6%. There was no time trend for the overall PI and NNRTI resistance. The most frequently observed major resistant sites in PR were V82 (2.0% and L90 (1.8%. In RT, we found E138 (58.6%, K103 (13.1%, V179 (8.4% and T215 (7.1%, M41 (4.7% associated with resistance to NNRTIs and NRTIs, respectively. The prevalence of K103N and E138Q were significantly increased during 2003–2013. Crucially, we found that both K103N, E138Q are associated with transmission networking within men having sex with men (MSM and intravenous drug user (IDU local networks. The K103N network included seropositives across Greece, while the latter only from the recent IDU outbreak in Athens metropolitan area (1. Phylodynamic analyses revealed that the exponential growth for K103N network started in 2009

  5. The temporal increase in HIV-1 non-R5 tropism frequency among newly diagnosed patients from northern Poland is associated with clustered transmissions

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    Miłosz Parczewski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: CCR5 (R5 tropic viruses are associated with early stages of infection, whereas CXCR4 (X4 HIV-1 tropism has been associated with severe immunodeficiency. We investigated the temporal changes in the genotype-predicted tropism frequency and the phylogenetic relationships between the R5 and non-R5 clades. Methods: A cohort of 194 patients with a newly diagnosed HIV infection that was linked to their care from 2007 to 2014 was analyzed. Baseline plasma samples were used to assess the HIV-1 genotypic tropism with triplicate V3-loop sequencing. The non-R5 tropism prediction thresholds were assigned using a false positive rate (FPR of 10 and 5.75% and associated with clinical and laboratory data. The transmission clusters were analyzed using pol sequences with a maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. Results: The overall non-R5 tropism frequency for 5.75% FPR was 15.5% (n=30 and 27.8% (n=54 for 10% FPR. The frequency of the non-R5 tropism that was predicted using 5.75% FPR increased significantly from 2007 (0% to 2014 (n=5/17, 29.4% (p=0.004, rough slope +3.73%/year and from 0% (2007 to 35.3% (2014, n=6/17 (p=0.071, rough slope +2.9%/year using 10% FPR. Increase in the asymptomatic diagnoses over time was noted (p=0.05, rough slope +3.53%/year along with a tendency to increase the lymphocyte CD4 nadir (p=0.069. Thirty-two clusters were identified, and non-R5 tropic viruses were found for 26 (30.95% sequences contained within 14 (43.8% clusters. Non-R5 tropism was associated with subtype D variants (p=0.0001 and the presence of CCR5 Δ32/wt genotype (p=0.052. Conclusions: R5 tropism predominates among the treatment of naive individuals, but the increases in the frequency of non-R5 tropic variants may limit the clinical efficacy of the co-receptor inhibitors. The rising prevalence of non-R5 HIV-1 may indicate transmission of X4 clades.

  6. DC-SIGN-mediated infectious synapse formation enhances X4 HIV-1 transmission from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Pion, Marjorie; Garcia, Eduardo; Escola, Jean-Michel; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Piguet, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the early events of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Model systems of HIV sexual transmission have shown that DCs expressing the DC-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN capture and internalize HIV at mucosal surfaces and efficiently transfer HIV to CD4+

  7. [Prevention of vertical transmission of HIV-1 in Mallorca, Spain. Impact of antiretroviral therapy from 1995 to 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyes, María; Ciria, Luis; Ruiz De Gopegui, Rosa; Sánchez, Emilia; Villalonga, Concepción; de La Peña, Andrés; Riera, Melchor; Salas, Ana; Ribas, Angeles

    2002-03-23

    Our objective was to evaluate the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the prevention of maternal-fetal HIV transmission in a population of HIV-infected pregnant women. We studied prospectively all HIV-infected pregnant women attended in our hospital from January 1995 to December 2000. We offered treatment with zidovudine (ZDV) alone or in combination according to women's requirements. There were 98 mother-infant pairs and we studied 93 of them. The rate of vertical transmission was 1.4% when ART was started in pregnancy. Risk of HIV transmission was greater in mothers not being treated with ART during pregnancy (relative risk [RR]: 18; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.2-145.4), in mothers who only received ZDV at delivery and child vs those who received ART during pregnancy (RR: 16.4; 95% CI: 1.8-145.6) and in mothers who were active intravenous drug users (RR: 9.3; 95% CI: 2.2-38.5), with significant differences between vaginal delivery and caesarean section. We observed a substantial benefit from ART, especially in the group of HIV-infected pregnant women who started treatment during pregnancy. Preventive interventions are needed.

  8. Siglec-1 initiates formation of the virus-containing compartment and enhances macrophage-to-T cell transmission of HIV-1.

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    Jason E Hammonds

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 particles assemble and bud from the plasma membrane of infected T lymphocytes. Infected macrophages, in contrast, accumulate particles within an apparent intracellular compartment known as the virus-containing compartment or VCC. Many aspects of the formation and function of the VCC remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that VCC formation does not actually require infection of the macrophage, but can be reproduced through the exogenous addition of non-infectious virus-like particles or infectious virions to macrophage cultures. Particles were captured by Siglec-1, a prominent cell surface lectin that attaches to gangliosides on the lipid envelope of the virus. VCCs formed within infected macrophages were readily targeted by the addition of ganglioside-containing virus-like particles to the extracellular media. Depletion of Siglec-1 from the macrophage or depletion of gangliosides from viral particles prevented particle uptake into the VCC and resulted in substantial reductions of VCC volume. Furthermore, Siglec-1-mediated virion capture and subsequent VCC formation was required for efficient trans-infection of autologous T cells. Our results help to define the nature of this intracellular compartment, arguing that it is a compartment formed by particle uptake from the periphery, and that this compartment can readily transmit virus to target T lymphocytes. Inhibiting or eliminating the VCC may be an important component of strategies to reduce HIV transmission and to eradicate HIV reservoirs.

  9. Association of RANTES -403 G/A, -28 C/G and In1.1 T/C polymorphism with HIV-1 transmission and progression among North Indians.

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    Rathore, Anurag; Chatterjee, Animesh; Sivarama, P; Yamamoto, Naohiko; Singhal, Pradeep K; Dhole, Tapan N

    2008-07-01

    The relationships between host immune factors and HIV-1 disease progression are still in dispute. The RANTES SNPs exhibit distinct ethnic distribution and are associated with different effects on the course of HIV infection. Therefore, impact of RANTES gene polymorphism on HIV-1 transmission and progression needs to be evaluated. The RANTES genotypes were identified by PCR-RFLP method and confirmed by sequencing in HIV-1 seronegative (HSN; n=315), HIV-1 exposed seronegative (HES; n=47) and HIV-1 seropositive (HSP; n=196) patients classified into different clinical stages (i.e. Stages I, II, III). Fisher exact test was used for statistical analysis and Arlequin software for haplotype analysis. RANTES allele -403G, -28C and In1.1 T were the predominant allele in the subject studied. HSP group have higher frequency of RANTES In1.1 T allele compared with HSN (91.32% vs. 86.19%; P=0.013) and HES (91.32% vs. 78.72%; P=0.001). Higher frequency of RANTES In1.1 C allele in Stage III was observed, compared with Stage I (14.28% vs. 6.39%) and was significantly associated with high risk (P=0.047, OR=2.439, C.I.=1.061-5.609). Haplotype II (ACT) was significantly higher in HSP compared with HSN (9.69% vs. 1.58%) and associated with high risk (P<0.001, OR=6.655, C.I.=2.443-18.132). There were no significant differences in RANTES -403 A/G and -28 C/G genotype and allele distribution in all the groups compared. Our results implicate that RANTES In1.1 T allele and haplotype II (ACT) may be a risk factor for HIV-1 transmission while RANTES In1.1 C allele may be risk factor for disease progression among North Indians.

  10. Is intrapartum intravenous zidovudine for prevention of mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission still useful in the combination antiretroviral therapy era?

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    Briand, Nelly; Warszawski, Josiane; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Dollfus, Catherine; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Cravello, Ludovic; Nguyen, Rose; Matheron, Isabelle; Winer, Norbert; Tubiana, Roland; Rouzioux, Christine; Faye, Albert; Blanche, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

     Intrapartum intravenous zidovudine (ZDV) prophylaxis is a long-standing component of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in high-resource countries. In some recent guidelines, intravenous ZDV is no longer systematically recommended for mothers receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with low viral load. We evaluated the impact of intravenous ZDV according to viral load and obstetrical conditions.  All HIV-1-infected women delivering between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2010 in the French Perinatal Cohort (ANRS-EPF) were analyzed if they received ART during pregnancy and did not breastfeed. We identified maternal and obstetrical characteristics related to lack of intravenous ZDV and compared its association with MTCT rate and other infant parameters, according to various risk factors.  Intravenous ZDV was used in 95.2% of the 11 538 deliveries. Older age, multiparity, and preterm and vaginal delivery were associated with lack of intravenous ZDV (n = 554). In women who delivered with viral load ≥1000 copies/mL, the overall MTCT rate was higher without than with intravenous ZDV (7.5% vs 2.9%; P = .01); however, there was no such difference when the neonate received postnatal intensification therapy. Among them, 77% of women who had viral load intravenous ZDV vs 0.6% with intravenous ZDV; P = .17). Intravenous ZDV was not associated with increased short-term hematological toxicity or lactate level.  Intravenous ZDV remains an effective tool to reduce transmission in cases of virological failure, even in cART-treated women. However, for the vast majority of women with low viral loads at delivery, in the absence of obstetrical risk factors, systematic intravenous ZDV appears to be unnecessary.

  11. HIV-1 Virological Synapse is not Simply a Copycat of the Immunological Synapse

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    Gaia Vasiliver-Shamis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The virological synapse (VS is a tight adhesive junction between an HIV-infected cell and an uninfected target cell, across which virus can be efficiently transferred from cell to cell in the absence of cell-cell fusion. The VS has been postulated to resemble, in its morphology, the well-studied immunological synapse (IS. This review article discusses the structural similarities between IS and VS and the shared T cell receptor (TCR signaling components that are found in the VS. However, the IS and the VS display distinct kinetics in disassembly and intracellular signaling events, possibly leading to different biological outcomes. Hence, HIV-1 exploits molecular components of IS and TCR signaling machinery to trigger unique changes in cellular morphology, migration, and activation that facilitate its transmission and cell-to-cell spread.

  12. Mother-to-child transmission of different HIV-1 subtypes among ARV Naïve infected pregnant women in Nigeria Transmissão materno-fetal de diferentes subtipos de HIV-1 entre gestantes infectadas na Nigéria

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    G.N. Odaibo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV as well as the implications of the circulating multiple subtypes to MTCT in Nigeria are not known. This study was therefore undertaken to determine the differential rates of MTCT of HIV-1 subtypes detected among infected pregnant women before ARV intervention therapy became available in Nigeria. Twenty of the HIV-positive women who signed the informed consent form during pregnancy brought their babies for follow-up testing at age 18-24 months. Plasma samples from both mother and baby were tested for HIV antibody at the Department of Virology, UCH, Ibadan, Nigeria. All positive samples (plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells - PBMCs were shipped to the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium, where the subtype of the infecting virus was determined using the HMA technique. Overall, a mother-to-child HIV transmission rate of 45% was found in this cohort. Specifically, 36.4%, 66.7% and 100% of the women infected with HIV-1 CRF02 (IbNg, G and B, respectively, transmitted the virus to their babies. As far as it can be ascertained, this is the first report on the rate of MTCT of HIV in Nigeria. The findings reported in this paper will form a useful reference for assessment of currently available therapeutic intervention of MTCT in the country.A taxa de transmissão materno-fetal (MTCT do HIV bem como as implicações dos múltiplos subtipos circulantes para MTCT na Nigéria não são conhecidos. Este estudo foi realizado para determinar as diferentes taxas de MTCT dos subtipos de HIV-1 detectados entre gestantes infectadas antes que a administração da terapia ARV estivesse disponível na Nigéria. Vinte das mulheres HIV positivas que assinaram o consentimento durante a gravidez trouxeram seus filhos para seguimento na idade de 18-24 meses. Amostras de plasma de ambos, mãe e filho foram testadas para anticorpos HIV no Departamento de Virologia, UCH, Ibadan, Nigéria. Todas as

  13. Slaying the Trojan horse: natural killer cells exhibit robust anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation and cytolysis against allogeneic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooneratne, Shayarana L; Richard, Jonathan; Lee, Wen Shi; Finzi, Andrés; Kent, Stephen J; Parsons, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Many attempts to design prophylactic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines have focused on the induction of neutralizing antibodies (Abs) that block infection by free virions. Despite the focus on viral particles, virus-infected cells, which can be found within mucosal secretions, are more infectious than free virus both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, assessment of human transmission couples suggests infected seminal lymphocytes might be responsible for a proportion of HIV-1 transmissions. Although vaccines that induce neutralizing Abs are sought, only some broadly neutralizing Abs efficiently block cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. As HIV-1 vaccines need to elicit immune responses capable of controlling both free and cell-associated virus, we evaluated the potential of natural killer (NK) cells to respond in an Ab-dependent manner to allogeneic T cells bearing HIV-1 antigens. This study presents data measuring Ab-dependent anti-HIV-1 NK cell responses to primary and transformed allogeneic T-cell targets. We found that NK cells are robustly activated in an anti-HIV-1 Ab-dependent manner against allogeneic targets and that tested target cells are subject to Ab-dependent cytolysis. Furthermore, the educated KIR3DL1(+) NK cell subset from HLA-Bw4(+) individuals exhibits an activation advantage over the KIR3DL1(-) subset that contains both NK cells educated through other receptor/ligand combinations and uneducated NK cells. These results are intriguing and important for understanding the regulation of Ab-dependent NK cell responses and are potentially valuable for designing Ab-dependent therapies and/or vaccines. NK cell-mediated anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent functions have been associated with protection from infection and disease progression; however, their role in protecting from infection with allogeneic cells infected with HIV-1 is unknown. We found that HIV-1-specific ADCC antibodies bound to allogeneic cells infected with HIV-1 or coated

  14. Carbohydrate-binding agents efficiently prevent dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN)-directed HIV-1 transmission to T lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Balzarini, Jan; Van Herrewege, Yven; Vermeire, Kurt; Vanham, Guido; Schols, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of HIV-1 to dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN)-expressing B-lymphoblast Raji cells (Raji/DC-SIGN) but not to wild-type Raji/0 cells results in the capture of HIV-1 particles to the cells as measured by the quantification of cell-associated p24 antigen. Cocultivation of HIV-1-captured Raji/DC-SIGN cells with uninfected CD4+ T lymphocyte C8166 cells results in abundant formation of syncytia within 36 h after cocultivation. Short pre...

  15. Characteristics of HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples Enrolled in a Clinical Trial of Antiretroviral Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV-1 Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Mujugira; Baeten, Jared M.; Deborah Donnell; Patrick Ndase; Mugo, Nelly R.; Linda Barnes; Campbell, James D.; Jonathan Wangisi; Tappero, Jordan W.; Elizabeth Bukusi; Cohen, Craig R.; Elly Katabira; Allan Ronald; Elioda Tumwesigye; Edwin Were

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stable heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa have high HIV-1 transmission rates and are a critical population for evaluation of new HIV-1 prevention strategies. The Partners PrEP Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir and emtricitabine-tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis to decrease HIV-1 acquisition within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. We describe the trial design and characteristics of the study cohort. Methods HIV-1...

  16. Viral linkage in HIV-1 seroconverters and their partners in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial.

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    Mary S Campbell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of viruses in HIV-1 transmission pairs will help identify biological determinants of infectiousness and evaluate candidate interventions to reduce transmission. Although HIV-1 sequencing is frequently used to substantiate linkage between newly HIV-1 infected individuals and their sexual partners in epidemiologic and forensic studies, viral sequencing is seldom applied in HIV-1 prevention trials. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00194519 was a prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled serodiscordant heterosexual couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression in reducing HIV-1 transmission; as part of the study analysis, HIV-1 sequences were examined for genetic linkage between seroconverters and their enrolled partners.We obtained partial consensus HIV-1 env and gag sequences from blood plasma for 151 transmission pairs and performed deep sequencing of env in some cases. We analyzed sequences with phylogenetic techniques and developed a Bayesian algorithm to evaluate the probability of linkage. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between enrolled partners' sequences and a Bayesian posterior probability of ≥ 50%. Adjudicators classified each seroconversion, finding 108 (71.5% linked, 40 (26.5% unlinked, and 3 (2.0% indeterminate transmissions, with linkage determined by consensus env sequencing in 91 (84%. Male seroconverters had a higher frequency of unlinked transmissions than female seroconverters. The likelihood of transmission from the enrolled partner was related to time on study, with increasing numbers of unlinked transmissions occurring after longer observation periods. Finally, baseline viral load was found to be significantly higher among linked transmitters.In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner

  17. Epidemiological Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance in Spain in 2004-2012: Relevance of Transmission Clusters in the Propagation of Resistance Mutations.

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    Yolanda Vega

    Full Text Available Our objectives were to carry out an epidemiological surveillance study on transmitted drug resistance (TDR among individuals newly diagnosed of HIV-1 infection during a nine year period in Spain and to assess the role of transmission clusters (TC in the propagation of resistant strains. An overall of 1614 newly diagnosed individuals were included in the study from January 2004 through December 2012. Individuals come from two different Spanish regions: Galicia and the Basque Country. Resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI and protease inhibitors (PI were analyzed according to mutations included in the surveillance drug-resistance mutations list updated in 2009. TC were defined as those comprising viruses from five or more individuals whose sequences clustered in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees with a bootstrap value ≥90%. The overall prevalence of TDR to any drug was 9.9%: 4.9% to nucleoside RTIs (NRTIs, 3.6% to non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs, and 2.7% to PIs. A significant decrease of TDR to NRTIs over time was observed [from 10% in 2004 to 2% in 2012 (p=0.01]. Sixty eight (42.2% of 161 sequences with TDR were included in 25 TC composed of 5 or more individuals. Of them, 9 clusters harbored TDR associated with high level resistance to antiretroviral drugs. T215D revertant mutation was transmitted in a large cluster comprising 25 individuals. The impact of epidemiological networks on TDR frequency may explain its persistence in newly diagnosed individuals. The knowledge of the populations involved in TC would facilitate the design of prevention programs and public health interventions.

  18. HIV-1 Adapts To Replicate in Cells Expressing Common Marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliva, Alberto; Finzi, Andrés; Haim, Hillel; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that a major block to HIV-1 replication in common marmosets operates at the level of viral entry and that this block can be overcome by adaptation of the virus in tissue-cultured cells. However, our current studies indicate that HIV-1 encounters additional postentry blocks in common marmoset peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we show that the common marmoset APOBEC3G (A3G) and BST2 proteins block HIV-1 in cell cultures. Using a directed-evolution method that takes advantage of the natural ability of HIV-1 to mutate during replication, we have been able to overcome these blocks in tissue-cultured cells. In the adapted viruses, specific changes were observed in gag, vif, env, and nef. The contribution of these changes to virus replication in the presence of the A3G and BST2 restriction factors was studied. We found that certain amino acid changes in Vif and Env that arise during adaptation to marmoset A3G and BST2 allow the virus to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors. The changes in Vif reduce expression levels and encapsidation of marmoset APOBEC3G, while the changes in Env increase viral fitness and discretely favor cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, allowing viral escape from these restriction factors. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 can infect only humans and chimpanzees. The main reason for this narrow tropism is the presence in many species of dominant-acting factors, known as restriction factors, that block viral replication in a species-specific way. We have been exploring the blocks to HIV-1 in common marmosets, with the ultimate goal of developing a new animal model of HIV-1 infection in these monkeys. In this study, we observed that common marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2, two known restriction factors, are able to block HIV-1 in cell cultures. We have adapted HIV-1 to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors and have characterized the mechanisms of escape. These studies can help in the

  19. HIV-1 vaccine induced immune responses in newborns of HIV-1 infected mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Elizabeth J; Johnson, Daniel C; Muresan, Petronella; Fenton, Terence; Tomaras, Georgia D; McNamara, James; Read, Jennifer S; Douglas, Steven D; Deville, Jaime; Gurwith, Marc; Gurunathan, Sanjay; Lambert, John S

    2006-07-13

    Breast milk transmission continues to account for a large proportion of cases of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 worldwide. An effective HIV-1 vaccine coupled with either passive immunization or short-term antiretroviral prophylaxis represents a potential strategy to prevent breast milk transmission. This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of ALVAC HIV-1 vaccine with and without a subunit envelope boost in infants born to HIV-1-infected women. : Placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers in the US were immunized with a prime-boost regimen using a canarypox virus HIV-1 vaccine (vCP1452) and a recombinant glycoprotein subunit vaccine (rgp120). Infants (n = 30) were randomized to receive: vCP1452 alone, vCP1452 + rgp120, or corresponding placebos. Local reactions were mild or moderate and no significant systemic toxicities occurred. Subjects receiving both vaccines had gp120-specific binding serum antibodies that were distinguishable from maternal antibody. Repeated gp160-specific lymphoproliferative responses were observed in 75%. Neutralizing activity to HIV-1 homologous to the vaccine strain was observed in 50% of the vCP1452 + rgp120 subjects who had lost maternal antibody by week 24. In some infants HIV-1-specific proliferative and antibody responses persisted until week 104. HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were detected in two subjects in each treatment group; the frequency of HIV-1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses did not differ between vaccine and placebo recipients. The demonstration of vaccine-induced immune responses in early infancy supports further study of HIV-1 vaccination as a strategy to reduce breast milk transmission.

  20. Nevirapine-Resistant HIV-1 DNA in Breast Milk After Single-Dose Nevirapine With or Without Zidovudine for Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Payant, Rachel; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Micek, Mark A; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A; Matunha, Laurinda; Montoya, Pablo; Matediana, Eduardo; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2012-09-01

    Among 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected women who received single-dose nevirapine (NVP), 17 (57%) had NVP-resistant HIV-1 detected in breast milk. NVP resistance in breast milk persisted for at least 8 months postpartum and was apparently transmitted to at least 1 infant. NVP resistance was detected less often in women who also received zidovudine. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Short-term antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child transmission is safe and results in a sustained increase in CD4 T-cell counts in HIV-1-infected mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, R; Senise, Jf; Vaz, Mjr; Diaz, Rs; Castelo, A

    2009-03-01

    Short-term antiretroviral therapy (START) to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is currently recommended for all HIV-1-infected pregnant women. The objective of this study was to assess the effect on CD4 cell counts and viral load dynamics the withdrawal of START after birth could generate. This was a 5-year cohort study involving HIV-1-infected pregnant women who presented with CD4 counts >300 cells/microL and had received START to prevent MTCT. Seventy-five pregnancies were assessed. In 24 cases, there was a history of antiretroviral therapy prior to prophylaxis. The median baseline CD4 count was 573 cells/microL. In 75% of cases, prophylaxis was started after 26.6 weeks of gestation. The median CD4 cell count increase over baseline during prophylaxis was 24.5%. In only five cases did HIV-1 viral load remain detectable during prophylaxis. After START, CD4 cell counts did not drop significantly, and the HIV-1 viral load plateau was near the baseline level. The estimated mean time for CD4 count to fall below 300 cells/microL was 3.5 years and was directly associated with high baseline CD4 cell count, as well as with CD4 increase after prophylaxis, whereas it was negatively correlated with previous use of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and persistence of detectable HIV-1 viral load during prophylaxis. A potent, well-tolerated prophylactic ARV regimen can improve CD4 cell counts during and after START. In women receiving such prophylaxis, there is a remarkable time interval for CD4 cell counts to drop to levels that indicate treatment.

  2. Impact of HIV-1 infection pathways on susceptibility to antiviral drugs and on virus spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Kazuya; Miyazato, Paola; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-10-01

    The infection routes of HIV-1 can affect several viral properties, including dissemination, pathogenesis, and immune evasion. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory activity of a wide variety of anti-HIV drugs, focusing on the impact that different infection pathways have on their efficacy. Compared to cell-free infection, inhibitory activities were reduced in cell-to-cell productive transmission for all drugs tested. We detected weak reporter-expressing target cells after cell-to-cell transmission in the presence of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Further analysis revealed that this expression was mainly due to unintegrated circular HIV (cHIV) DNAs, consisting of 1-LTR and 2-LTR circles. When in vitro-constructed cHIV DNAs were introduced into cells, the production of infectious and intercellular transmittable virions was observed, suggesting that cHIV DNA could be a source of infectious virus. These results highlight some advantages of the cell-to-cell infection mode for viral expansion, particularly in the presence of anti-retroviral drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Astrocytes Resist HIV-1 Fusion but Engulf Infected Macrophage Material

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    Rebecca A. Russell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 disseminates to diverse tissues and establishes long-lived viral reservoirs. These reservoirs include the CNS, in which macrophage-lineage cells, and as suggested by many studies, astrocytes, may be infected. Here, we have investigated astrocyte infection by HIV-1. We confirm that astrocytes trap and internalize HIV-1 particles for subsequent release but find no evidence that these particles infect the cell. Astrocyte infection was not observed by cell-free or cell-to-cell routes using diverse approaches, including luciferase and GFP reporter viruses, fixed and live-cell fusion assays, multispectral flow cytometry, and super-resolution imaging. By contrast, we observed intimate interactions between HIV-1-infected macrophages and astrocytes leading to signals that might be mistaken for astrocyte infection using less stringent approaches. These results have implications for HIV-1 infection of the CNS, viral reservoir formation, and antiretroviral therapy.

  4. Multiple transmissions of a stable human leucocyte antigen-B27 cytotoxic T-cell-escape strain of HIV-1 in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Marion; Hoogland, Frederik M.; Back, Nicole Kt; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Bakker, Margreet; Brinkman, Kees; Prins, Maria; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The evolution of HIV-1 is largely shaped by the cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response of the host as encoded by the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes. Certain HLA-B alleles can delay disease progression, but it is uncertain whether this protection will sustain or whether the virus is in the

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  6. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  7. Antiviral mechanism of polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas-Córdoba, Enrique; Maly, Marek; De la Mata, Francisco J; Gómez, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology-derived platforms, such as dendrimers, are very attractive in several biological applications. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers have shown great potential as antiviral agents in the development of novel microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1. In this work, we studied the mechanism of two sulfated and naphthylsulfonated functionalized carbosilane dendrimers, G3-S16 and G2-NF16. They are able to inhibit viral infection at fusion and thus at the entry step. Both compounds impede the binding of viral particles to target cell surface and membrane fusion through the blockage of gp120-CD4 interaction. In addition, and for the first time, we demonstrate that dendrimers can inhibit cell-to-cell HIV transmission and difficult infectious synapse formation. Thus, carbosilane dendrimers' mode of action is a multifactorial process targeting several proteins from viral envelope and from host cells that could block HIV infection at different stages during the first step of infection.

  8. Emergence in Japan of an HIV-1 variant associated with transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China: first indication of the International Dissemination of the Chinese MSM lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Makiko; Lemey, Philippe; Sano, Takako; Itoda, Ichiro; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Sagara, Hiroko; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Yamanaka, Ko; Iwamuro, Shinya; Matano, Tetsuro; Imai, Mitsunobu; Kato, Shingo; Takebe, Yutaka

    2013-05-01

    A survey of HIV-1 strains circulating in the Tokyo-Kanagawa metropolitan area of Japan during 2004 to 2011 (n = 477) identified six Japanese males (patients 1 to 6), who harbored viruses with genome segments derived from a distinct CRF01_AE variant uniquely found among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China (designated CN.MSM.01-1). These six HIV infections were diagnosed in 2010 and 2011 among MSM (3 of 75) and men with unknown risk factors (3 of 63) and differed from the vast majority of HIV infections among MSM in Japan, which are overwhelmingly characterized by subtype B (239 of 246 [97.2%]). Approximately one-third (91 of 239 [38.1%]) of subtype B strains from MSM in Japan belong to a large monophyletic cluster (designated JP.MSM.B-1). In addition, we identified a smaller subtype B cluster (n = 8) (designated JP.MSM.B-2) that also contains strains from two Chinese MSM living in Japan. Interestingly, patients 5 and 6 were found to be coinfected with CRF01_AE (CN.MSM.01-1) and subtype B (JP.MSM.B-2 or JP.MSM.B-1) variants that are unique to the HIV-1 epidemics among MSM in China and Japan, respectively. Our study demonstrates for the first time the effect of the expanding HIV epidemic among MSM in China on transmission in neighboring countries and shows the ongoing mixing of CRF01_AE and subtype B lineages unique to HIV-1 that cocirculate in MSM populations in East Asia. This finding highlights the importance of strengthening epidemiological surveillance in the region and the need for effective measures to limit transmission among MSM in East Asia.

  9. Emergence in Japan of an HIV-1 Variant Associated with Transmission among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in China: First Indication of the International Dissemination of the Chinese MSM Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Makiko; Lemey, Philippe; Sano, Takako; Itoda, Ichiro; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Sagara, Hiroko; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Yamanaka, Ko; Iwamuro, Shinya; Matano, Tetsuro; Imai, Mitsunobu; Kato, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    A survey of HIV-1 strains circulating in the Tokyo-Kanagawa metropolitan area of Japan during 2004 to 2011 (n = 477) identified six Japanese males (patients 1 to 6), who harbored viruses with genome segments derived from a distinct CRF01_AE variant uniquely found among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China (designated CN.MSM.01-1). These six HIV infections were diagnosed in 2010 and 2011 among MSM (3 of 75) and men with unknown risk factors (3 of 63) and differed from the vast majority of HIV infections among MSM in Japan, which are overwhelmingly characterized by subtype B (239 of 246 [97.2%]). Approximately one-third (91 of 239 [38.1%]) of subtype B strains from MSM in Japan belong to a large monophyletic cluster (designated JP.MSM.B-1). In addition, we identified a smaller subtype B cluster (n = 8) (designated JP.MSM.B-2) that also contains strains from two Chinese MSM living in Japan. Interestingly, patients 5 and 6 were found to be coinfected with CRF01_AE (CN.MSM.01-1) and subtype B (JP.MSM.B-2 or JP.MSM.B-1) variants that are unique to the HIV-1 epidemics among MSM in China and Japan, respectively. Our study demonstrates for the first time the effect of the expanding HIV epidemic among MSM in China on transmission in neighboring countries and shows the ongoing mixing of CRF01_AE and subtype B lineages unique to HIV-1 that cocirculate in MSM populations in East Asia. This finding highlights the importance of strengthening epidemiological surveillance in the region and the need for effective measures to limit transmission among MSM in East Asia. PMID:23365432

  10. HIV-1 A1 Subtype Epidemic in Italy Originated from Africa and Eastern Europe and Shows a High Frequency of Transmission Chains Involving Intravenous Drug Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alessia; Bozzi, Giorgio; Franzetti, Marco; Binda, Francesca; Simonetti, Francesco R; De Luca, Andrea; Micheli, Valeria; Meraviglia, Paola; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Monno, Laura; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Balotta, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Subtype A accounts for only 12% of HIV-1 infections worldwide but predominates in Russia and Former Soviet Union countries of Eastern Europe. After an early propagation via heterosexual contacts, this variant spread explosively among intravenous drug users. A distinct A1 variant predominates in Greece and Albania, which penetrated directly from Africa. Clade A1 accounts for 12.5% of non-B subtypes in Italy, being the most frequent after F1 subtype. Aim of this study was to investigate the circulation of A1 subtype in Italy and trace its origin and diffusion through phylogenetic and phylodynamic approaches. The phylogenetic analysis of 113 A1 pol sequences included in the Italian ARCA database, indicated that 71 patients (62.8%) clustered within 5 clades. A higher probability to be detected in clusters was found for patients from Eastern Europe and Italy (88.9% and 60.4%, respectively) compared to those from Africa (20%) (p Italy through three introduction events: directly from East Africa, from Albania and Greece, and from the area encompassing Moldavia and Ukraine. As in previously documented A1 epidemics of East European countries, HIV-1 A1 subtype spread in Italy in part through intravenous drug users. However, Eastern European women contributed to the penetration of such variant, probably through sex work.

  11. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  12. Trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells fosters both HIV-1 trans-infection in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes and reactivation of the HIV-1 reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiozzini, Chiara; Arenaccio, Claudia; Olivetta, Eleonora; Anticoli, Simona; Manfredi, Francesco; Ferrantelli, Flavia; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Schietroma, Ivan; Andreotti, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio

    2017-09-01

    Intact HIV-1 and exosomes can be internalized by dendritic cells (DCs) through a common pathway leading to their transmission to CD4+ T lymphocytes by means of mechanisms defined as trans-infection and trans-dissemination, respectively. We previously reported that exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells activate both uninfected quiescent CD4+ T lymphocytes, which become permissive to HIV-1, and latently infected cells, with release of HIV-1 particles. However, nothing is known about the effects of trans-dissemination of exosomes produced by HIV-1-infected cells on uninfected or latently HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes. Here, we report that trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells induces cell activation in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes, which appears stronger with mature than immature DCs. Using purified preparations of both HIV-1 and exosomes, we observed that mDC-mediated trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells to resting CD4+ T lymphocytes induces efficient trans-infection and HIV-1 expression in target cells. Most relevant, when both mDCs and CD4+ T lymphocytes were isolated from combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-1-infected patients, trans-dissemination of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells led to HIV-1 reactivation from the viral reservoir. In sum, our data suggest a role of exosome trans-dissemination in both HIV-1 spread in the infected host and reactivation of the HIV-1 reservoir.

  13. HIV-1 Transmission During Recent Infection and During Treatment Interruptions as Major Drivers of New Infections in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzel, Alex; Shilaih, Mohaned; Yang, Wan-Lin; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Braun, Dominique L; Calmy, Alexandra; Furrer, Hansjakob; Cavassini, Matthias; Battegay, Manuel; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger D; Aubert, V; Battegay, M; Bernasconi, E; Böni, J; Bucher, H C; Burton-Jeangros, C; Calmy, A; Cavassini, M; Dollenmaier, G; Egger, M; Elzi, L; Fehr, J; Fellay, J; Furrer, H; Fux, C A; Gorgievski, M; Günthard, H F; Haerry, D; Hasse, B; Hirsch, H H; Hoffmann, M; Hösli, I; Kahlert, C; Kaiser, L; Keiser, O; Klimkait, T; Kouyos, R D; Kovari, H; Ledergerber, B; Martinetti, G; de Tejada, B Martinez; Metzner, K; Müller, N; Nadal, D; Nicca, D; Pantaleo, G; Rauch, A; Regenass, S; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schöni-Affolter, F; Schmid, P; Schüpbach, J; Speck, R; Tarr, P; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P L; Weber, R; Yerly, S

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the fraction of transmissions during recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is essential for the population-level success of "treatment as prevention". A phylogenetic tree was constructed with 19 604 Swiss sequences and 90 994 non-Swiss background sequences. Swiss transmission pairs were identified using 104 combinations of genetic distance (1%-2.5%) and bootstrap (50%-100%) thresholds, to examine the effect of those criteria. Monophyletic pairs were classified as recent or chronic transmission based on the time interval between estimated seroconversion dates. Logistic regression with adjustment for clinical and demographic characteristics was used to identify risk factors associated with transmission during recent or chronic infection. Seroconversion dates were estimated for 4079 patients on the phylogeny, and comprised between 71 (distance, 1%; bootstrap, 100%) to 378 transmission pairs (distance, 2.5%; bootstrap, 50%). We found that 43.7% (range, 41%-56%) of the transmissions occurred during the first year of infection. Stricter phylogenetic definition of transmission pairs was associated with higher recent-phase transmission fraction. Chronic-phase viral load area under the curve (adjusted odds ratio, 3; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-5.48) and time to antiretroviral therapy (ART) start (adjusted odds ratio 1.4/y; 1.11-1.77) were associated with chronic-phase transmission as opposed to recent transmission. Importantly, at least 14% of the chronic-phase transmission events occurred after the transmitter had interrupted ART. We demonstrate a high fraction of transmission during recent HIV infection but also chronic transmissions after interruption of ART in Switzerland. Both represent key issues for treatment as prevention and underline the importance of early diagnosis and of early and continuous treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  14. AIDS in rural Africa: a paradigm for HIV-1 prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, C P

    1996-07-01

    Networks of concurrent sexual partnerships may be the primary cause of epidemic spread of HIV-1 in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. This pattern of sexual behaviour increases the likelihood that individuals experiencing primary HIV-1 infection transmit the virus to other persons. Networks of concurrent partnerships are likely to be important in both the early ('epidemic') and late ('endemic') phases of HIV-1 transmission. Interventions should aim to break the sexual networks, whatever the stage of the epidemic. However, prevention of transmission in the endemic phase also requires a greater awareness of early clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection in the general population. Such awareness, coupled with the availability of condoms and access to HIV-1 testing facilities, may reduce transmission in discordant couples.

  15. HIV-1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  16. JAK-STAT Signaling Pathways and Inhibitors Affect Reversion of Envelope-Mutated HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yudong; Xu, Hongtao; Han, Yingshan; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    HIV can spread by both cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. Here, we show that many of the amino acid changes in Env that are close to the CD4 binding pocket can affect HIV replication. We generated a number of mutant viruses that were unable to infect T cells as cell-free viruses but were nevertheless able to infect certain T cell lines as cell-associated viruses, which was followed by reversion to the wild type. However, the activation of JAK-STAT signaling pathways caused the inhibition of such cell-to-cell infection as well as the reversion of multiple HIV Env mutants that displayed differences in their abilities to bind to the CD4 receptor. Specifically, two T cell activators, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), both capable of activation of JAK-STAT pathways, were able to inhibit cell-to-cell viral transmission. In contrast, but consistent with the above result, a number of JAK-STAT and mTOR inhibitors actually promoted HIV-1 transmission and reversion. Hence, JAK-STAT signaling pathways may differentially affect the replication of a variety of HIV Env mutants in ways that differ from the role that these pathways play in the replication of wild-type viruses.IMPORTANCE Specific alterations in HIV Env close to the CD4 binding site can differentially change the ability of HIV to mediate infection for cell-free and cell-associated viruses. However, such differences are dependent to some extent on the types of target cells used. JAK-STAT signaling pathways are able to play major roles in these processes. This work sheds new light on factors that can govern HIV infection of target cells. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT.Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F. In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System.Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29 of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29 by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24. By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41. The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2-3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml, resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage.Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 quasispecies.

  18. HIV-1 A1 Subtype Epidemic in Italy Originated from Africa and Eastern Europe and Shows a High Frequency of Transmission Chains Involving Intravenous Drug Users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Lai

    Full Text Available Subtype A accounts for only 12% of HIV-1 infections worldwide but predominates in Russia and Former Soviet Union countries of Eastern Europe. After an early propagation via heterosexual contacts, this variant spread explosively among intravenous drug users. A distinct A1 variant predominates in Greece and Albania, which penetrated directly from Africa. Clade A1 accounts for 12.5% of non-B subtypes in Italy, being the most frequent after F1 subtype.Aim of this study was to investigate the circulation of A1 subtype in Italy and trace its origin and diffusion through phylogenetic and phylodynamic approaches.The phylogenetic analysis of 113 A1 pol sequences included in the Italian ARCA database, indicated that 71 patients (62.8% clustered within 5 clades. A higher probability to be detected in clusters was found for patients from Eastern Europe and Italy (88.9% and 60.4%, respectively compared to those from Africa (20% (p < .001. Higher proportions of clustering sequences were found in intravenous drug users with respect to heterosexuals (85.7% vs. 59.3%, p = .056 and in women with respect to men (81.4% vs. 53.2%, p < .006. Subtype A1 dated phylogeny indicated an East African origin around 1961. Phylogeographical reconstruction highlighted 3 significant groups. One involved East European and some Italian variants, the second encompassed some Italian and African strains, the latter included the majority of viruses carried by African and Italian subjects and all viral sequences from Albania and Greece.Subtype A1 originated in Central Africa and spread among East European countries in 1982. It entered Italy through three introduction events: directly from East Africa, from Albania and Greece, and from the area encompassing Moldavia and Ukraine. As in previously documented A1 epidemics of East European countries, HIV-1 A1 subtype spread in Italy in part through intravenous drug users. However, Eastern European women contributed to the penetration of

  19. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mary; Srikrishna, Geetha; Balagopal, Ashwin

    2017-06-01

    HIV-1 infection is of global importance, and still incurs substantial morbidity and mortality. Although major pharmacologic advances over the past two decades have resulted in remarkable HIV-1 control, a cure is still forthcoming. One approach to a cure is to exploit natural mechanisms by which the host restricts HIV-1. Herein, we review past and recent discoveries of HIV-1 restriction factors, a diverse set of host proteins that limit HIV-1 replication at multiple levels, including entry, reverse transcription, integration, translation of viral proteins, and packaging and release of virions. Recent studies of intracellular HIV-1 restriction have offered unique molecular insights into HIV-1 replication and biology. Studies have revealed insights of how restriction factors drive HIV-1 evolution. Although HIV-1 restriction factors only partially control the virus, their importance is underscored by their effect on HIV-1 evolution and adaptation. The list of host restriction factors that control HIV-1 infection is likely to expand with future discoveries. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation by these factors will uncover new targets for therapeutic control of HIV-1 infection.

  20. Early Initiation of ARV During Pregnancy to Move towards Virtual Elimination of Mother-to-Child-Transmission of HIV-1 in Yunnan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrine Meyers

    Full Text Available To identify factors associated with mother-to-child-transmission and late access to prevention of maternal to child transmission (PMTCT services among HIV-infected women; and risk factors for infant mortality among HIV-exposed infants in order to assess the feasibility of virtual elimination of vertical transmission and pediatric HIV in this setting.Observational study evaluating the impact of a provincial PMTCT program.The intervention was implemented in 26 counties of Yunnan Province, China at municipal and tertiary health care settings. Log linear regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to identify unadjusted and adjusted correlates for late ARV intervention and MTCT. Cox proportional hazard models with robust sandwich estimation were applied to examine correlates of infant mortality.Mother-to-child- transmission rate of HIV was controlled to 2%, with late initiation of maternal ARV showing a strong association with vertical transmission and infant mortality. Risk factors for late initiation of maternal ARV were age, ethnicity, education, and having a husband not tested for HIV. Mortality rate among HIV-exposed infants was 2.9/100 person-years. In addition to late initiation of maternal ARV, ethnicity, low birth weight and preterm birth were associated with infant mortality.This PMTCT program in Yunnan achieved low rates of MTCT. However the infant mortality rate in this cohort of HIV-exposed children was almost three times the provincial rate. Virtual elimination of MTCT of HIV is an achievable goal in China, but more attention needs to be paid to HIV-free survival.

  1. Mucosal dendritic cells in HIV-1 susceptibility: a critical role for C-type lectin receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertoghs, Nina; van Pul, Lisa; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual transmission is the major route of HIV-1 infection worldwide. The interaction of HIV-1 with mucosal dendritic cells (DCs) might determine HIV-1 susceptibility as well as initial antiviral immunity controlling virus in the chronic phase. Different DC subsets reside in mucosal tissues and

  2. Sexually transmitted infections among HIV-1-discordant couples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Guthrie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available More new HIV-1 infections occur within stable HIV-1-discordant couples than in any other group in Africa, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs may increase transmission risk among discordant couples, accounting for a large proportion of new HIV-1 infections. Understanding correlates of STIs among discordant couples will aid in optimizing interventions to prevent HIV-1 transmission in these couples.HIV-1-discordant couples in which HIV-1-infected partners were HSV-2-seropositive were tested for syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis, and HIV-1-uninfected partners were tested for HSV-2. We assessed sociodemographic, behavioral, and biological correlates of a current STI.Of 416 couples enrolled, 16% were affected by a treatable STI, and among these both partners were infected in 17% of couples. A treatable STI was found in 46 (11% females and 30 (7% males. The most prevalent infections were trichomoniasis (5.9% and syphilis (2.6%. Participants were 5.9-fold more likely to have an STI if their partner had an STI (P<0.01, and STIs were more common among those reporting any unprotected sex (OR = 2.43; P<0.01 and those with low education (OR = 3.00; P<0.01. Among HIV-1-uninfected participants with an HSV-2-seropositive partner, females were significantly more likely to be HSV-2-seropositive than males (78% versus 50%, P<0.01.Treatable STIs were common among HIV-1-discordant couples and the majority of couples affected by an STI were discordant for the STI, with relatively high HSV-2 discordance. Awareness of STI correlates and treatment of both partners may reduce HIV-1 transmission.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519.

  3. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arhel Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs, in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs, which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved with difficulties, particularly as a result of the vulnerability of the capsid assembly to experimental manipulation. Nevertheless, recent studies of capsid structure, retroviral restriction and mechanisms of nuclear import, as well as the recent expansion of technical advances in genome-wide studies and cell imagery approaches, have substantially changed our understanding of HIV uncoating. Although early work suggested that uncoating occurs immediately following viral entry in the cell, thus attributing a trivial role for the capsid in infected cells, recent data suggest that uncoating occurs several hours later and that capsid has an all-important role in the cell that it infects: for transport towards the nucleus, reverse transcription and nuclear import. Knowing that uncoating occurs at a later stage suggests that the viral capsid interacts extensively with the cytoskeleton and other cytoplasmic components during its transport to the nucleus, which leads to a considerable reassessment of our efforts to identify potential therapeutic targets for HIV therapy. This review discusses our current understanding of HIV uncoating, the functional interplay between infectivity and timely uncoating, as well as exposing the appropriate methods to study uncoating and addressing the many questions that remain unanswered.

  4. Daily Acyclovir Delays HIV-1 Disease Progression Among HIV-1/HSV-2 Dually-Infected Persons: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingappa, Jairam R.; Baeten, Jared M.; Wald, Anna; Hughes, James P.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Mujugira, Andrew; Mugo, Nelly; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth H.; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda E.; McIntyre, James; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Magaret, Amalia; Wang, Richard S.; Kidoguchi, Lara; Barnes, Linda; Ridzon, Renee; Corey, Lawrence; Celum, Connie

    2010-01-01

    Background Well-tolerated medications that slow HIV-1 disease progression and delay initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are needed. Most HIV-1-infected persons are dually-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Daily HSV-2 suppression reduces plasma HIV-1 levels, but whether HSV-2 suppression delays HIV-1 disease progression is unknown. Methods Within a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of HSV-2 suppressive therapy (acyclovir 400 mg orally bid) to decrease HIV-1 transmission, 3381 HSV-2/HIV-1 dually-infected heterosexual Africans who at enrollment had CD4 counts ≥250 cells/mm3 and were not taking ART were followed for up to 24 months. We evaluated the effect of acyclovir on HIV-1 disease progression, defined by a primary composite endpoint of first occurrence of CD4 count death. As an exploratory analysis, we evaluated the endpoint of CD4 decline to HIV-1 plasma RNA was 4.1 log10 copies/mL. Acyclovir reduced risk of HIV-1 disease progression: 284 participants on acyclovir versus 324 on placebo reached the primary endpoint (hazard ratio [HR] 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–0.98, p=0.03). Among participants with CD4 counts ≥350 cells/mm3, acyclovir delayed risk of CD4 decline to HIV-1 disease progression by 16% (95% CI 2–29%). The role of HSV-2 suppression in reducing HIV-1 disease progression prior to ART initiation warrants consideration (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00194519). PMID:20153888

  5. HIV-1 replication in macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Lentiviruses such as the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considered to be unique amongst the retroviruses due to their ability to replicate in macrophages, which are often referred to as non-dividing cells. The studies described in this thesis focus on the ability of HIV-1 to

  6. Molecular typing of the local HIV-1 epidemic in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljic, Marina; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jevtovic, Djordje; Pesic-Pavlovic, Ivana; Zerjav, Sonja; Nikolic, Valentina; Ranin, Jovan; Stanojevic, Maja

    2013-10-01

    Worldwide HIV-1 pandemic is becoming increasingly complex, with growing heterogeneity of subtypes and recombinant viruses. Previous studies have documented HIV-1 subtype B as the predominant one in Serbia, with limited presence and genetic diversity of non B subtypes. In recent years, MSM transmission has become the most frequently reported risk for HIV infection among newly diagnosed patients in Serbia, but very little is known of the network structure and dynamics of viral transmission in this and other risk groups. To gain insight about the HIV-1 subtypes distribution pattern as well as characteristics of HIV-1 transmission clusters in Serbia, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the pol gene segment in 221 HIV-1-infected patients sampled during 2002-2011. Subtype B was found to still be the most prevalent one in Serbia, accounting for over 90% of samples, while greater diversity of other subtypes was found than previously reported, including subtypes G, C, A, F, CRF01 and CRF02. In total, 41.3% of analyzed subtype B sequences were found associated in transmission clusters/network, that are highly related with MSM transmission route. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Mediate HIV-1 gp120 Interactions with α4β7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, David; Guo, Wenjin; Cleveland, Brad; von Haller, Priska; Eng, Jimmy K; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Arthos, James; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2017-11-01

    Gut-homing α4β7high CD4+ T lymphocytes have been shown to be preferentially targeted by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and are implicated in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Previous studies demonstrated that HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 binds and signals through α4β7 and that this likely contributes to the infection of α4β7high T cells and promotes cell-to-cell virus transmission. Structures within the second variable loop (V2) of gp120, including the tripeptide motif LDV/I, are thought to mediate gp120-α4β7 binding. However, lack of α4β7 binding has been reported in gp120 proteins containing LDV/I, and the precise determinants of gp120-α4β7 binding are not fully defined. In this work, we report the novel finding that fibronectins mediate indirect gp120-α4β7 interactions. We show that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells used to express recombinant gp120 produced fibronectins and other extracellular matrix proteins that copurified with gp120. CHO cell fibronectins were able to mediate the binding of a diverse panel of gp120 proteins to α4β7 in an in vitro cell binding assay. The V2 loop was not required for fibronectin-mediated binding of gp120 to α4β7, nor did V2-specific antibodies block this interaction. Removal of fibronectin through anion-exchange chromatography abrogated V2-independent gp120-α4β7 binding. Additionally, we showed a recombinant human fibronectin fragment mediated gp120-α4β7 interactions similarly to CHO cell fibronectin. These findings provide an explanation for the apparently contradictory observations regarding the gp120-α4β7 interaction and offer new insights into the potential role of fibronectin and other extracellular matrix proteins in HIV-1 biology.IMPORTANCE Immune tissues within the gut are severely damaged by HIV-1, and this plays an important role in the development of AIDS. Integrin α4β7 plays a major role in the trafficking of lymphocytes, including CD4+ T cells, into gut lymphoid tissues. Previous reports

  8. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetto, Silvana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic), H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic), and the dual tropic (X4R5) HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  9. Anti-HIV-1 activity of flavonoid myricetin on HIV-1 infection in a dual-chamber in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Pasetto

    Full Text Available HIV infection by sexual transmission remains an enormous global health concern. More than 1 million new infections among women occur annually. Microbicides represent a promising prevention strategy that women can easily control. Among emerging therapies, natural small molecules such as flavonoids are an important source of new active substances. In this study we report the in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 and microbicide activity of the following flavonoids: Myricetin, Quercetin and Pinocembrin. Cytotoxicity tests were conducted on TZM-bl, HeLa, PBMC, and H9 cell cultures using 0.01-100 µM concentrations. Myricetin presented the lowest toxic effect, with Quercetin and Pinocembrin relatively more toxic. The anti-HIV-1 activity was tested with TZM-bl cell plus HIV-1 BaL (R5 tropic, H9 and PBMC cells plus HIV-1 MN (X4 tropic, and the dual tropic (X4R5 HIV-1 89.6. All flavonoids showed anti-HIV activity, although Myricetin was more effective than Quercetin or Pinocembrin. In TZM-bl cells, Myricetin inhibited ≥90% of HIV-1 BaL infection. The results were confirmed by quantification of HIV-1 p24 antigen in supernatant from H9 and PBMC cells following flavonoid treatment. In H9 and PBMC cells infected by HIV-1 MN and HIV-1 89.6, Myricetin showed more than 80% anti-HIV activity. Quercetin and Pinocembrin presented modest anti-HIV activity in all experiments. Myricetin activity was tested against HIV-RT and inhibited the enzyme by 49%. Microbicide activities were evaluated using a dual-chamber female genital tract model. In the in vitro microbicide activity model, Myricetin showed promising results against different strains of HIV-1 while also showing insignificant cytotoxic effects. Further studies of Myricetin should be performed to identify its molecular targets in order to provide a solid biological foundation for translational research.

  10. The Complex Interaction Between Methamphetamine Abuse and HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Ryan Colby; Pandhare, Jui; Qian, Han-Zhu; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-09-01

    The global HIV/AIDS pandemic has claimed the lives of an estimated 35 million people. A significant barrier for combating this global pandemic is substance use since it is associated with HIV transmission, delayed diagnosis/initiation of therapy, and poor adherence to therapy. Clinical studies also suggest a link between substance use and HIV-disease progression/AIDS-associated mortality. Methamphetamine (METH) use is one of the fastest-growing substance use problems in the world. METH use enhances high-risk sexual behaviors, therefore increases the likelihood of HIV-1 acquisition. METH use is also associated with higher viral loads, immune dysfunction, and antiretroviral resistance. Moreover, METH use has also been correlated with rapid progression to AIDS. However, direct effects of METH on HIV-1 disease progression remains poorly understood because use of METH and other illicit drugs is often associated with reduced/non adherence to ART. Nevertheless, in vitro studies demonstrate that METH increases HIV-1 replication in cell cultures and animal models. Thus, it has been proposed that METH's potentiating effects on HIV-1 replication may in part contribute to the worsening of HIV-1 pathogenesis. However, our recent data demonstrate that METH at physiologically relevant concentrations has no effect and at higher concentrations inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Thus, the goal of this review is to systematically examine the published literature to better understand the complex interaction between METH abuse and HIV-1 disease progression.

  11. Preexposure prophylaxis is efficacious for HIV-1 prevention among women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Were, Edwin; Kiarie, James; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Mujugira, Andrew; Frenkel, Lisa M; Donnell, Deborah; Ronald, Allan; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2014-11-28

    To evaluate preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) efficacy for HIV-1 prevention among women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) for contraception and men whose HIV-1-infected partners use DMPA. Secondary analysis of data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of daily oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir PrEP among heterosexual Kenyan and Ugandan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. PrEP efficacy for HIV-1 prevention was compared among HIV-1-uninfected women using DMPA versus no hormonal contraception and among HIV-1 uninfected men whose HIV-1-infected female partners used DMPA versus no hormonal contraception. Of 4747 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, 901 HIV-1-uninfected women used DMPA at some point during follow-up, 1422 HIV-1-uninfected women used no hormonal contraception, 1568 HIV-1-uninfected men had female partners who used DMPA, and 2626 men had female partners who used no hormonal contraception. PrEP efficacy estimates for HIV-1 prevention, compared with placebo, were similar among women using DMPA and those using no hormonal contraception (64.7 and 75.5%, adjusted interaction P = 0.65). Similarly, for men whose female partners used DMPA, PrEP efficacy did not differ from men whose partners used no hormonal contraception (90.0 versus 81.7%, adjusted interaction P = 0.52). PrEP is efficacious for HIV-1 prevention among women using DMPA and men whose partners use DMPA, suggesting PrEP could mitigate the potential increased HIV-1 acquisition and transmission risks that have been associated with DMPA use. Women at risk for HIV-1 choosing DMPA could maintain this contraceptive method and add PrEP to achieve prevention of unintended pregnancy and HIV-1.

  12. IFITM Proteins Restrict HIV-1 Infection by Antagonizing the Envelope Glycoprotein

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    Jingyou Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM proteins have been recently shown to restrict HIV-1 and other viruses. Here, we provide evidence that IFITM proteins, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, specifically antagonize the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env, thereby inhibiting viral infection. IFITM proteins interact with HIV-1 Env in viral producer cells, leading to impaired Env processing and virion incorporation. Notably, the level of IFITM incorporation into HIV-1 virions does not strictly correlate with the extent of inhibition. Prolonged passage of HIV-1 in IFITM-expressing T lymphocytes leads to emergence of Env mutants that overcome IFITM restriction. The ability of IFITMs to inhibit cell-to-cell infection can be extended to HIV-1 primary isolates, HIV-2 and SIVs; however, the extent of inhibition appears to be virus-strain dependent. Overall, our study uncovers a mechanism by which IFITM proteins specifically antagonize HIV-1 Env to restrict HIV-1 infection and provides insight into the specialized role of IFITMs in HIV infection.

  13. IFITM proteins incorporated into HIV-1 virions impair viral fusion and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Alex A; Bruel, Timothée; Porrot, Françoise; Mallet, Adeline; Sachse, Martin; Euvrard, Marine; Liang, Chen; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Olivier

    2014-12-10

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins protect cells from diverse virus infections by inhibiting virus-cell fusion. IFITM proteins also inhibit HIV-1 replication through mechanisms only partially understood. We show that when expressed in uninfected lymphocytes, IFITM proteins exert protective effects during cell-free virus infection, but this restriction can be overcome upon HIV-1 cell-to-cell spread. However, when present in virus-producing lymphocytes, IFITM proteins colocalize with viral Env and Gag proteins and incorporate into nascent HIV-1 virions to limit entry into new target cells. IFITM in viral membranes is associated with impaired virion fusion, offering additional and more potent defense against virus spread. Thus, IFITM proteins act additively in both productively infected cells and uninfected target cells to inhibit HIV-1 spread, potentially conferring these proteins with greater breadth and potency against enveloped viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple proviral integration events after virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Rebecca A; Martin, Nicola; Mitar, Ivonne; Jones, Emma; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2013-08-15

    HIV-1 can move directly between T cells via virological synapses (VS). Although aspects of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this mode of spread have been elucidated, the outcomes for infection of the target cell remain incompletely understood. We set out to determine whether HIV-1 transfer via VS results in productive, high-multiplicity HIV-1 infection. We found that HIV-1 cell-to-cell spread resulted in nuclear import of multiple proviruses into target cells as seen by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Proviral integration into the target cell genome was significantly higher than that seen in a cell-free infection system, and consequent de novo viral DNA and RNA production in the target cell detected by quantitative PCR increased over time. Our data show efficient proviral integration across VS, implying the probability of multiple integration events in target cells that drive productive T cell infection. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Characteristics of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled in a clinical trial of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M; Donnell, Deborah; Ndase, Patrick; Mugo, Nelly R; Barnes, Linda; Campbell, James D; Wangisi, Jonathan; Tappero, Jordan W; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth H; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; John-Stewart, Grace; Kidoguchi, Lara; Panteleeff, Dana; Krows, Meighan; Shah, Heena; Revall, Jennifer; Morrison, Susan; Ondrejcek, Lisa; Ingram, Charlotte; Coombs, Robert W; Lingappa, Jairam R; Celum, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Stable heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa have high HIV-1 transmission rates and are a critical population for evaluation of new HIV-1 prevention strategies. The Partners PrEP Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir and emtricitabine-tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis to decrease HIV-1 acquisition within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. We describe the trial design and characteristics of the study cohort. HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partner did not meet national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral therapy, were enrolled at 9 research sites in Kenya and Uganda. The HIV-1 susceptible partner was randomized to daily oral tenofovir, emtricitabine-tenofovir, or matching placebo with monthly follow-up for 24-36 months. From July 2008 to November 2010, 7920 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples were screened and 4758 enrolled. For 62% (2966/4758) of enrolled couples, the HIV-1 susceptible partner was male. Median age was 33 years for HIV-1 susceptible and HIV-1 infected partners [IQR (28-40) and (26-39) respectively]. Most couples (98%) were married, with a median duration of partnership of 7.0 years (IQR 3.0-14.0) and recent knowledge of their serodiscordant status [median 0.4 years (IQR 0.1-2.0)]. During the month prior to enrollment, couples reported a median of 4 sex acts (IQR 2-8); 27% reported unprotected sex and 14% of male and 1% of female HIV-1 susceptible partners reported sex with outside partners. Among HIV-1 infected partners, the median plasma HIV-1 level was 3.94 log(10) copies/mL (IQR 3.31-4.53) and median CD4 count was 496 cells/µL (IQR 375-662); the majority (64%) had WHO stage 1 HIV-1 disease. Couples at high risk of HIV-1 transmission were rapidly recruited into the Partners PrEP Study, the largest efficacy trial of oral PrEP. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00557245).

  16. Characteristics of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled in a clinical trial of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mujugira

    Full Text Available Stable heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa have high HIV-1 transmission rates and are a critical population for evaluation of new HIV-1 prevention strategies. The Partners PrEP Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir and emtricitabine-tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis to decrease HIV-1 acquisition within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. We describe the trial design and characteristics of the study cohort.HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partner did not meet national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral therapy, were enrolled at 9 research sites in Kenya and Uganda. The HIV-1 susceptible partner was randomized to daily oral tenofovir, emtricitabine-tenofovir, or matching placebo with monthly follow-up for 24-36 months.From July 2008 to November 2010, 7920 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples were screened and 4758 enrolled. For 62% (2966/4758 of enrolled couples, the HIV-1 susceptible partner was male. Median age was 33 years for HIV-1 susceptible and HIV-1 infected partners [IQR (28-40 and (26-39 respectively]. Most couples (98% were married, with a median duration of partnership of 7.0 years (IQR 3.0-14.0 and recent knowledge of their serodiscordant status [median 0.4 years (IQR 0.1-2.0]. During the month prior to enrollment, couples reported a median of 4 sex acts (IQR 2-8; 27% reported unprotected sex and 14% of male and 1% of female HIV-1 susceptible partners reported sex with outside partners. Among HIV-1 infected partners, the median plasma HIV-1 level was 3.94 log(10 copies/mL (IQR 3.31-4.53 and median CD4 count was 496 cells/µL (IQR 375-662; the majority (64% had WHO stage 1 HIV-1 disease.Couples at high risk of HIV-1 transmission were rapidly recruited into the Partners PrEP Study, the largest efficacy trial of oral PrEP. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00557245.

  17. Identification and characterization of transmitted and early founder virus envelopes in primary HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Keele, Brandon F.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Decker, Julie M.; Pham, Kimmy T.; Salazar, Maria G.; Sun, Chuanxi; Grayson, Truman; Wang, Shuyi; Li, Hui; Wei, Xiping; Jiang, Chunlai; Kirchherr, Jennifer L; Gao, Feng; Anderson, Jeffery A.

    2008-01-01

    The precise identification of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) responsible for productive clinical infection could be instrumental in elucidating the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and in designing effective vaccines. Here, we developed a mathematical model of random viral evolution and, together with phylogenetic tree construction, used it to analyze 3,449 complete env sequences derived by single genome amplification from 102 subjects with acute HIV-1 (clade B) infection. Viral e...

  18. Genotypic and functional properties of early infant HIV-1 envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan John L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the properties of HIV-1 variants that are transmitted from women to their infants is crucial to improving strategies to prevent transmission. In this study, 162 full-length envelope (env clones were generated from plasma RNA obtained from 5 HIV-1 Clade B infected mother-infant pairs. Following extensive genotypic and phylogenetic analyses, 35 representative clones were selected for functional studies. Results Infant quasispecies were highly homogeneous and generally represented minor maternal variants, consistent with transmission across a selective bottleneck. Infant clones did not differ from the maternal in env length, or glycosylation. All infant variants utilized the CCR5 co-receptor, but were not macrophage tropic. Relatively high levels (IC50 ≥ 100 μg/ml of autologous maternal plasma IgG were required to neutralize maternal and infant viruses; however, all infant viruses were neutralized by pooled sera from HIV-1 infected individuals, implying that they were not inherently neutralization-resistant. All infant viruses were sensitive to the HIV-1 entry inhibitors Enfuvirtide and soluble CD4; none were resistant to Maraviroc. Sensitivity to human monoclonal antibodies 4E10, 2F5, b12 and 2G12 varied. Conclusions This study provides extensive characterization of the genotypic and functional properties of HIV-1 env shortly after transmission. We present the first detailed comparisons of the macrophage tropism of infant and maternal env variants and their sensitivity to Maraviroc, the only CCR5 antagonist approved for therapeutic use. These findings may have implications for improving approaches to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission.

  19. The regulated secretory pathway in CD4(+ T cells contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse.

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    Clare Jolly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 at the virological synapse (VS is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4(+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4(+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS. Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4(+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4(+ T cells to enhance its dissemination.

  20. Potential Role of the Formation of Tunneling Nanotubes in HIV-1 Spread in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michihiro; Bhuyan, Farzana; Hiyoshi, Masateru; Noyori, Osamu; Nasser, Hesham; Miyazaki, Mitsue; Saito, Tamio; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shunsuke; Hase, Koji; Ohno, Hiroshi; Suzu, Shinya

    2016-02-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), the long membrane extensions connecting distant cells, have emerged as a novel form of cell-to-cell communication. However, it is not fully understood how and to what extent TNTs contribute to intercellular spread of pathogens including HIV-1. In this study, we show that HIV-1 promotes TNT formation per se via its protein Nef and a cellular protein M-Sec, which appears to mediate approximately half of viral spread among monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). A small compound that inhibits M-Sec-induced TNT formation reduced HIV-1 production by almost half in MDMs. Such inhibition was not observed with Nef-deficient mutant HIV-1 that fails to promote TNT formation and replicates less efficiently than the wild-type HIV-1 in MDMs. The TNT inhibitor-sensitive/Nef-promoting viral production was also observed in a T cell line ectopically expressing M-Sec, but not in another M-Sec(-) T cell line. Our results suggest the importance of TNTs in HIV-1 spread among MDMs and might answer the long-standing question how Nef promotes HIV-1 production in a cell type-specific manner. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

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    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  2. The CD85j+ NK cell subset potently controls HIV-1 replication in autologous dendritic cells.

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    Daniel Scott-Algara

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells and dendritic cells (DC are thought to play critical roles in the first phases of HIV infection. In this study, we examined changes in the NK cell repertoire and functions occurring in response to early interaction with HIV-infected DC, using an autologous in vitro NK/DC coculture system. We show that NK cell interaction with HIV-1-infected autologous monocyte-derived DC (MDDC modulates NK receptor expression. In particular, expression of the CD85j receptor on NK cells was strongly down-regulated upon coculture with HIV-1-infected MDDC. We demonstrate that CD85j(+ NK cells exert potent control of HIV-1 replication in single-round and productively HIV-1-infected MDDC, whereas CD85j(- NK cells induce a modest and transient decrease of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 suppression in MDCC by CD85j(+ NK cells required cell-to-cell contact and did not appear mediated by cytotoxicity or by soluble factors. HIV-1 inhibition was abolished when NK-MDDC interaction through the CD85j receptor was blocked with a recombinant CD85j molecule, whereas inhibition was only slightly counteracted by blocking HLA class I molecules, which are known CD85j ligands. After masking HLA class I molecules with specific antibodies, a fraction of HIV-1 infected MDDC was still strongly stained by a recombinant CD85j protein. These results suggest that CD85j(+ NK cell inhibition of HIV-1 replication in MDDC is mainly mediated by CD85j interaction with an unknown ligand (distinct from HLA class I molecules preferentially expressed on HIV-1-infected MDDC.

  3. Proteasome-independent degradation of HIV-1 in naturally non-permissive human placental trophoblast cells

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    Barré-Sinoussi Françoise

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human placenta-derived cell line BeWo has been demonstrated to be restrictive to cell-free HIV-1 infection. BeWo cells are however permissive to infection by VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1, which enters cells by a receptor-independent mechanism, and to infection by HIV-1 via a cell-to-cell route. Results Here we analysed viral entry in wild type BeWo (CCR5+, CXCR4+ and BeWo-CD4+ (CD4+, CCR5+, CXCR4+ cells. We report that HIV-1 internalisation is not restricted in either cell line. Levels of internalised p24 antigen between VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes and R5 or X4 virions were comparable. We next analysed the fate of internalised virions; X4 and R5 HIV-1 virions were less stable over time in BeWo cells than VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes. We then investigated the role of the proteasome in restricting cell-free HIV-1 infection in BeWo cells using proteasome inhibitors. We observed an increase in the levels of VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 infection in proteasome-inhibitor treated cells, but the infection by R5-Env or X4-Env pseudotyped virions remains restricted. Conclusion Collectively these results suggest that cell-free HIV-1 infection encounters a surface block leading to a non-productive entry route, which either actively targets incoming virions for non-proteasomal degradation, and impedes their release into the cytoplasm, or causes the inactivation of mechanisms essential for viral replication.

  4. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

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    Benaroch Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective

  5. HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by native-like envelope trimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Rogier W.; van Gils, Marit J.; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J.; Burger, Judith A.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne C.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G.; Seaman, Michael S.; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K.; Klasse, Per Johan; Labranche, Celia; Schief, William R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Montefiori, David C.; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505

  6. Tenascin-C is an innate broad-spectrum, HIV-1-neutralizing protein in breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Genevieve G; Jaeger, Frederick H; Amos, Joshua D; Ho, Carrie; Kunz, Erika L; Anasti, Kara; Stamper, Lisa W; Liebl, Brooke E; Barbas, Kimberly H; Ohashi, Tomoo; Moseley, Martin Arthur; Liao, Hua-Xin; Erickson, Harold P; Alam, S Munir; Permar, Sallie R

    2013-11-05

    Achieving an AIDS-free generation will require elimination of postnatal transmission of HIV-1 while maintaining the nutritional and immunologic benefits of breastfeeding for infants in developing regions. Maternal/infant antiretroviral prophylaxis can reduce postnatal HIV-1 transmission, yet toxicities and the development of drug-resistant viral strains may limit the effectiveness of this strategy. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, greater than 90% of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding remain uninfected, despite daily mucosal exposure to the virus for up to 2 y. Moreover, milk of uninfected women inherently neutralizes HIV-1 and prevents virus transmission in animal models, yet the factor(s) responsible for this anti-HIV activity is not well-defined. In this report, we identify a primary HIV-1-neutralizing protein in breast milk, Tenascin-C (TNC). TNC is an extracellular matrix protein important in fetal development and wound healing, yet its antimicrobial properties have not previously been established. Purified TNC captured and neutralized multiclade chronic and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants, and depletion of TNC abolished the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of milk. TNC bound the HIV-1 Envelope protein at a site that is induced upon engagement of its primary receptor, CD4, and is blocked by V3 loop- (19B and F39F) and chemokine coreceptor binding site-directed (17B) monoclonal antibodies. Our results demonstrate the ability of an innate mucosal host protein found in milk to neutralize HIV-1 via binding to the chemokine coreceptor site, potentially explaining why the majority of HIV-1-exposed breastfed infants are protected against mucosal HIV-1 transmission.

  7. Cell-to-cell spread of HIV permits ongoing replication despite antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Alex; Kim, Jocelyn T; Balazs, Alejandro B; Dekel, Erez; Mayo, Avi; Milo, Ron; Baltimore, David

    2011-08-17

    Latency and ongoing replication have both been proposed to explain the drug-insensitive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reservoir maintained during antiretroviral therapy. Here we explore a novel mechanism for ongoing HIV replication in the face of antiretroviral drugs. We propose a model whereby multiple infections per cell lead to reduced sensitivity to drugs without requiring drug-resistant mutations, and experimentally validate the model using multiple infections per cell by cell-free HIV in the presence of the drug tenofovir. We then examine the drug sensitivity of cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a mode of HIV transmission that can lead to multiple infection events per target cell. Infections originating from cell-free virus decrease strongly in the presence of antiretrovirals tenofovir and efavirenz whereas infections involving cell-to-cell spread are markedly less sensitive to the drugs. The reduction in sensitivity is sufficient to keep multiple rounds of infection from terminating in the presence of drugs. We examine replication from cell-to-cell spread in the presence of clinical drug concentrations using a stochastic infection model and find that replication is intermittent, without substantial accumulation of mutations. If cell-to-cell spread has the same properties in vivo, it may have adverse consequences for the immune system, lead to therapy failure in individuals with risk factors, and potentially contribute to viral persistence and hence be a barrier to curing HIV infection.

  8. German-Austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy and in HIV1-exposed newborn, update 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Bernd; Beichert, Matthias; Marcus, Ulrich; Grubert, Thomas; Gingelmaier, Andrea; Haberl, Annette; Schmied, Brigitte

    2009-11-03

    In Germany during the last years about 200-250 HIV1-infected pregnant women delivered a baby each year, a number that is currently increasing. To determine the HIV-status early in pregnancy voluntary HIV-testing of all pregnant women is recommended in Germany and Austria as part of prenatal care. In those cases, where HIV1-infection was known during pregnancy, since 1995 the rate of vertical transmission of HIV1 was reduced to 1-2%. - This low transmission rate has been achieved by the combination of anti-retroviral therapy of pregnant women, caesarean section scheduled before onset of labour, anti-retroviral post exposition prophylaxis in the newborn and refraining from breast-feeding by the HIV1-infected mother. To keep pace with new results in research, approval of new anti-retroviral drugs and changes in the general treatment recommendations for HIV1-infected adults, in 1998, 2001, 2003 and 2005 an interdisciplinary consensus meeting was held. Gynaecologists, infectious disease specialists, paediatricians, pharmacologists, virologists and members of the German AIDS Hilfe (NGO) were participating in this conference to update the prevention strategies. A fifth update became necessary in 2008. The updating process was started in January 2008 and was terminated in September 2008. The guidelines provide new recommendations on the indication and the starting point for HIV-therapy in pregnancies without complications, drugs and drug combinations to be used preferably in these pregnancies and updated information on adverse effects of anti-retroviral drugs. Also the procedures for different scenarios and risk constellations in pregnancy have been specified again. - With these current guidelines in Germany and Austria the low rate of vertical HIV1-transmission should be further maintained.

  9. Adding new dimensions: towards an integrative understanding of HIV-1 spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fackler, Oliver T; Murooka, Thomas T; Imle, Andrea; Mempel, Thorsten R

    2014-08-01

    In vitro studies in primary or immortalized cells continue to be used to elucidate the essential principles that govern the interactions between HIV-1 and isolated target cells. However, until recently, substantial technical barriers prevented this information from being efficiently translated to the more complex scenario of HIV-1 spread in the host in vivo, which has limited our understanding of the impact of host physiological parameters on the spread of HIV-1. In this Review, we discuss the recent development of imaging approaches to visualize HIV-1 spread and the adaptation of these approaches to organotypic ex vivo models and animal models. We focus on new concepts, including the mechanisms and in vivo relevance of cell-cell transmission for HIV-1 spread and the function of the HIV-1 pathogenesis factor Nef, which have emerged from the application of these integrative approaches in complex cell systems.

  10. Catechins containing a galloyl moiety as potential anti-HIV-1 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yali; Jiang, Fan; Liu, Ping; Chen, Wei; Yi, Kejia

    2012-06-01

    Catechins containing galloyl moieties are important natural antioxidant compounds. In this paper, we review the multiple mechanisms whereby catechins containing a galloyl moiety can target key proteins to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV-1, as well as HIV-1 fusion, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, HIV-1 integrase and HIV-1 protease. Furthermore, catechins with a galloyl moiety can mediate host cell factors such as nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB and casein kinase II to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The most significant inhibitory effect is blocking gp120 binding to isolated human CD4+ T cells. The multiple mechanisms underlying the anti-HIV activity of galloyl-containing catechins predict that these catechins could be used as alternative therapies in the treatment of HIV infection. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phylodynamics of the HIV-1 epidemic in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatorre, Edson; Bello, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the HIV-1 epidemic in Cuba displayed a complex molecular epidemiologic profile with circulation of several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRF); but the evolutionary and population history of those viral variants remains unknown. HIV-1 pol sequences of the most prevalent Cuban lineages (subtypes B, C and G, CRF18_cpx, CRF19_cpx, and CRFs20/23/24_BG) isolated between 1999 and 2011 were analyzed. Maximum-likelihood analyses revealed multiple introductions of subtype B (n≥66), subtype C (n≥10), subtype G (n≥8) and CRF18_cpx (n≥2) viruses in Cuba. The bulk of HIV-1 infections in this country, however, was caused by dissemination of a few founder strains probably introduced from North America/Europe (clades B(CU-I) and B(CU-II)), east Africa (clade C(CU-I)) and central Africa (clades G(CU), CRF18(CU) and CRF19(CU)), or locally generated (clades CRFs20/23/24_BG). Bayesian-coalescent analyses show that the major HIV-1 founder strains were introduced into Cuba during 1985-1995; whereas the CRFs_BG strains emerged in the second half of the 1990s. Most HIV-1 Cuban clades appear to have experienced an initial period of fast exponential spread during the 1990s and early 2000s, followed by a more recent decline in growth rate. The median initial growth rate of HIV-1 Cuban clades ranged from 0.4 year⁻¹ to 1.6 year⁻¹. Thus, the HIV-1 epidemic in Cuba has been a result of the successful introduction of a few viral strains that began to circulate at a rather late time of the AIDS pandemic, but then were rapidly disseminated through local transmission networks.

  12. Increased genetic diversity of HIV-1 circulating in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hon-Kwan Chen

    Full Text Available HIV-1 group M strains are characterized into 9 pure subtypes and 48 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs. Recent studies have identified the presence of new HIV-1 recombinants in Hong Kong and their complexity continues to increase. This study aims to characterize the HIV-1 genetic diversity in Hong Kong. Phylogenetic analyses were performed by using HIV-1 pol sequences including protease and partial reverse transcriptase isolated from 1045 local patients in Hong Kong from 2003 to 2008. For the pol sequences with unassigned genotype, the evidence of recombination was determined by using sliding-window based bootscan plots and their env C2V3 region were also sequenced. Epidemiological background of these patients was further collected. The pol phylogenetic analyses highlighted the extent of HIV-1 genetic diversity in Hong Kong. Subtype B (450/1045; 43.1% and CRF01_AE (469/1045; 44.9% variants were clearly predominant. Other genotypes (126/1045; 12.1% including 3 defined subtypes, 10 CRFs, 1 unassigned subtype and 33 recombinants with 11 different mosaic patterns were observed. Recombinants of subtype B and CRF01_AE were mainly found among local Chinese MSM throughout 2004 to 2008, while the CRF02_AG and subtype G recombinants were circulating among non-Chinese Asian population in Hong Kong through heterosexual transmission starting from 2008. Our study demonstrated the complex recombination of HIV-1 in Hong Kong and the need in developing surveillance system for tracking the distribution of new HIV-1 genetic variants.

  13. Impact of Cocaine Abuse on HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi eDash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over 1.2 million people in the United States are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Tremendous progress has been made over the past three decades on many fronts in the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 disease. However, HIV-1 infection is incurable and antiretroviral drugs continue to remain the only effective treatment option for HIV infected patients. Unfortunately, only three out of ten HIV-1 infected individuals in the US have the virus under control. Thus, majority of HIV-1 infected individuals in the US are either unaware of their infection status or not connected/retained to care or are non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy (ART. This national public health crisis, as well as the ongoing global HIV/AIDS pandemic, is further exacerbated by substance abuse, which serves as a powerful cofactor at every stage of HIV/AIDS including transmission, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment. Clinical studies indicate that substance abuse may increase viral load, accelerate disease progression and worsen AIDS-related mortality even among ART adherent patients. However, confirming a direct causal link between substance abuse and HIV/AIDS in human patients remains a highly challenging endeavor. In this review we will discuss the recent and past developments in clinical and basic science research on the effects of cocaine abuse on HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis treatment reduces vaginal HIV-1 shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia; Amedee, Angela; Clark, Rebecca A; Dumestre, Jeanne; Theall, Katherine P; Myers, Leann; Hagensee, Michael E; Farley, Thomas A; Martin, David H

    2009-01-01

    Vaginal HIV-1 shedding has been associated with Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection and could play a role in HIV transmission. The purpose of the study was to examine if effective TV treatment reduces the presence of vaginal HIV-1 RNA. TV+ women attending an HIV outpatient clinic in New Orleans, LA, who resolved infection (n = 58) and TV-negative controls (n = 92), matched on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were examined and interviewed at baseline, 1, and 3 months. TV status was tested by culture and the amount of cell free HIV-1 RNA in the vaginal fluids was determined by the Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor ultrasensitive assay. : Most women (81.3%) were black and the mean age was 37.5 (SD 8.7). At baseline, 46.0% had plasma HIV-1 RNA >/=10,000 copies/mL, 26.4% had CD4<200 cells/muL, 54.7% were taking ART, and only 26.0% had detectable HIV-1 RNA in their vaginal fluids. TV-positive women who were effectively treated for TV were less likely to shed HIV vaginally at 3-months post-treatment compared to baseline (R.R. 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12-0.92, P = 0.03), whereas there was no change for TV-negative women. This study provides additional support that reducing TV infection among HIV-positive women may have an impact on the prevention of HIV transmission. Reasons for the delayed treatment effect and the effect on cervical shedding need further investigation.

  15. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  16. HIV epidemiology. The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Nuno R; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Baele, Guy; Bedford, Trevor; Ward, Melissa J; Tatem, Andrew J; Sousa, João D; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Pépin, Jacques; Posada, David; Peeters, Martine; Pybus, Oliver G; Lemey, Philippe

    2014-10-03

    Thirty years after the discovery of HIV-1, the early transmission, dissemination, and establishment of the virus in human populations remain unclear. Using statistical approaches applied to HIV-1 sequence data from central Africa, we show that from the 1920s Kinshasa (in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo) was the focus of early transmission and the source of pre-1960 pandemic viruses elsewhere. Location and dating estimates were validated using the earliest HIV-1 archival sample, also from Kinshasa. The epidemic histories of HIV-1 group M and nonpandemic group O were similar until ~1960, after which group M underwent an epidemiological transition and outpaced regional population growth. Our results reconstruct the early dynamics of HIV-1 and emphasize the role of social changes and transport networks in the establishment of this virus in human populations. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. A macaque model of HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Ambrose, Zandrea; Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Piatak, Michael; Yuan, Fang; Trubey, Charles M.; Coalter, Vicky; Kiser, Rebecca; Schneider, Doug; Smedley, Jeremy; Pung, Rhonda; Gathuka, Mercy; Estes, Jacob D.; Veazey, Ronald S.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of a primate model that utilizes HIV-1 as the challenge virus is an impediment to AIDS research; existing models generally employ simian viruses that are divergent from HIV-1, reducing their usefulness in preclinical investigations. Based on an understanding of species-specific variation in primate TRIM5 and APOBEC3 antiretroviral genes, we constructed simian-tropic (st)HIV-1 strains that differ from HIV-1 only in the vif gene. We demonstrate that such minimally modified stHIV-1 stra...

  18. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HIV-1 viral loads between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HIV-1 test, Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Hofmann, Jörg; Izopet, Jacques; Kühn, Sebastian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Mancon, Alessandro; Marcos, Mª Angeles; Mileto, Davide; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Viral load monitoring is essential for patients under treatment for HIV. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the novel, automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. ¥ OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the clinical performance of the new quantitative VERIS HIV-1 Assay at multiple EU laboratories. Method comparison with the VERIS HIV-1 Assay was performed with 415 specimens at 5 sites tested with COBAS ® AmpliPrep/COBAS ® TaqMan ® HIV-1 Test, v2.0, 169 specimens at 3 sites tested with RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and 202 specimens from 2 sites tested with VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Patient monitoring sample results from 4 sites were also compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed the average bias between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay to be 0.28, 0.39, and 0.61 log 10 cp/mL, respectively. Bias at low end levels below 1000cp/mL showed predicted bias to be HIV-1 Assay versus COBAS HIV-1 Test and RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and HIV-1 Assay. Analysis on 174 specimens tested with the 0.175mL volume VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test showed average bias of 0.39 log 10 cp/mL. Patient monitoring results using VERIS HIV-1 Assay demonstrated similar viral load trends over time to all comparators. The VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the DxN VERIS System demonstrated comparable clinical performance to COBAS ® HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Xu [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Mellon, Michael [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States); Bowder, Dane [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Quinn, Meghan [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States); Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska—Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Xiang, Shi-Hua, E-mail: sxiang2@unl.edu [Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture.

  20. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 variants circulating in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbreglia Costanza

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The continuous identification of HIV-1 non-B subtypes and recombinant forms in Italy indicates the need of constant molecular epidemiology survey of genetic forms circulating and transmitted in the resident population. Methods The distribution of HIV-1 subtypes has been evaluated in 25 seropositive individuals residing in Italy, most of whom were infected through a sexual route during the 1995–2005 period. Each sample has been characterized by detailed molecular and phylogenetic analyses. Results 18 of the 25 samples were positive at HIV-1 PCR amplification. Three samples showed a nucleotide divergence compatible with a non-B subtype classification. The phylogenetic analysis, performed on both HIV-1 env and gag regions, confirms the molecular sub-typing prediction, given that 1 sample falls into the C subtype and 2 into the G subtype. The B subtype isolates show high levels of intra-subtype nucleotide divergence, compatible with a long-lasting epidemic and a progressive HIV-1 molecular diversification. Conclusion The Italian HIV-1 epidemic is still mostly attributable to the B subtype, regardless the transmission route, which shows an increasing nucleotide heterogeneity. Heterosexual transmission and the interracial blending, however, are slowly introducing novel HIV-1 subtypes. Therefore, a molecular monitoring is needed to follow the constant evolution of the HIV-1 epidemic.

  1. German-austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy and in HIV1-exposed newborn - update 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchholz Bernd

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract German-Austrian recommendations for HIV1-therapy in pregnancy - Update 2008 Bernd Buchholz (University Medical Centre Mannheim, Pediatric Clinic, Matthias Beichert (Mannheim, Gynecology and Obstetrics Practice, Ulrich Marcus (Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Thomas Grubert, Andrea Gingelmaier (Gynecology Clinic of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Dr. med. Annette Haberl (HIV-Department, J. W. Goethe-University Hospital, Frankfurt, Dr. med. Brigitte Schmied (Otto-Wagner Spital, Wien. In Germany during the last years about 200-250 HIV1-infected pregnant women delivered a baby each year, a number that is currently increasing. To determine the HIV-status early in pregnancy voluntary HIV-testing of all pregnant women is recommended in Germany and Austria as part of prenatal care. In those cases, where HIV1-infection was known during pregnancy, since 1995 the rate of vertical transmission of HIV1 was reduced to 1-2%. This low transmission rate has been achieved by the combination of anti-retroviral therapy of pregnant women, caesarean section scheduled before onset of labour, anti-retroviral post exposition prophylaxis in the newborn and refraining from breast-feeding by the HIV1-infected mother. To keep pace with new results in research, approval of new anti-retroviral drugs and changes in the general treatment recommendations for HIV1-infected adults, in 1998, 2001, 2003 and 2005 an interdisciplinary consensus meeting was held. Gynaecologists, infectious disease specialists, paediatricians, pharmacologists, virologists and members of the German AIDS Hilfe (NGO were participating in this conference to update the prevention strategies. A fifth update became necessary in 2008. The updating process was started in January 2008 and was terminated in September 2008. The guidelines provide new recommendations on the indication and the starting point for HIV-therapy in pregnancies without complications, drugs and drug combinations to be

  2. Case report of a haemovigilance investigation using phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A R; Petry, A; Gräf, T; Vandresen, R; Kupek, E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the first report of a transfusion-acquired HIV-1 infection and to verify transmission from the donor to the recipients using phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 DNA sequences in a Brazilian blood bank. Although haemovigilance procedures based on phylogenetic analysis of HIV have been reported in several countries, this type of study has yet to be conducted in Latin America. Upon identifying a HIV-1-positive repeat blood donor by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) blood screening, all recipients of the donor's previous donation were identified and tested for HIV-1 by EIA, nucleic acid amplification test and HIV-1 DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. One of the recipients tested positive for HIV-1. The phylogenetic analysis showed a high genetic similarity among the viruses, thus supporting the hypothesis of transmission from the donor to the recipient. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 DNA sequences has been a decisive tool in verifying suspected transmission of the virus from blood donor to recipient in Brazil. © 2011 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2011 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  3. The Role of Cationic Polypeptides in Modulating HIV-1 Infection of the Cervicovaginal Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Liese Cole

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The mucosa and overlying fluid of the female reproductive tract (FRT are portals for the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. Toward the ongoing development of topically applied microbicides and mucosal vaccines against HIV-1, it is evermore important to understand how the dynamic FRT mucosa is involved in controlling transmission and infection of HIV-1. Cationic peptides and proteins are the principal innate immune effector molecules of mucosal surfaces, and interact in a combinatorial fashion to modulate HIV-1 infection of the cervix and vagina. While cationic peptides and proteins have historically been categorized as antimicrobial or have other host-benefitting roles, an increasing number of these molecules have been found to augment HIV-1 infection and potentially antagonize host defense. Complex environmental factors such as hormonal fluctuations and/or bacterial and viral co-infections provide additional challenges to both experimentation and interpretation of results. In the context of heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, this review explores how various cationic peptides and proteins participate in modulating host defense against HIV-1 of the cervicovaginal mucosa.

  4. Dual neonate vaccine platform against HIV-1 and M. tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hopkins

    Full Text Available Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and tuberculosis (TB are two of the world's most devastating diseases. The first vaccine the majority of infants born in Africa receive is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG as a prevention against TB. BCG protects against disseminated disease in the first 10 years of life, but provides a variable protection against pulmonary TB and enhancing boost delivered by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA expressing antigen 85A (Ag85A of M. tuberculosis is currently in phase IIb evaluation in African neonates. If the newborn's mother is positive for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, the baby is at high risk of acquiring HIV-1 through breastfeeding. We suggested that a vaccination consisting of recombinant BCG expressing HIV-1 immunogen administered at birth followed by a boost with rMVA sharing the same immunogen could serve as a strategy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 and rMVA expressing an African HIV-1-derived immunogen HIVA is currently in phase I trials in African neonates. Here, we aim to develop a dual neonate vaccine platform against HIV-1 and TB consisting of BCG.HIVA administered at birth followed by a boost with MVA.HIVA.85A. Thus, mMVA.HIVA.85A and sMVA.HIVA.85A vaccines were constructed, in which the transgene transcription is driven by either modified H5 or short synthetic promoters, respectively, and tested for immunogenicity alone and in combination with BCG.HIVA(222. mMVA.HIVA.85A was produced markerless and thus suitable for clinical manufacture. While sMVA.HIVA.85A expressed higher levels of the immunogens, it was less immunogenic than mMVA.HIVA.85A in BALB/c mice. A BCG.HIVA(222-mMVA.HIVA.85A prime-boost regimen induced robust T cell responses to both HIV-1 and M. tuberculosis. Therefore, proof-of-principle for a dual anti-HIV-1/M. tuberculosis infant vaccine platform is established. Induction of immune responses against these pathogens

  5. Novel Acylguanidine-Based Inhibitor of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwimanzi, Philip; Tietjen, Ian; Miller, Scott C.; Shahid, Aniqa; Cobarrubias, Kyle; Kinloch, Natalie N.; Baraki, Bemuluyigza; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Fedida, David; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of transmissible HIV-1 strains with resistance to antiretroviral drugs highlights a continual need for new therapies. Here we describe a novel acylguanidine-containing compound, 1-(2-(azepan-1-yl)nicotinoyl)guanidine (or SM111), that inhibits in vitro replication of HIV-1, including strains resistant to licensed protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase inhibitors, without major cellular toxicity. At inhibitory concentrations, intracellular p24Gag production was unaffected, but virion release (measured as extracellular p24Gag) was reduced and virion infectivity was substantially impaired, suggesting that SM111 acts at a late stage of viral replication. SM111-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 was partially overcome by a Vpu I17R mutation alone or a Vpu W22* truncation in combination with Env N136Y. These mutations enhanced virion infectivity and Env expression on the surface of infected cells in the absence and presence of SM111 but also impaired Vpu's ability to downregulate CD4 and BST2/tetherin. Taken together, our results support acylguanidines as a class of HIV-1 inhibitors with a distinct mechanism of action compared to that of licensed antiretrovirals. Further research on SM111 and similar compounds may help to elucidate knowledge gaps related to Vpu's role in promoting viral egress and infectivity. IMPORTANCE New inhibitors of HIV-1 replication may be useful as therapeutics to counteract drug resistance and as reagents to perform more detailed studies of viral pathogenesis. SM111 is a small molecule that blocks the replication of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 strains by impairing viral release and substantially reducing virion infectivity, most likely through its ability to prevent Env expression at the infected cell surface. Partial resistance to SM111 is mediated by mutations in Vpu and/or Env, suggesting that the compound affects host/viral protein interactions that are important during viral egress. Further characterization of

  6. HIV Cell-to-Cell Spread Results in Earlier Onset of Viral Gene Expression by Multiple Infections per Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullé, Mikaël; Müller, Thorsten G.; Dähling, Sabrina; Jackson, Laurelle; Mahamed, Deeqa; Oom, Lance; Lustig, Gila

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a directed mode of viral transmission, has been observed to be more rapid than cell-free infection. However, a mechanism for earlier onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was previously uncharacterized. Here we used time-lapse microscopy combined with automated image analysis to quantify the timing of the onset of HIV gene expression in a fluorescent reporter cell line, as well as single cell staining for infection over time in primary cells. We compared cell-to-cell spread of HIV to cell-free infection, and limited both types of transmission to a two-hour window to minimize differences due to virus transit time to the cell. The mean time to detectable onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was accelerated by 19% in the reporter cell line and by 35% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells relative to cell-free HIV infection. Neither factors secreted by infected cells, nor contact with infected cells in the absence of transmission, detectably changed onset. We recapitulated the earlier onset by infecting with multiple cell-free viruses per cell. Surprisingly, the acceleration in onset of viral gene expression was not explained by cooperativity between infecting virions. Instead, more rapid onset was consistent with a model where the fastest expressing virus out of the infecting virus pool sets the time for infection independently of the other co-infecting viruses. PMID:27812216

  7. HIV Cell-to-Cell Spread Results in Earlier Onset of Viral Gene Expression by Multiple Infections per Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullé, Mikaël; Müller, Thorsten G; Dähling, Sabrina; Ganga, Yashica; Jackson, Laurelle; Mahamed, Deeqa; Oom, Lance; Lustig, Gila; Neher, Richard A; Sigal, Alex

    2016-11-01

    Cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a directed mode of viral transmission, has been observed to be more rapid than cell-free infection. However, a mechanism for earlier onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was previously uncharacterized. Here we used time-lapse microscopy combined with automated image analysis to quantify the timing of the onset of HIV gene expression in a fluorescent reporter cell line, as well as single cell staining for infection over time in primary cells. We compared cell-to-cell spread of HIV to cell-free infection, and limited both types of transmission to a two-hour window to minimize differences due to virus transit time to the cell. The mean time to detectable onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was accelerated by 19% in the reporter cell line and by 35% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells relative to cell-free HIV infection. Neither factors secreted by infected cells, nor contact with infected cells in the absence of transmission, detectably changed onset. We recapitulated the earlier onset by infecting with multiple cell-free viruses per cell. Surprisingly, the acceleration in onset of viral gene expression was not explained by cooperativity between infecting virions. Instead, more rapid onset was consistent with a model where the fastest expressing virus out of the infecting virus pool sets the time for infection independently of the other co-infecting viruses.

  8. Diagnostik af HIV-1 infektionen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, C B; Dickmeiss, E; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1991-01-01

    Different methods have been developed for the diagnosis of HIV infection, i.e. detection of antibodies, antigen and proviral DNA. ELISA methods for detecting HIV-1 antibodies are widely used as screening assays. A sample which is repeatedly positive with ELISA is re-tested with a confirmatory test...... in a proportion of patients. Detection and quantitation of HIV antigen are used as indicators of disease progression and for monitoring the antiviral efficacy of therapeutic interventions. When no antibodies or antigens can be detected in persons suspected of having HIV infection, culture of HIV can be performed....... For research purposes, detection of small amounts of proviral DNA can be made with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method is not yet applicable in routine diagnosis of HIV infection....

  9. Contraceptive method and pregnancy incidence among women in HIV-1-serodiscordant partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngure, Kenneth; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly R; Celum, Connie; Cohen, Craig R; Odoyo, Josephine; Rees, Helen; Kiarie, James N; Were, Edwin; Baeten, Jared M

    2012-02-20

    Effective contraception reduces unintended pregnancies and is a central strategy to reduce vertical HIV-1 transmission for HIV-1-infected women. Among 2269 HIV-1-seropositive and 1085-seronegative women from seven African countries who were members of HIV-1-serodiscordant heterosexual partnerships and who were participating in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial, we assessed pregnancy incidence according to contraceptive method using multivariate Andersen-Gill analysis. Compared with women using no contraceptive method, pregnancy incidence was significantly reduced among HIV-1-seropositive and HIV-1-seronegative women using injectable contraception [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.24, P = 0.001 and aHR 0.25, P pregnancy risk only among HIV-1-seropositive women (aHR 0.51, P = 0.004) but not seronegative women (aHR 0.64, P = 0.3), and, for both seropositive and seronegative women, oral contraceptive pill users were more likely to become pregnant than injectable contraceptive users (aHR 2.22, P = 0.01 for HIV-1-seropositive women and aHR 2.65, P = 0.09 for HIV-1-seronegative women). Condoms, when reported as being used as the primary contraceptive method, marginally reduced pregnancy incidence (aHR 0.85, P = 0.1 for seropositive women and aHR 0.67, P = 0.02 for seronegative women). There were no pregnancies among women using intrauterine devices, implantable methods or who had undergone surgical sterilization, although these methods were used relatively infrequently. Family planning programs and HIV-1 prevention trials need innovative ways to motivate uptake and sustained use of longer acting, less user-dependent contraception for women who do not desire pregnancy.

  10. BioAfrica's HIV-1 Proteomics Resource: Combining protein data with bioinformatics tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Michelle

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most Internet online resources for investigating HIV biology contain either bioinformatics tools, protein information or sequence data. The objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive online proteomics resource that integrates bioinformatics with the latest information on HIV-1 protein structure, gene expression, post-transcriptional/post-translational modification, functional activity, and protein-macromolecule interactions. The BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteomics Resource http://bioafrica.mrc.ac.za/proteomics/index.html is a website that contains detailed information about the HIV-1 proteome and protease cleavage sites, as well as data-mining tools that can be used to manipulate and query protein sequence data, a BLAST tool for initiating structural analyses of HIV-1 proteins, and a proteomics tools directory. The Proteome section contains extensive data on each of 19 HIV-1 proteins, including their functional properties, a sample analysis of HIV-1HXB2, structural models and links to other online resources. The HIV-1 Protease Cleavage Sites section provides information on the position, subtype variation and genetic evolution of Gag, Gag-Pol and Nef cleavage sites. The HIV-1 Protein Data-mining Tool includes a set of 27 group M (subtypes A through K reference sequences that can be used to assess the influence of genetic variation on immunological and functional domains of the protein. The BLAST Structure Tool identifies proteins with similar, experimentally determined topologies, and the Tools Directory provides a categorized list of websites and relevant software programs. This combined database and software repository is designed to facilitate the capture, retrieval and analysis of HIV-1 protein data, and to convert it into clinically useful information relating to the pathogenesis, transmission and therapeutic response of different HIV-1 variants. The HIV-1 Proteomics Resource is readily accessible through the BioAfrica website at

  11. Effect on transmission of HIV-1 resistance of timing of implementation of viral load monitoring to determine switches from first to second-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Pillay, Deenan; Garnett, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    There is concern that antiretroviral therapy (ART) use with only clinical monitoring for failure will result in high rates of transmission of virus with resistance to drugs currently in use.......There is concern that antiretroviral therapy (ART) use with only clinical monitoring for failure will result in high rates of transmission of virus with resistance to drugs currently in use....

  12. HIV-1 epidemiology and circulating subtypes in the countryside of South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Sperotto Librelotto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has spread worldwide, with several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms. Brazil has an incidence of 20.5 HIV-1/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS patients per 100,000 inhabitants; however, the Southernmost State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS has more than twice the number of HIV-1-infected people (41.3/100,000 inhabitants and a different pattern of subtype frequencies, as previously reported in studies conducted in the capital (Porto Alegre and its metropolitan region. This study examined HIV-1/AIDS epidemiological and molecular aspects in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. METHODS: Socio-demographic, clinical and risk behavioral characteristics were obtained from HIV-1-positive adult patients using a structured questionnaire. HIV-1 subtypes were determined by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing of the pol and env genes. RESULTS: The study sample included 149 (55% women patients with a mean age of 41.8 ± 11.9 years. Most (73.8% patients had a low education level and reported heterosexual practices as the most (91.9% probable transmission route. HIV-1 subtypes were detected in 26 patients: 18 (69.2% infected with subtype C, six (23.1% infected with subtype B and two (7.7% infected with BC recombinant forms. CONCLUSIONS: These data highlight the increasing number of HIV-1 subtype C infections in the countryside of South Brazil.

  13. HIV-1 epidemiology and circulating subtypes in the countryside of South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librelotto, Carina Sperotto; Gräf, Tiago; Simon, Daniel; de Almeida, Sabrina Esteves Matos; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has spread worldwide, with several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms. Brazil has an incidence of 20.5 HIV-1/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients per 100,000 inhabitants; however, the Southernmost State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) has more than twice the number of HIV-1-infected people (41.3/100,000 inhabitants) and a different pattern of subtype frequencies, as previously reported in studies conducted in the capital (Porto Alegre) and its metropolitan region. This study examined HIV-1/AIDS epidemiological and molecular aspects in the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. Socio-demographic, clinical and risk behavioral characteristics were obtained from HIV-1-positive adult patients using a structured questionnaire. HIV-1 subtypes were determined by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the pol and env genes. The study sample included 149 (55% women) patients with a mean age of 41.8 ± 11.9 years. Most (73.8%) patients had a low education level and reported heterosexual practices as the most (91.9%) probable transmission route. HIV-1 subtypes were detected in 26 patients: 18 (69.2%) infected with subtype C, six (23.1%) infected with subtype B and two (7.7%) infected with BC recombinant forms. These data highlight the increasing number of HIV-1 subtype C infections in the countryside of South Brazil.

  14. Contribution of Epidemiological Predictors in Unraveling the Phylogeographic History of HIV-1 Subtype C in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräf, Tiago; Vrancken, Bram; Maletich Junqueira, Dennis; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Esteves de Matos Almeida, Sabrina; Pinto, Aguinaldo Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The phylogeographic history of the Brazilian HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) epidemic is still unclear. Previous studies have mainly focused on the capital cities of Brazilian federal states, and the fact that HIV-1C infections increase at a higher rate than subtype B infections in Brazil calls for a better understanding of the process of spatial spread. A comprehensive sequence data set sampled across 22 Brazilian locations was assembled and analyzed. A Bayesian phylogeographic generalized linear model approach was used to reconstruct the spatiotemporal history of HIV-1C in Brazil, considering several potential explanatory predictors of the viral diffusion process. Analyses were performed on several subsampled data sets in order to mitigate potential sample biases. We reveal a central role for the city of Porto Alegre, the capital of the southernmost state, in the Brazilian HIV-1C epidemic (HIV-1C_BR), and the northward expansion of HIV-1C_BR could be linked to source populations with higher HIV-1 burdens and larger proportions of HIV-1C infections. The results presented here bring new insights to the continuing discussion about the HIV-1C epidemic in Brazil and raise an alternative hypothesis for its spatiotemporal history. The current work also highlights how sampling bias can confound phylogeographic analyses and demonstrates the importance of incorporating external information to protect against this. Subtype C is responsible for the largest HIV infection burden worldwide, but our understanding of its transmission dynamics remains incomplete. Brazil witnessed a relatively recent introduction of HIV-1C compared to HIV-1B, but it swiftly spread throughout the south, where it now circulates as the dominant variant. The northward spread has been comparatively slow, and HIV-1B still prevails in that region. While epidemiological data and viral genetic analyses have both independently shed light on the dynamics of spread in isolation, their combination has not yet been

  15. Prospective Study of Acute HIV-1 Infection in Adults in East Africa and Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Merlin L.; Eller, Leigh A.; Kibuuka, Hannah; Rono, Kathleen; Maganga, Lucas; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kroon, Eugene; Sawe, Fred K.; Sinei, Samuel; Sriplienchan, Somchai; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Malia, Jennifer; Manak, Mark; de Souza, Mark S.; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Rolland, Morgane; Dorsey-Spitz, Julie; Eller, Michael A.; Milazzo, Mark; Li, Qun; Lewandowski, Andrew; Wu, Hao; Swann, Edith; O'Connell, Robert J.; Peel, Sheila; Dawson, Peter; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is a major contributor to transmission of HIV-1. An understanding of acute HIV-1 infection may be important in the development of treatment strategies to eradicate HIV-1 or achieve a functional cure. Methods We performed twice-weekly qualitative plasma HIV-1 RNA nucleic acid testing in 2276 volunteers who were at high risk for HIV-1 infection. For participants in whom acute HIV-1 infection was detected, clinical observations, quantitative measurements of plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (to assess viremia) and HIV antibodies, and results of immunophenotyping of lymphocytes were obtained twice weekly. Results Fifty of 112 volunteers with acute HIV-1 infection had two or more blood samples collected before HIV-1 antibodies were detected. The median peak viremia (6.7 log10 copies per milliliter) occurred 13 days after the first sample showed reactivity on nucleic acid testing. Reactivity on an enzyme immunoassay occurred at a median of 14 days. The nadir of viremia (4.3 log10 copies per milliliter) occurred at a median of 31 days and was nearly equivalent to the viral-load set point, the steady-state viremia that persists durably after resolution of acute viremia (median plasma HIV-1 RNA level, 4.4 log10 copies per milliliter). The peak viremia and downslope were correlated with the viral-load set point. Clinical manifestations of acute HIV-1 infection were most common just before and at the time of peak viremia. A median of one symptom of acute HIV-1 infection was recorded at a median of two study visits, and a median of one sign of acute HIV-1 infection was recorded at a median of three visits. Conclusions The viral-load set point occurred at a median of 31 days after the first detection of plasma viremia and correlated with peak viremia. Few symptoms and signs were observed during acute HIV-1 infection, and they were most common before peak viremia. (Funded by the Department of Defense and the National

  16. Controle de polidrâmnio recorrente em gestante portadora do HIV-1: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte,Geraldo; Figueiró-Filho,Ernesto Antonio; El Beitune,Patrícia; Quintana,Silvana Maria; Marcolin,Alessandra Cristina; Yano,Rafael Kioshi; Cavalli,Ricardo de Carvalho

    2004-01-01

    A redução da transmissão vertical (TV) do vírus da imunodeficiência humana tipo 1 (HIV-1) utilizando a profilaxia com a zidovudina (AZT) representa significativo avanço na assistência pré-natal e obstétrica destas pacientes. Condutas obstétricas invasivas são contra-indicadas em gestantes portadoras do HIV-1, em face do risco de aumento da taxa de TV deste vírus. Os autores relatam um caso de polidrâmnio recorrente em gestante portadora do HIV-1, que exigiu drenagem por amniocentese. Foram re...

  17. HIV-1 as RNA evolution machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben

    2011-01-01

    We have over the years studied several sequence or structural elements within the HIV-1 RNA genome. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the role of these RNA motifs in virus replication. We have developed HIV-1 evolution as a powerful research method to study different aspects of the viral

  18. T cell dynamics in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, D.R.; Boer, R.J. de; Wolthers, K.C.; Miedema, F.

    1999-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of HIV-1 infection is CD4⁺ T cell depletion. This statement is widely used in papers on HIV-1 research; however, while true, it is deceptively simplistic in that it fails to describe what is actually a complex change in the representation of T cell

  19. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  20. Herpes viruses and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations influence the virologic and immunologic milieu of the male genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Sara; Morris, Sheldon R; Anderson, Christy; Spina, Celsa A; Vargas, Milenka V; Young, Jason A; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Smith, Davey M

    2013-01-02

    To further understand the role that chronic viral infections of the male genital tract play on HIV-1 dynamics and replication. Retrospective, observational study including 236 paired semen and blood samples collected from 115 recently HIV-1 infected antiretroviral naive men who have sex with men. In this study, we evaluated the association of seminal HIV-1 shedding to coinfections with seven herpes viruses, blood plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, CD4 T-cell counts, presence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (DRMs) in HIV-1 pol, participants' age and stage of HIV-infection using multivariate generalized estimating equation methods. Associations between herpes virus shedding, seminal HIV-1 levels, number and immune activation of seminal T-cells was also investigated (Mann-Whitney). Seminal herpes virus shedding was observed in 75.7% of individuals. Blood HIV-1 RNA levels (P herpes virus (HHV)-8 levels (P herpes viruses seminal shedding in our cohort. Shedding of CMV, EBV and HHV-8 and absence of DRM were associated with increased frequency of HIV-1 shedding and/or higher levels of HIV-1 RNA in semen, which are likely important cofactors for HIV-1 transmission.

  1. Infected cell killing by HIV-1 protease promotes NF-kappaB dependent HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary D Bren

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells often results in apoptotic death of infected cells, yet it is unclear what evolutionary advantage this offers to HIV-1. Given the independent observations that acute T cell HIV-1 infection results in (1 NF-kappaB activation, (2 caspase 8 dependent apoptosis, and that (3 caspase 8 directly activates NF-kappaB, we questioned whether these three events might be interrelated. We first show that HIV-1 infected T cell apoptosis, NF-kappaB activation, and caspase 8 cleavage by HIV-1 protease are coincident. Next we show that HIV-1 protease not only cleaves procaspase 8, producing Casp8p41, but also independently stimulates NF-kappaB activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the HIV protease cleavage of caspase 8 is necessary for optimal NF-kappaB activation and that the HIV-1 protease specific cleavage fragment Casp8p41 is sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 replication through NF-kappaB dependent HIV-LTR activation both in vitro as well as in cells from HIV infected donors. Consequently, the molecular events which promote death of HIV-1 infected T cells function dually to promote HIV-1 replication, thereby favoring the propagation and survival of HIV-1.

  2. Contraceptive method and pregnancy incidence among African women in HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    NGURE, Kenneth; HEFFRON, Renee; MUGO, Nelly R.; CELUM, Connie; COHEN, Craig R.; ODOYO, Josephine; REES, Helen; KIARIE, James N.; WERE, Edwin; BAETEN, Jared M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective contraception reduces unintended pregnancies and is a central strategy to reduce vertical HIV-1 transmission for HIV-1 infected women. Methods Among 2269 HIV-1 seropositive and 1085 seronegative women from 7 African countries who were members of HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual partnerships and who were participating in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial, we assessed pregnancy incidence for women using various contraceptive methods using multivariate Andersen-Gill analysis. Results Compared with women using no contraceptive method, pregnancy incidence was significantly reduced among HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative women using injectable contraception (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.24, p=0.001 and aHR 0.25, ppregnancy risk only among HIV-1 seropositive women (aHR 0.51, p=0.004) but not seronegative women (aHR 0.64, p=0.3), and, for both seropositive and seronegative women, oral contraceptive pill users were more likely to become pregnant than injectable contraceptive users (aHR 2.22, p=0.01 for HIV-1 seropositive women and aHR 2.65, p=0.09 for HIV-1 seronegative women). Condoms, when reported as being used as the primary contraceptive method, marginally reduced pregnancy incidence (aHR 0.85, p=0.1 for seropositive women and aHR 0.67, p=0.02 for seronegative women). There were no pregnancies among women using intrauterine devices, implantable methods or who had undergone surgical sterilization, although these methods were used relatively infrequently. Conclusions Family planning programs and HIV-1 prevention trials need innovative ways to motivate uptake and sustained use of longer acting, less user-dependent contraception for women who do not desire pregnancy. PMID:22156966

  3. HIV-1 envelope subregion length variation during disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel E Curlin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The V3 loop of the HIV-1 Env protein is the primary determinant of viral coreceptor usage, whereas the V1V2 loop region is thought to influence coreceptor binding and participate in shielding of neutralization-sensitive regions of the Env glycoprotein gp120 from antibody responses. The functional properties and antigenicity of V1V2 are influenced by changes in amino acid sequence, sequence length and patterns of N-linked glycosylation. However, how these polymorphisms relate to HIV pathogenesis is not fully understood. We examined 5185 HIV-1 gp120 nucleotide sequence fragments and clinical data from 154 individuals (152 were infected with HIV-1 Subtype B. Sequences were aligned, translated, manually edited and separated into V1V2, C2, V3, C3, V4, C4 and V5 subregions. V1-V5 and subregion lengths were calculated, and potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNLGS counted. Loop lengths and PNLGS were examined as a function of time since infection, CD4 count, viral load, and calendar year in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. V1V2 length and PNLGS increased significantly through chronic infection before declining in late-stage infection. In cross-sectional analyses, V1V2 length also increased by calendar year between 1984 and 2004 in subjects with early and mid-stage illness. Our observations suggest that there is little selection for loop length at the time of transmission; following infection, HIV-1 adapts to host immune responses through increased V1V2 length and/or addition of carbohydrate moieties at N-linked glycosylation sites. V1V2 shortening during early and late-stage infection may reflect ineffective host immunity. Transmission from donors with chronic illness may have caused the modest increase in V1V2 length observed during the course of the pandemic.

  4. Genetic and phylogenetic evolution of HIV-1 in a low subtype heterogeneity epidemic: the Italian example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tornesello Maria

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 is classified into genetic groups, subtypes and sub-subtypes which show a specific geographic distribution pattern. The HIV-1 epidemic in Italy, as in most of the Western Countries, has traditionally affected the Intra-venous drug user (IDU and Homosexual (Homo risk groups and has been sustained by the genetic B subtype. In the last years, however, the HIV-1 transmission rate among heterosexuals has dramatically increased, becoming the prevalent transmission route. In fact, while the traditional risk groups have high levels of knowledge and avoid high-risk practices, the heterosexuals do not sufficiently perceive the risk of HIV-1 infection. This misperception, linked to the growing number of immigrants from non-Western Countries, where non-B clades and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs are prevalent, is progressively introducing HIV-1 variants of non-B subtype in the Italian epidemic. This is in agreement with reports from other Western European Countries. In this context, the Italian HIV-1 epidemic is still characterized by low subtype heterogeneity and represents a paradigmatic example of the European situation. The continuous molecular evolution of the B subtype HIV-1 isolates, characteristic of a long-lasting epidemic, together with the introduction of new subtypes as well as recombinant forms may have significant implications for diagnostic, treatment, and vaccine development. The study and monitoring of the genetic evolution of the HIV-1 represent, therefore, an essential strategy for controlling the local as well as global HIV-1 epidemic and for developing efficient preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Seminal Plasma HIV-1 RNA Concentration Is Strongly Associated with Altered Levels of Seminal Plasma Interferon-γ, Interleukin-17, and Interleukin-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer C.; Anton, Peter A.; Baldwin, Gayle Cocita; Elliott, Julie; Anisman-Posner, Deborah; Tanner, Karen; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Sugar, Catherine; Yang, Otto O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA level is an important determinant of the risk of HIV-1 sexual transmission. We investigated potential associations between seminal plasma cytokine levels and viral concentration in the seminal plasma of HIV-1-infected men. This was a prospective, observational study of paired blood and semen samples from 18 HIV-1 chronically infected men off antiretroviral therapy. HIV-1 RNA levels and cytokine levels in seminal plasma and blood plasma were measured and analyzed using simple linear regressions to screen for associations between cytokines and seminal plasma HIV-1 levels. Forward stepwise regression was performed to construct the final multivariate model. The median HIV-1 RNA concentrations were 4.42 log10 copies/ml (IQR 2.98, 4.70) and 2.96 log10 copies/ml (IQR 2, 4.18) in blood and seminal plasma, respectively. In stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis, blood HIV-1 RNA level (pplasma HIV-1 RNA level. After controlling for blood HIV-1 RNA level, seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA level was positively associated with interferon (IFN)-γ (p=0.03) and interleukin (IL)-17 (p=0.03) and negatively associated with IL-5 (p=0.0007) in seminal plasma. In addition to blood HIV-1 RNA level, cytokine profiles in the male genital tract are associated with HIV-1 RNA levels in semen. The Th1 and Th17 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17 are associated with increased seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA, while the Th2 cytokine IL-5 is associated with decreased seminal plasma HIV-1 RNA. These results support the importance of genital tract immunomodulation in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25209674

  6. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  8. The Presence and Anti-HIV-1 Function of Tenascin C in Breast Milk and Genital Fluids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin G Mansour

    Full Text Available Tenascin-C (TNC is a newly identified innate HIV-1-neutralizing protein present in breast milk, yet its presence and potential HIV-inhibitory function in other mucosal fluids is unknown. In this study, we identified TNC as a component of semen and cervical fluid of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, although it is present at a significantly lower concentration and frequency compared to that of colostrum and mature breast milk, potentially due to genital fluid protease degradation. However, TNC was able to neutralize HIV-1 after exposure to low pH, suggesting that TNC could be active at low pH in the vaginal compartment. As mucosal fluids are complex and contain a number of proteins known to interact with the HIV-1 envelope, we further studied the relationship between the concentration of TNC and neutralizing activity in breast milk. The amount of TNC correlated only weakly with the overall innate HIV-1-neutralizing activity of breast milk of uninfected women and negatively correlated with neutralizing activity in milk of HIV-1 infected women, indicating that the amount of TNC in mucosal fluids is not adequate to impede HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, the presence of polyclonal IgG from milk of HIV-1 infected women, but not other HIV-1 envelope-binding milk proteins or monoclonal antibodies, blocked the neutralizing activity of TNC. Finally, as exogenous administration of TNC would be necessary for it to mediate measurable HIV-1 neutralizing activity in mucosal compartments, we established that recombinantly produced TNC has neutralizing activity against transmitted/founder HIV-1 strains that mimic that of purified TNC. Thus, we conclude that endogenous TNC concentration in mucosal fluids is likely inadequate to block HIV-1 transmission to uninfected individuals.

  9. Cell-to-Cell Spread of HIV and Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, K M; Satija, N; Esposito, A M; Chen, B K

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gives rise to a chronic infection that progressively depletes CD4(+) T lymphocytes. CD4(+) T lymphocytes play a central coordinating role in adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to do so they migrate and interact within lymphoid compartments and at effector sites to mount immune responses. While cell-free virus serves as an excellent prognostic indicator for patient survival, interactions of infected T cells or virus-scavenging immune cells with uninfected T cells can greatly enhance viral spread. HIV can induce interactions between infected and uninfected T cells that are triggered by cell surface expression of viral Env, which serves as a cell adhesion molecule that interacts with CD4 on the target cell, before it acts as the viral membrane fusion protein. These interactions are called virological synapses and promote replication in the face of selective pressure of humoral immune responses and antiretroviral therapy. Other infection-enhancing cell-cell interactions occur between virus-concentrating antigen-presenting cells and recipient T cells, called infectious synapses. The exact roles that these cell-cell interactions play in each stage of infection, from viral acquisition, systemic dissemination, to chronic persistence are still being determined. Infection-promoting immune cell interactions are likely to contribute to viral persistence and enhance the ability of HIV-1 to evade adaptive immune responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Are Prophylactic and Therapeutic Target Concentrations Different?: the Case of Lopinavir-Ritonavir or Lamivudine Administered to Infants for Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV-1 Transmission during Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foissac, Frantz; Blume, Jörn; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Kankasa, Chipepo; Meda, Nicolas; Tumwine, James K; Singata-Madliki, Mandisa; Harper, Kim; Illamola, Silvia M; Bouazza, Naïm; Nagot, Nicolas; Van de Perre, Philippe; Blanche, Stéphane; Hirt, Déborah

    2017-02-01

    The ANRS 12174 trial assessed the efficacy and tolerance of lopinavir (LPV)-ritonavir (LPV/r) prophylaxis versus those of lamivudine (3TC) prophylaxis administered to breastfed infants whose HIV-infected mothers were not on antiretroviral therapy. In this substudy, we assessed LPV/r and 3TC pharmacokinetics to evaluate the percentage of infants with therapeutic plasma concentrations and to discuss these data in the context of a prophylactic treatment. Infants from the South African trial site underwent blood sampling for pharmacokinetic study at weeks 6, 26, and 38 of life. We applied a Bayesian approach to derive the 3TC and LPV pharmacokinetic parameters on the basis of previously published pharmacokinetic models for HIV-infected children. We analyzed 114 LPV and 180 3TC plasma concentrations from 69 infants and 92 infants, respectively. A total of 30 LPV and 20 3TC observations were considered missing doses and discarded from the Bayesian analysis. The overall population analysis showed that 30 to 40% of the infants did not reach therapeutic targets, regardless of treatment group. The median LPV trough concentrations at weeks 6, 26, and 38 were 2.8 mg/liter (interquartile range [IQR], 1.7 to 4.4 mg/liter), 5.6 mg/liter (IQR, 3.2 to 7.7 mg/liter), and 3.4 mg/liter (IQR, 2.3 to 7.3 mg/liter), respectively. The median 3TC area under the curve from 0 to 12 h after the last drug intake were 5.6 mg · h/liter (IQR, 4.1 to 7.8 mg · h/liter), 5.9 mg · h/liter (IQR, 5.1 to 7.5 mg · h/liter), and 7.3 mg · h/liter (IQR, 4.9 to 8.5 mg · h/liter) at weeks 6, 26, and 38, respectively. Use of the therapeutic doses recommended by the WHO would have resulted in a higher proportion of infants achieving the targets. However, no HIV-1 infection was reported among these infants. These results suggest that the prophylactic targets for both 3TC and LPV may be lower than the therapeutic ones. For treatment, the WHO dosing guidelines should be suitable to maintain values above the

  11. Conserved molecular signatures in gp120 are associated with the genetic bottleneck during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), SIV-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), and HIV type 1 (HIV-1) transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mileidy W; DeVico, Anthony L; Lewis, George K; Spouge, John L

    2015-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission typically results from infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) variant. Are T/F variants chosen uniformly at random from the donor pool, or are they selected based on advantageous traits facilitating transmission? Finding evidence for selection during transmission is of particular interest, because it would indicate that phenotypic and/or genetic properties of the viruses might be harnessed as potential vaccine targets or immunotherapies. Here, we systematically evaluated the differences between the Env proteins of simian immunodeficiency virus/simian HIV (SIV/SHIV) stock and T/F variants in search of "signature" sites of transmission. We also surveyed residue preferences in HIV at the SIV/SHIV signature sites. Four sites of gp120 showed significant selection, and an additional two sites showed a similar trend. Therefore, the six sites clearly differentiate T/F viruses from the majority of circulating variants in the stocks. The selection of SIV/SHIV could be inferred reasonably across both vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects, with infections resulting from vaginal, rectal, and intravenous routes of transmission and regardless of viral dosage. The evidence for selection in SIV and SHIV T/F variants is strong and plentiful, and in HIV the evidence is suggestive though commensurate with the availability of suitable data for analysis. Two of the signature residues are completely conserved across the SIV, SHIV, and HIV variants we examined. Five of the signature residues map to the C1 region of gp120 and one to the signal peptide. Our data raise the possibility that C1, while governing the association between gp120 and gp41, modulates transmission efficiency, replicative fitness, and/or host cell tropism at the level of virus-cell attachment and entry. The present study finds significant evidence of selection on gp120 molecules of SIV/SHIV T/F viruses. The data provide ancillary evidence suggesting the same sites

  12. The impact of pregnancy on the HIV-1-specific T cell function in infected pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygino, Joana; Vieira, Morgana M; Kasahara, Taissa M; Xavier, Luciana F; Blanco, Bernardo; Guillermo, Landi V C; Filho, Renato G S; Saramago, Carmen S M; Lima-Silva, Agostinho A; Oliveira, Ariane L; Guimarães, Vander; Andrade, Arnaldo F B; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2012-12-01

    Evidences indicate that pregnancy can alter the Ag-specific T-cell responses. This work aims to evaluate the impact of pregnancy on the in vitro HIV-1-specific immune response. As compared with non-pregnant patients, lower T-cell proliferation and higher IL-10 production were observed in T-cell cultures from pregnant patients following addition of either mitogens or HIV-1 antigens. In our system, the main T lymphocyte subset involved in producing IL-10 was CD4(+)FoxP3(-). Depletion of CD4(+) cells elevated TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Interestingly, the in vitro HIV-1 replication was lower in cell cultures from pregnant patients, and it was inversely related to IL-10 production. In these cultures, the neutralization of IL-10 by anti-IL-10 mAb elevated TNF-α release and HIV-1 replication. In conclusion, our results reveal that pregnancy-related events should favor the expansion of HIV-1-specific IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T-cells in HIV-1-infected women, which should, in the scenario of pregnancy, help to reduce the risk of vertical HIV-1 transmission. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Absence of XMRV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of ARV-treatment naive HIV-1 infected and HIV-1/HCV coinfected individuals and blood donors.

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    Cosmina Gingaras

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV has been found in the prostatic tissue of prostate cancer patients and in the blood of chronic fatigue syndrome patients. However, numerous studies have found little to no trace of XMRV in different human cohorts. Based on evidence suggesting common transmission routes between XMRV and HIV-1, HIV-1 infected individuals may represent a high-risk group for XMRV infection and spread. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 179 HIV-1 infected treatment naïve patients, 86 of which were coinfected with HCV, and 54 healthy blood donors. DNA was screened for XMRV provirus with two sensitive, published PCR assays targeting XMRV gag and env and one sensitive, published nested PCR assay targeting env. Detection of XMRV was confirmed by DNA sequencing. One of the 179 HIV-1 infected patients tested positive for gag by non-nested PCR whereas the two other assays did not detect XMRV in any specimen. All healthy blood donors were negative for XMRV proviral sequences. Sera from 23 HIV-1 infected patients (15 HCV(+ and 12 healthy donors were screened for the presence of XMRV-reactive antibodies by Western blot. Thirteen sera (57% from HIV-1(+ patients and 6 sera (50% from healthy donors showed reactivity to XMRV-infected cell lysate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The virtual absence of XMRV in PBMCs suggests that XMRV is not associated with HIV-1 infected or HIV-1/HCV coinfected patients, or blood donors. Although we noted isolated incidents of serum reactivity to XMRV, we are unable to verify the antibodies as XMRV specific.

  14. Stoichiometric parameters of HIV-1 entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarr, Melissa; Siliciano, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During HIV type 1 (HIV-1) entry, trimers of gp120 bind to CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor on the target cell. The stoichiometric parameters associated with HIV-1 entry remain unclear. Important unanswered questions include: how many trimers must attach to CD4 molecules, how many must bind coreceptors, and how many functional gp120 subunits per trimer are required for entry? We performed single round infectivity assays with chimeric viruses and compared the experimental relative infectivity curves with curves generated by mathematical models. Our results indicate that HIV-1 entry requires only a small number of functional spikes (one or two), that Env trimers may function with fewer than three active subunits, and that there is no major difference in the stoichiometric requirements for CCR5 vs. CXCR4 mediated HIV-1 entry into host cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Understanding of HIV-1 Latency

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    W. Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been an important breakthrough in the treatment of HIV-1 infection and has also a powerful tool to upset the equilibrium of viral production and HIV-1 pathogenesis. Despite the advent of potent combinations of this therapy, the long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs like cells from monocyte-macrophage lineage and resting memory CD4+ T cells which are established early during primary infection constitute a major obstacle to virus eradication. Further HAART interruption leads to immediate rebound viremia from latent reservoirs. This paper focuses on the essentials of the molecular mechanisms for the establishment of HIV-1 latency with special concern to present and future possible treatment strategies to completely purge and target viral persistence in the reservoirs.

  16. HIV-1 diversity and drug-resistant mutations in infected individuals in Changchun, China.

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    Ming Yan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection has been detected in all provinces of China. Although epidemiological and phylogenetic studies have been conducted in many regions, such analyses are lacking from Jilin province in northeastern China. METHOD: Epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses, as well as detection of drug-resistant mutations, were conducted on 57 HIV-1 infected patients from Changchun city identified and confirmed through annual surveillance by local Centers for Disease Control in Jilin province of northeastern China in 2012. RESULTS: Sexual contact was determined to be the major pathway for HIV-1 transmission in Jilin, where hetero- and homosexual activities contributed almost equally. Phylogenetic analyses detected multiple subtypes of HIV-1 including subtype G circulating in Jilin, with multiple origins for each of them. Both subtype B and CRF01_AE were dominant, and evidence of subtype B transmitting between different high-risk groups was observed. Mutations in the viral protease at position 71 indicated the presence of a selective pressure. Several drug-resistant mutations were detected, although they were predicted with low-level resistance to antiviral treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Information from this study fills the gap in knowledge of HIV-1 transmission in Changchun city, Jilin province, China. By revealing the origin and evolutionary status of local HIV-1 strains, this work contributes to ongoing efforts in the control and prevention of AIDS.

  17. ZAP-70 kinase regulates HIV cell-to-cell spread and virological synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol-Foulon, Nathalie; Sourisseau, Marion; Porrot, Françoise; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Trouillet, Céline; Nobile, Cinzia; Blanchet, Fabien; di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Noraz, Nelly; Taylor, Naomi; Alcover, Andres; Hivroz, Claire; Schwartz, Olivier

    2007-01-24

    HIV efficiently spreads in lymphocytes, likely through virological synapses (VSs). These cell-cell junctions share some characteristics with immunological synapses, but cellular proteins required for their constitution remain poorly characterized. We have examined here the role of ZAP-70, a key kinase regulating T-cell activation and immunological synapse formation, in HIV replication. In lymphocytes deficient for ZAP-70, or expressing a kinase-dead mutant of the protein, HIV replication was strikingly delayed. We have characterized further this replication defect. ZAP-70 was dispensable for the early steps of viral cycle, from entry to expression of viral proteins. However, in the absence of ZAP-70, intracellular Gag localization was impaired. ZAP-70 was required in infected donor cells for efficient cell-to-cell HIV transmission to recipients and for formation of VSs. These results bring novel insights into the links that exist between T-cell activation and HIV spread, and suggest that HIV usurps components of the immunological synapse machinery to ensure its own spread through cell-to-cell contacts.

  18. Clinical research in HIV-1 infected children

    OpenAIRE

    Fraaij, Pieter

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAcquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was described for the first time in 1981. Two years later the previously unknown human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent. HIV has been included in the genus Lent/viruses of the Retroviridae family. Two types are recognized: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Of these, HIV-1 is the primary etiologic agent of the current pandemic. HIV probably originates from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) which is endemic in African mon...

  19. Prospective Memory in HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    CAREY, CATHERINE L.; WOODS, STEVEN PAUL; RIPPETH, JULIE D.; HEATON, ROBERT K.; GRANT, IGOR

    2006-01-01

    The cognitive deficits associated with HIV-1 infection are thought to primarily reflect neuropathophysiology within the fronto-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits. Prospective memory (ProM) is a cognitive function that is largely dependent on prefronto-striatal circuits, but has not previously been examined in an HIV-1 sample. A form of episodic memory, ProM involves the complex processes of forming, monitoring, and executing future intentions vis-à-vis ongoing distractions. The current study e...

  20. Prospective memory in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Catherine L; Woods, Steven Paul; Rippeth, Julie D; Heaton, Robert K; Grant, Igor

    2006-05-01

    The cognitive deficits associated with HIV-1 infection are thought to primarily reflect neuropathophysiology within the fronto-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits. Prospective memory (ProM) is a cognitive function that is largely dependent on prefronto-striatal circuits, but has not previously been examined in an HIV-1 sample. A form of episodic memory, ProM involves the complex processes of forming, monitoring, and executing future intentions vis-à-vis ongoing distractions. The current study examined ProM in 42 participants with HIV-1 infection and 29 demographically similar seronegative healthy comparison (HC) subjects. The HIV-1 sample demonstrated deficits in time- and event-based ProM, as well as more frequent 24-hour delay ProM failures and task substitution errors relative to the HC group. In contrast, there were no significant differences in recognition performance, indicating that the HIV-1 group was able to accurately retain and recognize the ProM intention when retrieval demands were minimized. Secondary analyses revealed that ProM performance correlated with validated clinical measures of executive functions, episodic memory (free recall), and verbal working memory, but not with tests of semantic memory, retention, or recognition discrimination. Taken together, these findings indicate that HIV-1 infection is associated with ProM impairment that is primarily driven by a breakdown in the strategic (i.e., executive) aspects of retrieving future intentions, which is consistent with a prefronto-striatal circuit neuropathogenesis.

  1. Renal epithelial cells produce and spread HIV-1 via T-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Maria; Balakumaran, Bala; Chen, Ping; Negri, Donatella R M; Cara, Andrea; Chen, Benjamin K; Klotman, Mary E

    2014-10-23

    Increasing evidence supports the role of the kidney as a reservoir for HIV-1. In-vitro co-cultivation of HIV-infected T cells with renal tubule epithelial (RTE) cells results in virus transfer to the latter, whereas cell-free virus infection is inefficient. We further characterized the fate of HIV-1 after it is internalized in renal epithelial cells. Primary or immortalized CD4 cells were infected with a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing replication competent HIV-1. HIV-1 transfer from T cells to RTE cells was carried out in a co-culture system and evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. HIV-1 integration in renal cells was evaluated by Alu-PCR and the production of infectious particles was assessed by p24-ELISA and TZM-bl assay. HIV-infected renal cells were used as donor cells in a co-culture system to evaluate their ability to transfer the virus back to T cells. Renal cells become productively infected by HIV-1 and multiple copies of HIV-1 can be transferred from infected T cells to renal cells. Two separate cell populations were identified among infected renal cells based on reporter gene GFP expression level (low vs. high), only the high showing sensitivity to azidothymidine and ritonavir. Co-cultivation of HIV-1-infected renal cells with noninfected T cells resulted in HIV-1 transmission to T cells, supporting bidirectional exchange of virus between T cells and kidney-derived cells. Persistent expression and generation of infectious virus in renal cells required HIV integration. These results support the kidney as a potential reservoir where virus is exchanged between interstitial T cells and RTE cells. 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  2. Higher viral load and genetic diversity of HIV-1 in seminal compartments than in blood of seven Chinese men who have sex with men and have early HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan-Mei; Chen, Guang-Lei; Zhu, Wei-Jun; Huang, Hui-Huang; Fu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ming; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2017-06-01

    To date, there have been no reports characterizing HIV-1 in the semen of Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM) with early infection. In this study, genetic diversity and viral load of HIV-1 in the seminal compartments and blood of Chinese MSM with early HIV-1 infection were examined. Viral load and genetic diversity of HIV-1 in paired samples of semen and blood were analyzed in seven MSM with early HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 RNA and DNA were quantitated by real-time PCR assays. Through sequencing the C2-V5 region of the HIV-1 env gene, the HIV-1 genotype and genetic diversity based on V3 loop amino acid sequences were determined by using Geno2pheno and PSSM programs co-receptor usage. It was found that there was more HIV-1 RNA in seminal plasma than in blood plasma and total, and more 2-LTR circular and integrated HIV-1 DNA in seminal cells than in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all seven patients with early HIV-infection. There was also greater HIV-1 genetic diversity in seminal than in blood compartments. HIV-1 in plasma displayed higher genetic diversity than in cells from the blood and semen. In addition, V3 loop central motifs, which present some key neutralizing antibody epitopes, varied between blood and semen. Thus, virological characteristics in semen may be more representative when evaluating risk of transmission in persons with early HIV infection. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Persistence of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T.; Aitken, Celia; Asboe, David; Webster, Daniel; Cane, Patricia; Castro, Hannah; Chadwick, David; Churchill, Duncan; Clark, Duncan; Collins, Simon; Delpech, Valerie; Geretti, Anna Maria; Goldberg, David; Hale, Antony; Hué, Stéphane; Kaye, Steve; Kellam, Paul; Lazarus, Linda; Leigh-Brown, Andrew; Mackie, Nicola; Orkin, Chloe; Rice, Philip; Pillay, Deenan; Smit, Erasmus; Templeton, Kate; Tilston, Peter; Tong, William; Williams, Ian; Zhang, Hongyi; Zuckerman, Mark; Greatorex, Jane; Wildfire, Adrian; O'Shea, Siobhan; Mullen, Jane; Mbisa, Tamyo; Cox, Alison; Tandy, Richard; Hale, Tony; Fawcett, Tracy; Hopkins, Mark; Ashton, Lynn; Garcia-Diaz, Ana; Shepherd, Jill; Schmid, Matthias L; Payne, Brendan; Chadwick, David; Hay, Phillip; Rice, Phillip; Paynter, Mary; Clark, Duncan; Bibby, David; Kaye, Steve; Kirk, Stuart; MacLean, Alasdair; Aitken, Celia; Gunson, Rory

    2013-01-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models. PMID:23904291

  4. Genetic association of IL-10 gene promoter polymorphism and HIV-1 infection in North Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Rathore, Anurag; Sivarama, P; Yamamoto, Naohiko; Dhole, Tapan N

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines play a significant role in host immune defense. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory cytokine that can both stimulate and suppress the immune response and inhibits HIV-1 replication in vivo. Interindividual variations in IL-10 production were genetically contributed to polymorphisms within IL-10 promoter region. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of IL-10 gene promoter -1082 G/A, -819 C/T, and 592 C/A polymorphism on HIV-1 transmission /progression in North Indian individuals. A total of 180 HIV-1 seropositive (HSP) stratified on the basis of disease severity (stage I, II, and III), 50 HIV-1 exposed seronegative (HES) and 305 HIV-1 seronegative (HSN) individuals were genotyped for IL-10 gene promoter by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. A suggestive evidence of association was obtained for IL-10 592 C/A promoter polymorphism at the level of allele and genotype distribution. The frequency of IL-10 592 A allele and genotype was significantly increased in HSP compared to HSN (p = 0.013; OR = 1.412 and p = 0.034; OR = 1.685 respectively). Further comparison in between different clinical stages of HIV-1 infected patients of IL-10 592 A allele and genotype revealed a significant increase in its frequency in the stage III compared with those together in stage I (p = 0.004, OR = 2.181 and p = 0.002, OR = 4.156, respectively). This study reports for the first time that IL-10 gene promoter 592 C/A polymorphism may be a risk factor for HIV-1 transmission/progression in HIV-1 infected North Indian individuals.

  5. A national study of the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Australia 2005-2012.

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    Alison Castley

    Full Text Available Rates of new HIV-1 diagnoses are increasing in Australia, with evidence of an increasing proportion of non-B HIV-1 subtypes reflecting a growing impact of migration and travel. The present study aims to define HIV-1 subtype diversity patterns and investigate possible HIV-1 transmission networks within Australia.The Australian Molecular Epidemiology Network (AMEN HIV collaborating sites in Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria, Queensland and western Sydney (New South Wales, provided baseline HIV-1 partial pol sequence, age and gender information for 4,873 patients who had genotypes performed during 2005-2012. HIV-1 phylogenetic analyses utilised MEGA V6, with a stringent classification of transmission pairs or clusters (bootstrap ≥98%, genetic distance ≤1.5% from at least one other sequence in the cluster.HIV-1 subtype B represented 74.5% of the 4,873 sequences (WA 59%, SA 68.4%, w-Syd 73.8%, Vic 75.6%, Qld 82.1%, with similar proportion of transmission pairs and clusters found in the B and non-B cohorts (23% vs 24.5% of sequences, p = 0.3. Significantly more subtype B clusters were comprised of ≥3 sequences compared with non-B clusters (45.0% vs 24.0%, p = 0.021 and significantly more subtype B pairs and clusters were male-only (88% compared to 53% CRF01_AE and 17% subtype C clusters. Factors associated with being in a cluster of any size included; being sequenced in a more recent time period (p3 was associated with being sequenced in a more recent time period (p = 0.05 and being male (p = 0.008.This nationwide HIV-1 study of 4,873 patient sequences highlights the increased diversity of HIV-1 subtypes within the Australian epidemic, as well as differences in transmission networks associated with these HIV-1 subtypes. These findings provide epidemiological insights not readily available using standard surveillance methods and can inform the development of effective public health strategies in the current paradigm of HIV prevention

  6. A national study of the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Australia 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castley, Alison; Sawleshwarkar, Shailendra; Varma, Rick; Herring, Belinda; Thapa, Kiran; Dwyer, Dominic; Chibo, Doris; Nguyen, Nam; Hawke, Karen; Ratcliff, Rodney; Garsia, Roger; Kelleher, Anthony; Nolan, David

    2017-01-01

    Rates of new HIV-1 diagnoses are increasing in Australia, with evidence of an increasing proportion of non-B HIV-1 subtypes reflecting a growing impact of migration and travel. The present study aims to define HIV-1 subtype diversity patterns and investigate possible HIV-1 transmission networks within Australia. The Australian Molecular Epidemiology Network (AMEN) HIV collaborating sites in Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria, Queensland and western Sydney (New South Wales), provided baseline HIV-1 partial pol sequence, age and gender information for 4,873 patients who had genotypes performed during 2005-2012. HIV-1 phylogenetic analyses utilised MEGA V6, with a stringent classification of transmission pairs or clusters (bootstrap ≥98%, genetic distance ≤1.5% from at least one other sequence in the cluster). HIV-1 subtype B represented 74.5% of the 4,873 sequences (WA 59%, SA 68.4%, w-Syd 73.8%, Vic 75.6%, Qld 82.1%), with similar proportion of transmission pairs and clusters found in the B and non-B cohorts (23% vs 24.5% of sequences, p = 0.3). Significantly more subtype B clusters were comprised of ≥3 sequences compared with non-B clusters (45.0% vs 24.0%, p = 0.021) and significantly more subtype B pairs and clusters were male-only (88% compared to 53% CRF01_AE and 17% subtype C clusters). Factors associated with being in a cluster of any size included; being sequenced in a more recent time period (p3) was associated with being sequenced in a more recent time period (p = 0.05) and being male (p = 0.008). This nationwide HIV-1 study of 4,873 patient sequences highlights the increased diversity of HIV-1 subtypes within the Australian epidemic, as well as differences in transmission networks associated with these HIV-1 subtypes. These findings provide epidemiological insights not readily available using standard surveillance methods and can inform the development of effective public health strategies in the current paradigm of HIV prevention in

  7. Optimal Uses of Antiretrovirals for Prevention in HIV-1 Serodiscordant Heterosexual Couples in South Africa: A Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Timothy B.; Baeten, Jared M.; Heffron, Renee; Barnabas, Ruanne; de Bruyn, Guy; Cremin, Íde; Delany, Sinead; Garnett, Geoffrey P.; Gray, Glenda; Johnson, Leigh; McIntyre, James; Rees, Helen; Celum, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Background Antiretrovirals have substantial promise for HIV-1 prevention, either as antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV-1–infected persons to reduce infectiousness, or as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1–uninfected persons to reduce the possibility of infection with HIV-1. HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in long-term partnerships (one member is infected and the other is uninfected) are a priority for prevention interventions. Earlier ART and PrEP might both reduce HIV-1 transmission in this group, but the merits and synergies of these different approaches have not been analyzed. Methods and Findings We constructed a mathematical model to examine the impact and cost-effectiveness of different strategies, including earlier initiation of ART and/or PrEP, for HIV-1 prevention for serodiscordant couples. Although the cost of PrEP is high, the cost per infection averted is significantly offset by future savings in lifelong treatment, especially among couples with multiple partners, low condom use, and a high risk of transmission. In some situations, highly effective PrEP could be cost-saving overall. To keep couples alive and without a new infection, providing PrEP to the uninfected partner could be at least as cost-effective as initiating ART earlier in the infected partner, if the annual cost of PrEP is ART and PrEP is >70% effective. Conclusions Strategic use of PrEP and ART could substantially and cost-effectively reduce HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. New and forthcoming data on the efficacy of PrEP, the cost of delivery of ART and PrEP, and couples behaviours and preferences will be critical for optimizing the use of antiretrovirals for HIV-1 prevention. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:22110407

  8. Optimal uses of antiretrovirals for prevention in HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples in South Africa: a modelling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy B Hallett

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiretrovirals have substantial promise for HIV-1 prevention, either as antiretroviral treatment (ART for HIV-1-infected persons to reduce infectiousness, or as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for HIV-1-uninfected persons to reduce the possibility of infection with HIV-1. HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in long-term partnerships (one member is infected and the other is uninfected are a priority for prevention interventions. Earlier ART and PrEP might both reduce HIV-1 transmission in this group, but the merits and synergies of these different approaches have not been analyzed.We constructed a mathematical model to examine the impact and cost-effectiveness of different strategies, including earlier initiation of ART and/or PrEP, for HIV-1 prevention for serodiscordant couples. Although the cost of PrEP is high, the cost per infection averted is significantly offset by future savings in lifelong treatment, especially among couples with multiple partners, low condom use, and a high risk of transmission. In some situations, highly effective PrEP could be cost-saving overall. To keep couples alive and without a new infection, providing PrEP to the uninfected partner could be at least as cost-effective as initiating ART earlier in the infected partner, if the annual cost of PrEP is 70% effective.Strategic use of PrEP and ART could substantially and cost-effectively reduce HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. New and forthcoming data on the efficacy of PrEP, the cost of delivery of ART and PrEP, and couples behaviours and preferences will be critical for optimizing the use of antiretrovirals for HIV-1 prevention. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  9. Two variants of HIV-1 B serotype are transmitted heterosexually in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casseb J.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 variability may have an important impact on transmission and pathogenicity. Better characterization of the HIV epidemic in Brazil is necessary for the development of vaccine trials in this country. We analyzed sera from 108 HIV-1-infected volunteers from São Paulo City to determine serotype and reactivity for V3 motifs of HIV in this population, and the relationship to transmission mode. We concluded that the HIV-1 B serotype is frequent among heterosexually infected women, even in the absence of anal sex, and that two major V3 motifs, GPGR and GWGR, had similar prevalence among women (48% and 52%, respectively and men (56% and 44%, respectively. We also observed an equal distribution of these strains regardless of their CD4+ T cell counts, clinical status, and mode of transmission. Even though V3 serology for HIV-1 subtyping is an inexpensive tool for use in developing countries, additional methods, such as heteroduplex mobility assay and direct DNA sequencing, should be included to determine HIV-1 genetic diversity.

  10. Mechanisms of Horizontal Cell-to-Cell Transfer of Wolbachia spp. in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Pamela M; Pietri, Jose E; Debec, Alain; Russell, Shelbi; Patel, Bhavin; Sullivan, William

    2017-04-01

    Wolbachia is an intracellular endosymbiont present in most arthropod and filarial nematode species. Transmission between hosts is primarily vertical, taking place exclusively through the female germ line, although horizontal transmission has also been documented. The results of several studies indicate that Wolbachia spp. can undergo transfer between somatic and germ line cells during nematode development and in adult flies. However, the mechanisms underlying horizontal cell-to-cell transfer remain largely unexplored. Here, we establish a tractable system for probing horizontal transfer of Wolbachia cells between Drosophila melanogaster cells in culture using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). First, we show that horizontal transfer is independent of cell-to-cell contact and can efficiently take place through the culture medium within hours. Further, we demonstrate that efficient transfer utilizes host cell phagocytic and clathrin/dynamin-dependent endocytic machinery. Lastly, we provide evidence that this process is conserved between species, showing that horizontal transfer from mosquito to Drosophila cells takes place in a similar fashion. Altogether, our results indicate that Wolbachia utilizes host internalization machinery during infection, and this mechanism is conserved across insect species.IMPORTANCE Our work has broad implications for the control and treatment of tropical diseases. Wolbachia can confer resistance against a variety of human pathogens in mosquito vectors. Elucidating the mechanisms of horizontal transfer will be useful for efforts to more efficiently infect nonnatural insect hosts with Wolbachia as a biological control agent. Further, as Wolbachia is essential for the survival of filarial nematodes, understanding horizontal transfer might provide new approaches to treating human infections by targeting Wolbachia Finally, this work provides a key first step toward the genetic manipulation of Wolbachia. Copyright © 2017 American

  11. Assessing the HIV-1 Epidemic in Brazilian Drug Users: A Molecular Epidemiology Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monick Lindenmeyer Guimarães

    Full Text Available Person who inject illicit substances have an important role in HIV-1 blood and sexual transmission and together with person who uses heavy non-injecting drugs may have less than optimal adherence to anti-retroviral treatment and eventually could transmit resistant HIV variants. Unfortunately, molecular biology data on such key population remain fragmentary in most low and middle-income countries. The aim of the present study was to assess HIV infection rates, evaluate HIV-1 genetic diversity, drug resistance, and to identify HIV transmission clusters in heavy drug users (DUs. For this purpose, DUs were recruited in the context of a Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS study in different Brazilian cities during 2009. Overall, 2,812 individuals were tested for HIV, and 168 (6% of them were positive, of which 19 (11.3% were classified as recent seroconverters, corresponding to an estimated incidence rate of 1.58%/year (95% CI 0.92-2.43%. Neighbor joining phylogenetic trees from env and pol regions and bootscan analyses were employed to subtype the virus from132 HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1 subtype B was prevalent in most of the cities under analysis, followed by BF recombinants (9%-35%. HIV-1 subtype C was the most prevalent in Curitiba (46% and Itajaí (86% and was also detected in Brasília (9% and Campo Grande (20%. Pure HIV-1F infections were detected in Rio de Janeiro (9%, Recife (6%, Salvador (6% and Brasília (9%. Clusters of HIV transmission were assessed by Maximum likelihood analyses and were cross-compared with the RDS network structure. Drug resistance mutations were verified in 12.2% of DUs. Our findings reinforce the importance of the permanent HIV-1 surveillance in distinct Brazilian cities due to viral resistance and increasing subtype heterogeneity all over Brazil, with relevant implications in terms of treatment monitoring, prophylaxis and vaccine development.

  12. Cell-to-cell communication--periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshardt, Dieter D; Stadlinger, Bernd; Terheyden, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    Although regenerative treatment options are available, periodontal regeneration is still regarded as insufficient and unpredictable. This review article provides scientific background information on the animated 3D film Cell-to-Cell Communication - Periodontal Regeneration. Periodontal regeneration is understood as a recapitulation of embryonic mechanisms. Therefore, a thorough understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating normal tooth root development is imperative to improve existing and develop new periodontal regenerative therapies. However, compared to tooth crown and earlier stages of tooth development, much less is known about the development of the tooth root. The formation of root cementum is considered the critical element in periodontal regeneration. Therefore, much research in recent years has focused on the origin and differentiation of cementoblasts. Evidence is accumulating that the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) has a pivotal role in root formation and cementogenesis. Traditionally, ectomesenchymal cells in the dental follicle were thought to differentiate into cementoblasts. According to an alternative theory, however, cementoblasts originate from the HERS. What happens when the periodontal attachment system is traumatically compromised? Minor mechanical insults to the periodontium may spontaneously heal, and the tissues can structurally and functionally be restored. But what happens to the periodontium in case of periodontitis, an infectious disease, after periodontal treatment? A non-regenerative treatment of periodontitis normally results in periodontal repair (i.e., the formation of a long junctional epithelium) rather than regeneration. Thus, a regenerative treatment is indicated to restore the original architecture and function of the periodontium. Guided tissue regeneration or enamel matrix proteins are such regenerative therapies, but further improvement is required. As remnants of HERS persist as epithelial cell

  13. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihn, Suzannah J; Foster, Toshana L; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J D; Wilson, Sam J

    2017-04-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4(+) T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4(+) T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission.IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope gene

  14. CCR5 inhibitors in HIV-1 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Patrick; Perros, Manos

    2008-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is the causative pathogen of AIDS, the world's biggest infectious disease killer. About 33 million people are infected worldwide, with 2.1 million deaths a year as a direct consequence. The devastating nature of AIDS has prompted widespread research, which has led to an extensive array of therapies to suppress viral replication and enable recovery of the immune system to prolong and improve patient life substantially. However, the genetic plasticity and replication rate of HIV-1 are considerable, which has lead to rapid drug resistance. This, together with the need for reducing drug side effects and increasing regimen compliance, has led researchers to identify antiretroviral drugs with new modes of action. This review describes the discovery and clinical development of CCR5 antagonists and the recent approval of maraviroc as a breakthrough in anti-HIV-1 therapy. CCR5 inhibitors target a human cofactor to disable HIV-1 entry into the cells, and thereby provide a new hurdle for the virus to overcome. The status and expert opinion of CCR5 antagonists for the treatment of HIV-1 infection are detailed.

  15. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  16. Identification of HIV-1 Tat-Associated Proteins Contributing to HIV-1 Transcription and Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Maxime Junior; Power, Derek; Kong, Weili; Huang, Huachao; Santoso, Netty; Zhu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat is a virus-encoded trans-activator that plays a central role in viral transcription. We used our recently developed parallel analysis of in vitro translated open reading frames (ORFs) (PLATO) approach to identify host proteins that associate with HIV-1 Tat. From this proteomic assay, we identify 89 Tat-associated proteins (TAPs). We combine our results with other datasets of Tat or long terminal repeat (LTR)-associated proteins. For some of these proteins (NAT10, TINP1, XRCC5, SIN3A), we confirm their strong association with Tat. These TAPs also suppress Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription. Removing suppression of HIV-1 transcription benefits the reversal of post-integrated, latent HIV-1 proviruses. We demonstrate that these transcriptionally suppressing TAPs contribute to HIV-1 latency in Jurkat latency (J-LAT) cells. Therefore, our proteomic analysis highlights the previously unappreciated TAPs that play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency and can be further studied as potential pharmacological targets for the “shock and kill” HIV-1 cure strategy. PMID:28368303

  17. The achilles heel of the trojan horse model of HIV-1 trans-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavrois, Marielle; Neidleman, Jason; Greene, Warner C

    2008-06-27

    To ensure their survival, microbial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to subvert host immune defenses. The human retrovirus HIV-1 has been proposed to hijack the natural endocytic function of dendritic cells (DCs) to infect interacting CD4 T cells in a process termed trans-infection. Although DCs can be directly infected by certain strains of HIV-1, productive infection of DCs is not required during trans-infection; instead, DCs capture and internalize infectious HIV-1 virions in vesicles for later transmission to CD4 T cells via vesicular exocytosis across the infectious synapse. This model of sequential endocytosis and exocytosis of intact HIV-1 virions has been dubbed the "Trojan horse" model of HIV-1 trans-infection. While this model gained rapid favor as a strong example of how a pathogen exploits the natural properties of its cellular host, our recent studies challenge this model by showing that the vast majority of virions transmitted in trans originate from the plasma membrane rather than from intracellular vesicles. This review traces the experimental lines of evidence that have contributed to what we view as the "rise and decline" of the Trojan horse model of HIV-1 trans-infection.

  18. The achilles heel of the trojan horse model of HIV-1 trans-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle Cavrois

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available To ensure their survival, microbial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to subvert host immune defenses. The human retrovirus HIV-1 has been proposed to hijack the natural endocytic function of dendritic cells (DCs to infect interacting CD4 T cells in a process termed trans-infection. Although DCs can be directly infected by certain strains of HIV-1, productive infection of DCs is not required during trans-infection; instead, DCs capture and internalize infectious HIV-1 virions in vesicles for later transmission to CD4 T cells via vesicular exocytosis across the infectious synapse. This model of sequential endocytosis and exocytosis of intact HIV-1 virions has been dubbed the "Trojan horse" model of HIV-1 trans-infection. While this model gained rapid favor as a strong example of how a pathogen exploits the natural properties of its cellular host, our recent studies challenge this model by showing that the vast majority of virions transmitted in trans originate from the plasma membrane rather than from intracellular vesicles. This review traces the experimental lines of evidence that have contributed to what we view as the "rise and decline" of the Trojan horse model of HIV-1 trans-infection.

  19. Cross-Reactivity of Anti-HIV-1 T Cell Immune Responses among the Major HIV-1 Clades in HIV-1-Positive Individuals from 4 Continents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul M. Coplan; Swati B. Gupta; Sheri A. Dubey; Punnee Pitisuttithum; Alex Nikas; Bernard Mbewe; Efthyia Vardas; Mauro Schechter; Esper G. Kallas; Dan C. Freed; Tong-Ming Fu; Christopher T. Mast; Pilaipan Puthavathana; James Kublin; Kelly Brown Collins; John Chisi; Richard Pendame; Scott J. Thaler; Glenda Gray; James Mcintyre; Walter L. Straus; Jon H. Condra; Devan V. Mehrotra; Harry A. Guess; Emilio A. Emini; John W. Shiver

    2005-01-01

    .... Therefore, we quantified the cross-clade reactivity, among unvaccinated individuals, of anti-HIV-1 T cell responses to the infecting HIV-1 clade relative to other major circulating clades. Methods...

  20. Role of seminal plasma in the anti-HIV-1 activity of candidate microbicides

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    Li Yun-Yao

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of microbicides for prevention of HIV-1 infection in macaque models for vaginal infection has indicated that the concentrations of active compounds needed for protection by far exceed levels sufficient for complete inhibition of infection in vitro. These experiments were done in the absence of seminal plasma (SP, a vehicle for sexual transmission of the virus. To gain insight into the possible effect of SP on the performance of selected microbicides, their anti-HIV-1 activity in the presence, and absence of SP, was determined. Methods The inhibitory activity of compounds against the X4 virus, HIV-1 IIIB, and the R5 virus, HIV-1 BaL was determined using TZM-bl indicator cells and quantitated by measuring β-galactosidase induced by infection. The virucidal properties of cellulose acetate 1,2-benzene-dicarboxylate (CAP, the only microbicide provided in water insoluble, micronized form, in the presence of SP was measured. Results The HIV-1 inhibitory activity of the polymeric microbicides, poly(naphthalene sulfonate, cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, CAP (in soluble form and polystyrene sulfonate, respectively, was considerably (range ≈ 4 to ≈ 73-fold diminished in the presence of SP (33.3%. Formulations of micronized CAP, providing an acidic buffering system even in the presence of an SP volume excess, effectively inactivated HIV-1 infectivity. Conclusion The data presented here suggest that the in vivo efficacy of polymeric microbicides, acting as HIV-1 entry inhibitors, might become at least partly compromised by the inevitable presence of SP. These possible disadvantages could be overcome by combining the respective polymers with acidic pH buffering systems (built-in for formulations of micronized CAP or with other anti-HIV-1 compounds, the activity of which is not affected by SP, e.g. reverse transcriptase and zinc finger inhibitors.

  1. HIV-1 Reservoir Association with Immune Activation

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    Alejandro Vallejo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of EBioMedicine, Ruggiero and colleagues describe immune activation biomarkers associated with the size of the HIV reservoir in a carefully designed cross-sectional study. The cohort consists of a homogeneous sample of HIV-1-infected patients with long-term plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression under antiretroviral treatment (ART. It is crucial to explore the potential utility of biomarkers that are easier (less labor intensive, less expensive to measure than integrated HIV DNA load, in order to quickly and accurately quantify cellular reservoirs of HIV.

  2. Inhibition of highly productive HIV-1 infection in T cells, primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes by Sargassum fusiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veille Jean-Claude

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high rate of HIV-1 mutation and increasing resistance to currently available antiretroviral (ART therapies highlight the need for new antiviral agents. Products derived from natural sources have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication during various stages of the virus life cycle, and therefore represent a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. To expand our arsenal of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection, we investigated aqueous extract from Sargassum fusiforme (S. fusiforme for ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in the periphery, in T cells and human macrophages, and for ability to inhibit in the central nervous system (CNS, in microglia and astrocytes. Results S. fusiforme extract blocked HIV-1 infection and replication by over 90% in T cells, human macrophages and microglia, and it also inhibited pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3 infection in human astrocytes by over 70%. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4 and CCR5 (R5-tropic HIV-1, was dose dependant and long lasting, did not inhibit cell growth or viability, was not toxic to cells, and was comparable to inhibition by the nucleoside analogue 2', 3'-didoxycytidine (ddC. S. fusiforme treatment blocked direct cell-to-cell infection spread. To investigate at which point of the virus life cycle this inhibition occurs, we infected T cells and CD4-negative primary human astrocytes with HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which bypasses the HIV receptor requirements. Infection by pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3 was also inhibited in a dose dependant manner, although up to 57% less, as compared to inhibition of native NL4-3, indicating post-entry interferences. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating S. fusiforme to be a potent inhibitor of highly productive HIV-1 infection and replication in T cells, in primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes. Results with VSV/NL4-3 infection, suggest inhibition

  3. Linker-extended native cyanovirin-N facilitates PEGylation and potently inhibits HIV-1 by targeting the glycan ligand.

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    Jia Chen

    Full Text Available Cyanovirin-N (CVN potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection, but both cytotoxicity and immunogenicity have hindered the translation of this protein into a viable therapeutic. A molecular docking analysis suggested that up to 12 residues were involved in the interaction of the reverse parallel CVN dimer with the oligosaccharide targets, among which Leu-1 was the most prominent hot spot residue. This finding provided a possible explanation for the lack of anti-HIV-1 activity observed with N-terminal PEGylated CVN. Therefore, linker-CVN (LCVN was designed as a CVN derivative with a flexible and hydrophilic linker (Gly4Ser3 at the N-terminus. The N-terminal α-amine of LCVN was PEGylated to create 10 K PEG-aldehyde (ALD-LCVN. LCVN and 10 K PEG-ALD-LCVN retained the specificity and affinity of CVN for high mannose N-glycans. Moreover, LCVN exhibited significant anti-HIV-1 activity with attenuated cytotoxicity in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line and MT-4 T lymphocyte cell lines. 10 K PEG-ALD-LCVN also efficiently inactivated HIV-1 with remarkably decreased cytotoxicity and pronounced cell-to-cell fusion inhibitory activity in vitro. The linker-extended CVN and the mono-PEGylated derivative were determined to be promising candidates for the development of an anti-HIV-1 agent. This derivatization approach provided a model for the PEGylation of biologic candidates without introducing point mutations.

  4. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Breast Milk are Associated with HIV-1 Shedding but Not With Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Shetty, Avinash K.; Seidel, Kristy D.; Qin, Xuan; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S.; Katzenstein, David A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast milk HIV-1 load is associated with clinical and subclinical mastitis, and both milk viral load and mastitis are associated with increased mother-to-child-transmission of HIV-1 (MTCT) through breastfeeding. Bacterial infections may cause clinical mastitis, but whether other co-pathogens common in HIV-1 infection are associated with subclinical mastitis or HIV-1 shedding is unknown. Design A cross-sectional study of HIV-1 infected breastfeeding women in Zimbabwe was performed to examine the relationship between a wide range of breast co-infections, mastitis, and HIV-1 shedding. Methods Breast milk was cultured for bacteria and fungi, and tested by PCR for mycobacteria, mycoplasmas, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), HHV-7, HHV-8, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and HIV-1 RNA and DNA. Symptoms of clinical mastitis were documented, and subclinical mastitis was identified by breast milk sodium concentration (Na+) and leukocyte counts. Results Co-infections of milk were not associated with clinical or subclinical mastitis in the 217 women studied. Detection of HIV-1 RNA, but not DNA, in breast milk was associated with CMV concentration (OR 1.8, p=0.002) and detection of EBV (OR 3.8, p=0.0003), but not other co-infections in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Co-infection of breast milk with bacteria, fungi or herpes viruses was not associated with mastitis. The associations between shedding of CMV and EBV with HIV-1 in milk suggest a local interaction between herpes virus infection and HIV-1 independent of mastitis. CMV and EBV infections may impact HIV-1 shedding in breast milk and the risk of MTCT. PMID:18614868

  5. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in breast milk are associated with HIV-1 shedding but not with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Shetty, Avinash K; Seidel, Kristy D; Qin, Xuan; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S; Katzenstein, David A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2008-07-31

    Breast milk HIV-1 load is associated with clinical and subclinical mastitis, and both milk viral load and mastitis are associated with increased mother-to-child-transmission of HIV-1 through breastfeeding. Bacterial infections may cause clinical mastitis, but whether other copathogens common in HIV-1 infection are associated with subclinical mastitis or HIV-1 shedding is unknown. A cross-sectional study of HIV-1-infected breastfeeding women in Zimbabwe was performed to examine the relationship between a wide range of breast coinfections, mastitis, and HIV-1 shedding. Breast milk was cultured for bacteria and fungi and tested by PCR for mycobacteria, mycoplasmas, human herpesvirus (HHV)-6, HHV-7, HHV-8, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and HIV-1 RNA and DNA. Symptoms of clinical mastitis were documented and subclinical mastitis was identified by breast milk sodium concentration (Na) and leukocyte counts. Coinfections of milk were not associated with clinical or subclinical mastitis in the 217 women studied. Detection of HIV-1 RNA, but not DNA, in breast milk was associated with cytomegalovirus concentration (odds ratio = 1.8, P = 0.002) and detection of Epstein-Barr virus (odds ratio = 3.8, P = 0.0003) but not other coinfections in multivariate analysis. Coinfection of breast milk with bacteria, fungi, or herpes viruses was not associated with mastitis. The associations between shedding of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus with HIV-1 in milk suggest a local interaction between herpes virus infection and HIV-1 independent of mastitis. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections may impact HIV-1 shedding in breast milk and the risk of MTCT.

  6. No evidence of association between HIV-1 and malaria in populations with low HIV-1 prevalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego F Cuadros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The geographic overlap between HIV-1 and malaria has generated much interest in their potential interactions. A variety of studies have evidenced a complex HIV-malaria interaction within individuals and populations that may have dramatic effects, but the causes and implications of this co-infection at the population level are still unclear. In a previous publication, we showed that the prevalence of malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum is associated with HIV infection in eastern sub-Saharan Africa. To complement our knowledge of the HIV-malaria co-infection, the objective of this work was to assess the relationship between malaria and HIV prevalence in the western region of sub-Saharan Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Population-based cross-sectional data were obtained from the HIV/AIDS Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Liberia and Cameroon, and the malaria atlas project. Using generalized linear mixed models, we assessed the relationship between HIV-1 and Plasmodium falciparum parasite rate (PfPR adjusting for important socio-economic and biological cofactors. We found no evidence that individuals living in areas with stable malaria transmission (PfPR>0.46 have higher odds of being HIV-positive than individuals who live in areas with PfPR≤0.46 in western sub-Saharan Africa (estimated odds ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.50. In contrast, the results suggested that PfPR was associated with being infected with HIV in Cameroon (estimated odds ratio 1.56, 95% confidence interval 1.23-2.00. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Contrary to our previous research on eastern sub-Saharan Africa, this study did not identify an association between PfPR and infection with HIV in western sub-Saharan Africa, which suggests that malaria might not play an important role in the spread of HIV in populations where the HIV prevalence is low. Our work highlights the importance of

  7. Punica granatum (Pomegranate juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1 infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2 binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored.

  8. Short-Term Dynamic and Local Epidemiological Trends in the South American HIV-1B Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; de Medeiros, Rubia Marília; Gräf, Tiago; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2016-01-01

    The human displacement and sexual behavior are the main factors driving the HIV-1 pandemic to the current profile. The intrinsic structure of the HIV transmission among different individuals has valuable importance for the understanding of the epidemic and for the public health response. The aim of this study was to characterize the HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) epidemic in South America through the identification of transmission links and infer trends about geographical patterns and median time of transmission between individuals. Sequences of the protease and reverse transcriptase coding regions from 4,810 individuals were selected from GenBank. Maximum likelihood phylogenies were inferred and submitted to ClusterPicker to identify transmission links. Bayesian analyses were applied only for clusters including ≥5 dated samples in order to estimate the median maximum inter-transmission interval. This study analyzed sequences sampled from 12 South American countries, from individuals of different exposure categories, under different antiretroviral profiles, and from a wide period of time (1989-2013). Continentally, Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela were revealed important sites for the spread of HIV-1B among countries inside South America. Of note, from all the clusters identified about 70% of the HIV-1B infections are primarily occurring among individuals living in the same geographic region. In addition, these transmissions seem to occur early after the infection of an individual, taking in average 2.39 years (95% CI 1.48-3.30) to succeed. Homosexual/Bisexual individuals transmit the virus as quickly as almost half time of that estimated for the general population sampled here. Public health services can be broadly benefitted from this kind of information whether to focus on specific programs of response to the epidemic whether as guiding of prevention campaigns to specific risk groups.

  9. Where in the Cell Are You? Probing HIV-1 Host Interactions through Advanced Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan S. Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continuously evolve to hijack the host cell machinery in order to successfully replicate and orchestrate key interactions that support their persistence. The type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 is a prime example of viral persistence within the host, having plagued the human population for decades. In recent years, advances in cellular imaging and molecular biology have aided the elucidation of key steps mediating the HIV-1 lifecycle and viral pathogenesis. Super-resolution imaging techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED and photoactivation and localization microscopy (PALM have been instrumental in studying viral assembly and release through both cell–cell transmission and cell–free viral transmission. Moreover, powerful methods such as Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC have shed light on the protein-protein interactions HIV-1 engages within the host to hijack the cellular machinery. Specific advancements in live cell imaging in combination with the use of multicolor viral particles have become indispensable to unravelling the dynamic nature of these virus-host interactions. In the current review, we outline novel imaging methods that have been used to study the HIV-1 lifecycle and highlight advancements in the cell culture models developed to enhance our understanding of the HIV-1 lifecycle.

  10. Initial antibodies binding to HIV-1 gp41 in acutely infected subjects are polyreactive and highly mutated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Munshaw, Supriya; Zhang, Ruijun; Marshall, Dawn J.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Whitesides, John F.; Lu, Xiaozhi; Yu, Jae-Sung; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gao, Feng; Markowitz, Martin; Heath, Sonya L.; Bar, Katharine J.; Goepfert, Paul A.; Montefiori, David C.; Shaw, George C.; Alam, S. Munir; Margolis, David M.; Denny, Thomas N.; Boyd, Scott D.; Marshal, Eleanor; Egholm, Michael; Simen, Birgitte B.; Hanczaruk, Bozena; Fire, Andrew Z.; Voss, Gerald; Kelsoe, Garnett; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The initial antibody response to HIV-1 is targeted to envelope (Env) gp41, and is nonneutralizing and ineffective in controlling viremia. To understand the origins and characteristics of gp41-binding antibodies produced shortly after HIV-1 transmission, we isolated and studied gp41-reactive plasma cells from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1. The frequencies of somatic mutations were relatively high in these gp41-reactive antibodies. Reverted unmutated ancestors of gp41-reactive antibodies derived from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 frequently did not react with autologous HIV-1 Env; however, these antibodies were polyreactive and frequently bound to host or bacterial antigens. In one large clonal lineage of gp41-reactive antibodies, reactivity to HIV-1 Env was acquired only after somatic mutations. Polyreactive gp41-binding antibodies were also isolated from uninfected individuals. These data suggest that the majority of gp41-binding antibodies produced after acute HIV-1 infection are cross-reactive responses generated by stimulating memory B cells that have previously been activated by non–HIV-1 antigens. PMID:21987658

  11. Anti-gp120 minibody gene transfer to female genital epithelial cells protects against HIV-1 virus challenge in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussama M Abdel-Motal

    Full Text Available Although cervico-vaginal epithelial cells of the female lower genital tract provide the initial defense system against HIV-1 infection, the protection is sometimes incomplete. Thus, enhancing anti-HIV-1 humoral immunity at the mucosal cell surface by local expression of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAb that block HIV-1 entry would provide an important new intervention that could slow the spread of HIV/AIDS.This study tested the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV-BnAb gene transfer to cervico-vaginal epithelial cells will lead to protection against HIV-1. Accordingly, a recombinant AAV vector that encodes human b12 anti-HIV gp120 BnAb as a single-chain variable fragment Fc fusion (scFvFc, or "minibody" was constructed. The secreted b12 minibody was shown to be biologically functional in binding to virus envelope protein, neutralizing HIV-1 and importantly, blocking transfer and infectivity of HIV-1(bal in an organotypic human vaginal epithelial cell (VEC model. Furthermore, cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells were found to be efficiently transduced by the optimal AAV serotype mediated expression of GFP.This study provides the foundation for a novel microbicide strategy to protect against sexual transmission of HIV-1 by AAV transfer of broadly neutralizing antibody genes to cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells that could replenish b12 BnAb secreting cells through multiple menstrual cycles.

  12. A Peptide Derived from the HIV-1 gp120 Coreceptor-Binding Region Promotes Formation of PAP248-286 Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

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    Jinquan Chen

    Full Text Available Semen is a major vehicle for HIV transmission. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fragments, such as PAP248-286, in human semen can form amyloid fibrils to enhance HIV infection. Other endogenous or exogenous factors present during sexual intercourse have also been reported to promote the formation of seminal amyloid fibrils.Here, we demonstrated that a synthetic 15-residue peptide derived from the HIV-1 gp120 coreceptor-binding region, designated enhancing peptide 2 (EP2, can rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers. These EP2-derivated nanofibers promptly accelerated the formation of semen amyloid fibrils by PAP248-286, as shown by Thioflavin T (ThT and Congo red assays. The amyloid fibrils presented similar morphology, assessed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM, in the presence or absence of EP2. Circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy revealed that EP2 accelerates PAP248-286 amyloid fibril formation by promoting the structural transition of PAP248-286 from a random coil into a cross-β-sheet. Newly formed semen amyloid fibrils effectively enhanced HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells and U87 cells by promoting the binding of HIV-1 virions to target cells.Nanofibers composed of EP2 promote the formation of PAP248-286 amyloid fibrils and enhance HIV-1 infection.

  13. Dendritic cell immunoreceptor is a new target for anti-AIDS drug development: identification of DCIR/HIV-1 inhibitors.

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    Alexandra A Lambert

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 pandemic continues to expand while no effective vaccine or cure is yet available. Existing therapies have managed to limit mortality and control viral proliferation, but are associated with side effects, do not cure the disease and are subject to development of resistance. Finding new therapeutic targets and drugs is therefore crucial. We have previously shown that the dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR, a C-type lectin receptor expressed on dendritic cells (DCs, acts as an attachment factor for HIV-1 to DCs and contributes to HIV-1 transmission to CD4(+ T lymphocytes (CD4TL. Directly involved in HIV-1 infection, DCIR is expressed in apoptotic or infected CD4TL and promotes trans-infection to bystander cells. Here we report the 3D modelling of the extracellular domain of DCIR. Based on this structure, two surface accessible pockets containing the carbohydrate recognition domain and the EPS binding motif, respectively, were targeted for screening of chemicals that will disrupt normal interaction with HIV-1 particle. Preliminary screening using Raji-CD4-DCIR cells allowed identification of two inhibitors that decreased HIV-1 attachment and propagation. The impact of these inhibitors on infection of DCs and CD4TL was evaluated as well. The results of this study thus identify novel molecules capable of blocking HIV-1 transmission by DCs and CD4TL.

  14. Epidemiology of HIV-1 and emerging problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukashov, V. V.; de Ronde, A.; de Jong, J. J.; Goudsmit, J.

    2000-01-01

    Broad use of antiretroviral drugs is becoming a factor that is important to consider for understanding the HIV-1 epidemiology. Since 1993, we observe that a proportion of new infections within major risk groups in Amsterdam is caused by azidothymidine (AZT)-resistant viruses. After the introduction

  15. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lint, Carine; Bouchat, Sophie; Marcello, Alessandro

    2013-06-26

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Erichsen D, Lopez A L, Peng H, Niemann D, Williams C,. Bauer M, Morgello S, Cotter R L, Ryan L A, Ghorpade A,. Gendelman H E and Zheng J 2003 Neuronal injury regulates fractalkine: relevance for HIV-1 associated dementia; J. Neu- roimmunol. 138 144–155. Enting R H, Hoetelmans R M, Lange J M, Burger D M and.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 associated neurodegeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since identification of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), numerous studies suggest a link between neurological impairments, in particular dementia, with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with alarming occurrence worldwide. Approximately, 60% of HIV-infected people show some form of neurological ...

  18. Epigenetic heterogeneity in HIV-1 latency establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yuka; Kobayashi-Ishihara, Mie; Fujikawa, Dai; Ishida, Takaomi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Yamagishi, Makoto

    2015-01-09

    Despite prolonged antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 persists as transcriptionally inactive proviruses. The HIV-1 latency remains a principal obstacle in curing AIDS. It is important to understand mechanisms by which HIV-1 latency is established to make the latent reservoir smaller. We present a molecular characterization of distinct populations at an early phase of infection. We developed an original dual-color reporter virus to monitor LTR kinetics from establishment to maintenance stage. We found that there are two ways of latency establishment i.e., by immediate silencing and slow inactivation from active infection. Histone covalent modifications, particularly polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated H3K27 trimethylation, appeared to dominate viral transcription at the early phase. PRC2 also contributes to time-dependent LTR dormancy in the chronic phase of the infection. Significant differences in sensitivity against several stimuli were observed between these two distinct populations. These results will expand our understanding of heterogeneous establishment of HIV-1 latency populations.

  19. Enteric viruses in HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative children with diarrheal diseases in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Monica Simões; Fumian, Tulio Machado; Maranhão, Adriana Gonçalves; de Assis, Rosane Maria; Xavier, Maria da Penha Trindade Pinheiro; Rocha, Myrna Santos; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello

    2017-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases (DD) have distinct etiological profiles in immune-deficient and immune-competent patients. This study compares detection rates, genotype distribution and viral loads of different enteric viral agents in HIV-1 seropositive (n = 200) and HIV-1 seronegative (n = 125) children hospitalized with DD in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Except for group A rotavirus (RVA), which were detected through enzyme immunoassay, the other enteric viruses (norovirus [NoV], astrovirus [HAstV], adenovirus [HAdV] and bocavirus [HBoV]) were detected through PCR or RT-PCR. A quantitative PCR was performed for RVA, NoV, HAstV, HAdV and HBoV. Infections with NoV (19% vs. 9.6%; p<0.001), HBoV (14% vs. 7.2%; p = 0.042) and HAdV (30.5% vs. 14.4%; p<0.001) were significantly more frequent among HIV-1 seropositive children. RVA was significantly less frequent among HIV-1 seropositive patients (6.5% vs. 20%; p<0.001). Similarly, frequency of infection with HAstV was lower among HIV-1 seropositive children (5.5% vs. 12.8%; p = 0.018). Among HIV-1 seropositive children 33 (16.5%) had co-infections, including three enteric viruses, such as NoV, HBoV and HAdV (n = 2) and NoV, HAstV and HAdV (n = 2). The frequency of infection with more than one virus was 17 (13.6%) in the HIV-1 negative group, triple infection (NoV + HAstV + HBoV) being observed in only one patient. The median viral load of HAstV in feces was significantly higher among HIV-1 positive children compared to HIV-1 negative children. Concerning children infected with RVA, NoV, HBoV and HAdV, no statistically significant differences were observed in the medians of viral loads in feces, comparing HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative children. Similar detection rates were observed for RVA, HAstV and HAdV, whilst NoV and HBoV were significantly more prevalent among children with CD4+ T lymphocyte count below 200 cells/mm3. Enteric viruses should be considered an important cause of DD in HIV-1 seropositive children, along with

  20. Enteric viruses in HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative children with diarrheal diseases in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Augusta Rodrigues Portes

    Full Text Available Diarrheal diseases (DD have distinct etiological profiles in immune-deficient and immune-competent patients. This study compares detection rates, genotype distribution and viral loads of different enteric viral agents in HIV-1 seropositive (n = 200 and HIV-1 seronegative (n = 125 children hospitalized with DD in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Except for group A rotavirus (RVA, which were detected through enzyme immunoassay, the other enteric viruses (norovirus [NoV], astrovirus [HAstV], adenovirus [HAdV] and bocavirus [HBoV] were detected through PCR or RT-PCR. A quantitative PCR was performed for RVA, NoV, HAstV, HAdV and HBoV. Infections with NoV (19% vs. 9.6%; p<0.001, HBoV (14% vs. 7.2%; p = 0.042 and HAdV (30.5% vs. 14.4%; p<0.001 were significantly more frequent among HIV-1 seropositive children. RVA was significantly less frequent among HIV-1 seropositive patients (6.5% vs. 20%; p<0.001. Similarly, frequency of infection with HAstV was lower among HIV-1 seropositive children (5.5% vs. 12.8%; p = 0.018. Among HIV-1 seropositive children 33 (16.5% had co-infections, including three enteric viruses, such as NoV, HBoV and HAdV (n = 2 and NoV, HAstV and HAdV (n = 2. The frequency of infection with more than one virus was 17 (13.6% in the HIV-1 negative group, triple infection (NoV + HAstV + HBoV being observed in only one patient. The median viral load of HAstV in feces was significantly higher among HIV-1 positive children compared to HIV-1 negative children. Concerning children infected with RVA, NoV, HBoV and HAdV, no statistically significant differences were observed in the medians of viral loads in feces, comparing HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative children. Similar detection rates were observed for RVA, HAstV and HAdV, whilst NoV and HBoV were significantly more prevalent among children with CD4+ T lymphocyte count below 200 cells/mm3. Enteric viruses should be considered an important cause of DD in HIV-1 seropositive children, along

  1. Modeling Anti-HIV-1 HSPC-Based Gene Therapy in Humanized Mice Previously Infected with HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaikawin, Wannisa; Shimizu, Saki; Kamata, Masakazu; Cortado, Ruth; Jung, Yujin; Lam, Jennifer; Wen, Jing; Kim, Patrick; Xie, Yiming; Kim, Sanggu; Arokium, Hubert; Presson, Angela P; Chen, Irvin S Y; An, Dong Sung

    2018-06-15

    Investigations of anti-HIV-1 human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC)-based gene therapy have been performed by HIV-1 challenge after the engraftment of gene-modified HSPCs in humanized mouse models. However, the clinical application of gene therapy is to treat HIV-1-infected patients. Here, we developed a new method to investigate an anti-HIV-1 HSPC-based gene therapy in humanized mice previously infected with HIV-1. First, humanized mice were infected with HIV-1. When plasma viremia reached >107 copies/mL 3 weeks after HIV-1 infection, the mice were myeloablated with busulfan and transplanted with anti-HIV-1 gene-modified CD34+ HSPCs transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing two short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against CCR5 and HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), along with human thymus tissue under the kidney capsule. Anti-HIV-1 vector-modified human CD34+ HSPCs successfully repopulated peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues in HIV-1 previously infected humanized mice. Anti-HIV-1 shRNA vector-modified CD4+ T lymphocytes showed selective advantage in HIV-1 previously infected humanized mice. This new method will be useful for investigations of anti-HIV-1 gene therapy when testing in a more clinically relevant experimental setting.

  2. Identification of Acute HIV-1 Infection by Hologic Aptima HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Leigh Anne; Malia, Jennifer; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Oundo, Joseph; Lueer, Cornelia; Cham, Fatim; de Souza, Mark; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Peel, Sheila A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Hologic Aptima HIV-1 Qualitative RNA assay was used in a rigorous screening approach designed to identify individuals at the earliest stage of HIV-1 infection for enrollment into subsequent studies of cellular and viral events in early infection (RV 217/Early Capture HIV Cohort [ECHO] study). Volunteers at high risk for HIV-1 infection were recruited from study sites in Thailand, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya with high HIV-1 prevalence rates among the populations examined. Small-volume blood samples were collected by finger stick at twice-weekly intervals and tested with the Aptima assay. Participants with reactive Aptima test results were contacted immediately for entry into a more comprehensive follow-up schedule with frequent blood draws. Evaluation of the Aptima test prior to use in this study showed a detection sensitivity of 5.5 copies/ml (50%), with all major HIV-1 subtypes detected. A total of 54,306 specimens from 1,112 volunteers were examined during the initial study period (August 2009 to November 2010); 27 individuals were identified as converting from uninfected to infected status. A sporadic reactive Aptima signal was observed in HIV-1-infected individuals under antiretroviral therapy. Occasional false-reactive Aptima results in uninfected individuals, or nonreactive results in HIV-1-infected individuals not on therapy, were observed and used to calculate assay sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity of the Aptima assay were 99.03% and 99.23%, respectively; positive and negative predictive values were 92.01% and 99.91%, respectively. Conversion from HIV-1-uninfected to -infected status was rapid, with no evidence of a prolonged period of intermittent low-level viremia. PMID:28424253

  3. Transmitted/founder and chronic subtype C HIV-1 use CD4 and CCR5 receptors with equal efficiency and are not inhibited by blocking the integrin α4β7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas F Parrish

    Full Text Available Sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 most often results from productive infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F virus, indicating a stringent mucosal bottleneck. Understanding the viral traits that overcome this bottleneck could have important implications for HIV-1 vaccine design and other prevention strategies. Most T/F viruses use CCR5 to infect target cells and some encode envelope glycoproteins (Envs that contain fewer potential N-linked glycosylation sites and shorter V1/V2 variable loops than Envs from chronic viruses. Moreover, it has been reported that the gp120 subunits of certain transmitted Envs bind to the gut-homing integrin α4β7, possibly enhancing virus entry and cell-to-cell spread. Here we sought to determine whether subtype C T/F viruses, which are responsible for the majority of new HIV-1 infections worldwide, share biological properties that increase their transmission fitness, including preferential α4β7 engagement. Using single genome amplification, we generated panels of both T/F (n = 20 and chronic (n = 20 Env constructs as well as full-length T/F (n = 6 and chronic (n = 4 infectious molecular clones (IMCs. We found that T/F and chronic control Envs were indistinguishable in the efficiency with which they used CD4 and CCR5. Both groups of Envs also exhibited the same CD4+ T cell subset tropism and showed similar sensitivity to neutralization by CD4 binding site (CD4bs antibodies. Finally, saturating concentrations of anti-α4β7 antibodies failed to inhibit infection and replication of T/F as well as chronic control viruses, although the growth of the tissue culture-adapted strain SF162 was modestly impaired. These results indicate that the population bottleneck associated with mucosal HIV-1 acquisition is not due to the selection of T/F viruses that use α4β7, CD4 or CCR5 more efficiently.

  4. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  5. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Yu, Jie; Zhu, Lei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  6. The cell biology of HIV-1 and other retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouland Andrew J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recognition of the growing influence of cell biology in retrovirus research, we recently organized a Summer conference sponsored by the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB on the Cell Biology of HIV-1 and other Retroviruses (July 20–23, 2006, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. The meeting brought together a number of leading investigators interested in the interplay between cell biology and retrovirology with an emphasis on presentation of new and unpublished data. The conference was arranged from early to late events in the virus replication cycle, with sessions on viral fusion, entry, and transmission; post-entry restrictions to retroviral infection; nuclear import and integration; gene expression/regulation of retroviral Gag and genomic RNA; and assembly/release. In this review, we will attempt to touch briefly on some of the highlights of the conference, and will emphasize themes and trends that emerged at the meeting. Meeting report The conference began with a keynote address from W. Sundquist on the biochemistry of HIV-1 budding. This presentation will be described in the section on Assembly and Release of Retroviruses.

  7. Assessment of HIV-1 entry inhibitors by MLV/HIV-1 pseudotyped vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaler Sonja

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine leukemia virus (MLV vector particles can be pseudotyped with a truncated variant of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope protein (Env and selectively target gene transfer to human cells expressing both CD4 and an appropriate co-receptor. Vector transduction mimics the HIV-1 entry process and is therefore a safe tool to study HIV-1 entry. Results Using FLY cells, which express the MLV gag and pol genes, we generated stable producer cell lines that express the HIV-1 envelope gene and a retroviral vector genome encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. The BH10 or 89.6 P HIV-1 Env was expressed from a bicistronic vector which allowed the rapid selection of stable cell lines. A codon-usage-optimized synthetic env gene permitted high, Rev-independent Env expression. Vectors generated by these producer cells displayed different sensitivity to entry inhibitors. Conclusion These data illustrate that MLV/HIV-1 vectors are a valuable screening system for entry inhibitors or neutralizing antisera generated by vaccines.

  8. Occurrence, characteristics, and patterns of HIV-1 and HIV-2 western blot indeterminate sera in low risk populations in West Virginia and pre-AIDS Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindzielorz, A H; Belshe, R B; Mufson, M A

    1990-05-01

    To further characterize HIV-1 and HIV-2 Western blot indeterminate (IWB) sera, 402 sera from 318 healthy low-risk individuals from West Virginia and 159 African sera obtained in the pre-AIDS era (1968-1972) were studied. All IWB sera tested for antigen by HIV-1 enzyme immunoassay (EIA-Ag) were negative. HIV-1 and HIV-2 IWB reactivity occurred independent of HIV-1 and HIV-2 false-positive testing for antibody by enzyme immunoassay (EIA-Ab) and no cross-reactions between HIV-1 and HIV-2 IWB patterns were detected. The IWB patterns were reproducible, demonstrated no age or sex related pattern, and showed no evidence of vertical or horizontal transmission. The African sera exhibited a significantly higher number of IWB patterns. IWB reactivity in HIV-1 and HIV-2 seronegative individuals may not be viral in origin and the occurrence of IWB pattern may vary among populations.

  9. Transplanting supersites of HIV-1 vulnerability.

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    Tongqing Zhou

    Full Text Available One strategy for isolating or eliciting antibodies against a specific target region on the envelope glycoprotein trimer (Env of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 involves the creation of site transplants, which present the target region on a heterologous protein scaffold with preserved antibody-binding properties. If the target region is a supersite of HIV-1 vulnerability, recognized by a collection of broadly neutralizing antibodies, this strategy affords the creation of "supersite transplants", capable of binding (and potentially eliciting antibodies similar to the template collection of effective antibodies. Here we transplant three supersites of HIV-1 vulnerability, each targeted by effective neutralizing antibodies from multiple donors. To implement our strategy, we chose a single representative antibody against each of the target supersites: antibody 10E8, which recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER on the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein; antibody PG9, which recognizes variable regions one and two (V1V2 on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein; and antibody PGT128 which recognizes a glycopeptide supersite in variable region 3 (glycan V3 on gp120. We used a structural alignment algorithm to identify suitable acceptor proteins, and then designed, expressed, and tested antigenically over 100-supersite transplants in a 96-well microtiter-plate format. The majority of the supersite transplants failed to maintain the antigenic properties of their respective template supersite. However, seven of the glycan V3-supersite transplants exhibited nanomolar affinity to effective neutralizing antibodies from at least three donors and recapitulated the mannose9-N-linked glycan requirement of the template supersite. The binding of these transplants could be further enhanced by placement into self-assembling nanoparticles. Essential elements of the glycan V3 supersite, embodied by as few as 3 N-linked glycans and ∼ 25 Env residues, can be

  10. Transcytosis of HIV-1 through vaginal epithelial cells is dependent on trafficking to the endocytic recycling pathway.

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    Ballington L Kinlock

    Full Text Available While it is accepted that viruses can enter epithelial cells by endocytosis, the lack of an established biological mechanism for the trafficking of infectious virions through vaginal epithelial cells and their release from the plasma membrane has contributed to ongoing controversy about whether endocytosis is a mere artifact of some cell culture systems and whether squamous vaginal epithelial cells are even relevant as it pertains to HIV-1 transmission.In this study, we investigated the intracellular trafficking pathway that HIV-1 exploits to transcytose vaginal epithelial cells. The reduction of endosome tubulation by recycling endosome inhibitors blocked transcytosis of HIV-1 in a cell culture and transwell system. In addition, we demonstrate that although heat-inactivated virus was endocytosed as efficiently as native virus, heat-inactivated virus was trafficked exclusively to the lysosomal pathway for degradation following endocytosis. Lysosomal protease-specific inhibitors blocked the degradation of inactivated virions. Immunofluorescence analysis not only demonstrated that HIV-1 was inside the cells but the different colocalization pattern of native vs. heat inactivated virus with transferrin provided conclusive evidence that HIV-1 uses the recycling pathway to get across vaginal epithelial cells.Altogether, our findings demonstrate the precise intracellular trafficking pathway utilized by HIV-1 in epithelial cells, confirms that HIV-1 transcytosis through vaginal epithelial cells is a biological phenomenon and brings to light the differential intracellular trafficking of native vs heat-inactivated HIV-1 which with further exploration could prove to provide valuable insights that could be used in the prevention of transcytosis/transmission of HIV-1 across the mucosal epithelia.

  11. Colorectal Mucus Binds DC-SIGN and Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection of CD4+ T-Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Dekker, Henk L.; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1–3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa. PMID:25793526

  12. HIV-1 Group P is unable to antagonize human tetherin by Vpu, Env or Nef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauter Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new subgroup of HIV-1, designated Group P, was recently detected in two unrelated patients of Cameroonian origin. HIV-1 Group P phylogenetically clusters with SIVgor suggesting that it is the result of a cross-species transmission from gorillas. Until today, HIV-1 Group P has only been detected in two patients, and its degree of adaptation to the human host is largely unknown. Previous data have shown that pandemic HIV-1 Group M, but not non-pandemic Group O or rare Group N viruses, efficiently antagonize the human orthologue of the restriction factor tetherin (BST-2, HM1.24, CD317 suggesting that primate lentiviruses may have to gain anti-tetherin activity for efficient spread in the human population. Thus far, three SIV/HIV gene products (vpu, nef and env are known to have the potential to counteract primate tetherin proteins, often in a species-specific manner. Here, we examined how long Group P may have been circulating in humans and determined its capability to antagonize human tetherin as an indicator of adaptation to humans. Results Our data suggest that HIV-1 Group P entered the human population between 1845 and 1989. Vpu, Env and Nef proteins from both Group P viruses failed to counteract human or gorilla tetherin to promote efficient release of HIV-1 virions, although both Group P Nef proteins moderately downmodulated gorilla tetherin from the cell surface. Notably, Vpu, Env and Nef alleles from the two HIV-1 P strains were all able to reduce CD4 cell surface expression. Conclusions Our analyses of the two reported HIV-1 Group P viruses suggest that zoonosis occurred in the last 170 years and further support that pandemic HIV-1 Group M strains are better adapted to humans than non-pandemic or rare Group O, N and P viruses. The inability to antagonize human tetherin may potentially explain the limited spread of HIV-1 Group P in the human population.

  13. Long-term nonprogression and broad HIV-1-specific proliferative T-cell responses

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    Nesrina eImami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex mechanisms underlying the maintenance of fully functional, proliferative, HIV-1-specific T-cell responses involve processes from early T-cell development through to the final stages of T-cell differentiation and antigen recognition. Virus-specific proliferative CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses, important for the control of infection, are observed in some HIV-1+ patients during early stages of disease, and are maintained in long-term nonprogressing subjects. In the vast majority of HIV-1+ patients, full immune functionality is lost when proliferative HIV-1-specific T-cell responses undergo a variable progressive decline throughout the course of chronic infection. This appears irreparable despite administration of potent combination antiretroviral therapy, which to date is non-curative, necessitating life-long administration and the development of effective, novel, therapeutic interventions. While a sterilising cure, involving clearance of virus from the host, remains a primary aim, a functional cure may be a more feasible goal with considerable impact on worldwide HIV-1 infection. Such an approach would enable long-term co-existence of host and virus in the absence of toxic and costly drugs. Effective immune homeostasis coupled with a balanced response appropriately targeting conserved viral antigens, in a manner that avoids hyperactivation and exhaustion, may prove to be the strongest correlate of durable viral control. This review describes novel concepts underlying full immune functionality in the context of HIV-1 infection, which may be utilised in future strategies designed to improve upon existing therapy. The aim will be to induce long-term nonprogressor or elite controller status in every infected host, through immune-mediated control of viraemia and reduction of viral reservoirs, leading to lower HIV-1 transmission rates.

  14. HIV-1 Subtype distribution in morocco based on national sentinel surveillance data 2004-2005

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    Akrim Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about HIV-1 subtype distribution in Morocco. Some data suggest an emergence of new HIV subtypes. We conducted phylogenetic analysis on a nationally representative sample of 60 HIV-1 viral specimens collected during 2004-2005 through the Morocco national HIV sentinel surveillance survey. Results While subtype B is still the most prevalent, 23.3% of samples represented non-B subtypes, the majority of which were classified as CRF02_AG (15%. Molecular clock analysis confirmed that the initial introduction of HIV-1B in Morocco probably came from Europe in the early 1980s. In contrast, the CRF02_AG strain appeared to be introduced from sub-Saharan Africa in two separate events in the 1990s. Conclusions Subtype CRF02_AG has been emerging in Morocco since the 1990s. More information about the factors introducing HIV subtype-specific transmission will inform the prevention strategy in the region.

  15. Dual role of autophagy in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis

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    Killian M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autophagy, the major mechanism for degrading long-lived intracellular proteins and organelles, is essential for eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Autophagy also defends the cell against invasion by microorganisms and has important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Increasingly evident is that HIV-1 replication is dependent on select components of autophagy. Fittingly, HIV-1 proteins are able to modulate autophagy to maximize virus production. At the same time, HIV-1 proteins appear to disrupt autophagy in uninfected cells, thereby contributing to CD4+ cell death and HIV-1 pathogenesis. These observations allow for new approaches for the treatment and possibly the prevention of HIV-1 infection. This review focuses on the relationship between autophagy and HIV-1 infection. Discussed is how autophagy plays dual roles in HIV-1 replication and HIV-1 disease progression.

  16. Intestinal microbiota and HIV-1 infection

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    E. B. S. M. Trindade

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota consists of a qualitatively and quantitatively diverse range of microorganisms dynamically interacting with the host. It is remarkably stable with regard to the presence of microorganisms and their roles which, however, can be altered due to pathological conditions, diet composition, gastrointestinal disturbances and/or drug ingestion. The present review aimed at contributing to the discussion about changes in the intestinal microbiota due to HIV-1 infection, focusing on the triad infection-microbiota-nutrition as factors that promote intestinal bacterial imbalance. Intestinal microbiota alterations can be due to the HIV-1 infection as a primary factor or the pharmacotherapy employed, or they can be one of the consequences of the disease.

  17. Phylodynamic and Phylogeographic Profiles of Subtype B HIV-1 Epidemics in South Spain.

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    Santiago Pérez-Parra

    Full Text Available Since 1982, HIV-1 epidemics have evolved to different scenarios in terms of transmission routes, subtype distribution and characteristics of transmission clusters. We investigated the evolutionary history of HIV-1 subtype B in south Spain.We studied all newly diagnosed HIV-1 subtype B patients in East Andalusia during the 2005-2012 period. For the analysis, we used the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences from baseline resistance, and the Trugene® HIV Genotyping kit (Siemens, Barcelona, Spain. Subtyping was done with REGA v3.0. The maximum likelihood trees constructed with RAxML were used to study HIV-1 clustering. Phylogeographic and phylodynamic profiles were studied by Bayesian inference methods with BEAST v1.7.5 and SPREAD v1.0.6.Of the 493 patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, 234 grouped into 55 clusters, most of which were small (44 clusters ≤ 5 patients, 31 with 2 patients, 13 with 3. The rest (133/234 were grouped into 11 clusters with ≥ 5 patients, and most (82%, 109/133 were men who have sex with men (MSM grouped into 8 clusters. The association with clusters was more frequent in Spanish (p = 0.02 men (p< 0.001, MSM (p<0.001 younger than 35 years (p = 0.001 and with a CD4+ T-cell count above 350 cells/ul (p<0.001. We estimated the date of HIV-1 subtype B regional epidemic diversification around 1970 (95% CI: 1965-1987, with an evolutionary rate of 2.4 (95%CI: 1.7-3.1 x 10-3 substitutions/site/year. Most clusters originated in the 1990s in MSMs. We observed exponential subtype B HIV-1 growth in 1980-1990 and 2005-2008. The most significant migration routes for subtype B went from inland cities to seaside locations.We provide the first data on the phylodynamic and phylogeographic profiles of HIV-1 subtype B in south Spain. Our findings of transmission clustering among MSMs should alert healthcare managers to enhance preventive measures in this risk group in order to prevent future outbreaks.

  18. Variability of HIV-1 genomes among children and adolescents from Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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    Sabri Saeed Sanabani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic variability is a major feature of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and considered the key factor to frustrating efforts to halt the virus epidemic. In this study, we aimed to investigate the genetic variability of HIV-1 strains among children and adolescents born from 1992 to 2009 in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. METHODOLOGY: Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were collected from 51 HIV-1-positive children and adolescents on ART followed between September 1992 and July 2009. After extraction, the genetic materials were used in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR to amplify the viral near full length genomes (NFLGs from 5 overlapped fragments. NFLGs and partial amplicons were directly sequenced and data were phylogenetically inferred. RESULTS: Of the 51 samples studied, the NFLGs and partial fragments of HIV-1 from 42 PBMCs and 25 plasma were successfully subtyped. Results based on proviral DNA revealed that 22 (52.4% patients were infected with subtype B, 16 (38.1% were infected with BF1 mosaic variants and 4 (9.5% were infected with sub-subtype F1. All the BF1 recombinants were unique and distinct from any previously identified unique or circulating recombinant forms in South America. Evidence of dual infections was detected in 3 patients coinfected with the same or distinct HIV-1 subtypes. Ten of the 31 (32.2% and 12 of the 21 (57.1% subjects with recovered proviral and plasma, respectively, protease sequences were infected with major mutants resistant to protease inhibitors. The V3 sequences of 14 patients with available sequences from PBMC/or plasma were predicted to be R5-tropic virus except for two patients who harbored an X4 strain. CONCLUSIONS: The high proportion of HIV-1 BF1 recombinant, coinfection rate and vertical transmission in Brazil merits urgent attention and effective measures to reduce the transmission of HIV among spouses and sex partners.

  19. Early low-titer neutralizing antibodies impede HIV-1 replication and select for virus escape.

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    Katharine J Bar

    Full Text Available Single genome sequencing of early HIV-1 genomes provides a sensitive, dynamic assessment of virus evolution and insight into the earliest anti-viral immune responses in vivo. By using this approach, together with deep sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, antibody adsorptions and virus-entry assays, we found evidence in three subjects of neutralizing antibody (Nab responses as early as 2 weeks post-seroconversion, with Nab titers as low as 1∶20 to 1∶50 (IC(50 selecting for virus escape. In each of the subjects, Nabs targeted different regions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env in a strain-specific, conformationally sensitive manner. In subject CH40, virus escape was first mediated by mutations in the V1 region of the Env, followed by V3. HIV-1 specific monoclonal antibodies from this subject mapped to an immunodominant region at the base of V3 and exhibited neutralizing patterns indistinguishable from polyclonal antibody responses, indicating V1-V3 interactions within the Env trimer. In subject CH77, escape mutations mapped to the V2 region of Env, several of which selected for alterations of glycosylation. And in subject CH58, escape mutations mapped to the Env outer domain. In all three subjects, initial Nab recognition was followed by sequential rounds of virus escape and Nab elicitation, with Nab escape variants exhibiting variable costs to replication fitness. Although delayed in comparison with autologous CD8 T-cell responses, our findings show that Nabs appear earlier in HIV-1 infection than previously recognized, target diverse sites on HIV-1 Env, and impede virus replication at surprisingly low titers. The unexpected in vivo sensitivity of early transmitted/founder virus to Nabs raises the possibility that similarly low concentrations of vaccine-induced Nabs could impair virus acquisition in natural HIV-1 transmission, where the risk of infection is low and the number of viruses responsible for transmission and productive clinical

  20. HIV-1 Variants and Drug Resistance in Pregnant Women from Bata (Equatorial Guinea: 2012-2013.

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    Patricia Alvarez

    Full Text Available This is the first study describing drug resistance mutations (DRM and HIV-1 variants among infected pregnant women in Equatorial Guinea (GQ, a country with high (6.2% and increasing HIV prevalence.Dried blood spots (DBS were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 from 69 HIV-1 infected women participating in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in the Hospital Regional of Bata and Primary Health Care Centre María Rafols, Bata, GQ. The transmitted (TDR or acquired (ADR antiretroviral drug resistance mutations at partial pol sequence among naive or antiretroviral therapy (ART-exposed women were defined following WHO or IAS USA 2015 lists, respectively. HIV-1 variants were identified by phylogenetic analyses.A total of 38 of 69 HIV-1 specimens were successfully amplified and sequenced. Thirty (79% belonged to ART-experienced women: 15 exposed to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI monotherapy, and 15 to combined ART (cART as first regimen including two NRTI and one non-NRTI (NNRTI or one protease inhibitor (PI. The TDR rate was only found for PI (3.4%. The ADR rate was 37.5% for NNRTI, 8.7% for NRTI and absent for PI or NRTI+NNRTI. HIV-1 group M non-B variants caused most (97.4% infections, mainly (78.9% recombinants: CRF02_AG (55.2%, CRF22_A101 (10.5%, subtype C (10.5%, unique recombinants (5.3%, and A3, D, F2, G, CRF06_cpx and CRF11_cpx (2.6% each.The high rate of ADR to retrotranscriptase inhibitors (mainly to NNRTIs observed among pretreated pregnant women reinforces the importance of systematic DRM monitoring in GQ to reduce HIV-1 resistance transmission and to optimize first and second-line ART regimens when DRM are present.

  1. Phylogenetic characteristics of HIV-1 among travelers entering China from Myanmar: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Binhui; Liang, Yaobo; Feng, Yue; Dong, Shuwei; Wang, Yajuan; Li, Yaping; Zhang, A-Mei; Liu, Li; Qin, Weihong; Xia, Xueshan

    2017-08-01

    Due to the open policy of the Chinese government, a large number of Burmese individuals enter China at land ports in Yunnan province for travel or business. However, the situation of HIV-1 infection and its phylogenetic characteristics among these travelers remains unclear, which is a potential threat to public health. From January 2003 to December 2012, a total of 1,961 travelers were detected to be positive for HIV-1 infection at land ports between Myanmar and Yunnan province, China. From 1153 (58.8%) Burmese of them, we randomly collected 489 serum samples for HIV-1 subtype/recombinant analysis. Based on successfully obtained 223 gag-RT sequences, 187 of them were genotyped as 2 subtypes and 3 CRFs. CRF01_AE was showed to be the most prevalent genotype (54.3%), followed by subtypes C (13.5%) and B (10.8%). Notably, CRF07_BC (1.3%) and CRF08_BC (4.0%) were mainly distributed in travelers from Shan state and Kachin (91.7%, 11/12), but was not found in travelers from the capital city of Yangon (0/16). Additionally, there were 36 samples (16.1%) were preliminary determined as unique recombinant forms (URFs). The higher HIV-1 infection among entering travelers from Myanmar and its diverse and complex genotypes distribution suggest this bridge population may facilitate the transmission of HIV-1. It is necessary to have the strict monitoring on this population for prevention of HIV-1 cross-border transmission. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 before, during and after a civil war in an occupational cohort in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, Fredrik; Biague, Antonio; da Silva, Zacarias José; Dias, Francisco; Nilsson, L A Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Norrgren, Hans

    2009-07-31

    To study prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 between 1990 and 2007 and to examine impact of the civil war in 1998-1999. We also wanted to investigate possible interaction between HIV-1 and HIV-2. Open prospective cohort study of 4592 police officers in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Analysis of HIV-1 and HIV-2 prevalence and incidence divided in 2-3 years time strata. HIV-1 prevalence (including HIV-1/HIV-2 dual reactivity) increased gradually from 0.6 to 3.6% before the war and was 9.5% in the first serosurvey after the war. HIV-1 incidence more than doubled during and shortly after the war, from 0.50 to 1.22 per 100 person-years. Both prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 decreased in the following periods after the war. HIV-2 prevalence decreased from 13.4 to 6.2% during the entire study period and HIV-2 incidence decreased from 1.38 to 0.18 per 100 person-years. Adjusted incidence rate ratios of HIV-1 incidence in HIV-2-positive participants compared with HIV-negative participants ranged from 1.02 to 1.18 (not significant) depending on the confounding variables included. HIV-1 has increased, whereas HIV-2 has decreased and the risk of acquiring HIV-1 is now more than four times higher as compared with HIV-2. The civil war in 1998-1999 appears to have induced a temporary increase in HIV-1 transmission, but now a stabilization of HIV-1 incidence and prevalence seems to have taken place. There was no evidence of a protective effect of HIV-2 against HIV-1 infection.

  3. HIV-1 vaccine design: Learning from natural infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Kerkhof, T.L.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Het humane immuundeficiëntie virus type 1 (hiv-1) is het virus dat aids veroorzaakt. Er is nog steeds geen bescherming tegen een hiv-1 infectie en de beëindiging van de wereldwijde epidemie kan waarschijnlijk alleen worden bereikt met behulp van een vaccin. Een hiv-1 vaccin zal bescherming moeten

  4. HIV-1 envelope trimer fusion proteins and their applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliepen, K.H.E.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a major threat to global health and a vaccine is not yet on the horizon. A successful HIV-1 vaccine should probably induce HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies that target the envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer on the outside of the virion. A possible starting point for such a vaccine are soluble

  5. Large Isoform of Mammalian Relative of DnaJ is a Major Determinant of Human Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection

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    Yu-Ping Chiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection have been of interest for decades. We aimed to determine the contribution of large isoform of Mammalian DnaJ (MRJ-L, a HIV-1 Vpr-interacting cellular protein, to this natural variation. Expression of MRJ-L in monocyte-derived macrophages was significantly higher in HIV-infected individuals (n = 31 than their uninfected counterparts (n = 27 (p = 0.009. Fifty male homosexual subjects (20 of them are HIV-1 positive were further recruited to examine the association between MRJ-L levels and occurrence of HIV infection. Bayesian multiple logistic regression revealed that playing a receptive role and increased levels of MRJ-L in macrophages were two risk factors for HIV-1 infection. A 1% rise in MRJ-L expression was associated with a 1.13 fold (95% CrI 1.06–1.29 increase in odds of contracting HIV-1 infection. Ex vivo experiments revealed that MRJ-L facilitated Vpr-dependent nuclear localization of virus. Infection of macrophage-tropic strain is a critical step in HIV-1 transmission. MRJ-L is a critical factor in this process; hence, subjects with higher macrophage MRJ-L levels are more vulnerable to HIV-1 infection.

  6. Human prostate supports more efficient replication of HIV-1 R5 than X4 strains ex vivo

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    Denis Hélène

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to determine whether human prostate can be productively infected by HIV-1 strains with different tropism, and thus represent a potential source of HIV in semen, an organotypic culture of prostate from men undergoing prostatic adenomectomy for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH was developed. The presence of potential HIV target cells in prostate tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The infection of prostate explants following exposures with HIV-1 R5, R5X4 and X4 strains was analyzed through the measure of RT activity in culture supernatants, the quantification of HIV DNA in the explants and the detection of HIV RNA+ cells in situ. Results The overall prostate characteristics were retained for 21/2 weeks in culture. Numerous potential HIV-1 target cells were detected in the prostate stroma. Whilst HIV-1 R5SF162 strain consistently productively infected prostatic T lymphocytes and macrophages, the prototypic X4IIIB strain and a primary R5X4 strain showed less efficient replication in this organ. Conclusion The BPH prostate is a site of HIV-1 R5 replication that could contribute virus to semen. A limited spreading of HIV-1 X4 and R5X4 in this organ could participate to the preferential sexual transmission of HIV-1 R5 strains.

  7. Human prostate supports more efficient replication of HIV-1 R5 than X4 strains ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tortorec, Anna; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Denis, Hélène; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Havard, Laurence; Ruffault, Annick; Jégou, Bernard; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie

    2008-12-31

    In order to determine whether human prostate can be productively infected by HIV-1 strains with different tropism, and thus represent a potential source of HIV in semen, an organotypic culture of prostate from men undergoing prostatic adenomectomy for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) was developed. The presence of potential HIV target cells in prostate tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The infection of prostate explants following exposures with HIV-1 R5, R5X4 and X4 strains was analyzed through the measure of RT activity in culture supernatants, the quantification of HIV DNA in the explants and the detection of HIV RNA+ cells in situ. The overall prostate characteristics were retained for 21/2 weeks in culture. Numerous potential HIV-1 target cells were detected in the prostate stroma. Whilst HIV-1 R5SF162 strain consistently productively infected prostatic T lymphocytes and macrophages, the prototypic X4IIIB strain and a primary R5X4 strain showed less efficient replication in this organ. The BPH prostate is a site of HIV-1 R5 replication that could contribute virus to semen. A limited spreading of HIV-1 X4 and R5X4 in this organ could participate to the preferential sexual transmission of HIV-1 R5 strains.

  8. Upregulation of interferon-alpha and RANTES in the cervix of HIV-1-seronegative women with high-risk behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirbod, Taha; Nilsson, Jakob; Andersson, Sonia; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Ferrari, Davide; Manghi, Mara; Andersson, Jan; Lopalco, Lucia; Broliden, Kristina

    2006-10-01

    The expression of innate immune molecules associated with potential blocking activity of HIV-1 propagation was analyzed in the cervical tissue of a group of African HIV-1 IgG-negative commercial sex workers (CSWs) with an HIV-1-encountering risk behavior. Cervical biopsies from the superior portion of the ectocervix were assessed for innate immune molecules and evaluated in situ by computerized image analysis at the single-cell level. A higher expression of interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) and RANTES was detected in CSWs and HIV-1-infected individuals as compared to low-risk HIV-1-uninfected controls (Neg Ctrls). Most (>90%) of RANTES-expressing cells were CD8 cells as determined by confocal microscopy. In contrast, the expression of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) was comparable between the groups. The expression of beta-defensin 2 was highest in HIV-1-infected individuals. Induction of IFNalpha and RANTES expression in cervical mucosa may contribute to protection of sexual HIV-1 transmission in subjects with a higher risk behavior.

  9. Quantification of the Epitope Diversity of HIV-1-Specific Binding Antibodies by Peptide Microarrays for Global HIV-1 Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6,564 peptides from across...

  10. Surface glycoprotein of Borna disease virus mediates virus spread from cell to cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Frank; Bayer, Karen; Czerwonka, Nadine; Lu, Yinghui; Kehr, Kristine; Hirz, Manuela; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Garten, Wolfgang; Herden, Christiane

    2016-03-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a non-segmented negative-stranded RNA virus that maintains a strictly neurotropic and persistent infection in affected end hosts. The primary target cells for BDV infection are brain cells, e.g. neurons and astrocytes. The exact mechanism of how infection is propagated between these cells and especially the role of the viral glycoprotein (GP) for cell-cell transmission, however, are still incompletely understood. Here, we use different cell culture systems, including rat primary astrocytes and mixed cultures of rat brain cells, to show that BDV primarily spreads through cell-cell contacts. We employ a highly stable and efficient peptidomimetic inhibitor to inhibit the furin-mediated processing of GP and demonstrate that cleaved and fusion-active GP is strictly necessary for the cell-to-cell spread of BDV. Together, our quantitative observations clarify the role of Borna disease virus-glycoprotein for viral dissemination and highlight the regulation of GP expression as a potential mechanism to limit viral spread and maintain persistence. These findings furthermore indicate that targeting host cell proteases might be a promising approach to inhibit viral GP activation and spread of infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. HIV-1 Phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Gray, Rebecca R.; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; McGrath, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that 1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, 2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and 3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:21055482

  12. Evaluation of Xpert HIV-1 Qual assay for resolution of HIV-1 infection in samples with negative or indeterminate Geenius HIV-1/2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaeli, Michal; Wax, Marina; Gozlan, Yael; Rakovsky, Aviya; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of HIV infection is a multistage algorithm. Following screening with 4(th) generation combination immunoassay, confirmation of HIV infection is performed with an antibody assay that differentiates HIV-1 from HIV-2 infection. In the newly updated algorithm, samples that are nonreactive or indeterminate in the differentiation assay are to be tested with an HIV-1 nucleic acid amplification (NAAT) test for resolution. Xpert HIV-1 Qual is a new NAAT assay approved for the identification of HIV infection in whole and dried blood. To assess the performance of Xpert HIV-1 Qual supplementary assay in resolving the clinical status of serum samples reactive by 4(th) generation immunoassays and indeterminate or negative by Geenius HIV-1/2 confirmatory assay. In a retrospective study, samples from 97 individuals for whom the true HIV-1 status was already known (by follow-up samples) and which were negative or indeterminate by HIV-1/2 Geenius assay were tested with Xpert Qual HIV-1 assay. Xpert Qual assay correctly classified all 97 samples from HIV-1 positive (n=49) and negative (n=48) individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of Xpert Qual when using the true HIV status as a reference were 100% (92.7-100% at 95% confidence interval [CI] and 92.6-100% at 95% CI, respectively). Applying Xpert Qual HIV-1 assay in the new HIV multi-stage diagnostic algorithm correctly classified 100% of HIV-1 infections including 49 from HIV-1 carriers who have not yet seroconverted. With this assay the total time required for acute HIV diagnosis could be significantly reduced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Infection of monkeys by simian-human immunodeficiency viruses with transmitted/founder clade C HIV-1 envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L; Mach, Linh V; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N; Lewis, Mark G; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L; Burton, Dennis R; Sodroski, Joseph G; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-01-15

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed 10 clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing using Gingival Crevicular Fluid as a New Technique for Detecting HIV-1 Infection

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    Alex Willyandre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of HIV-1 infection by individuals in window period who are tested negative in conventional HIV-1 detection would pose the community with serious problems. Several diagnostic tools require specific labora-tory equipment, perfect timing of diagnosis, antibody to HIV-1, and invasive technique to get sample for examination, until high amount of time to process the sample as well as accessibility of remote areas. Many attempts have been made to solve those problems to come to a new detection technique. This review aims to give information about the current development technique for detection of HIV infection. Microfluidic Chip-based Nucleic Acid Testing is currently introduced for detection of HIV-1 infection. This review also cover the possible usage of gingival crevicular fluid as sample specimen that could be taken noninvasively from the individual.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v18i2.63

  15. Photochemical neutralization of HIV-1 and inhibition of HIV-1 induced syncytium formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.E.; Utecht, R.E. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States); Chanh, T.C.; Allan, J.S. [Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX (United States); Sogandares-Bernal, F.; Judy, M.M.; Matthews J.L. [Baylor Research Foundation, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The authors have prepared a new class of photochemically activatable antiviral compounds based on the 1,8-naphthalimide skeleton which are excited by visible (420 nm) light, and which are highly effective in causing neutralization of enveloped viruses including HIV-1, HSV-1, and VSV. One such photoactive compound, 1,14-bis-(N-hexyl-3-bromo-1,8-naphthalimid-4-yl)-1,4,11,14-tetrazatetradecane-5,10-dione (diED66Br) effectively neutralized HIV-1 in vitro at concentrations below .1{mu}M; similar results are obtained for HSV-1 and VSV. DiED66Br also effectively inhibits syncytium formation induced by cells infected with HIV-1 at doses which had no effect on normal human blood peripheral mononuclear cells. The synthesis of the photochemically active compounds and the mode of antiviral action will be discussed.

  16. HIV-1 diversity in an antiretroviral treatment naïve cohort from Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msimanga, Patrick Wela; Vardas, Efthyia; Engelbrecht, Susan

    2015-02-13

    South Africa has a generalized and explosive HIV/AIDS epidemic with the largest number of people infected with HIV-1 in the world. Molecular investigations of HIV-1 diversity can help enhance interventions to contain and combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic. However, many studies of HIV-1 diversity in South Africa tend to be limited to the major metropolitan centers and their surrounding provinces. Hardly any studies of HIV diversity have been undertaken in Mpumalanga Province, and this study sought to investigate the HIV-1 diversity in this province, as well as establish the occurrence and extent of transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance mutations. HIV-1 gag p24, pol p10 and p66/p51, pol p31 and env gp41 gene fragments from 43 participants were amplified and sequenced. Quality control on the sequences was carried out using the LANL QC online tool. HIV-1 subtype was preliminary assigned using the REGA 3.0 and jpHMM online tools. Subtype for the pol gene fragment was further designated using the SCUEAL online tool. Phylogenetic analysis was inferred using the Maximum Likelihood methods in MEGA version 6. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were determined using the Stanford database. Phylogenetic analysis using Maximum Likelihood methods indicated that all sequences in the study clustered with HIV-1 subtype C. The exception was one putative subtype BC unique recombinant form. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations K103N and E138A were also detected, indicating possible transmission of anti-retroviral drug resistance mutations. The phylogenetic analysis of the HIV sequences revealed that, by 2009, patients in the Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga were predominantly infected with HIV-1 subtype C. However, the generalized, explosive nature of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa, in the context of extensive mobility by South Africans who inhabit rural areas, renders the continued molecular monitoring and surveillance of the epidemic imperative.

  17. HCV viremia is associated with drug use in young HIV-1 and HCV coinfected pregnant and non-pregnant women*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Georgia B.; Nowicki, Marek J.; Du, Wenbo; Homans, James; Stek, Alice; Kramer, Francoise; Kovacs, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Aims Vertical transmission of HCV is increased among HIV-1/HCV coinfected women and is related to HCV viral load. In this study we assessed clinical and demographic factors associated with HCV viremia in a cohort of young pregnant and non-pregnant mothers coinfected with HIV-1. Design A cross-sectional clinic-based study nested within a prospective cohort study. Methods From 1988 to 2000, HIV-1 + pregnant and non-pregnant women with children followed in a large maternal, child and adolescent HIV-1 clinic were evaluated for HCV infection using EIA 3.0. HCV RNA levels were determined for HCV antibody + women using polymerase chain reaction. Demographic and clinical characteristics between HCV-RNA(+) and HCV-RNA(−) women and between pregnant and non-pregnant HIV-1/HCV coinfected women were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Findings Among 359 HIV-1(+) women, 84 (23%) were HCV-ab + and 49/84 (58%) had detectable HCV-RNA in plasma. Median age was 31. CD4 counts, HIV-1 RNA levels and demographic characteristics were similar for viremic and non-viremic women and pregnant and non-pregnant women. However, viremic women were more likely to report a history of (88% versus 43%; P < 0.001) or active injection drug use (AIDU) (83% versus 29%; P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that HCV viremia was associated significantly with AIDU (adjusted OR: 15.17; 95% CI: 3.56, 64.56) after adjusting for age, race, number of sexual partners, pregnancy status, CD4 counts and HIV-1 viral load. Conclusion In this cohort of young HIV-1 and HCV coinfected women, HCV viremia was associated strongly with active injection drug use, perhaps due to reinfection or reactivation of HCV. Thus, careful evaluation for HCV infection and counseling related to drug use may be necessary. PMID:15847620

  18. Factors of intermittent HIV-1 excretion in semen and efficiency of sperm processing in obtaining spermatozoa without HIV-1 genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujan, Louis; Daudin, Myriam; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Righi, Laurence; Thauvin, Laurence; Berges, Laetitia; Izopet, Jacques; Berrebi, Alain; Massip, Patrice; Pasquier, Christophe

    2004-03-26

    To study the risk factors for HIV-1 in semen according to the localization of HIV-1 in sperm cell fractions and to assess the efficiency of sperm processing in obtaining spermatozoa without HIV-1 genomes. Ninety-four HIV-infected patients provided 281 paired blood and semen samples. Sperm cell separation was performed using two successive methods. HIV-1 RNA was quantified in blood and seminal plasma. HIV-1 RNA and DNA were detected in cell fractions. HIV-1 RNA was found in 14% of seminal plasma samples and up to 8.7% of native semen cells were positive for HIV-1 RNA and DNA. Ten seminal plasma samples had detectable RNA although blood viral load was undetectable. Antiretroviral treatment reduced the likelihood of RNA detection in seminal plasma. For semen with polynuclear cells and HIV-1 RNA in seminal plasma, the likelihood of detecting HIV-1 genomes in semen cells was increased fourfold and sixfold, respectively. In 25% of patients, HIV-1 excretion was intermittent. In the group of patients with systematic negative seminal plasma, HIV-1 genomes were detected in up to 10% of sperm cell samples. Our method of sperm processing always enabled us to obtain spermatozoa without detectable HIV-1 genomes. Polynuclear cells in semen are a risk factor for seminal HIV-1 excretion. Blood viral load was the only predictive factor for the intermittence of HIV-1 excretion in semen over time. Sperm processing using two successive methods was effective in obtaining spermatozoa without detectable HIV-1 genomes regardless of the viral load level in native semen.

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells suppress HIV-1 replication but contribute to HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis in humanized mice.

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    Guangming Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were depleted prior to HIV-1 infection, the induction of IFN-I and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs were abolished during acute HIV-1 infection with either a highly pathogenic CCR5/CXCR4-dual tropic HIV-1 or a standard CCR5-tropic HIV-1 isolate. Consistent with the anti-viral role of IFN-I, HIV-1 replication was significantly up-regulated in pDC-depleted mice. Interestingly, the cell death induced by the highly pathogenic HIV-1 isolate was severely reduced in pDC-depleted mice. During chronic HIV-1 infection, depletion of pDC also severely reduced the induction of IFN-I and ISGs, associated with elevated HIV-1 replication. Surprisingly, HIV-1 induced depletion of human immune cells including T cells in lymphoid organs, but not the blood, was reduced in spite of the increased viral replication. The increased cell number in lymphoid organs was associated with a reduced level of HIV-induced cell death in human leukocytes including CD4 T cells. We conclude that pDC play opposing roles in suppressing HIV-1 replication and in promoting HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis. These findings suggest that pDC-depletion and IFN-I blockade will provide novel strategies for treating those HIV-1 immune non-responsive patients with persistent immune activation despite effective anti-retrovirus treatment.

  20. An autoreactive antibody from an SLE/HIV-1 individual broadly neutralizes HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Wiehe, Kevin; Grimm, Sebastian K.; Lynch, Rebecca; Yang, Guang; Kozink, Daniel M.; Perrin, Florence; Cooper, Abby J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Xi; Liu, Mengfei; McKee, Krisha; Parks, Robert J.; Eudailey, Joshua; Wang, Minyue; Clowse, Megan; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G.; Moody, M. Anthony; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Boyd, Scott D.; Gao, Feng; Kelsoe, Garnett; Verkoczy, Laurent; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kepler, Thomas B.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly HIV-1–neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) display one or more unusual traits, including a long heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3), polyreactivity, and high levels of somatic mutations. These shared characteristics suggest that BnAb development might be limited by immune tolerance controls. It has been postulated that HIV-1–infected individuals with autoimmune disease and defective immune tolerance mechanisms may produce BnAbs more readily than those without autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified an HIV-1–infected individual with SLE who exhibited controlled viral load (<5,000 copies/ml) in the absence of controlling HLA phenotypes and developed plasma HIV-1 neutralization breadth. We collected memory B cells from this individual and isolated a BnAb, CH98, that targets the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120). CH98 bound to human antigens including dsDNA, which is specifically associated with SLE. Anti-dsDNA reactivity was also present in the patient’s plasma. CH98 had a mutation frequency of 25% and 15% nt somatic mutations in the heavy and light chain variable domains, respectively, a long HCDR3, and a deletion in the light chain CDR1. The occurrence of anti-dsDNA reactivity by a HIV-1 CD4bs BnAb in an individual with SLE raises the possibility that some BnAbs and SLE-associated autoantibodies arise from similar pools of B cells. PMID:24614107

  1. Disparate associations of HLA class I markers with HIV-1 acquisition and control of viremia in an African population.

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    Wei Song

    Full Text Available Acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is mediated by a combination of characteristics of the infectious and the susceptible member of a transmission pair, including human behavioral and genetic factors, as well as viral fitness and tropism. Here we report on the impact of established and potential new HLA class I determinants of heterosexual HIV-1 acquisition in the HIV-1-exposed seronegative (HESN partners of serodiscordant Zambian couples.We assessed the relationships of behavioral and clinically documented risk factors, index partner viral load, and host genetic markers to HIV-1 transmission among 568 cohabiting couples followed for at least nine months. We genotyped subjects for three classical HLA class I genes known to influence immune control of HIV-1 infection. From 1995 to December 2006, 240 HESNs seroconverted and 328 remained seronegative. In Cox proportional hazards models, HLA-A*68:02 and the B*42-C*17 haplotype in HESN partners were significantly and independently associated with faster HIV-1 acquisition (relative hazards = 1.57 and 1.55; p = 0.007 and 0.013, respectively after controlling for other previously established contributing factors in the index partner (viral load and specific class I alleles, in the HESN partner (age, gender, or in the couple (behavioral and clinical risk score. Few if any previously implicated class I markers were associated here with the rate of acquiring infection.A few HLA class I markers showed modest effects on acquisition of HIV-1 subtype C infection in HESN partners of discordant Zambian couples. However, the striking disparity between those few markers and the more numerous, different markers found to determine HIV-1 disease course makes it highly unlikely that, whatever the influence of class I variation on the rate of infection, the mechanism mediating that phenomenon is identical to that involved in disease control.

  2. Disparate Associations of HLA Class I Markers with HIV-1 Acquisition and Control of Viremia in an African Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; He, Dongning; Brill, Ilene; Malhotra, Rakhi; Mulenga, Joseph; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Tang, Jianming; Kaslow, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is mediated by a combination of characteristics of the infectious and the susceptible member of a transmission pair, including human behavioral and genetic factors, as well as viral fitness and tropism. Here we report on the impact of established and potential new HLA class I determinants of heterosexual HIV-1 acquisition in the HIV-1-exposed seronegative (HESN) partners of serodiscordant Zambian couples. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the relationships of behavioral and clinically documented risk factors, index partner viral load, and host genetic markers to HIV-1 transmission among 568 cohabiting couples followed for at least nine months. We genotyped subjects for three classical HLA class I genes known to influence immune control of HIV-1 infection. From 1995 to December 2006, 240 HESNs seroconverted and 328 remained seronegative. In Cox proportional hazards models, HLA-A*68:02 and the B*42-C*17 haplotype in HESN partners were significantly and independently associated with faster HIV-1 acquisition (relative hazards = 1.57 and 1.55; p = 0.007 and 0.013, respectively) after controlling for other previously established contributing factors in the index partner (viral load and specific class I alleles), in the HESN partner (age, gender), or in the couple (behavioral and clinical risk score). Few if any previously implicated class I markers were associated here with the rate of acquiring infection. Conclusions/Significance A few HLA class I markers showed modest effects on acquisition of HIV-1 subtype C infection in HESN partners of discordant Zambian couples. However, the striking disparity between those few markers and the more numerous, different markers found to determine HIV-1 disease course makes it highly unlikely that, whatever the influence of class I variation on the rate of infection, the mechanism mediating that phenomenon is identical to that involved in

  3. Role of Endolysosomes in HIV-1 Tat-Induced Neurotoxicity

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    Liang Hui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Combined anti-retroviral therapeutic drugs effectively increase the lifespan of HIV-1-infected individuals who then have a higher prevalence of HAND (HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorder. Soluble factors including HIV-1 proteins released from HIV-1-infected cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, and particular attention has been paid to the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription protein because of its ability to directly excite neurons and cause neuronal cell death. Since HIV-1 Tat enters cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and since endolysosomes play an important role in neuronal cell life and death, we tested here the hypothesis that HIV-1 Tat neurotoxicity is associated with changes in the endolysosome structure and function and also autophagy. Following the treatment of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons with HIV-1 Tat or as controls mutant-Tat or PBS, neuronal viability was determined using a triple staining method. Preceding observations of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death, we observed statistically significant changes in the structure and membrane integrity of endolysosomes, endolysosome pH and autophagy. As early as 24 h after HIV-1 Tat was applied to neurons, HIV-1 Tat accumulated in endolysosomes, endolysosome morphology was affected and their size increased, endolysosome membrane integrity was disrupted, endolysosome pH increased, specific activities of endolysosome enzymes decreased and autophagy was inhibited, as indicated by the significant changes in three markers for autophagy. In contrast, statistically significant levels of HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal cell death were observed only after 48 h of HIV-1 Tat treatment. Our findings suggest that endolysosomes are involved in HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention against HAND.

  4. Human Cytosolic Extracts Stabilize the HIV-1 Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Thomas; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Wang, Xiaozhao; Smith, Amos B.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects on HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. The assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core. Interestingly, stabilization of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes is not due solely to macromolecular crowding, suggesting the presence of specific cellular factors that stabilize the HIV-1 core. By using our novel assay, we measured the abilities of different drugs, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine, Bi2 (also known as BI-2), and the peptide CAI, to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Interestingly, we found that PF74 and Bi2 strongly stabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. On the other hand, the peptide CAI destabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. We also found that purified cyclophilin A destabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes in the presence of cellular extracts in a cyclosporine-sensitive manner. In agreement with previous observations using the fate-of-the-capsid assay, we also demonstrated the ability of recombinant CPSF6 to stabilize HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Overall, our findings suggested that cellular extracts specifically stabilize the HIV-1 core. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 core stability in vitro. PMID:23885082

  5. Natural Escherichia coli strains undergo cell-to-cell plasmid transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Sekoguchi, Ayuka; Imai, Junko; Kondo, Kumiko; Shibata, Yuka; Maeda, Sumio

    2016-12-02

    Horizontal gene transfer is a strong tool that allows bacteria to adapt to various environments. Although three conventional mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer (transformation, transduction, and conjugation) are well known, new variations of these mechanisms have also been observed. We recently reported that DNase-sensitive cell-to-cell transfer of nonconjugative plasmids occurs between laboratory strains of Escherichia coli in co-culture. We termed this phenomenon "cell-to-cell transformation." In this report, we found that several combinations of Escherichia coli collection of reference (ECOR) strains, which were co-cultured in liquid media, resulted in DNase-sensitive cell-to-cell transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Plasmid isolation of these new transformants demonstrated cell-to-cell plasmid transfer between the ECOR strains. Natural transformation experiments, using a combination of purified plasmid DNA and the same ECOR strains, revealed that cell-to-cell transformation occurs much more frequently than natural transformation under the same culture conditions. Thus, cell-to-cell transformation is both unique and effective. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate cell-to-cell plasmid transformation in natural E. coli strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibitory effects of Sudanese plant extracts on HIV-1 replication and HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, G; Miyashiro, H; Nakamura, N; Hattori, M; Kawahata, T; Otake, T; Kakiuchi, N; Shimotohno, K

    1999-02-01

    Forty-eight methanol and aqueous extracts from Sudanese plants were screened for their inhibitory activity on viral replication. Nineteen extracts showed inhibitory effects on HIV-induced cytopathic effects (CPE) on MT-4 cells. The extracts were further screened against HIV-1 protease (PR) using an HPLC assay method. Of the tested extracts, the methanol extracts of Acacia nilotica (bark and pods), Euphorbia granulata (leaves), Maytenus senegalensis (stem-bark) and aqueous extracts of A. nilotica (pods) and M. senegalensis (stem-bark) showed considerable inhibitory effects against HIV-1 PR. Inhibitory principles were isolated from M. senegalensis and their activities were also discussed.

  7. HIV-1 efficient entry in inner foreskin is mediated by elevated CCL5/RANTES that recruits T cells and fuels conjugate formation with Langerhans cells.

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    Zhicheng Zhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Male circumcision reduces acquisition of HIV-1 by 60%. Hence, the foreskin is an HIV-1 entry portal during sexual transmission. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 transmission occurs following 1 h of polarized exposure of the inner, but not outer, foreskin to HIV-1-infected cells, but not to cell-free virus. At this early time point, Langerhans cells (LCs and T-cells within the inner foreskin epidermis are the first cells targeted by the virus. To gain in-depth insight into the molecular mechanisms governing inner foreskin HIV-1 entry, foreskin explants were inoculated with HIV-1-infeceted cells for 4 h. The chemokine/cytokine milieu secreted by the foreskin tissue, and resulting modifications in density and spatial distribution of T-cells and LCs, were then investigated. Our studies show that in the inner foreskin, inoculation with HIV-1-infected cells induces increased CCL5/RANTES (1.63-fold and decreased CCL20/MIP-3-alpha (0.62-fold secretion. Elevated CCL5/RANTES mediates recruitment of T-cells from the dermis into the epidermis, which is blocked by a neutralizing CCL5/RANTES Ab. In parallel, HIV-1-infected cells mediate a bi-phasic modification in the spatial distribution of epidermal LCs: attraction to the apical surface at 1 h, followed by migration back towards the basement membrane later on at 4 h, in correlation with reduced CCL20/MIP-3-alpha at this time point. T-cell recruitment fuels the continuous formation of LC-T-cell conjugates, permitting the transfer of HIV-1 captured by LCs. Together, these results reveal that HIV-1 induces a dynamic process of immune cells relocation in the inner foreskin that is associated with specific chemokines secretion, which favors efficient HIV-1 entry at this site.

  8. HIV-1 Efficient Entry in Inner Foreskin Is Mediated by Elevated CCL5/RANTES that Recruits T Cells and Fuels Conjugate Formation with Langerhans Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhicheng; Barry de Longchamps, Nicolas; Schmitt, Alain; Zerbib, Marc; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Bomsel, Morgane; Ganor, Yonatan

    2011-01-01

    Male circumcision reduces acquisition of HIV-1 by 60%. Hence, the foreskin is an HIV-1 entry portal during sexual transmission. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 transmission occurs following 1 h of polarized exposure of the inner, but not outer, foreskin to HIV-1-infected cells, but not to cell-free virus. At this early time point, Langerhans cells (LCs) and T-cells within the inner foreskin epidermis are the first cells targeted by the virus. To gain in-depth insight into the molecular mechanisms governing inner foreskin HIV-1 entry, foreskin explants were inoculated with HIV-1-infeceted cells for 4 h. The chemokine/cytokine milieu secreted by the foreskin tissue, and resulting modifications in density and spatial distribution of T-cells and LCs, were then investigated. Our studies show that in the inner foreskin, inoculation with HIV-1-infected cells induces increased CCL5/RANTES (1.63-fold) and decreased CCL20/MIP-3-alpha (0.62-fold) secretion. Elevated CCL5/RANTES mediates recruitment of T-cells from the dermis into the epidermis, which is blocked by a neutralizing CCL5/RANTES Ab. In parallel, HIV-1-infected cells mediate a bi-phasic modification in the spatial distribution of epidermal LCs: attraction to the apical surface at 1 h, followed by migration back towards the basement membrane later on at 4 h, in correlation with reduced CCL20/MIP-3-alpha at this time point. T-cell recruitment fuels the continuous formation of LC-T-cell conjugates, permitting the transfer of HIV-1 captured by LCs. Together, these results reveal that HIV-1 induces a dynamic process of immune cells relocation in the inner foreskin that is associated with specific chemokines secretion, which favors efficient HIV-1 entry at this site. PMID:21738469

  9. HIV-1 genetic variants in Kyrgyzstan

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    V Laga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: During the last two decades, HIV-1 has been spreading rapidly in former Soviet Union republics including Kyrgyzstan. The current molecular monitoring of HIV-infection epidemic is carried out in Russia only with no or limited data from the other FSU countries. The aim of this work was to investigate the prevalence of HIV-1 genetic variants circulating in Kyrgyzstan. Methods: Blood collection from the HIV-infected patients was carried out by local specialists with the informed consent and the questionnaire was answered by each of the patients. The total number of samples was 100. The washed cell pellets were transferred to Moscow following with proviral DNA extraction, PCR amplification and gag, pol and env genes sequencing. The phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences using neighbor-joining method was carried out by MEGA 3 program. The preliminary data were obtained in 22 samples isolated from PBMC of HIV-infected patients from Kyrgyzstan. Results: Among the samples studied 6 (27.3% samples belonged to a subtype CRF02_AG, 16 samples - to subtype A (A1. One of the samples belonging to CRF02_AG, probably, is a recombinant between CRF02_AG and A1. There was no major drug resistance mutations in the samples studied. The minor mutations were presented in small proportions: 1 in PR (L10I, 6 in RT (A62V - in 3 samples, V108G, E138A, Y181F, M184I, L210M - on one sample and 1 in IN (L74M. It was impossible to associate the distribution of mutations with HIV-1 genetic variant. The V3 loop (env gene in 17 samples was analyzed for tropism using geno2pheno program; all samples were found to be R5-viruses. Conclusion: The HIV-1 subtype A seems to dominate in Kyrgyzstan like in other FSU countries. The recombinant CRF02_AG epidemiologically linked to Uzbekistan is quite widespread. The rest of Kyrgyzstan collection is under investigation and the data will be refined soon.

  10. Rigidity analysis of HIV-1 protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, J. W.; Wells, S. A.; Jimenez-Roldan, E.; Freedman, R. F.; Römer, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    We present a rigidity analysis on a large number of X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme HIV-1 protease using the 'pebble game' algorithm of the software FIRST. We find that although the rigidity profile remains similar across a comprehensive set of high resolution structures, the profile changes significantly in the presence of an inhibitor. Our study shows that the action of the inhibitors is to restrict the flexibility of the β-hairpin flaps which allow access to the active site. The results are discussed in the context of full molecular dynamics simulations as well as data from NMR experiments.

  11. HIV-1 is not a major driver of increased plasma IL-6 levels in chronic HIV-1 disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Carey L.; Biancotto, Angélique; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Pilch-Cooper, Heather A.; Valdez, Hernan; Margolis, Leonid; Sieg, Scott F.; McComsey, Grace A.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Lederman, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Increased plasma IL-6 levels have been associated with HIV-1 disease progression risk, yet the drivers of IL-6 production in HIV-1 infection are not known. This study was designed to explore the relationship between HIV-1 replication and IL-6 induction. Design Correlations between plasma levels of IL-6 and HIV-1 RNA were examined in two clinical studies. To more directly assess the induction of IL-6 by HIV-1, several cell and tissue types that support HIV-1 replication in vivo were infected with HIV-1 and expression of IL-6 was measured. Methods Spearman’s rank correlations were used to examine the relationship between plasma levels of IL-6 and HIV-1 RNA. Macrophages, and colonic and lymph node histocultures were infected with HIV-1 or stimulated with bacterial products, LPS or flagellin, and IL-6 levels in supernatant were measured by ELISA or multiplex bead assay. Results In the clinical studies there was weak or no correlation between plasma levels of IL-6 and HIV-1 RNA but IL-6 levels were correlated with plasma levels of the LPS coreceptor CD14. Macrophages stimulated with LPS or flagellin showed robust production of IL-6, but there was no increase in IL-6 production after HIV-1 infection. IL-6 expression was not increased in lymph node histocultures obtained from HIV-1 infected subjects nor after productive HIV-1 infection of colonic or lymph node histocultures ex vivo. Conclusions We find no evidence that HIV-1 replication is an important driver of IL-6 expression in vivo or in in vitro systems. PMID:22659649

  12. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

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    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, NE (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  13. Evaluation of three enzyme immunoassays for HIV-1 antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, P B; Lisker, A; Folds, J D

    1989-01-01

    Three enzyme immunoassay (EIA) methods for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were evaluated. Serum or plasma samples from 22 individuals seropositive for HIV-1 antibodies were tested with the Abbott, Coulter, and DuPont kits for presence of HIV-1 p24 antigen. Another 12 samples were tested with two kits only. Discordant results were obtained with 9 of 34 (26%) HIV-1-antibody-positive patient samples tested. Most of these discrepancies were found in samples containing less than 30 pg/ml of HIV-1 p24 core antigen. A sampling of sera from normal blood donors and patients with infectious or autoimmune diseases revealed a low level of false positive reactions, especially with sera containing antinuclear antibodies or rheumatoid factor. Noteworthy is the frequency of false positive reactions seen with the DuPont EIA for HIV-1 p24 antigen. 18/111 sera (16.2%) containing auto-antibodies tested positively with the DuPont HIV-1 p24 antigen EIA. The nonspecific nature of the test reactivity for 9/10 of these samples was confirmed using an HIV-1 p24 antigen inhibition assay. These findings are discussed in light of the need for HIV-1 antigen detection in the clinical laboratory and of other methods for HIV-1 detection: the polymerase chain reaction and measurements of reverse transcriptase activity.

  14. Genetic composition of replication competent clonal HIV-1 variants isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), HIV-1 proviral DNA from PBMC and HIV-1 RNA in serum in the course of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo-Matas, Diana; van Gils, Marit J; Bowles, Emma J; Navis, Marjon; Rachinger, Andrea; Boeser-Nunnink, Brigitte; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B; Kootstra, Neeltje A; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2010-09-30

    The HIV-1 quasispecies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is considered to be a mix of actively replicating, latent, and archived viruses and may be genetically distinct from HIV-1 variants in plasma that are considered to be recently produced. Here we analyzed the genetic relationship between gp160 env sequences from replication competent clonal HIV-1 variants that were isolated from PBMC and from contemporaneous HIV-1 RNA in serum and HIV-1 proviral DNA in PBMC of four longitudinally studied therapy naïve HIV-1 infected individuals. Replication competent clonal HIV-1 variants, HIV-1 RNA from serum, and HIV-1 proviral DNA from PBMC formed a single virus population at most time points analyzed. However, an under-representation in serum of HIV-1 sequences with predicted CXCR4 usage was sometimes observed implying that the analysis of viral sequences from different sources may provide a more complete assessment of the viral quasispecies in peripheral blood in vivo. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid HIV-1 testing during labor: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulterys, Marc; Jamieson, Denise J; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Cohen, Mardge H; Maupin, Robert; Nesheim, Steven; Webber, Mayris P; Van Dyke, Russell; Wiener, Jeffrey; Branson, Bernard M

    2004-07-14

    Timely testing of women in labor with undocumented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status could enable immediate provision of antiretroviral prophylaxis. To determine the feasibility and acceptance of rapid HIV testing among women in labor and to assess rapid HIV assay performance. The Mother-Infant Rapid Intervention At Delivery (MIRIAD) study implemented 24-hour counseling and voluntary rapid HIV testing for women in labor at 16 US hospitals from November 16, 2001, through November 15, 2003. A rapid HIV-1 antibody test for whole blood was used. Acceptance of HIV testing; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the rapid test; time from blood collection to patient notification of results. There were 91,707 visits to the labor and delivery units in the study, 7381 of which were by eligible women without documentation of HIV testing. Of these, 5744 (78%) women were approached for rapid HIV testing and 4849 (84%) consented. HIV-1 test results were positive for 34 women (prevalence = 7/1000). Sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 100% and 99.9%, respectively; positive predictive value was 90% compared with 76% for enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Factors independently associated with higher test acceptance included younger age, being black or Hispanic, gestational age less than 32 weeks, and having had no prenatal care. Lower acceptance was associated with being admitted between 4 pm and midnight, particularly on Friday nights, but this may be explained in part by fewer available personnel. Median time from blood collection to patient notification of result was 66 minutes (interquartile range, 45-120 minutes), compared with 28 hours for EIA (PHIV testing is feasible and delivers accurate and timely test results for women in labor. It provides HIV-positive women prompt access to intrapartum and neonatal antiretroviral prophylaxis, proven to reduce perinatal HIV transmission, and may be particularly applicable to higher-risk populations.

  16. Overshoot of HIV-1 viraemia after early discontinuation of antiretroviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M D; de Boer, R J; de Wolf, F; Foudraine, N A; Boucher, C A; Goudsmit, J; Lange, J M

    1997-09-01

    To determine whether, as predicted by predator-prey dynamics, early withdrawal of antiretroviral therapy, i.e. when the number of CD4+ lymphocytes is still elevated, results in an overshoot of HIV-1 viraemia due to infection of increased numbers of available target cells at that time. Five HIV-1-infected individuals were identified who discontinued antiretroviral therapy for various reasons after 8-19 days, and from whom stored serum samples obtained before, during, and shortly after treatment were available for measurement of HIV-1 RNA load. A mathematical model was designed to assess whether increased target cell availability could quantitatively explain the clinical observations. After therapy withdrawal, increases in the HIV-1 RNA load to levels exceeding pretreatment values by log10 0.6-1.5 copies/ml were observed after 2-17 days in all four of the individuals who had treatment-induced increases in CD4+ cell counts at the time of therapy withdrawal. Increases in viraemia were maximal within a few days, and subsequently seemed to wane until the pretreatment equilibrium between virus and its target cells was attained. Mathematical modelling confirms that these transient increases in viraemia can be explained by increased availability of target cells at the time of therapy withdrawal. Transient rises in HIV-1 viraemia do occur following early therapy withdrawal. These rises especially warrant consideration in short-term antiretroviral regimens for prevention of mother-to-child transmission, as are being studied in developing countries, since they could result in an increased transmission risk during the post-partum period through breast-feeding. This possibility needs to be investigated urgently.

  17. Demographic processes affect HIV-1 evolution in primary infection before the onset of selective processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbeck, Joshua T; Rolland, Morgane; Liu, Yi; McLaughlin, Sherry; McNevin, John; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Kim; Stoddard, Julia N; Raugi, Dana; Sorensen, Stephanie; Genowati, Indira; Birditt, Brian; McKay, Angela; Diem, Kurt; Maust, Brandon S; Deng, Wenjie; Collier, Ann C; Stekler, Joanne D; McElrath, M Juliana; Mullins, James I

    2011-08-01

    HIV-1 transmission and viral evolution in the first year of infection were studied in 11 individuals representing four transmitter-recipient pairs and three independent seroconverters. Nine of these individuals were enrolled during acute infection; all were men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 subtype B. A total of 475 nearly full-length HIV-1 genome sequences were generated, representing on average 10 genomes per specimen at 2 to 12 visits over the first year of infection. Single founding variants with nearly homogeneous viral populations were detected in eight of the nine individuals who were enrolled during acute HIV-1 infection. Restriction to a single founder variant was not due to a lack of diversity in the transmitter as homogeneous populations were found in recipients from transmitters with chronic infection. Mutational patterns indicative of rapid viral population growth dominated during the first 5 weeks of infection and included a slight contraction of viral genetic diversity over the first 20 to 40 days. Subsequently, selection dominated, most markedly in env and nef. Mutants were detected in the first week and became consensus as early as day 21 after the onset of symptoms of primary HIV infection. We found multiple indications of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations while reversions appeared limited. Putative escape mutations were often rapidly replaced with mutually exclusive mutations nearby, indicating the existence of a maturational escape process, possibly in adaptation to viral fitness constraints or to immune responses against new variants. We showed that establishment of HIV-1 infection is likely due to a biological mechanism that restricts transmission rather than to early adaptive evolution during acute infection. Furthermore, the diversity of HIV strains coupled with complex and individual-specific patterns of CTL escape did not reveal shared sequence characteristics of acute infection that could be harnessed for

  18. HIV-1 RNA detection in the amniotic fluid of HIV-infected pregnant women

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    Ana Christina Lobato

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at evaluating the potential to detect human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in amniotic fluid (AF collected at delivery from 40 HIV-positive pregnant women. Thirty patients had a plasma viral load (VL below 1,000 copies/mL at delivery. VL was positive in three AF samples. No significant association was found between the HIV-1 RNA in AF and the maternal plasma samples. There was no HIV vertical transmission detected.

  19. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution of HIV-1 and HSV-2 epidemics in Chad revealing HSV-2 hot-spot in regions of high-risk HIV spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Koyalta, Donato; Ndinaromtan, Montana; Tchobkréo, Bagamla; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Day, Nesrine; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Weiss, Helen; Bélec, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) is known to be a potent co-factor of Human Immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) heterosexual transmission. We were interested in assessing the distribution of HIV-1 and HSV-2 epidemics at the national level in Chad. In 2007, a population-based anonymous serosurvey for HIV-1 and HSV-2 infections, using dried blood spots, was conducted. The study included 548 adults living in 15 regions of Chad. After specimen elution, serological testing for HIV and HSV-2 infections was performed. Countrywide, the HIV-1 and HSV-2 seroprevalences were 11.1% and 15.7%, respectively. A positive correlation was observed with the highest HIV-1 prevalence seen in regions of the highest HSV-2 prevalence, especially in two conflict-affected eastern provinces of Darfur. Urgent public health interventions are needed in regions of Chad where high HSV-2 prevalence may be increasing the risk of HIV propagation.

  1. Reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 whole genome haplotypes reveals clonal interference and genetic hitchhiking among immune escape variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Following transmission, HIV-1 evolves into a diverse population, and next generation sequencing enables us to detect variants occurring at low frequencies. Studying viral evolution at the level of whole genomes was hitherto not possible because next generation sequencing delivers relatively short reads. Results We here provide a proof of principle that whole HIV-1 genomes can be reliably reconstructed from short reads, and use this to study the selection of immune escape mutations at the level of whole genome haplotypes. Using realistically simulated HIV-1 populations, we demonstrate that reconstruction of complete genome haplotypes is feasible with high fidelity. We do not reconstruct all genetically distinct genomes, but each reconstructed haplotype represents one or more of the quasispecies in the HIV-1 population. We then reconstruct 30 whole genome haplotypes from published short sequence reads sampled longitudinally from a single HIV-1 infected patient. We confirm the reliability of the reconstruction by validating our predicted haplotype genes with single genome amplification sequences, and by comparing haplotype frequencies with observed epitope escape frequencies. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis shows that the HIV-1 population undergoes selection driven evolution, with successive replacement of the viral population by novel dominant strains. We demonstrate that immune escape mutants evolve in a dependent manner with various mutations hitchhiking along with others. As a consequence of this clonal interference, selection coefficients have to be estimated for complete haplotypes and not for individual immune escapes. PMID:24996694

  2. Species tropism of HIV-1 modulated by viral accessory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Masako eNomaguchi; Naoya eDoi; Yui eMatsumoto; Yosuke eSakai; Sachi eFujiwara; Akio eAdachi

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tropic and pathogenic only for humans, and does not replicate in macaque monkeys routinely used for experimental infections. This specially narrow host range (species tropism) has impeded much the progress of HIV-1/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) basic research. Extensive studies on the underlying mechanism have revealed that Vif, one of viral accessory proteins, is critical for the HIV-1 species tropism in addition to Gag-capsid protei...

  3. The Genetic Diversity and Evolution of HIV-1 Subtype B Epidemic in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pablo; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa; Rodríguez, Nayra; Vargas, Freddie; Yamamura, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-23

    HIV-1 epidemics in Caribbean countries, including Puerto Rico, have been reported to be almost exclusively associated with the subtype B virus (HIV-1B). However, while HIV infections associated with other clades have been only sporadically reported, no organized data exist to accurately assess the prevalence of non-subtype B HIV-1 infection. We analyzed the nucleotide sequence data of the HIV pol gene associated with HIV isolates from Puerto Rican patients. The sequences (n = 945) were obtained from our "HIV Genotyping" test file, which has been generated over a period of 14 years (2001-2014). REGA subtyping tool found the following subtypes: B (90%), B-like (3%), B/D recombinant (6%), and D/B recombinant (0.6%). Though there were fewer cases, the following subtypes were also found (in the given proportions): A1B (0.3%), BF1 (0.2%), subtype A (01-AE) (0.1%), subtype A (A2) (0.1%), subtype F (12BF) (0.1%), CRF-39 BF-like (0.1%), and others (0.1%). Some of the recombinants were identified as early as 2001. Although the HIV epidemic in Puerto Rico is primarily associated with HIV-1B virus, our analysis uncovered the presence of other subtypes. There was no indication of subtype C, which has been predominantly associated with heterosexual transmission in other parts of the world.

  4. Owl monkey CCR5 reveals synergism between CD4 and CCR5 in HIV-1 entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahabedian, John; Sharma, Amit; Kaczmarek, Maryska E; Wilkerson, Greg K; Sawyer, Sara L; Overbaugh, Julie

    2017-12-01

    Studying HIV-1 replication in the presence of functionally related proteins from different species has helped define host determinants of HIV-1 infection. Humans and owl monkeys, but not macaques, encode a CD4 receptor that permits entry of transmissible HIV-1 variants due to a single residue difference. However, little is known about whether divergent CCR5 receptor proteins act as determinants of host-range. Here we show that both owl monkey (Aotus vociferans) CD4 and CCR5 receptors are functional for the entry of transmitted HIV-1 when paired with human versions of the other receptor. By contrast, the owl monkey CD4/CCR5 pair is generally a suboptimal receptor combination, although there is virus-specific variation in infection with owl monkey receptors. Introduction of the human residues 15Y and 16T within a sulfation motif into owl monkey CCR5 resulted in a gain of function. These findings suggest there is cross-talk between CD4 and CCR5 involving the sulfation motif. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavapathruni, Aravind; Anderson, Karen S

    2007-12-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic has existed for >25 years. Extensive work globally has provided avenues to combat viral infection, but the disease continues to rage on in the human population and infected approximately 4 million people in 2006 alone. In this review, we provide a brief history of HIV/AIDS, followed by analysis of one therapeutic target of HIV-1: its reverse transcriptase (RT). We discuss the biochemical characterization of RT in order to place emphasis on possible avenues of inhibition, which now includes both nucleoside and non-nucleoside modalities. Therapies against RT remain a cornerstone of anti-HIV treatment, but the virus eventually resists inhibition through the selection of drug-resistant RT mutations. Current inhibitors and associated resistance are discussed, with the hopes that new therapeutics can be developed against RT.

  6. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S; Rennert, Paul D; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C; Freed, Eric O; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-09-02

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors.

  7. RNA Interference Therapies for an HIV-1 Functional Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Robert J; Gatignol, Anne

    2017-12-27

    HIV-1 drug therapies can prevent disease progression but cannot eliminate HIV-1 viruses from an infected individual. While there is hope that elimination of HIV-1 can be achieved, several approaches to reach a functional cure (control of HIV-1 replication in the absence of drug therapy) are also under investigation. One of these approaches is the transplant of HIV-1 resistant cells expressing anti-HIV-1 RNAs, proteins or peptides. Small RNAs that use RNA interference pathways to target HIV-1 replication have emerged as competitive candidates for cell transplant therapy and have been included in all gene combinations that have so far entered clinical trials. Here, we review RNA interference pathways in mammalian cells and the design of therapeutic small RNAs that use these pathways to target pathogenic RNA sequences. Studies that have been performed to identify anti-HIV-1 RNA interference therapeutics are also reviewed and perspectives on their use in combination gene therapy to functionally cure HIV-1 infection are provided.

  8. Chronic HIV-1 infection frequently fails to protect against superinfection.

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    Anne Piantadosi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Reports of HIV-1 superinfection (re-infection have demonstrated that the immune response generated against one strain of HIV-1 does not always protect against other strains. However, studies to determine the incidence of HIV-1 superinfection have yielded conflicting results. Furthermore, few studies have attempted to identify superinfection cases occurring more than a year after initial infection, a time when HIV-1-specific immune responses would be most likely to have developed. We screened a cohort of high-risk Kenyan women for HIV-1 superinfection by comparing partial gag and envelope sequences over a 5-y period beginning at primary infection. Among 36 individuals, we detected seven cases of superinfection, including cases in which both viruses belonged to the same HIV-1 subtype, subtype A. In five of these cases, the superinfecting strain was detected in only one of the two genome regions examined, suggesting that recombination frequently occurs following HIV-1 superinfection. In addition, we found that superinfection occurred throughout the course of the first infection: during acute infection in two cases, between 1-2 y after infection in three cases, and as late as 5 y after infection in two cases. Our results indicate that superinfection commonly occurs after the immune response against the initial infection has had time to develop and mature. Implications from HIV-1 superinfection cases, in which natural re-exposure leads to re-infection, will need to be considered in developing strategies for eliciting protective immunity to HIV-1.

  9. Progress in HIV-1 antibody research using humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruell, Henning; Klein, Florian

    2017-05-01

    Recent discoveries of highly potent broadly HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies provide new opportunities to successfully prevent, treat, and potentially cure HIV-1 infection. To test their activity in vivo, humanized mice have been shown to be a powerful model and were used to investigate antibody-mediated prevention and therapy approaches. In this review, we will summarize recent findings in humanized mice that have informed on the potential use of broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting HIV-1 in humans. Humanized mouse models have been used to demonstrate the antiviral efficacy of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies in vivo. It has been shown that a combination of antibodies can suppress viremia below the limit of detection and targets the HIV-1 reservoir. Moreover, passively administered antibodies and vector-mediated antibody production protect humanized mice from HIV-1 infection. Finally, immunization studies in knock-in/transgenic mice carrying human antibody gene segments have informed on potential vaccination strategies to induce broad and potent HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Humanized mouse models are of great value for HIV-1 research. They represent a highly versatile in vivo system to investigate novel approaches for HIV-1 prevention and therapy and expedite the critical translation from basic findings to clinical application.

  10. Antibodies Elicited by Multiple Envelope Glycoprotein Immunogens in Primates Neutralize Primary Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1) Sensitized by CD4-Mimetic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M; Easterhoff, David; Bradley, Todd; Luo, Kan; Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Phad, Ganesh E; Vázquez Bernat, Néstor; Melillo, Bruno; Santra, Sampa; Smith, Amos B; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Haynes, Barton; Sodroski, Joseph

    2016-05-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate virus entry through a series of complex conformational changes triggered by binding to the receptors CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved Env epitopes are thought to be an important component of a protective immune response. However, to date, HIV-1 Env immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been identified, creating hurdles for vaccine development. Small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds engage the CD4-binding pocket on the gp120 exterior Env and induce Env conformations that are highly sensitive to neutralization by antibodies, including antibodies directed against the conserved Env region that interacts with CCR5/CXCR4. Here, we show that CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize primary HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies that can be elicited in monkeys and humans within 6 months by several Env vaccine candidates, including gp120 monomers. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the gp120 V2 and V3 variable regions were isolated from the immunized monkeys and humans; these monoclonal antibodies neutralized a primary HIV-1 only when the virus was sensitized by a CD4-mimetic compound. Thus, in addition to their direct antiviral effect, CD4-mimetic compounds dramatically enhance the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of antibodies that can be elicited with currently available immunogens. Used as components of microbicides, the CD4-mimetic compounds might increase the protective efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. Preventing HIV-1 transmission is a high priority for global health. Eliciting antibodies that can neutralize transmitted strains of HIV-1 is difficult, creating problems for the development of an effective vaccine. We found that small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize HIV-1 to antibodies that can be elicited in vaccinated humans and monkeys. These results suggest an approach to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission in which a virus

  11. Innate immune sensing of HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Martin R; Olagnier, David; Hiscott, John

    2015-03-01

    The innate immune system plays a critical role in the control of viral infections. Although the mechanisms involved in sensing and response to viral pathogens has progressed tremendously in the last decade, an understanding of the innate antiviral response to human retroviruses lagged behind. Recent studies now demonstrate that human retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) trigger a type I interferon antiviral response through novel cytosolic sensors that detect DNA intermediates of reverse transcription; in addition, these early host-pathogen interactions may trigger cell death pathways depending on the activation state of the target cell. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the understanding of innate immune sensing of human retroviruses. Innate immune sensing of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 is influenced by the target cell phenotype, viral replicative intermediates, and host restriction factors that limit retroviral replication. Macrophages and dendritic cells detect HIV-DNA intermediates, whereas CD4 T cells differentially sense HIV DNA depending on the level of T-cell activation. Furthermore, the structure of the viral capsid and interplay between innate DNA sensors and host restriction factors all contribute to the magnitude of the ensuing innate immune response. The interplay between HIV infection and the innate immune system has emerged as an important component of HIV pathogenesis, linked to both induction of innate immunity and stimulation of cell death mechanisms. Ultimately, an in-depth knowledge of the mechanisms of innate immune control of human retrovirus infection may facilitate the development of novel treatment strategies to control retrovirus-induced immunopathology.

  12. Elevated risk for HIV-1 infection in adolescents and young adults in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Cristina Bassichetto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have sought to describe HIV infection and transmission characteristics around the world. Identification of early HIV-1 infection is essential to proper surveillance and description of regional transmission trends. In this study we compare people recently infected (RI with HIV-1, as defined by Serologic Testing Algorithm for Recent HIV Seroconversion (STARHS, to those with chronic infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects were identified from 2002-2004 at four testing sites in São Paulo. Of 485 HIV-1-positive subjects, 57 (12% were defined as RI. Of the participants, 165 (34.0% were aware of their serostatus at the time of HIV-1 testing. This proportion was statistically larger (p59 years-old age strata (p<0.001. The majority of study participants were male (78.4%, 25 to 45 years-old (65.8%, white (63.2%, single (61.7%, with family income of four or more times the minimum wage (41.0%, but with an equally distributed educational level. Of those individuals infected with HIV-1, the predominant route of infection was sexual contact (89.4%, with both hetero (47.5% and homosexual (34.5% exposure. Regarding sexual activity in these individuals, 43.9% reported possible HIV-1 exposure through a seropositive partner, and 49.4% reported multiple partners, with 47% having 2 to 10 partners and 37.4% 11 or more; 53.4% of infected individuals reported condom use sometimes; 34.2% reported non-injecting, recreational drug use and 23.6% were reactive for syphilis by VDRL. Subjects younger than 25 years of age were most vulnerable according to the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we evaluated RI individuals and discovered that HIV-1 has been spreading among younger individuals in São Paulo and preventive approaches should, therefore, target this age stratum.

  13. A novel strategy for inducing enhanced mucosal HIV-1 antibody responses in an anti-inflammatory environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Wegmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic vaccination against HIV-1 sexual transmission will probably require antibody elicitation at genital mucosal surfaces. However, HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env-based antigens are weakly immunogenic, particularly when applied mucosally. The polyanion PRO 2000 is safe for human vaginal application, and thus may represent a potential formulating agent for vaginal delivery of experimental vaccine immunogens. Based upon its biochemical properties, we hypothesized that PRO 2000 might enhance mucosal immunogenicity of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env-based antigens, promoting local and systemic immune responses. Vaginal immunization with Env-PRO 2000 resulted in significantly increased titres of Env-specific mucosal IgA and IgG in mice and rabbits, respectively, compared to Env alone, revealing modest but significant mucosal adjuvant activity for PRO 2000. In vitro, PRO 2000 associated with Env, protecting the glycoprotein from proteolytic degradation in human vaginal lavage. Unexpectedly, PRO 2000 antagonized TLR4 activation, suppressing local production of inflammatory cytokines. Since inflammation-mediated recruitment of viral target cells is a major risk factor in HIV-1 transmission, the immune modulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of PRO 2000 combined with its intravaginal safety profile suggests promise as an HIV-1 mucosal vaccine formulating agent.

  14. Glycosylation and oligomeric state of envelope protein might influence HIV-1 virion capture by α4β7 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Subhash; Messina, Emily L; AlSalmi, Wadad; Ananthaswamy, Neeti; Gao, Guofen; Uritskiy, Gherman; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Peachman, Kristina K; Robb, Merlin L; Rao, Mangala; Rao, Venigalla B

    2017-08-01

    The α4ß7 integrin present on host cells recognizes the V1V2 domain of the HIV-1 envelope protein. This interaction might be involved in virus transmission. Administration of α4ß7-specific antibodies inhibit acquisition of SIV in a macaque challenge model. But the molecular details of V1V2: α4ß7 interaction are unknown and its importance in HIV-1 infection remains controversial. Our biochemical and mutational analyses show that glycosylation is a key modulator of V1V2 conformation and binding to α4ß7. Partially glycosylated, but not fully glycosylated, envelope proteins are preferred substrates for α4ß7 binding. Surprisingly, monomers of the envelope protein bound strongly to α4ß7 whereas trimers bound poorly. Our results suggest that a conformationally flexible V1V2 domain allows binding of the HIV-1 virion to the α4ß7 integrin, which might impart selectivity for the poorly glycosylated HIV-1 envelope containing monomers to be more efficiently captured by α4ß7 integrin present on mucosal cells at the time of HIV-1 transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HIV-1 diversity, drug-resistant mutations, and viral evolution among high-risk individuals in phase II HIV vaccine trial sites in southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Qi

    Full Text Available HIV-1 prevalence in Guangxi, China, has been growing since 1996, when the first case was reported. Over half of HIV-1 positive patients in Guangxi Province were injecting drug users (IDUs, possibly because of the province's location near drug-trafficking routes. Since a phase II HIV vaccine trial is ongoing there, a current characterization of the subtypes of HIV-1 among IDUs in Guangxi would provide critical information for future HIV vaccine trials, as well as further control and prevention of HIV-1 transmission. Thus, we conducted a molecular epidemiological investigation of HIV-1 samples from 2008-2010 among IDUs in multiple cities in Guangxi Province. Our results, based on the gag/pol fragment, indicated a very high proportion (78.47% of HIV-1 CRF08_BC recombinants, some CRF01_AE (15.38% recombinants, and a low proportion of CRF07_BC (6.15% recombinants among the IDUs. The high proportion of CRF08 HIV-1 strains among recent IDUs matches the vaccine candidate constructs. However, future vaccine development should also incorporate CRF01-targeted vaccine candidates. Distinct Env sequence evolution patterns were observed for CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE, indicating that different local selection pressures have been exerted on these two HIV-1 subtypes. Unique drug-resistant mutations were also detected, and our data indicate that HIV treatment programs should consider pre-existing drug-resistant mutations.

  16. High Multiplicity Infection by HIV-1 in Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating virus-host interactions responsible for HIV-1 transmission is important for advancing HIV-1 prevention strategies. To this end, single genome amplification (SGA and sequencing of HIV-1 within the context of a model of random virus evolution has made possible for the first time an unambiguous identification of transmitted/founder viruses and a precise estimation of their numbers. Here, we applied this approach to HIV-1 env analyses in a cohort of acutely infected men who have sex with men (MSM and found that a high proportion (10 of 28; 36% had been productively infected by more than one virus. In subjects with multivariant transmission, the minimum number of transmitted viruses ranged from 2 to 10 with viral recombination leading to rapid and extensive genetic shuffling among virus lineages. A combined analysis of these results, together with recently published findings based on identical SGA methods in largely heterosexual (HSX cohorts, revealed a significantly higher frequency of multivariant transmission in MSM than in HSX [19 of 50 subjects (38% versus 34 of 175 subjects (19%; Fisher's exact p = 0.008]. To further evaluate the SGA strategy for identifying transmitted/founder viruses, we analyzed 239 overlapping 5' and 3' half genome or env-only sequences from plasma viral RNA (vRNA and blood mononuclear cell DNA in an MSM subject who had a particularly well-documented virus exposure history 3-6 days before symptom onset and 14-17 days before peak plasma viremia (47,600,000 vRNA molecules/ml. All 239 sequences coalesced to a single transmitted/founder virus genome in a time frame consistent with the clinical history, and a molecular clone of this genome encoded replication competent virus in accord with model predictions. Higher multiplicity of HIV-1 infection in MSM compared with HSX is consistent with the demonstrably higher epidemiological risk of virus acquisition in MSM and could indicate a greater challenge for HIV-1

  17. Origin of the HIV-1 group O epidemic in western lowland gorillas

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’arc, Mirela; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Esteban, Amandine; Learn, Gerald H.; Boué, Vanina; Liegeois, Florian; Etienne, Lucie; Tagg, Nikki; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Boesch, Christophe; Madinda, Nadège F.; Robbins, Martha M.; Gray, Maryke; Cournil, Amandine; Ooms, Marcel; Letko, Michael; Simon, Viviana A.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Peeters, Martine

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1, the cause of AIDS, is composed of four phylogenetic lineages, groups M, N, O, and P, each of which resulted from an independent cross-species transmission event of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting African apes. Although groups M and N have been traced to geographically distinct chimpanzee communities in southern Cameroon, the reservoirs of groups O and P remain unknown. Here, we screened fecal samples from western lowland (n = 2,611), eastern lowland (n = 103), and mountain (n = 218) gorillas for gorilla SIV (SIVgor) antibodies and nucleic acids. Despite testing wild troops throughout southern Cameroon (n = 14), northern Gabon (n = 16), the Democratic Republic of Congo (n = 2), and Uganda (n = 1), SIVgor was identified at only four sites in southern Cameroon, with prevalences ranging from 0.8–22%. Amplification of partial and full-length SIVgor sequences revealed extensive genetic diversity, but all SIVgor strains were derived from a single lineage within the chimpanzee SIV (SIVcpz) radiation. Two fully sequenced gorilla viruses from southwestern Cameroon were very closely related to, and likely represent the source population of, HIV-1 group P. Most of the genome of a third SIVgor strain, from central Cameroon, was very closely related to HIV-1 group O, again pointing to gorillas as the immediate source. Functional analyses identified the cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G as a barrier for chimpanzee-to-gorilla, but not gorilla-to-human, virus transmission. These data indicate that HIV-1 group O, which spreads epidemically in west central Africa and is estimated to have infected around 100,000 people, originated by cross-species transmission from western lowland gorillas. PMID:25733890

  18. Reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 whole genome haplotypes reveals clonal interference and genetic hitchhiking among immune escape variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074214152

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following transmission, HIV-1 evolves into a diverse population, and next generation sequencing enables us to detect variants occurring at low frequencies. Studying viral evolution at the level of whole genomes was hitherto not possible because next generation sequencing delivers

  19. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera...... on this infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  20. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a def...

  1. HIV-1 with multiple CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptor use is predictive of immunological failure in infected children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Cavarelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 R5 viruses are characterized by a large phenotypic variation, that is reflected by the mode of coreceptor use. The ability of R5 HIV-1 to infect target cells expressing chimeric receptors between CCR5 and CXCR4 (R5(broad viruses, was shown to correlate with disease stage in HIV-1 infected adults. Here, we ask the question whether phenotypic variation of R5 viruses could play a role also in mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV-1 and pediatric disease progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral isolates obtained from a total of 59 HIV-1 seropositive women (24 transmitting and 35 non transmitting and 28 infected newborn children, were used to infect U87.CD4 cells expressing wild type or six different CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors. HIV-1 isolates obtained from newborn infants had predominantly R5(narrow phenotype (n = 20, but R5(broad and R5X4 viruses were also found in seven and one case, respectively. The presence of R5(broad and R5X4 phenotypes correlated significantly with a severe decline of the CD4+ T cells (CDC stage 3 or death within 2 years of age. Forty-three percent of the maternal R5 isolates displayed an R5(broad phenotype, however, the presence of the R5(broad virus was not predictive for MTCT of HIV-1. Of interest, while only 1 of 5 mothers with an R5X4 virus transmitted the dualtropic virus, 5 of 6 mothers carrying R5(broad viruses transmitted viruses with a similar broad chimeric coreceptor usage. Thus, the maternal R5(broad phenotype was largely preserved during transmission and could be predictive of the phenotype of the newborn's viral variant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that R5(broad viruses are not hampered in transmission. When transmitted, immunological failure occurs earlier than in children infected with HIV-1 of R5(narrow phenotype. We believe that this finding is of utmost relevance for therapeutic interventions in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Rio Grande, RS, Brazil Epidemiologia molecular do HIV-1 em Rio Grande, RS, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Barral de Martínez

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a molecular epidemiological study to investigate HIV-1 strains in Rio Grande, southern Brazil, searching for an association with transmission mode and risk behavior. Patients (185 identified at an AIDS treatment reference Hospital, from 1994 to 1997, were included; from which 107 blood samples were obtained. Nested PCR was realized once for each sample; for amplified samples (69 HIV subtypes were classified using the heteroduplex mobility assay. Subtypes identified were B (75%, C (22% and F (3%. All infections with C were diagnosed after 1994. Comparing patients with B and C, no differences were detected regarding demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics; survival analysis did not reveal differences in HIV to AIDS evolution. A higher proportion of injecting drug users, IDU (not significant, pUm estudo de epidemiologia molecular foi conduzido para investigar subtipos de HIV-1 circulando em Rio Grande, RS, buscando uma associação com modos de transmissão e comportamentos de risco. Pacientes (185 identificados de 1994 a 1997, em um Hospital de referência para o tratamento da AIDS foram incluidos; amostras de sangue foram obtidas de 107. A reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR foi realizada uma única vez; nas amostras que amplificaram, (69 o subtipo foi classificado pelo ensaio de mobilidade do heteroduplex (HMA. Os subtipos de HIV identificados foram B (75%, C (22% e F (3%. As infecções com C foram diagnosticadas após 1994. Pacientes infectados com B e C não mostraram diferenças (características demográficas, clínicas e laboratoriais; a análise de sobrevida não mostrou diferenças na evolução HIV-AIDS. Maior proporção de usuários de drogas injetáveis (UDI (não significativa, p<0,07, foi identificada entre infectados com C. Este resultado sugere C ter sido introduzido nesta área através dos UDI, sendo transmitido pelos seus parceiros sexuais, a pessoas com outras práticas de risco.

  3. Drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive children newly diagnosed with HIV-1 in Manaus, Amazonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Solange Dourado de; Sabidó, Meritxell; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Benzaken, Adele Schwartz; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of drug resistance mutations (DRM), the prevalence of drug susceptibility [transmitted drug resistance (TDR)] and the prevalence of HIV-1 variants among treatment-naive HIV-infected children in Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil. Children born to HIV-infected mothers and diagnosed with HIV in an HIV reference service centre and with available pol sequence between 2010 and 2015 prior to antiretroviral initiation were included. TDR was identified using the Calibrated Population Resistance Tool. HIV-1 subtypes were defined by Rega and phylogenetic analyses. One hundred and seventeen HIV-infected children with a median age of 3.7 years were included. Among them, 28.2% had been exposed to some form of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). HIV DRM were present in 21.4% of all children. Among PMTCT-exposed children, 3% had NRTI mutations, 15.2% had NNRTI mutations and 3% had PI mutations. Among PMTCT-unexposed children, 1.2% had NRTI mutations, 21.4% had non-NNRTI mutations and 1.2% had PI mutations. The most common DRM was E138A (8.5%). The prevalence of TDR was 16.2%; 21.1% among PMTCT-exposed children and 14.3% among PMTC-unexposed children. The analysis of HIV-1 subtypes revealed that 80.2% were subtype B, 6.0% were subtype C, 3.4% were subtype F1 and 10.3% were possible unique recombinant forms (BF1, 4.3%; DB, 4.3%; BC, 0.9%; KC, 0.9%). We report a high prevalence of DRM in this population, including in almost a quarter of children with no reported PMTCT. The high prevalence of TDR observed might compromise ART effectiveness. Results show extensive HIV-1 diversity and expansion of subtype C, which highlights the need for surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes in Amazonas state.

  4. Tracing the Origin and Northward Dissemination Dynamics of HIV-1 Subtype C in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatorre, Edson; Couto-Fernandez, José C.; Guimarães, Monick Lindenmayer; Vaz Cardoso, Ludimila Paula; de Alcantara, Keila Correia; Martins de Araújo Stefani, Mariane; Romero, Hector; Freire, Caio C. M.; Iamarino, Atila; de A Zanotto, Paolo M.; Morgado, Mariza G.; Bello, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the HIV-1 subtype C epidemic in southern Brazil was initiated by the introduction of a single founder strain probably originating from east Africa. However, the exact country of origin of such a founder strain as well as the origin of the subtype C viruses detected outside the Brazilian southern region remains unknown. HIV-1 subtype C pol sequences isolated in the southern, southeastern and central-western Brazilian regions (n = 209) were compared with a large number (n ~ 2,000) of subtype C pol sequences of African origin. Maximum-likelihood analyses revealed that most HIV-1 subtype C Brazilian sequences branched in a single monophyletic clade (CBR-I), nested within a larger monophyletic lineage characteristic of east Africa. Bayesian analyses indicate that the CBR-I clade most probably originated in Burundi and was introduced into the Paraná state (southern region) around the middle 1970s, after which it rapidly disseminated to neighboring regions. The states of Paraná and Santa Catarina have been the most important hubs of subtype C dissemination, and routine travel and spatial accessibility seems to have been the major driving forces of this process. Five additional introductions of HIV-1 subtype C strains probably originated in eastern (n = 2), southern (n = 2) and central (n = 1) African countries were detected in the Rio de Janeiro state (southeastern region). These results indicate a continuous influx of HIV-1 subtype C strains of African origin into Brazil and also unveil the existence of unrecognized transmission networks linking this country to east Africa. PMID:24069269

  5. Subtype Classification of Iranian HIV-1 Sequences Registered in the HIV Databases, 2006-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesi, Kazem; Moallemi, Samaneh; Farrokhi, Molood; Alinaghi, Seyed Ahmad Seyed; Truong, Hong–Ha M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Iran has increased dramatically in the past few years. While the earliest cases were among hemophiliacs, injection drug users (IDUs) fuel the current epidemic. Previous molecular epidemiological analysis found that subtype A was most common among IDUs but more recent studies suggest CRF_35AD may be more prevalent now. To gain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in Iran, we analyzed all Iranian HIV sequence data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Methods All Iranian HIV sequences from subtyping studies with pol, gag, env and full-length HIV-1 genome sequences registered in the HIV databases (www.hiv.lanl.gov) between 2006 and 2013 were downloaded. Phylogenetic trees of each region were constructed using Neighbor-Joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony methods. Results A total of 475 HIV sequences were analyzed. Overall, 78% of sequences were CRF_35AD. By gene region, CRF_35AD comprised 83% of HIV-1 pol, 62% of env, 78% of gag, and 90% of full-length genome sequences analyzed. There were 240 sequences re-categorized as CRF_AD. The proportion of CRF_35AD sequences categorized by the present study is nearly double the proportion of what had been reported. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis indicates HIV-1 subtype CRF_35AD is the predominant circulating strain in Iran. This result differed from previous studies that reported subtype A as most prevalent in HIV- infected patients but confirmed other studies which reported CRF_35AD as predominant among IDUs. The observed epidemiological connection between HIV strains circulating in Iran and Afghanistan may be due to drug trafficking and/or immigration between the two countries. This finding suggests the possible origins and transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS within Iran and provides useful information for designing control and intervention strategies. PMID:25188443

  6. Subtype classification of Iranian HIV-1 sequences registered in the HIV databases, 2006-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Baesi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection in Iran has increased dramatically in the past few years. While the earliest cases were among hemophiliacs, injection drug users (IDUs fuel the current epidemic. Previous molecular epidemiological analysis found that subtype A was most common among IDUs but more recent studies suggest CRF_35AD may be more prevalent now. To gain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in Iran, we analyzed all Iranian HIV sequence data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory. METHODS: All Iranian HIV sequences from subtyping studies with pol, gag, env and full-length HIV-1 genome sequences registered in the HIV databases (www.hiv.lanl.gov between 2006 and 2013 were downloaded. Phylogenetic trees of each region were constructed using Neighbor-Joining (NJ and Maximum Parsimony methods. RESULTS: A total of 475 HIV sequences were analyzed. Overall, 78% of sequences were CRF_35AD. By gene region, CRF_35AD comprised 83% of HIV-1 pol, 62% of env, 78% of gag, and 90% of full-length genome sequences analyzed. There were 240 sequences re-categorized as CRF_AD. The proportion of CRF_35AD sequences categorized by the present study is nearly double the proportion of what had been reported. CONCLUSIONS: Phylogenetic analysis indicates HIV-1 subtype CRF_35AD is the predominant circulating strain in Iran. This result differed from previous studies that reported subtype A as most prevalent in HIV- infected patients but confirmed other studies which reported CRF_35AD as predominant among IDUs. The observed epidemiological connection between HIV strains circulating in Iran and Afghanistan may be due to drug trafficking and/or immigration between the two countries. This finding suggests the possible origins and transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS within Iran and provides useful information for designing control and intervention strategies.

  7. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  8. HIV-1, how llamas help us fight the AIDS pandemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strokappe, N.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314411534

    2013-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) is one of the major health problems worldwide and has been for over thirty years. Most (67%) of the people infected with HIV-1 are living in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, the access to treatments is limited and most women are not in a position to protect

  9. Vaginalmycosis and HIV-1 infection in Kaduna, Nigeria. | Eni ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vaginal mycosis and HIV-1 infection are common health problems in females. These infections cause high mortality, morbidity and reproductive health disorders in females. The study is to investigate to what extent these infections are prevalent in this centre. 300 non- pregnant females who tested positive with HIV-1 ...

  10. The origin and emergence of an HIV-1 epidemic:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Audelin, Anne M.; Helleberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To describe, at patient-level detail, the determining events and factors involved in the development of a country's HIV-1 epidemic.......To describe, at patient-level detail, the determining events and factors involved in the development of a country's HIV-1 epidemic....

  11. Telomeres and HIV-1 infection: in search of exhaustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, K. C.; Miedema, F.

    1998-01-01

    Telomere length analysis could be helpful in determining if exhaustion and replicative senescence are involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Evidence that CD8+ T cells have shorter telomeres may point towards an increased turnover of CD8+ T cells and exhaustion of the CD8+ T-cell responses in HIV-1

  12. Schistosomiasis and HIV-1 infection in rural Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama, Rutendo; Gomo, Exnevia

    2005-01-01

    Stunted development and reduced fecundity of Schistosoma parasites in immunodeficient mice and the impaired ability of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans to excrete schistosome eggs have been described. This study explores the effect that HIV-1-associated immunodeficiency has ...

  13. Development of aptamer based HIV-1 entry inhibitor prophylactic drugs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    London, G

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIDS remains a major public health problem globally, especially in Southern Africa where over 6.4 million people are infected by the most prevalent HIV-1 subtype C. To help stop the spread of HIV-1 subtype C, we isolated 2ʹ-F-RNA aptamers against gp...

  14. Dendritic Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1 Controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Yu, Xu G

    2017-02-01

    Robust HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses are currently regarded as the main correlate of immune defense in rare individuals who achieve natural, drug-free control of HIV-1; however, the mechanisms that support evolution of such powerful immune responses are not well understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized innate immune cells critical for immune recognition, immune regulation, and immune induction, but their possible contribution to HIV-1 immune defense in controllers remains ill-defined. Recent studies suggest that myeloid DCs from controllers have improved abilities to recognize HIV-1 through cytoplasmic immune sensors, resulting in more potent, cell-intrinsic type I interferon secretion in response to viral infection. This innate immune response may facilitate DC-mediated induction of highly potent antiviral HIV-1-specific T cells. Moreover, protective HLA class I isotypes restricting HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells may influence DC function through specific interactions with innate myelomonocytic MHC class I receptors from the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor family. Bi-directional interactions between dendritic cells and HIV-1-specific T cells may contribute to natural HIV-1 immune control, highlighting the importance of a fine-tuned interplay between innate and adaptive immune activities for effective antiviral immune defense.

  15. Raltegravir with optimized background therapy for resistant HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steigbigel, Roy T; Cooper, David A; Kumar, Princy N

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raltegravir (MK-0518) is an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase active against HIV-1 susceptible or resistant to older antiretroviral drugs. METHODS: We conducted two identical trials in different geographic regions to evaluate the safety and efficacy...

  16. Antibody function in neutralization and protection against HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessell, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to induce neutralizing antibodies is generally thought to be of great importance for vaccine efficacy. In HIV-1 research this quality has been elusive as the HIV-1 virus has evolved multiple mechanisms to evade neutralizing antibodies. This thesis traces studies with four broadly

  17. HTLV-1 Tax activates HIV-1 transcription in latency models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Victor Emmanuel Viana; José, Diego Pandeló; Leal, Fabio E; Nixon, Douglas F; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2017-04-01

    HIV-1 latency is a major obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Coinfection with HTLV-1 has been associated with faster progression to AIDS. HTLV-1 encodes the transactivator Tax which can activate both HTLV-1 and HIV-1 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that Tax activates HIV transcription in latent CD4(+) T cells. Tax promotes the activation of P-TEFb, releasing CDK9 and Cyclin T1 from inactive forms, promoting transcription elongation and reactivation of latent HIV-1. Tax mutants lacking interaction with the HIV-1-LTR promoter were not able to activate P-TEFb, with no subsequent activation of latent HIV. In HIV-infected primary resting CD4(+) T cells, Tax-1 reactivated HIV-1 transcription up to five fold, confirming these findings in an ex vivo latency model. Finally, our results confirms that HTLV-1/Tax hijacks cellular partners, promoting HIV-1 transcription, and this interaction should be further investigated in HIV-1 latency studies in patients with HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms in Activation of Latent HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Rafati (Haleh)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Finding a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is extremely challenging. Development of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), transformed HIV-1 infection from an acute syndrome into chronic disease. Although using HAART results in

  19. Neutralizing antibodies in slowly progressing HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Nielsen, C; Iversen, Johan

    1995-01-01

    Ten asymptomatic individuals who had experienced only limited CD4+ cell loss after prolonged infection with HIV-1 were studied. These individuals had a mean CD4+ cell count of 674 x 10(6) cells/L and a mean duration of infection of 8.5 years. Also included were 10 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected...

  20. The role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mahmoud Mohammad; Abuharfeil, Nizar Mohammad; Yaseen, Mohammad Mahmoud; Shabsoug, Barakat Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    It is well-recognized that human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) mainly targets CD4+ T cells and macrophages. Nonetheless, during the past three decades, a huge number of studies have reported that HIV-1 can directly or indirectly target other cellular components of the immune system including CD8+ T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), among others. PMNs are the most abundant leukocytes in the human circulation, and are known to play principal roles in the elimination of invading pathogens, regulating different immune responses, healing of injured tissues, and maintaining mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, little was known about the impact of HIV-1 infection on PMNs as well as the impact of PMNs on HIV-1 disease progression. This is because early studies focused on neutropenia and recurrent microbial infections, particularly, during advanced disease. However, recent studies have extended the investigation area to cover new aspects of the interactions between HIV-1 and PMNs. This review aims to summarize these advances and address the impact of HIV-1 infection on PMNs as well as the impact of PMNs on HIV-1 disease progression to better understand the pathophysiology of HIV-1 infection.

  1. Probing the sequence space available for HIV-1 evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Brake, Olivier; Von Eije, Karin J.; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    We designed a novel experimental approach to probe the sequence space available for HIV-1 evolution. Selective pressure was put on conserved HIV-1 genomic sequences by means of RNA interference (RNAi). Virus escape was monitored in many parallel cultures, and we scored the mutations selected in the

  2. Dating the age of the SIV lineages that gave rise to HIV-1 and HIV-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel O Wertheim

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Great strides have been made in understanding the evolutionary history of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV and the zoonoses that gave rise to